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Sample records for adsorption cartridge system

  1. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  2. EVALUATING A COMPOSITE CARTRIDGE FOR SMALL SYSTEM DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multi-layer, cartridge-based system that combines physical filtration with carbon adsorption and ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection has been developed to perform as a water treatment security device to protect homes against accidental or intentional contaminant events. A seri...

  3. Cartridge Bearing System for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Edward P.; Hanson, Robert A.; Jones, William R.; Mohr, Terry W.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional spin axis ball bearings have been unreliable in spacecraft, often failing by two heretofore uncontrolled processes: ball retainer instability and lubricant breakdown. The Space Cartridge Bearing System (SCBS) addresses each of these mechanisms directly, leading to a bearing system with absolute freedom from retainer instability and negligible lubricant degradation rate. The result is a reliable plug-in bearing cartridge with a definite design life.

  4. Adsorption efficiency of respirator filter cartridges for isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Marcus; Meiby, Elinor; Gylestam, Daniel; Dahlin, Jakob; Spanne, Mårten; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar; Tveterås, Björn Oscar; Pedersen, Age Engen

    2010-06-01

    In some industries, the temperature and the humidity will vary greatly between different work places, such as outdoor work in arctic or tropical climates. There is therefore a need to test respirator filters at conditions that simulate conditions that are relevant for the industries that they are used in. Filter cartridges were exposed to controlled atmospheres of varying isocyanate concentration, air humidity, and temperature in an exposure chamber. For isocyanic acid (ICA) and methyl isocyanate (MIC), the exposure concentrations were between 100 and 200 p.p.b., monitored using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. ICA and MIC were generated by continuous thermal degradation of urea and dimethylurea. The breakthrough was studied by collecting air samples at the outlet of the filter cartridges using impinger flasks or dry samplers with di-n-butylamine as derivatization reagent for isocyanates followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. For hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI), the exposure concentrations were between 4 and 20 p.p.b. and were generated by wet membrane permeation. To reveal the profile of adsorption in different layers of the respirator filters, representative samples from each of the layers were hydrolyzed. The hydrolysis products hexamethylene diamine and isophorone diamine were determined after derivatization with pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA) followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. The two filter types studied efficiently absorbed both ICA and MIC. There was no trend of impaired performance throughout 48-h exposure tests. Even when the filters were exposed to high concentrations (approximately 200 p.p.b.) of ICA and MIC for 96 h, the isocyanates were efficiently absorbed with only a limited breakthrough. The majority of the HDI and IPDI (>90%) were absorbed in the top layers of the absorbant, but HDI and IPDI penetrated farther down into the respirator filters during 120 h

  5. Adsorption efficiency of respirator filter cartridges for isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Marcus; Meiby, Elinor; Gylestam, Daniel; Dahlin, Jakob; Spanne, Mårten; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar; Tveterås, Björn Oscar; Pedersen, Age Engen

    2010-06-01

    In some industries, the temperature and the humidity will vary greatly between different work places, such as outdoor work in arctic or tropical climates. There is therefore a need to test respirator filters at conditions that simulate conditions that are relevant for the industries that they are used in. Filter cartridges were exposed to controlled atmospheres of varying isocyanate concentration, air humidity, and temperature in an exposure chamber. For isocyanic acid (ICA) and methyl isocyanate (MIC), the exposure concentrations were between 100 and 200 p.p.b., monitored using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. ICA and MIC were generated by continuous thermal degradation of urea and dimethylurea. The breakthrough was studied by collecting air samples at the outlet of the filter cartridges using impinger flasks or dry samplers with di-n-butylamine as derivatization reagent for isocyanates followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. For hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI), the exposure concentrations were between 4 and 20 p.p.b. and were generated by wet membrane permeation. To reveal the profile of adsorption in different layers of the respirator filters, representative samples from each of the layers were hydrolyzed. The hydrolysis products hexamethylene diamine and isophorone diamine were determined after derivatization with pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA) followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. The two filter types studied efficiently absorbed both ICA and MIC. There was no trend of impaired performance throughout 48-h exposure tests. Even when the filters were exposed to high concentrations (approximately 200 p.p.b.) of ICA and MIC for 96 h, the isocyanates were efficiently absorbed with only a limited breakthrough. The majority of the HDI and IPDI (>90%) were absorbed in the top layers of the absorbant, but HDI and IPDI penetrated farther down into the respirator filters during 120 h

  6. Economics of the coal cartridge system

    SciTech Connect

    Kujime, Yasuhiko

    1994-12-31

    In 1992, our Coal Cartridge System (CCS) pulverized coal and sludge-fired boiler started operation, and it continues to operate well. We think that the CCS is a very cost-effective fuel, and it is extremely easy to use. If the CCS production base were to be situated in a coal producing country, the cost of manufacturing CCSs would be greatly reduced.

  7. High performance quarter-inch cartridge tape systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Ted

    1993-01-01

    Within the established low cost structure of Data Cartridge drive technology, it is possible to achieve nearly 1 terrabyte (10(exp 12)) of data capacity and more than 1 Gbit/sec (greater than 100 Mbytes/sec) transfer rates. The desirability to place this capability within a single cartridge will be determined by the market. The 3.5 in. or smaller form factor may suffice to serve both the current Data Cartridge market and a high performance segment. In any case, Data Cartridge Technology provides a strong sustainable technology growth path in the 21st century.

  8. Disposable and removable nucleic acid extraction and purification cartridges for automated flow-through systems

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, John Frederick

    2014-09-09

    Removable cartridges are used on automated flow-through systems for the purpose of extracting and purifying genetic material from complex matrices. Different types of cartridges are paired with specific automated protocols to concentrate, extract, and purifying pathogenic or human genetic material. Their flow-through nature allows large quantities sample to be processed. Matrices may be filtered using size exclusion and/or affinity filters to concentrate the pathogen of interest. Lysed material is ultimately passed through a filter to remove the insoluble material before the soluble genetic material is delivered past a silica-like membrane that binds the genetic material, where it is washed, dried, and eluted. Cartridges are inserted into the housing areas of flow-through automated instruments, which are equipped with sensors to ensure proper placement and usage of the cartridges. Properly inserted cartridges create fluid- and air-tight seals with the flow lines of an automated instrument.

  9. Variable thrust cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2000-11-07

    The present invention is a variable thrust cartridge comprising a water-molten aluminum reaction chamber from which a slug is propelled. The cartridge comprises a firing system that initiates a controlled explosion from the reaction chamber. The explosive force provides a thrust to a slug, preferably contained within the cartridge.

  10. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  11. An extended equation for rate coefficients for adsorption of organic vapors and gases on activated carbons in air-purifying respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Wood, G O; Lodewyckx, P

    2003-01-01

    Organic vapor adsorption rates in air-purifying respirator cartridges (and other packed beds of activated carbon granules) need to be known for estimating service lives. The correlation of Lodewyckx and Vansant [AIHAJ 61:501-505 (2000)] for mass transfer coefficients for organic vapor adsorption onto activated carbon was tested with additional data from three sources. It was then extended to better describe all the data, including that for gases. The additional parameter that accomplished this was the square root of molar equilibrium capacity of the vapor or gas on the carbon. This change, along with skew corrections when appropriate, resulted in better correlations with all experimental rate coefficients. PMID:14521430

  12. Hollow-Fiber Cartridges: Model Systems for Virus Removal from Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Menon, Jeevan

    2005-11-01

    Aethlon Medical is developing a hollow-fiber hemodialysis device designed to remove viruses and toxins from blood. Possible target viruses include HIV and pox-viruses. The filter could reduce virus and viral toxin concentration in the patient's blood, delaying illness so the patient's immune system can fight off the virus. In order to optimize the design of such a filter, the fluid mechanics of the device is both modeled analytically and investigated experimentally. The flow configuration of the proposed device is that of Starling flow. Polysulfone hollow-fiber dialysis cartridges were used. The cartridges are charged with water as a model fluid for blood and fluorescent latex beads are used in the experiments as a model for viruses. In the experiments, properties of the flow through the cartridge are determined through pressure and volume flow rate measurements of water. The removal of latex beads, which are captured in the porous walls of the fibers, was measured spectrophotometrically. Experimentally derived coefficients derived from these experiments are used in the analytical model of the flow and removal predictions from the model are compared to those obtained from the experiments.

  13. Modular microfluidic cartridge-based universal diagnostic system for global health applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Holger; Klemm, Richard; Dietze, William; White, Wallace; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Freyberg, Susanne; Moche, Christian; Dailey, Peter; Gärtner, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Current microfluidics-enabled point-of-care diagnostic systems are typically designed specifically for one assay type, e.g. a molecular diagnostic assay for a single disease of a class of diseases. This approach often leads to high development cost and a significant training requirement for users of different instruments. We have developed an open platform diagnostic system which allows to run molecular, immunological and clinical assays on a single instrument platform with a standardized microfluidic cartridge architecture in an automated sample-in answer-out fashion. As examples, a molecular diagnostic assay for tuberculosis, an immunoassay for HIV p24 and a clinical chemistry assay for ALT liver function have been developed and results of their pre-clinical validation are presented.

  14. Can the RUVIS reflected UV imaging system visualize fingerprint corrosion on brass cartridge casings postfiring?

    PubMed

    Leintz, Rachel; Bond, John W

    2013-05-01

    Comparisons are made between the visualization of fingerprint corrosion ridge detail on fired brass cartridge casings, where fingerprint sweat was deposited prefiring, using both ultraviolet (UV) and visible (natural daylight) light sources. A reflected ultraviolet imaging system (RUVIS), normally used for visualizing latent fingerprint sweat deposits, is compared with optical interference and digital color mapping of visible light, the latter using apparatus constructed to easily enable selection of the optimum viewing angle. Results show that reflected UV, with a monochromatic UV source of 254 nm, was unable to visualize fingerprint ridge detail on any of 12 casings analyzed, whereas optical interference and digital color mapping using natural daylight yielded ridge detail on three casings. Reasons for the lack of success with RUVIS are discussed in terms of the variation in thickness of the thin film of metal oxide corrosion and absorption wavelengths for the corrosion products of brass.

  15. Service life of respirator cartridges for formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.O.; Carlson, G.J.; Johnson, J.S.

    1981-11-20

    To date there is no NIOSH-approved air-purifying respirator which will effectively remove formaldehyde gas. Because of formaldehyde's high vapor pressure, service life values calculated using the adsorption isotherm and Wheeler equations indicate that organic vapor cartridges containing activated carbon will last less than 10 minutes at concentrations greater than 10 ppM. Studies were initiated to identify a suitable sorbent for this potentially dangerous material. The project involves the following steps: develop a method for producing relatively high concentrations (20 ppM) of a formaldehyde test mixture; verify this test concentration using the NIOSH-approved chromotropic acid wet chemical technique; and survey a wide variety of sorbents, both plain and impregnated, in hopes of identifying a suitable air-purifying cartridge for formaldehyde. A dynamic formaldehyde generation system was fabricated in which formaldehyde was produced by continuously injecting formalin using a syringe pump. The concentration was monitored using an infrared analyzer and checked using the chromotropic acid technique. Twenty-five cartridges were tested for service life at concentrations of formaldehyde gas from 7.1 to 14.8 ppM. Acid gas cartridges and those containing Pittsburgh FCA or ASC showed superior service life.

  16. Rotatable reagent cartridge for high-performance microvalve system on a centrifugal microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takayuki; Naruishi, Nahoko; Nagai, Hidenori; Tanaka, Yoshihide; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu

    2013-07-16

    Recently, microfluidic lab-on-a-CD (LabCD) has attracted attentions of researchers for its potential for pumpless, compact, and chip-inclusive on-site bioassay. To control the fluids in the LabCD, microvalves such as capillary, hydrophobic, siphon, and sacrificial valves have been employed. However, no microvalve can regulate more than one channel. In a complicated bioassay with many sequential mixing, washing, and wasting steps, thus, an intricate fluidic network with many microchannels, microvalves, and reservoirs is required, which increases assay costs in terms of both system development and chip preparation. To address this issue, we developed a rotatable reagent cartridge (RRC), which was a column-shaped tank and has several rooms to store different reagents. By embedding and rotating the RRC in the LabCD with a simple mechanical force, only the reagent in the room connected to the following channel was injected. By regulating the angle of the RRC to the LabCD, conservation and ejection of each reagent could be switched. Our developed RRC had no air vent hole, which was achieved by the gas-permeable gap between the bottle and cap parts of the RRC. The RRC could inject 230 nL-10 μL of reagents with good recoveries more than 96%. Finally, an enzymatic assay of L-lactate was demonstrated, where the number of valves and reservoirs were well minimized, significantly simplifying the fluidic system and increasing the channel integratability. Well quantitative analyses of 0-100 μM L-lactate could easily be carried out with R(2) > 0.999, indicating the practical utility of the RRC for microfluidic bioanalysis. PMID:23802811

  17. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  18. Studies on Vapor Adsorption Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamsundar, N.; Ramotowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The project consisted of performing experiments on single and dual bed vapor adsorption systems, thermodynamic cycle optimization, and thermal modeling. The work was described in a technical paper that appeared in conference proceedings and a Master's thesis, which were previously submitted to NASA. The present report describes some additional thermal modeling work done subsequently, and includes listings of computer codes developed during the project. Recommendations for future work are provided.

  19. Quick-change filter cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Ortiz, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    A quick-change filter cartridge. In sampling systems for measurement of airborne materials, a filter element is introduced into the sampled airstream such that the aerosol constituents are removed and deposited on the filter. Fragile sampling media often require support in order to prevent rupture during sampling, and careful mounting and sealing to prevent misalignment, tearing, or creasing which would allow the sampled air to bypass the filter. Additionally, handling of filter elements may introduce cross-contamination or exposure of operators to toxic materials. Moreover, it is desirable to enable the preloading of filter media into quick-change cartridges in clean laboratory environments, thereby simplifying and expediting the filter-changing process in the field. The quick-change filter cartridge of the present invention permits the application of a variety of filter media in many types of instruments and may also be used in automated systems. The cartridge includes a base through which a vacuum can be applied to draw air through the filter medium which is located on a porous filter support and held there by means of a cap which forms an airtight seal with the base. The base is also adapted for receiving absorbing media so that both particulates and gas-phase samples may be trapped for investigation, the latter downstream of the aerosol filter.

  20. Physical adsorption strength in open systems.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, M Todd; Stuart, Steven J; Cooper, Alan C; Pez, G P; Cheng, Hansong

    2006-11-23

    For a physical adsorption system, the distances of adsorbates from the surface of a substrate can vary significantly, depending on particle loading and interatomic interactions. Although the total adsorption energy is quantified easily, the normalized, per-particle adsorption energies are more ambiguous if some of these particles are far away from the surface and are interacting only weakly with the substrate. A simple analytical procedure is proposed to characterize the distance dependence of the physisorption strength and effective adsorption capacity. As an example, the method is utilized to describe H2 physisorption in a finite bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17107125

  1. CGF cartridge development, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, Carl A.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a summary of SRI's efforts in Crystal Growth Furnace cartridge developments. It includes: evaluation of molybdenum, TZM, and WC-103 as cartridge materials; a survey of oxidation resistant coatings; chemical compatibility studies of cadmium-zinc-telluride and gallium-arsenide with TZM and WC-103; a survey of future cartridge materials; and suggested improvements in ampoule design.

  2. Determination of pressure drop across activated carbon fiber respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) is considered as an alternative adsorbent to granular activated carbon (GAC) for the development of thinner, lighter, and efficient respirators because of their larger surface area and adsorption capacities, thinner critical bed depth, lighter weight, and fabric form. This study aims to measure the pressure drop across different types of commercially available ACFs in respirator cartridges to determine the ACF composition and density that will result in acceptably breathable respirators. Seven ACF types in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were tested. ACFs in cartridges were challenged with pre-conditioned constant air flow (43 LPM, 23°C, 50% RH) at different compositions (single- or combination-ACF type) in a test chamber. Pressure drop across ACF cartridges were obtained using a micromanometer, and compared among different cartridge configurations, to those of the GAC cartridge, and to the NIOSH breathing resistance requirements for respirator cartridges. Single-ACF type cartridges filled with any ACFF had pressure drop measurements (23.71-39.93 mmH2O) within the NIOSH inhalation resistance requirement of 40 mmH2O, while those of the ACFC cartridges (85.47±3.67 mmH2O) exceeded twice the limit due possibly to the denser weaving of ACFC fibers. All single ACFF-type cartridges had higher pressure drop compared to the GAC cartridge (23.13±1.14 mmH2O). Certain ACF combinations (2 ACFF or ACFC/ACFF types) resulted to pressure drop (26.39-32.81 mmH2O) below the NIOSH limit. All single-ACFF type and all combination-ACF type cartridges with acceptable pressure drop had much lower adsorbent weights than GAC (≤15.2% of GAC weight), showing potential for light-weight respirator cartridges. 100% ACFC in cartridges may result to respirators with high breathing resistance and, thus, is not recommended. The more dense ACFF and ACFC types may still be possibly used in respirators by combining them with less dense ACFF materials and/or by

  3. Determination of pressure drop across activated carbon fiber respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) is considered as an alternative adsorbent to granular activated carbon (GAC) for the development of thinner, lighter, and efficient respirators because of their larger surface area and adsorption capacities, thinner critical bed depth, lighter weight, and fabric form. This study aims to measure the pressure drop across different types of commercially available ACFs in respirator cartridges to determine the ACF composition and density that will result in acceptably breathable respirators. Seven ACF types in cloth (ACFC) and felt (ACFF) forms were tested. ACFs in cartridges were challenged with pre-conditioned constant air flow (43 LPM, 23°C, 50% RH) at different compositions (single- or combination-ACF type) in a test chamber. Pressure drop across ACF cartridges were obtained using a micromanometer, and compared among different cartridge configurations, to those of the GAC cartridge, and to the NIOSH breathing resistance requirements for respirator cartridges. Single-ACF type cartridges filled with any ACFF had pressure drop measurements (23.71-39.93 mmH2O) within the NIOSH inhalation resistance requirement of 40 mmH2O, while those of the ACFC cartridges (85.47±3.67 mmH2O) exceeded twice the limit due possibly to the denser weaving of ACFC fibers. All single ACFF-type cartridges had higher pressure drop compared to the GAC cartridge (23.13±1.14 mmH2O). Certain ACF combinations (2 ACFF or ACFC/ACFF types) resulted to pressure drop (26.39-32.81 mmH2O) below the NIOSH limit. All single-ACFF type and all combination-ACF type cartridges with acceptable pressure drop had much lower adsorbent weights than GAC (≤15.2% of GAC weight), showing potential for light-weight respirator cartridges. 100% ACFC in cartridges may result to respirators with high breathing resistance and, thus, is not recommended. The more dense ACFF and ACFC types may still be possibly used in respirators by combining them with less dense ACFF materials and/or by

  4. Integrated quality control: implementation and validation of instrument function checks and procedural controls for a cartridge-based point-of-care system for critical care analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Paul; Mansouri, Sohrab

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the process used to develop and validate an integrated quality-control system for a cartridge-based, point-of-care system for critical care analysis is outlined. Application of risk management principles has resulted in a quality control system using a combination of statistical quality control with onboard reference solutions and failure pattern recognition used to flag common failure modes during the analytical phase of the testing process. A combination of traditional external quality control, integrated quality control to monitor ongoing instrument functionality, operator training, and other laboratory-implemented monitors is most effective in controlling known failure modes during the testing process.

  5. Shotgun cartridge rock breaker

    DOEpatents

    Ruzzi, Peter L.; Morrell, Roger J.

    1995-01-01

    A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

  6. Droplet actuator analyzer with cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory F. (Inventor); Sturmer, Ryan A. (Inventor); Paik, Philip Y. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Vijay (Inventor); Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Pamula, Vamsee K. (Inventor); Brafford, Keith R. (Inventor); West, Richard M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator with cartridge is provided. According to one embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes an analyzer unit comprising electronic or optical receiving means, a cartridge comprising self-contained droplet handling capabilities, and a wherein the cartridge is coupled to the analyzer unit by a means which aligns electronic and/or optical outputs from the cartridge with electronic or optical receiving means on the analyzer unit. According to another embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes a sample analyzer comprising a cartridge coupled thereto and a means of electrical interface and/or optical interface between the cartridge and the analyzer, whereby electrical signals and/or optical signals may be transmitted from the cartridge to the analyzer.

  7. Chemical compatibility of cartridge materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Bryan; Wilcox, R. C.; Zee, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives were to determine the chemical compatibility of titanium-zirconium-molybdenum (TZM) with GaAs and CdZnTe, and Inconel with HgCdTe and HgZnTe. At the present time, no other studies regarding the compatibility of these crystal components and their respective cartridge materials have been performed. This study was to identify any possible problems between these materials to insure proper containment of possibly hazardous fumes during crystal growth experiments. In this study, the reaction zone between the materials was studied and the amount of degradation to the system was measured. Detailed results are presented.

  8. Cartridge Valves: A New Technology for Fluid Power Transmission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruen, Clem; Garrett, Jim

    1985-01-01

    Describes a new technology--the cartridge or logic valve, which streamlines hydraulic systems by decreasing the number of individual components and increasing system efficiency. The author describes and illustrates the principles and components of the valve, explains the types of cartridge inserts, and discusses applications of the system. (CT)

  9. Plumbing Fixture for a Microfluidic Cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A fixture has been devised for making the plumbing connections between a microfluidic device in a replaceable cartridge and an external fluidic system. The fixture includes a 0.25-in. (6.35-mm) thick steel plate, to which the cartridge is fastened by two 10-32 thumb screws. The plate holds one plumbing fitting for the inlet and one for the outlet of the microfluidic device. Each fitting includes a fused-silica tube of 0.006-in. (approx.0.15-mm) inside diameter within a fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) tube of 0.0155-in. (approx.0.39-mm) inside diameter and 0.062- in. (approx.1.57-mm) outside diameter. The FEP tube is press-fit through the steel plate so that its exposed end is flush with the surface of the plate, and the silica tube protrudes 0.03 in. (approx.0.76 mm) from the plate/FEP-tube-end surface. The cartridge includes a glass cover plate that contains 0.06-mm-wide access ports. When the cartridge is fastened to the steel plate, the silica tubes become inserted through the access ports and into the body of the cartridge, while the ends of the FEP tubes become butted against the glass cover plate. An extremely tight seal is thereby made.

  10. Use of C18 silica cartridges to purify and characterize pterins

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Ferre, J.

    1986-01-01

    The C18 silica cartridge is shown to be useful to prepare samples for quantitative analysis. The concentration of the compound to be analyzed and the removal of some interfering substances can be accomplished simultaneously. The purpose of this report is to describe the basic principles that govern adsorption of pteridines to C18 silica cartridges. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Carbon adsorption system protects LPG storage sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gothenquist, C.A.; Rooker, K.M.

    1996-07-01

    Chevron U.S.A. Products Co. installed a carbon adsorption system to protect an LPG storage sphere at its refinery in Richmond, Calif. Vessel damage can result when amine contamination leads to emulsion formation and consequent amine carry-over, thus promoting wet-H{sub 2}S cracking. In Chevron`s No. 5 H{sub 2}S recovery plant, a mixture of butane and propane containing H{sub 2}S is contacted with diethanolamine (DEA) in a liquid-liquid absorber. The absorber is a countercurrent contactor with three packed beds. Because the sweetening system did not include a carbon adsorption unit for amine purification, contaminants were building up in the DEA. The contaminants comprised: treatment chemicals, hydrocarbons, foam inhibitors, and amine degradation products. The paper describes the solution to this problem.

  12. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided.

  13. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-06-15

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided. 5 figs.

  14. Catalyst cartridge for carbon dioxide reduction unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A catalyst cartridge, for use in a carbon dioxide reducing apparatus in a life support system for space vehicles, is described. The catalyst cartridge includes an inner perforated metal wall, an outer perforated wall space outwardly from the inner wall, a base plate closing one end of the cartridge, and a cover plate closing the other end of the cartridge. The cover plate has a central aperture through which a supply line with a heater feeds a gaseous reaction mixture comprising hydrogen and carbon dioxide at a temperature from about 1000 to about 1400 F. The outer surfaces of the internal wall and the inner surfaces of the outer wall are lined with a ceramic fiber batting material of sufficient thickness to prevent carbon formed in the reaction from passing through it. The portion of the surfaces of the base and cover plates defined within the inner and outer walls are also lined with ceramic batting. The heated reaction mixture passes outwardly through the inner perforated wall and ceramic batting and over the catalyst. The solid carbon product formes is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The solid carbon product formed is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The water vapor and unreacted carbon dioxide and any intermediate products pass through the perforations of the outer wall.

  15. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, E.E.; Lundquist, S.H.

    1999-04-27

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite. 4 figs.

  16. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, Eric E.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    1999-01-01

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite.

  17. Reusability study with organic vapor air-purifying respirator cartridges

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.O.; Kissane, R.

    1997-11-01

    The question often arises about the reusability of organic vapor adsorption beds, such as air- purifying respirator cartridges, after periods of storage without use (airflow). The extremes of practice are: (1) use once and discard or (2) reuse multiple times assuming the protection is still afforded. The goal is to develop data and a model to provide guidance to decide when reuse is acceptable. They have studied the loss of protection of a commercial organic vapor cartridge after storage for varying periods of time. Three vapors (ethyl acetate, methylene chloride, and hexane) were individually loaded onto test cartridges using a breathing pump. Extents of loading, times of loading, and vapor concentrations were varied. After selected periods of storage the cartridges were again challenged with the same vapor concentration. The increases in concentration of a vapor in the effluent air (simulated breaths) from a cartridge immediately upon reuse depended on the storage period, the extent of loading during initial use, the volatility of the vapor, and the water vapor adsorbed, but not much on the vapor concentration.

  18. Automatic firearm class identification from cartridge cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalakannan, Sridharan; Mann, Christopher J.; Bingham, Philip R.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Gleason, Shaun S.

    2011-03-01

    We present a machine vision system for automatic identification of the class of firearms by extracting and analyzing two significant properties from spent cartridge cases, namely the Firing Pin Impression (FPI) and the Firing Pin Aperture Outline (FPAO). Within the framework of the proposed machine vision system, a white light interferometer is employed to image the head of the spent cartridge cases. As a first step of the algorithmic procedure, the Primer Surface Area (PSA) is detected using a circular Hough transform. Once the PSA is detected, a customized statistical region-based parametric active contour model is initialized around the center of the PSA and evolved to segment the FPI. Subsequently, the scaled version of the segmented FPI is used to initialize a customized Mumford-Shah based level set model in order to segment the FPAO. Once the shapes of FPI and FPAO are extracted, a shape-based level set method is used in order to compare these extracted shapes to an annotated dataset of FPIs and FPAOs from varied firearm types. A total of 74 cartridge case images non-uniformly distributed over five different firearms are processed using the aforementioned scheme and the promising nature of the results (95% classification accuracy) demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  19. Investigation of Microgranular Adsorptive Filtration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhenxiao

    Over the past few decades, enormous advances have been made in the application of low-pressure membrane filtration to both drinking water and wastewater treatment. Nevertheless, the full potential of this technology has not been reached, due primarily to limitations imposed by membrane fouling. In drinking water treatment, much of the fouling is caused by soluble and particulate natural organic matter (NOM). Efforts to overcome the problem have focused on removal of NOM from the feed solution, usually by addition of conventional coagulants like alum and ferric chloride (FeCl3) or adsorbents like powdered activated carbon (PAC). While coagulants and adsorbents can remove a portion of the NOM, their performance with respect to fouling control has been inconsistent, often reducing fouling but sometimes having no effect or even exacerbating fouling. This research investigated microgranular adsorptive filtration (muGAF), a process that combines three existing technologies---granular media filtration, packed bed adsorption, and membrane filtration---in a novel way to reduce membrane fouling while simultaneously removing NOM from water. In this technology, a thin layer of micron-sized adsorbent particles is deposited on the membrane prior to delivering the feed to the system. The research reported here represents the first systematic study of muGAF, and the results demonstrate the promising potential of this process. A new, aluminum-oxide-based adsorbent---heated aluminum oxide particles (HAOPs)---was synthesized and shown to be very effective for NOM removal as well as fouling reduction in muGAF systems. muGAF has also been demonstrated to work well with powdered activated carbon (PAC) as the adsorbent, but not as well as when HAOPs are used; the process has also been successful when used with several different membrane types and configurations. Experiments using a wide range of operational parameters and several analytical tools lead to the conclusion that the fouling

  20. Analysis of the use of adsorption processes in trigeneration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzebielec, Andrzej; Rusowicz, Artur

    2013-12-01

    The trigeneration systems for production of cold use sorption refrigeration machines: absorption and adsorption types. Absorption systems are characterized namely by better cooling coefficient of performance, while the adsorptive systems are characterized by the ability to operate at lower temperatures. The driving heat source temperature can be as low as 60-70 °C. Such temperature of the driving heat source allows to use them in district heating systems. The article focuses on the presentation of the research results on the adsorption devices designed to work in trigeneration systems.

  1. 30 CFR 75.1317 - Primer cartridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Primer cartridges. 75.1317 Section 75.1317... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1317 Primer cartridges. (a) Primer cartridges shall be primed and loaded only by a qualified person or a person working in...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1317 - Primer cartridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Primer cartridges. 75.1317 Section 75.1317... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1317 Primer cartridges. (a) Primer cartridges shall be primed and loaded only by a qualified person or a person working in...

  3. Video Cartridges and Cassettes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kletter, Richard C.; Hudson, Heather

    The economic and social significance of video cassettes (viewer-controlled playback system) is explored in this report. The potential effect of video cassettes on industrial training, education, libraries, and television is analyzed in conjunction with the anticipated hardware developments. The entire video cassette industry is reviewed firm by…

  4. Effect of cropping systems on adsorption of metals by soils: I. Single-metal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Basta, N.T.; Tabatabai, M.A. )

    1992-02-01

    The effect of long-term cropping systems on adsorption of metals was studied for soils obtained from two sites, Clarion-Webster Research Center (CWRC site) at Kanawha and Galva-Primghar Research Center (GPRC site) at Sutherland, under long-term rotation experiments in Iowa. Each experiment consisted of three cropping systems: continuous corn (CCCC), corn-soybean-corn-soybean (CSCS), and corn-oats-meadow-meadow (COMM), and treated with (+N) and without (0 N) ammoniacal fertilizer. In general, CSCS and COMM cropping systems did not significantly affect the metal adsorption maxima of soils obtained from both sites. Cadmium, Cu, and Pb adsorption were significantly correlated with pH and percentage base saturation for soils from both sites.

  5. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  6. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Rosen, Robert S.

    2005-04-19

    A cartridge primer which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML's would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers.

  7. Limited-life cartridge primers

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Rosen, R.S.

    1998-06-30

    A cartridge primer is described which utilizes an explosive that can be designed to become inactive in a predetermined period of time: a limited-life primer. The explosive or combustible material of the primer is an inorganic reactive multilayer (RML). The reaction products of the RML are sub-micron grains of non-corrosive inorganic compounds that would have no harmful effects on firearms or cartridge cases. Unlike use of primers containing lead components, primers utilizing RML`s would not present a hazard to the environment. The sensitivity of an RML is determined by the physical structure and the stored interfacial energy. The sensitivity lowers with time due to a decrease in interfacial energy resulting from interdiffusion of the elemental layers. Time-dependent interdiffusion is predictable, thereby enabling the functional lifetime of an RML primer to be predetermined by the initial thickness and materials selection of the reacting layers. 10 figs.

  8. Silver migration from silver-modified activated carbon applied as a water filtration medium in classic cartridges of jug filter systems.

    PubMed

    Garboś, S; Swięcicka, D

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive study was undertaken in order to examine the possible adverse effect of jug filter systems (JFSs) on the quality of filtered water taking into account the released amounts of silver (Ag) into the filtered test water. Nine brands of JFSs (A-I) were investigated according to BS 8427:2004 using a validated ICP/MS method. Essential modification of BS 8427:2004 within the domain of the composite sample preparation was proposed and applied during the tests. The established grand mean concentrations of released Ag from A-H classic cartridges (containing Ag-modified activated carbon and ion exchange resins) and I classic cartridge (containing non-modified activated carbon and ion exchange resin) installed in corresponding JFSs were in the range of 2.6-13.1 µg l⁻¹ and lower than 0.014 µg l⁻¹, respectively. These values were applied for the estimation of the daily intakes of Ag connected with the consumption of water filtered using JFSs (ranging from < 0.0004 to 0.374 µg kg⁻¹ day⁻¹). After taking into account the grand mean concentrations of Ag established during the whole cycle of exploitation for nine JFSs and on the basis of available toxicological data for this element, no long-term risk for human health with respect to appearance of argyria (a condition caused by improper exposure to the Ag or Ag compounds) could be expected (the Hazard Quotient indices estimated as ratios of the daily intakes to the reference dose of Ag were equal or lower than 0.075). Ag-modified activated carbon is not included in the positive list of the authorised substances of the European Commission Regulation (EU) No. 10/2011. Additionally, this material has not been approved by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). A part of water filtered by JFSs can be directly consumed as drinking water and additionally the remaining water can be applied for the preparation of food products (drinks, soups, etc.). In both cases the quality of water has to fulfil

  9. Silver migration from silver-modified activated carbon applied as a water filtration medium in classic cartridges of jug filter systems.

    PubMed

    Garboś, S; Swięcicka, D

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive study was undertaken in order to examine the possible adverse effect of jug filter systems (JFSs) on the quality of filtered water taking into account the released amounts of silver (Ag) into the filtered test water. Nine brands of JFSs (A-I) were investigated according to BS 8427:2004 using a validated ICP/MS method. Essential modification of BS 8427:2004 within the domain of the composite sample preparation was proposed and applied during the tests. The established grand mean concentrations of released Ag from A-H classic cartridges (containing Ag-modified activated carbon and ion exchange resins) and I classic cartridge (containing non-modified activated carbon and ion exchange resin) installed in corresponding JFSs were in the range of 2.6-13.1 µg l⁻¹ and lower than 0.014 µg l⁻¹, respectively. These values were applied for the estimation of the daily intakes of Ag connected with the consumption of water filtered using JFSs (ranging from < 0.0004 to 0.374 µg kg⁻¹ day⁻¹). After taking into account the grand mean concentrations of Ag established during the whole cycle of exploitation for nine JFSs and on the basis of available toxicological data for this element, no long-term risk for human health with respect to appearance of argyria (a condition caused by improper exposure to the Ag or Ag compounds) could be expected (the Hazard Quotient indices estimated as ratios of the daily intakes to the reference dose of Ag were equal or lower than 0.075). Ag-modified activated carbon is not included in the positive list of the authorised substances of the European Commission Regulation (EU) No. 10/2011. Additionally, this material has not been approved by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). A part of water filtered by JFSs can be directly consumed as drinking water and additionally the remaining water can be applied for the preparation of food products (drinks, soups, etc.). In both cases the quality of water has to fulfil

  10. Chemical compatibility of cartridge materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Roy C.; Zee, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    This twelve month progress report deals with the chemical compatibility of semiconductor crystals grown in zero gravity. Specifically, it studies the chemical compatibility between TZM, a molybdenum alloy containing titanium and zirconium, and WC 103, a titanium alloy containing Niobium and Hafnium, and Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and Cadmium Zinc Tellurite (CdZnTe). Due to the health hazards involved, three approaches were used to study the chemical compatibility between the semiconductor and cartridge materials: reaction retort, thermogravimetric analysis, and bulk cylindrical cartridge containers. A scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer was used to examine all samples after testing. The first conclusion drawn is that reaction rates with TZM were not nearly as great as they were with WC 103. Second, the total reaction between GaAs and WC 103 was almost twice that with TZM. Therefore, even though WC 103 is easier to fabricate, at least half of the cartridge thickness will be degraded if contact is made with one of the semiconductor materials leading to a loss of strength properties.

  11. Catalytic cartridge SO.sub.3 decomposer

    DOEpatents

    Galloway, Terry R.

    1982-01-01

    A catalytic cartridge internally heated is utilized as a SO.sub.3 decomposer for thermochemical hydrogen production. The cartridge has two embodiments, a cross-flow cartridge and an axial flow cartridge. In the cross-flow cartridge, SO.sub.3 gas is flowed through a chamber and incident normally to a catalyst coated tube extending through the chamber, the catalyst coated tube being internally heated. In the axial-flow cartridge, SO.sub.3 gas is flowed through the annular space between concentric inner and outer cylindrical walls, the inner cylindrical wall being coated by a catalyst and being internally heated. The modular cartridge decomposer provides high thermal efficiency, high conversion efficiency, and increased safety.

  12. Catalytic cartridge SO.sub.3 decomposer

    DOEpatents

    Galloway, Terry R.

    1982-01-01

    A catalytic cartridge surrounding a heat pipe driven by a heat source is utilized as a SO.sub.3 decomposer for thermochemical hydrogen production. The cartridge has two embodiments, a cross-flow cartridge and an axial flow cartridge. In the cross-flow cartridge, SO.sub.3 gas is flowed through a chamber and incident normally to a catalyst coated tube extending through the chamber, the catalyst coated tube surrounding the heat pipe. In the axial-flow cartridge, SO.sub.3 gas is flowed through the annular space between concentric inner and outer cylindrical walls, the inner cylindrical wall being coated by a catalyst and surrounding the heat pipe. The modular cartridge decomposer provides high thermal efficiency, high conversion efficiency, and increased safety.

  13. Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-04

    HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

  14. ALMA Band 5 Cartridge Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billade, Bhushan; Lapkin, I.; Nystrom, O.; Sundin, E.; Fredrixon, M.; Finger, R.; Rashid, H.; Desmaris, V.; Meledin, D.; Pavolotsky, A.; Belitsky, Victor

    2010-03-01

    Work presented here concerns the design and performance of the ALMA Band 5 cold cartridge, one of the 10 frequency channels of ALMA project, a radio interferometer under construction at Atacama Desert in Chile. The Band 5 cartridge is a dual polarization receiver with the polarization separation performed by orthomode transducer (OMT). For each polarization, Band 5 receiver employs sideband rejection (2SB) scheme based on quadrature layout, with SIS mixers covering 163-211 GHz with 4-8 GHz IF. The LO injection circuitry is integrated with mixer chip and is implemented on the same substrate, resulting in a compact 2SB assembly. Amongst the other ALMA bands, the ALMA Band 5 being the lowest frequency band that uses all cold optics, has the largest mirror. Consequently, ALMA Band 5 mirror along with its support structure leaves very little room for placing OMT, mixers and IF subsystems. The constraints put by the size of cold optics and limited cartridge space, required of us to revise the original 2SB design and adopt a design where all the components like OMT, mixer, IF hybrid, isolators and IF amplifier are directly connected to each other without using any co-ax cables in-between. The IF subsystem uses the space between 4 K and 15 K stage of the cartridge and is thermally connected to 4 K stage. Avoiding co-ax cabling required use of custom designed IF hybrid, furthermore, due to limited cooling capacity at 4 K stage, resistive bias circuitry for the mixers is moved to 15 K stage and the IF hybrid along with an integrated bias-T is implemented using superconducting micro-strip lines. The E-probes for both LO and RF waveguide-to-microstrip transitions are placed perpendicular to the wave direction (back-piece configuration). The RF choke at the end of the probes provides a virtual ground for the RF/LO signal, and the choke is DC grounded to the chassis. The on-chip LO injection is done using a microstrip line directional coupler with slot-line branches in the

  15. Calibration procedures for seeds preloaded in cartridges

    SciTech Connect

    Brame, Ryan S.; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Zaider, Marco

    2006-08-15

    Radioactive seeds preloaded in sterilized cartridges or needles are commonly obtainable from manufacturers. Under the US regulations for control of radioactive materials, seed users are required to account for all seeds and independently verify their air kerma strength (S{sub K}). As a result, the viability of inspection schemes that rely on measurement of aggregate seeds is of interest. In this paper we consider the conditions (if any) under which cartridge inspection can satisfy regulatory requirements and still provide practical benefit (i.e., time savings) against the regular single-seed assay. The standards for comparison are the recommendations of AAPM TG40, AAPM TG56, and ACR's 'Standard for the Performance of Manually Loaded Brachytherapy Sources'. The practical benefit is judged in comparison to the effort required to apply the 10% assay recommendation of TG40 to seeds in cartridges. Two specific cartridge inspection schemes are considered: (a) measuring the S{sub K} of each cartridge in a batch; (b) measuring a single cartridge sampled at random from the batch. Unlike the 10% assay, which is defined (imperfectly, in our view) without reference to the prevalence of in-calibration seeds, the estimation of the relative merits of cartridge inspection methods must necessarily include such information and, as such, is manufacturer specific. In this paper results are provided for Oncura model 6711 {sup 125}I seeds in shielded and unshielded Mick cartridges. We show that the only practically useful cartridge inspection scheme is the batch scheme applied to unshielded cartridges. The false positive rates associated with the other schemes are such that we expect to open a cartridge (and perform the 10% assay) at least 80% of the time. While anything less than 100% of the time is theoretically an improvement, this neglects the additional effort required to assay the cartridges.

  16. Bell & Howell Introduces an 8mm Cartridge Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educ Screen Audiovisual Guide, 1970

    1970-01-01

    "Bell & Howell has developed a highly versatile cartidge projector system for cine and super 8mm formats. Because Bell & Howell believes that standardization is an important factor in the development of a cartridge system, it has built in a flexibility which will allow this standardization. (Author)

  17. Estimating reusability of organic air-purifying respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Wood, Gerry O; Snyder, Jay L

    2011-10-01

    Reuse of organic vapor air-purifying respirator cartridges after a job or shift can provide economy and energy savings. However, standards and manufacturers' guidance discourage reuse, presumably due to a lack of quantitative objective exposure and use information. Storage and simulated reuse laboratory studies and modeling have been done to provide such information. Two important parameters of breakthrough curves, midpoint time (related to adsorption capacity) and midpoint slope (related to adsorption rate), have been shown to be unchanged during storage for reuse. Extrapolations to smaller breakthrough concentrations and times can be made from this reference breakthrough and time. Significant step increases in breakthrough concentration upon cartridge reuse have been observed in some cases. Values of immediate breakthrough concentrations upon reuse (IBURs) have been measured and correlated. The Dubinin/Radushkevich adsorption isotherm equation has been used to estimate maximum IBURs, which depend on many factors, including conditions and duration of first use. An empirical equation describing rate of approach to maximum IBUR as a function of storage time has been developed to provide intermediate IBUR estimates, which are also very dependent on the vapor identity and extent of first-use loading. Using these equations, IBUR estimates with appropriate safety factors can be compared with the allowable breakthrough concentration to help the Industrial Hygienist make reusability decisions. PMID:21936700

  18. Replaceable Microfluidic Cartridges for a PCR Biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Kevin; Sullivan, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts a replaceable microfluidic cartridge that is a component of a miniature biosensor that detects target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences. The biosensor utilizes (1) polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to multiply the amount of DNA to be detected, (2) fluorogenic polynucleotide probe chemicals for labeling the target DNA sequences, and (3) a high-sensitivity epifluorescence-detection optoelectronic subsystem. Microfluidics is a relatively new field of device development in which one applies techniques for fabricating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to miniature systems for containing and/or moving fluids. Typically, microfluidic devices are microfabricated, variously, from silicon or polymers. The development of microfluidic devices for applications that involve PCR and fluorescence-based detection of PCR products poses special challenges

  19. Nucleation and interfacial adsorption in ternary systems.

    PubMed

    Philippe, T

    2015-03-01

    Nucleation is studied in incompressible ternary fluids by examining the topology of the overall landscape of the energy surface. Minimum free energy paths for nucleation (MFEPs) of a single nucleus in an infinite matrix are computed with the string method in the framework of the continuum theory of nucleation for the regular solution. Properties of the critical nucleus are compared with the predictions of the classical nucleation theory. MFEPs are found to exhibit complex nucleation pathways with non-monotonic variations of compositions in the interfacial region, specifically adsorption of a component. In the symmetric regular solution, the minority component is found to segregate at the interface during nucleation with a concomitant depletion of the nucleus core, resulting in unpredicted partition of the non-selective component. Despite increasing the gradient energy, such inhomogeneity in composition is shown to lower the nucleation barrier. PMID:25747088

  20. CONCENTRATION AND PROCESSING OF WATERBORNE VIRUSES BY POSITIVE CHARGE 1MDS CARTRIDGE FILTERS AND ORGANIC FLOCCULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes the most widely used virus adsorption-elution (VIRADEL) method for recovering human enteric viruses from water matrices (Fout et al., 1996). The method takes advantage of postively charged cartridge filters to concentrate viruses from water. The major adv...

  1. Design theory and performance of cryogenic molecular adsorption refrigeration systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, W. H.; Woltman, A. W.; Masson, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Closed-cycle operation of molecular adsorption refrigeration systems (MARS) has been demonstrated by using thermally cycled zeolites to adsorb and desorb various gases under pressures of 20-60 atm. This paper develops three aspects of the design theory: the physical theory of molecular adsorption of small molecules such as A, N2, N2O and NH3, the design relations for closed-cycle flow for three or more compressors, and the coefficient of performance. This work is intended to demonstrate nonmechanical gas compression for various cryogenic gases than can compete with mechanical systems with a different mix of advantages and disadvantages.

  2. Adsorption Processes in Spacecraft Environmental Control and Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Liese Dall; Finn, John E.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The environmental control and life support system on a spacecraft must maintain a safe and comfortable environment in which the crew can live and work. The system's functions include supplying the crew with oxygen and water as well as removing carbon dioxide, water vapor, and trace contaminants from cabin air. Although open-loop systems have been used in the past, logistics and safety factors of current and future missions in space make near-complete recycling of the cabin's air and water imperative. The recycling process may include separation and reduction of carbon dioxide, removal of trace gas-phase contaminants, recovery and purification of humidity condensate, purification and polishing of wastewater streams, and other processes. Several of these operations can be performed totally or in part by adsorption processes. These processes are frequently good candidates to perform separations and purifications in space due to their gravity independence, high reliability, relatively high energy efficiency, design flexibility, technological maturity, and regenerability. For these reasons, adsorption has historically played a key role in life support on U.S. and Russian piloted spacecraft. This article focuses on three current spacecraft life support applications that often use adsorption technology: gas-phase trace contaminant control, carbon dioxide removal from cabin air, and potable water recovery from waste streams. In each application, adsorption technology has been selected for use on the International Space Station. The requirements, science, and hardware for each of these applications are discussed. Eventually, human space exploration may lead to construction of planetary habitats. These habitats may provide additional opportunities for use of adsorption processes, such as control of greenhouse gas composition, and may have different requirements and resources available to them, such as gases present in the planetary atmosphere. Adsorption separation and

  3. Adsorption processes in spacecraft environmental control and life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DallBauman, L. A.; Finn, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    The environmental control and life support system on a spacecraft maintains a safe and comfortable environment in which the crew can live and work by supplying oxygen and water and by removing carbon dioxide, water vapor, and trace contaminants from cabin air. Although open-loop systems have been used successfully in the past for short-duration missions, the economics of current and future long-duration missions in space will make nearly complete recycling of air and water imperative. A variety of operations will be necessary to achieve the goal of nearly complete recycling. These include separation and reduction of carbon dioxide, removal of trace gas-phase contaminants, recovery and purification of humidity condensate, purification and polishing of wastewater streams, and others. Several of these can be performed totally or in part by adsorption processes. These processes are good candidates to perform separations and purifications in space due to their gravity independence, high reliability, relative high energy efficiency, design flexibility, technological maturity, and regenerative nature. For these reasons, adsorption has historically played a key role in life support on U.S. and Russian piloted spacecraft. Among the life support applications that can be achieved through use of adsorption technology are removal of trace contaminants and carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovery of potable water from waste streams. In each of these cases adsorption technology has been selected for use onboard the International Space Station. The requirements, science, and hardware for these applications are discussed. Human space exploration may eventually lead to construction of planetary habitats. These habitats may provide additional opportunities for use of adsorption processes, such as control of greenhouse gas composition, and may have different resources available to them, such as gases present in the planetary atmosphere. Separation and purification processes based on

  4. Adsorption processes in spacecraft environmental control and life support systems.

    PubMed

    DallBauman, L A; Finn, J E

    1999-01-01

    The environmental control and life support system on a spacecraft maintains a safe and comfortable environment in which the crew can live and work by supplying oxygen and water and by removing carbon dioxide, water vapor, and trace contaminants from cabin air. Although open-loop systems have been used successfully in the past for short-duration missions, the economics of current and future long-duration missions in space will make nearly complete recycling of air and water imperative. A variety of operations will be necessary to achieve the goal of nearly complete recycling. These include separation and reduction of carbon dioxide, removal of trace gas-phase contaminants, recovery and purification of humidity condensate, purification and polishing of wastewater streams, and others. Several of these can be performed totally or in part by adsorption processes. These processes are good candidates to perform separations and purifications in space due to their gravity independence, high reliability, relative high energy efficiency, design flexibility, technological maturity, and regenerative nature. For these reasons, adsorption has historically played a key role in life support on U.S. and Russian piloted spacecraft. Among the life support applications that can be achieved through use of adsorption technology are removal of trace contaminants and carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovery of potable water from waste streams. In each of these cases adsorption technology has been selected for use onboard the International Space Station. The requirements, science, and hardware for these applications are discussed. Human space exploration may eventually lead to construction of planetary habitats. These habitats may provide additional opportunities for use of adsorption processes, such as control of greenhouse gas composition, and may have different resources available to them, such as gases present in the planetary atmosphere. Separation and purification processes based on

  5. 42 CFR 84.192 - Cartridges in parallel; resistance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.192 Cartridges in parallel; resistance requirements. Where two or...

  6. 42 CFR 84.192 - Cartridges in parallel; resistance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.192 Cartridges in parallel; resistance requirements. Where two or...

  7. High-Performance Water-Iodinating Cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Richard; Gibbons, Randall E.; Flanagan, David T.

    1993-01-01

    High-performance cartridge contains bed of crystalline iodine iodinates water to near saturation in single pass. Cartridge includes stainless-steel housing equipped with inlet and outlet for water. Bed of iodine crystals divided into layers by polytetrafluoroethylene baffles. Holes made in baffles and positioned to maximize length of flow path through layers of iodine crystals. Resulting concentration of iodine biocidal; suppresses growth of microbes in stored water or disinfects contaminated equipment. Cartridge resists corrosion and can be stored wet. Reused several times before necessary to refill with fresh iodine crystals.

  8. Cartridge case image matching using effective correlation area based method.

    PubMed

    Yammen, S; Muneesawang, P

    2013-06-10

    A firearm leaves a unique impression on fired cartridge cases. The cross-correlation function plays an important role in matching the characteristic features on the cartridge case found at the crime scene with a specific firearm, for accurate firearm identification. This paper proposes that the computational forensic techniques of alignment and effective correlation area-based approaches to image matching are essential to firearm identification. Specifically, the reference and the corresponding cartridge cases are aligned according to the phase-correlation criterion on the transform domain. The informative segments of the breech face marks are identified by a cross-covariance coefficient using the coefficient value in a window located locally in the image space. The segments are then passed to the measurement of edge density for computing effective correlation areas. Experimental results on a new dataset show that the correlation system can make use of the best properties of alignment and effective correlation area-based approaches, and can attain significant improvement of image-correlation results, compared with the traditional image-matching methods for firearm identification, which employ cartridge-case samples. An analysis of image-alignment score matrices suggests that all translation and scaling parameters are estimated correctly, and contribute to the successful extraction of effective correlation areas. It was found that the proposed method has a high discriminant power, compared with the conventional correlator. This paper advocates that this method will enable forensic science to compile a large-scale image database to perform correlation of cartridge case bases, in order to identify firearms that involve pairwise alignments and comparisons.

  9. 21 CFR 872.6770 - Cartridge syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... syringe is a device intended to inject anesthetic agents subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The device... cartridge) containing anesthetic is placed. After attaching a needle to the syringe body and activating...

  10. 21 CFR 872.6770 - Cartridge syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... syringe is a device intended to inject anesthetic agents subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The device... cartridge) containing anesthetic is placed. After attaching a needle to the syringe body and activating...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6770 - Cartridge syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... syringe is a device intended to inject anesthetic agents subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The device... cartridge) containing anesthetic is placed. After attaching a needle to the syringe body and activating...

  12. 21 CFR 872.6770 - Cartridge syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... syringe is a device intended to inject anesthetic agents subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The device... cartridge) containing anesthetic is placed. After attaching a needle to the syringe body and activating...

  13. 21 CFR 872.6770 - Cartridge syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... syringe is a device intended to inject anesthetic agents subcutaneously or intramuscularly. The device... cartridge) containing anesthetic is placed. After attaching a needle to the syringe body and activating...

  14. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  15. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  16. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  17. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  18. 42 CFR 84.191 - Chemical cartridge respirators; required components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemical cartridge respirators; required components... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.191 Chemical cartridge respirators; required components. (a) Each chemical cartridge respirator described in § 84.190 shall, where its design requires, contain the...

  19. A polypropylene cartridge filter with hematite nanoparticles for solid particles retention and arsenic removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewska, Justyna; Jakubiak, Szymon; Michalski, Jakub; Pronk, Wouter; Hug, Stephan J.; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J.

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we report a processing route for deposition of hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles into a cartridge filter composed of polypropylene (PP) non-woven fabric by a dip-coating method. During the process, a plasma activated non-woven fabric was immersed in an electrostatically stabilized aqueous hematite suspension under low vacuum conditions. Oxygen groups introduced onto the surface of the polymer provide a strong attachment of hematite nanoparticles to the polypropylene surface, confirmed under conditions of ultrasound. Preliminary tests demonstrated the efficiency of the cartridge in treating spring water with moderate arsenic concentrations, with kinetics and extent of adsorption showing a good correlation to a Langmuir adsorption model.

  20. Estimating service lives of organic vapor cartridges II: a single vapor at all humidities.

    PubMed

    Wood, Gerry O

    2004-07-01

    A widely used equation model for estimating service lives of organic vapor air-purifying respirator cartridges has been updated with more recent research results. It has been expanded to account for effects of high relative humidities. Adsorption capacity competition between water vapor and organic vapor is largely explained by mutual exclusion of adsorption volume of the activated carbon. The Dubinin/Radushkevich equation is used to describe the adsorption isotherms of both water and organic vapors. Effects of relative humidity and adsorbed water on adsorption rates are described by an empirical correlation with breakthrough times. The dynamic natures of adsorption and competition are incorporated using an expanding zone model with displaced water rollup. The complete model has been tested and verified with published and unpublished data from many sources. PMID:15238318

  1. Adsorption bed models used in simulation of atmospheric control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    Two separate techniques were used to obtain important basic data for the adsorption of seven liquid and eight gaseous trace contaminants. A columetric system used in previous HSC studies was modified to determine the HSC capacity of all the contaminants. A second study of six of the liquids was performed in a gas chromatorgraph. The results of these two studies are reported in two parts. First, a brief summary of the chromatographic results are given. Second, a thesis is given which reports in some detail the results of the volumetric studies. Comparison of the data that are common to both studies are also included.

  2. Penetrating ocular trauma associated with blank cartridge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Blank cartridge guns are generally regarded as being harmless and relative safe. However recent published articles demonstrated that the gas pressure from the exploding propellant of blank cartridge is powerful enough to penetrate the thoracic wall, abdominal muscle, small intestine and the skull. And there has been a limited number of case reports of ocular trauma associated with blank cartridge injury. In addition, no report on case with split extraocular muscle injury with traumatic cataract and penetrating corneoscleral wound associated with blank cartridge has been previously documented. This report describes the case of patient who sustained penetrating ocular injury with extraocular muscle injury by a close-distance blank cartridge that required surgical intervention. Case presentation A 20-year-old man sustained a penetrating globe injury in the right eye while cleaning a blank cartridge pistol. His uncorrected visual acuity at presentation was hand motion and he had a flame burn of his right upper and lower lid with multiple missile wounds. On slit-lamp examination, there was a 12-mm laceration of conjunctiva along the 9 o'clock position with two pinhole-like penetrating injuries of cornea and sclera. There was also a 3-mm corneal laceration between 9 o'clock and 12 o'clock and the exposed lateral rectus muscle was split. Severe Descemet's membrane folding with stromal edema was observed, and numerous yellow, powder-like foreign bodies were impacted in the cornea. Layered anterior chamber bleeding with traumatic cataract was also noted. Transverse view of ultrasonography showed hyperechoic foreign bodies with mild reduplication echoes and shadowing. However, a computed tomographic scan using thin section did not reveal a radiopaque foreign body within the right globe. Conclusion To our best knowledge, this is the first case report of split extraocular muscle injury with traumatic cataract and penetrating ocular injury caused by blank cartridge

  3. Gradient Heating Facility. Experiment cartridges. Description and general specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Specifications that define experiment cartridges that are compatible with the furnace of the gradient heating facility on board the Spacelab are presented. They establish a standard cartridge design independent of the type of experiment to be conducted. By using them, experimenters can design, construct, and test the hot section of the cartridge, known as the high temperature nacelle.

  4. 42 CFR 84.193 - Cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. 84... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.193 Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color...

  5. 42 CFR 84.193 - Cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. 84... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.193 Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color...

  6. 42 CFR 84.193 - Cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. 84... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.193 Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color...

  7. 42 CFR 84.193 - Cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. 84... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.193 Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color...

  8. 42 CFR 84.193 - Cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. 84... Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.193 Cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color...

  9. Educational Uses of Cartridge Tapes. Dissemination Document No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, S. Joseph

    Tape cartridges for use by special education teachers are analyzed according to design, effective use, and availability. Basic operating principles of cassette and continuous loop tape cartridges are described and illustrated. Advantages of tape cartridges are indicated, such as the following: the position is saved on tape during student timeouts,…

  10. Hydrogen Molecule Adsorption on a Borophene-Titanium System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio

    2015-03-01

    From the synthesis of graphene have developed a wide range of researchs on their use, both theoretical and experimental. So there have been research on graphene-based electronics, but also on issues of energy, particularly hydrogen adsorption on graphene-based systems. Given the potential represented by these structures is very natural to wonder about similar structures, but based in elements near carbon. One of the lines developed very recently consider the boron as the element to build graphene-like structures. Different studies, both theoretical and experimental have been made where the studied structures are graphene type or fullerene, where boron is used in place of carbon. We will use as a starting point the proposed structures by Xiaobao and Tang. This structure is known as the borophene, which in first place will be decorated with titanium and then, this system interact with hydrogen molecule. In our calculation we use functional density theory, atomic pseudopotentials, Born approximation and molecular dynamic.

  11. An integratable microfluidic cartridge for forensic swab samples lysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianing; Brooks, Carla; Estes, Matthew D; Hurth, Cedric M; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Fully automated rapid forensic DNA analysis requires integrating several multistep processes onto a single microfluidic platform, including substrate lysis, extraction of DNA from the released lysate solution, multiplexed PCR amplification of STR loci, separation of PCR products by capillary electrophoresis, and analysis for allelic peak calling. Over the past several years, most of the rapid DNA analysis systems developed started with the reference swab sample lysate and involved an off-chip lysis of collected substrates. As a result of advancement in technology and chemistry, addition of a microfluidic module for swab sample lysis has been achieved in a few of the rapid DNA analysis systems. However, recent reports on integrated rapid DNA analysis systems with swab-in and answer-out capability lack any quantitative and qualitative characterization of the swab-in sample lysis module, which is important for downstream forensic sample processing. Maximal collection and subsequent recovery of the biological material from the crime scene is one of the first and critical steps in forensic DNA technology. Herein we present the design, fabrication and characterization of an integratable swab lysis cartridge module and the test results obtained from different types of commonly used forensic swab samples, including buccal, saliva, and blood swab samples, demonstrating the compatibility with different downstream DNA extraction chemistries. This swab lysis cartridge module is easy to operate, compatible with both forensic and microfluidic requirements, and ready to be integrated with our existing automated rapid forensic DNA analysis system. Following the characterization of the swab lysis module, an integrated run from buccal swab sample-in to the microchip CE electropherogram-out was demonstrated on the integrated prototype instrument. Therefore, in this study, we demonstrate that this swab lysis cartridge module is: (1) functionally, comparable with routine benchtop lysis

  12. A cartridge based sensor array platform for multiple coagulation measurements from plasma.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, O; Ermek, E; Kilinc, N; Bulut, S; Baris, I; Kavakli, I H; Yaralioglu, G G; Urey, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a MEMS-based sensor array enabling multiple clot-time tests for plasma in one disposable microfluidic cartridge. The versatile LoC (Lab-on-Chip) platform technology is demonstrated here for real-time coagulation tests (activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) and Prothrombin Time (PT)). The system has a reader unit and a disposable cartridge. The reader has no electrical connections to the cartridge. This enables simple and low-cost cartridge designs and avoids reliability problems associated with electrical connections. The cartridge consists of microfluidic channels and MEMS microcantilevers placed in each channel. The microcantilevers are made of electroplated nickel. They are actuated remotely using an external electro-coil and the read-out is also conducted remotely using a laser. The phase difference between the cantilever oscillation and the coil drive is monitored in real time. During coagulation, the viscosity of the blood plasma increases resulting in a change in the phase read-out. The proposed assay was tested on human and control plasma samples for PT and aPTT measurements. PT and aPTT measurements from control plasma samples are comparable with the manufacturer's datasheet and the commercial reference device. The measurement system has an overall 7.28% and 6.33% CV for PT and aPTT, respectively. For further implementation, the microfluidic channels of the cartridge were functionalized for PT and aPTT tests by drying specific reagents in each channel. Since simultaneous PT and aPTT measurements are needed in order to properly evaluate the coagulation system, one of the most prominent features of the proposed assay is enabling parallel measurement of different coagulation parameters. Additionally, the design of the cartridge and the read-out system as well as the obtained reproducible results with 10 μl of the plasma samples suggest an opportunity for a possible point-of-care application. PMID:25353144

  13. Heated transportable fuel cell cartridges

    DOEpatents

    Lance, Joseph R.; Spurrier, Francis R.

    1985-01-01

    A fuel cell stack protective system is made where a plurality of fuel cells, each containing liquid electrolyte subject to crystallization, is enclosed by a containing vessel, and where at least one electric heater is placed in the containing vessel and is capable of preventing electrolyte crystallization.

  14. Absorption and adsorption chillers applied to air conditioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczyńska, Agnieszka; Szaflik, Władysław

    2010-07-01

    This work presents an application possibility of sorption refrigerators driven by low temperature fluid for air conditioning of buildings. Thermodynamic models were formulated and absorption LiBr-water chiller with 10 kW cooling power as well as adsorption chiller with silica gel bed were investigated. Both of them are using water for desorption process with temperature Tdes = 80 °C. Coefficient of performance (COP) for both cooling cycles was analyzed in the same conditions of the driving heat source, cooling water Tc = 25 °C and temperature in evaporator Tevap = 5 °C. In this study, the computer software EES was used to investigate the performance of absorption heat pump system and its behaviour in configuration with geothermal heat source.

  15. Estimating service lives of air-purifying respirator cartridges for reactive gas removal.

    PubMed

    Wood, Gerry O

    2005-08-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to estimate service lives of air-purifying respirator cartridges that remove gases reactively from flowing air. Most gases, because of their high volatility and low polarizability, are not effectively removed by physical adsorption on activated carbon. Models previously developed for toxic organic vapors cannot estimate service lives of cartridges for toxic gases. Often, an activated carbon is impregnated with a chemical to enhance gas removal by chemical reaction(s). The kinds of reactions, types and amounts of impregnants, and effects of the presence of water vary; therefore, the model requires user inputs of gas capacity and water effect parameters. Ideally, these should be available from manufacturers of the cartridges. If they are not, they can be extracted from measured breakthrough times using this model. The key to this model is the observation that adsorption rates of gases can be adequately quantified by the same correlations that have been reported for organic vapors. The resulting model has been used to correlate and predict breakthrough times for several common toxic gases. PMID:16012083

  16. Predicting Boron, Molybdenum, Selenium, and Arsenic Adsorption in Soil Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A chemical surface complexation model was applied to boron, molybdenum, selenium, and arsenic adsorption on up to 49 soils selected for variation in soil properties. The surface complexation model was able to fit boron, molybdenum, selenite, and arsenate adsorption on the soils. General regression...

  17. Protein sequence analysis using Hewlett-Packard biphasic sequencing cartridges in an applied biosystems 473A protein sequencer.

    PubMed

    Tang, S; Mozdzanowski, J; Anumula, K R

    1999-01-01

    Protein sequence analysis using an adsorptive biphasic sequencing cartridge, a set of two coupled columns introduced by Hewlett-Packard for protein sequencing by Edman degradation, in an Applied Biosystems 473A protein sequencer has been demonstrated. Samples containing salts, detergents, excipients, etc. (e.g., formulated protein drugs) can be easily analyzed using the ABI sequencer. Simple modifications to the ABI sequencer to accommodate the cartridge extend its utility in the analysis of difficult samples. The ABI sequencer solvents and reagents were compatible with the HP cartridge for sequencing. Sequence information up to ten residues can be easily generated by this nonoptimized procedure, and it is sufficient for identifying proteins by database search and for preparing a DNA probe for cloning novel proteins.

  18. Microfluidic cartridges for DNA purification and genotyping processed in standard laboratory instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focke, Maximilian; Mark, Daniel; Stumpf, Fabian; Müller, Martina; Roth, Günter; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2011-06-01

    Two microfluidic cartridges intended for upgrading standard laboratory instruments with automated liquid handling capability by use of centrifugal forces are presented. The first microfluidic cartridge enables purification of DNA from human whole blood and is operated in a standard laboratory centrifuge. The second microfluidic catridge enables genotyping of pathogens by geometrically multiplexed real-time PCR. It is operated in a slightly modified off-the-shelf thermal cycler. Both solutions aim at smart and cost-efficient ways to automate work flows in laboratories. The DNA purification cartridge automates all liquid handling steps starting from a lysed blood sample to PCR ready DNA. The cartridge contains two manually crushable glass ampoules with liquid reagents. The DNA yield extracted from a 32 μl blood sample is 192 +/- 30 ng which corresponds to 53 +/- 8% of a reference extraction. The genotyping cartridge is applied to analyse isolates of the multi-resistant Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA) by real-time PCR. The wells contain pre-stored dry reagents such as primers and probes. Evaluation of the system with 44 genotyping assays showed a 100% specificity and agreement with the reference assays in standard tubes. The lower limit of detection was well below 10 copies of DNA per reaction.

  19. Isothermal Adsorption Measurement for the Development of High Performance Solid Sorption Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bidyut Baran; Koyama, Shigeru; Alam, K. C. Amanul; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao; Ng, Kim Choon; Chua, Hui Tong

    Interest in low-grade thermal heat powered solid sorption system using natural refrigerants has been increased. However, the drawbacks of these adsorption systems are their poor performance. The objective of this paper is to improve the performance of thermally powered adsorption cooling system by selecting new adsorbent-refrigerant pairs. Adsorption capacity of adsorbent-refrigerant pair depends on the thermophysical properties (pore size, pore volume and pore diameter) of adsorbent and isothermal characteristics of the adsorbent-refrigerant pair. In this paper, the thermophysical properties of three types of silica gels and three types of pitch based activated carbon fibers are determined from the nitrogen adsorption isotherms. The standard nitrogen gas adsorption/desorption measurements on various adsorbents at liquid nitrogen of temperature 77.4 K were performed. Surface area of each adsorbent was determined by the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) plot of nitrogen adsorption data. Pore size distribution was measured by the Horvath and Kawazoe (HK) method. Adsorption/desorption isotherm results showed that all three carbon fibers have no hysteresis and had better adsorption capacity in comparison with those of silica gels.

  20. Specification for IBM/IBM compatible 3480 tape cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jimmy L.

    1988-01-01

    This document establishes the same kinds of standards and controls that are currently in use for the procurement on new analog and digital magnetic tapes. The Magnetic Tape Certification Facility (MTCF) currently maintains a Quality Products List (QPL) for all new analog and digital magnetic tapes purchased by NASA-GSFC. Extensive tests are conducted in the MTCF on an annual basis to determine the manufacturer's tape types to be added to or deleted from the current QPL. The MTCF currently maintains two specifications for magnetic tapes: NASA TM-79724 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new analog tapes; and NASA TM-80599 is used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new digital tapes. This specification will be used for the QPL and acceptance testing of new 3480 cartridges. The magnetic tapes used by GSFC, LaRC, ARC/Dryden, WFF, and the Network Tracking Stations are covered by the NASA-GSFC specifications. The 3480 cartridge was introduced approximately 3.5 years ago and is becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to digital magnetic tapes. Many users have already converted to the 3480 system and have more tape drives on order.

  1. Analysis of multiple vendor cartridge filters: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Youngberg, D.A.

    1988-11-01

    A study was performed to determine the most efficient and economical 0.2 ..mu..m filter cartridges for use in pure water applications at Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). Eight cartridges were evaluated for weight gain and volume filtered; calculations were performed to standardize the data. Five cartridges were found to exhibit the qualities desired for the KCD pure water applications. 7 tabs.

  2. Intelligent image capture of cartridge cases for firearms examiners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brett C.; Guerci, Joseph R.

    1997-02-01

    The FBI's DRUGFIRETM system is a nationwide computerized networked image database of ballistic forensic evidence. This evidence includes images of cartridge cases and bullets obtained from both crime scenes and controlled test firings of seized weapons. Currently, the system is installed in over 80 forensic labs across the country and has enjoyed a high degree of success. In this paper, we discuss some of the issues and methods associated with providing a front-end semi-automated image capture system that simultaneously satisfies the often conflicting criteria of the many human examiners visual perception versus the criteria associated with optimizing autonomous digital image correlation. Specifically, we detail the proposed processing chain of an intelligent image capture system (IICS), involving a real- time capture 'assistant,' which assesses the quality of the image under test utilizing a custom designed neural network.

  3. Electric cartridge-type heater for producing a given non-uniform axial power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Clark, D.L.; Kress, T.S.

    1975-10-14

    An electric cartridge heater is provided to simulate a reactor fuel element for use in safety and thermal-hydraulic tests of model nuclear reactor systems. The electric heat-generating element of the cartridge heater consists of a specifically shaped strip of metal cut with variable width from a flat sheet of the element material. When spirally wrapped around a mandrel, the strip produces a coiled element of the desired length and diameter. The coiled element is particularly characterized by an electrical resistance that varies along its length due to variations in strip width. Thus, the cartridge heater is constructed such that it will produce a more realistic simulation of the actual nonuniform (approximately ''chopped'' cosine) power distribution of a reactor fuel element.

  4. Cartridge output testing - Methods to overcome closed-bomb shortcomings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Schimmel, Morry L.

    1991-01-01

    Although the closed-bomb test has achieved virtually universal acceptance for measuring the output performance of pyrotechnic cartridges, there are serious shortcomings in its ability to quantify the performance of cartridges used as energy sources for pyrotechnic-activated mechanical devices. This paper presents several examples of cartridges (including the NASA Standard Initiator NSI) that successfully met closed-bomb performance requirements, but resulted in functional failures in mechanisms. To resolve these failures, test methods were developed to demonstrate a functional margin, based on comparing energy required to accomplish the function to energy deliverable by the cartridge.

  5. Ballistic aspects of tandem-loaded cartridges of identical caliber.

    PubMed

    Rabl, W; Katzgraber, F; Kneubuehl, B P

    1998-01-01

    Tandem loading of a cartridge of the same caliber is possible only if the diameter of the barrel is sufficiently wide. This requirement is met by the .22 long shot Anschütz miniature clay pigeon gun. Ballistic experiments with tandem-loaded cartridges of the same caliber as those loaded in the normal way showed the bullet of the regularly loaded cartridge to impact the muzzle-loaded cartridge. On firing a shot, the bullet of the posterior cartridge penetrates the anterior one, expanding the case of the first cartridge to the diameter of the barrel and disintegrating the bullet. Regardless of whether the muzzle-loaded cartridge is ignited or not, the discharge speed of the projectiles (v0) is considerably below that of single shots. Calculations yielded a theoretical reduction by about 60%. In accordance with the formula E=1/2*m*v2, in terms of the energy released, the elevated mass of the projectile is of secondary importance compared with the reduction of v0. Although the "projectile" mass is more than twice the normal rate, the energy density is significantly reduced and the biological effect is attenuated. This also became apparent in the failed suicide attempt of a 43-year-old male who used a miniature clay pigeon gun to shoot himself in the forehead at a range of a few centimeters. He had inserted a second cartridge, base to head with the first cartridge, in the factory-bored barrel of the gun. The leading cartridge was destroyed by the regularly loaded one. The pierced and expanded case of the leading cartridge was found nearby the injured man and was at first taken to be the jacket of a larger-caliber bullet.

  6. Index to 8mm Motion Cartridges. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Southern California, Los Angeles. National Information Center for Educational Media.

    Research at the National Information Center for Educational Media has shown that the 8mm motion cartridge with optical and magnetic sound seems to meet the basic tenets of a prime educational criterion for an educational medium--that it be available to the learner at his convenience. This is a bibliographical source for 8mm motion cartridges, and…

  7. Estimating service lives of organic vapor cartridges III: multiple vapors at all humidities.

    PubMed

    Wood, Gerry O; Snyder, Jay L

    2007-05-01

    A published model for estimating service lives of organic vapor (OV) air-purifying respirator cartridges has been extended to include multiple organic vapors at all humidities. Equilibria among the OVs are calculated using Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory, whereas the effects of adsorbed water are considered as due to micropore volume exclusion. Solubilities of OVs in water must also be taken into account. Adsorption kinetics of components of mixtures are based on published correlations of the effects of covapors and water vapor. The dynamics of adsorption and competition are incorporated using expanding zones within the carbon bed, taking into account vapor and water displacements. Measurements of breakthrough curves for two ternary OV mixtures at high humidities have been done for a single cartridge type. The service life estimation model, implemented as a spreadsheet and a computer program, has been tested against these data as well as data for OV mixtures from literature sources. Good agreements were obtained between model predictions and experimental breakthrough times at dry conditions and humid conditions. PMID:17454504

  8. A compact point-of-use water purification cartridge for household use in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajshree A; Ahmad, Dilshad; Kausley, Shankar B; Balkunde, Pradeep L; Malhotra, Chetan P

    2015-03-01

    Simple, low-cost household interventions are known to be effective in lowering the incidence of waterborne diseases in developing countries. However, high costs along with operational and maintenance issues have prevented the successful adoption of these interventions among the affected communities. To address these limitations, a cost-effective, gravity-driven water purification cartridge has been developed by employing the synergistic disinfection action of low concentrations of silver and chlorine on bacteria and viruses. The silver and chlorine treatment components within the cartridge have been developed using inexpensive materials and integrated with a life indicator and auto-shut-off-mechanism within a compact form factor. The antibacterial as well as antiviral performance of the cartridge was tested by using ground water spiked with Escherichia coli and MS2 bacteriophage. The results show that, although individually, the silver and chlorine treatment systems were unable to inactivate the test strains, the integrated cartridge inactivates both bacteria as well as viruses up to the log reduction requirement of the USEPA guide standard for microbiological water purifiers over its designated life of 2,000 liters. PMID:25719469

  9. Research and Development of a Small-Scale Adsorption Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Yeshpal

    The world is grappling with two serious issues related to energy and climate change. The use of solar energy is receiving much attention due to its potential as one of the solutions. Air conditioning is particularly attractive as a solar energy application because of the near coincidence of peak cooling loads with the available solar power. Recently, researchers have started serious discussions of using adsorptive processes for refrigeration and heat pumps. There is some success for the >100 ton adsorption systems but none exists in the <10 ton size range required for residential air conditioning. There are myriad reasons for the lack of small-scale systems such as low Coefficient of Performance (COP), high capital cost, scalability, and limited performance data. A numerical model to simulate an adsorption system was developed and its performance was compared with similar thermal-powered systems. Results showed that both the adsorption and absorption systems provide equal cooling capacity for a driving temperature range of 70--120 ºC, but the adsorption system is the only system to deliver cooling at temperatures below 65 ºC. Additionally, the absorption and desiccant systems provide better COP at low temperatures, but the COP's of the three systems converge at higher regeneration temperatures. To further investigate the viability of solar-powered heat pump systems, an hourly building load simulation was developed for a single-family house in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Thermal as well as economic performance comparison was conducted for adsorption, absorption, and solar photovoltaic (PV) powered vapor compression systems for a range of solar collector area and storage capacity. The results showed that for a small collector area, solar PV is more cost-effective whereas adsorption is better than absorption for larger collector area. The optimum solar collector area and the storage size were determined for each type of solar system. As part of this dissertation

  10. Characterization of adsorption of aqueous arsenite and arsenate onto charred dolomite in microcolumn systems.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Yousef; Al-Muhtaseb, Ala'a H; Mousa, Hasan; Walker, Gavin M; Ahmad, Mohammad N M

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the removal of arsenite, As(III), and arsenate, As(V), from aqueous solutions onto thermally processed dolomite (charred dolomite) via microcolumn was evaluated. The effects of mass of adsorbent (0.5-2 g), initial arsenic concentration (50-2000 ppb) and particle size (<0.355-2 mm) on the adsorption capacity of charred dolomite in a microcolumn were investigated. It was found that the adsorption of As(V) and As(III) onto charred dolomite exhibited a characteristic 'S' shape. The adsorption capacity increased as the initial arsenic concentration increased. A slow decrease in the column adsorption capacity was noted as the particle size increased from>0.335 to 0.710-2.00 mm. For the binary system, the experimental data show that the adsorption of As(V) and As(III) was independent of both ions in solution. The experimental data obtained from the adsorption process were successfully correlated with the Thomas Model and Bed Depth Service Time Model. PMID:25244130

  11. [Enforcement of type M 20 cal. 4 mm cartridges].

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jaworski, Ryszard; Kawecki, Jerzy; Semiczek, Wiesław; Trnka, Jakub

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to investigate and compare the speed and energy of a bullet from 4 mm cal. cartridges of central ignition type M20, both original and transformed by addition of different kinds of propellants. Original cartridges are characterized by an average speed of the bullet of 144 m/s and average energy of 4.8 J. After transformation by the addition of on an average 31.3 mg of smokeless powder from a cartridge type LR'22, a maximum bullet speed of 299 m/s (average) and maximum energy of 21.2 joule (average) were reached. Our test showed that shots using transformed ammunition type M 20 cal. 4 mm can be dangerous for both health and life. Multiple M20 shot wounds may be very similar to single shot wounds caused by a shotshell cartridge fired from a shotgun weapon.

  12. Preparation of a new adsorbent from activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) for manufacturing organic-vacbpour respirator cartridge.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Mehdi; Adl, Javad; Shahtaheri, Seyyed Jamaleddin; Rashidi, Alimorad; Ghorbanali, Amir; Kakooe, Hossein; Forushani, Abbas Rahimi; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-26

    In this study a composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) was prepared to improve the performance of activated carbon (AC) for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its utilization for respirator cartridges. Activated carbon was impregnated with a nickel nitrate catalyst precursor and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were deposited directly on the AC surface using catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Deposited CNFs on catalyst particles in AC micropores, were activated by CO2 to recover the surface area and micropores. Surface and textural characterizations of the prepared composites were investigated using Brunauer, Emmett and Teller's (BET) technique and electron microscopy respectively. Prepared composite adsorbent was tested for benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) adsorption and then employed in an organic respirator cartridge in granular form. Adsorption studies were conducted by passing air samples through the adsorbents in a glass column at an adjustable flow rate. Finally, any adsorbed species not retained by the adsorbents in the column were trapped in a charcoal sorbent tube and analyzed by gas chromatography. CNFs with a very thin diameter of about 10-20 nm were formed uniformly on the AC/CNF. The breakthrough time for cartridges prepared with CO2 activated AC/CNF was 117 minutes which are significantly longer than for those cartridges prepared with walnut shell- based activated carbon with the same weight of adsorbents. This study showed that a granular form CO2 activated AC/CNF composite could be a very effective alternate adsorbent for respirator cartridges due to its larger adsorption capacities and lower weight.

  13. Preparation of a new adsorbent from activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) for manufacturing organic-vacbpour respirator cartridge

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study a composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) was prepared to improve the performance of activated carbon (AC) for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its utilization for respirator cartridges. Activated carbon was impregnated with a nickel nitrate catalyst precursor and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were deposited directly on the AC surface using catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Deposited CNFs on catalyst particles in AC micropores, were activated by CO2 to recover the surface area and micropores. Surface and textural characterizations of the prepared composites were investigated using Brunauer, Emmett and Teller’s (BET) technique and electron microscopy respectively. Prepared composite adsorbent was tested for benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) adsorption and then employed in an organic respirator cartridge in granular form. Adsorption studies were conducted by passing air samples through the adsorbents in a glass column at an adjustable flow rate. Finally, any adsorbed species not retained by the adsorbents in the column were trapped in a charcoal sorbent tube and analyzed by gas chromatography. CNFs with a very thin diameter of about 10-20 nm were formed uniformly on the AC/CNF. The breakthrough time for cartridges prepared with CO2 activated AC/CNF was 117 minutes which are significantly longer than for those cartridges prepared with walnut shell- based activated carbon with the same weight of adsorbents. This study showed that a granular form CO2 activated AC/CNF composite could be a very effective alternate adsorbent for respirator cartridges due to its larger adsorption capacities and lower weight. PMID:23369424

  14. Advanced Thermo-Adsorptive Battery: Advanced Thermo-Adsorptive Battery Climate Control System

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-31

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing a low-cost, compact, high-capacity, advanced thermoadsorptive battery (ATB) for effective climate control of EVs. The ATB provides both heating and cooling by taking advantage of the materials’ ability to adsorb a significant amount of water. This efficient battery system design could offer up as much as a 30% increase in driving range compared to current EV climate control technology. The ATB provides high-capacity thermal storage with little-to-no electrical power consumption. The ATB is also looking to explore the possibility of shifting peak electricity loads for cooling and heating in a variety of other applications, including commercial and residential buildings, data centers, and telecom facilities.

  15. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm of anionic dyes onto organo-bentonite from single and multisolute systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dazhong; Fan, Jianxin; Zhou, Weizhi; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Kang, Qi

    2009-12-15

    The performances of polydiallydimethylammonium modified bentonite (PDADMA-bentonite) as an adsorbent to remove anionic dyes, namely Acid Scarlet GR (AS-GR), Acid Turquoise Blue 2G (ATB-2G) and Indigo Carmine (IC), were investigated in single, binary and ternary dye systems. In adsorption from single dye solutions with initial concentration of 100 micromol/L, the dosage of PDADMA-bentonite needed to remove 95% dye was 0.42, 0.68 and 0.75 g/L for AS-GR, ATB-2G and IC, respectively. The adsorption isotherms of the three dyes obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model with the equilibrium constants of 0.372, 0.629 and 4.31 L/micromol, the saturation adsorption amount of 176.3, 149.2 and 228.7 micromol/g for ATB-2G, IC and AS-GR, respectively. In adsorption from mixed dye solutions, the isotherm of each individual dye followed an expanded Langmuir isotherm model and the relationship between the total amount of dyes adsorbed and the total equilibrium dye concentration was interpreted well by Langmuir isotherm model. In the region of insufficient dosage of PDADMA-bentonite, the dye with a larger affinity was preferentially removed by adsorption. Desorption was observed in the kinetic curve of the dye with lower affinity on PDADMA-bentonite surface by the competitive adsorption. The kinetics in single dye solution and the total adsorption of dyes in binary and ternary dye systems nicely followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  16. Predicting the lifetime of organic vapor cartridges exposed to volatile organic compound mixtures using a partial differential equations model.

    PubMed

    Vuong, François; Chauveau, Romain; Grevillot, Georges; Marsteau, Stéphanie; Silvente, Eric; Vallieres, Cécile

    2016-09-01

    In this study, equilibria, breakthrough curves, and breakthrough times were predicted for three binary mixtures of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a model based on partial differential equations of dynamic adsorption coupling a mass balance, a simple Linear Driving Force (LDF) hypothesis to describe the kinetics, and the well-known Extended-Langmuir (EL) equilibrium model. The model aims to predict with a limited complexity, the BTCs of respirator cartridges exposed to binary vapor mixtures from equilibria and kinetics data obtained from single component. In the model, multicomponent mass transfer was simplified to use only single dynamic adsorption data. The EL expression used in this study predicted equilibria with relatively good accuracy for acetone/ethanol and ethanol/cyclohexane mixtures, but the prediction of cyclohexane uptake when mixed with heptane is less satisfactory. The BTCs given by the model were compared to experimental BTCs to determine the accuracy of the model and the impact of the approximation on mass transfer coefficients. From BTCs, breakthrough times at 10% of the exposure concentration t10% were determined. All t10% were predicted within 20% of the experimental values, and 63% of the breakthrough times were predicted within a 10% error. This study demonstrated that a simple mass balance combined with kinetic approximations is sufficient to predict lifetime for respirator cartridges exposed to VOC mixtures. It also showed that a commonly adopted approach to describe multicomponent adsorption based on volatility of VOC rather than adsorption equilibrium greatly overestimated the breakthrough times.

  17. Carbon cartridge standards for 125I and suggested applications.

    PubMed

    Tries, M A; Ring, J P; Chabot, G E

    1997-09-01

    Carbon cartridge standards were prepared to assess the activity of 125I incident on, and adsorbed in, cartridge samples during air sampling. Each cartridge standard consisted of an 125I-spiked filter paper at a known depth, ranging from 0 to 19 mm, embedded in approximately 34 g of 20-30 mesh activated carbon contained within a 6.35 cm diameter by 2.22 cm deep metal cartridge with screened openings. The total counting efficiency values range from 17.8 to 20.8% for cartridges counted at 3.2 mm from a thin-crystal NaI(Tl) detector. The standards were analyzed using a front/back counting technique, and fitting functions were developed relating the front/back net counts ratio and counting efficiency to the 125I depth of burial. A method for determining sample activity that accounts for exponential radioiodine loading in cartridge samples is compared to a less complicated technique that assumes all the radioiodine is located at an equivalent depth of burial that is based on the sample front/back net counts ratio. In addition, methods are presented for determining airborne 125I activity for constant and variable concentrations. Variable concentrations are assumed to occur in a fume hood duct by one or more bulk releases as a result of iodinations that are performed during a given sampling interval. The two methods are shown to have maximum relative deviations ranging from -16 to +16%. PMID:9287093

  18. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  19. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  20. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  1. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a) Requirements for Fuel Cell Cartridges. Fuel cell cartridges, including when contained in or packed with...

  2. 42 CFR 84.194 - Filters used with chemical cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filters used with chemical cartridges; location... DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.194 Filters used with chemical cartridges; location; replacement. (a) Particulate matter filters used in conjunction with a chemical cartridge shall be located...

  3. 42 CFR 84.194 - Filters used with chemical cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Filters used with chemical cartridges; location... DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.194 Filters used with chemical cartridges; location; replacement. (a) Particulate matter filters used in conjunction with a chemical cartridge shall be located...

  4. 42 CFR 84.194 - Filters used with chemical cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.194 Filters used with chemical cartridges; location; replacement. (a) Particulate matter filters used in conjunction with a chemical cartridge shall be located on... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Filters used with chemical cartridges;...

  5. 42 CFR 84.194 - Filters used with chemical cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.194 Filters used with chemical cartridges; location; replacement. (a) Particulate matter filters used in conjunction with a chemical cartridge shall be located on... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Filters used with chemical cartridges;...

  6. 42 CFR 84.194 - Filters used with chemical cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.194 Filters used with chemical cartridges; location; replacement. (a) Particulate matter filters used in conjunction with a chemical cartridge shall be located on... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Filters used with chemical cartridges;...

  7. Direct coupling between stress, strain and adsorption reactions - A study on coal-CO2 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, S.; Peach, C. J.; Spiers, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Though it is well-known that adsorption reactions frequently assist deformation of porous rocks, very little understanding exists on the direct coupling with stress state and strain. One of the materials in which adsorption plays a large role is coal, as is observed in the particular case of Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production (ECBM), which involves the geological storage of CO2 and the recovery of CH4. In this case, adsorption and the associated swelling cause significant injectivity problems, which is experienced in almost all pilot field projects to date. This suggests that indeed a strong fundamental coupling exists between CO2 sorption, changes in the mechanical state of the coal matrix and changes in the transport properties of the system, and illustrates the need to understand coupled stress-strain-sorption behaviour. In this contribution, we describe several important observations made on coal-CO2 systems that can learn us about many other natural, stressed adsorbate-adsorbent systems. In our experiments, first of all, the adsorption of CO2 in the coal matrix gave rise to swelling. Although this is well-known, we found that the total volumetric strain occurring under unconfined conditions can be realistically modelled (up to at least 100 MPa) as the sum of an adsorption-related expansion term and an elastic compression term. Second, effective in situ stresses will directly reduce the sorption capacity, and associated swelling of the coal matrix significantly. Our general thermodynamic model for the effect of a 3D stress state on adsorbed CO2 concentration supports this observation, and also shows that "self-stressing", as a result of CO2 adsorption occurring under conditions of restricted or zero strain (i.e. fully constrained conditions), will more than double the expected in situ stresses. A constitutive equation was developed to describe the full coupling between stress state, total strain (i.e. combined strain of adsorption processes and poroelasticity

  8. Interpretation of dynamic frontal analysis data in solid/supercritical fluid adsorption systems. I: theory.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Tarafder, Abhijit; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-05-17

    A theory is proposed to relate the elution times of the adsorption front shocks of breakthrough curves recorded during classical dynamic frontal analysis (FA) experiments with selected compounds and their adsorption isotherms in solid/supercritical fluid adsorption systems. The actual density and viscosity of binary mixtures of CO2 and methanol were obtained from the NIST REPPROP software. Diluted solutions of S-naproxen were considered (<2% in mass) but the possible effects of the analyte concentration on the viscosity and the density of the eluent percolating through the column were neglected. This allows the determination of the excess adsorption isotherm (or Gibbs excess isotherm) of the adsorbed analyte in the whole column at constant mass and volumetric flow rate of pure CO2 and of the modifier solution. A local Langmuir adsorption isotherm and a constant saturation capacity were assumed in the calculations. The variation of the adsorption-desorption constant with the eluent density was taken from the experimental variation of the retention factor of S-naproxen on a chiral column packed with Whelk-O1 particles. The results show that the isotherm parameters obtained from the best adjustment of the Langmuir model to the SFC excess adsorption data deviates by less than 7% from the assumed saturation capacity and from the average of the equilibrium constant along the chromatographic column. In practice, this conclusion holds true provided that the precision of the measurement of elution times of front shocks of breakthrough curves is better than 1% and that the maximum surface coverage qexp,max/qS is at least equal to 20%.

  9. Adsorption and Processes in Spacecraft Environmental Control and Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dall-Bauman, Liese; Finn, John E.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The environmental control and life support system on a spacecraft must maintain a safe and comfortable environment in which the crew can live and work. The system's functions include supplying the crew with oxygen and water, as well as removing carbon dioxide, water vapor, and trace contaminants from cabin air. Although open-loop systems have been used in the past, logistics and safety factors of current and future missions in space make near-complete recycling of the cabin's air and water desirable. The recycling process may include separation and reduction of carbon dioxide, removal of trace gas-phase contaminants, recovery and purification of humidity condensate, purification and polishing of wastewater streams, and other processes. Several of these operations can be performed totally or in part by adsorption processes. Adsorption processes are frequently good candidates for separation and purification in space by virtue of such characteristics as gravity independence, high reliability, relatively high energy efficiency, design flexibility, technological maturity, and regenerability. For these reasons, adsorption has historically played a key role in life support on U.S. and Russian piloted spacecraft. This article focuses on three current spacecraft life support applications that often use adsorption technology: carbon dioxide separation from cabin air, gas-phase trace contaminant control, and potable water recovery from waste streams. In each application, adsorption technology has been selected for use on the International Space Station. The requirements, science, and hardware for each application are discussed. Eventually, human space exploration may lead to construction of planetary habitats. These habitats may have additional applications, such as control of greenhouse gas composition and purification of hydroponic solutions, and may have different requirements and resources available to them, such as gases present in the planetary atmosphere. Adsorption

  10. Phase diagrams of adsorption systems and calibration functions in the lattice-gas model.

    PubMed

    Tovbin, Yuriy K; Rabinovich, Alexander B

    2004-07-01

    Using the calibration function is suggested to increase the accuracy of approximate equations in the lattice-gas model at calculating various concentration dependences of equilibrium characteristics for nonideal adsorption systems in the vicinity of the critical point. This function should provide a shift of the approximate result to the exact one, when the lattice-gas model equations are used in the quality of the interpolation tool between the exact solutions. A comparison of approximate equations with Onsager's exact solution preferrably allows a use of the quasi-chemical approximation as the interpolation procedure and the exact information on the critical point. The modified lattice-gas model takes into account next the molecular properties of the Lennard-Jones fluid: the long-range potential of adsorbate-adsorbate, an excluded volume of the adsorption site, and a contribution of the triple interactions, as well as a softness of the lattice structure. The modified lattice-gas model with the calibration function is used for the phase diagram descriptions for argon adsorption on the homogeneous (111) CdCl2 face (two-dimensional systems) and for methane adsorption in carbon slitlike pores (three-dimensional system) as well as the other equilibrium characteristics of mentioned systems.

  11. Regeneration of Exhausted Arsenic Adsorptive media of a Full Scale Treatment System

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will describe the method and results of laboratory tests showing the feasibility of regenerating exhausted, iron-based, adsorptive media and the results of a follow up regeneration test at a full scale system in Twentynine Palms CA. The laboratory studies on se...

  12. WATER AND WASTEWATER POLISHING USING 3M SELECTIVE SEPARATION REMEDIATION CARTRIDGE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, K. M.; Scanlan, T. J.; Seely, D. C.

    2002-02-25

    3M has developed technology for selectively removing trace levels of dissolved contaminant materials from liquids using systems operating at flow rates up to 50 gallons per minute. This technology combines active particle chemistries with a particle-loaded membrane to achieve a new medium for liquid waste processing--a spiral wound filter cartridge. This technology has shown success by generating high decontamination factors and reducing contaminants to part per trillion levels. The spiral wound cartridge offers simplified installation, convenient replacement, and clean, easy disposal of a concentrated waste. By incorporating small, high surface area particles (5 to 80 microns) into a sturdy, yet porous, membrane greater removal efficiencies of even trace contaminants can be achieved at higher flow rates than with conventional column systems. In addition, the captive-particle medium prevents channeling of liquids and insures uniform flow across the sorbing particle surface. The cartridges fit into standard, commercially-available housings and whole system capital costs are substantially lower than those of column or reverse osmosis systems. Developmental work at high degrees of water polishing have included removal of mercury from contaminated wastewater, various radionuclides from process water, and organometallic species from surface water discharges. Laboratory testing and on-site demonstration data of these applications show the levels of success that have been achieved thus far.

  13. Phosphate adsorption from wastewater using zirconium (IV) hydroxide: Kinetics, thermodynamics and membrane filtration adsorption hybrid system studies.

    PubMed

    Johir, M A H; Pradhan, M; Loganathan, P; Kandasamy, J; Vigneswaran, S

    2016-02-01

    Excessive phosphate in wastewater should be removed to control eutrophication of water bodies. The potential of employing amorphous zirconium (Zr) hydroxide to remove phosphate from synthetic wastewater was studied in batch adsorption experiments and in a submerged membrane filtration adsorption hybrid (MFAH) reactor. The adsorption data satisfactorily fitted to Langmuir, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models. Langmuir adsorption maxima at 22 °C and pHs of 4.0, 7.1, and 10.0 were 30.40, 18.50, and 19.60 mg P/g, respectively. At pH 7.1 and temperatures of 40 °C and 60 °C, they were 43.80 and 54.60 mg P/g, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔG° and ΔS° were negative and ΔH° was positive. FTIR, zeta potential and competitive phosphate, sulphate and nitrate adsorption data showed that the mechanism of phosphate adsorption was inner-sphere complexation. In the submerged MFAH reactor experiment, when Zr hydroxide was added at doses of 1-5 g/L once only at the start of the experiment, the removal of phosphate from 3 L of wastewater containing 10 mg P/L declined after 5 h of operation. However, when Zr hydroxide was repeatedly added at 5 g/L dose every 24 h, satisfactory removal of phosphate was maintained for 3 days.

  14. Phosphate adsorption from wastewater using zirconium (IV) hydroxide: Kinetics, thermodynamics and membrane filtration adsorption hybrid system studies.

    PubMed

    Johir, M A H; Pradhan, M; Loganathan, P; Kandasamy, J; Vigneswaran, S

    2016-02-01

    Excessive phosphate in wastewater should be removed to control eutrophication of water bodies. The potential of employing amorphous zirconium (Zr) hydroxide to remove phosphate from synthetic wastewater was studied in batch adsorption experiments and in a submerged membrane filtration adsorption hybrid (MFAH) reactor. The adsorption data satisfactorily fitted to Langmuir, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models. Langmuir adsorption maxima at 22 °C and pHs of 4.0, 7.1, and 10.0 were 30.40, 18.50, and 19.60 mg P/g, respectively. At pH 7.1 and temperatures of 40 °C and 60 °C, they were 43.80 and 54.60 mg P/g, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔG° and ΔS° were negative and ΔH° was positive. FTIR, zeta potential and competitive phosphate, sulphate and nitrate adsorption data showed that the mechanism of phosphate adsorption was inner-sphere complexation. In the submerged MFAH reactor experiment, when Zr hydroxide was added at doses of 1-5 g/L once only at the start of the experiment, the removal of phosphate from 3 L of wastewater containing 10 mg P/L declined after 5 h of operation. However, when Zr hydroxide was repeatedly added at 5 g/L dose every 24 h, satisfactory removal of phosphate was maintained for 3 days. PMID:26686069

  15. Adsorption Behaviors of 17α-Ethinylestradiol in Sediment-Water System in Northern Taihu Lake, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonghua; Hu, Liangfeng; Wang, Qiuying; Lu, Guanghua; Li, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption behavior of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in northern Taihu Lake sediment was analyzed by using batch equilibrium experiment. Freundlich isotherm could describe the adsorption thermodynamic behavior of EE2 in sediment. Sediment organic matter (SOM) contents had important impacts on the adsorption capacity for EE2. The pH values also influenced the adsorption capacity for EE2. Increase of pH value could decrease the EE2 adsorption, which might be due to the electrostatic repulsion between the anionic form of EE2 and sediments with negative charge under high pH values. Competitive effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on EE2 adsorption were further analyzed. The results showed that low concentration BPA did not have significant influences on EE2 adsorption. However, high concentration BPA could reduce EE2 adsorption, which might be due to the similar molecular diameter of BPA with adsorption sites and one more benzene ring with a hydroxyl group in BPA. These results provide primary information of EE2 adsorption in sediment-water system in Taihu Lake, which is useful for the environmental risk assessment and management of EE2 in studied area. PMID:25152910

  16. Adaptation of a speciation sampling cartridge for measuring ammonia flux from cattle feedlots using relaxed eddy accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K. A.; Ham, J. M.

    Improved measurements of ammonia losses from cattle feedlots are needed to quantify the national NH 3 emissions inventory and evaluate management techniques for reducing emissions. Speciation cartridges composed of glass honeycomb denuders and filter packs were adapted to measure gaseous NH 3 and aerosol NH 4+ fluxes using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). Laboratory testing showed that a cartridge equipped with four honeycomb denuders had a total capture capacity of 1800 μg of NH 3. In the field, a pair of cartridges was deployed adjacent to a sonic anemometer and an open-path gas analyzer on a mobile tower. High-speed valves were attached to the inlets of the cartridges and controlled by a datalogger so that up- and down-moving eddies were independently sampled based on direction of the vertical wind speed and a user-defined deadband. Air flowed continuously through the cartridges even when not sampling by means of a recirculating air handling system. Eddy covariance measurement of CO 2 and H 2O, as measured by the sonic and open-path gas analyzer, were used to determine the relaxation factor needed to compute REA-based fluxes. The REA system was field tested at the Beef Research Unit at Kansas State University in the summer and fall of 2007. Daytime NH 3 emissions ranged between 68 and 127 μg m -2 s -1; fluxes tended to follow a diurnal pattern correlated with latent heat flux. Daily fluxes of NH 3 were between 2.5 and 4.7 g m -2 d -1 and on average represented 38% of fed nitrogen. Aerosol NH 4+ fluxes were negligible compared with NH 3 emissions. An REA system designed around the high-capacity speciation cartridges can be used to measure NH 3 fluxes from cattle feedlots and other strong sources. The system could be adapted to measure fluxes of other gases and aerosols.

  17. A self-heating cartridge for molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changchun; Mauk, Michael G; Hart, Robert; Qiu, Xianbo; Bau, Haim H

    2011-08-21

    A disposable, water-activated, self-heating, easy-to-use, polymeric cartridge for isothermal nucleic acid amplification and visual fluorescent detection of the amplification products is described. The device is self-contained and does not require any special instruments to operate. The cartridge integrates chemical, water-triggered, exothermic heating with temperature regulation facilitated with a phase-change material (PCM) and isothermal nucleic acid amplification. The water flows into the exothermic reactor by wicking through a porous paper. The porous paper's characteristics control the rate of water supply, which in turn controls the rate of exothermic reaction. The PCM material enables the cartridge to maintain a desired temperature independent of ambient temperatures in the range between 20 °C and 40 °C. The utility of the cartridge is demonstrated by amplifying and detecting Escherichia coli DNA with loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The device can detect consistently as few as 10 target molecules in the sample. With proper modifications, the cartridge also can work with other isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies for detecting nucleic acids associated with various pathogens borne in blood, saliva, urine, and other body fluids as well as in water and food. The device is suitable for use at home, in the field, and in poor-resource settings, where access to sophisticated laboratories is impractical, unaffordable, or nonexistent.

  18. Better VPS Fabrication of Crucibles and Furnace Cartridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Zimmerman, Frank R.; O'Dell, J. Scott; McKechnie, Timothy N.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental investigation has shown that by (1) vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) of suitable refractory metal alloys on graphite mandrels, and then (2) heat-treating the VPS alloy deposits under suitable conditions, it is possible to fabricate improved crucibles and furnace cartridges that could be used at maximum temperatures between 1,400 and 1,600 C and that could withstand chemical attack by the materials to be heated in the crucibles and cartridges. Taken by itself, the basic concept of fabricating furnace cartridges by VPS of refractory materials onto graphite mandrels is not new; taken by itself, the basic concept of heat treatment of VPS deposits for use as other than furnace cartridges is also not new; however, prior to this investigation, experimental crucibles and furnace cartridges fabricated by VPS had not been heat treated and had been found to be relatively weak and brittle. Accordingly, the investigation was directed toward determining whether certain combinations of (1) refractory alloy compositions, (2) VPS parameters, and (3) heat-treatment parameters could result in VPS-fabricated components with increased ductility.

  19. Using the PL/SQL Cartridge of the Oracle Application Server to Deploy Web Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, C.L.

    1999-06-14

    Deploying business applications on the internal Web is a priority at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Lockheed Martin Energy Research) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. as with most corporations. Three separate applications chose the Oracle Application Server (OAS), using the PL/SQL cartridge as a Web deployment method. This method was chosen primarily because the data was already stored in Oracle tables and developers knew HJSQL or at least SQL. The Database Support group had the responsibility of installing, testing, and determining standard methods for interfacing with the PL/SQL cartridge of the OAS. Note that the term Web Application Server was used for version 3, but in this discussion, OAS will be used for both version 3 and version 4.

  20. Scattering, Adsorption, and Langmuir-Hinshelwood Desorption Models for Physisorptive and Chemisorptive Gas-Surface Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Brook I.

    Surface effects limit the performance of hypersonic vehicles, micro-electro-mechanical devices, and directed energy systems. This research develops methods to predict adsorption, scattering, and thermal desorption of molecules on a surface. These methods apply to physisorptive (adsorption and scattering) and chemisorptive (thermal desorption) gas-surface systems. Engineering and design applications will benefit from these methods, hence they are developed under the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo construct. The novel adsorption and scattering contribution, the Modified Kisliuk with Scattering method, predicts angular and energy distributions, and adsorption probabilities. These results agree more closely with experiment than the state-of-the-art Cercignani-Lampis-Lord scattering kernel. Super-elastic scattering is predicted. Gas-adlayer interactions are included for the first time. Accommodation coefficents can be determined by fitting simulations to experimental data. The new thermal desorption model accurately calculates angular, translational, rotational, and vibrational distributions, and the rotational alignment parameter. The model is validated by comparing with experiments. Multiple transition states are considered in a set of non-dimensionalized equations of motion, linked with temporally-accurate event timing. Initial conditions are chosen from a new truncated Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Run times are improved by eliminating the Gaussian Weighting of desorbing products. The absorption energy barrier is shown to significantly contribute only to the translational energy of desorbing molecules by contributing energy to each adatom in a similar manner.

  1. Environment-modulated Kondo phenomena in FePc/Au(111) adsorption systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Zheng, Xiao; Yang, Jinlong

    2016-03-01

    Recent scanning tunneling microscopy experiments on electron transport through iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc) molecules adsorbed on the Au(111) surface have revealed that the measured Kondo conductance signature depends strongly on the specific adsorption site. To understand the physical origin of experimental observations, particularly the variation of Kondo features with the molecular adsorption site, we employ a combined density functional theory (DFT) and hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) approach to investigate the electronic structure and Kondo correlation in FePc/Au(111) composite systems. The calculation results indicate that, for the on-top adsorption configuration, the two degenerate spin-unpaired dπ orbitals on the Fe center are coupled indirectly through substrate band states, leading to the Fano-like antiresonance line shape in the d I /d V spectra, while for the bridge adsorption configuration, the environment-induced couplings are largely suppressed because of the two different spin-unpaired d orbitals. Therefore, our work suggests that the environment-induced coupling as an essential physical factor could greatly influence the Fano-Kondo features in magnetic molecule/metal composites, and the crucial role of local orbital degeneracy and symmetry is discovered. These findings provide important insights into the electron correlation effects in complex solid-state systems. The usefulness and practicality of the combined DFT+HEOM method is also highlighted.

  2. Refilling of carbon nanotube cartridges for 3D nanomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Bekarevich, Raman; Toyoda, Masami; Baba, Shuichi; Nakata, Toshihiko; Hirahara, Kaori

    2016-04-01

    Metal-filled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known to be used as pen-tip injectors for 3D manufacturing on the nanoscale. However, the CNT interior cannot accumulate enough material to fabricate complex metallic nanostructures. Therefore a method for refilling the CNT cartridge needs to be developed. The strategy for refilling of CNT cartridges is suggested in this study. Controlled growth of gold nanowires in the interior of isolated CNTs using a real-time manipulator installed in a transmission electron microscope is reported herein. The encapsulation process of discrete gold nanoparticles in the hollow spaces of open-ended multi-wall CNTs was evaluated in detail. The experimental results reveal that the serial loading of isolated gold nanoparticles allows the control of the length of the loaded nanowires with nanometer accuracy. Thermophoresis and the coalescence of gold nanoparticles are assumed to be the primary mechanisms responsible for gold loading into a CNT cartridge. PMID:26973081

  3. Carbon tetrachloride replacement compounds for organic vapor air-purifying respirator cartridge and activated carbon testing--a review.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Smith, S J; Wood, G O

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews efforts by researchers and organizations around the world to identify chemicals as substitutes for carbon tetrachloride in measuring activated carbon activity (adsorption capacity) or organic vapor air-purifying respirator cartridge (or other packed carbon bed) breakthrough times. Such measurements usually are done to determine if a minimum performance standard is met. Different criteria have been established, supporting data developed and used, and conclusions reached. This article presents relevant published, unpublished, obscure, and recalculated data which the reader can use to make a choice of replacement chemical and testing conditions. No recommendations for a specific replacement chemical are endorsed or promoted in this review. PMID:11549144

  4. Photosensitive cartridge for weapons zeroing and marksmanship training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, F. N.; Schjelderup, J. R.

    1985-05-01

    The invention provides a light sensitive dummy cartridge for insertion into the chamber of a magazine-type weapon. A muzzle collimator is inserted into the barrel in alignment with the cartridge photosensor and the longitudinal axis of the bore. The power supply, audible scoring apparatus, and electrical circuit for the photosensor, moreover, are mounted in a dummy magazine. This combination provides an easy-to-install apparatus for temporarily converting a conventional firearm into a photoresponsive training device. This is a patent application.

  5. Study on the irreversible thermodynamics of a marine engine exhaust-powered adsorption refrigerating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yingchun; Mei, Ning; Xu, Zhen

    2006-04-01

    This study investigates the heat and mass transfer mechanism of a marine engine exhaust-powered adsorption refrigerating system by using irreversible thermodynamics. The equations of entropy-production rate and the linear phenomenological equations of thermodynamic flux and force are established. The conventional experimental facilities of unit tube are developed and the phenomenological coefficients are obtained by fitting the experimental data. It is concluded that the thermodynamic process in the adsorbent bed is determined by the coupling effect of the heat and mass transfer; furthermore, the mass transfer is determined by the heat transfer. Taking some measures to increase heat transfer can improve the performance of the adsorption refrigerating system. The conclusions presented in this paper may be of value to the engineering applications of the system.

  6. The first optic ganglion of the bee. II. Topographical relationships of the monopolar cells within and between cartridges.

    PubMed

    Ribi, W A

    1976-08-26

    The arrangement of first and second order neurons in an optic cartridge and the topographical relationships of the second order neurons within a cartridge and to groups of surrounding cartridges have been analyzed in the visual system of the bee, Apis mellifera, from light and electron microscope studies on Golgi preparations. At the level of the monopolar cell body layer, the nine retinula cell fibres of each ommatidium, the six short visual fibres arranged in a circle surrounding the three long visual fibres, become cartridges as a consequence of the appearance of the second order neurons (L-fibres) which join the R-fibre bundles. Two of the four different L-fibre types, L-1 and L-2, remain together in the centre of the cartridge throughout the lamina. The axons of the L-3 and L-4 fibres, however, have their position integrated into the circle formed by the endings of the short visual fibres. On the basis of further examination of light and especially electron microscopical Golgi material, the different L-fibres can be classified into four types which appear in each cartridge. The clear stratification in the first synaptic region (A, B and C) seems to be the best criterion for a morphological classification since such a classification necessarily also includes a functional basis. According to a naming system based on the position of the lateral processes, L-fibres with side branches in strata A, B and C are called L-1 fibres. Fibres with lateral processes in strata A and B are L-2 fibres; monopolar cell fibres with branches only in the second stratum B are L-fibres of type 3; and all monopolar cells with branches only in stratum C are called L-4 fibres. In addition to the branching pattern covering only the parent cartridge, two of the four fibre types (L-2 and L-4) have long collaterals reaching neighbouring cartridges: L-2 in stratum A and L-4 in straum C. These collaterals presumably form a substrate for lateral interactions.

  7. Adsorption of doxorubicin on citrate-capped gold nanoparticles: insights into engineering potent chemotherapeutic delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Dennis; Cameron, Amanda; MacDonald, Bruce; Nganou, Collins; Scheller, Hope; Marsh, James; Beale, Stefanie; Lu, Mingsheng; Shan, Zhi; Kaliaperumal, Rajendran; Xu, Heping; Servos, Mark; Bennett, Craig; Macquarrie, Stephanie; Oakes, Ken D.; Mkandawire, Martin; Zhang, Xu

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanomaterials have received great interest for their use in cancer theranostic applications over the past two decades. Many gold nanoparticle-based drug delivery system designs rely on adsorbed ligands such as DNA or cleavable linkers to load therapeutic cargo. The heightened research interest was recently demonstrated in the simple design of nanoparticle-drug conjugates wherein drug molecules are directly adsorbed onto the as-synthesized nanoparticle surface. The potent chemotherapeutic, doxorubicin often serves as a model drug for gold nanoparticle-based delivery platforms; however, the specific interaction facilitating adsorption in this system remains understudied. Here, for the first time, we propose empirical and theoretical evidence suggestive of the main adsorption process where (1) hydrophobic forces drive doxorubicin towards the gold nanoparticle surface before (2) cation-π interactions and gold-carbonyl coordination between the drug molecule and the cations on AuNP surface facilitate DOX adsorption. In addition, biologically relevant compounds, such as serum albumin and glutathione, were shown to enhance desorption of loaded drug molecules from AuNP at physiologically relevant concentrations, providing insight into the drug release and in vivo stability of such drug conjugates.Gold nanomaterials have received great interest for their use in cancer theranostic applications over the past two decades. Many gold nanoparticle-based drug delivery system designs rely on adsorbed ligands such as DNA or cleavable linkers to load therapeutic cargo. The heightened research interest was recently demonstrated in the simple design of nanoparticle-drug conjugates wherein drug molecules are directly adsorbed onto the as-synthesized nanoparticle surface. The potent chemotherapeutic, doxorubicin often serves as a model drug for gold nanoparticle-based delivery platforms; however, the specific interaction facilitating adsorption in this system remains understudied

  8. Adsorption and bioaccessibility of phenanthrene on carbon nanotubes in the in vitro gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Qing; Zheng, Hao; Du, Peng; Tao, Shu; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-10-01

    Adsorption and bioaccessibility of phenanthrene on graphite and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated in simulated gastrointestinal fluid using a passive dosing system. The saturated adsorption capacity of phenanthrene on different adsorbents follows an order of hydroxylated CNTs (H-CNTs)>carboxylated CNTs (C-CNTs)>graphitized CNTs (G-CNTs)>graphite, consistent with the order of their surface area and micropore volume. The change of phenanthrene adsorption on the adsorbents is different with the presence of pepsin (800mg/L) and bile salts (500mg/L and 5000mg/L, abbreviated as BS500 and BS5000). Both solubilization of phenanthrene by pepsin and bile salts and their competition with phenanthrene for the adsorption sites play a role. In addition, the large increase of the maximum adsorption capacity in BS5000 solution indicates an enhanced dispersion of CNTs or an exfoliation of graphite by bile salts, which consequently increases the exposed surface area. The bioaccessibility increases in pepsin and BS500 solution with a growing free phenanthrene concentration. Although the bioaccessibility of phenanthrene stalls or slightly decreases in the middle range of free phenanthrene concentration in BS5000 solution, the bioaccessibility overall is much higher than that in pepsin and BS500 solution at the same phenanthrene level. It is impossible to separate the effect of competition from dispersion (or exfoliation) at this stage, but the relative contribution of solubilization to phenanthrene desorption in pepsin and BS500 solutions was quantified, which improves our understanding of the mechanisms on bioaccessibility of adsorbed pollutants on CNTs. PMID:27213670

  9. Index to 8mm Motion Cartridges. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Southern California, Los Angeles. National Information Center for Educational Media.

    Research at the National Information Center for Educational Media (NICEM) has shown that the 8mm motion cartridge with optical and magnetic sound seems to meet the basic tenets of a prime educational criterion for an educational medium--that it be available to the learner at his convenience. This is a bibliographical source for 8mm motion…

  10. From SCORM to Common Cartridge: A Step Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Barbone, Victor; Anido-Rifon, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Shareable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM) was proposed as a standard for sharable learning object packaging, delivering and sequencing. Several years later, Common Cartridge (CC) is proposed as an enhancement of SCORM offering more flexibility and addressing needs not originally envisioned, namely assessment and web 2.0 standards, content…

  11. Biodegradation of persistent organics can overcome adsorption-desorption hysteresis in biological activated carbon systems.

    PubMed

    Abromaitis, V; Racys, V; van der Marel, P; Meulepas, R J W

    2016-04-01

    In Biological Activated Carbon (BAC) systems, persistent organic pollutants can be removed through a combination of adsorption, desorption and biodegradation. These processes might be affected by the presence of other organics, especially by the more abundant easily-biodegradable organics, like acetate. In this research these relations are quantified for the removal of the persistent pharmaceutical metoprolol. Acetate did not affect the adsorption and desorption of metoprolol, but it did greatly enhance the metoprolol biodegradation. At least part of the BAC biomass growing on acetate was also able to metabolise metoprolol, although metoprolol was only converted after the acetate was depleted. The presence of easily-degradable organics like acetate in the feeding water is therefore beneficial for the removal of metoprolol in BAC systems. The isotherms obtained from metoprolol adsorption and desorption experiments showed that BAC systems are subject to hysteresis; for AC bioregeneration to take place the microbial biomass has to reduce the concentration at the AC-biomass interface 2.7 times compared to the concentration at which the carbon was being loaded. However, given the threshold concentration of the MET degrading microorganisms (<0.08 μg/L) versus the average influent concentration (1.3 μg/L), bioregeneration is feasible.

  12. Adsorption of high salinity surfactant systems and sacrificial agents for EOR on model adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Volz, H.V.

    1988-05-01

    In chemical flooding processes for enhanced oil recovery, chemical adsorption is a major factor which may limit the applicability of these processes. Under typical high salinity conditions of West German oil reservoirs (100 to 200 kg/m/sup 3/ of total dissolved solids) adsorption experiments with single and multi-component surfactant systems and with and without the use of sacrificial agents on model adsorbents were carried out, adsorbents being calcium benetonite, illite, kaolinite, dickite, prochlorite, and quartz. It can be shown that polyethylene glycols of appropriate molecular weight, which were used as sacrificial agents, adsorb specifically on calcium bentonite or quartz, whereas on kaolnite they form an adsorbing complex together with the surfactant. Based on experimental results specific coverages of sacrificial agents and surfactants are calculated.

  13. Removal of humic and tannic acids by adsorption-coagulation combined systems with activated biochar.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chanil; Phal, Narong; Oh, Jeill; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Jang, Min; Yoon, Yeomin

    2015-12-30

    Despite recent interest in transforming biomass into bio-oil and syngas, there is inadequate information on the compatibility of byproducts (e.g., biochar) with agriculture and water purification infrastructures. A pyrolysis at 300°C yields efficient production of biochar, and its physicochemical properties can be improved by chemical activation, resulting in a suitable adsorbent for the removal of natural organic matter (NOM), including hydrophobic and hydrophilic substances, such as humic acids (HA) and tannic acids (TA), respectively. In this study, the adsorption affinities of different HA and TA combinations in NOM solutions were evaluated, and higher adsorption affinity of TA onto activated biochar (AB) produced in the laboratory was observed due to its superior chemisorption tendencies and size-exclusion effects compared with that of HA, whereas hydrophobic interactions between adsorbent and adsorbate were deficient. Assessment of the AB role in an adsorption-coagulation hybrid system as nuclei for coagulation in the presence of aluminum sulfate (alum) showed a synergistic effect in a HA-dominated NOM solution. An AB-alum hybrid system with a high proportion of HA in the NOM solution may be applicable as an end-of-pipe solution.

  14. Removal of humic and tannic acids by adsorption-coagulation combined systems with activated biochar.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chanil; Phal, Narong; Oh, Jeill; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Jang, Min; Yoon, Yeomin

    2015-12-30

    Despite recent interest in transforming biomass into bio-oil and syngas, there is inadequate information on the compatibility of byproducts (e.g., biochar) with agriculture and water purification infrastructures. A pyrolysis at 300°C yields efficient production of biochar, and its physicochemical properties can be improved by chemical activation, resulting in a suitable adsorbent for the removal of natural organic matter (NOM), including hydrophobic and hydrophilic substances, such as humic acids (HA) and tannic acids (TA), respectively. In this study, the adsorption affinities of different HA and TA combinations in NOM solutions were evaluated, and higher adsorption affinity of TA onto activated biochar (AB) produced in the laboratory was observed due to its superior chemisorption tendencies and size-exclusion effects compared with that of HA, whereas hydrophobic interactions between adsorbent and adsorbate were deficient. Assessment of the AB role in an adsorption-coagulation hybrid system as nuclei for coagulation in the presence of aluminum sulfate (alum) showed a synergistic effect in a HA-dominated NOM solution. An AB-alum hybrid system with a high proportion of HA in the NOM solution may be applicable as an end-of-pipe solution. PMID:26340547

  15. Adsorption calorimetry and enhanced oil recovery: Three component systems, topical report. [Decyltrimethylammonium bromide/water/sodium bromide methanol/toluene/n-heptane

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, L.A.

    1988-03-01

    One objective of this project is to determine the adsorptive losses of EOR chemicals on minerals in a systematic manner and expand adsorption models for incorporation as an adsorption module into chemical flooding simulators. The Woodbury-Noll adsorption model was developed which fits both amount and heat of adsorption simultaneously. Two ternary systems were selected with a view to extending the Woodbury-Noll adsorption model to these systems. In the first of these systems, DTAB/NaBr/H20/silica, competitive effects are not present. In the second system, methanol/toluene/heptane/silica, competitive adsoprtion is present. Flow adsorption calorimetry was carried out on these ternary systems and on their respective binaries. Adsorption calorimetry of DTAB from solutions with added electrolyte showed that the heat and the amount of adsorption increased when the salt content was raised to 3 percent, being approximately constant thereafter. However, the increase in salinity above this amount moved the plateau region to lower surfactant concentrations. Adsorption of DTAB at 45)degree)C resulted in lower adsorption than at 25)degree)C, but the heat release was only slightly lower. The heat and amount of adsorption of methanol from heptane onto silica are both markedly reduced by the presence of toluene in the solution. Densities of the surfactant solutions and of the binaries of methanol/toluene/heptane system are reported. 6 refs., 20 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. Refilling of carbon nanotube cartridges for 3D nanomanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekarevich, Raman; Toyoda, Masami; Baba, Shuichi; Nakata, Toshihiko; Hirahara, Kaori

    2016-03-01

    Metal-filled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known to be used as pen-tip injectors for 3D manufacturing on the nanoscale. However, the CNT interior cannot accumulate enough material to fabricate complex metallic nanostructures. Therefore a method for refilling the CNT cartridge needs to be developed. The strategy for refilling of CNT cartridges is suggested in this study. Controlled growth of gold nanowires in the interior of isolated CNTs using a real-time manipulator installed in a transmission electron microscope is reported herein. The encapsulation process of discrete gold nanoparticles in the hollow spaces of open-ended multi-wall CNTs was evaluated in detail. The experimental results reveal that the serial loading of isolated gold nanoparticles allows the control of the length of the loaded nanowires with nanometer accuracy. Thermophoresis and the coalescence of gold nanoparticles are assumed to be the primary mechanisms responsible for gold loading into a CNT cartridge.Metal-filled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known to be used as pen-tip injectors for 3D manufacturing on the nanoscale. However, the CNT interior cannot accumulate enough material to fabricate complex metallic nanostructures. Therefore a method for refilling the CNT cartridge needs to be developed. The strategy for refilling of CNT cartridges is suggested in this study. Controlled growth of gold nanowires in the interior of isolated CNTs using a real-time manipulator installed in a transmission electron microscope is reported herein. The encapsulation process of discrete gold nanoparticles in the hollow spaces of open-ended multi-wall CNTs was evaluated in detail. The experimental results reveal that the serial loading of isolated gold nanoparticles allows the control of the length of the loaded nanowires with nanometer accuracy. Thermophoresis and the coalescence of gold nanoparticles are assumed to be the primary mechanisms responsible for gold loading into a CNT cartridge. Electronic

  17. Evaluation of an adsorption system to concentrate VOC in air streams prior to catalytic incineration.

    PubMed

    Campesi, María A; Luzi, Carlos D; Barreto, Guillermo F; Martínez, Osvaldo M

    2015-05-01

    Catalytic combustion is a well-developed process for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to reduce both the amount of catalyst needed for incineration and the surface area of recuperative heat exchangers, an evaluation of the use of thermal swing adsorption as a previous step for VOC concentration is made. An air stream containing ethyl acetate and ethanol (employed as solvents in printing processes) has been taken as a case study. Based on the characteristics of the adsorption/desorption system and the properties of the stream to be treated, a monolithic rotor concentrator with activated carbon as adsorbent material is adopted. Once the temperature of the inlet desorption stream TD is chosen, the minimum possible desorption flow rate, WD,min, and the amount of adsorbent material can be properly defined according to the extent of the Mass Transfer Zone (MTZ) at the end of the adsorption stage. An approximate procedure to speed up the calculations needed for sizing the bed and predicting the operating variables is also presented. In the case studied here, the concentration of the VOC stream can reach 6 times that of the primary effluent when TD = 200 °C is chosen.

  18. Experimental study on activated carbon-nitrogen pair in a prototype pressure swing adsorption refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupam, Kumar; Palodkar, Avinash V.; Halder, G. N.

    2016-04-01

    Pressure swing adsorption of nitrogen onto granular activated carbon in the single-bed adsorber-desorber chamber has been studied at six different pressures 6-18 kgf/cm2 to evaluate their performance as an alternative refrigeration technique. Refrigerating effect showed a linear rise with an increase in the operating pressure. However, the heat of adsorption and COP exhibited initial rise with the increasing operating pressure but decreased later after reaching a maximum value. The COP initially increases with operating pressures however, with the further rise of operating pressure it steadily decreased. The highest average refrigeration, maximum heat of adsorption and optimum coefficient of performance was evaluated to be 415.38 W at 18 kgf/cm2, 92756.35 J at 15 kgf/cm2 and 1.32 at 12 kgf/cm2, respectively. The system successfully produced chilled water at 1.7 °C from ambient water at 28.2 °C.

  19. Evaluation of an adsorption system to concentrate VOC in air streams prior to catalytic incineration.

    PubMed

    Campesi, María A; Luzi, Carlos D; Barreto, Guillermo F; Martínez, Osvaldo M

    2015-05-01

    Catalytic combustion is a well-developed process for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to reduce both the amount of catalyst needed for incineration and the surface area of recuperative heat exchangers, an evaluation of the use of thermal swing adsorption as a previous step for VOC concentration is made. An air stream containing ethyl acetate and ethanol (employed as solvents in printing processes) has been taken as a case study. Based on the characteristics of the adsorption/desorption system and the properties of the stream to be treated, a monolithic rotor concentrator with activated carbon as adsorbent material is adopted. Once the temperature of the inlet desorption stream TD is chosen, the minimum possible desorption flow rate, WD,min, and the amount of adsorbent material can be properly defined according to the extent of the Mass Transfer Zone (MTZ) at the end of the adsorption stage. An approximate procedure to speed up the calculations needed for sizing the bed and predicting the operating variables is also presented. In the case studied here, the concentration of the VOC stream can reach 6 times that of the primary effluent when TD = 200 °C is chosen. PMID:25734958

  20. Analysis of the adsorption process and of desiccant cooling systems: a pseudo- steady-state model for coupled heat and mass transfer. [DESSIM, DESSIM2, DESSIM4

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.S.

    1982-12-01

    A computer model to simulate the adiabatic adsorption/desorption process is documented. Developed to predict the performance of desiccant cooling systems, the model has been validated through comparison with experimental data for single-blow adsorption and desorption. A literature review on adsorption analysis, detailed discussions of the adsorption process, and an initial assessment of the potential for performance improvement through advanced component development are included.

  1. Performance of an electrothermal swing adsorption system with postdesorption liquefaction for organic gas capture and recovery.

    PubMed

    Mallouk, Kaitlin E; Rood, Mark J

    2013-07-01

    The use of adsorption on activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) followed by electrothermal swing adsorption (ESA) and postdesorption pressure and temperature control allows organic gases with boiling points below 0 °C to be captured from air streams and recovered as liquids. This technology has the potential to be a more sustainable abatement technique when compared to thermal oxidation. In this paper, we determine the process performance and energy requirements of a gas recovery system (GRS) using ACFC-ESA for three adsorbates with relative pressures between 8.3 × 10(-5) and 3.4 × 10(-3) and boiling points as low as -26.3 °C. The GRS is able to capture > 99% of the organic gas from the feed air stream, which is comparable to destruction efficiencies for thermal oxidizers. The energy used per liquid mole recovered ranges from 920 to 52,000 kJ/mol and is a function of relative pressure of the adsorbate in the feed gas. Quantifying the performance of the bench-scale gas recovery system in terms of its ability to remove organic gases from the adsorption stream and the energy required to liquefy the recovered organic gases is a critical step in developing new technologies to allow manufacturing to occur in a more sustainable manner. To our knowledge, this is the first time an ACFC-ESA system has been used to capture, recover, and liquefy organic compounds with vapor pressures as low as 8.3 × 10(-5) and the first time such a system has been analyzed for process performance and energy consumption. PMID:23789711

  2. Performance of an electrothermal swing adsorption system with postdesorption liquefaction for organic gas capture and recovery.

    PubMed

    Mallouk, Kaitlin E; Rood, Mark J

    2013-07-01

    The use of adsorption on activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) followed by electrothermal swing adsorption (ESA) and postdesorption pressure and temperature control allows organic gases with boiling points below 0 °C to be captured from air streams and recovered as liquids. This technology has the potential to be a more sustainable abatement technique when compared to thermal oxidation. In this paper, we determine the process performance and energy requirements of a gas recovery system (GRS) using ACFC-ESA for three adsorbates with relative pressures between 8.3 × 10(-5) and 3.4 × 10(-3) and boiling points as low as -26.3 °C. The GRS is able to capture > 99% of the organic gas from the feed air stream, which is comparable to destruction efficiencies for thermal oxidizers. The energy used per liquid mole recovered ranges from 920 to 52,000 kJ/mol and is a function of relative pressure of the adsorbate in the feed gas. Quantifying the performance of the bench-scale gas recovery system in terms of its ability to remove organic gases from the adsorption stream and the energy required to liquefy the recovered organic gases is a critical step in developing new technologies to allow manufacturing to occur in a more sustainable manner. To our knowledge, this is the first time an ACFC-ESA system has been used to capture, recover, and liquefy organic compounds with vapor pressures as low as 8.3 × 10(-5) and the first time such a system has been analyzed for process performance and energy consumption.

  3. A Case Study of a Low Power Vapour Adsorption Refrigeration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinesh, Banala; Sai Manikanta, M.; Dishal Kumar, T.; Sahu, Debjyoti

    2016-09-01

    Industrial refrigeration is one of the most energy consuming sector. In conventional Vapor Compression refrigeration system, compressor is the major power consuming element. Vapor Adsorption refrigeration system is one of the best replacement for the Vapor Compression refrigeration system. Our main objective is to analyze, design and develop a Vapor Adsorption refrigeration system which is cost effective and environmental friendly. A prototype model that is capable of producing a temperature drop in closed evaporator chamber was designed, fabricated and tested. Activated carbon/Methanol pair is chosen as Adsorbent/Refrigerant pair. The system is analyzed in ANSYS 14.5 using the inlet conditions obtained from the experimental setup. The performances and effectiveness of the unit was studied by determining Refrigeration Effect (RE), Coefficient of Performance (COP) and explaining operational issues of the unit. The results obtained from the analysis and experiments have marginal difference in COP i.e. with an error percentage of 5.94%. The overall COP obtained is 0.34 through experiments and from analysis the COP obtained is approximately 0.32.

  4. Rapid determination of color additives, using the C18 cartridge.

    PubMed

    Young, M L

    1984-01-01

    A reliable method has been developed for the rapid separation and identification of the 7 permitted FD&C dyes (Red Nos. 3 and 40; Blue Nos. 1 and 2; Yellow Nos. 5 and 6; Green No. 3) and the recently banned FD&C Red No. 2 in foods. The colors are separated by using the C18 cartridge, and their identity is confirmed by spectrophotometry.

  5. Next Generation LOCAD-PTS Cartridge Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, H.; Nutter, D.; Weite, E.; Wells, M.; Maule, J.; Damon, M.; Monaco, L.; Steele, A.; Wainwright, N.

    2008-01-01

    Future astrobiology exploration missions will require rapid, point-of-use techniques for surface science experiments and contamination monitoring. The Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development (LOCAD) team is developing operational instruments that advance spaceflight technologies to molecular-based methods. Currently, LOCAD-Portable Test System (PTS) is quantifying levels of the bacterial molecule endotoxin onboard the Internatioal Space Station. Future research and development will focus on more sensitive molecular techniques that expand the number of compounds detected to include beta-glucan from fungal cell walls.

  6. [Some issues concerning the use of firearms with Flobert cartridges].

    PubMed

    Vaitkevicius, Eduardas; Kurapka, Egidijus; Malewski, Hendryk

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the work is to analyze and evaluate legal, criminalistic and criminological problematic issues appearing in Lithuania due to circulation of firearms designed for the Flobert cartridge. The purpose of guns with the Flobert cartridge is shooting training in closed areas. Provided the kinetic energy of Flobert cartridge is not bigger that 7.5 J. the guns meant for those bullets have been classified to unlimited circulation of guns since 1999 in Lithuania. Now these firearms can be purchased by anyone over 18. Due to this reason the demand for these firearms has increased. The sale of these firearms amounts to several thousands (the population of Lithuania is more than 3.5 million). The analyses of the authors show that these firearms are not used in accordance with their purpose. Experimental practice and experimental research proved that these firearms can cause serious bodily injuries. The latter fact allowed the authors to formulate propositions regarding legal regulation of circulation of these firearms. PMID:14971299

  7. Simulation of hydrogen adsorption systems adopting the flow through cooling concept

    SciTech Connect

    Corgnale, Claudio; Hardy, Bruce; Chahine, Richard; Cossement, Daniel; Tamburello, David; Anton, Donald

    2014-10-13

    Hydrogen storage systems based on adsorbent materials have the potential of achieving the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) targets, especially in terms of gravimetric capacity. This paper deals with analysis of adsorption storage systems adopting the flow through cooling concept. By this approach the feeding hydrogen provides the needed cold to maintain the tank at low temperatures. Two adsorption systems have been examined and modeled adopting the Dubinin-Astakhov model, to see their performance under selected operating conditions. A first case has been analyzed, modeling a storage tank filled with carbon based material (namely MaxSorb®) and comparing the numerical outcomes with the available experimental results for a 2.5 L tank. Under selected operating conditions (minimum inlet hydrogen temperature of approximately 100 K and maximum pressure on the order of 8.5 MPa) and adopting the flow through cooling concept the material shows a gravimetric capacity of about 5.7 %. A second case has been modeled, examining the same tank filled with metal organic framework material (MOF5®) under approximately the same conditions. The model shows that the latter material can achieve a (material) gravimetric capacity on the order of 11%, making the system potentially able to achieve the DOE 2017 target.

  8. Simulation of hydrogen adsorption systems adopting the flow through cooling concept

    DOE PAGES

    Corgnale, Claudio; Hardy, Bruce; Chahine, Richard; Cossement, Daniel; Tamburello, David; Anton, Donald

    2014-10-13

    Hydrogen storage systems based on adsorbent materials have the potential of achieving the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) targets, especially in terms of gravimetric capacity. This paper deals with analysis of adsorption storage systems adopting the flow through cooling concept. By this approach the feeding hydrogen provides the needed cold to maintain the tank at low temperatures. Two adsorption systems have been examined and modeled adopting the Dubinin-Astakhov model, to see their performance under selected operating conditions. A first case has been analyzed, modeling a storage tank filled with carbon based material (namely MaxSorb®) and comparing the numerical outcomes withmore » the available experimental results for a 2.5 L tank. Under selected operating conditions (minimum inlet hydrogen temperature of approximately 100 K and maximum pressure on the order of 8.5 MPa) and adopting the flow through cooling concept the material shows a gravimetric capacity of about 5.7 %. A second case has been modeled, examining the same tank filled with metal organic framework material (MOF5®) under approximately the same conditions. The model shows that the latter material can achieve a (material) gravimetric capacity on the order of 11%, making the system potentially able to achieve the DOE 2017 target.« less

  9. Three-component competitive adsorption model for flow-through PAC systems. 2. Model application to a PAC/membrane system.

    PubMed

    Li, Qilin; Mariñas, Benito J; Snoeyink, Vernon L; Campos, Carlos

    2003-07-01

    A three-component competitive adsorption kinetic model, developed and validated in part 1 of this study, was applied to a continuous-flow PAC/membrane system to study the effects of various system and operating parameters on organic removal. The model quantitatively describes the two competitive adsorption mechanisms that occur during adsorption of trace organic compounds by powdered activated carbon (PAC) in flow-through systems where the PAC is retained in the system: pore blockage and direct competition for adsorption sites. Model simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of influent water composition, membrane cleaning water quality, PAC pore size distribution, and system operation conditions such as hydraulic retention time, membrane cleaning interval, and PAC dosing method on treatment efficiency. Effects of these factors on adsorption capacity as well as surface diffusion rate and consequent removal of the trace organic compound were discussed. It was found that optimal operating conditions for maximum trace organic compound removal must be determined on the basis of the adsorption properties and concentrations of the competing compounds in the influent. For the conditions investigated in this study, the small strongly competing compound, p-DCB, had greater impact on atrazine removal than the large pore-blocking compound, PSS-1.8k. Various process design and operating parameters had complex and interrelated effects on the impact of competitive adsorption and corresponding trace contaminant removal efficiency in hybrid PAC/membrane systems. PMID:12875407

  10. Development of STR profiles from firearms and fired cartridge cases.

    PubMed

    Horsman-Hall, Katie M; Orihuela, Yvette; Karczynski, Stephanie L; Davis, Ann L; Ban, Jeffrey D; Greenspoon, Susan A

    2009-09-01

    Fired cartridge cases are a common type of evidence found at crime scenes. However, due to the high chamber temperatures and touch nature of this evidence, DNA testing is not commonly sought because it is believed DNA is only present in low levels, whether it is due to initial low levels of DNA and/or DNA degradation from the heat or inhibition of the PCR reaction. Moreover, very few laboratories report STR typing success with fired cases. This study focused on obtaining STR profiles from fired cartridge cases using the AmpFlSTR MiniFiler kit, which is designed to amplify DNA from low level, inhibited, and degraded samples. Comparisons to other STR amplification kits were also conducted. In attempt to simulate casework, random individuals loaded cartridges into a firearm. DNA was recovered from the fired cartridge cases using the double swab technique and extracted using an automated large volume DNA IQ method. Initially, testing focused on known shedders handling cartridges for 30s prior to firing. A significantly greater number of alleles was obtained following amplification with the MiniFiler kit versus the PowerPlex 16 BIO kit. No alleles were observed using the Identifiler kit. In an attempt to better simulate casework, a random selection of laboratory personnel handled shotshells for as long as needed to load and fire the weapon. In this mock sample study, the MiniFiler kit successfully amplified an average of 22% of expected alleles from DNA recovered from shotshell cases versus the PowerPlex 16 BIO kit where an average of 7% of alleles were observed. However, the total number of alleles obtained from the two kits was not significantly different. The quality of the DNA obtained from fired cases was studied with evidence of inhibition in at least 11% of shotshell case samples. After swabbing the head and the hull of three shotshell cases separately, a significantly greater number of alleles was obtained from the hull as opposed to the head of the fired

  11. Construction of a high efficiency copper adsorption bacterial system via peptide display and its application on copper dye polluted wastewater.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, Murali Kannan; Nadarajan, Saravanan Prabhu; Ganesh, Irisappan; Ravikumar, Sambandam; Yun, Hyungdon; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Hong, Soon Ho

    2015-11-01

    For the construction of an efficient copper waste treatment system, a cell surface display strategy was employed. The copper adsorption ability of recombinant bacterial strains displaying three different copper binding peptides were evaluated in LB Luria-Bertani medium (LB), artificial wastewater, and copper phthalocyanine containing textile dye industry wastewater samples. Structural characteristics of the three peptides were also analyzed by similarity-based structure modeling. The best binding peptide was chosen for the construction of a dimeric peptide display and the adsorption ability of the monomeric and dimeric peptide displayed strains were compared. The dimeric peptide displayed strain showed superior copper adsorption in all three tested conditions (LB, artificial wastewater, and textile dye industry wastewater). When the strains were exposed to copper phthalocyanine dye polluted wastewater, the dimeric peptide display [543.27 µmol/g DCW dry cell weight (DCW)] showed higher adsorption of copper when compared with the monomeric strains (243.53 µmol/g DCW).

  12. Preparation and use of maize tassels' activated carbon for the adsorption of phenolic compounds in environmental waste water samples.

    PubMed

    Olorundare, O F; Msagati, T A M; Krause, R W M; Okonkwo, J O; Mamba, B B

    2015-04-01

    The determination and remediation of three phenolic compounds bisphenol A (BPA), ortho-nitrophenol (o-NTP), parachlorophenol (PCP) in wastewater is reported. The analysis of these molecules in wastewater was done using gas chromatography (GC) × GC time-of-flight mass spectrometry while activated carbon derived from maize tassel was used as an adsorbent. During the experimental procedures, the effect of various parameters such as initial concentration, pH of sample solution, eluent volume, and sample volume on the removal efficiency with respect to the three phenolic compounds was studied. The results showed that maize tassel produced activated carbon (MTAC) cartridge packed solid-phase extraction (SPE) system was able to remove the phenolic compounds effectively (90.84-98.49%, 80.75-97.11%, and 78.27-97.08% for BPA, o-NTP, and PCP, respectively). The MTAC cartridge packed SPE sorbent performance was compared to commercially produced C18 SPE cartridges and found to be comparable. All the parameters investigated were found to have a notable influence on the adsorption efficiency of the phenolic compounds from wastewaters at different magnitudes.

  13. Analytical study of a gas-fired adsorptive air-conditioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Poyelle, F.; Guilleminot, J.J.; Meunier, F.

    1996-11-01

    Adsorptive air conditioning represents a potential alternative to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) systems. But to compete with other systems, adsorption systems must exhibit sufficient figures of merit and energetic densities. An analytical study to predict the overall heat transfer coefficient in an adsorber has been conducted and is presented here. This study, based on a method-of-moment analysis, shows the influence of three parameters limiting the heat transfer in adsorbent beds. Heat transfer in adsorbent beds has been intensified. Using new consolidated materials, the machine utilizes two uniform temperature adsorbent beds in a cycle that incorporates both heat and mass recovery. It uses a zeolite-water pair. It is designed to produce 3 kW of cooling. Expected cooling performances are 300 W/kg of adsorbent with a coefficient of performance (COP) close to 0.8 and a cycle time of 20 minutes. The thermal conditions used to test the cycle are: the heater, 220 C; the cooler, 40 C; and the evaporation temperature, 3 C.

  14. Testing, Modeling and System Impact of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacomini, Christine S.; Powers, Aaron; Lewis, Matthew; Linrud, Christopher; Waguespack, Glenn; Conger, Bruce; Paul, Heather L.

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated temperature swing adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for removal and rejection of carbon dioxide (CO2) and heat from a portable life support system (PLSS) to the Martian environment. Previously, hardware was built and tested to demonstrate using heat from simulated, dry ventilation loop gas to affect the temperature swing required to regenerate an adsorbent used for CO2 removal. New testing has been performed using a moist, simulated ventilation loop gas to demonstrate the effects of water condensing and freezing in the heat exchanger during adsorbent regeneration. In addition, thermal models of the adsorbent during regeneration were modified and calibrated with test data to capture the effect of the CO2 heat of desorption. Finally, MTSA impact on PLSS design was evaluated by performing thermal balances assuming a specific PLSS architecture. Results using NASA s Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT), a PLSS system evaluation tool, are presented.

  15. Performance study of unglazed cylindrical solar collector for adsorption refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh, A.; Kaushik, S. C.; Kumaraguru, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    In the present communication, the unglazed cylindrical solar adsorber module is suggested for refrigeration and theoretical models for the heat and mass transfer in the cylindrical adsorber with heat balance equations in the collector components have been developed. It has been found that, both the SCP and COPsolar raises with increasing the evaporation temperature and drop off with the increase of the condensation temperature. The COPsolar increased from 0.15 to 0.52 with the increase of the total solar energy absorbed by the collector while the COPcycle varied in the range of 0.57-0.73. The efficiency of unglazed solar collector varied from 36 to 44 %. The cost of current unglazed adsorption refrigeration system is compared with the glazed system, and it is 33 to 50 % less than the cost of glazed system.

  16. Construction and measurements of an improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, J.; Bunker, R.; Dunagan, C.; Loose, X.; Schnee, R. W.; Stark, M.; Sundarnath, K.; Tronstad, D.

    2015-08-01

    In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto detector surfaces, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. An improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system and cleanroom build upon a previous design implemented at Syracuse University that achieved radon levels of ˜0.2 Bq m-3. This improved system will employ a better pump and larger carbon beds feeding a redesigned cleanroom with an internal HVAC unit and aged water for humidification. With the rebuilt (original) radon mitigation system, the new low-radon cleanroom has already achieved a > 300× reduction from an input activity of 58.6 ± 0.7 Bq m-3 to a cleanroom activity of 0.13 ± 0.06 Bq m-3.

  17. Construction and measurements of an improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    SciTech Connect

    Street, J. Bunker, R.; Dunagan, C.; Loose, X.; Schnee, R. W.; Stark, M.; Sundarnath, K.; Tronstad, D.

    2015-08-17

    In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto detector surfaces, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. An improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system and cleanroom build upon a previous design implemented at Syracuse University that achieved radon levels of ∼0.2 Bq m{sup −3}. This improved system will employ a better pump and larger carbon beds feeding a redesigned cleanroom with an internal HVAC unit and aged water for humidification. With the rebuilt (original) radon mitigation system, the new low-radon cleanroom has already achieved a > 300× reduction from an input activity of 58.6 ± 0.7 Bq m{sup −3} to a cleanroom activity of 0.13 ± 0.06 Bq m{sup −3}.

  18. The molecular adsorption-type endotoxin detection system using immobilized ɛ-polylysine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Katsutoshi; Tsuji, Akihito; Nishishita, Naoki; Hirano, Yoshiaki

    2007-12-01

    mass incrementation is occurred, and the existence of endtoxin can be detected immediately, by using of Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM). In this report, the immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the Au and Si substrate and its adsorptive activity are described. We use X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the ɛ-polylysine immobilization, and the adsorptive activity of immobilized ɛ-polylysine is measured by AFM and QCM. This molecular adsorption type endotoxin sensor aims to the realization of "real-time endotoxin detection system".

  19. Three-component competitive adsorption model for flow-through PAC systems. 1. Model development and verification with a PAC/membrane system.

    PubMed

    Li, Qilin; Mariñas, Benito J; Snoeyink, Vernon L; Campos, Carlos

    2003-07-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) interferes with the adsorption of trace organic compounds on porous adsorbents such as powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pore blockage and direct competition for adsorption sites. The competitive effect of NOM in flow-through systems in which the retention time of the PAC is greater than the hydraulic retention time of the system can be magnified because NOM from the influent water can continue to adsorb on the PAC retained in the system. As a result, the adsorption capacity and the diffusion coefficient of trace compounds can decrease as NOM from the influent water accumulates. In this study, a dynamic three-component adsorption model was developed to quantitatively describe the removal of a trace compound from water in flow-through PAC processes. The system was simplified by using p-dichlorobenzene (p-DCB) to represent the NOM fraction that competes directly with the target trace organic atrazine for adsorption sites and by using poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS-1.8k) to represent large, pore-blocking NOM. The model was based on the homogeneous surface diffusion assumption with the adsorption capacity of atrazine being gradually adjusted using a simplified version of the ideal adsorbed solution theory model developed in this study. The surface diffusion coefficients of atrazine and p-DCB were modeled as a function of the surface concentration of the pore-blocking compound, PSS-1.8k. The model was verified experimentally with a PAC/microfiltration (MF) system. The use of single-solute adsorption parameters obtained from batch isotherm and kinetic tests resulted in good model predictions for the adsorption of atrazine and the two model compounds under operating conditions typical of PAC/MF systems. The model will be applied to study various operating conditions and other system parameters of PAC/membrane systems in part 2 of this study. PMID:12875406

  20. Building a working understanding of protein adsorption with model systems and serendipity.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Here we will consider a working understanding of protein adsorption to be one that is adequate for practical use. Serendipity will be considered as a resource that can be used along with model systems in order to build such a working understanding. In particular, the term refers to a preparedness on the part of the researcher to make connections between a variety of everyday inputs from sources in and outside of the main concerns of the research, and a willingness to apply those connections toward the broader utility and impact of the work. In this paper we summarize the highlights and major conclusions of our work with proteins at interfaces - gained by use of comparatively very simple experimental systems while harnessing luck as effectively as we could along the way - and its relevance to meeting challenges in biopharma and biomedical technology. PMID:25200205

  1. Image matching algorithms for breech face marks and firing pins in a database of spent cartridge cases of firearms.

    PubMed

    Geradts, Z J; Bijhold, J; Hermsen, R; Murtagh, F

    2001-06-01

    On the market several systems exist for collecting spent ammunition data for forensic investigation. These databases store images of cartridge cases and the marks on them. Image matching is used to create hit lists that show which marks on a cartridge case are most similar to another cartridge case. The research in this paper is focused on the different methods of feature selection and pattern recognition that can be used for optimizing the results of image matching. The images are acquired by side light images for the breech face marks and by ring light for the firing pin impression. For these images a standard way of digitizing the images used. For the side light images and ring light images this means that the user has to position the cartridge case in the same position according to a protocol. The positioning is important for the sidelight, since the image that is obtained of a striation mark depends heavily on the angle of incidence of the light. In practice, it appears that the user positions the cartridge case with +/-10 degrees accuracy. We tested our algorithms using 49 cartridge cases of 19 different firearms, where the examiner determined that they were shot with the same firearm. For testing, these images were mixed with a database consisting of approximately 4900 images that were available from the Drugfire database of different calibers.In cases where the registration and the light conditions among those matching pairs was good, a simple computation of the standard deviation of the subtracted gray levels, delivered the best-matched images. For images that were rotated and shifted, we have implemented a "brute force" way of registration. The images are translated and rotated until the minimum of the standard deviation of the difference is found. This method did not result in all relevant matches in the top position. This is caused by the effect that shadows and highlights are compared in intensity. Since the angle of incidence of the light will give a

  2. Automotive hydrogen storage system using cryo-adsorption on activated carbon.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J. K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-07-01

    An integrated model of a sorbent-based cryogenic compressed hydrogen system is used to assess the prospect of meeting the near-term targets of 36 kg-H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric and 4.5 wt% gravimetric capacity for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The model includes the thermodynamics of H{sub 2} sorption, heat transfer during adsorption and desorption, sorption dynamics, energetics of cryogenic tank cooling, and containment of H{sub 2} in geodesically wound carbon fiber tanks. The results from the model show that recoverable hydrogen, rather than excess or absolute adsorption, is a determining measure of whether a sorbent is a good candidate material for on-board storage of H{sub 2}. A temperature swing is needed to recover >80% of the sorption capacity of the superactivated carbon sorbent at 100 K and 100 bar as the tank is depressurized to 3-8 bar. The storage pressure at which the system needs to operate in order to approach the system capacity targets has been determined and compared with the breakeven pressure above which the storage tank is more compact if H{sub 2} is stored only as a cryo-compressed gas. The amount of liquid N{sub 2} needed to cool the hydrogen dispensed to the vehicle to 100 K and to remove the heat of adsorption during refueling has been estimated. The electrical energy needed to produce the requisite liquid N{sub 2} by air liquefaction is compared with the electrical energy needed to liquefy the same amount of H{sub 2} at a central plant. The alternate option of adiabatically refueling the sorbent tank with liquid H{sub 2} has been evaluated to determine the relationship between the storage temperature and the sustainable temperature swing. Finally, simulations have been run to estimate the increase in specific surface area and bulk density of medium needed to satisfy the system capacity targets with H{sub 2} storage at 100 bar.

  3. Air monitoring of aromatic hydrocarbons during automobile spray painting for developing change schedule of respirator cartridges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of End of Service Life Indicator (ESLI), a cartridge change schedule should be established for ensuring that cartridges are changed before their end of service life. Factors effecting service life of cartridges were evaluated, including the amount of atmospheric contamination with aromatic hydrocarbon vapors in the workplace, temperature, and relative humidity of the air. A new change schedule was established based on comparing the results of air monitoring and workplace conditions, laboratory experiment, and the NIOSH MultiVapor software. Spray painters were being exposed to aromatic hydrocarbons in a range exceeding occupational exposure limits. The cartridge change schedule was not effective and could no longer provide adequate protection against organic contaminants for sprayers. Change schedules for respirator cartridges should be reduced from 16–24 hours to 4 hours. NIOSH’s service life software program could be applied to developing cartridge change schedules. PMID:24468234

  4. Solid cartridge for a pulse weld forming electrode and method of joining tubular members

    DOEpatents

    Bonnen, John Joseph Francis; Golovashchenko, Sergey Fedorovich; Mamutov, Alexander; Maison, Lloyd Douglas; Dawson, Scott Alwyn; deVries, James

    2016-02-23

    A cartridge assembly is disclosed for a pulse welding a first tube supported on a mandrel to a second tube. An outer tool is assembled over the second tube and a stored charge is discharged in the cartridge assembly. The cartridge comprises an annular conductor and a solid casing enveloping the conductor. The stored charge is electrically connected to the conductor and discharged through the conductor to compress the second tube and pulse weld the second tube to the first tube.

  5. Ling's Adsorption Theory as a Mechanism of Membrane Potential Generation Observed in Both Living and Nonliving Systems.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Funatani, Makoto; Ikeda, Kota

    2016-01-26

    The potential between two electrolytic solutions separated by a membrane impermeable to ions was measured and the generation mechanism of potential measured was investigated. From the physiological point of view, a nonzero membrane potential or action potential cannot be observed across the impermeable membrane. However, a nonzero membrane potential including action potential-like potential was clearly observed. Those observations gave rise to a doubt concerning the validity of currently accepted generation mechanism of membrane potential and action potential of cell. As an alternative theory, we found that the long-forgotten Ling's adsorption theory was the most plausible theory. Ling's adsorption theory suggests that the membrane potential and action potential of a living cell is due to the adsorption of mobile ions onto the adsorption site of cell, and this theory is applicable even to nonliving (or non-biological) system as well as living system. Through this paper, the authors emphasize that it is necessary to reconsider the validity of current membrane theory and also would like to urge the readers to pay keen attention to the Ling's adsorption theory which has for long years been forgotten in the history of physiology.

  6. Ling’s Adsorption Theory as a Mechanism of Membrane Potential Generation Observed in Both Living and Nonliving Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Funatani, Makoto; Ikeda, Kota

    2016-01-01

    The potential between two electrolytic solutions separated by a membrane impermeable to ions was measured and the generation mechanism of potential measured was investigated. From the physiological point of view, a nonzero membrane potential or action potential cannot be observed across the impermeable membrane. However, a nonzero membrane potential including action potential-like potential was clearly observed. Those observations gave rise to a doubt concerning the validity of currently accepted generation mechanism of membrane potential and action potential of cell. As an alternative theory, we found that the long-forgotten Ling’s adsorption theory was the most plausible theory. Ling’s adsorption theory suggests that the membrane potential and action potential of a living cell is due to the adsorption of mobile ions onto the adsorption site of cell, and this theory is applicable even to nonliving (or non-biological) system as well as living system. Through this paper, the authors emphasize that it is necessary to reconsider the validity of current membrane theory and also would like to urge the readers to pay keen attention to the Ling’s adsorption theory which has for long years been forgotten in the history of physiology. PMID:26821050

  7. Comparison of adsorption and photo-Fenton processes for phenol and paracetamol removing from aqueous solutions: single and binary systems.

    PubMed

    Rad, Leila Roshanfekr; Haririan, Ismaeil; Divsar, Faten

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, adsorption and photo-Fenton processes have been compared for the removal of phenol and paracetamol from aqueous solutions in a single and binary systems. NaX nanozeolites and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were used during adsorption and photo-Fenton processes, respectively. Both nanoparticles were synthesized using microwave heating method. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis. Based on results, more than 99% removing percentages of phenol and paracetamol were obtained during photo-Fenton process at initial concentrations of 10, 20, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of phenol and paracetamol. Moreover, the complete removing of phenol and paracetamol was only achieved at lower initial concentrations than 10 mg/L for phenol and paracetamol during adsorption process. The results showed a significant dependence of the phenol and paracetamol removing on the initial concentrations of phenol and paracetamol for selection of process. The photo-Fenton process could be considered an alternative method in higher initial concentrations of phenol and paracetamol. However, the adsorption process due to economical issue was preferred for phenol and paracetamol removing at lower initial concentrations. The kinetic data of photo-Fenton and adsorption processes were well described using first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The results of phenol and paracetamol removing in a binary system confirmed the obtained results of single removing of phenol and paracetamol in selection of process.

  8. Ling's Adsorption Theory as a Mechanism of Membrane Potential Generation Observed in Both Living and Nonliving Systems.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Funatani, Makoto; Ikeda, Kota

    2016-01-01

    The potential between two electrolytic solutions separated by a membrane impermeable to ions was measured and the generation mechanism of potential measured was investigated. From the physiological point of view, a nonzero membrane potential or action potential cannot be observed across the impermeable membrane. However, a nonzero membrane potential including action potential-like potential was clearly observed. Those observations gave rise to a doubt concerning the validity of currently accepted generation mechanism of membrane potential and action potential of cell. As an alternative theory, we found that the long-forgotten Ling's adsorption theory was the most plausible theory. Ling's adsorption theory suggests that the membrane potential and action potential of a living cell is due to the adsorption of mobile ions onto the adsorption site of cell, and this theory is applicable even to nonliving (or non-biological) system as well as living system. Through this paper, the authors emphasize that it is necessary to reconsider the validity of current membrane theory and also would like to urge the readers to pay keen attention to the Ling's adsorption theory which has for long years been forgotten in the history of physiology. PMID:26821050

  9. A polycarbonate based surface plasmon resonance sensing cartridge for high sensitivity HBV loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tsung-Liang; Wei, Shih-Chung; Lee, Szu-Yuan; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2012-02-15

    In this study, we report a simple, low-cost surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-sensing cartridge based on a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the on-site detection of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). For LAMP detection, a SPR based LAMP sensing system (SPRLAMP) was constructed, including a novel SPRLAMP sensing cartridge integrating a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) micro-reactor with a polycarbonate (PC)-based prism coated with a 50 nm Au film. First, we found that the change of refractive index of the bulk solution was approximately 0.0011 refractive index (RI) units after LAMP reaction. The PC-based prism's linearity and thermal responses were compared to those of a traditional glass prism to show that a PC-based prism can be used for SPR measurement. Finally, the HBV template mixed in the 10 μl LAMP solution could be detected by SPRLAMP system in 17 min even at the detection-limited concentration of 2 fg/ml. We also analyzed the correlation coefficients between the initial concentrations of HBV DNA templates and the system response (ΔRU) at varying amplification times to establish an optimal amplification time endpoint of 25 min (R(2)=0.98). In conclusion, the LAMP reaction could be detected with the SPRLAMP sensing cartridge based on direct sensing of the bulk refractive index.

  10. The effects of laser welding on heterogeneous immunoassay performance in a microfluidic cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Mäntymaa, Anne; Halme, Jussi; Välimaa, Lasse; Kallio, Pasi

    2011-01-01

    Sealing of a microfluidic cartridge is a challenge, because the cartridge commonly contains heat-sensitive biomolecules that must also be protected from contamination. In addition, the objective is usually to obtain a sealing method suitable for mass production. Laser welding is a rapid technique that can be accomplished with low unit costs. Even though the technique has been widely adopted in industry, the literature on its use in microfluidic applications is not large. This paper is the first to report the effects of laser welding on the performance of the heterogeneous immunoassay in a polystyrene microfluidic cartridge in which biomolecules are immobilized into the reaction surface of the cartridge before sealing. The paper compares the immunoassay performance of microfluidic cartridges that are sealed either with an adhesive tape or by use of laser transmission welding. The model analyte used is thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The results show that the concentration curves in the laser-welded cartridges are very close to the curves in the taped cartridges. This indicates, first, that laser welding does not cause any significant reduction in immunoassay performance, and second, that the polystyrene cover does not have significant effect on the signal levels. Interestingly, the coefficients of variance between parallel samples were lower in the laser-welded cartridges than in the taped cartridges. PMID:22685505

  11. High-Temperature Crystal-Growth Cartridge Tubes Made by VPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard; O'Dell, Scott; McKechnie, Timothy; Power, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Cartridge tubes for use in a crystal growth furnace at temperatures as high as 1,600 deg. C have been fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS). These cartridges consist mainly of an alloy of 60 weight percent molybdenum with 40 weight percent rhenium, made from molybdenum powder coated with rhenium. This alloy was selected because of its high melting temperature (approximately equal.2,550 C) and because of its excellent ductility at room temperature. These cartridges are intended to supplant tungsten/nickel-alloy cartridges, which cannot be used at temperatures above approximately equal 1,300 C.

  12. Maintaining accuracy of cellular Yule-Nielsen spectral Neugebauer models for different ink cartridges using principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binyu; Xu, Haisong; Luo, M Ronnier; Guo, Jinyi

    2011-07-01

    The replacement of used-up ink cartridges is unavoidable, but it makes the existing characterization model far from accurate, while recharacterization is labor intensive. In this study, we propose a new correction method for cellular Yule-Nielsen spectral Neugebauer (CYNSN) models based on principal component analysis (PCA). First, a small set of correction samples are predicted, printed using new ink cartridges, and then measured. Second, the link between the predicted and measured reflectance weights, generated by PCA, is determined. The experimental results show that the proposed method provides a significant and robust improvement, since not only the color change between original and new inks but also the systemic error of CYNSN modelsis taken into account in the method.

  13. Water treatment cartridge filter pilot test at Pond C-2

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, E.J.; Hoffman, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    This study determined the performance of a pilot scale cartridge filter tank utilized to treat raw water at Rocky Flats Plant terminal Pond C-2. No chemical treatment was used during this study. The filter tank was fitted with eight polypropylene 3M{reg_sign} Model 723 cartridges vendor rated at 99% removal efficiency for particles of 2 microns and larger. The duration of the test was 30 minutes at a flowrate of 200 gallons per minutes. Performance was determined by measuring total suspended solids (TSS), total dissolved solids (TDS), nephelometric turbidity units (NTU), gross alpha activity, gross beta activity, plutonium ({sup 239}Pu) levels, total particle counts (TPC), and differential particle counts (DPC) before and after treatment at specific time intervals throughout the test. Performance testing shows this treatment method produced a high quality effluent. Compared to raw water levels, TSS, NTU, gross alpha, and Pu{sup 239} were significantly reduced in the treated water samples. TPC and DPC data showed an average filtration efficiency of 97% for particles in the 1--50 micron range. This treatment method had no statistically significant affect on TDS and gross beta activity levels.

  14. Fatal cranial shot by blank cartridge gun: two suicide cases.

    PubMed

    Buyuk, Yalcin; Cagdir, Sadi; Avsar, Abdullah; Duman, Gokce U; Melez, D Oguzhan; Sahin, Feyzi

    2009-08-01

    Blank firing pistols are generally considered to be harmless and these guns are not accepted as being firearms in most countries. Due to lack of legal regulations these guns are easily purchased by anyone aged over 18 years. Reports of serious injuries and even fatalities due to these guns are increasing in the literature. These guns when modified or even unmodified can cause serious and potentially fatal injuries. Without doing any changes to the barrel, using blank or tear gas cartridges, firing at contact range can cause penetration of gas into the body including bone originated from gun powder. We report two suicide cases shooting themselves at temporal region with a blank cartridge gun at contact range. There was no foreign body on radiological examination and there was no trajectory of a bullet inside the brain. In both cases the wound was at the right temporal region and there was defect at temporal bone. There was circular soot around this bone defect. The injury of the brain tissue was localized at the level of the defect but there was widespread subarachnoidal bleeding. We discussed the potential danger of these guns and stressed the need of legal regulations concerning these guns.

  15. Studies of adsorption equilibria and kinetics in the systems: Aqueous solution of dyes-mesoporous carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derylo-Marczewska, A.; Marczewski, A. W.; Winter, Sz.; Sternik, D.

    2010-06-01

    Two carbonaceous materials were synthesized by using the method of impregnation of mesoporous silicas obtained by applying the Pluronic copolymers as pore-creating agents. The isotherms of adsorption of methylene blue and methyl orange from aqueous solutions were measured by the static method. The profiles of adsorbate concentration change in time were obtained from the UV-vis spectra. The adsorption isotherms and kinetic dependence were discussed in the terms of theory of adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces.

  16. Construction and measurements of a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    SciTech Connect

    Schnee, R. W.; Bunker, R.; Ghulam, G.; Jardin, D.; Kos, M.; Tenney, A. S.

    2013-08-08

    Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the {sup 222}Rn decay chain on (and near) detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay, and in screening detectors. In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto the wires of the Beta Cage during its assembly, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at Syracuse University using a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system. The radon filter shows ∼20× reduction at its output, from 7.47±0.56 to 0.37±0.12 Bq/m{sup 3}, and the cleanroom radon activity meets project requirements, with a lowest achieved value consistent with that of the filter, and levels consistently < 2 Bq/m{sup 3}.

  17. Construction and measurements of a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnee, R. W.; Bunker, R.; Ghulam, G.; Jardin, D.; Kos, M.; Tenney, A. S.

    2013-08-01

    Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the 222Rn decay chain on (and near) detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay, and in screening detectors. In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto the wires of the Beta Cage during its assembly, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at Syracuse University using a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system. The radon filter shows ˜20× reduction at its output, from 7.47±0.56 to 0.37±0.12 Bq/m3, and the cleanroom radon activity meets project requirements, with a lowest achieved value consistent with that of the filter, and levels consistently < 2 Bq/m3.

  18. Development and analysis of micro-polygeneration systems and adsorption chillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluesenkamp, Kyle

    About a fifth of all primary energy in the US is consumed by residential buildings, mostly for cooling, heating and to provide electricity. Furthermore, retrofits are essential to reducing this consumption, since the buildings that exist today will comprise over half of those in use in 2050. Residential combined heat and power (or micro CHP, defined by <5 kW electrical generation capacity) has been identified as a retrofit technology which can reduce energy consumption in existing homes during the heating season by 5-30%. This thesis investigates the addition of a thermally-driven chiller/heat pump to a CHP system (to form a trigeneration system) to additionally provide savings during the cooling season, and enhance heating season savings. Scenarios are identified in which adding thermally-driven equipment to a micro CHP system reduces primary energy consumption, through analytical and experimental investigations. The experimental focus is on adsorption heat pump systems, which are capable of being used with the CHP engines (prime movers) that are already widely deployed. The analytical analysis identifies energy saving potential off-grid for today's prime movers, with potential on-grid for various fuel cell technologies. A novel dynamic test facility was developed to measure real-world residential trigeneration system performance using a prototype adsorption chiller. The chiller was designed and constructed for this thesis and was driven by waste heat from a commercially available natural gas-fueled 4 kW (electric) CHP engine. A control strategy for the chiller was developed, enabling a 5-day experiment to be run using a thermal load profile based on moderate Maryland summer air conditioning loads and typical single-family domestic hot water demand, with experimental results in agreement with models. In this summer mode, depending on electrical loads, the trigeneration system used up to 36% less fuel than off-grid separate generation and up to 29% less fuel than

  19. Computerized disease profiling using GPS-linked multi-function sensor cartridges.

    PubMed

    Lorence, Daniel; Wu, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Disease identification in public health monitoring routinely employs analyte detection systems capable of discriminating mixtures of analytes, toxins, cells and/or bacteria in medical and/or environmental solutions. The development of smart sensors capable of discriminating such compounds has become increasingly important for clinical, environmental, and health applications. While some sensors have been fashioned for single analyte detection, methods and systems that facilitate rapid screening of multiple clinical components are needed, serving as triggers for potential epidemics or more specific confirmatory testing. In public health applications, there is like need for immediate collection of geocoded data tagged by disease identification characteristics, with corresponding alerting capabilities. In this technology review we propose one promising model for using a combination of emerging systems-based technologies in multi sensor cartridges, integrated with GPS-enabled, alert-capable mobile phone devices.

  20. Gas Adsorption Properties of Fluorocarbon Thin Films Prepared Using Three Different Types of RF Magnetron Sputtering Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoru Iwamori,; Norihiko Hasegawa,; Satoshi Yano,; Kazutoshi Noda,

    2010-04-01

    Fluorocarbon thin films were deposited onto a quartz crystal with a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) target using three different types of RF magnetron sputtering systems with strong, weak, and unbalanced magnetic fields. The adsorption properties of these thin films for water, ethanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, toluene, and methyl salicylate were evaluated using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method in order to characterize the surface properties of these thin films. These thin films have low sensitivities to non-polar solvents that contain methyl and aromatic groups, and high sensitivities to polar solvents that contain carbonyl and hydroxyl groups. Chemical structures, especially, polar moieties in these fluorocarbon thin films would affect the gas adsorption properties.

  1. Phosphorous adsorption and precipitation in a permeable reactive wall: Applications for wastewater disposal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.J.; Blowes, D.W. |; Placek, C.J. |

    1997-12-31

    A permeable reactive mixture has been developed using low cost, readily available materials that is capable of providing effective, long-term phosphorous treatment in areas impacted by on-land wastewater disposal. The reactive mixture creates a geochemical environment suitable for P-attenuation by both adsorption and precipitation reactions. Potential benefits include significant reductions in phosphorous loading to receiving groundwater and surface water systems, and the accumulation of P-mass in a finite and accessible volume of material. The mixture may be applied as a component within surface treatment systems or in subsurface applications such as horizontal or vertical permeable reactive walls. The mixture averaged > 90% treatment efficiency over 3.6 years of continuous-flow laboratory column experiments. The mixture was further evaluated at the pilot-scale to treat municipal wastewater, and the field-scale to treat a well-characterized septic system plume using an in situ funnel and gate system. Average PO{sub 4}-P concentrations in effluent exiting the reactive mixture range between 0 - 0.3 mg/L. Mineralogical analyses have isolated the phases responsible for phosphorous uptake, and discrete phosphate precipitates have been identified.

  2. Local chemical potentials and pressures in heterogeneous systems: Adsorptive, absorptive, interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2016-07-01

    Equations self-consistently describing chemical and mechanical equilibria in heterogeneous systems are derived. The equations are based on the lattice gas model using discrete distributions of molecules in space (on a scale comparable to molecular size) and continuum distributions of molecules (at short distances inside the cells) during their translational and vibrational motions. It is shown that the theory provides a unified description of the equilibrium distributions of molecules in three aggregate states and at their interfaces. Potential functions of intermolecular interactions (such as Mie pair potentials) in several coordination spheres that determine the compressibility of the lattice structure are considered. For simplicity, it is assumed that differences between the sizes of mixture components are small. Expressions for the local components of the pressure tensor inside multicomponent solid phases and heterogeneous systems (adsorptive, absorptive, and interfaces) are obtained. It is established that they can be used to calculate the lattice parameters of deforming phases and the thermodynamic characteristics of interfaces, including surface tension. The tensor nature of the chemical potential in heterogeneous systems is discussed.

  3. 42 CFR 84.1155 - Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1155 Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement. (a) Particulate matter filters used in conjunction with a canister or cartridge... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Filters used with canisters and...

  4. 42 CFR 84.1155 - Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1155 Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement. (a) Particulate matter filters used in conjunction with a canister or cartridge... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Filters used with canisters and...

  5. 42 CFR 84.1155 - Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1155 Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement. (a) Particulate matter filters used in conjunction with a canister or cartridge... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Filters used with canisters and...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1155 - Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1155 Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement. (a) Particulate matter filters used in conjunction with a canister or cartridge... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Filters used with canisters and...

  7. 42 CFR 84.113 - Canisters and cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Canisters and cartridges; color and markings... DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.113 Canisters and cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color...

  8. A van der Waals density functional theory comparison of metal decorated graphene systems for hydrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Janet; Yadav, Shwetank; Tam, Jasmine; Veer Singh, Chandra

    2014-06-01

    Previous Density Functional Theory (DFT) studies on metal decorated graphene generally use local density approximation (LDA) or generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals which can cause inaccuracies in hydrogen binding energies as they neglect van der Waals (vdW) interactions and are difficult to compare due to their widely varying simulation parameters. We investigated the hydrogen binding ability of several metals with a consistent set of simulations using the GGA functional and incorporated vdW forces through the vdW-DF2 functional. Metal adatom anchoring on graphene and hydrogen adsorption ability for both single and double sided decoration were studied for eight metals (Al, Li, Na, Ca, Cu, Ni, Pd, and Pt). It was found that the vdW correction can have a significant impact on both metal and hydrogen binding energies. The vdW-DF2 functional led to stronger metal adatom and hydrogen binding for light metals in comparison to GGA results, while heavier transition metals displayed the opposite behaviour but still produced stronger hydrogen binding energies than light metals. Nickel was found to be the best balance between hydrogen binding ability for reversible storage and low weight. The effects on hydrogen binding energy and maximum achievable hydrogen gravimetric density were analyzed for Ni-graphene systems with varying metal coverage. Lower metal coverage was found to improve hydrogen binding but decrease hydrogen gravimetric density. The highest achieved Ni-graphene system gravimetric density was 6.12 wt. %.

  9. Immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the probe surface for molecular adsorption type endotoxin detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Katsutoshi; Tsuji, Akihito; Nishishita, Naoki; Hirano, Yoshiaki

    2007-04-01

    adsorption reaction between ɛ-polylysine and endotoxin. ɛ-polylysine has the structure of straight chain molecule composed by 25-30 residues made by lysine, and it is used as an antimicrobial agent, moreover, cellulose beads with immobilized ɛ-polylysine is used as the barrier filter for endotoxin removal. Therefore, it is expected that the endotoxin be adsorbed to the immobilized ɛ-polylysine onto the probe. As the result of this reaction, the mass of the probe is increased, and endotoxin can be detected by using of Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM). In our previous research, we have already acquired the proteins immobilization technique onto Au and Si surface. In this report, the proposal of molecular adsorption type endotoxin detection system, and the immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the probe are described. We use X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the ɛ-polylysine immobilization, and the adsorptive activity of immobilized ɛ-polylysine is measured by XPS and AFM. The purpose of this study is to bring about the realization of "Real-time endotoxin detection system".

  10. Construction of a high efficiency copper adsorption bacterial system via peptide display and its application on copper dye polluted wastewater.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, Murali Kannan; Nadarajan, Saravanan Prabhu; Ganesh, Irisappan; Ravikumar, Sambandam; Yun, Hyungdon; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Hong, Soon Ho

    2015-11-01

    For the construction of an efficient copper waste treatment system, a cell surface display strategy was employed. The copper adsorption ability of recombinant bacterial strains displaying three different copper binding peptides were evaluated in LB Luria-Bertani medium (LB), artificial wastewater, and copper phthalocyanine containing textile dye industry wastewater samples. Structural characteristics of the three peptides were also analyzed by similarity-based structure modeling. The best binding peptide was chosen for the construction of a dimeric peptide display and the adsorption ability of the monomeric and dimeric peptide displayed strains were compared. The dimeric peptide displayed strain showed superior copper adsorption in all three tested conditions (LB, artificial wastewater, and textile dye industry wastewater). When the strains were exposed to copper phthalocyanine dye polluted wastewater, the dimeric peptide display [543.27 µmol/g DCW dry cell weight (DCW)] showed higher adsorption of copper when compared with the monomeric strains (243.53 µmol/g DCW). PMID:26219270

  11. Adsorption mechanism of mixed cationic/anionic collectors in feldspar-quartz flotation system.

    PubMed

    Vidyadhar, A; Hanumantha Rao, K

    2007-02-15

    The adsorption mechanism of mixed cationic alkyl diamine and anionic sulfonate/oleate collectors at acidic pH values was investigated on microcline and quartz minerals through Hallimond flotation, electrokinetic and diffuse reflectance FTIR studies. In the presence of anionic collectors, neither of the minerals responded to flotation but the diamine flotation of the minerals was observed to be pH and concentration dependent. The presence of sulfonate enhanced the diamine flotation of the minerals by its co-adsorption. The difference in surface charge between the minerals at pH 2 was found to be the basis for preferential feldspar flotation from quartz in mixed diamine/sulfonate collectors. The infrared spectra revealed no adsorption of sulfonate collector when used alone but displayed its co-adsorption as diamine-sulfonate complex when used with diamine. The presence of sulfonate increased the diamine adsorption due to a decrease in the electrostatic head-head repulsion between the adjacent surface ammonium ions and thereby increasing the lateral tail-tail hydrophobic bonds. The mole ratio of diamine/sulfonate was found to be an important factor in the orientation of alkyl chains and thus the flotation response of minerals. The increase in sulfonate concentration beyond diamine concentration leads to the formation of soluble 1:2 diamine-sulfonate complex or precipitate and the adsorption of these species decreased the flotation since the alkyl chains are in chaotical orientation with a conceivable number of head groups directing towards the solution phase.

  12. A new method for antimony speciation in plant biomass and nutrient media using anion exchange cartridge.

    PubMed

    Tisarum, Rujira; Ren, Jing-Hua; Dong, Xiaoling; Chen, Hao; Lessl, Jason T; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-11-01

    A selective separation method based on anion exchange cartridge was developed to determine antimony (Sb) speciation in biological matrices by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS). The selectivity of the cartridge towards antimonite [Sb(III)] and antimonate [Sb(V)] reversed in the presence of deionized (DI) water and 2mM citric acid. While Sb(V) was retained by the cartridge in DI water, Sb(III) was retained in citric acid media. At pH 6, Sb(III) and Sb(V) formed Sb(III)- and Sb(V)-citrate complexes, but the cartridge had higher affinity towards the Sb(III)-citrate complex. Separation of Sb(III) was tested at various concentrations in fresh and spent growth media and plant tissues. Our results showed that cartridge-based Sb speciation was successful in plant tissues, which was confirmed by HPLC-ICP-MS. The cartridge retained Sb(III) and showed 92-104% Sb(V) recovery from arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata roots treated with Sb(III) and Sb(V). The cartridge procedure is an effective alternative for Sb speciation, offering low cost, reproducible results, and simple Sb analysis using GFAAS. PMID:26452943

  13. A new method for antimony speciation in plant biomass and nutrient media using anion exchange cartridge.

    PubMed

    Tisarum, Rujira; Ren, Jing-Hua; Dong, Xiaoling; Chen, Hao; Lessl, Jason T; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-11-01

    A selective separation method based on anion exchange cartridge was developed to determine antimony (Sb) speciation in biological matrices by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS). The selectivity of the cartridge towards antimonite [Sb(III)] and antimonate [Sb(V)] reversed in the presence of deionized (DI) water and 2mM citric acid. While Sb(V) was retained by the cartridge in DI water, Sb(III) was retained in citric acid media. At pH 6, Sb(III) and Sb(V) formed Sb(III)- and Sb(V)-citrate complexes, but the cartridge had higher affinity towards the Sb(III)-citrate complex. Separation of Sb(III) was tested at various concentrations in fresh and spent growth media and plant tissues. Our results showed that cartridge-based Sb speciation was successful in plant tissues, which was confirmed by HPLC-ICP-MS. The cartridge retained Sb(III) and showed 92-104% Sb(V) recovery from arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata roots treated with Sb(III) and Sb(V). The cartridge procedure is an effective alternative for Sb speciation, offering low cost, reproducible results, and simple Sb analysis using GFAAS.

  14. A filtration and column-adsorption system for onsite concentration and fractionation of organic substances from large volumes of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.

    1984-01-01

    A portable filtration and column-adsorption system which can concentrate suspended sediment and dissolved-aqueous organic substances onsite was developed. Organic solutes also are fractionated into hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-acid, base, and neutral fractions. Subsequent isolation of organic solutes from fraction concentrates and extraction of organic constituents in suspended sediment entrained on filter tubes is performed by a variety of procedures in the laboratory. Three surface-water samples and one ground-water sample ranging in volume from 300 to 1,100 liters were processed through the filtration and column-adsorption system, yielding from about 0.8 to 3.0 grams of recovered organic carbon per sample.

  15. Modelling Cu(II) adsorption to ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite-bacteria composites: Deviation from additive adsorption in the composite sorption system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2013-03-01

    Bacterially associated iron (hydr)oxides are widespread in natural environments and are potent scavengers of dissolved metal ions. However, it is unclear whether metal sorption on these composites adheres to the additivity principle, and thus whether metal concentrations in environments where these composites comprise a significant proportion of the reactive iron phases can be modelled assuming component additivity. Here we address this issue for Cu adsorption on ferrihydrite-Bacillus subtilis composites. We precipitated pure ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite composites with different ferrihydrite:bacteria mass ratios, and measured Cu adsorption as a function of pH, Cu adsorbed concentration and composite mass ratio. We develop a molecular-level surface complexation model for Cu adsorption on pure ferrihydrite. We then combine our end-member models for Cu adsorption on B. subtilis (Moon and Peacock, 2011) and ferrihydrite to model the observed Cu adsorption on the composites, adopting a component linear additivity approach. By comparing observed Cu adsorption to that predicted by our composite model, constrained to the exact best fitting end-member stability constants, we find that Cu adsorption behaviour on ferrihydrite-B. subtilis composites deviates from additivity. Specifically, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite is enhanced across the adsorption pH edge (pH ˜3-6), while on our composite composed mainly of bacteria adsorption is enhanced at mid-high pH (pH ˜5-6) but diminished at mid-low pH (pH ˜5-3), compared to additivity. In current surface complexation modelling constructs, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite can be modelled in a component additivity approach, by optimising the stability constants for Cu adsorption on the ferrihydrite and bacteria fractions to values that are within the uncertainty on the end-member stability constant values. The deviation from additivity of these composites, apparent when

  16. A cost-effective system for in-situ geological arsenic adsorption from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Shan, Huimei; Ma, Teng; Wang, Yanxin; Zhao, Jie; Han, Hongyin; Deng, Yamin; He, Xin; Dong, Yihui

    2013-11-01

    An effective and low-cost in-situ geological filtration system was developed to treat arsenic-contaminated groundwater in remote rural areas. Hangjinhouqi in western Hetao Plain of Inner Mongolia, China, where groundwater contains a high arsenic concentration, was selected as the study area. Fe-mineral and limestone widely distributed in the study area were used as filter materials. Batch and column experiments as well as field tests were performed to determine optimal filtration parameters and to evaluate the effectiveness of the technology for arsenic removal under different hydrogeochemical conditions. A mixture containing natural Fe-mineral (hematite and goethite) and limestone at a mass ratio of 2:1 was found to be the most effective for arsenic removal. The results indicated that Fe-mineral in the mixture played a major role for arsenic removal. Meanwhile, limestone buffered groundwater pH to be conducive for the optimal arsenic removal. As(III) adsorption and oxidation by iron mineral, and the formation of Ca-As(V) precipitation with Ca contributed from limestone dissolution were likely mechanisms leading to the As removal. Field demonstrations revealed that a geological filter bed filled with the proposed mineral mixture reduced groundwater arsenic concentration from 400 μg/L to below 10 μg/L. The filtration system was continuously operated for a total volume of 365,000L, which is sufficient for drinking water supplying a rural household of 5 persons for 5 years at a rate of 40 L per person per day.

  17. Revising organic vapour respirator cartridge change schedule: a case study of a paint plant in Iran.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ali; Jahangiri, Mehdi; Zare Derisi, Forough; Nourozi, Mohammad Amin

    2013-01-01

    After having revised the change schedule for organic vapour respirator cartridges in a paint plant in Iran, we established that it did not provide adequate protection against organic vapours at some workplaces and needed shortening from (48 to 72) h to 4 h. The revision also showed that relying on odour thresholds as the primary means to determine the time to change a chemical cartridge was not effective and that the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) MultiVapor service life software program could be applied to develop cartridge change schedules adjusted to specific workplaces.

  18. Revising organic vapour respirator cartridge change schedule: a case study of a paint plant in Iran.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ali; Jahangiri, Mehdi; Zare Derisi, Forough; Nourozi, Mohammad Amin

    2013-01-01

    After having revised the change schedule for organic vapour respirator cartridges in a paint plant in Iran, we established that it did not provide adequate protection against organic vapours at some workplaces and needed shortening from (48 to 72) h to 4 h. The revision also showed that relying on odour thresholds as the primary means to determine the time to change a chemical cartridge was not effective and that the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) MultiVapor service life software program could be applied to develop cartridge change schedules adjusted to specific workplaces. PMID:23585165

  19. Ballistics firearms identification based on images of a cartridge case and projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-guang; Watson, Anthony

    1998-12-01

    A spent cartridge case exhibits characteristic markings (firearm fingerprint) that can be used to identify the type, and possibly make, of weapon in which the cartridge was fired. This paper details research into the use of discriminant analysis for the purpose of matching spent cartridge cases to specific make and model of firearms. A fired projectile can also be analyzed by measuring the class characteristics such as land mark, groove, mar, and twist ratio. A personal computer (PC) based prototype software application called FireBall will also be described in detail.

  20. System Modeling of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) Subassembly for Prototype Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Chad; Padilla, Sebastian; Iacomini, Christie; Paul, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes modeling methods for the three core components of a Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) subassembly: the sorbent bed, a sublimation (cooling) heat exchanger (SHX), and a condensing icing (warming) heat exchanger (CIHX). The primary function of the MTSA, removing carbon dioxide from a ventilation loop, is performed via the sorbent bed. The CIHX is used to heat the sorbent bed for desorption and to remove moisture from the ventilation loop while the SHX is alternately employed to cool the sorbent bed via sublimation of a spray of water at low pressure to prepare the reconditioned bed for the next cycle. This paper describes a system level model of the MTSA as developed in Thermal Desktop and SINDA/FLUINT including assumptions on geometry and physical phenomena, modeling methodology and relevant pa ra mete rizatio ns. Several areas of particular modeling interest are discussed. In the sorbent bed, capture of the translating CO2 saturation front and associated local energy and mass balance in both adsorbing and desorbing modes is covered. The CIHX poses particular challenges for modeling in SINDA/FLUINT as accounting for solids states in fluid submodels are not a native capability. Methods for capturing phase change and latent heat of ice as well as the transport properties across a layer of low density accreted frost are developed. This extended modeling capacity is applicable to temperatures greater than 258 K. To extend applicability to the minimum device temperature of 235 K, a method for a mapped transformation of temperatures from below the limit temperatures to some value above is given along with descriptions for associated material property transformations and the resulting impacts to total heat and mass transfer. Similar considerations are shown for the SHX along with assumptions for flow mechanics and resulting model methods for sublimation in a flow.

  1. Determining an optimal sequence for chemical development of latent prints on cartridge casings and shotgun shells.

    PubMed

    Edmiston, Kelli E; Johnson, Julianne

    2009-11-01

    In developing latent prints on cartridge casings and shotgun shells, multiple chemical processes should be used in order to obtain the best results. In Phase I, this study established an optimal chemical sequence for both Brass and Nickel cartridge casings based on six sequences involving four chemicals: Cyanoacrylate, Black Powder, Rhodamine 6G and Acidified Hydrogen Peroxide. Phase II was a validation study of Phase I involving a random sample of both Brass and Nickel cartridge casings, which were processed according to the determined optimal sequences. In addition, ribbed shotgun shells were processed under Phase I results and determined to be dependent upon the utilization of a CrimeScope at 515 nm. Consideration should be given to the type of cartridge case being examined. Although limitations exist, some chemical sequences undeniably work better than others. All photographs were manipulated with Adobe Photoshop. All results were verified by a senior latent print examiner.

  2. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; deMello, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the scale-down platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency.

  3. 42 CFR 84.113 - Canisters and cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may... DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.113 Canisters and cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color...

  4. 42 CFR 84.113 - Canisters and cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may... DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.113 Canisters and cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color...

  5. 42 CFR 84.113 - Canisters and cartridges; color and markings; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may... DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.113 Canisters and cartridges; color and markings; requirements. The color...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1157 - Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... filters; performance requirements; general. 84.1157 Section 84.1157 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... with particulate filters; performance requirements; general. Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters and the individual components of each such device shall, as appropriate, meet...

  7. Melanoidin Removal Mechanism in An Aqueous Adsorption System: An Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Study.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Diego L; Oliveira, Leandro S; Franca, Adriana S

    2015-01-01

    Melanoidins are colored products that can be found in food and drinks, formed by Maillard reactions. Sometimes these compounds are considered undesirable in certain food products, because they impart a brownish color and must be removed. An overview of recent patents related to melanoidin removal indicates that it can be performed by chemical/biological degradation or by adsorption processes. Therefore, in the present study, the adsorption mechanism for synthetic melanoidin removal from aqueous solutions was studied using different Raphanus sativus press-cake sorbents, with the precursor material being carbonized in a microwave oven, either with direct heating or after a chemical activation process with phosphoric acid, nitric acid or potassium hydroxide. Physical and chemical modifications were evaluated by FTIR, pHPZC, thermogravimetry and BET. The adsorption kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second order model for all activated carbons (ACs). Evaluation of the diffusion process showed dependence on the initial melanoidin concentration due to the wide range of sizes of the adsorbed molecules. The equilibrium data were best fitted by the Langmuir model for the acid-treated AC and by the Freundlich model for the base-treated and non-chemically treated ACs. Melanoidin adsorption was characterized as a spontaneous, favorable and endothermic process involving hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions between the adsorbents surfaces and the adsorbed molecules. PMID:26013772

  8. Design of a hybrid advective-diffusive microfluidic system with ellipsometric detection for studying adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Cunlu; Wijnperlé, Daniel; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-05-01

    Establishing and maintaining concentration gradients that are stable in space and time is critical for applications that require screening the adsorption behavior of organic or inorganic species onto solid surfaces for wide ranges of fluid compositions. In this work, we present a design of a simple and compact microfluidic device based on steady-state diffusion of the analyte, between two control channels where liquid is pumped through. The device generates a near-linear distribution of concentrations. We demonstrate this via experiments with dye solutions and comparison to finite-element numerical simulations. In a subsequent step, the device is combined with total internal reflection ellipsometry to study the adsorption of (cat)ions on silica surfaces from CsCl solutions at variable pH. Such a combined setup permits a fast determination of an adsorption isotherm. The measured optical thickness is compared to calculations from a triple layer model for the ion distribution, where surface complexation reactions of the silica are taken into account. Our results show a clear enhancement of the ion adsorption with increasing pH, which can be well described with reasonable values for the equilibrium constants of the surface reactions. PMID:27375818

  9. CO(2) adsorption on supported molecular amidine systems on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Alesi, W Richard; Gray, McMahan; Kitchin, John R

    2010-08-23

    The CO(2) capture capacities for typical flue gas capture and regeneration conditions of two tertiary amidine N-methyltetrahydropyrimidine (MTHP) derivatives supported on activated carbon were determined through temperature-controlled packed-bed reactor experiments. Adsorption-desorption experiments were conducted at initial adsorption temperatures ranging from 29 degrees C to 50 degrees C with temperature-programmed regeneration under an inert purge stream. In addition to the capture capacity of each amine, the efficiencies at which the amidines interact with CO(2) were determined. Capture capacities were obtained for 1,5-diazo-bicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-ene (DBN) and 1,8-diazobicyclo[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene (DBU) supported on activated carbon at a loading of approximately 2.7 mol amidine per kg of sorbent. Moisture was found to be essential for CO(2) capture on the amidines, but parasitic moisture sorption on the activated carbon ultimately limited the capture capacities. DBN was shown to have a higher capture capacity of 0.8 mol CO(2) per kg of sorbent and an efficiency of 0.30 mol CO(2) per mol of amidine at an adsorption temperature of 29 degrees C compared to DBU. The results of these experiments were then used in conjunction with a single-site adsorption model to derive the Gibbs free energy for the capture reaction, which can provide information about the suitability of the sorbent under different operating conditions. PMID:20730982

  10. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... at least 100 cycles. Following the cycling test the fuel cell cartridge must be charged and the water... psig) at 55 °C (131 °F); and (3) Pass the hot water bath test prescribed in accordance with § 173.306(a... the following: (1) Each fuel cell cartridge must have a water capacity less than or equal to 120 mL...

  11. Competitive adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from their binary and ternary acidic systems using tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haibin; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Jingting; Wang, Baolin; Sun, Hongwen

    2013-10-15

    The adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions in binary and ternary component systems by tourmaline was investigated. Kinetic data were accurately fitted to pseudo-second order and internal diffusion models, which indicated that the adsorption of heavy metals occurred on the interior surface of the sorbent and internal diffusion was the controlling mechanism during heavy metal ion adsorption but was not the only rate-controlling step. Additionally, tourmaline had a very good adsorption capacity for Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) in multi-component aqueous solutions at strongly acidic pH values (in contrast to industrial wastewater pH values). This good adsorption capacity is attributed to the fact that tourmaline can automatically adjust the pH values of acidic (except pH 2.0 and 3.0), neutral or alkaline aqueous solutions to 6.0. Adsorption isotherms and separation factors showed that tourmaline displays a high selectivity toward one metal in a two-component or a three-component system with an affinity order of Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Ni(II). Thermodynamic parameters indicated that heavy metal adsorption was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic. Therefore, tourmaline should be explored as a material for removing pollutants from the strongly acidic wastewater. PMID:23851318

  12. Competitive adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from their binary and ternary acidic systems using tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haibin; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Jingting; Wang, Baolin; Sun, Hongwen

    2013-10-15

    The adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions in binary and ternary component systems by tourmaline was investigated. Kinetic data were accurately fitted to pseudo-second order and internal diffusion models, which indicated that the adsorption of heavy metals occurred on the interior surface of the sorbent and internal diffusion was the controlling mechanism during heavy metal ion adsorption but was not the only rate-controlling step. Additionally, tourmaline had a very good adsorption capacity for Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) in multi-component aqueous solutions at strongly acidic pH values (in contrast to industrial wastewater pH values). This good adsorption capacity is attributed to the fact that tourmaline can automatically adjust the pH values of acidic (except pH 2.0 and 3.0), neutral or alkaline aqueous solutions to 6.0. Adsorption isotherms and separation factors showed that tourmaline displays a high selectivity toward one metal in a two-component or a three-component system with an affinity order of Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Ni(II). Thermodynamic parameters indicated that heavy metal adsorption was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic. Therefore, tourmaline should be explored as a material for removing pollutants from the strongly acidic wastewater.

  13. Disposable pen-shaped capillary gel electrophoresis cartridge for fluorescence detection of bio-molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkhanian, Varoujan; Tsai, Shou-Kuan

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a novel and cost-effective capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) system utilizing disposable pen-shaped gelcartridges for highly efficient, high speed, high throughput fluorescence detection of bio-molecules. The CGE system has been integrated with dual excitation and emission optical-fibers with micro-ball end design for fluorescence detection of bio-molecules separated and detected in a disposable pen-shaped capillary gel electrophoresis cartridge. The high-performance capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) analyzer has been optimized for glycoprotein analysis type applications. Using commercially available labeling agent such as ANTS (8-aminonapthalene-1,3,6- trisulfonate) as an indicator, the capillary gel electrophoresis-based glycan analyzer provides high detection sensitivity and high resolving power in 2-5 minutes of separations. The system can hold total of 96 samples, which can be automatically analyzed within 4-5 hours. This affordable fiber optic based fluorescence detection system provides fast run times (4 minutes vs. 20 minutes with other CE systems), provides improved peak resolution, good linear dynamic range and reproducible migration times, that can be used in laboratories for high speed glycan (N-glycan) profiling applications. The CGE-based glycan analyzer will significantly increase the pace at which glycoprotein research is performed in the labs, saving hours of preparation time and assuring accurate, consistent and economical results.

  14. Comparison of practical techniques to develop latent fingermarks on fired and unfired cartridge cases.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Carlos M A; Lobo, Bernardo J M; Cunha, Alfredo G; Freitas, Jair C C; Emmerich, Francisco G

    2015-05-01

    We have tested some widely used and practical fingermark enhancement techniques such as powdering (regular powder dusting and magnetic powder application), cyanoacrylate fuming, fluorescent dying (basic yellow 40), gun blueing solutions and acidified hydrogen peroxide solutions. The results were evaluated and compared in order to establish best procedures on processing cartridge cases. The tests were performed on brass discs subjected to three different temperatures (room temperature, 63 and 200°C), and on fired and unfired cartridge cases. All the samples were processed after three different periods of time (24h, 7 days and 14 days) after deposition. The best results for both fired and unfired cartridge cases were obtained by the sequential application of cyanoacrylate, gun blueing solution and basic yellow 40. Some stages of the firing process were isolated in order to identify their effects over the final amount and quality of the remaining latent fingermarks on cartridge cases. Good state fingermarks were developed on unfired cartridge cases cycled through the gun, showing that friction inside the gun without firing does not cause significant damage to the fingermarks. On the other hand, fired cartridge cases are significantly affected by the firing effects, exhibiting low quality ridge details which are mainly located next to base. An unexpected phenomenon was observed on most of the brass discs heated to 200°C and developed with gun blueing solutions; they presented a reverse development compared to the expected one, with darkening of the ridges instead of the background.

  15. Comparison of practical techniques to develop latent fingermarks on fired and unfired cartridge cases.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Carlos M A; Lobo, Bernardo J M; Cunha, Alfredo G; Freitas, Jair C C; Emmerich, Francisco G

    2015-05-01

    We have tested some widely used and practical fingermark enhancement techniques such as powdering (regular powder dusting and magnetic powder application), cyanoacrylate fuming, fluorescent dying (basic yellow 40), gun blueing solutions and acidified hydrogen peroxide solutions. The results were evaluated and compared in order to establish best procedures on processing cartridge cases. The tests were performed on brass discs subjected to three different temperatures (room temperature, 63 and 200°C), and on fired and unfired cartridge cases. All the samples were processed after three different periods of time (24h, 7 days and 14 days) after deposition. The best results for both fired and unfired cartridge cases were obtained by the sequential application of cyanoacrylate, gun blueing solution and basic yellow 40. Some stages of the firing process were isolated in order to identify their effects over the final amount and quality of the remaining latent fingermarks on cartridge cases. Good state fingermarks were developed on unfired cartridge cases cycled through the gun, showing that friction inside the gun without firing does not cause significant damage to the fingermarks. On the other hand, fired cartridge cases are significantly affected by the firing effects, exhibiting low quality ridge details which are mainly located next to base. An unexpected phenomenon was observed on most of the brass discs heated to 200°C and developed with gun blueing solutions; they presented a reverse development compared to the expected one, with darkening of the ridges instead of the background. PMID:25769130

  16. Adsorption of La(III) in aqueous systems by N-(2-hydroxyethyl) salicylaldimine-functionalized mesoporous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Tadjarodi, Azadeh Jalalat, Vahideh; Zare-Dorabei, Rouholah

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • HESI-SBA-15 as a new adsorbent was synthesized for the first time. • This adsorbent was selective for lanthanum ion removal in presence of other ions. • The factors that affected adsorption of La(III) in aqueous solution were studied. • La{sup 3+} uptake process was according to pseudo-second-order kinetic model. - Abstract: In this work, a novel modified SBA-15 with covalently bonded N-(2-hydroxyethyl) salicylaldimine Schiff base as a ligand (HESI-SBA-15) was successfully synthesized, characterized and used as a selective absorbent for lanthanum ions removal from water systems. The structure and physicochemical properties were identified by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption–desorption, thermogravimetric analysis and FTIR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, BET surface area and BJH pore size. These techniques have confirmed that the Schiff base ligand was successfully grafted on the SBA-15 surface and ordered arrangement of the silica support was preserved under functionalization. The effect of pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, ionic strength and initial metal ions concentration were studied by using a batch method. This new adsorbent showed high adsorption capacity and selectivity for lanthanum in the presence of other ions. The adsorption process was exactly according to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorbent showed a good reusability after four cycles recovery.

  17. Predicting Phase Diagram of the CaCl2-H2O Binary System from the BET Adsorption Isotherm

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza

    2008-01-01

    A recent publication in Fluid Phase Equilibria by Zeng (Zeng, Zhou et al. 2007) claimed remarkable accuracy in predicting the solubility of CaCl2-H2O solutions with the Brunaruer-Emett-Teller (BET) model parameters. Their approach necessarily requires prior knowledge of equilibrium water vapor pressures above saturated solutions as a function of temperature for the hydrates of CaCl2 that exist under those conditions. However, the intrinsic BET model does not require prior knowledge of such solubility data that the approach of (Zeng, Zhou et al. 2007) is dependent upon. This paper highlights the differences between the two approaches and covers a much wider range of compositions and temperatures than is done by (Zeng, Zhou et al. 2007). The statistical mechanical description of multilayer adsorption culminating in the BET adsorption isotherm for aqueous electrolytes as developed by Ally and Braunstein (Ally and Braunstein 1993) is used to predict the liquidus behavior of CaCl2-H2O across the entire composition range (from the melting point of pure water to the melting point of anhydrous calcium chloride), including possible metastable crystalline phases. The method requires as input the two BET parameters r, the statistically averaged number of adsorption sites and ε, the energy of adsorption of water in excess of the energy of condensation of pure water. Usually it suffices to keep r and ε constant, typically evaluated at 298.15 K, but in the case of CaCl2-H2O, it is found that both r and ε must be considered temperature dependent in order to predict the liquidus curve, eutectic and peritectic points with reasonable accuracy over the large temperature and compositional range for this binary system.

  18. Transient Modeling and Analysis of a Metabolic Heat-Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) System for a PLSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iacomini, Christie; Powers, Aaron; Speight, Garland; Padilla, Sebastian; Paul, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    A Metabolic heat-regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) system is being developed for carbon dioxide, water and thermal control in a lunar and martian portable life support system (PLSS). A previous system analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of MTSA on PLSS design. That effort was Mars specific and assumed liquid carbon dioxide (LCO2) coolant made from martian resources. Transient effects were not considered but rather average conditions were used throughout the analysis. This effort takes into further consideration the transient effects inherent in the cycling MTSA system as well as assesses the use of water as coolant. Standard heat transfer, thermodynamic, and heat exchanger methods are presented to conduct the analysis. Assumptions and model verification are discussed. The tool was used to perform various system studies. Coolant selection was explored and takes into account different operational scenarios as the minimum bed temperature is driven by the sublimation temperature of the coolant (water being significantly higher than LCO2). From this, coolant mass is sized coupled with sorbent bed mass because MTSA adsorption performance decreases with increasing sublimation temperature. Reduction in heat exchanger performance and even removal of certain heat exchangers, like a recuperative one between the two sorbent beds, is also investigated. Finally, the coolant flow rate is varied over the cycle to determine if there is a more optimal means of cooling the bed from a mass perspective. Results of these studies and subsequent recommendations for system design are presented.

  19. Initial stages of adsorption in the Cu/Si( 1 1 1 ) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, P.; Savchenkov, A.; Mutombo, P.; Cháb, V.; Slezák, J.

    2002-05-01

    The adsorption of Cu atoms on a Si(1 1 1)-7×7 surface was studied using scanning tunnelling microscopy. Two different kinds of clusters were found at room temperature and we associate them with copper atoms embedded in subsurface layers. Short annealing at ˜550 °C stimulates a reaction, leading to the substitution of corner Si adatoms in the 7×7 unit cell. This configuration is stable with respect to continuing thermal processing.

  20. Piezoelectric-driven droplet impact printing with an interchangeable microfluidic cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baoqing; Fan, Jinzhen; Li, Jiannan; Chu, Jiaru; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic impact printing has been recently introduced, utilizing its nature of simple device architecture, low cost, non-contamination, and scalable multiplexability and high throughput. In this paper, we have introduced an impact-based droplet printing platform utilizing a simple plug-and-play microfluidic cartridge driven by piezoelectric actuators. Such a customizable printing system allows for ultrafine control of droplet volume from picoliters (∼23 pl) to nanoliters (∼10 nl), a 500 fold variation. The high flexibility of droplet generation can be simply achieved by controlling the magnitude of actuation (e.g., driving voltage) and the waveform shape of actuation pulses, in addition to nozzle size restrictions. Detailed printing characterizations on these parameters have been conducted consecutively. A multiplexed impact printing system has been prototyped and demonstrated to provide the functions of single-droplet jetting and droplet multiplexing as well as concentration gradient generation. Moreover, a generic biological assay has also been tested and validated on this printing platform. Therefore, the microfluidic droplet printing system could be of potential value to establish multiplexed micro reactors for high-throughput life science applications. PMID:26392833

  1. Air-Cooled Design of a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.; Rosen, Micha; LeVan, M. Douglas; Wang, Yuan; Cavalcante, Celio L.

    2004-01-01

    The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby closing the air-loop. We have a developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) for performing these tasks that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no rapidly moving parts. This paper discusses the mechanical design and the results of thermal model validation tests of a TSAC that uses air as the cooling medium.

  2. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  3. Effect of organic matter properties, clay mineral type and thermal maturity on gas adsorption in organic-rich shale systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Milliken, Kitty; Lewan, Mike; Sun, Xun; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    A series of CH4 adsorption experiments on natural organic-rich shales, isolated kerogen, clay-rich rocks, and artificially matured Woodford Shale samples were conducted under dry conditions. Our results indicate that physisorption is a dominant process for CH4 sorption, both on organic-rich shales and clay minerals. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of the investigated samples is linearly correlated with the CH4 sorption capacity in both organic-rich shales and clay-rich rocks. The presence of organic matter is a primary control on gas adsorption in shale-gas systems, and the gas-sorption capacity is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) content, organic-matter type, and thermal maturity. A large number of nanopores, in the 2–50 nm size range, were created during organic-matter thermal decomposition, and they significantly contributed to the surface area. Consequently, methane-sorption capacity increases with increasing thermal maturity due to the presence of nanopores produced during organic-matter decomposition. Furthermore, CH4 sorption on clay minerals is mainly controlled by the type of clay mineral present. In terms of relative CH4 sorption capacity: montmorillonite ≫ illite – smectite mixed layer > kaolinite > chlorite > illite. The effect of rock properties (organic matter content, type, maturity, and clay minerals) on CH4 adsorption can be quantified with the heat of adsorption and the standard entropy, which are determined from adsorption isotherms at different temperatures. For clay-mineral rich rocks, the heat of adsorption (q) ranges from 9.4 to 16.6 kJ/mol. These values are considerably smaller than those for CH4 adsorption on kerogen (21.9–28 kJ/mol) and organic-rich shales (15.1–18.4 kJ/mol). The standard entropy (Δs°) ranges from -64.8 to -79.5 J/mol/K for clay minerals, -68.1 to -111.3 J/mol/K for kerogen, and -76.0 to -84.6 J/mol/K for organic-rich shales. The affinity of CH4 molecules for sorption on organic matter

  4. An adsorption-release-biodegradation system for simultaneous biodegradation of phenol and ammonium in phenol-rich wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Hu; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Ren, Rui-Peng; Lv, Yong-Kang

    2016-07-01

    The feasibility of simultaneous biodegradation of phenol and ammonium in phenol-rich wastewater was evaluated in a reusable system, which contained macroporous adsorption resin and Alcaligenes faecalis strain WY-01. In the system, up to 6000mg/L phenol could be completely degraded by WY-01; meanwhile, 99.03±3.95% of ammonium was removed from the initial concentration of 384mg/L. This is the first study to show the capability of single strain in simultaneous removal of ammonium and phenol in wastewater containing such high concentrations of phenol. Moreover, the resin was regenerated during the biodegradation process without any additional manipulations, indicating the system was reusable. Furthermore, enzyme assay, gene expression patterns, HPLC-MS and gas chromatography analysis confirmed that phenol biodegradation accompanied with aerobic nitrifier denitrification process. Results imply that the reusable system provides a novel strategy for more efficient biodegradation of phenol and ammonium contained in some particular industrial wastewater. PMID:27060247

  5. Solid source MOCVD system

    DOEpatents

    Hubert, B.N.; Wu, X.D.

    1998-10-13

    A system for MOCVD fabrication of superconducting and non-superconducting oxide films provides a delivery system for the feeding of metallorganic precursors for multi-component chemical vapor deposition. The delivery system can include multiple cartridges containing tightly packed precursor materials. The contents of each cartridge can be ground at a desired rate and fed together with precursor materials from other cartridges to a vaporization zone and then to a reaction zone within a deposition chamber for thin film deposition. 13 figs.

  6. Solid source MOCVD system

    DOEpatents

    Hubert, Brian N.; Wu, Xin Di

    1998-01-01

    A system for MOCVD fabrication of superconducting and non-superconducting oxide films provides a delivery system for the feeding of metalorganic precursors for multi-component chemical vapor deposition. The delivery system can include multiple cartridges containing tightly packed precursor materials. The contents of each cartridge can be ground at a desired rate and fed together with precursor materials from other cartridges to a vaporization zone and then to a reaction zone within a deposition chamber for thin film deposition.

  7. Investigation of effective forensic cleaning methods for bullet and cartridge case samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuherk, Cassie Marie

    Bullet and cartridge case evidence may potentially link weapons and crimes through the comparison of toolmark patterns. This analysis relies on the clarity of the toolmarks and the ability of the examiner to identify patterns on the evidence. These patterns may be distorted by debris such as soil, blood, cyanoacrylate, and construction materials. Despite the potential importance of bullet and cartridge case evidence, few investigations of proper cleaning methods have been conducted. The present study was designed to examine the effects of various cleaning solutions and application methods on copper and brass bullets and cartridge cases. Additionally, this research investigated the efficacy of these cleaning protocols on the common evidence contaminants blood and cyanoacrylate. No cleaning method was found to be universally effective on both contaminant types and nondestructive to the metal surface. Ultrasonication was the most efficient application method employed when used in conjunction with an appropriate cleaning solution. Acetone proved to be safe and successful at removing heavy cyanoacrylate deposits from brass cartridge cases without damaging the metal. Although sulfuric acid removed most of the cyanoacrylate from the brass cartridge case, ultrasonication of the fumed cartridge cases in sulfuric acid caused the nickel-plated primer caps to turn black. Additionally, etching occurred when sulfuric acid was allowed to dry on the cartridge case surface. Citric acid, salt-flour-vinegar paste, TergazymeRTM, and water did not effectively remove the cyanoacrylate from the cartridge cases, but the solutions were safe to use on the brass and sometimes resulted in a shinier surface. Regardless of the cleaning method employed, the bloodstained bullets retained most or all of the underlying brown tarnish. Ultrasonication with sulfuric acid was successful at removing some blood-initiated tarnishing; however, the removal of residues was not complete, making it difficult

  8. Direct analysis of nine pharmaceuticals in culture media by use of cartridge separation with electrospray mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Fang; Ma, Mingsheng; Tam, Yun K

    2002-09-01

    A 2-cm cartridge has been used for separation before electrospray mass spectrometric analysis of pharmaceutical compounds in cell culture media, alleviating the need for sample extraction and desalting procedures. Nine representative pharmaceuticals listed in the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) were chosen as the candidate compounds and Hank's balanced salt solution with Hepes buffer (HBSS-Hepes buffer) was used as the cell-culture medium in an effort to study permeability of chemicals through cell monolayers. Effects of several conditions, e.g. pH and buffer concentration in the mobile phase, flow rate, and temperature on separation efficiency were examined. The nine pharmaceuticals were separated within 2 min by use of a 2-cm C(8) cartridge. Relative standard deviations (RSD) from repeated analysis within the same day or over five days were 0.03-0.2% for retention times and 0.6-5.3% for peak areas; antipyrine was used as internal standard. Calibration curves based on peak-area measurements were linear over the range 0.1-20 micro mol L(-1). The HBSS-Hepes buffer did not interfere with separation and detection; identical separation and peak intensity were obtained when the samples were separately prepared in distilled water or in the culture medium. PMID:12207243

  9. Inhallation of e-Cigarette Cartridge Solution Aggravates Allergen-induced Airway Inflammation and Hyper-responsiveness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are becoming increasingly popular worldwide and their cellular effects warrant further evaluation. In this study, we investigated the effects of an e-cigarette cartridge solution on allergen related asthmatic airway inflammation (AI) and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), when it is delivered by intratracheal route in mice. Asthmatic AI and AHR were induced by systemic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) followed by intratracheal, intraperitoneal, and aerosol allergen challenges in BALB/c mice. The cartridge solution of e-cigarette (containing 16 mg/ml nicotine) was diluted 50 times and 100 μl of the diluted solution was intratracheally instilled to OVA-sensitized (OVA-S) mice two times a week for 10 weeks. Long-term e-cigarette inhalation elicited no remarkable changes in the activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase enzymes in serum, however, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells including eosinophils, into airways from blood, aggravated the asthmatic AI and AHR, and stimulated the production of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and OVA-specific IgE production. Our data suggest that the inhalation of e-cigarette solutions can function as an important factor to exacerbate the allergy-induced asthma symptoms. Further studies are needed to address the effects of e-cigarette solutions on human health. PMID:24795794

  10. Hazard classification test of the cartridge, 120-mm, APFSDS-T, XM829

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, C.D.; Hadlock, D.E.; Mishima, J.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-11-01

    Research was conducted to determine the behavior of the ammunition XM829 when subjected to detonation of an adjacent XM829 cartridge, and a sustained hot fire. It was concluded that the functioning of an XM829 cartridge, in one shipping container, will not cause immediate functioning of XM829 cartridges in adjacent containers. However, if a fire results and is sustained, adjacent cartridges may ignite, resulting in some scattering of debris within a maximum radius of 40 feet. Further, the XM829 cartridge can be expected to remain in a kinetic controlled regime with vigorous oxidation occurring early in such a fire but dropping off as the temperature cools toward ambient. Mass balance analyses data indicated a recovery of at least 80% in the 1982 external heat; in the 1983 test, the recovery percentage was improved to approximately 100% of the original depleted uranium weight volume. Therefore, it may be concluded that a significant airborne release of the depleted uranium material did not occur.

  11. 3D-printed paper spray ionization cartridge with fast wetting and continuous solvent supply features.

    PubMed

    Salentijn, Gert I J; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    We report the development of a 3D-printed cartridge for paper spray ionization (PSI) that can be used almost immediately after solvent introduction in a dedicated reservoir and allows prolonged spray generation from a paper tip. The fast wetting feature described in this work is based on capillary action through paper and movement of fluid between paper and the cartridge material (polylactic acid, PLA). The influence of solvent composition, PLA conditioning of the cartridge with isopropanol, and solvent volume introduced into the reservoir have been investigated with relation to wetting time and the amount of solvent consumed for wetting. Spray has been demonstrated with this cartridge for tens of minutes, without any external pumping. It is shown that fast wetting and spray generation can easily be achieved using a number of solvent mixtures commonly used for PSI. The PSI cartridge was applied to the analysis of lidocaine from a paper tip using different solvent mixtures, and to the analysis of lidocaine from a serum sample. Finally, a demonstration of online paper chromatography-mass spectrometry is given.

  12. A chemical adsorption system for the sampling of gaseous organic pollutants in operating theatre atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Halliday, M M; Carter, K B

    1978-10-01

    The development of an air sampler and its use in measuring organic pollutants in operating theatre atmospheres are described. Air was sampled continuously during an operating session and the results obtained represent the average pollution at the sample site during that session. The technique involved the chemical adsorption of organic vapours to polymer beads and pollutants thus trapped could be stored for several days before thermal desorption and analysis by gas chromatography. The three most abundant organic pollutants were ethanol, propan-2-ol (isopropanol) and halothane.

  13. pH profile of the adsorption of nucleotides onto montmorillonite. II - Adsorption and desorption of 5-prime-AMP in iron-calcium montmorillonite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Lawless, J. G.; Mazzurco, J.; Church, F. M.; Margulies, L.; Orenberg, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of 5-prime-AMP with montmorillonite saturated with various ratios of two metals found ubiquitously on the surface of earth, that is, iron and calcium, is investigated. Adsorption and desorption of the nucleotide were studied in the pH range of 2-12 at three levels of addition: 0.080, 0.268 and 0.803 mmole 5-prime-AMP per gram of clay. Two desorption stages were employed - H2O wash and NaOH extraction (pH = 12.0). 5-prime-AMP was preferentially adsorbed on the Fe-containing clays relative to the Ca clay. The nucleotide was fully recovered by the two desorption stages, mostly by the NaOH extraction. The evidence at hand indicates that 5-prime-AMP reaction with clay is affected by electrostatic interactions involving both attraction and repulsion forces. Some specific adsorption, possibly the result of covalent bonding and complex formation with the adsorbed ion, cannot be ruled out for iron but does not appear to operate for calcium. Changes in pH cause varying degrees of attaction and repulsion of 5-prime-AMP and may have been operating on the primitive earth, leading to sequences of adsorption and release of this biomolecule.

  14. Application of an automation system and a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the optimal operation of a membrane adsorption hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Vigneswaran, S; Ngo, H H; Nguyen, H T; Ben-Aim, R

    2006-01-01

    The application of automation and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems to municipal water and wastewater treatment plants is rapidly increasing. However, the application of these systems is less frequent in the research and development phases of emerging treatment technologies used in these industries. This study involved the implementation of automation and a SCADA system to the submerged membrane adsorption hybrid system for use in a semi-pilot scale research project. An incremental approach was used in the development of the automation and SCADA systems, leading to the development of two new control systems. The first system developed involved closed loop control of the backwash initiation, based upon a pressure increase, leading to productivity improvements as the backwash is only activated when required, not at a fixed time. This system resulted in a 40% reduction in the number of backwashes required and also enabled optimised operations under unsteady concentrations of wastewater. The second system developed involved closed loop control of the backwash duration, whereby the backwash was terminated when the pressure reached a steady state. This system resulted in a reduction of the duration of the backwash of up to 25% and enabled optimised operations as the foulant build-up within the reactor increased. PMID:16722068

  15. Dissolution improvement of solid self-emulsifying drug delivery systems of fenofibrate using an inorganic high surface adsorption material.

    PubMed

    Shazly, Gamal; Mohsin, Kazi

    2015-03-01

    Solidification of lipid formulations using adsorbents is a recent technique attracting great interest due to its favourable properties including flexibility in dose division, reduction of intra-subject and inter-subject variability, improvement in efficacy/safety profile and enhancement of physical/ chemical stability. The current study aims to convert liquid self-emulsifying/nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS/SNEDDS) into solid SEDDS/SNEDDS and to assess how adsorption of the drug onto an inorganic high surface area material, NeusilinR grade US2 (NUS2), affects its in vitro dissolution performance. Lipid formulation classification systems (LFCS) Type III formulations were designed for the model anti-cholesterol drug fenofibrate. NUS2 was used to solidify the SEDDS/SNEDDS. Particle size and SEM analyses of solid SEDDS/SNEDDS powder were carried out to investigate the adsorption efficiency. In vitro dissolution studies were conducted to compare the developed formulations with the marketed product. The results of characterization studies showed that the use of 50% (m/m) adsorbent resulted in superior flowability and kept the drug stable is amorphous state. Dissolution studies allow the conclusion that the formulation containing a surfactant of higher water solubility (particularly, Type IIIB SNEDDS) has comparably faster and higher release profiles than Type IIIA (SEDDS) and marketed product. PMID:25781702

  16. Removal of bisphenol derivatives through quinone oxidation by polyphenol oxidase and subsequent quinone adsorption on chitosan in the heterogeneous system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuji; Takahashi, Ayumi; Kashiwada, Ayumi; Yamada, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the combined use of a biopolymer chitosan and an oxidoreductase polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was systematically investigated for the removal of bisphenol derivatives from aqueous medium. The process parameters, such as the pH value, temperature, and PPO concentration, were estimated to conduct the enzymatic quinone oxidation of bisphenol derivatives by as little enzyme as possible. Bisphenol derivatives effectively underwent PPO-catalysed quinone oxidation without H2O2 unlike other oxidoreductases, such as peroxidase and tyrosinase, and the optimum conditions were determined to be pH 7.0 and 40°C for bisphenol B, bisphenol E, bisphenol O, and bisphenol Z; pH 7.0 and 30°C for bisphenol C and bisphenol F; and pH 8.0 and 40°C for bisphenol T. They were completely removed through adsorption of enzymatically generated quinone derivatives on chitosan beads or chitosan powders. Quinone adsorption on chitosan beads or chitosan powders in the heterogeneous system was found to be a more effective procedure than generation of aggregates in the homogeneous system with chitosan solution. The removal time was shortened by increasing the amount of chitosan beads or decreasing the size of the chitosan powders.

  17. Microfluidic impact printer with interchangeable cartridges for versatile non-contact multiplexed micropatterning

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuzhe; Huang, Eric; Lam, Kit S.; Pan, Tingrui

    2015-01-01

    Biopatterning has been increasingly used for well-defined cellular microenvironment, patterned surface topology, and guided biological cues; however, it meets additional challenges on biocompatibility, temperature and chemical sensitivity and limited reagent volume. In this paper, we target at combining the desired features from the non-contact inkjet printing and the dot-matrix impact printing to establish a versatile multiplexed micropatterning platform, referred to as Microfluidic Impact Printer (MI-Printer), for emerging biomedical applications. Using this platform, we can achieve the distinct features of no cross-contamination, minute volume manipulation with minimal dead volume, high-throughput and biocompatible printing process, multiplexed patterning with automatic alignment, printing availability for complex medium (cell suspension or colloidal solutions), interchangeable/disposable microfluidic cartridge design with out-of-cleanroom microfabrication, simple printing system assembly and configuration, all highly desirable towards biological applications. Specifically, the printing resolution of the MI-printer platform has been experimentally characterized and theoretically analyzed. Printed droplets with 80µm in diameter have been repeatedly obtained. Furthermore, two unique features of MI-printer platform, multiplexed printing and self-alignment printing, have been successfully experimentally demonstrated (less than 10µm misalignment). In addition, combinatorial patterning and biological patterning, which utilizes the multiplexed and self-alignment printing nature of the MI-printer, have been devised to demonstrate the applicability of this robust printing technique for emerging biomedical applications. PMID:23525299

  18. Efficient substructure searching of large chemical libraries: the ABCD chemical cartridge.

    PubMed

    Agrafiotis, Dimitris K; Lobanov, Victor S; Shemanarev, Maxim; Rassokhin, Dmitrii N; Izrailev, Sergei; Jaeger, Edward P; Alex, Simson; Farnum, Michael

    2011-12-27

    Efficient substructure searching is a key requirement for any chemical information management system. In this paper, we describe the substructure search capabilities of ABCD, an integrated drug discovery informatics platform developed at Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C. The solution consists of several algorithmic components: 1) a pattern mapping algorithm for solving the subgraph isomorphism problem, 2) an indexing scheme that enables very fast substructure searches on large structure files, 3) the incorporation of that indexing scheme into an Oracle cartridge to enable querying large relational databases through SQL, and 4) a cost estimation scheme that allows the Oracle cost-based optimizer to generate a good execution plan when a substructure search is combined with additional constraints in a single SQL query. The algorithm was tested on a public database comprising nearly 1 million molecules using 4,629 substructure queries, the vast majority of which were submitted by discovery scientists over the last 2.5 years of user acceptance testing of ABCD. 80.7% of these queries were completed in less than a second and 96.8% in less than ten seconds on a single CPU, while on eight processing cores these numbers increased to 93.2% and 99.7%, respectively. The slower queries involved extremely generic patterns that returned the entire database as screening hits and required extensive atom-by-atom verification.

  19. Glycine on silica: a model system for the study of adsorption and reactivity of aminoacids on extraterrestrial particulate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J. F.; Stievano, L.; Costa, D.; Meng, M.; Lomenech, C.

    It is well known that a wide variety of organic compounds have been detected in extraterrestrial environments. Among them, simple aminoacids were often found in meteorites, comets and extraterrestrial particulates. Such materials, which are supposed to be formed and evolved in interstellar space, have therefore become of interest as possible sources for the development of Earth's first biosphere. In order to understand how organic matter can develop in such systems, and, in particular, how oligopeptides can be formed on the surface of such solids starting from simpler molecules, we decided to undertake a study of the adsorption and reactivity of simple aminoacids on finely divided oxide surfaces. Here we report, both from the theoretical and experimental point of view, on the mechanisms of formation of polypeptides starting from glycine, the simplest aminoacid, on the surface of silicon oxide. Glycine was adsorbed on the surface of well-characterised silica both from aqueous solutions under controlled pH and concentration, and from the gas phase. The adsorbed molecules were characterised using middle IR and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopies. The different preparation conditions resulted in different adsorption mechanisms at specific adsorption sites and different states of the adsorbed glycine in agreement with the DFT simulation data. The thermal reactivity of adsorbed/deposited glycine was then investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, in-situ diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy, and thermoprogrammed desorption coupled with mass spectrometry. Adsorbed glycine molecules react to form peptide bonds at a temperature considerably lower than bulk crystalline α -glycine, mainly producing the cyclic dimer diketopiperazine. These findings are of relevance for the evaluation of prebiotic peptide synthesis scenarii.

  20. [Effects of dissolved organic matter on napropamide adsorption and transport in soil system].

    PubMed

    Ma, Ai-jun; Zhou, Li-xiang; He, Ren-hong

    2006-02-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can affect the environmental behaviors of herbicides in soil. Batch adsorption and column experiments were conducted to measure the sorption and leaching of napropamide in soils in the presence of DOM derived from green manure (GM) and sewage sludge (SS). DOM reduced sorption of napropamide significantly onto the tested soils, consequently which facilitated the transport of napropamide exhibited by soil column experiment. The sorption inhibition and the increased mobility of napropamide caused by DOM of GM origin were more significant than that of SS origin for the same soil. Within the selected concentration range of the napropamide and DOM in this study napropamide sorption isotherm could be described well by the Freundlich equation. In comparison with the control, DOM of GM and SS origins could reduce napropamide adsorption by 22.9% and 11.3% in the yellow-brown soil and 9.5% and 6.5% in the calcareous soil, respectively. Correspondingly, in the presence of DOM the leaching losses of napropamide in soil column increased by 73.42% and 26.87% in the yellow-brown soil and 43.54% and 28.29% in the calcareous soil, respectively. PMID:16686205

  1. The Cartridge Theory: a description of the functioning of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment, based on modelling results.

    PubMed

    Samsó, Roger; García, Joan

    2014-03-01

    Despite the fact that horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands have been in operation for several decades now, there is still no clear understanding of some of their most basic internal functioning patterns. To fill this knowledge gap, on this paper we present what we call "The Cartridge Theory". This theory was derived from simulation results obtained with the BIO_PORE model and explains the functioning of urban wastewater treatment wetlands based on the interaction between bacterial communities and the accumulated solids leading to clogging. In this paper we start by discussing some changes applied to the biokinetic model implemented in BIO_PORE (CWM1) so that the growth of bacterial communities is consistent with a well-known population dynamics models. This discussion, combined with simulation results for a pilot wetland system, led to the introduction of "The Cartridge Theory", which states that the granular media of horizontal subsurface flow wetlands can be assimilated to a generic cartridge which is progressively consumed (clogged) with inert solids from inlet to outlet. Simulations also revealed that bacterial communities are poorly distributed within the system and that their location is not static but changes over time, moving towards the outlet as a consequence of the progressive clogging of the granular media. According to these findings, the life-span of constructed wetlands corresponds to the time when bacterial communities are pushed as much towards the outlet that their biomass is not anymore sufficient to remove the desirable proportion of the influent pollutants.

  2. A paper microfluidic cartridge for automated staining of malaria parasites with an optically transparent microscopy window.

    PubMed

    Horning, Matthew P; Delahunt, Charles B; Singh, S Ryan; Garing, Spencer H; Nichols, Kevin P

    2014-06-21

    A paper microfluidic cartridge for the automated staining of malaria parasites (Plasmodium) with acridine orange prior to microscopy is presented. The cartridge enables simultaneous, sub-minute generation of both thin and thick smears of acridine orange stained parasites. Parasites are stained in a cellulose matrix, after which the parasites are ejected via capillary forces into an optically transparent chamber. The unique slanted design of the chamber ensures that a high percentage of the stained blood will be of the required thickness for a thin smear, without resorting to spacers or other methods that can increase production cost or require tight quality controls. A hydrophobic snorkel facilitates the removal of air bubbles during filling. The cartridge contains both a thin smear region, where a single layer of cells is presented unobstructed, for ease of species identification, and a thick smear region, containing multiple cell layers, for enhanced limit of detection.

  3. Fatalities caused by spherical bullets fired from blank cartridge guns in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uzün, Ibrahim; Büyük, Yalçin; Erkol, Zerrin; Ağritmiş, Hasan; Kir, Ziya

    2009-09-01

    Blank cartridge guns are generally regarded as being harmless and are not considered to be firearms in the legal sense in most countries. To show the danger of these guns upon simple modifications, we report 59 fatalities resulting from these simply modified blank cartridge guns in Istanbul, Turkey. The great majority of the victims were males and the age of those ranged from 11 to 61 years. In 55.9% of these cases, homicide was the origin followed by suicide (39%). The right temporal region was detected to be the preferred region in suicidal shots by blank cartridge guns with a frequency of 56.5%. In trial shots, all these guns were detected to discharge steel or lead spherical objects, generally 4 or 5 mm in diameter, successfully. Our findings strongly suggest that these guns should also be considered as handguns in the legal sense.

  4. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  5. Operating characteristics of a cartridge collector utilizing medium-pressure purge air

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, J. )

    1993-11-01

    For over 20 years, dust collectors equipped with cleanable paper cartridge pulse-jet cleaning mechanisms. Applications have been limited primarily to light inlet dust loads of 2 grains/dscf (4.6g/m[sup 3] or less). One manufacturer has successfully tested and operated a dust collector utilizing a full-scale, medium-pressure (6 to 8 psig, 4.0 to 5.5 MPa), utilizing 6-in. (150-mm) diameter by 50-in. (1,270-mm) cellulose cartridge filter elements, under high inlet dust load conditions.

  6. Modeling Pb (II) adsorption from aqueous solution by ostrich bone ash using adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mohammad J; Abedi-Koupai, Jahangir; Eslamian, Sayed S; Mousavi, Sayed F; Hasheminejad, Hasti

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of Adaptive Neural-Based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model in estimating the efficiency of Pb (II) ions removal from aqueous solution by ostrich bone ash, a batch experiment was conducted. Five operational parameters including adsorbent dosage (C(s)), initial concentration of Pb (II) ions (C(o)), initial pH, temperature (T) and contact time (t) were taken as the input data and the adsorption efficiency (AE) of bone ash as the output. Based on the 31 different structures, 5 ANFIS models were tested against the measured adsorption efficiency to assess the accuracy of each model. The results showed that ANFIS5, which used all input parameters, was the most accurate (RMSE = 2.65 and R(2) = 0.95) and ANFIS1, which used only the contact time input, was the worst (RMSE = 14.56 and R(2) = 0.46). In ranking the models, ANFIS4, ANFIS3 and ANFIS2 ranked second, third and fourth, respectively. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the estimated AE is more sensitive to the contact time, followed by pH, initial concentration of Pb (II) ions, adsorbent dosage, and temperature. The results showed that all ANFIS models overestimated the AE. In general, this study confirmed the capabilities of ANFIS model as an effective tool for estimation of AE. PMID:23383640

  7. Interaction of cement model systems with superplasticizers investigated by atomic force microscopy, zeta potential, and adsorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Lucia; Kaufmann, Josef; Winnefeld, Frank; Plank, Johann

    2010-07-01

    Polyelectrolyte-based dispersants are commonly used in a wide range of industrial applications to provide specific workability to colloidal suspensions. Their working mechanism is based on adsorption onto the surfaces of the suspended particles. The adsorbed polymer layer can exercise an electrostatic and/or a steric effect which is responsible for achieving dispersion. This study is focused on the dispersion forces induced by polycarboxylate ether-based superplasticizers (PCEs) commonly used in concrete. They are investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) applying standard silicon nitride tips exposed to solutions with different ionic compositions in a wet cell. Adsorption isotherms and zeta potential analysis were performed to characterize polymer displacement in the AFM system on nonreactive model substrates (quartz, mica, calcite, and magnesium oxide) in order to avoid the complexity of cement hydration products. The results show that PCE is strongly adsorbed by positively charged materials. This fact reveals that, being silicon nitride naturally positively charged, in most cases the superplasticizer adsorbs preferably on the silicon nitride tip than on the AFM substrate. However, the force-distance curves displayed repulsive interactions between tip and substrates even when polymer was poorly adsorbed on both. These observations allow us to conclude that the dispersion due to PCE strongly depends on the particle charge. It differs between colloids adsorbing and not adsorbing PCE, and leads to different forces acting between the particles.

  8. The influence of adsorption coating on molecular heat transfer in the system `rarefied gas — metal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhov, A. I.; Borisov, S. F.; Porodnov, B. T.

    2010-03-01

    Based on the classical concept of atomic motion and the Goodman and Wachman lattice theory, we have developed a computer program to model the equilibrium and non-equilibrium scattering of helium atoms by 3D tungsten crystal lattice with allowance for adsorption surface coating. Within the concept of energy accommodation coefficient, we have calculated the rate of molecular heat transfer of helium to clean tungsten surface or to tungsten surface partially covered with an adsorbate. The calculations were performed for various surface temperatures. The calculated dependences were compared to test data obtained in experiments with surfaces controlled in terms of their chemical composition. Within the developed approach, the simulations proved capable of providing an adequate description to experimental data obtained for the equilibrium energy accommodation coefficient on the clean surface, and also for the non-equilibrium energy accommodation coefficient for the surface partially covered with adsorbate.

  9. ORC-GAC-Fe0 system for the remediation of trichloroethylene and monochlorobenzene contaminated aquifer: 1. Adsorption and degradation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qi; Chen, Ying-xu; Plagentz, V; Schäfer, D; Dahmke, A

    2004-01-01

    Activities at a former Chemistry Triangle in Bitterfeld, Germany, resulted in contamination of groundwater with a mixture of trichloroethylene(TCE) and monochlorobenzene(MCB). The objective of this study was to develop a barrier system, which includes an ORC(oxygen release compounds) and GAC(granular activated carbon) layer for adsorption of MCB and bioregeneration of GAC, a Fe0 layer for chemical reductive dechlorination of TCE and other chlorinated hydrocarbon in situ. A laboratory-scale column experiment was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of this proposed system. This experiment was performed using a series of continuous flow Teflon columns including an ORC column, a GAC column, and a Fe0 column. Simulated MCB and TCE contaminated groundwater was pumped upflow into this system at a flow rate of 1.1 ml/min. Results showed that 17%-50% of TCE and 28%-50% of MCB were dissipated in ORC column. Chloride ion, however, was not released, which suggest the dechlorination do not happen in ORC column. In GAC column, the adsorption of contaminants on activated carbon and their induced degradation by adapted microorganisms attached to the carbon surface were observed. Due to competitive exchange processes, TCE can be desorbed by MCB in GAC column and further degraded in iron column. The completely dechlorination rate of TCE was 0.16-0.18 cm(-1), 1-4 magnitudes more than the formation rate of three dichloroethene isomers. Cis-DCE is the main chlorinated product, which can be cumulated in the system, not only depending on the formation rate and its decaying rate, but also the initial concentration of TCE.

  10. Nondestructive laser system for the in-situ study of the kinetics of the adsorption processes at solid/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, Radu; Sharkany, Josif P.

    1999-05-01

    This paper presents a laser-optical fiber system which allows us to estimate continuously and 'in situ' the evolution of the adsorption layer at the interface solid-liquid. Locally, the kinetics of the evolution of the adsorption layer at the interface between a mineral and a xanthate organic solution, is investigated. In this case, the knowledge for the kinetics of the adsorption process is extremely important for explaining the intimate mechanisms of the flotation industrial processes. The monitoring system for the kinetics of the adsorption of xanthate organic molecules on the mineral support is based, during its run, on the variation in the relative reflectance of the interface due to the adsorption layer evolution. The method, designed to study the evolution kinetics of the adsorption layer at the interface between a xanthate solution and a sulphuric mineral, is based on the proportionally link between the evolution of the adsorption layer and the relative variation of its refraction index. The experimental appliance used a coherent and monochromatic unpolarized laser radiation, with its wavelength (lambda) equals 0.89 micrometer, which corresponds to the near IR range. This wavelength has been chosen both for physical performed using an Al mirror as standard for maximum (100%) reflectance, and by immersing it into different xanthate solutions having successively the following concentrations: 25 mg/l; 50 mg/l; 100 mg/l and 3 g/l, respectively. This procedure allowed to observe that the reflection given by the mirror, in these cases, has a relatively narrow spectral range in UV, for which it has values greater for 4 - 6%. The following ones have been used: isobutyl xanthate, amyl xanthate and ethyl xanthate. The reflection spectrum on the mirror (if neglecting the attenuation in liquid and the transmission spectrum) was measured by means of a spectrophotometer SPECORD M40 (made in Germany), and the determinations were performed in the range from 200 to 950 nm.

  11. Fractional Statistical Theory of Adsorption of Polyatomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardo, J. L.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Romá, F.

    2004-10-01

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane’s statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory.

  12. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption of polyatomics.

    PubMed

    Riccardo, J L; Ramirez-Pastor, A J; Romá, F

    2004-10-29

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane's statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory. PMID:15525184

  13. Design method for adsorption beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, R. L.; Jackson, J. K.

    1970-01-01

    Regenerable adsorption beds for long-term life support systems include synthetic geolite to remove carbon dioxide and silica gel to dehumidify the atmospheric gas prior to its passage through the geolite beds. Bed performance is evaluated from adsorption characteristics, heat and mass transfer, and pressure drop.

  14. Investigating Premature Ignition of Thruster Pressure Cartridges by Vibration-Induced Electrostatic Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Stephen S.; Saulsberry, Regor

    2010-01-01

    Pyrotechnic thruster pressure cartridges (TPCs) are used for aeroshell separation on a new NASA crew launch vehicle. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) during TPC acceptance testing indicated that internal assemblies moved during shock and vibration testing due to an internal bond anomaly. This caused concerns that the launch environment might produce the same movement and release propellant grains that might be prematurely ignited through impact or through electrostatic discharge (ESD) as grains vibrated against internal surfaces. Since a new lot could not be fabricated in time, a determination had to be made as to whether the lot was acceptable to fly. This paper discusses the ESD evaluation and a separate paper addresses the impact problem. A challenge to straight forward assessment existed due to the unavailability of triboelectric data characterizing the static charging characteristics of the propellants within the TPC. The approach examined the physical limitations for charge buildup within the TPC system geometry and evaluated it for discharge under simulated vibrations used to qualify components for launch. A facsimile TPC was fabricated using SS 301 for the case and surrogate worst case materials for the propellants based on triboelectric data. System discharge behavior was evaluated by applying high voltage to the point of discharge in air and by placing worst case charge accumulations within the facsimile TPC and forcing discharge. The facsimile TPC contained simulated propellant grains and lycopodium, a well characterized indicator for static discharge in dust explosions, and was subjected to accelerations equivalent to the maximum accelerations possible during launch. The magnitude of charge generated within the facsimile TPC system was demonstrated to lie in a range of 100 to 10,000 times smaller than the spark energies measured to ignite propellant grains in industry standard discharge tests. The test apparatus, methodology, and results are described in

  15. System-dependent dispersion coefficients for the DFT-D3 treatment of adsorption processes on ionic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Stephan; Moellmann, Jonas; Reckien, Werner; Bredow, Thomas; Grimme, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations (DFT-D3) were performed for the adsorption of CO on MgO and C(2) H(2) on NaCl surfaces. An extension of our non-empirical scheme for the computation of atom-in-molecules dispersion coefficients is proposed. It is based on electrostatically embedded M(4)X(4) (M=Na, Mg) clusters that are used in TDDFT calculations of dynamic dipole polarizabilities. We find that the C(MM)(6) dispersion coefficients for bulk NaCl and MgO are reduced by factors of about 100 and 35 for Na and Mg, respectively, compared to the values of the free atoms. These are used in periodic DFT calculations with the revPBE semi-local density functional. As demonstrated by calculations of adsorption potential energy curves, the new C(6) coefficients lead to much more accurate energies (E(ads)) and molecule-surface distances than with previous DFT-D schemes. For NaCl/C(2) H(2) we obtained at the revPBE-D3(BJ) level a value of E(ads) =-7.4 kcal mol(-1) in good agreement with experimental data (-5.7 to -7.1 kcal mol(-1)). Dispersion-uncorrected DFT yields an unbound surface state. For the MgO/CO system, the computed revPBE-D3(BJ) value of E(ads) =-4.1 kcal mol(-1) is also in reasonable agreement with experimental results (-3.0 kcal mol(-1)) when thermal corrections are taken into account. Our new dispersion correction also improves computed lattice constants of the bulk systems significantly compared to plain DFT or previous DFT-D results. The extended DFT-D3 scheme also provides accurate non-covalent interactions for ionic systems without empirical adjustments and is suggested as a general tool in surface science.

  16. Synthesis of porous molecularly imprinted polymers for selective adsorption of glutathione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Renyuan; Hu, Xiaoling; Guan, Ping; Li, Ji; Qian, Liwei; Wang, Chaoli; Wang, Qiaoli

    2015-03-01

    An effective approach overcome the classical deficiencies of biomolecules molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), that is, low binding capacity and slow mass transfer rate, is proposed. With glutathione (GSH) as target molecule, porous imprinted layers were fabricated according to our newly developed method the introduction of a mixture of acetontrile and dimethylsulfoxide as porogen in surface-initiated polymerization systems. The resultant MIPs particles exhibited a large surface area could remarkably improve the imprinting effect in relation to a significantly increased imprinting factor and mass transfer rate, compared to the MIPs prepared by using aqueous solution as solvent. The batch static binding tests were carried out to evaluate the adsorption kinetics, adsorption isotherms and selective recognition of the MIPs particles. The binding behavior followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model, revealing that the process was chemically carried out. Two binding isotherm models were applied to analyze equilibrium data, obtaining the best description by Langmuir isotherm model. In addition, the selective of separation and extraction of GSH from a mixture of GSH and its structural analogs could be achieved on the MIPs solid-phase extraction cartridge, indicating that the possibility for the separation and enrichment of the template from complicated matrices.

  17. Evaluation of a passive optical based end of service life indicator (ESLI) for organic vapor respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Checky, Melissa; Frankel, Kevin; Goddard, Denise; Johnson, Erik; Thomas, J Christopher; Zelinsky, Maria; Javner, Cassidy

    2016-01-01

    A passive visual end of service life indicator (ESLI) for certain organic vapors has been attached to the inside wall of an organic vapor respirator cartridge. The opposite side of the ESLI touches activated carbon inside the cartridge. During use, organic vapors moving through the cartridge adsorb into both the carbon and the ESLI. The cartridge body is clear so that when vapor concentrations meet a certain threshold, the user may observe the progressive development of an indicator bar down the side of the ESLI. The cartridge is deemed ready to change when any part of the indicator bar touches a marked end line. The performance of the ESLI was observed when the cartridge was tested against a variety of organic vapors, exposure concentrations above the minimum indication level, humidities, temperatures, flow rates, and mixtures. In all cases, the ESLI indicated end of service life with more than 10% cartridge service life remaining (which is a NIOSH test criteria). The results were also compared to mathematical predictions of cartridge service life. PMID:26418577

  18. Evaluation of a passive optical based end of service life indicator (ESLI) for organic vapor respirator cartridges

    PubMed Central

    Checky, Melissa; Frankel, Kevin; Goddard, Denise; Johnson, Erik; Thomas, J. Christopher; Zelinsky, Maria; Javner, Cassidy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A passive visual end of service life indicator (ESLI) for certain organic vapors has been attached to the inside wall of an organic vapor respirator cartridge. The opposite side of the ESLI touches activated carbon inside the cartridge. During use, organic vapors moving through the cartridge adsorb into both the carbon and the ESLI. The cartridge body is clear so that when vapor concentrations meet a certain threshold, the user may observe the progressive development of an indicator bar down the side of the ESLI. The cartridge is deemed ready to change when any part of the indicator bar touches a marked end line. The performance of the ESLI was observed when the cartridge was tested against a variety of organic vapors, exposure concentrations above the minimum indication level, humidities, temperatures, flow rates, and mixtures. In all cases, the ESLI indicated end of service life with more than 10% cartridge service life remaining (which is a NIOSH test criteria). The results were also compared to mathematical predictions of cartridge service life. PMID:26418577

  19. 42 CFR 84.112 - Canisters and cartridges in parallel; resistance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Canisters and cartridges in parallel; resistance requirements. 84.112 Section 84.112 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  20. 42 CFR 84.112 - Canisters and cartridges in parallel; resistance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canisters and cartridges in parallel; resistance requirements. 84.112 Section 84.112 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  1. 42 CFR 84.114 - Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement. 84.114 Section 84.114 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF...

  2. 42 CFR 84.114 - Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement. 84.114 Section 84.114 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF...

  3. 42 CFR 84.1155 - Filters used with canisters and cartridges; location; replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Filters used with canisters and cartridges... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1155 Filters used with canisters and...

  4. Antimony speciation by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using solid phase extraction cartridges.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunhai; Cai, Qiantao; Guo, Zhong-Xian; Yang, Zhaoguang; Khoo, Soo Beng

    2002-10-01

    A novel and simple method for inorganic antimony speciation is described based on selective solid phase extraction (SPE) separation of antimony(III) and highly sensitive inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) detection of total antimony and antimony(V) in the aqueous phase of the sample. Non-polar SPE cartridges, such as the Isolute silica-based octyl (C8) sorbent-containing cartridge, selectively retained the Sb(III) complex with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC), while the uncomplexed Sb(V) remained as a free species in the solution and passed through the cartridge. The Sb(III) concentration was calculated as the difference between total antimony and Sb(V) concentrations. The detection limit was 1 ng L(-1) antimony. Factors affecting the separation and detection of antimony species were investigated. Acidification of samples led to partial or complete retention of Sb(V) on C8 cartridge. Foreign ions tending to complex with Sb(III) or APDC did not interfere with the retention behavior of the Sb(III)-APDC complex. This method has been successfully applied to antimony speciation of various types of water samples.

  5. 42 CFR 84.1157 - Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., and mists of paints, lacquers, and enamels 50 70 20 1 Measured at end of service life specified in... specified in § 84.205. (c) Lacquer and enamel mist tests; general. (1) Three respirators with cartridges containing or having attached to them, filters for protection against mists of paints, lacquers, and...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1157 - Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., and mists of paints, lacquers, and enamels 50 70 20 1 Measured at end of service life specified in... specified in § 84.205. (c) Lacquer and enamel mist tests; general. (1) Three respirators with cartridges containing or having attached to them, filters for protection against mists of paints, lacquers, and...

  7. 42 CFR 84.1157 - Chemical cartridge respirators with particulate filters; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., and mists of paints, lacquers, and enamels 50 70 20 1 Measured at end of service life specified in... specified in § 84.205. (c) Lacquer and enamel mist tests; general. (1) Three respirators with cartridges containing or having attached to them, filters for protection against mists of paints, lacquers, and...

  8. 76 FR 16639 - Certain Ink Cartridges and Components Thereof; Institution of Consolidated Advisory Opinion and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ...; and Seiko Epson Corporation of Japan (collectively ``Epson''). 71 FR 14720 (March 23, 2006). The... COMMISSION Certain Ink Cartridges and Components Thereof; Institution of Consolidated Advisory Opinion and... given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has instituted consolidated advisory opinion...

  9. 75 FR 44988 - In the Matter of Certain Toner Cartridges and Components Thereof; Notice of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Toner Cartridges and Components Thereof; Notice of Investigation AGENCY... 202-205-2000. Hearing impaired individuals are advised that information on this matter can be...

  10. 78 FR 40506 - Certain Toner Cartridges and Components Thereof; Issuance of General Exclusion Order and Cease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ..., California; Ink Technologies Printer Supplies, LLC of Dayton, Ohio; SupplyBuy.com , Inc. of Nashville... Group, Inc.; IJSS Inc.; Imaging Resources, LLC; Ink Technologies Printer Supplies LLC; SupplyBuy.com... COMMISSION Certain Toner Cartridges and Components Thereof; Issuance of General Exclusion Order and Cease...

  11. A Field-Test of Solar Assisted Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkura, Masashi; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu

    A field-test of solar assisted desiccant evaporative cooling process has been carried out, which is a quite attractive cooling / dehumidification process considering various environmental problems caused by conventional electricity driven air conditioners. The process performance has been examined by means of temperature drop between outside air and supply air and COPs (COP value based on solar irradiation). This cooling performance was strongly influenced by solar irradiation and ambient air condition. Stable irradiation produced a higher regeneration temperature resulting higher dehumidifying performance. At one day with as table solar irradiation, the cooling process could produce cool supply air of 18.7°C against the ambient air of 30.1°C and averaged COP, was 0.41. On the other hand, unstable irradiation due to some clouds made the dehumidifying performance lower. However, decrease in the cooling performance was small compared to that obtained at the stable irradiation condition. This is due to buffering by thermal storage of the water circulating in solar collectors. Influence of ambient humidity on the cooling performance was rather serious. At higher humidity condition, the amount of dehumidified water became larger due to increase of effective adsorption capacity of the desiccant rotor. However, the temperature drop was decreased to 6.9°C. This behavior was mainly due to simultaneous increase of humidity and temperature in the dehumidified air. In this situation, an effective evaporation in the following water spray evaporative cooler did not occur.

  12. Artificial neural network (ANN) modeling of adsorption of methylene blue by NaOH-modified rice husk in a fixed-bed column system.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shamik; Saha, Papita Das

    2013-02-01

    In this study, rice husk was modified with NaOH and used as adsorbent for dynamic adsorption of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. Continuous removal of MB from aqueous solutions was studied in a laboratory scale fixed-bed column packed with NaOH-modified rice husk (NMRH). Effect of different flow rates and bed heights on the column breakthrough performance was investigated. In order to determine the most suitable model for describing the adsorption kinetics of MB in the fixed-bed column system, the bed depth service time (BDST) model as well as the Thomas model was fitted to the experimental data. An artificial neural network (ANN)-based model was also developed for describing the dynamic dye adsorption process. An extensive error analysis was carried out between experimental data and data predicted by the models by using the following error functions: correlation coefficient (R(2)), average relative error, sum of the absolute error and Chi-square statistic test (χ(2)). Results show that with increasing bed height and decreasing flow rate, the breakthrough time was delayed. All the error functions yielded minimum values for the ANN model than the traditional models (BDST and Thomas), suggesting that the ANN model is the most suitable model to describe the fixed-bed adsorption of MB by NMRH. It is also more rational and reliable to interpret dynamic dye adsorption data through a process of ANN architecture.

  13. Numerical study of an internal-reforming solid oxide fuel cell and adsorption chiller co-generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Leong, K. C.

    A study is conducted on a cogeneration system that incorporates a natural gas fed internal-reforming solid oxide fuel cell (IRSOFC) and a zeolite/water adsorption chiller (AC). The main aim is to investigate the performance of this combined system under different operating conditions and design parameters. A mathematical model is developed to simulate the combined system under steady-state conditions. The effects of fuel flow rate, fuel utilization factor, circulation ratio, mass of adsorbent and inlet air temperature on the performance are considered. The results show that the proposed IRSOFC-AC cogeneration system can achieve a total efficiency (combined electrical power and cooling power) of more than 77%. The electrical efficiency is found to decrease as the fuel flow rate increases, while the cooling power increases to a constant value. The total efficiency reaches a maximum value with variation of the fuel utilization factor. Both the circulation ratio and the inlet air temperature exert positive impacts on system efficiency.

  14. Development of a Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry Cartridge with Integrated Solid Phase Extraction for Bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengsen; Manicke, Nicholas E

    2015-06-16

    A novel paper spray cartridge with an integrated solid phase extraction (SPE) column is described. The cartridge performs extraction and pre-concentration, as well as sample ionization by paper spray, from complex samples such as plasma. The cartridge allows for selective enrichment of target molecules from larger sample volumes and removal of the matrix, which significantly improved the signal intensity of target compounds in plasma samples by paper spray ionization. Detection limits, quantitative performance, recovery, ionization suppression, and the effects of sample volume were evaluated for five drugs: carbamazepine, atenolol, sulfamethazine, diazepam, and alprazolam. Compared with direct paper spray analysis of dried plasma spots, paper spray analysis using the integrated solid phase extraction improved the detection limits significantly by a factor of 14-70, depending on the drug. The improvement in detection limits was, in large part, due to the capability of analyzing larger sample volumes. In addition, ionization suppression was found to be lower and recovery was higher for paper spray with integrated SPE, as compared to direct paper spray analysis. By spiking an isotopically labeled internal standard into the plasma sample, a linear calibration curve for the drugs was obtained from the limit of detection (LOD) to 1 μg/mL, indicating that this method can be used for quantitative analysis. The paper spray cartridge with integrated SPE could prove valuable for analytes that ionize poorly, in applications where lower detection limits are required, or on portable mass spectrometers. The improved performance comes at the cost of requiring a more complex paper spray cartridge and requiring larger sample volumes than those used in typical direct paper spray ionization.

  15. Cd adsorption onto bacterial surfaces: A universal adsorption edge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Nathan; Fein, Jeremy

    2001-07-01

    In this study, we measure the thermodynamic stability constants for proton and Cd binding onto the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus megaturium, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Sporosarcina ureae, and Bacillus cereus. Potentiometric titrations and Cd-bacteria adsorption experiments yield average values for the carboxyl site pK a, site concentration, and log stability constant for the bacterial surface Cd-carboxyl complex of 5.0, 2.0 × 10 -3 mol/g and 4.0 respectively. Our results indicate that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit nearly identical Cd adsorption behavior as a function of pH. We propose that metal-bacteria adsorption is not dependent on the bacterial species involved, and we develop a generalized adsorption model which may greatly simplify the task of quantifying the effects of bacterial adsorption on dissolved mass transport in realistic geologic systems.

  16. Co-Adsorption of Ammonia and Formaldehyde on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents for the Primary Life Support System (PLSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Serio, Michael A.; Wilburn, Monique S.

    2016-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of a reversible carbon sorbent for trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is deemed non-regenerable, while the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. Data on concurrent sorption and desorption of ammonia and formaldehyde, which are major TCs of concern, are presented in this paper. A carbon sorbent was fabricated by dry impregnation of a reticulated carbon-foam support with polyvinylidene chloride, followed by carbonization and thermal oxidation in air. Sorbent performance was tested for ammonia and formaldehyde sorption and vacuum regeneration, with and without water present in the gas stream. It was found that humidity in the gas phase enhanced ammonia-sorption capacity by a factor larger than two. Co-adsorption of ammonia and formaldehyde in the presence of water resulted in strong formaldehyde sorption (to the point that it was difficult to saturate the sorbent on the time scales used in this study). In the absence of humidity, adsorption of formaldehyde on the carbon surface was found to impair ammonia sorption in subsequent runs; in the presence of water, however, both ammonia and formaldehyde could be efficiently removed from the gas phase by the sorbent. The efficiency of vacuum regeneration could be enhanced by gentle heating to temperatures below 60 deg.

  17. Heavy metal adsorptivity of calcium-alginate-modified diethylenetriamine-silica gel and its application to a flow analytical system using flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Suzuki, Toshinobu; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Nagai, Daisuke; Hirayama, Kazuo; Onozato, Makoto; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2014-08-20

    This study aimed to evaluate the heavy metal adsorptivity of calcium-alginate-modified diethylenetriamine-silica gel (CaAD) and incorporate this biosorbent into a flow analytical system for heavy metal ions using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The biosorbent was synthesized by electrostatically coating calcium alginate onto diethylenetriamine (dien)-silica gel. Copper ion adsorption tests by a batch method showed that CaAD exhibited a higher adsorption rate compared with other biosorbents despite its low maximum adsorption capacity. Next, CaAD was packed into a 1mL microcolumn, which was connected to a flow analytical system equipped with an FAAS instrument. The flow system quantitatively adsorbed heavy metals and enriched their concentrations. This quantitative adsorption was achieved for pH 3-4 solutions containing 1.0×10(-6) M of heavy metal ions at a flow rate of 5.0 mL min(-1). Furthermore, the metal ions were successfully desorbed from CaAD at low nitric acid concentrations (0.05-0.15 M) than from the polyaminecarboxylic acid chelating resin (Chelex 100). Therefore, CaAD may be considered as a biosorbent that quickly adsorbs and easily desorbs analyte metal ions. In addition, the flow system enhanced the concentrations of heavy metals such as Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Pb(2+) by 50-fold. This new enrichment system successfully performed the separation and determination of Cu(2+) (5.0×10(-8)M) and Zn(2+) (5.7×10(-8) M) in a river water sample and Pb(2+) (3.8×10(-9) M) in a ground water sample.

  18. Heavy metal adsorptivity of calcium-alginate-modified diethylenetriamine-silica gel and its application to a flow analytical system using flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Suzuki, Toshinobu; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Nagai, Daisuke; Hirayama, Kazuo; Onozato, Makoto; Itabashi, Hideyuki

    2014-08-20

    This study aimed to evaluate the heavy metal adsorptivity of calcium-alginate-modified diethylenetriamine-silica gel (CaAD) and incorporate this biosorbent into a flow analytical system for heavy metal ions using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The biosorbent was synthesized by electrostatically coating calcium alginate onto diethylenetriamine (dien)-silica gel. Copper ion adsorption tests by a batch method showed that CaAD exhibited a higher adsorption rate compared with other biosorbents despite its low maximum adsorption capacity. Next, CaAD was packed into a 1mL microcolumn, which was connected to a flow analytical system equipped with an FAAS instrument. The flow system quantitatively adsorbed heavy metals and enriched their concentrations. This quantitative adsorption was achieved for pH 3-4 solutions containing 1.0×10(-6) M of heavy metal ions at a flow rate of 5.0 mL min(-1). Furthermore, the metal ions were successfully desorbed from CaAD at low nitric acid concentrations (0.05-0.15 M) than from the polyaminecarboxylic acid chelating resin (Chelex 100). Therefore, CaAD may be considered as a biosorbent that quickly adsorbs and easily desorbs analyte metal ions. In addition, the flow system enhanced the concentrations of heavy metals such as Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Pb(2+) by 50-fold. This new enrichment system successfully performed the separation and determination of Cu(2+) (5.0×10(-8)M) and Zn(2+) (5.7×10(-8) M) in a river water sample and Pb(2+) (3.8×10(-9) M) in a ground water sample. PMID:25086892

  19. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2011-05-26

    This report describes experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions using monosodium titanate (MST) and crystalline silicotitanate (CST)-laden filter cartridges. Four types of ion exchange cartridge media (CST and MST designed by both 3M and POROX{reg_sign}) were evaluated. In these proof-of-principle tests effective uptake of both Sr-85 and Cs-137 was observed. However, the experiments were not performed long enough to determine the saturation levels or breakthrough curve for each filter cartridge. POREX{reg_sign} MST cartridges, which by design were based on co-sintering of the active titanates with polyethylene particles, seem to perform as well as the 3M-designed MST cartridges (impregnated filter membrane design) in the uptake of strontium. At low salt simulant conditions (0.29 M Na{sup +}), the instantaneous decontamination factor (D{sub F}) for Sr-85 with the 3M-design MST cartridge measured 26, representing the removal of 96% of the Sr-85. On the other hand, the Sr-85 instantaneous D{sub F} with the POREX{reg_sign} design MST cartridge measured 40 or 98% removal of the Sr-85. Strontium removal with the 3M-design MST and CST cartridges placed in series filter arrangement produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 or 97.6% removal compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 or 99.7% removal of the strontium with the POREX{reg_sign} MST and CST cartridge design placed in series. At high salt simulant conditions (5.6 M Na{sup +}), strontium removal with 3M-designed MST cartridge only and with 3M-designed MST and CST cartridges operated in a series configuration were identical. The instantaneous decontamination factor and the strontium removal efficiency, under the above configuration, averaged 8.6 and 88%, respectively. There were no POREX{reg_sign} cartridge experiments using the higher ionic strength simulant solution. At low salt simulant conditions, the uptake of Cs-137 with

  20. Nanoparticle filtration performance of filtering facepiece respirators and canister/cartridge filters.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; BerryAnn, Roland; Szalajda, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory protection offered by a particulate respirator is a function of the filter efficiency and face seal leakage. A previous study in our laboratory measured the filter penetration and total inward leakage (TIL) of 20-1000 nm size particles for N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) using a breathing manikin. The results showed relatively higher filter penetration and TIL value under different leak sizes and flow rates at the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), ∼45 nm for electrostatic FFRs,and ∼150 nm for the same FFRs after charge removal. This indicates an advantage of mechanical filters over electrostatic filters rated for similar filter efficiencies in providing respiratory protection in nanoparticle workplaces. To better understand the influence of the MPPS, the filtration performance of commonly used one N95 and one N100 FFR models, and four P100 canister/cartridge models were measured with monodisperse NaCl aerosols, and polydisperse NaCl aerosols employed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification test method. As expected, the polydisperse aerosol penetration was below 5% for the N95 FFR, and below 0.03% for the N100 FFR and P100 canister/cartridge filters. Monodisperse aerosol penetration results showed a MPPS of ∼40 nm for both the N95 and N100 FFRs. All four P100 canister/cartridge filters had a MPPS of ≥150 nm, similar to expectations for mechanical filters. The P100 canister/cartridge filters showed lower penetration values for different size nanoparticles than the N100 FFRs. The results indicate that a mechanical filter would offer a relatively higher filtration performance for nanoparticles than an electrostatic counterpart rated for the same filter efficiency. Overall, the results obtained in the study suggest that MPPS should be considered as a key factor in the development of respirator standards and recommendations for protection against nanoparticles. PMID:23927008

  1. Thermodynamics of interfacial energy in binary metallic systems: influence of adsorption on dihedral angles

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, I. . E-mail: ichiko@eps.s.u-tiokyo.ac.jp; Takei, Y.

    2005-02-01

    The solid-liquid interfacial energy (or interfacial tension) was investigated by the lattice-liquid statistical calculation and by the Cahn-Hilliard theory of interface. Interfacial energies in binary metallic systems were estimated from a few bulk thermodynamic properties, i.e., melting temperature, entropy of fusion, and the critical temperature of the liquid phase. In eutectic systems, interfacial energy gradually increases with decreasing concentration of the solid species in the liquid. In monotectic systems, interfacial thickening occurs and interfacial energy is reduced around the liquid immiscibility gap. The results of calculation explain the experimental data of dihedral angles fairly well.

  2. Characterization of volatile organic gunshot residues in fired handgun cartridges by headspace sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Gallidabino, Matteo; Romolo, Francesco S; Weyermann, Celine

    2015-09-01

    In forensic investigation of firearm-related cases, determination of the residual amount of volatile compounds remaining inside a cartridge could be useful in estimating the time since its discharge. Published approaches are based on following the decrease of selected target compounds as a function of time by using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME). Naphthalene as well as an unidentified decomposition product of nitrocellulose (referred to as "TEA2") are usually employed for this purpose. However, reliability can be brought into question given their high volatility and low reproducibility of the extracted procedure. In order to identify alternatives and therefore develop improved dating methods, an extensive study on the composition and variability of volatile residues in nine different types of cartridges was carried out. Analysis was performed using headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE), which is a more exhaustive technique compared to SPME. One hundred sixty six compounds were identified (several of which for the first time), and it was observed that the final compositional characteristics of each residue were strongly dependent on its source. Variability of single identified compounds within and between different types of cartridge as well as their evolution over time were also studied. Many explosion products containing up to four aromatic rings were found to be globally present in high proportions. Twenty-seven of them (excluding naphthalene) also presented detectable decreases during the first 24 h. Therefore, they could be used as complementary target analytes in future dating methods. PMID:26168966

  3. Characterization of volatile organic gunshot residues in fired handgun cartridges by headspace sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Gallidabino, Matteo; Romolo, Francesco S; Weyermann, Celine

    2015-09-01

    In forensic investigation of firearm-related cases, determination of the residual amount of volatile compounds remaining inside a cartridge could be useful in estimating the time since its discharge. Published approaches are based on following the decrease of selected target compounds as a function of time by using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME). Naphthalene as well as an unidentified decomposition product of nitrocellulose (referred to as "TEA2") are usually employed for this purpose. However, reliability can be brought into question given their high volatility and low reproducibility of the extracted procedure. In order to identify alternatives and therefore develop improved dating methods, an extensive study on the composition and variability of volatile residues in nine different types of cartridges was carried out. Analysis was performed using headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE), which is a more exhaustive technique compared to SPME. One hundred sixty six compounds were identified (several of which for the first time), and it was observed that the final compositional characteristics of each residue were strongly dependent on its source. Variability of single identified compounds within and between different types of cartridge as well as their evolution over time were also studied. Many explosion products containing up to four aromatic rings were found to be globally present in high proportions. Twenty-seven of them (excluding naphthalene) also presented detectable decreases during the first 24 h. Therefore, they could be used as complementary target analytes in future dating methods.

  4. RAMGEN ROTOR CARTRIDGE FOR THE PRE-PROTOTYPE RAMGEN ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron Koopman

    2003-09-01

    The research and development of a unique combustion engine is presented. The engine converts the thrust from ramjet modules located on the rim of a disk into shaft torque, which in turn can be used for electrical power generation or mechanical drive applications. A test program was undertaken that included evaluation of the pre-prototype engine and incorporation of improvements to the thrust modules and supporting systems. Fuel mixing studies with vortex generators and bluff body flame holders demonstrated the importance of increasing the shear-layer area and spreading angle to augment flame volume. Evaluation of flame-holding configurations (with variable fuel injection methods) concluded that the heat release zone, and therefore combustion efficiency, could be manipulated by judicious selection of bluff body geometry, and is less influenced by fuel injection distribution. Finally, successful operation of novel fuel and cooling air delivery systems have resolved issues of gas (fuel and air) delivery to the individual rotor segments. The lessons learned from the pre-prototype engine are currently being applied to the development of a 2.8MW engine.

  5. Development Study of Cartridge/Crucible Tube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKechnie, Timothy N.; ODell, Scott J.

    1998-01-01

    The limitations of traditional alloys and the desire for improved performance for components is driving the increased utilization of refractory metals in tile space industry. From advanced propulsion systems to high temperature furnace components for microgravity processing, refractory metals are being used for their high melting temperatures and inherent chemical stability. Techniques have been developed to produce near net shape refractory metal components utilizing vacuum plasma spraying. Material utilization is very high, and laborious machining can be avoided. As-spray formed components have been tested and found to perform adequately. However, increased mechanical and thermal properties are needed. To improve these properties, post processing thermal treatments such as hydrogen sintering and vacuum annealing have been performed. Components formed from alloys of tungsten, rhenium, tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum are discussed and a metallurgical analyses detailing the results are presented. A qualitative comparison of mechanical properties is also included.

  6. Development of an in Vitro System to Simulate the Adsorption of Self-Emulsifying Tea (Camellia oleifera) Seed Oil.

    PubMed

    Sramala, Issara; Pinket, Wichchunee; Pongwan, Pawinee; Jarussophon, Suwatchai; Kasemwong, Kittiwut

    2016-01-01

    In this study, tea (Camellia oleifera) seed oil was formulated into self-emulsifying oil formulations (SEOF) to enhance the aqueous dispersibility and intestinal retention to achieve higher bioavailability. Self-emulsifying tea seed oils were developed by using different concentrations of lecithin in combination with surfactant blends (Span(®)80 and Tween(®)80). The lecithin/surfactant systems were able to provide clear and stable liquid formulations. The SEOF were investigated for physicochemical properties including appearance, emulsion droplets size, PDI and zeta potential. The chemical compositions of tea seed oil and SEOF were compared using GC-MS techniques. In addition, the oil adsorption measurement on artificial membranes was performed using a Franz cell apparatus and colorimetric analysis. The microscopic structure of membranes was observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After aqueous dilution with fed-state simulated gastric fluid (FeSSGF), the droplet size of all SEOF was close to 200 nm with low PDI values and the zeta potential was negative. GC-MS chromatograms revealed that the chemical compositions of SEOF were not significantly different from that of the original tea seed oil. The morphological study showed that only the SEOF could form film layers. The oil droplets were extracted both from membrane treated with tea seed oil and the SEOF in order to evaluate the chemical compositions by GC-MS. PMID:27136528

  7. Development and Testing of a Temperature-swing Adsorption Compressor for Carbon Dioxide in Closed-loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Rosen, Micha; Affleck, David; LeVan, M. Douglas; Wang, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby dosing the air-loop. We have developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no rapidly moving parts for performing these tasks. The TSAC is a solid-state compressor that has the capability to remove CO2 from a low- pressure source, and subsequently store, compress, and deliver at a higher pressure as required by a processor. The TSAC is an ideal interface device for CO2 removal and reduction units in the air revitalization loop of a spacecraft for oxygen recovery. This paper discusses the design and testing of a TSAC for carbon dioxide that has application in the ISS and future spacecraft for closing the air revitalization loop.

  8. Capital and Operating Costs of Small Arsenic Removal Adsorptive Media Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted 50 full-scale demonstration projects on treatment systems removing arsenic from drinking water in 26 states throughout the U.S. The projects were conducted to evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of arsenic remo...

  9. The Adsorption of Arsenic on Iron Pipes in Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to remain compliant with the U.S. EPA’s Lead and Copper rule, it is pivotal to understand the relationship between factors affecting lead release in drinking water distribution systems. Lead solids were synthesized in cell experiments using a pH range of 6-11 with both 1...

  10. INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

    2000-11-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

  11. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  12. Nitrogen rejection with pressure swing adsorption. Principles, design and remote control using an expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Buras, R.J.; Chan, A.; Mitariten, M.J.

    1995-11-01

    The rejection of nitrogen from low-quality natural gas has historically been accomplished through low-temperature cryogenic systems and generally applied to large volumes of gas. Until recently, the treatment of small gas volumes has presented difficulty in meeting economic targets. The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has indicated that in 1988, total nonassociated raw gas reserves in the lower 48 states was 144 TCF. Of these reserves, an estimated 19.2 TCF (13.3%) contain nitrogen greater than or equal to 4% and that only 1.7 TCF of this high nitrogen gas is in production. Nitrogen rejection from associated gas is also an expanding market and includes the applications of coal seam gas and GOB gas processing. UOP has developed and commercialized its NITREX process for these markets. This process separates nitrogen from methane through the cycling of multiple fixed beds of adsorbent. The NITREX system requires little pretreatment and is a shop-fabricated system with maximized skid mounting of components. The economic attractiveness of upgrading low-quality natural gas has been extended to low gas volumes through the use of this technology. POLYBED{reg_sign}PSA systems were first commercialized for the separation of light gases in 1966. This technology operates by using a fixed bed of adsorbent to adsorb gases of higher boiling points and molecular weights from lighter gases. Commercially attractive separations include the purification of hydrogen from light gases, the upgrading of raw helium for liquefaction and the manufacture of ultra pure methane for chemical plant feedstock.

  13. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  14. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed

    Calvet, R

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described.

  15. Extracorporeal adsorption of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Staubach, K H; Rosenfeldt, J A; Veit, O; Bruch, H P

    1997-02-01

    In a porcine endotoxin shock model using a continuous intravenous endotoxin infusion of 250 ng/kg body weight per hour, the cardiorespiratory and hematologic parameters were studied while applying a new on-line polymyxin B immobilized adsorption system. This preliminary report shows that the new adsorbent can remove endotoxin selectively from the circulation and confers a good amount of protection from endotoxin-induced cardiopulmonary decompensation as well as hematologic alterations. Survival time could be extended from 216 min to 313 min. Whereas cardiac output and mean arterial pressure declined critically after 3 h in the controls, the treated group remained stable for another 3 h. These data show that endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B coupled covalently to acrylic spheres as an adjunctive on-line measure in the septic syndrome seems feasible. PMID:10225785

  16. A biodegradable polymeric system for peptide-protein delivery assembled with porous microspheres and nanoparticles, using an adsorption/infiltration process.

    PubMed

    Alcalá-Alcalá, Sergio; Urbán-Morlán, Zaida; Aguilar-Rosas, Irene; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2013-01-01

    A biodegradable polymeric system is proposed for formulating peptides and proteins. The systems were assembled through the adsorption of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles onto porous, biodegradable microspheres by an adsorption/infiltration process with the use of an immersion method. The peptide drug is not involved in the manufacturing of the nanoparticles or in obtaining the microspheres; thus, contact with the organic solvent, interfaces, and shear forces required for the process are prevented during drug loading. Leuprolide acetate was used as the model peptide, and poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was used as the biodegradable polymer. Leuprolide was adsorbed onto different amounts of PLGA nanoparticles (25 mg/mL, 50 mg/mL, 75 mg/mL, and 100 mg/mL) in a first stage; then, these were infiltrated into porous PLGA microspheres (100 mg) by dipping the structures into a microsphere suspension. In this way, the leuprolide was adsorbed onto both surfaces (ie, nanoparticles and microspheres). Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed the formation of a nanoparticle film on the porous microsphere surface that becomes more continuous as the amount of infiltrated nanoparticles increases. The adsorption efficiency and release rate are dependent on the amount of adsorbed nanoparticles. As expected, a greater adsorption efficiency (~95%) and a slower release rate were seen (~20% of released leuprolide in 12 hours) when a larger amount of nanoparticles was adsorbed (100 mg/mL of nanoparticles). Leuprolide acetate begins to be released immediately when there are no infiltrated nanoparticles, and 90% of the peptide is released in the first 12 hours. In contrast, the systems assembled in this study released less than 44% of the loaded drug during the same period of time. The observed release profiles denoted a Fickian diffusion that fit Higuchi's model (t(1/2)). The manufacturing process presented here may be useful as a potential alternative for formulating

  17. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems; Adsorption and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2010-10-01

    Functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS) have previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems suggesting they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials biocompatibility and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e. blood, urine, etc.) As a result, thiol SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material’s performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e. variable pH and ionic strength) as well to gauge any potentially negative cellular effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or possible chelation of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus non-toxic. As a result, it has been determined that organic ligand-functionalized nanoporous silica materials could be a valuable material for detoxification therapeutics and potentially other biomedical applications as needed.

  18. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for the Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems: Adsorption and Application

    PubMed Central

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, R. Shane

    2012-01-01

    Surface-functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS), has previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems, suggesting that they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials’ biocompatibility, and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e., blood, urine, etc.) Consequentially, thiol-functionalized SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material’s performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e., variable pH and ionic strength) to gauge any potentially negative effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or the removal of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus nontoxic. The results show that organic ligand functionalized nanoporous silica could be a valuable material for a range of detoxification therapies and potentially other biomedical applications. PMID:20939537

  19. Functionalized nanoporous silica for the removal of heavy metals from biological systems: adsorption and application.

    PubMed

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L; Warner, Marvin G; Fryxell, Glen E; Wiacek, Robert J; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, R Shane

    2010-10-01

    Surface-functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS), has previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems, suggesting that they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials' biocompatibility, and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e., blood, urine, etc.) Consequentially, thiol-functionalized SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material's performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e., variable pH and ionic strength) to gauge any potentially negative effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or the removal of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus nontoxic. The results show that organic ligand functionalized nanoporous silica could be a valuable material for a range of detoxification therapies and potentially other biomedical applications. PMID:20939537

  20. Adsorption of Pb(II) on the kaolinite(0 0 1) surface in aqueous system: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Xia, Shuwei; Yu, Liangmin

    2015-06-01

    A systematic first-principles model study of Pb(II) adsorption on the basal hydroxylated (0 0 1) surface of kaolinite in aqueous environment was carried out using periodic DFT slab calculations. The effective coordination number, coordination geometry, preferred adsorption position and adsorption type of Pb(II) complex were examined, with two different types of surface sites (Ou with "up" hydrogen and Ol with "lying" hydrogen) considered. Complexes in mono-, bi- and tri-dentate modes exhibit coordination number of 3-5 within the hemidirected tendency geometry. The monodentate complex on "Ou" site and the tridentate complex on "Ou-Ou-Ol" site of two neighboring Al centers are found to be the major adsorption species. Hydrogen bonding interaction of surface Ol with hydrogen of aqua ligands acts as the key factor for the stability of complex. Partial density of state (PDOS) projections combining with Mulliken bond populations show that coupling of Pb 6p with the antibonding Pb 6s-O 2p states is the dominant orbital interaction of Pb(II) with aqua oxygen (Ow) or surface oxygen (Os). Different from the covalent Pbsbnd Ow, bond of Pbsbnd Os displays strong ionic characters.

  1. Optically active microspheres constructed by helical substituted polyacetylene and used for adsorption of organic compounds in aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Liang, Junya; Song, Ci; Deng, Jianping

    2014-11-12

    This article reports optically active microspheres consisting of chiral helical substituted polyacetylene and β-cyclodextrin-derivative (β-CD-A). The microspheres showed remarkable adsorption toward various organic compounds in water. To prepare the microspheres, an acetylenic-derived helical macro-monomer was synthesized and then underwent aqueous suspension copolymerization with octadecyl acrylate and butyl acrylate by using azobis(isobutyronitrile) as initiator and β-CD-A simultaneously as comonomer and cross-linking agent. The helical macro-monomer chains enabled the microspheres to exhibit desirable enantio-differentiating adsorption capacity toward chiral compounds respectively dissolved in organic solvent, dispersed in water, and dissolved in water. The saturated absorbency toward (R)-(+)- and (S)-(-)-1-phenylethylamine was 29 and 12 mg · g(-1), respectively. The microspheres also showed large oil absorbency (e.g., 22 g · g(-1) CCl4) and a large adsorption toward methyl red (as a model for organic dyes) dispersed in water. The presence of β-CD-A moieties improved the adsorption performance of the microspheres. The present optically active microspheres open a new approach for preparing adsorbents particularly chiral adsorbents with potentials for wastewater treatment. PMID:25290256

  2. Exploration of mXRF analysis of gunshot residue from cartridge cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Martin; Stamouli, Amalia; Knijnenberg, Alwin

    2015-10-01

    During the reconstruction of a shooting incident, several analytical techniques are at the disposal of forensic scientists. The Netherlands Forensic Institute is exploring the opportunities in which mXRF can be used to obtain information in these reconstructions. In this paper the possibilities of using the 2D-mXRF instrument as a screening tool are explored. Primarily the focus is on using mXRF to obtain information regarding the elemental composition of gunshot residue from cartridge cases. Secondly, the possibilities of using the 2D-mXRF instrument to, quickly and easily, set up databases for gunshot residue analysis are investigated.

  3. Optimal stapler cartridge selection according to the thickness of the pancreas in distal pancreatectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hongbeom; Jang, Jin-Young; Son, Donghee; Lee, Seungyeoun; Han, Youngmin; Shin, Yong Chan; Kim, Jae Ri; Kwon, Wooil; Kim, Sun-Whe

    2016-08-01

    Stapling is a popular method for stump closure in distal pancreatectomy (DP). However, research on which cartridges are suitable for different pancreatic thickness is lacking. To identify the optimal stapler cartridge choice in DP according to pancreatic thickness.From November 2011 to April 2015, data were prospectively collected from 217 consecutive patients who underwent DP with 3-layer endoscopic staple closure in Seoul National University Hospital, Korea. Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) was graded according to International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula definitions. Staplers were grouped based on closed length (CL) (Group I: CL ≤ 1.5 mm, II: 1.5 mm < CL < 2 mm, III: CL ≥ 2 mm). Compression ratio (CR) was defined as pancreas thickness/CL. Distribution of pancreatic thickness was used to find the cut-off point of thickness which predicts POPF according to stapler groups.POPF developed in 130 (59.9%) patients (Grade A; n = 86 [66.1%], B; n = 44 [33.8%]). The numbers in each stapler group were 46, 101, and 70, respectively. Mean thickness was higher in POPF cases (15.2 mm vs 13.5 mm, P = 0.002). High body mass index (P = 0.003), thick pancreas (P = 0.011), and high CR (P = 0.024) were independent risk factors for POPF in multivariate analysis. Pancreatic thickness was grouped into <12 mm, 12 to 17 mm, and >17 mm. With pancreatic thickness <12 mm, the POPF rate was lowest with Group II (I: 50%, II: 27.6%, III: 69.2%, P = 0.035).The optimal stapler cartridges with pancreatic thickness <12 mm were those in Group II (Gold, CL: 1.8 mm). There was no suitable cartridge for thicker pancreases. Further studies are necessary to reduce POPF in thick pancreases. PMID:27583852

  4. Optimal stapler cartridge selection according to the thickness of the pancreas in distal pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hongbeom; Jang, Jin-Young; Son, Donghee; Lee, Seungyeoun; Han, Youngmin; Shin, Yong Chan; Kim, Jae Ri; Kwon, Wooil; Kim, Sun-Whe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stapling is a popular method for stump closure in distal pancreatectomy (DP). However, research on which cartridges are suitable for different pancreatic thickness is lacking. To identify the optimal stapler cartridge choice in DP according to pancreatic thickness. From November 2011 to April 2015, data were prospectively collected from 217 consecutive patients who underwent DP with 3-layer endoscopic staple closure in Seoul National University Hospital, Korea. Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) was graded according to International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula definitions. Staplers were grouped based on closed length (CL) (Group I: CL ≤ 1.5 mm, II: 1.5 mm < CL < 2 mm, III: CL ≥ 2 mm). Compression ratio (CR) was defined as pancreas thickness/CL. Distribution of pancreatic thickness was used to find the cut-off point of thickness which predicts POPF according to stapler groups. POPF developed in 130 (59.9%) patients (Grade A; n = 86 [66.1%], B; n = 44 [33.8%]). The numbers in each stapler group were 46, 101, and 70, respectively. Mean thickness was higher in POPF cases (15.2 mm vs 13.5 mm, P = 0.002). High body mass index (P = 0.003), thick pancreas (P = 0.011), and high CR (P = 0.024) were independent risk factors for POPF in multivariate analysis. Pancreatic thickness was grouped into <12 mm, 12 to 17 mm, and >17 mm. With pancreatic thickness <12 mm, the POPF rate was lowest with Group II (I: 50%, II: 27.6%, III: 69.2%, P = 0.035). The optimal stapler cartridges with pancreatic thickness <12 mm were those in Group II (Gold, CL: 1.8 mm). There was no suitable cartridge for thicker pancreases. Further studies are necessary to reduce POPF in thick pancreases. PMID:27583852

  5. Modulating adsorption and stability properties in pillared metal-organic frameworks: a model system for understanding ligand effects.

    PubMed

    Burtch, Nicholas C; Walton, Krista S

    2015-11-17

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are nanoporous materials with highly tunable properties that make them ideal for a wide array of adsorption applications. Through careful choice of metal and ligand precursors, one can target the specific functionality and pore characteristics desired for the application of interest. However, among the wide array of MOFs reported in the literature, there are varying trends in the effects that ligand identity has on the adsorption, chemical stability, and intrinsic framework dynamics of the material. This is largely due to ligand effects being strongly coupled with structural properties arising from the differing topologies among frameworks. Given the important role such properties play in dictating adsorbent performance, understanding these effects will be critical for the design of next generation functional materials. Pillared MOFs are ideal platforms for understanding how ligand properties can affect the adsorption, stability, and framework dynamics in MOFs. In this Account, we highlight our recent work demonstrating how experiment and simulation can be used to understand the important role ligand identity plays in governing the properties of isostructural MOFs containing interconnected layers pillared by bridging ligands. Changing the identity of the linear, ditopic ligand in either the 2-D layer or the pillaring third dimension allows targeted modulation of the chemical functionality, porosity, and interpenetration of the framework. We will discuss how these characteristics can have important consequences on the adsorption, chemical stability, and dynamic properties of pillared MOFs. The structures discussed in this Account comprise the greatest diversity of isostructural MOFs whose stability properties have been studied, allowing valuable insight into how ligand properties dictate the chemical stability of isostructural frameworks. We also discuss how functional groups can affect adsorbate energetics at their most favorable

  6. Centrifugal adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Tsao, Yow-Min D. (Inventor); Lee, Wenshan (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A gas-liquid separator uses a helical passageway to impart a spiral motion to a fluid passing therethrough. The centrifugal force generated by the spiraling motion urges the liquid component of the fluid radially outward which forces the gas component radially inward. The gas component is then separated through a gas-permeable, liquid-impervious membrane and discharged through a central passageway. A filter material captures target substances contained in the fluid.

  7. Adsorption of apolar molecules at the water liquid-vapor interface: A Monte Carlo simulations study of the water-n-octane system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovszky, Pál; Varga, Imre; Gilányi, Tibor

    2003-07-01

    The adsorption of n-octane at the water liquid-vapor interface has been investigated by Monte Carlo computer simulation. For this purpose, simulation of five different water-apolar interfacial systems have been performed, in which the number of n-octane molecules has been varied. The results clearly show that the apolar n-octane molecules are adsorbed from the vapor phase at the interface. The adsorption is driven by the weak attraction due to the dispersion forces acting between the water molecules and the methyl and methylene groups of the octanes. This weak attraction is, however, amplified by the fact that it is added up for the CH2 and CH3 groups belonging to the same molecule. Consistently, the n-octane molecules located closest to the aqueous phase are found to prefer all-trans conformation and parallel alignment with the plane of the interface. On the other hand, entropic effects become more important among the molecules of the outer part of the adsorption layer. Hence, the preferred orientation of these molecules is perpendicular to the interface, as they can be extended toward the less dense region of the apolar phase; and gauche dihedrals appear more frequently here than among the molecules located next to the aqueous phase.

  8. An Assessment of the Axial and Radial Dilation of a DPIMS Tantalum Cartridge for Space Shuttle Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S.V.; Ghosn, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-based heat treatment tests are planned on an argon gas-filled tantalum cartridge developed as pan of a Diffusion Processes in Molten Semiconductors (DPIMS) experiment conducted on NASA's Space Shuttle. The possibility that the cartridge may creep during testing and touch the furnace walls is of real concern in this program. The present paper discusses the results of calculations performed to evaluate this possibility. Deformation mechanism maps were constructed using literature data in order to identify the creep mechanism dominant under the appropriate stresses and temperatures corresponding to the test conditions. These results showed that power-law creep was dominant when the grain size of the material exceeded 55 gm but Coble creep was the important mechanism below this value of grain size. Finite element analysis was used to analyze the heat treatment tWs assuming a furnace run away condition (which is a worst case scenario) using the appropriate creep parameters corresponding to grain sizes of 1 and 100 gm. Calculations were also conducted to simulate the effect of an initial 3 tilt of the cartridge assembly, the maximum possible tilt angle. The von Mises stress and su-ain distributions were calculated assuming that the cartridge was fixed at one end as it was heated from ambient temperature to 1823 K in 1.42 h, maintained at 1823 K for 9.5 h and then further heated to an over temperature condition of 2028 K in 0.3 h. The inelastic axial and radial displacements of the cartridge walls were evaluated by resolving the von Mises strain along the corresponding directions. These calculations reveal that the maximum axial and radial displacements are expected to be about 2.9 and 0.25 mm, respectively, for both fine and coarse-grained materials at 2028 K. It was determined that these displacements occur during heat-up to temperature and creep of the cartridge is likely to be relatively insignificant irrespective of grain size. Furthermore, with a 3' tilt of

  9. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION-EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATIONS-12092

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-01-03

    Experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions with monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate laden filter cartridges are presented. In these proof-of-principle tests, effective uptake of both strontium-85 and cesium-137 were observed using ion-exchangers in this filter cartridge configuration. At low salt simulant conditions, the instantaneous decontamination factor for strontium-85 with monosodium titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges measured 26, representing 96% strontium-85 removal efficiency. On the other hand, the strontium-85 instantaneous decontamination factor with co-sintered active monosodium titanate cartridges measured 40 or 98% Sr-85 removal efficiency. Strontium-85 removal with the monosodium titanate impregnated membrane cartridges and crystalline silicotitanate impregnated membrane cartridges, placed in series arrangement, produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 for strontium-85 with co-sintered active monosodium titanate cartridges and co-sintered active crystalline silicotitanate cartridges placed in series. Overall, polyethylene co-sintered active titanates cartridges performed as well as titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges in the uptake of strontium. At low ionic strength conditions, there was a significant uptake of cesium-137 with co-sintered crystalline silicotitanate cartridges. Tests results with crystalline silicotitanate impregnated membrane cartridges for cesium-137 decontamination are currently being re-evaluated. Based on these preliminary findings we conclude that incorporating monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate sorbents into membranes represent a promising method for the semicontinuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium and cesium from nuclear waste solutions.

  10. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF STRONTIUM AND CESIUM FROM SIMULATED WASTE SOLUTION WITH TITANATE ION-EXCHANGERS IN A FILTER CARTRIDGE CONFIGURATIONS-12092

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Martin, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2011-11-10

    Experimental results for the selective removal of strontium and cesium from simulated waste solutions with monosodium titanate (MST) and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) laden filter cartridges are presented. In these proof-of-principle tests, effective uptake of both Sr-85 and Cs-137 were observed using ion-exchangers in this filter cartridge configuration. At low salt simulant conditions, the instantaneous decontamination factor (D{sub F}) for Sr-85 with MST impregnated filter membrane cartridges measured 26, representing 96% Sr-85 removal efficiency. On the other hand, the Sr-85 instantaneous D{sub F} with co-sintered active MST cartridges measured 40 or 98% Sr-85 removal efficiency. Strontium-85 removal with the MST impregnated membrane cartridges and CST impregnated membrane cartridges, placed in series arrangement, produced an instantaneous decontamination factor of 41 compared to an instantaneous decontamination factor of 368 for strontium-85 with co-sintered active MST cartridges and co-sintered active CST cartridges placed in series. Overall, polyethylene co-sintered active titanates cartridges performed as well as titanate impregnated filter membrane cartridges in the uptake of strontium. At low ionic strength conditions, there was a significant uptake of Cs-137 with co-sintered CST cartridges. Tests results with CST impregnated membrane cartridges for Cs-137 decontamination are currently being re-evaluated. Based on these preliminary findings we conclude that incorporating MST and CST sorbents into membranes represent a promising method for the semi-continuous removal of radioisotopes of strontium and cesium from nuclear waste solutions.

  11. Flight prototype CO2 and humidity control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    A regenerable CO2 and humidity control system is presently being developed for potential use on the space shuttle as an alternative to the baseline lithium hydroxide system. The system utilizes a sorbent material (designated HS-C) to adsorb CO2 and water vapor from the cabin atmosphere and desorb the CO2 and water vapor overboard when exposed to a space vacuum. Continuous operation is achieved by utilizing two beds which are alternately cycled between adsorption and desorption. A shuttle vehicle integration study showed that the HS-C system offers substantial weight advantages compared to the baseline shuttle orbiter expendable lithium hydroxide CO2 removal system for extended missions beyond the nominal design of four men for seven days. This study defined a system packaging envelope in the area presently occupied by the LiOH cartridges.

  12. Thermal enhancement cartridge heater modified (TECH Mod) tritium hydride bed development, Part 1 - Design and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.; Estochen, E.G.

    2015-03-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities have used first generation (Gen1) LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride storage beds for tritium absorption, storage, and desorption. The Gen1 design utilizes hot and cold nitrogen supplies to thermally cycle these beds. Second and third generation (Gen2 and Gen3) storage bed designs include heat conducting foam and divider plates to spatially fix the hydride within the bed. For thermal cycling, the Gen2 and Gen3 beds utilize internal electric heaters and glovebox atmosphere flow over the bed inside the bed external jacket for cooling. The currently installed Gen1 beds require replacement due to tritium aging effects on the LANA0.75 material, and cannot be replaced with Gen2 or Gen3 beds due to different designs of these beds. At the end of service life, Gen1 bed desorption efficiencies are limited by the upper temperature of hot nitrogen supply. To increase end-of-life desorption efficiency, the Gen1 bed design was modified, and a Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) bed was developed. Internal electric cartridge heaters in the new design to improve end-of-life desorption, and also permit in-bed tritium accountability (IBA) calibration measurements to be made without the use of process tritium. Additional enhancements implemented into the TECH Mod design are also discussed. (authors)

  13. THERMAL ENHANCEMENT CARTRIDGE HEATER MODIFIED TECH MOD TRITIUM HYDRIDE BED DEVELOPMENT PART I DESIGN AND FABRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.; Estochen, E.

    2014-03-06

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities have used 1{sup st} generation (Gen1) LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride storage beds for tritium absorption, storage, and desorption. The Gen1 design utilizes hot and cold nitrogen supplies to thermally cycle these beds. Second and 3{sup rd} generation (Gen2 and Gen3) storage bed designs include heat conducting foam and divider plates to spatially fix the hydride within the bed. For thermal cycling, the Gen2 and Gen 3 beds utilize internal electric heaters and glovebox atmosphere flow over the bed inside the bed external jacket for cooling. The currently installed Gen1 beds require replacement due to tritium aging effects on the LANA0.75 material, and cannot be replaced with Gen2 or Gen3 beds due to different designs of these beds. At the end of service life, Gen1 bed desorption efficiencies are limited by the upper temperature of hot nitrogen supply. To increase end-of-life desorption efficiency, the Gen1 bed design was modified, and a Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) bed was developed. Internal electric cartridge heaters in the new design to improve end-of-life desorption, and also permit in-bed tritium accountability (IBA) calibration measurements to be made without the use of process tritium. Additional enhancements implemented into the TECH Mod design are also discussed.

  14. Penetration of methyl isocyanate through organic vapor and acid gas respirator cartridges

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.S.; Berardinelli, S.P.

    1987-04-01

    Methyl isocyanate (MIC) is a volatile, toxic chemical used to manufacture carbamate pesticides. In light of the December 1984 Bhopal, India disaster and possible safety problems at the Institute facility, NIOSH conducted this research as a basis upon which to recommend protective equipment that might be used in an emergency situation where extremely high MIC concentrations might be encountered. Both protective clothing and respirators were evaluated. In particular, NIOSH studies air-purifying respirators in order to assess their effectiveness against MIC vapor penetration. NIOSH does not recommend any air purifying respirator for MIC because of its high toxicity and lack of warming properties and because no effective end of service life indicator currently is available for MIC. This report addresses only MIC penetration through air-purifying cartridges at challenge concentration designed to simulate emergency escape conditions. The results presented are for two different manufacturers' organic vapor (OV) and acid gas cartridges. Penetration tests were conducted at three or four MIC challenge concentrations and at three different humidity conditions. In general, breakthrough times (1% of challenge concentration) were very short (<20 min). Also, high relative humidity was found to decrease the breakthrough time of MIC.

  15. Penetration of methyl isocyanate through organic vapor and acid gas respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Berardinelli, S P

    1987-04-01

    Methyl isocyanate (MIC) is a volatile, toxic chemical [Threshold Limit Value (TLV) = 0.02 ppm] used to manufacture carbamate pesticides. The principal manufacturer of MIC is Union Carbide, and the site of production is Institute, West Virginia. In light of the December 1984 Bhopal, India disaster and possible safety problems at the Institute facility, NIOSH conducted this research as a basis upon which to recommend protective equipment that might be used in an emergency situation where extremely high MIC concentrations might be encountered. Both protective clothing and respirators were evaluated. In particular, NIOSH studied air-purifying respirators in order to assess their effectiveness against MIC vapor penetration. NIOSH does not recommend any air purifying respirator for MIC because of its high toxicity and lack of warning properties and because no effective end of service life indicator currently is available for MIC. This report addresses only MIC penetration through air-purifying cartridges at challenge concentrations designed to simulate emergency escape conditions. Another report addresses the protective clothing issue. The results presented are for two different manufacturers' organic vapor (OV) and acid gas cartridges. Penetration tests were conducted at three or four MIC challenge concentrations and at three different humidity conditions. In general, breakthrough times (1% of challenge concentration) were very short (less than 20 min). Also, high relative humidity was found to decrease the breakthrough time of MIC. PMID:3591646

  16. Methane and CO2 Adsorption and Transport in Carbon-based Systems from Experiments and Molecular Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Jennifer; Firouzi, Mahnaz; Rupp, Erik; Haghapanah, Reza; Wang, Beibei

    2013-04-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration is one strategy that could potentially mitigate gigatons of CO2 emissions per year; however, technical obstacles have thus far hindered wide-scale deployment of this strategy. To design efficient and reliable strategies for either carbon capture or sequestration at the full-scale, one needs to understand the chemical and physical properties of CO2 and its interaction with its local surroundings at the molecular-scale. To investigate the chemical and physical properties of CO2 and its local surroundings at the molecular-scale, surface characterization studies are carried out alongside theoretical model efforts. Experimental investigation of CO2 interactions with organic-based porous materials ranging in complexity from functionalized graphene and activated carbon to various-rank coal and gas shale samples to create a set of realistic models that take into account both surface and pore heterogeneity. Integration of theory and experiments takes place to allow for the relevant physics at the molecular-level to be revealed. Determining adsorption and transport phenomena of CO2 (and mixtures, including H2O, and CH4) within the model pore systems can be used to understand the complex pore matrices of carbon-based sorbents, coal, and the organic components of gas shale that are crucial to determining their carbon capture or sequestration potential. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of pure carbon dioxide, methane, helium and their mixtures have been carried out in carbon slit pores to investigate gas slippage and Klinkenberg effects in the organic matrices of coal and gas shale rocks. NEMD techniques are ideally suited for the experimental situation in which an external driving force, such as a chemical potential or pressure gradient, are applied on the system. Simulations have been conducted to determine the effect of pore size and exposure to an external potential on the velocity profile and slip-stick boundary

  17. Adsorption of carbon oxide and nitrogen oxide molecules on the surface of the Ni/MgO(111) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.; Turiev, A. M.; Tsidaeva, N. I.; Pantileev, D. G.

    2009-10-01

    The coadsorption of carbon oxide (CO) and nitrogen oxide (NO) molecules on the surface of nickel nanoclusters formed on a thin magnesium oxide MgO(111) film grown on the Mo(110) face in an ultrahigh vacuum is studied by reflective infrared spectroscopy and thermodesorption spectroscopy (TDS). The adsorption of NO molecules is found to substantially change the state of the initially adsorbed CO molecules. The TDS and IR spectra suggest that the adsorption of NO molecules stimulates the surface migration of CO molecules from the surface of metallic clusters to the cluster-oxide interface, which is accompanied by a decrease in the angle of inclination of the molecular axis to the surface.

  18. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  19. Effect of organic-matter type and thermal maturity on methane adsorption in shale-gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Milliken, Kitty; Yang, Rongsheng

    2012-01-01

    A series of methane (CH4) adsorption experiments on bulk organic rich shales and their isolated kerogens were conducted at 35 °C, 50 °C and 65 °C and CH4 pressure of up to 15 MPa under dry conditions. Samples from the Eocene Green River Formation, Devonian–Mississippian Woodford Shale and Upper Cretaceous Cameo coal were studied to examine how differences in organic matter type affect natural gas adsorption. Vitrinite reflectance values of these samples ranged from 0.56–0.58 %Ro. In addition, thermal maturity effects were determined on three Mississippian Barnett Shale samples with measured vitrinite reflectance values of 0.58, 0.81 and 2.01 %Ro. For all bulk and isolated kerogen samples, the total amount of methane adsorbed was directly proportional to the total organic carbon (TOC) content of the sample and the average maximum amount of gas sorption was 1.36 mmol of methane per gram of TOC. These results indicate that sorption on organic matter plays a critical role in shale-gas storage. Under the experimental conditions, differences in thermal maturity showed no significant effect on the total amount of gas sorbed. Experimental sorption isotherms could be fitted with good accuracy by the Langmuir function by adjusting the Langmuir pressure (PL) and maximum sorption capacity (Γmax). The lowest maturity sample (%Ro = 0.56) displayed a Langmuir pressure (PL) of 5.15 MPa, significantly larger than the 2.33 MPa observed for the highest maturity (%Ro > 2.01) sample at 50 °C. The value of the Langmuir pressure (PL) changes with kerogen type in the following sequence: type I > type II > type III. The thermodynamic parameters of CH4 adsorption on organic rich shales were determined based on the experimental CH4 isotherms. For the adsorption of CH4 on organic rich shales and their isolated kerogen, the heat of adsorption (q) and the standard entropy (Δs0) range from 7.3–28.0 kJ/mol and from −36.2 to −92.2 J/mol/K, respectively.

  20. The influence of manufacturing processes on the identification of bullets and cartridge cases--a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, M S; de Kinder, J

    1999-01-01

    A basic hypothesis of firearms identification is the uniqueness of the striations and marks left on fired bullets and cartridge cases respectively. This paper reviews the studies so far reported in the literature on this issue, applied to consecutively (or closely) manufactured components of a firearm. A correct firearms identification starting from the striae on a bullet can be performed if one takes into account a few basic rules which are independent of the specific rifling technique applied to the barrel. However, the identification starting from a cartridge case has to be performed with care, exploiting as much as possible all the marks left during the firing process.

  1. A biodegradable polymeric system for peptide–protein delivery assembled with porous microspheres and nanoparticles, using an adsorption/infiltration process

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá-Alcalá, Sergio; Urbán-Morlán, Zaida; Aguilar-Rosas, Irene; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2013-01-01

    A biodegradable polymeric system is proposed for formulating peptides and proteins. The systems were assembled through the adsorption of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles onto porous, biodegradable microspheres by an adsorption/infiltration process with the use of an immersion method. The peptide drug is not involved in the manufacturing of the nanoparticles or in obtaining the microspheres; thus, contact with the organic solvent, interfaces, and shear forces required for the process are prevented during drug loading. Leuprolide acetate was used as the model peptide, and poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was used as the biodegradable polymer. Leuprolide was adsorbed onto different amounts of PLGA nanoparticles (25 mg/mL, 50 mg/mL, 75 mg/mL, and 100 mg/mL) in a first stage; then, these were infiltrated into porous PLGA microspheres (100 mg) by dipping the structures into a microsphere suspension. In this way, the leuprolide was adsorbed onto both surfaces (ie, nanoparticles and microspheres). Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed the formation of a nanoparticle film on the porous microsphere surface that becomes more continuous as the amount of infiltrated nanoparticles increases. The adsorption efficiency and release rate are dependent on the amount of adsorbed nanoparticles. As expected, a greater adsorption efficiency (~95%) and a slower release rate were seen (~20% of released leuprolide in 12 hours) when a larger amount of nanoparticles was adsorbed (100 mg/mL of nanoparticles). Leuprolide acetate begins to be released immediately when there are no infiltrated nanoparticles, and 90% of the peptide is released in the first 12 hours. In contrast, the systems assembled in this study released less than 44% of the loaded drug during the same period of time. The observed release profiles denoted a Fickian diffusion that fit Higuchi’s model (t1/2). The manufacturing process presented here may be useful as a potential alternative for formulating

  2. A comparison of surface topography characterization technologies for use in comparing spent bullet and cartridge case signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Batishko, C.R.; Hickman, B.J.; Cuta, F.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the US Department of Energy to provide technical assistance to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in evaluating and ranking technologies potentially useful in high-speed comparison of unique spent bullet and cartridge case surface signatures. Information sources included vendor input, current relevant literature, vendor phone contacts, other FBI resources, relevant PNL reports, and personal contact with numerous PNL technical staff. A comprehensive list of technologies was reduced to a list of 38 by grouping very similar methodologies, and further reduced to a short list of six by applying a set of five minimum functional requirements. A total of 14 primary criteria, many having secondary criteria, were subsequently used to evaluate each technology. The ranked short list results are reported and supported in this document, and their scores normalized to a hypothetical ideal system are as follows: (1) confocal microscopy 82.13; (2) laser dynamic focusing 72.04; (3)moire interferometry V70.94; (4)fringe field capacitance;(5)laser triangulation 66.18; (6)structured/sectioned light 65.55. Information available within the time/budget constraints which was used for the evaluation and ranking was not sufficiently detailed to evaluate specific implementations of the technologies. Each of the technologies in the short list was judged potentially capable of meeting the minimum requirements. Clever, novel engineering solutions resulting in a more cost-effective system, or a closer fit to the ideal system,'' could result in a reordering of the short list when actual technical proposals are evaluated. Therefore, it is recommended that a Request for Proposal not be limited to only the highest ranked technology, but include all six technologies in the short list.

  3. A comparison of surface topography characterization technologies for use in comparing spent bullet and cartridge case signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Batishko, C.R.; Hickman, B.J.; Cuta, F.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked by the US Department of Energy to provide technical assistance to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in evaluating and ranking technologies potentially useful in high-speed comparison of unique spent bullet and cartridge case surface signatures. Information sources included vendor input, current relevant literature, vendor phone contacts, other FBI resources, relevant PNL reports, and personal contact with numerous PNL technical staff. A comprehensive list of technologies was reduced to a list of 38 by grouping very similar methodologies, and further reduced to a short list of six by applying a set of five minimum functional requirements. A total of 14 primary criteria, many having secondary criteria, were subsequently used to evaluate each technology. The ranked short list results are reported and supported in this document, and their scores normalized to a hypothetical ideal system are as follows: (1) confocal microscopy 82.13; (2) laser dynamic focusing 72.04; (3)moire interferometry V70.94; (4)fringe field capacitance;(5)laser triangulation 66.18; (6)structured/sectioned light 65.55. Information available within the time/budget constraints which was used for the evaluation and ranking was not sufficiently detailed to evaluate specific implementations of the technologies. Each of the technologies in the short list was judged potentially capable of meeting the minimum requirements. Clever, novel engineering solutions resulting in a more cost-effective system, or a closer fit to the ``ideal system,`` could result in a reordering of the short list when actual technical proposals are evaluated. Therefore, it is recommended that a Request for Proposal not be limited to only the highest ranked technology, but include all six technologies in the short list.

  4. Location of MTBE and toluene in the channel system of the zeolite mordenite: Adsorption and host-guest interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Arletti, Rossella; Martucci, Annalisa; Alberti, Alberto; Pasti, Luisa; Nassi, Marianna; Bagatin, Roberto

    2012-10-15

    This paper reports a study of the location of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) and toluene molecules adsorbed in the pores of the organophylic zeolite mordenite from an aqueous solution. The presence of these organic molecules in the zeolite channels was revealed by structure refinement performed by the Rietveld method. About 3 molecules of MTBE and 3.6 molecules of toluene per unit cell were incorporated into the cavities of mordenite, representing 75% and 80% of the total absorption capacity of this zeolite. In both cases a water molecule was localized inside the side pocket of mordenite. The saturation capacity determined by the adsorption isotherms, obtained by batch experiments, and the weight loss given by thermogravimetric (TG) analyses were in very good agreement with these values. The interatomic distances obtained after the structural refinements suggest MTBE could be connected to the framework through a water molecule, while toluene could be bonded to framework oxygen atoms. The rapid and high adsorption of these hydrocarbons into the organophylic mordenite zeolite makes this cheap and environmental friendly material a suitable candidate for the removal of these pollutants from water. - graphical abstract: Location of MTBE (a) and toluene (b) in mordenite channels (projection along the [001] direction). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the MTBE and toluene adsorption process into an organophilic zeolite mordenite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of MTBE and toluene in mordenite was determined by X-ray diffraction studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer About 3 molecules of MTBE and 3.6 molecules of toluene per unit cell were incorporated into the zeolite cavities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MTBE is connected to the framework through a water molecule. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Toluene is directly bonded to framework oxygen atoms.

  5. A Validation Study of Bullet and Cartridge Case Comparisons Using Samples Representative of Actual Casework.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tasha P; Andrew Smith, G; Snipes, Jeffrey B

    2016-07-01

    The foundation of firearm and tool mark identification is that no two tools should produce the same microscopic marks on two separate objects that they would be inaccurately or wrongly identified. Studies addressing the validity of identification infrequently employ tests that mirror realistic casework scenarios. This study attempted to do so using a double-blind process, reducing test-taking bias. Test kits including bullets and cartridge cases but not the associated firearms were completed by 31 analysts from 22 agencies. Analysis of the results demonstrated an overall error rate of 0.303%, sensitivity of 85.2%, and specificity of 86.8%. Variability in performance across examiners is addressed, and the effect of examiners' years of experience on identification accuracy is explored. Finally, the article discusses the importance of studies using realistic case work scenarios when validating the field's performance and in providing courts with usable indicators of the accuracy of firearm and tool mark identification. PMID:27135174

  6. [Suicidal shot in the mouth with an unmodified blank cartridge pistol].

    PubMed

    Bungardt, Nikola; Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Madea, Burkhard

    2005-01-01

    In the medicolegal literature reports of suicides with weapons designed for self-defence, especially gas pistols, are rare. We report on a suicide of a 54-year-old woman who fired a fatal shot in her mouth with an unmanipulated blank cartridge pistol, make Röhm RG 8, calibre 8 mm. The autopsy findings (lips and mucosa of the buccal vestibule without injuries, but extensive lesions of the tongue and the middle and rear third of the smooth palate) suggest that the shot was fired - as observed by a witness - with the barrel of the weapon inside the oral cavity. Both macroscopic inspection and histological investigations excluded the possibility that death was caused by an injury of the brain, in particular the brain stem. The immediate cause of death was deep aspiration of chyme with concurrent aspiration of blood.

  7. Disposable cartridge extraction of retinol and alpha-tocopherol from fatty samples.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, C F; Ciba, N

    1988-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for liquid/solid extraction of retinol and alpha-tocopherol from samples, using a disposable kieselguhr cartridge. The substitution of the mixture methanol-ethanol-n-butanol (4 + 3 + 1) for methanol in the alkaline hydrolysis solution makes it now possible to process fatty samples. Methanol is necessary to solubilize the antioxidant ascorbic acid, and a linear chain alcohol such as n-butanol is necessary to reduce the size of soap micelles so that they can penetrate into the kieselguhr pores. In comparisons of the proposed method with conventional methods on mineral premixes and fatty feedstuffs, recovery and accuracy are at least as good by the proposed method. Advantages are increased rate of determinations and the ability to hydrolyze and extract retinol and alpha-tocopherol together from the same sample.

  8. Rapid identification of color additives, using the C18 cartridge: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Young, M L

    1988-01-01

    Nine laboratories collaboratively studied a method for the separation and identification of the 7 permitted FD&C color additives (Red Nos. 3 and 40; Blue Nos. 1 and 2; Yellow Nos. 5 and 6; Green No. 3) and the banned FD&C Red No. 2 in foods. The method is based on use of a commercial C18 cartridge and spectrophotometry or thin layer chromatography. Collaborators analyzed 5 commercial products (noodles, candy, carbonated soda, flavored gelatin, and powdered drink) and 2 dye mixtures (one containing FD&C Red Nos. 2, 3, and 40; the other containing FD&C Green No. 3 and Red No. 3). All of the colors were identified with little or no difficulty by 8 collaborators. The method has been adopted official first action.

  9. Location of MTBE and toluene in the channel system of the zeolite mordenite: Adsorption and host-guest interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arletti, Rossella; Martucci, Annalisa; Alberti, Alberto; Pasti, Luisa; Nassi, Marianna; Bagatin, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports a study of the location of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) and toluene molecules adsorbed in the pores of the organophylic zeolite mordenite from an aqueous solution. The presence of these organic molecules in the zeolite channels was revealed by structure refinement performed by the Rietveld method. About 3 molecules of MTBE and 3.6 molecules of toluene per unit cell were incorporated into the cavities of mordenite, representing 75% and 80% of the total absorption capacity of this zeolite. In both cases a water molecule was localized inside the side pocket of mordenite. The saturation capacity determined by the adsorption isotherms, obtained by batch experiments, and the weight loss given by thermogravimetric (TG) analyses were in very good agreement with these values. The interatomic distances obtained after the structural refinements suggest MTBE could be connected to the framework through a water molecule, while toluene could be bonded to framework oxygen atoms. The rapid and high adsorption of these hydrocarbons into the organophylic mordenite zeolite makes this cheap and environmental friendly material a suitable candidate for the removal of these pollutants from water.

  10. Development of fingermark on the surface of fired cartridge casing using amino acid sensitive reagents: Change of viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungwook; Han, Aleum

    2016-09-01

    Four amino acid sensitive fingermark enhancement reagents (ninhydrin, 5-methylthioninhydrin (5-MTN), 1,8-diazafloren-9-one (DFO), 1,2-indandione (1,2-IND) were used for the development of fingermark on the surface of brass. The reagents were used for the detection of a trace amount of metallic ion on the surface of cartridge casings to develop latent fingermarks. Ninhydrin-l-alanine (NIN-ALA), 5-MTN-l-alanine (MTN-ALA), DFO-l-alanine (DFO-ALA), 1,2-IND-l-alanine (IND-ALA) complexes were prepared and applied to the fired cartridge casings, for the further enhancement of fingermarks developed by corrosion on the surface of brass. Of the four complexes, NIN-ALA and MTN-ALA complexes induced color changes to enhance fingermarks on fired cartridge casings, but photoluminescence was not observed. About 31% of cartridge casings treated with MTN-ALA showed enhanced fingermarks. DFO-ALA and IND-ALA did not show any enhancement of fingermarks. PMID:27235594

  11. Japanese Science Films; a Descriptive and Evaluative Catalog of: 16mm Motion Pictures, 8mm Cartridges, and Video Tapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newren, Edward F., Ed.

    One hundred and eighty Japanese 16mm motion pictures, 8mm cartridges, and video tapes produced and judged appropriate for a variety of audience levels are listed in alphabetical order by title with descriptive and evaluative information. A subject heading list and a subject index to the film titles are included, as well as a sample of the…

  12. Differentiation of coloured inks of inkjet printer cartridges by thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poon, N L; Ho, S S H; Li, C K

    2005-01-01

    Document examiners are frequently asked to determine whether or not a colour printout has originated from a particular inkjet printer. The printer can rarely be identified unless some unique defects or irregularities of the printer are present on the printout. However, it is possible to decipher the make and/or model of the printer by comparing the ink-profile of the questioned printout with that of a seized inkjet printer cartridge or from one in a database. This paper presents an overview of a systematic approach to characterising and discriminating the inks of different inkjet printer cartridges using thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with multi-wavelength ultra-violet/visible (UV/Vis) detection. Ink samples from 23 different inkjet printer cartridges (including originals and substitutes) of different brands and colour printouts, printed by known printers were examined with newly developed chromatographic methods. Subsequently, a database of the ink-profiles was generated. The methods provide a useful tool for discriminating coloured inks in inkjet printer cartridges of different brands.

  13. Design of a Regenerable Air Revitalization Control System for the ABRS Plant Growth Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monje, Oscar; Monje, Oscar; Shellack, James; Mortenson, Todd; Wells, Howard

    Design of a Regenerable Air Revitalization Control System for the ABRS Plant Growth Facility. O. Monje Space Life Sciences Laboratory, Dynamac Corp., DYN-3, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899, USA J.L. Shellack, T.E. Mortenson, and H.W. Wells. Bionetics Corporation, BIO-1, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899, USA The Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) is a rear-breathing, single middeck locker equivalent plant growth system. ABRS is composed of two independently controlled growth chambers (each with 330 cm2 of growth area). The air revitalization system in each chamber is composed of two subsystems: CO2 Control and a Ethylene/VOC Control. The CO2 Control subsystem must control chamber [CO2] within a range of 300-2000 ppm, with a nominal setpoint of 1500 ppm. The Ethylene/VOC Control subsystem is required to maintain chamber ethylene concentration at ¡50 ppb. Previous spaceflight plant payloads have used non-regenerable cartridges for CO2 control and photocatalytic scrubbers for controlling concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Non-regenerable systems have used LiOH cartridges for [CO2] control with a combination of Purafil (KMnO4)/Activated charcoal for scrubbing VOCs. Regenerable air revitalization systems offer the potential for reducing the mass and volume of consumables used during spaceflight plant experiments. A system utilizing technologies employing regenerable adsorbents: zeolites 13X and 5A for CO2 control and Carbosieve SIII (C molecular sieve) for VOC control has been designed for ABRS. The filter cartridges were sized using expected chamber leak rates, measurements of adsorptive capacities, and measured CO2 consumption and VOC generation rates.

  14. Unexpected coupling between flow and adsorption in porous media.

    PubMed

    Vanson, Jean-Mathieu; Coudert, François-Xavier; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Levesque, Maximilien; Tardivat, Caroline; Klotz, Michaela; Boutin, Anne

    2015-08-14

    We study the interplay between transport and adsorption in porous systems under a fluid flow, based on a lattice Boltzmann scheme extended to account for adsorption. We performed simulations on well-controlled geometries with slit and grooved pores, investigating the influence of adsorption and flow on dispersion coefficient and adsorbed density. In particular, we present a counterintuitive effect where fluid flow induces heterogeneity in the adsorbate, displacing the adsorption equilibrium towards downstream adsorption sites in grooves. We also present an improvement of the adsorption-extended lattice Boltzmann scheme by introducing the possibility for saturating Langmuir-like adsorption, while earlier work focused on linear adsorption phenomena. We then highlight the impact of this change in situations of high concentration of adsorbate. PMID:26139013

  15. Studies of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons down to 4.5 K for the development of cryosorption pumps for fusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, U.; Vivek, G. A.; Krishnamoorthy, V.; Gangradey, R.; Udgata, S. S.; Tripati, V. S.

    2014-01-29

    Cryosorption pump is the only possible device to pump helium, hydrogen and its isotopes in fusion environment, such as high magnetic field and high plasma temperatures. Activated carbons are known to be the most suitable adsorbent in the development of cryosorption pumps. For this purpose, the data of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons in the temperature range 4.5 K to 77 K are needed, but are not available in the literature. For obtaining the above data, a commercial micro pore analyzer operating at 77 K has been integrated with a two stage GM cryocooler, which enables the cooling of the sample temperature down to 4.5 K. A heat switch mounted between the second stage cold head and the sample chamber helps to raise the sample chamber temperature to 77 K without affecting the performance of the cryocooler. The detailed description of this system is presented elsewhere. This paper presents the results of experimental studies of adsorption isotherms measured on different types of activated carbons in the form of granules, globules, flake knitted and non-woven types in the temperature range 4.5 K to 10 K using Helium gas as the adsorbate. The above results are analyzed to obtain the pore size distributions and surface areas of the activated carbons. The effect of adhesive used for bonding the activated carbons to the panels is also studied. These results will be useful to arrive at the right choice of activated carbon to be used for the development of cryosorption pumps.

  16. Studies of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons down to 4.5 K for the development of cryosorption pumps for fusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, U.; Vivek, G. A.; Krishnamoorthy, V.; Gangradey, R.; Udgata, S. S.; Tripati, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Cryosorption pump is the only possible device to pump helium, hydrogen and its isotopes in fusion environment, such as high magnetic field and high plasma temperatures. Activated carbons are known to be the most suitable adsorbent in the development of cryosorption pumps. For this purpose, the data of adsorption characteristics of activated carbons in the temperature range 4.5 K to 77 K are needed, but are not available in the literature. For obtaining the above data, a commercial micro pore analyzer operating at 77 K has been integrated with a two stage GM cryocooler, which enables the cooling of the sample temperature down to 4.5 K. A heat switch mounted between the second stage cold head and the sample chamber helps to raise the sample chamber temperature to 77 K without affecting the performance of the cryocooler. The detailed description of this system is presented elsewhere. This paper presents the results of experimental studies of adsorption isotherms measured on different types of activated carbons in the form of granules, globules, flake knitted and non-woven types in the temperature range 4.5 K to 10 K using Helium gas as the adsorbate. The above results are analyzed to obtain the pore size distributions and surface areas of the activated carbons. The effect of adhesive used for bonding the activated carbons to the panels is also studied. These results will be useful to arrive at the right choice of activated carbon to be used for the development of cryosorption pumps.

  17. Development of a Next-Generation Membrane-Integrated Adsorption Processor for CO2 Removal and Compression for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila; LeVan, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    The current CO2 removal technology of NASA is very energy intensive and contains many non-optimized subsystems. This paper discusses the concept of a next-generation, membrane integrated, adsorption processor for CO2 removal nd compression in closed-loop air revitalization systems. This processor will use many times less power than NASA's current CO2 removal technology and will be capable of maintaining a lower CO2 concentration in the cabin than that can be achieved by the existing CO2 removal systems. The compact, consolidated, configuration of gas dryer, CO2 separator, and CO2 compressor will allow continuous recycling of humid air in the cabin and supply of compressed CO2 to the reduction unit for oxygen recovery. The device has potential application to the International Space Station and future, long duration, transit, and planetary missions.

  18. Solvent vapor recovery by pressure swing adsorption. 3: Comparison of simulation with experiment for the butane-activated carbon system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Holland, C.E.; Ritter, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    A fully predictive (no adjustable parameters), nonisothermal, multicomponent mathematical model was developed and used to simulate a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process designed for the separation and recovery of concentrated butane vapor from nitrogen using BAX activated carbon. Nearly quantitative agreement with experiment was realized with this model over a wide range of process conditions, and for both the transient and periodic state process dynamics and the periodic state process performance. The model also verified some unique characteristics of this PSA process, and it revealed some of the subtleties associated with accurately simulating a PSA-solvent vapor recovery (SVR) process. These subtleties included the need to account for the adsorbate heat capacity and the temperature dependence of the gas-phase physical properties. No PSA models in the literature have included both of these features, which were critical to the accurate prediction of the heat effects in this PSA-SVR process.

  19. Evaluation of radon adsorption characteristics of a coconut shell-based activated charcoal system for radon and thoron removal applications.

    PubMed

    Karunakara, N; Sudeep Kumara, K; Yashodhara, I; Sahoo, B K; Gaware, J J; Sapra, B K; Mayya, Y S

    2015-04-01

    Radon ((222)Rn), thoron ((220)Rn), and their decay products contribute a major fraction (more than 50%) of doses received from ionisation radiation in public domain indoor environments and occupation environments such as uranium mines, thorium plants, and underground facilities, and are recognised as important radiological hazardous materials, which need to be controlled. This paper presents studies on the removal of (222)Rn and (220)Rn from air using coconut shell-based granular activated charcoal cylindrical adsorber beds. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the (222)Rn and (220)Rn adsorption characteristics, and the mitigation efficiency of coconut-based activated charcoal available in India. The performance parameters evaluated include breakthrough time (τ) and adsorption coefficient (K), and degassing characteristics of the charcoal bed of varying dimensions at different flow rates. While the breakthrough for (222)Rn occurred depending on the dimension of the adsorber bed and flow rates, for (220)Rn, the breakthrough did not occur. The breakthrough curve exhibited a stretched S-shape response, instead of the theoretically predicted sharp step function. The experiments confirm that the breakthrough time individually satisfies the quadratic relationship with respect to the diameter of the bed, and the linear relationship with respect to the length, as predicted in the theory. The K value varied in the range of 2.3-4.12 m(3) kg(-1) with a mean value of 2.99 m(3) kg(-1). The K value was found to increase with the increase in flow rate. Heating the charcoal to ∼ 100 °C resulted in degassing of the adsorbed (222)Rn, and the K of the degassed charcoal and virgin charcoal were found to be similar with no deterioration in performance indicating the re-usability of the charcoal.

  20. Evaluation of radon adsorption characteristics of a coconut shell-based activated charcoal system for radon and thoron removal applications.

    PubMed

    Karunakara, N; Sudeep Kumara, K; Yashodhara, I; Sahoo, B K; Gaware, J J; Sapra, B K; Mayya, Y S

    2015-04-01

    Radon ((222)Rn), thoron ((220)Rn), and their decay products contribute a major fraction (more than 50%) of doses received from ionisation radiation in public domain indoor environments and occupation environments such as uranium mines, thorium plants, and underground facilities, and are recognised as important radiological hazardous materials, which need to be controlled. This paper presents studies on the removal of (222)Rn and (220)Rn from air using coconut shell-based granular activated charcoal cylindrical adsorber beds. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the (222)Rn and (220)Rn adsorption characteristics, and the mitigation efficiency of coconut-based activated charcoal available in India. The performance parameters evaluated include breakthrough time (τ) and adsorption coefficient (K), and degassing characteristics of the charcoal bed of varying dimensions at different flow rates. While the breakthrough for (222)Rn occurred depending on the dimension of the adsorber bed and flow rates, for (220)Rn, the breakthrough did not occur. The breakthrough curve exhibited a stretched S-shape response, instead of the theoretically predicted sharp step function. The experiments confirm that the breakthrough time individually satisfies the quadratic relationship with respect to the diameter of the bed, and the linear relationship with respect to the length, as predicted in the theory. The K value varied in the range of 2.3-4.12 m(3) kg(-1) with a mean value of 2.99 m(3) kg(-1). The K value was found to increase with the increase in flow rate. Heating the charcoal to ∼ 100 °C resulted in degassing of the adsorbed (222)Rn, and the K of the degassed charcoal and virgin charcoal were found to be similar with no deterioration in performance indicating the re-usability of the charcoal. PMID:25658471

  1. Interfacial adsorption in ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Cruz, M.O. de la; Voorhees, P.W.

    1999-11-26

    Interfaces of A-B-C ternary alloys decomposed into two and three phases are studied. The effect of the gradient energy coefficients {bar {kappa}}{sub II}, I = A, B, C, on the interface composition profiles of ternary alloys is examined. The adsorption of component C in ternary alloys is obtained numerically by finding steady-state solutions of the nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard equations and by solving the two Euler-Lagrange equations resulting from minimizing the interfacial energy, and analytically near the critical point. It is found that the solutions from both numerical methods are identical for a two-phase system. In symmetric ternary systems (equal interaction energy between each pair of components) with a minority component C, the gradient energy coefficient of C, {bar {kappa}}{sub CC}, can have a very strong influence on the degree of adsorption. In the {alpha} and {beta} two-phase regions, where {alpha} and {beta} are the phases rich in the majority components A and B, respectively, as {bar {kappa}}{sub CC} increases, the adsorption of the minority component C in the {alpha} and {beta} interfaces decreases. Near a critical point, however, the degree of adsorption of minority component C is independent of the gradient energy coefficient.

  2. Performance evaluation of a hybrid system for efficient palm oil mill effluent treatment via an air-cathode, tubular upflow microbial fuel cell coupled with a granular activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Tee, Pei-Fang; Abdullah, Mohammad Omar; Tan, Ivy Ai Wei; Mohamed Amin, Mohamed Afizal; Nolasco-Hipolito, Cirilo; Bujang, Kopli

    2016-09-01

    An air-cathode MFC-adsorption hybrid system, made from earthen pot was designed and tested for simultaneous wastewater treatment and energy recovery. Such design had demonstrated superior characteristics of low internal resistance (29.3Ω) and favor to low-cost, efficient wastewater treatment and power generation (55mW/m(3)) with average current of 2.13±0.4mA. The performance between MFC-adsorption hybrid system was compared to the standalone adsorption system and results had demonstrated great pollutants removals of the integrated system especially for chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD3), total organic carbon (TOC), total volatile solids (TVS), ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3-N) and total nitrogen (TN) because such system combines the advantages of each individual unit. Besides the typical biological and electrochemical processes that happened in an MFC system, an additional physicochemical process from the activated carbon took place simultaneously in the MFC-adsorption hybrid system which would further improved on the wastewater quality. PMID:27268432

  3. Performance evaluation of a hybrid system for efficient palm oil mill effluent treatment via an air-cathode, tubular upflow microbial fuel cell coupled with a granular activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Tee, Pei-Fang; Abdullah, Mohammad Omar; Tan, Ivy Ai Wei; Mohamed Amin, Mohamed Afizal; Nolasco-Hipolito, Cirilo; Bujang, Kopli

    2016-09-01

    An air-cathode MFC-adsorption hybrid system, made from earthen pot was designed and tested for simultaneous wastewater treatment and energy recovery. Such design had demonstrated superior characteristics of low internal resistance (29.3Ω) and favor to low-cost, efficient wastewater treatment and power generation (55mW/m(3)) with average current of 2.13±0.4mA. The performance between MFC-adsorption hybrid system was compared to the standalone adsorption system and results had demonstrated great pollutants removals of the integrated system especially for chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD3), total organic carbon (TOC), total volatile solids (TVS), ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3-N) and total nitrogen (TN) because such system combines the advantages of each individual unit. Besides the typical biological and electrochemical processes that happened in an MFC system, an additional physicochemical process from the activated carbon took place simultaneously in the MFC-adsorption hybrid system which would further improved on the wastewater quality.

  4. Method and apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Drost, Kevin; Vishwanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2004-06-08

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. In another aspect, the apparatus or methods utilize heat exchange channels of varying lengths that have volumes controlled to provide equal heat fluxes. Methods of fuel cell startup are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  5. Method for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  6. Apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2005-12-13

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  7. Spectrophotometric investigation of the interactions between cationic (C.I. Basic Blue 9) and anionic (C.I. Acid Blue 25) dyes in adsorption onto extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanic in single and binary system.

    PubMed

    Ben Douissa, Najoua; Dridi-Dhaouadi, Sonia; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanica was used as an adsorbent for removal of a cationic (Basic blue 9, BB) and anionic textile dye (Acid blue 25, AB) from aqueous solution in single dye system. Characterization of the extracted cellulose and extracted cellulose-dye systems were performed using several techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta potential and Boehm acid-base titration method. Adsorption tests showed that the extracted cellulose presented higher adsorption of BB than AB in single dye system, revealing that electrostatic interactions are responsible, in the first instance, for the dye-adsorbent interaction. In single dye systems, the extracted cellulose presented the maximum adsorption capacities of BB and AB at 0.955 mmol.g(-1) and 0.370 mmol.g(-1), respectively. Adsorption experiments of AB dye on extracted cellulose saturated by BB dye exhibited the release of the latter dye from the sorbent which lead to dye-dye interaction in aqueous solution due to electrostatic attraction between both species. Interaction of BB and AB dyes were investigated using spectrophotometric analysis and results demonstrated the formation of a molecular complex detected at wavelengths 510 and 705 nm when anionic (AB) and cationic (BB) dye were taken in equimolar proportions. The adsorption isotherm of AB, taking into account the dye-dye interaction was investigated and showed that BB dye was released proportionately by AB equilibrium concentration. It was also observed that AB adsorption is widely enhanced when the formation of the molecular complex is disadvantaged.

  8. Spectrophotometric investigation of the interactions between cationic (C.I. Basic Blue 9) and anionic (C.I. Acid Blue 25) dyes in adsorption onto extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanic in single and binary system.

    PubMed

    Ben Douissa, Najoua; Dridi-Dhaouadi, Sonia; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk

    2016-01-01

    Extracted cellulose from Posidonia oceanica was used as an adsorbent for removal of a cationic (Basic blue 9, BB) and anionic textile dye (Acid blue 25, AB) from aqueous solution in single dye system. Characterization of the extracted cellulose and extracted cellulose-dye systems were performed using several techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta potential and Boehm acid-base titration method. Adsorption tests showed that the extracted cellulose presented higher adsorption of BB than AB in single dye system, revealing that electrostatic interactions are responsible, in the first instance, for the dye-adsorbent interaction. In single dye systems, the extracted cellulose presented the maximum adsorption capacities of BB and AB at 0.955 mmol.g(-1) and 0.370 mmol.g(-1), respectively. Adsorption experiments of AB dye on extracted cellulose saturated by BB dye exhibited the release of the latter dye from the sorbent which lead to dye-dye interaction in aqueous solution due to electrostatic attraction between both species. Interaction of BB and AB dyes were investigated using spectrophotometric analysis and results demonstrated the formation of a molecular complex detected at wavelengths 510 and 705 nm when anionic (AB) and cationic (BB) dye were taken in equimolar proportions. The adsorption isotherm of AB, taking into account the dye-dye interaction was investigated and showed that BB dye was released proportionately by AB equilibrium concentration. It was also observed that AB adsorption is widely enhanced when the formation of the molecular complex is disadvantaged. PMID:27148723

  9. Optimization of the bake-on siliconization of cartridges. Part I: Optimization of the spray-on parameters.

    PubMed

    Funke, Stefanie; Matilainen, Julia; Nalenz, Heiko; Bechtold-Peters, Karoline; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Friess, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Biopharmaceutical products are increasingly commercialized as drug/device combinations to enable self-administration. Siliconization of the inner syringe/cartridge glass barrel for adequate functionality is either performed at the supplier or drug product manufacturing site. Yet, siliconization processes are often insufficiently investigated. In this study, an optimized bake-on siliconization process for cartridges using a pilot-scale siliconization unit was developed. The following process parameters were investigated: spray quantity, nozzle position, spray pressure, time for pump dosing and the silicone emulsion concentration. A spray quantity of 4mg emulsion showed best, immediate atomization into a fine spray. 16 and 29mg of emulsion, hence 4-7-times the spray volume, first generated an emulsion jet before atomization was achieved. Poor atomization of higher quantities correlated with an increased spray loss and inhomogeneous silicone distribution, e.g., due to runlets forming build-ups at the cartridge lower edge and depositing on the star wheel. A prolonged time for pump dosing of 175ms led to a more intensive, long-lasting spray compared to 60ms as anticipated from a higher air-to-liquid ratio. A higher spray pressure of 2.5bar did not improve atomization but led to an increased spray loss. At a 20mm nozzle-to-flange distance the spray cone exactly reached the cartridge flange, which was optimal for thicker silicone layers at the flange to ease piston break-loose. Initially, 10μg silicone was sufficient for adequate extrusion in filled cartridges. However, both maximum break-loose and gliding forces in filled cartridges gradually increased from 5-8N to 21-22N upon 80weeks storage at room temperature. The increase for a 30μg silicone level from 3-6N to 10-12N was moderate. Overall, the study provides a comprehensive insight into critical process parameters during the initial spray-on process and the impact of these parameters on the characteristics of the

  10. Experimental Determination of P-V-T-X Properties and Adsorption Kinetics in the CO2-CH4 System under Shale Gas Reservoir Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Shale gas production via hydrofracturing has profoundly changed the energy portfolio in the USA and other parts of the world. Under the shale gas reservior conditions, CO2 and H2O, either in residence or being injected during hydrofracturing or both, co-exist with CH4. One important feature characteristic of shale is the presence of nanometer-scale (1-100 nm) pores in shale or mudstone. The interactions among CH4, CO2 and H2O in those nano-sized pores directly impact shale gas storage and gas release from the shale matrix. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of interactions among CH4, CO2 and H2O in nanopore confinement would provide guidance in addressing a number of problems such as rapid decline in production after a few years and low recovery rates. We are systematically investigating the P-V-T-X properties and adsorption kinetics in the CH4-CO2-H2O system under the reservior conditions. We have designed and constructed a unique high temperature and pressure experimental system that can measure both of the P-V-T-X properties and adsorption kinetics sequentially. We measure the P-V-T-X properties of CH4-CO2 mixtures with CH4 up to 95 vol. %, and adsorption kinetics of various materials, under the conditions relevant to shale gas reservoir. We use three types of materials: (I) model materials, (II) single solid phases separated from shale samples, and (III) crushed shale samples from both the known shale gas producing formations and the shale gas barren formations. The model materials are well characterized in terms of pore sizes. Therefore, the results associated with the model material serve as benchmarks for our model development. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This research is supported by a Geoscience Foundation LDRD.

  11. Separation of clavulanic acid from fermented broth of amino acids by an aqueous two-phase system and ion-exchange adsorption.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Clovis Sacardo; Cuel, Maressa Fabiano; Barreto, Verônica Orlandin; Kwong, Wu Hong; Hokka, Carlos O; Barboza, M

    2012-02-15

    The clavulanic acid is a substance which inhibits the β-lactamases used with penicillins for therapeutic treatment. After the fermentation, by-products of low molecular weight such as amino acids lysine, histidine, proline and tyrosine are present in the fermented broth. To remove these impurities the techniques of extraction by an aqueous two-phase system of 17% polyethylene glycol molecular weight 600 and 15% potassium phosphate were used for a partial purification. A subsequent ion-exchange adsorption was used for the recuperation of the clavulanic acid of the top phase and purification getting a concentration factor of 2 and purification of 100% in relation to the amino acids lysine, histidine, proline and tyrosine.

  12. Adsorption of thorium(IV) from simulated radioactive solutions using a novel electrospun PVA/TiO2/ZnO nanofiber adsorbent functionalized with mercapto groups: Study in single and multi-component systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Dariush; Keshtkar, Ali Reza; Moosavian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-03-01

    The novel polyvinyl alcohol/titanium oxide/zinc oxide (PVA/TiO2/ZnO) nanofiber adsorbent functionalized with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (TMPTMS) was prepared by electrospinning method and its potential was investigated for the adsorption of thorium from single and multi-metal aqueous solutions. The prepared adsorbent was characterized by FTIR, SEM and BET analysis. The influences of different operational parameters such as pH, ionic strength, equilibrium time, initial concentration and temperature were studied in batch mode. Investigation of ionic strength effect showed that the addition of NaNO3 to metal solution has a slight effect on the thorium adsorption, whereas pH value has a serious effect on the thorium adsorption at pH values lower than 4. The double-exponential model described the adsorption of Th(IV) ions much better than other kinetic models within both the single and multi-component systems. Among various isotherm models used, the equilibrium data of Th(IV) conformed the Langmuir isotherm in the single system, while those were best fitted by Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm in multi-component system. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH°, ΔS°, and ΔG° indicated that the nature of adsorption process was spontaneous, endothermic and thermodynamically favored. The inhibitory effect of other metal ions on the adsorption capacity of Th(IV) was in order of Al(III) > Cu(II) > Cd(II) > Ni(II) > U(VI) > Fe(II).

  13. Coupled plasma filtration adsorption for the treatment of a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lucisano, Gaetano; Capria, Maria; Matera, Giovanni; Presta, Pierangela; Comi, Nicolino; Talarico, Roberta; Rametti, Linda; Quirino, Angela; Giancotti, Aida; Fuiano, Giorgio

    2011-10-01

    Coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) is an extracorporeal blood purification therapy based on non-specific pro- and anti-inflammatory mediator adsorption on a special resin cartridge coupled with continuous veno-venous haemofiltration or continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration and is one of the emerging treatments for septic patients. However, in the literature, there are limited data about its efficacy in treating patients with acute diseases but without the traditional criteria for sepsis. We describe the case of a 43-year-old male who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pneumonia and acute kidney injury, whose clinical conditions rapidly improved after early CPFA therapy.

  14. Coupled plasma filtration adsorption for the treatment of a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lucisano, Gaetano; Capria, Maria; Matera, Giovanni; Presta, Pierangela; Comi, Nicolino; Talarico, Roberta; Rametti, Linda; Quirino, Angela; Giancotti, Aida

    2011-01-01

    Coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) is an extracorporeal blood purification therapy based on non-specific pro- and anti-inflammatory mediator adsorption on a special resin cartridge coupled with continuous veno-venous haemofiltration or continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration and is one of the emerging treatments for septic patients. However, in the literature, there are limited data about its efficacy in treating patients with acute diseases but without the traditional criteria for sepsis. We describe the case of a 43-year-old male who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pneumonia and acute kidney injury, whose clinical conditions rapidly improved after early CPFA therapy. PMID:25984170

  15. The impact of industrial-scale cartridge filtration on the native microbial communities from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Hammes, Frederik; Egli, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Groundwater is a major source for bottled water, which is increasingly consumed all over the world. Some categories of bottled water can be subjected to treatments such as disinfection prior to bottling. In the current study, we present the quantitative impact of industrial-scale micro-filtration (0.22 microm pore size) on native microbial communities of groundwater and evaluate subsequent microbial growth after bottling. Two separate groundwater aquifers were tested. Flow-cytometric total cell concentration (TCC) and total adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) analysis were used to quantify microbial abundance. The TCC of the native microbial community in both aquifers was in the range of 10(3)-10(4) cells/ml. Up to 10% of the native microbial community was able to pass through the cartridge filtration units installed at both aquifers. In addition, all samples (either with or without 0.22 microm filtration) showed significant growth after bottling and storage, reaching average final concentrations of 1-3 x 10(5) cells/ml. However, less growth was observed in carbon-free glassware than in standard polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles. Furthermore, our results showed that filtration and bottling can alter the microbial community patterns as observed with flow cytometry. The current study established that industrial-scale micro-filtration cannot serve as an absolute barrier for the native microbial community and provided significant insight to the impact of filtration and bottling on microbial concentrations in bottled water.

  16. Investigating Premature Ignition of Thruster Pressure Cartridges by Mechanical Impact of Internal Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Stephen S.; Saulsberry, Regor

    2010-01-01

    Pyrotechnic thruster pressure cartridges (TPCs) are used for aeroshell separation on a new NASA crew launch vehicle. The premature ignition concern was hypothesized based on the potential range of motion of the subassemblies, projected worst case accelerations, and the internal geometry that could subject propellant grains to mechanical impact sufficiently high for ignition. This possibility was investigated by fabricating a high-fidelity model of the suspected contact geometry, placing a representative amount of propellant in it, and impacting the propellant with a range of forces equivalent to and greater than the maximum possible during launch. Testing demonstrated that the likelihood of ignition is less than 1 in 1,000,000. The test apparatus, methodology, and results are described in this paper. Nondestructive evaluation ( NDE) during TPC acceptance testing indicated that internal assemblies moved during shock and vibration testing due to an internal bond anomaly. This caused concerns that the launch environment might produce the same movement and release propellant grains that might be prematurely ignited through impact or through electrostatic discharge (ESD) as grains vibrated against internal surfaces. Since a new lot could not be fabricated in time, a determination had to be made as to whether the lot was acceptable to fly. This paper discusses the analysis and impact testing used to address the potential impact issue and a separate paper addresses the ESD issue.

  17. Unsuitability of using the DNPH-coated solid sorbent cartridge for determination of airborne unsaturated carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Ho, K. F.; Liu, W. D.; Lee, S. C.; Dai, W. T.; Cao, J. J.; Ip, H. S. S.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of aldehydes and ketones are typically conducted by derivatization using sorbent cartridges coated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). The collected samples are eluted with acetonitrile and analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with an ultra-violet detector (HPLC/UV). This paper intends to examine artifacts about its suitability in identification of unsaturated carbonyls. Kinetic tests for acrolein, crotonaldehyde, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) showed formations of carbonyl-DNP-hydrazone during sampling, which could further react with DNPH, resulting in undesired UV absorption products [e.g., carbonyl-DNP-hydrazone-DNPH (dimer) and 2(carbonyl-DNP-hydrazone)-DNPH (trimer)]. The dimerization and trimerization occurred for acrolein and MVK whereas only dimerization for crotonaldehyde and methacrolein. The polymerization products undoubtedly affect the integrity of the chromatogram, leading to misidentification and inaccurate quantification. Whether precautions taken during sampling and/or sample treatment could avoid or minimize this artifact has not been thoughtfully investigated. More often, such artifacts are usually overlooked by scientists when the data are reported.

  18. Fired Cartridge Case Identification Using Optical Images and the Congruent Matching Cells (CMC) Method

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Mingsi; Song, John; Chu, Wei; Thompson, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    The Congruent Matching Cells (CMC) method for ballistics identification was invented at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The CMC method is based on the correlation of pairs of small correlation cells instead of the correlation of entire images. Four identification parameters – TCCF, Tθ, Tx and Ty are proposed for identifying correlated cell pairs originating from the same firearm. The correlation conclusion (matching or non-matching) is determined by whether the number of CMC is ≥ 6. This method has been previously validated using a set of 780 pair-wise 3D topography images. However, most ballistic images stored in current local and national databases are in an optical intensity (grayscale) format. As a result, the reliability of applying the CMC method on optical intensity images is an important issue. In this paper, optical intensity images of breech face impressions captured on the same set of 40 cartridge cases are correlated and analyzed for the validation test of CMC method using optical images. This includes correlations of 63 pairs of matching images and 717 pairs of non-matching images under top ring lighting. Tests of the method do not produce any false identification (false positive) or false exclusion (false negative) results, which support the CMC method and the proposed identification criterion, C = 6, for firearm breech face identifications using optical intensity images. PMID:26601045

  19. Development of NASA's Sample Cartridge Assembly: Design, Thermal Analysis, and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Brian; Hernandez, Deborah; Duffy, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Sample Cartridge Assembly (SCA) project is responsible for designing and validating a payload that contains a materials research sample in a sealed environment. The SCA will be heated in the European Space Agency's (ESA) Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) that is housed inside the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) located in the International Space Station (ISS). Sintered metals and crystal growth experiments in microgravity are examples of some of the types of materials research that may be performed with a SCA. The project's approach has been to use thermal models to guide the SCA through several design iterations. Various layouts of the SCA components were explored to meet the science and engineering requirements, and testing has been done to help prove the design. This paper will give an overview of the SCA design. It will show how thermal analysis is used to support the project. Also some testing that has been completed will also be discussed, including changes that were made to the thermal profile used during brazing.

  20. Microfluidic impact printer with interchangeable cartridges for versatile non-contact multiplexed micropatterning.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Huang, Eric; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2013-05-21

    Biopatterning has been increasingly used for well-defined cellular microenvironment, patterned surface topology, and guided biological cues; however, it meets challenges on biocompatibility, thermal and chemical sensitivity, as well as limited availability of reagents. In this paper, we aim at combining the desired features from non-contact inkjet printing and dot-matrix impact printing to establish a versatile multiplexed micropatterning platform, referred to as Microfluidic Impact Printer (MI-Printer), for emerging biomedical applications. Using this platform, we can achieve the distinct features of no cross-contamination, sub-microliter ink loading with a minimal dead volume, high-throughput printing, biocompatible non-contact processing, sequential patterning with self-alignment, wide adaptability for complex media (e.g., cell suspension or colloidal solutions), interchangeable/disposable cartridge design, and simple assembly and configuration, all highly desirable towards laboratory-based research and development. Specifically, the printing resolution of the MI-printer platform has been experimentally characterized and theoretically analysed. Optimal printing resolution of 80 μm has been repeatedly obtained. Furthermore, two useful functions of the MI-printer, multiplexed printing and combinatorial printing, have been experimentally demonstrated with less than 10 μm misalignment. Moreover, molecular and biological patterning, utilizing the multiplexed and combinatorial printing, has been implemented to illustrate the utility of this versatile printing technique for emerging biomedical applications.

  1. Thermodynamics of binary gas adsorption in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sujeet; Lefort, Ronan; Morineau, Denis; Mhanna, Ramona; Merdrignac-Conanec, Odile; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Leclercq, Théo

    2016-09-21

    MCM-41 nanoporous silicas show a very high selectivity for monoalcohols over aprotic molecules during adsorption of a binary mixture in the gas phase. We present here an original use of gravimetric vapour sorption isotherms to characterize the role played by the alcohol hydrogen-bonding network in the adsorption process. Beyond simple selectivity, vapour sorption isotherms measured for various compositions help to completely unravel at the molecular level the step by step adsorption mechanism of the binary system in the nanoporous solid, from the first monolayers to the complete liquid condensation. PMID:27532892

  2. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  3. Determination of propofol glucuronide from hair sample by using mixed mode anion exchange cartridge and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hye Kyung; Choe, Sanggil; In, Sangwhan; Pyo, Jae Sung

    2016-03-15

    The main objective of this study was to develop and validate a simpler and less time consuming analytical method for determination of propofol glucuronide from hair sample, by using mixed mode anion exchange cartridge and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The study uses propofol glucuronide, a major metabolite of propofol, as a marker for propofol abuse. The hair sample was digested in sodium hydroxide solution and loaded in mixed-mode anion cartridge for solid phase extraction. Water and ethyl acetate were used as washing solvents to remove interfering substances from the hair sample. Consequently, 2% formic acid in ethyl acetate was employed to elute propofol glucuronide from the sorbent of mixed-mode anion cartridge, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The method validation parameters such as selectivity, specificity, LOD, LLOQ, accuracy, precision, recovery, and matrix effect were also tested. The linearity of calibration curves showed good correlation, with correlation coefficient 0.998. The LOD and LLOQ of the propofol glucuronide were 0.2 pg/mg and 0.5 pg/mg, respectively. The intra and inter-day precision and accuracy were acceptable within 15%. The mean values of recovery and matrix effect were in the range of 91.7-98.7% and 87.5-90.3%, respectively, signifying that the sample preparation, washing and extraction procedure were efficient, and there was low significant hair matrix effect for the extraction of propofol glucuronide from hair sample on the mixed mode anion cartridge. To evaluate the suitability of method, the hair of propofol administered rat was successfully analyzed with this method.

  4. Detection and removal of dissolved hydrogen sulphide in flow-through systems via the sulphidation of hydrous iron (III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Poulton, S W; Krom, M D; van Rijn, J; Raiswell, R; Bows, R

    2003-02-01

    A novel automated warning and removal system for hydrogen sulphide in aqueous flow-through systems has been developed based on the sulphidation of ferrihydrite sorbed to zeolite substrate. The system consists of a small flow-through reaction cartridge with photo-sensors positioned at the base. During the reaction, sulphide is initially oxidised to elemental sulphur by the ferrihydrite, and Fe2+ is subsequently released to solution. This Fe2+ then reacts with additional dissolved sulphide to form solid phase iron monosulphide. The colour change from orange ferrihydrite to black iron monosulphide is continuously monitored by the photo-sensors, which provide a rapid and reproducible response (via a voltage change) to pulses of sulphidic water. The response of the photo-sensors is linear with respect to inflowing sulphide concentration, while the most rapid response to dissolved sulphide occurs at a flow rate of approximately 200 ml min(-1) (equivalent to a hydraulic loading rate of 21 cm min(-1). The presence of phosphate in solution substantially decreases reaction rates due to adsorption to reactive surface sites. However, the response time of the photo-sensors remains sufficient to provide a rapid indication of sulphidic conditions even in systems with high concentrations of dissolved phosphate. The cartridge has the advantage of partially or completely removing sulphide (depending on flow rate and substrate mass) from an initial pulse of water. At the optimal flow rate for the successful use of the cartridge as a sulphide warning system (200 ml min(-1)), required substrate masses for the complete removal of dissolved sulphide (over the experimental range of 0-1000 microM) are relatively small (0.5-2 kg).

  5. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system model for adsorption of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-dithiol onto gold nanoparticales-activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Hosaininia, R.; Ghaedi, A. M.; Vafaei, A.; Taghizadeh, F.

    2014-10-01

    In this research, a novel adsorbent gold nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (Au-NP-AC) was synthesized by ultrasound energy as a low cost routing protocol. Subsequently, this novel material characterization and identification followed by different techniques such as scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Unique properties such as high BET surface area (>1229.55 m2/g) and low pore size (<22.46 Å) and average particle size lower than 48.8 Å in addition to high reactive atoms and the presence of various functional groups make it possible for efficient removal of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-dithiol (TDDT). Generally, the influence of variables, including the amount of adsorbent, initial pollutant concentration, contact time on pollutants removal percentage has great effect on the removal percentage that their influence was optimized. The optimum parameters for adsorption of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2, 5-dithiol onto gold nanoparticales-activated carbon were 0.02 g adsorbent mass, 10 mg L-1 initial 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-dithiol concentration, 30 min contact time and pH 7. The Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), and multiple linear regression (MLR) models, have been applied for prediction of removal of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-dithiol using gold nanoparticales-activated carbon (Au-NP-AC) in a batch study. The input data are included adsorbent dosage (g), contact time (min) and pollutant concentration (mg/l). The coefficient of determination (R2) and mean squared error (MSE) for the training data set of optimal ANFIS model were achieved to be 0.9951 and 0.00017, respectively. These results show that ANFIS model is capable of predicting adsorption of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-dithiol using Au-NP-AC with high accuracy in an easy, rapid and cost effective way.

  6. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system model for adsorption of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-dithiol onto gold nanoparticales-activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Hosaininia, R; Ghaedi, A M; Vafaei, A; Taghizadeh, F

    2014-10-15

    In this research, a novel adsorbent gold nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (Au-NP-AC) was synthesized by ultrasound energy as a low cost routing protocol. Subsequently, this novel material characterization and identification followed by different techniques such as scanning electron microscope(SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller(BET) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Unique properties such as high BET surface area (>1229.55m(2)/g) and low pore size (<22.46Å) and average particle size lower than 48.8Å in addition to high reactive atoms and the presence of various functional groups make it possible for efficient removal of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-dithiol (TDDT). Generally, the influence of variables, including the amount of adsorbent, initial pollutant concentration, contact time on pollutants removal percentage has great effect on the removal percentage that their influence was optimized. The optimum parameters for adsorption of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2, 5-dithiol onto gold nanoparticales-activated carbon were 0.02g adsorbent mass, 10mgL(-1) initial 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-dithiol concentration, 30min contact time and pH 7. The Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), and multiple linear regression (MLR) models, have been applied for prediction of removal of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-dithiol using gold nanoparticales-activated carbon (Au-NP-AC) in a batch study. The input data are included adsorbent dosage (g), contact time (min) and pollutant concentration (mg/l). The coefficient of determination (R(2)) and mean squared error (MSE) for the training data set of optimal ANFIS model were achieved to be 0.9951 and 0.00017, respectively. These results show that ANFIS model is capable of predicting adsorption of 1,3,4-thiadiazole-2,5-dithiol using Au-NP-AC with high accuracy in an easy, rapid and cost effective way. PMID:24858196

  7. Study of the Behaviors of Gunshot Residues from Spent Cartridges by Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction-Gas Chromatographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kah Haw; Yew, Chong Hooi; Abdullah, Ahmad Fahmi Lim

    2015-07-01

    Gunshot residues, produced after shooting activity, have acquired their importance in analysis due to the notoriety of firearms-related crimes. In this study, solid-phase microextraction was performed to extract the headspace composition of spent cartridges using 85-μm polyacrylate fiber at 66°C for 21 min. Organic compounds, that is, naphthalene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, diphenylamine, and dibutyl phthalate were detected and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection technique. Evaluation of chromatograms for diphenylamine, dibutyl phthalate, and naphthalene indicates the period after a gunshot was discharged, whether it was 1 days, 2-4 days, <5 days, 10 days, 20 days, or more than 30 days ago. This study revealed the potential effects of environmental factors such as occasional wind blow and direct sunlight on the estimation of time after spent cartridges were discharged. In conclusion, we proposed reliable alternative in analyzing the headspace composition of spent cartridges in a simulated crime scene. PMID:25771708

  8. Goddard Space Flight Center specification for Helical-Scan 8-millimeter (mm) magnetic digital data tape cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jimmy L.

    1992-01-01

    The same kind of standard and controls are established that are currently in use for the procurement of new analog, digital, and IBM/IBM compatible 3480 tape cartridges, and 1 in wide channel video magnetic tapes. The Magnetic Tape Certification Facility (MTCF) maintains a Qualified Products List (QPL) for the procurement of new magnetic media and uses the following specifications for the QPL and Acceptance Tests: (1) NASA TM-79724 is used for the QPL and Acceptance Testing of new analog magnetic tapes; (2) NASA TM-80599 is used for the QPL and Acceptance Testing of new digital magnetic tapes; (3) NASA TM-100702 is used for the QPL and Acceptance Testing of new IBM/IBM compatible 3840 magnetic tape cartridges; and (4) NASA TM-100712 is used for the QPL and Acceptance Testing of new 1 in wide channel video magnetic tapes. This document will be used for the QPL and Acceptance Testing of new Helical Scan 8 mm digital data tape cartridges.

  9. Characterization of Plasma Gun with TiH2/C60 Cartridge for Disruption Mitigation in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Thompson, J. R.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.; HyperV Technologies Corp. Team

    2011-10-01

    Impurity injection for disruption mitigation in tokamaks must be faster than growth time of plasma instabilities, requires sufficient mass to get critical electron density, high penetrability, and large assimilation fraction in the core plasma, with rapid impurity redistribution over the whole plasma. FAR-TECH, Inc. proposed the innovative idea to use hyper-velocity (>30 km/s), high-density (>1023 m-3) C60/C plasma jets with high ram pressure to deliver the impurity mass in <1 ms. For this purpose C60 powder explosively sublimated into molecular gas, from a solid state, pulsed power driven TiH2/C60 injector cartridge is ionized and accelerated in a plasma accelerator. We report the complete characterization of the TiH2/C60 cartridge with 5 kJ capacitive driver which demonstrated the capability of producing >30 mg of C60 gas in <0.5 ms. In addition we present the construction and testing status of a 100 kJ coaxial plasma gun (~35 cm length) prototype with TiH2/C60 cartridge for a small scale, proof-of-principle experiment on a tokamak. Work supported by the US DOE DE-FG02-08ER85196 grant.

  10. A patterned abrasion caused by the impact of a cartridge case may simulate an atypical muzzle imprint mark.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Lena; Nadjem, Hadi; Glardon, Matthieu; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Pollak, Stefan; Große Perdekamp, Markus; Pircher, Rebecca

    2016-05-01

    In contact shots, the muzzle imprint is an informative finding associated with the entrance wound. It typically mirrors the constructional components being in line with the muzzle or just behind. Under special conditions, other patterned skin marks located near a gunshot entrance wound may give the impression to be part of the muzzle imprint. A potential mechanism causing a patterned pressure abrasion in close proximity to the bullet entrance site is demonstrated on the basis of a suicidal shot to the temple. The skin lesion in question appeared as a ring-shaped excoriation with a diameter corresponding to that of the cartridge case. Two hypotheses concerning the causative mechanism were investigated by test shots: - After being ejected, the cartridge case ricocheted inside a confined space (car cabin in the particular case) and secondarily hit the skin near the gunshot entrance wound. - The ejection of the cartridge case failed so that the case became stuck in the ejection port and its mouth contacted the skin when the body collapsed after being hit. PMID:26496804

  11. A patterned abrasion caused by the impact of a cartridge case may simulate an atypical muzzle imprint mark.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Lena; Nadjem, Hadi; Glardon, Matthieu; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Pollak, Stefan; Große Perdekamp, Markus; Pircher, Rebecca

    2016-05-01

    In contact shots, the muzzle imprint is an informative finding associated with the entrance wound. It typically mirrors the constructional components being in line with the muzzle or just behind. Under special conditions, other patterned skin marks located near a gunshot entrance wound may give the impression to be part of the muzzle imprint. A potential mechanism causing a patterned pressure abrasion in close proximity to the bullet entrance site is demonstrated on the basis of a suicidal shot to the temple. The skin lesion in question appeared as a ring-shaped excoriation with a diameter corresponding to that of the cartridge case. Two hypotheses concerning the causative mechanism were investigated by test shots: - After being ejected, the cartridge case ricocheted inside a confined space (car cabin in the particular case) and secondarily hit the skin near the gunshot entrance wound. - The ejection of the cartridge case failed so that the case became stuck in the ejection port and its mouth contacted the skin when the body collapsed after being hit.

  12. GENERAL: Cluster Growth Through Monomer Adsorption Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jian-Hong; Lin, Zhen-Quan; Chen, Xiao-Shuang

    2010-02-01

    We propose a monomer adsorption model, in which only the monomers are allowed to diffuse and adsorb onto other clusters. By means of the generalized rate equation we investigate the kinetic behavior of the system with a special rate kernel. For the system without monomer input, the concentration aj(t) of the Aj clusters (j > 1) asymptotically retains a nonzero quantity, while for the system with monomer input, it decays with time and vanishes finally. We also investigate the kinetics of an interesting model with fixed-rate monomer adsorption. For the case without monomer source, the evolution of the system will halt at a finite time; while the system evolves infinitely in time in the case with monomer source. Finally, we also suggest a connection between the fixed-rate monomer adsorption systems and growing networks.

  13. Adsorption of nisin and pediocin on nanoclays.

    PubMed

    Meira, Stela Maris Meister; Jardim, Arthur Izé; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-01

    Three different nanoclays (bentonite, octadecylamine-modified montmorillonite and halloysite) were studied as potential carriers for the antimicrobial peptides nisin and pediocin. Adsorption occurred from peptide solutions in contact with nanoclays at room temperature. Higher adsorption of nisin and pediocin was obtained on bentonite. The antimicrobial activity of the resultant bacteriocin-nanoclay systems was analyzed using skimmed milk agar as food simulant and the largest inhibition zones were observed against Gram-positive bacteria for halloysite samples. Bacteriocins were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonites as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) assay. Infrared spectroscopy suggested non-electrostatic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding between siloxane groups from clays and peptide molecules. Transmission electron microscopy did not show any alteration in morphologies after adsorption of antimicrobial peptides on bentonite and halloysite. These results indicate that nanoclays, especially halloysite, are suitable nanocarriers for nisin and pediocin adsorption.

  14. Adsorption of nisin and pediocin on nanoclays.

    PubMed

    Meira, Stela Maris Meister; Jardim, Arthur Izé; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-01

    Three different nanoclays (bentonite, octadecylamine-modified montmorillonite and halloysite) were studied as potential carriers for the antimicrobial peptides nisin and pediocin. Adsorption occurred from peptide solutions in contact with nanoclays at room temperature. Higher adsorption of nisin and pediocin was obtained on bentonite. The antimicrobial activity of the resultant bacteriocin-nanoclay systems was analyzed using skimmed milk agar as food simulant and the largest inhibition zones were observed against Gram-positive bacteria for halloysite samples. Bacteriocins were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonites as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) assay. Infrared spectroscopy suggested non-electrostatic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding between siloxane groups from clays and peptide molecules. Transmission electron microscopy did not show any alteration in morphologies after adsorption of antimicrobial peptides on bentonite and halloysite. These results indicate that nanoclays, especially halloysite, are suitable nanocarriers for nisin and pediocin adsorption. PMID:26041178

  15. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  16. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  17. Studies with an immobilized metal affinity chromatography cassette system involving binuclear triazacyclononane-derived ligands: automation of batch adsorption measurements with tagged recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Martin; Coghlan, Campbell J; Hearn, Milton T W

    2014-07-18

    This study describes the determination of the adsorption isotherms and binding kinetics of tagged recombinant proteins using a recently developed IMAC cassette system and employing automated robotic liquid handling procedures for IMAC resin screening. These results confirm that these new IMAC resins, generated from a variety of different metal-charged binuclear 1,4,7-triaza-cyclononane (tacn) ligands, interact with recombinant proteins containing a novel N-terminal metal binding tag, NT1A, with static binding capacities similar to those obtained with conventional hexa-His tagged proteins, but with significantly increased association constants. In addition, higher kinetic binding rates were observed with these new IMAC systems, an attribute that can be positively exploited to increase process productivity. The results from this investigation demonstrate that enhancements in binding capacities and affinities were achieved with these new IMAC resins and chosen NT1A tagged protein. Further, differences in the binding performances of the bis(tacn) xylenyl-bridged ligands were consistent with the distance between the metal binding centres of the two tacn moieties, the flexibility of the ligand and the potential contribution from the aromatic ring of the xylenyl group to undergo π/π stacking interactions with the tagged proteins.

  18. [Characteristic of ammonia nitrogen adsorption on karst underground river sediments].

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Chen, Kun-Kun; Jiang, Guang-Hui

    2011-02-01

    Karst aquifers are one of the most important aquifers in Southwestern China. One of the characteristics of karst aquifers is the enhanced permeability permits high flow velocities are capable of transporting suspended and bedload sediments. Mobile sediment in karst may act as a vector for the transport of contaminates. 14 sediment samples were collected from two underground rivers in two typical karst areas in Liuzhou city, Guangxi Autonomous Region, China. According to simulated experiment methods, characteristic of adsorption of ammonia nitrogen on sediment was studied. The results of ammonia nitrogen adsorption dynamics on sediments showed that the maximum adsorption velocity was less than 2 h. The adsorption balance quantity in 5 h accounted for 71% - 98% of the maximum adsorption quantity. The maximum adsorption quantity of ammonia nitrogen was 385.5 mg/kg, which was sediment from a cave in the middle areas of Guancun underground river system. The study of isotherm adsorption indicated adsorption quantity of NH4+ increase followed by incremental balance concentration of NH4+ in the aquatic phase. Adsorption quantity of ammonia nitrogen in sediments has a relative linear relationship with adsorption balance concentrations. Adsorption-desorption balance concentrations were all low, indicating sediments from underground rivers have great adsorption potential. Under the condition of low and high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen in overlying water, Langmuir and Tempkin couldn't simulate or simulate results couldn't reach remarkable level, whilst Linear and Freundlich models could simulate well. Research on different type sediments, sampling times and depths from two underground rivers shows characteristic of ammonia nitrogen adsorption on karst underground river sediments doesn't have good correspondence with the type of sediments. One of the reasons is there is no big difference between sediments in the development of climate, geology, hydrological conditions

  19. CRYOGENIC ADSORPTION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES OVER NANO-STRUCTURED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, S.; Heung, L.

    2010-10-07

    Porous materials such as zeolites, activated carbon, silica gels, alumina and a number of industrial catalysts are compared and ranked for hydrogen and deuterium adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. All samples show higher D{sub 2} adsorption than that of H{sub 2}, in which a HY sample has the greatest isotopic effect while 13X has the highest hydrogen uptake capacity. Material's moisture content has significant impact to its hydrogen uptake. A material without adequate drying could result in complete loss of its adsorption capacity. Even though some materials present higher H{sub 2} adsorption capacity at full pressure, their adsorption at low vapor pressure may not be as good as others. Adsorption capacity in a dynamic system is much less than in a static system. A sharp desorption is also expected in case of temperature upset.

  20. Adsorption properties of the nanozirconia/anionic polyacrylamide system-Effects of surfactant presence, solution pH and polymer carboxyl groups content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, Małgorzata; Chibowski, Stanisław; Urban, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption mechanism of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) on the nanozirconia surface was examined. The effects of solution pH, carboxyl groups content in macromolecules and anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate-SDS) addition were determined. The more probable structure of polymer adsorption layer was characterized based on the data obtained from spectrophotometry, viscosimetry and potentiometric titration methods. The adsorbed amount of polymer, size of macromolecules in the solution and surface charge density of ZrO2 particles in the absence and presence of PAM were assessed, respectively. Analysis of these results indicated that the increase of solution pH and content of carboxyl groups in the polymeric chains lead to more expanded conformations of adsorbing macromolecules. As a result, the adsorption of anionic polyacrylamide decreased. The SDS presence caused the significant increase of PAM adsorbed amount at pH 3, whereas at pH 6 and 9 the surfactant addition resulted in reduction of polymer adsorption level.

  1. Protein adsorption onto ceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Takami, Y; Yamane, S; Makinouchi, K; Otsuka, G; Glueck, J; Benkowski, R; Nosé, Y

    1998-04-01

    Ceramics seldom have been used as blood-contacting materials. However, alumina ceramic (Al2O3) and polyethylene are incorporated into the pivot bearings of the Gyro centrifugal blood pump. This material combination was chosen based on the high durability of the materials. Due to the stagnant flow that often occurs in a continuous flow condition inside a centrifugal pump, pivot bearing system is extremely critical. To evaluate the thombogenicity of pivot bearings in the Gyro pump, this study sought to investigate protein adsorption, particularly albumin, IgG, fibrinogen, and fibronectin onto ceramic surfaces. Al2O3 and silicon carbide ceramic (SiC) were compared with polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC). Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay revealed that the amount of adsorbed proteins onto Al2O3 and SiC was significantly less than that on PVC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicated that numerous proteins adsorbed onto PVC compared to PE, Al2O3, and SiC. Identification of adsorbed proteins by Western immunoblotting revealed that the adsorption of albumin was similar on all four materials tested. Western immunoblotting also indicated lesser amounts of IgG, fibrinogen, and fibronectin on Al2O3 and SiC than on PE and PVC. In conclusion, ceramics (Al2O3 and SiC) are expected to be thromboresistant from the viewpoint of protein adsorption. PMID:9511095

  2. Laboratory study on the adsorption of Mn(2+) on suspended and deposited amorphous Al(OH)(3) in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendong; Zhang, Xiaoni; Wang, Hongping; Wang, Xiaochang; Zhou, Lichuan; Liu, Rui; Liang, Yuting

    2012-09-01

    Manganese (II) is commonly present in drinking water. This paper mainly focuses on the adsorption of manganese on suspended and deposited amorphous Al(OH)(3) solids. The effects of water flow rate and water quality parameters, including solution pH and the concentrations of Mn(2+), humic acid, and co-existing cations on adsorption were investigated. It was found that chemical adsorption mainly took place in drinking water with pHs above 7.5; suspended Al(OH)(3) showed strong adsorption capacity for Mn(2+). When the total Mn(2+) input was 3 mg/L, 1.0 g solid could accumulate approximately 24.0 mg of Mn(2+) at 15 °C. In drinking water with pHs below 7.5, because of H(+) inhibition, active reaction sites on amorphous Al(OH)(3) surface were much less. The adsorption of Mn(2+) on Al(OH)(3) changed gradually from chemical coordination to physical adsorption. In drinking water with high concentrations of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(3+), and HA, the removal of Mn(2+) was enhanced due to the effects of co-precipitation and adsorption. In solution with 1.0 mg/L HA, the residual concentration of Mn(2+) was below 0.005 mg/L, much lower than the limit value required by the Chinese Standard for Drinking Water Quality. Unlike suspended Al(OH)(3), deposited Al(OH)(3) had a much lower adsorption capacity of 0.85 mg/g, and the variation in flow rate and major water quality parameters had little effect on it. Improved managements of water age, pipe flushing and mechanical cleaning were suggested to control residual Mn(2+).

  3. A comparison of three adsorption equations and sensitivity study of parameter uncertainty effects on adsorption refrigeration thermal performance estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongling; Hu, Eric; Blazewicz, Antoni

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents isosteric-based adsorption equilibrium tests of three activated carbon samples with methanol as an adsorbate. Experimental data was fitted into Langmuir equation, Freundlich equation and Dubinin-Astakov (D-A) equation, respectively. The fitted adsorption equations were compared in terms of agreement with experimental data. Moreover, equation format's impacts on calculation of the coefficient of performance (COP) and refrigeration capacity of an adsorption refrigeration system was analyzed. In addition, the sensitivity of each parameter in each adsorption equation format to the estimation of cycle's COP and refrigeration capacity was investigated. It was found that the D-A equation is the best form for presenting the adsorptive property of a carbon-methanol working pair. The D-A equation is recommended for estimating thermal performance of an adsorption refrigeration system because simulation results obtained using the D-A equation are less sensitive to errors of experimentally determined D-A equation's parameters.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: DELTA INDUSTRIAL SERVICES, INC., CAMPWATER PORTA-5 SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CampWater system uses ozonation followed by cartridge filtration to remove arsenic via co-precipitation. The system utilizes ozone to oxidize iron and arsenic (III) to arsenic (V). The arsenic bound to the iron precipitates is then removed by cartridge filtration. No additi...

  5. Constraints on the utility of MnO2 cartridge method for the extraction of radionuclides: A case study using 234Th

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baskaran, M.; Swarzenski, P.W.; Biddanda, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    [1] Large volume (102-103 L) seawater samples are routinely processed to investigate the partitioning of particle reactive radionuclides and Ra between solution and size-fractionated suspended particulate matter. One of the most frequently used methods to preconcentrate these nuclides from such large volumes involves extraction onto three filter cartridges (a prefilter for particulate species and two MnO2-coated filters for dissolved species) connected in series. This method assumes that the extraction efficiency is uniform for both MnO2-coated cartridges, that no dissolved species are removed by the prefilter, and that any adsorbed radionuclides are not desorbed from the MnO2-coated cartridges during filtration. In this study, we utilized 234Th-spiked coastal seawater and deionized water to address the removal of dissolved Th onto prefilters and MnO2-coated filter cartridges. Experimental results provide the first data that indicate (1) a small fraction of dissolved Th (<6%) can be removed by the prefilter cartridge; (2) a small fraction of dissolved Th (<5%) retained by the MnO2 surface can also be desorbed, which undermines the assumption of uniform extraction efficiency for Th; and (3) the absolute and relative extraction efficiencies can vary widely. These experiments provide insight on the variability of the extraction efficiency of MnO 2-coated filter cartridges by comparing the relative and absolute efficiencies and recommend the use of a constant efficiency on the combined activity from two filter cartridges connected in series for future studies of dissolved 234Th and other radionuclides in natural waters using sequential filtration/extraction methods. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Long-Duration Testing of a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Carbon Dioxide for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Micha; Mulloth, Lila; Varghese, Mini

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of long-duration testing of a temperature-swing adsorption compressor that has application in the International Space Station (ISS) and future spacecraft for closing the air revitalization loop. The air revitalization system of the ISS operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from Earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby closing the air-loop. The TSAC is a solid-state compressor that has the capability to remove CO2 from a low-pressure source, and subsequently store, compress, and deliver at a higher pressure as required by a processor. The TSAC is an ideal interface device for CO2 removal and reduction units in the air revitalization loop of a spacecraft for oxygen recovery. The TSAC was developed and its operation was successfully verified in integration tests with the flight-like Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) at Marshall Space Flight Center prior to the long-duration tests. Long-duration tests reveal the impacts of repeated thermal cycling on the compressor components and the adsorbent material.

  7. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  8. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  9. CSER 95-014: Criticality storage category for K Basin spent cartridge filters in ECOROK casks at central waste complex

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.M.

    1996-01-03

    This CSER justifies storing K Basin spent cartridge filters in ECOROK 25-11 casks with liners under the limits in an existing criticality prevention specification, CPS-SW-149-00002, Rev./Mod. B-1, because the worst case fissionable material inventory is less then 1/2 the CPS limit and the cask is larger than allowed containers, the cask and liner have adequate iron content to meet the CPS requirements, and the cask concrete walls are thick enough to isolate the fissionable contents of each cask from neutron interaction with fissionable material external to each cask.

  10. A chemiluminescent assay for hydroperoxide level of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide fraction purified by two Sep-Pak cartridges in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Seya, K; Ohkohchi, N; Shibuya, H; Satoh, M; Oikawa, K; Fukumori, T; Satomi, S; Motomura, S

    2000-08-15

    A chemiluminescent assay for hydroperoxide level of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide (PCOOH) fraction purified from biological samples was presented. This method utilized of two Sep-Pak cartridges. A lipid soluble fraction was isolated from each homogenized tissue or blood by Folch's method. The mixture of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PCOOH was separated from the lipid soluble fraction by a Sep-Pak silica cartridge. A Sep-Pak tC18 cartridge made complete separation of both PCOOH and PC possible. The hydroperoxide level of PCOOH fraction was quantified by the reaction with ferrous ion using 2-methyl-6-[p-methoxyphenyl]-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin++ +-3-one as a chemiluminescent dye. The mixture of positional isomers, 1-hexadecanoyl-2-[9, or 10-hydroperoxyl octadecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was used as an authentic standard. The good recovery rate for authentic PCOOH of 87.1 +/- 11.6% (mean +/- S.E., n = 4) was obtained by using two Sep-Pak cartridges. Linear calibration curve was obtained in the range from 2.5 to 20 nmol, and the detection limit of the standard was 10 pmol (signal-to-noise ratio > 3). This method was applied to the investigation of the lipid peroxidation induced by reperfusion of the liver with cold preservation, mimicking liver transplantation in rats. The effect of liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene diphosphonate (LEDD), which eliminate of Kupffer cells to prevent the generation of oxygen radicals on the lipid peroxidation, was compared with the untreated group as a control. After 1 h reperfusion at 37 degrees C the hydroperoxide level obtained the liver without preservation in the untreated group was 12.4 +/- 2.4 nmol/100 mg lipid (n = 4) and levels increased significantly by prolongation of the preservation time. On the other hand, the hydroperoxide level in the LEDD treated group did not change up to 24 h preservation. These results suggest that this improved assay for hydroperoxide level of PCOOH fraction in biological

  11. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry study of the retention behavior of arsenic species on various solid phase extraction cartridges and its application in arsenic speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chunhai; Cai, Qiantao; Guo, Zhong-Xian; Yang, Zhaoguang; Khoo, Soo Beng

    2003-07-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to investigate the retention behavior of arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), arsenobetaine (AsB), arsenocholine (AsC), trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) and tetramethylarsonium ion (TMAI) on various silica-based solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. A method for arsenic speciation is then developed on the basis of selective SPE separation of arsenic species and highly sensitive ICP-MS detection. Factors affecting the retention and elution of arsenic species were examined. Results showed that the retention of arsenic species depended on the chemical characteristics of arsenic species and the types of sorbent materials. Change of pH in the range of 2.0-9.0 did not show significant effects on the retention of DMA, AsB, AsC, TMAI and TMAO on an ethylbenzene sulfonic acid-based strong cation exchange (SCX-3) cartridge. pH also did not influence the retention of AsB, AsC, TMAI and TMAO on a mixed-mode (M-M) cartridge containing non-polar, strong cation exchange and strong anion exchange (SAX) functional groups. However, the retentions of As(V) and MMA on the SAX and the M-M cartridge changed with pH. As(V) and MMA were completely retained on the SAX cartridge and sequentially selectively eluted with 1.0 mol l -1 acetic acid (for MMA). DMA, AsB, AsC, TMAI and TMAO were completely retained on the SCX-3 cartridge and sequentially selectively eluted with 1.0 mol l -1 HNO 3 (for DMA). As(V), MMA, AsB, AsC, TMAI and TMAO were completely retained on the M-M cartridge. As(III) was not retained on either cartridge and remained in solution. Arsenic species in solution and those eluted from the cartridges were subsequently determined by ICP-MS. A detection limit of 8 ng l -1 arsenic in water sample was obtained. This method was successfully applied to arsenic speciation in various sources of water samples (drinking water, waste water, raw water, etc.) and US National Institute of

  12. Application of a bacterial extracellular polymeric substance in heavy metal adsorption in a co-contaminated aqueous system

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Martins, Paula Salles; de Almeida, Narcisa Furtado; Leite, Selma Gomes Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    The application of a bacterial extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) in the bioremediation of heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Cu) by a microbial consortium in a hydrocarbon co-contaminated aqueous system was studied. At the low concentrations used in this work (1.00 ppm of each metal), it was not observed an inhibitory effect on the cellular growing. In the other hand, the application of the EPS lead to a lower concentration of the free heavy metals in solution, once a great part of them is adsorbed in the polymeric matrix (87.12% of Cd; 19.82% of Zn; and 37.64% of Cu), when compared to what is adsorbed or internalized by biomass (5.35% of Cd; 47.35% of Zn; and 24.93% of Cu). It was noted an increase of 24% in the consumption of ethylbenzene, among the gasoline components that were quantified, in the small interval of time evaluated (30 hours). Our results suggest that, if the experiments were conducted in a larger interval of time, it would possibly be noted a higher effect in the degradation of gasoline compounds. Still, considering the low concentrations that were evaluated, it is possible that a real system could be bioremediated by natural attenuation process, demonstrated by the low effect of those levels of contaminants and co-contaminants over the naturally present microbial consortium. PMID:24031307

  13. Principal component analysis- adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system modeling and genetic algorithm optimization of adsorption of methylene blue by activated carbon derived from Pistacia khinjuk.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Ghaedi, A M; Abdi, F; Roosta, M; Vafaei, A; Asghari, A

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, activated carbon (AC) simply derived from Pistacia khinjuk and characterized using different techniques such as SEM and BET analysis. This new adsorbent was used for methylene blue (MB) adsorption. Fitting the experimental equilibrium data to various isotherm models shows the suitability and applicability of the Langmuir model. The adsorption mechanism and rate of processes was investigated by analyzing time dependency data to conventional kinetic models and it was found that adsorption follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Principle component analysis (PCA) has been used for preprocessing of input data and genetic algorithm optimization have been used for prediction of adsorption of methylene blue using activated carbon derived from P. khinjuk. In our laboratory various activated carbon as sole adsorbent or loaded with various nanoparticles was used for removal of many pollutants (Ghaedi et al., 2012). These results indicate that the small amount of proposed adsorbent (1.0g) is applicable for successful removal of MB (RE>98%) in short time (45min) with high adsorption capacity (48-185mgg(-1)).

  14. Comparison of adsorption behavior of PCDD/Fs on carbon nanotubes and activated carbons in a bench-scale dioxin generating system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xujian; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Shuaixi; Zhao, Xiyuan; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2015-07-01

    Porous carbon-based materials are commonly used to remove various organic and inorganic pollutants from gaseous and liquid effluents and products. In this study, the adsorption of dioxins on both activated carbons and multi-walled carbon nanotube was internally compared, via series of bench scale experiments. A laboratory-scale dioxin generator was applied to generate PCDD/Fs with constant concentration (8.3 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3)). The results confirm that high-chlorinated congeners are more easily adsorbed on both activated carbons and carbon nanotubes than low-chlorinated congeners. Carbon nanotubes also achieved higher adsorption efficiency than activated carbons even though they have smaller BET-surface. Carbon nanotubes reached the total removal efficiency over 86.8 % to be compared with removal efficiencies of only 70.0 and 54.2 % for the two other activated carbons tested. In addition, because of different adsorption mechanisms, the removal efficiencies of carbon nanotubes dropped more slowly with time than was the case for activated carbons. It could be attributed to the abundant mesopores distributed in the surface of carbon nanotubes. They enhanced the pore filled process of dioxin molecules during adsorption. In addition, strong interactions between the two benzene rings of dioxin molecules and the hexagonal arrays of carbon atoms in the surface make carbon nanotubes have bigger adsorption capacity. PMID:25728198

  15. Temperature and magnetism bi-responsive molecularly imprinted polymers: Preparation, adsorption mechanism and properties as drug delivery system for sustained release of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Li, Longfei; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Huan; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang; Chen, Yongkang

    2016-04-01

    Temperature and magnetism bi-responsive molecularly imprinted polymers (TMMIPs) based on Fe3O4-encapsulating carbon nanospheres were prepared by free radical polymerization, and applied to selective adsorption and controlled release of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) from an aqueous solution. Characterization results show that the as-synthesized TMMIPs have an average diameter of about 150 nm with a typical core-shell structure, and the thickness of the coating layer is approximately 50 nm. TMMIPs also displayed obvious magnetic properties and thermo-sensitivity. The adsorption results show that the prepared TMMIPs exhibit good adsorption capacity (up to 96.53 mg/g at 25 °C) and recognition towards 5-FU. The studies on 5-FU loading and release in vitro suggest that the release rate increases with increasing temperature. Meanwhile, adsorption mechanisms were explored by using a computational analysis to simulate the imprinted site towards 5-FU. The interaction energy between the imprinted site and 5-FU is -112.24 kJ/mol, originating from a hydrogen bond, Van der Waals forces and a hydrophobic interaction between functional groups located on 5-FU and a NIPAM monomer. The electrostatic potential charges and population analysis results suggest that the imprinted site of 5-FU can be introduced on the surface of TMMIPs, confirming their selective adsorption behavior for 5-FU.

  16. Comparison of adsorption behavior of PCDD/Fs on carbon nanotubes and activated carbons in a bench-scale dioxin generating system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xujian; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Shuaixi; Zhao, Xiyuan; Ni, Mingjiang; Cen, Kefa

    2015-07-01

    Porous carbon-based materials are commonly used to remove various organic and inorganic pollutants from gaseous and liquid effluents and products. In this study, the adsorption of dioxins on both activated carbons and multi-walled carbon nanotube was internally compared, via series of bench scale experiments. A laboratory-scale dioxin generator was applied to generate PCDD/Fs with constant concentration (8.3 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3)). The results confirm that high-chlorinated congeners are more easily adsorbed on both activated carbons and carbon nanotubes than low-chlorinated congeners. Carbon nanotubes also achieved higher adsorption efficiency than activated carbons even though they have smaller BET-surface. Carbon nanotubes reached the total removal efficiency over 86.8 % to be compared with removal efficiencies of only 70.0 and 54.2 % for the two other activated carbons tested. In addition, because of different adsorption mechanisms, the removal efficiencies of carbon nanotubes dropped more slowly with time than was the case for activated carbons. It could be attributed to the abundant mesopores distributed in the surface of carbon nanotubes. They enhanced the pore filled process of dioxin molecules during adsorption. In addition, strong interactions between the two benzene rings of dioxin molecules and the hexagonal arrays of carbon atoms in the surface make carbon nanotubes have bigger adsorption capacity.

  17. Influence of Ca2+ on tetracycline adsorption on montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Parolo, M Eugenia; Avena, Marcelo J; Pettinari, Gisela R; Baschini, Miria T

    2012-02-15

    The adsorption of tetracycline (TC) on montmorillonite was studied as a function of pH and Ca(2+) concentration using a batch technique complemented with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. In the absence of Ca(2+), TC adsorption was high at low pH and decreased as the pH increased. In the presence of Ca(2+), at least two different adsorption processes took place in the studied systems, i.e., cation exchange and Ca-bridging. Cation exchange was the prevailing process at pH<5, and thus, TC adsorption decreased by increasing total Ca(2+) concentration. On the contrary, Ca-bridging was the prevailing process at pH>5, and thus, TC adsorption increased by increasing Ca(2+) concentration. The pH 5 represents an isoadsorption pH where both adsorption processes compensate each other. TC adsorption became independent of Ca(2+) concentration at this pH. For TC adsorption on Ca(2+)-montmorillonite in 0.01 M NaCl experiments, the ratio adsorbed TC/retained Ca(2+) was close to 1 in the pH range of 5-9, indicating an important participation of Ca(2+) in the binding of TC to montmorillonite. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that TC adsorption induced intercalation between montmorillonite layers forming a multiphase system with stacking of layers with and without intercalated TC. PMID:22189389

  18. Moisture adsorption in optical coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, H. Angus

    1988-01-01

    The thin film filter is a very large aperture component which is exceedingly useful because of its small size, flexibility and ease of mounting. Thin film components, however, do have defects of performance and especially of stability which can cause problems in systems, particularly where long-term measurements are being made. Of all of the problems, those associated with moisture absorption are the most serious. Moisture absorption occurs in the pore-shaped voids inherent in the columnar structure of the layers. Ion-assisted deposition is a promising technique for substantially reducing moisture adsorption effects in thin film structures.

  19. Heterogeneous three-site lattice model for adsorption of aromatics in ZSM-5 zeolites: Temperature dependence of adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Narkiewicz-Michalek, J.; Szabelski, P.; Rudzinski, W.; Chiang, A.S.T.

    1999-08-31

    The three-site lattice model of collective localized adsorption of aromatics in ZSM-5 zeolites, presented in previous publications, is extended by taking into account the effects of energetic heterogeneity of the sites of the same type. The appropriate theoretical equations are derived and used for simultaneous description of the experimental adsorption isotherms and heats of adsorption of benzene and p-xylene in silicalite at 303 K. It is shown that taking into account this additional level of heterogeneity leads to a much better description of both the adsorption isotherms and the related heats of adsorption in these systems. The extended model also allows one to predict correctly the adsorption isotherms of benzene and p-xylene in silicalite at different temperatures using the parameters found at one temperature.

  20. Optimization of the bake-on siliconization of cartridges. Part II: Investigations into burn-in time and temperature.

    PubMed

    Funke, Stefanie; Matilainen, Julia; Nalenz, Heiko; Bechtold-Peters, Karoline; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Vetter, Florian; Müller, Christoph; Bracher, Franz; Friess, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Combination products have become popular formats for the delivery of parenteral medications. Bake-on siliconization of glass syringes or cartridges allows good piston break-loose and gliding during injection at low silicone levels. Although widely implemented in industry, still little is known and published on the effect of the bake-on process on the silicone level, layer thickness and chemical composition. In this study, cartridges were bake-on siliconized in a heat-tunnel by varying both temperature from 200 to 350°C for 12min and time from 5min to 3h at 316°C. Furthermore, a heat-oven with air-exchange was established as an experimental model. Heat treatment led to a time- and temperature-dependent decrease in the silicone level and layer thickness. After 1h at 316°C lubrication was insufficient. The silicone levels substantially decreased between 250 and 316°C after 12min. After bake-on, the peak molecular weight of the silicone remained unchanged while fractions below 5000g/mol were removed at 316 and 350°C. Cyclic low molecular weight siloxanes below 500g/mol were volatilized under all conditions. Despite most of the baked-on silicone was solvent-extractable, contact angle analysis indicated a strong binding of a remaining, thin silicone film to the glass surface. PMID:27328279

  1. Thermal enhancement cartridge heater modified tritium hydride bed development, Part 2 - Experimental validation of key conceptual design features

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, K.J.; Morgan, G.A.

    2015-03-15

    The Thermal Enhancement Cartridge Heater Modified (TECH Mod) tritium hydride bed is an interim replacement for the first generation (Gen1) process hydride beds currently in service in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facilities. 3 new features are implemented in the TECH Mod hydride bed prototype: internal electric cartridge heaters, porous divider plates, and copper foam discs. These modifications will enhance bed performance and reduce costs by improving bed activation and installation processes, in-bed accountability measurements, end-of-life bed removal, and He-3 recovery. A full-scale hydride bed test station was constructed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in order to evaluate the performance of the prototype TECH Mod hydride bed. Controlled hydrogen (H{sub 2}) absorption/ desorption experiments were conducted to validate that the conceptual design changes have no adverse effects on the gas transfer kinetics or H{sub 2} storage/release properties compared to those of the Gen1 bed. Inert gas expansions before, during, and after H{sub 2} flow tests were used to monitor changes in gas transfer rates with repeated hydriding/de-hydriding of the hydride material. The gas flow rates significantly decreased after initial hydriding of the material; however, minimal changes were observed after repeated cycling. The data presented herein confirm that the TECH Mod hydride bed would be a suitable replacement for the Gen1 bed with the added enhancements expected from the advanced design features. (authors)

  2. Influence of adsorption versus coprecipitation on the retention of rice straw-derived dissolved organic carbon and subsequent reducibility of Fe-DOC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodano, Marcella; Lerda, Cristina; Martin, Maria; Celi, Luisella; Said-Pullicino, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    adsorption or coprecipitation, DOC was obtained by incubating a suspension of rice straw in water (straw-solution ratio of 1:30) under oxic conditions at 25° C for 30 days to simulate the decomposition of rice straw in the field. Increasing amounts of DOC were equilibrated (pH = 6) with a known mass of ferrihydrite (initial molar C:Fe ratios of 1, 5 and 10) to obtain surface coated Fe-DOC systems with increasing C loading. On the other hand, coprecipitates with similar initial C:Fe ratios were obtained by oxidation of a Fe(II) solution in the presence of increasing amounts of DOC at pH = 6. A natural Fe-DOC coprecipitate was also obtained by in situ sampling of a paddy soil solution from the topsoil during a cropping season, and subsequent oxidation in the laboratory. The surface and chemical properties of all substrates were subsequently evaluated and compared. We hereby present the first results of the influence of adsorption vs coprecipitation on the selective retention of DOC, structure and surface charge, as well as their susceptibility to chemical reduction with ascorbic acid.

  3. Poliovirus Adsorption by 34 Minerals and Soils

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Rebecca S.; Taylor, Dene H.; Sturman, Lawrence S.; Reddy, Michael M.; Fuhs, G. Wolfgang

    1981-01-01

    The adsorption of radiolabeled infectious poliovirus type 2 by 34 well-defined soils and mineral substrates was analyzed in a synthetic freshwater medium containing 1 mM CaCl2 and 1.25 mM NaHCO3 at pH 7. In a model system, adsorption of poliovirus by Ottawa sand was rapid and reached equilibrium within 1 h at 4°C. Near saturation, the adsorption could be described by the Langmuir equation; the apparent surface saturation was 2.5 × 106 plaque-forming units of poliovirus per mg of Ottawa sand. At low surface coverage, adsorption was described by the Freundlich equation. The soils and minerals used ranged from acidic to basic and from high in organic content to organic free. The available negative surface charge on each substrate was measured by the adsorption of a cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. Most of the substrates adsorbed more than 95% of the virus. In general, soils, in comparison with minerals, were weak adsorbents. Among the soils, muck and Genesee silt loam were the poorest adsorbents; among the minerals, montmorillonite, glauconite, and bituminous shale were the least effective. The most effective adsorbents were magnetite sand and hematite, which are predominantly oxides of iron. Correlation coefficients for substrate properties and virus adsorption revealed that the elemental composition of the adsorbents had little effect on poliovirus uptake. Substrate surface area and pH, by themselves, were not significantly correlated with poliovirus uptake. A strong negative correlation was found between poliovirus adsorption and both the contents of organic matter and the available negative surface charge on the substrates as determined by their capacities for adsorbing the cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. PMID:6274259

  4. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  5. Adding adsorption to a geothermal simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.; Pingol, A.

    1992-01-01

    Physical adsorption of steam has increasingly become recognized as an important storage mechanism in vapor dominated geothermal reservoirs. A method has been developed which allows the effects of adsorption to be modeled using TETRAD, a commercially available geothermal simulator. The method consists of replacing the standard steam table with a new steam table which has been derived to include adsorptive effects. The TETRAD simulator, when run with the pseudo steam table, approximately matches the pressure, production, and saturation behavior of a desorbing geothermal system. Adsorption can be described as the existence of an immobile layer of liquid on the surfaces within a porous medium. The presence of an adsorbed liquid water layer in rocks has been shown experimentally to cause the vapor pressure of steam to be lower than its flat surface vapor pressure for a particular The pseudo steam table accounts for this vapor pressure lowering effect. A test run was made with TETRAD using the pseudo steam table and a low porosity, low permeability reservoir matrix. This test run was compared to an equivalent run made with Stanford Geothermal Program's simulator, ADSORB. The program ADSORB is a one dimensional simulator which has adsorption effects built into its difference equations. The comparison of these runs shows that the pseudo steam table allows TETRAD to match the behavior of the ADSORB simulator. Injection was not investigated in this study. A convenient method of modeling adsorption with TETRAD is to use standard steam tables while allowing for the vapor pressure lowering effect of adsorption. This will require modifications of the equations in the code that describe the partial pressure of the steam phase.

  6. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of six p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters in cosmetics using Sep-Pak florisil cartridges for sample pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y; Yamamoto, M; Owada, K; Sato, S; Masui, T; Nakazawa, H; Fujita, M

    1987-12-11

    A rapid and simple method is described for the simultaneous determination of methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, n-propyl, isobutyl and n-butyl p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters (parabens) in cosmetics by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The method involves a single extraction of parabens with diethyl ether and clean-up on a Sep-Pak Florisil cartridge. Fat-soluble excipients in the diethyl ether extracts are removed through the cartridges with hexane-chloroform (75:25). Parabens are then eluted from the cartridges with hexane-ethyl acetate (70:30) and determined by HPLC on a reversed-phase column with water-methanol (50:50) as the mobile phase using sec.-butylpraben as an internal standard. The method was applied to samples with complicated matrices such as cream, milk lotion, lotion and cleansing foam, and the recoveries were 99.0-102.3% with coefficients of variation of 0.3-1.2%.

  7. Sulfate adsorption on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-10-15

    Recent spectroscopic work has suggested that only one surface species of sulfate is dominant on hematite. Sulfate is therefore a very suitable anion to test and develop adsorption models for variable charge minerals. The authors have studied sulfate adsorption on goethite covering a large range of sulfate concentrations, surface coverages, pH values, and electrolyte concentrations. Four different techniques were used to cover the entire range of conditions. For characterization at low sulfate concentrations, below the detection limit of sulfate with ICP-AES, the authors used proton-sulfate titrations at constant pH. Adsorption isotherms were studied for the intermediate sulfate concentration range. Acid-base titrations in sodium sulfate and electromobility were used for high sulfate concentrations. All the data can be modeled with one adsorbed species if it is assumed that the charge of adsorbed sulfate is spatially distributed in the interface. The charge distribution of sulfate follows directly from modeling the proton-sulfate adsorption stoichoimemtry sine this stoichiometry is independent of the intrinsic affinity constant of sulfate. The charge distribution can be related to the structure of the surface complex by use of the Pauling bond valence concept and is in accordance with the microscopic structure found by spectroscopy. The intrinsic affinity constant follows from the other measurements. Modeling of the proton-ion stoichoimetry with the commonly used 2-pK models, where adsorbed ions are treated as point charges, is possible only if at least two surface species for sulfate are used.

  8. SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, C.S.

    1959-06-16

    Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

  9. Adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose onto cellulose model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoja, Johannes; Maurer, Reinhard J; Sax, Alexander F

    2014-07-31

    Reliable simulation of molecular adsorption onto cellulose surfaces is essential for the design of new cellulose nanocomposite materials. However, the applicability of classical force field methods to such systems remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we present the adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose on model surfaces of crystalline cellulose Iα and Iβ. The adsorption of the two large carbohydrates was simulated with the GLYCAM06 force field. To validate this approach, quantum theoretical calculations for the adsorption of glucose were performed: Equilibrium geometries were studied with density functional theory (DFT) and dispersion-corrected DFT, whereas the adsorption energies were calculated with two standard density functional approximations and five dispersion-containing DFT approaches. We find that GLYCAM06 gives a good account of geometries and, in most cases, accurate adsorption energies when compared to dispersion-corrected DFT energies. Adsorption onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iα is, in general, stronger than onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iβ. Contrary to intuition, the adsorption energy is not directly correlated with the number of hydrogen bonds; rather, it is dominated by dispersion interactions. Especially for bigger adsorbates, a neglect of these interactions leads to a dramatic underestimation of adsorption energies.

  10. Adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose onto cellulose model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoja, Johannes; Maurer, Reinhard J; Sax, Alexander F

    2014-07-31

    Reliable simulation of molecular adsorption onto cellulose surfaces is essential for the design of new cellulose nanocomposite materials. However, the applicability of classical force field methods to such systems remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we present the adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose on model surfaces of crystalline cellulose Iα and Iβ. The adsorption of the two large carbohydrates was simulated with the GLYCAM06 force field. To validate this approach, quantum theoretical calculations for the adsorption of glucose were performed: Equilibrium geometries were studied with density functional theory (DFT) and dispersion-corrected DFT, whereas the adsorption energies were calculated with two standard density functional approximations and five dispersion-containing DFT approaches. We find that GLYCAM06 gives a good account of geometries and, in most cases, accurate adsorption energies when compared to dispersion-corrected DFT energies. Adsorption onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iα is, in general, stronger than onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iβ. Contrary to intuition, the adsorption energy is not directly correlated with the number of hydrogen bonds; rather, it is dominated by dispersion interactions. Especially for bigger adsorbates, a neglect of these interactions leads to a dramatic underestimation of adsorption energies. PMID:25036217

  11. Flash chromatography on cartridges for the separation of plant extracts: rules for the selection of chromatographic conditions and comparison with medium pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Weber, Petra; Hamburger, Matthias; Schafroth, Nina; Potterat, Olivier

    2011-03-01

    Empirical rules for the selection of chromatographic conditions on flash chromatography cartridges were developed, with an emphasis on gradient mode. These rules were then tested with separation of extracts from important medicinal plants including Curcuma xanthorrhiza, Piper nigrum and Salvia milthiorrhiza. Sepacore® cartridges enabled a good separation of compounds with a broad range of polarity, as typically found in plant extracts. The chromatographic resolution remained, however, lower than that achieved on classical columns packed with material of smaller particle size. For poorly soluble extracts, solid introduction gave better results than liquid injection.

  12. Adsorption of gases on carbon molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vijayalakshmi, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Ganesh, K.S. )

    1994-12-01

    Adsorption on carbon molecular sieves (CMS) prepared by coke deposition has become an interesting area of adsorption due to its microporous nature and favorable separation factor on size and shape selectivity basis for many gaseous systems. In the present work CMS was synthesized from coconut shell through three major steps, namely, carbonization, activation, and coke deposition by hydrocarbon cracking. The crushed, washed, and sieved granules of coconut shell (particle size 2--3 mm) were pretreated with sodium silicate solution and oven-dried at 150 C to create the inorganic sites necessary for coke deposition. Carbonization and activation of the dried granules were carried out at 800 C, for 30 min each. The activated char thus produced was subjected to hydrocarbon cracking at 600 C for periods varying from 30 to 180 min. The product samples were characterized in terms of adsorption isotherm, kinetic adsorption curve, surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and characteristic energy for adsorption by using O[sub 2], N[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], C[sub 3]H[sub 6], and CH[sub 4].

  13. Final Report - Development of New Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) Technology to Recover High Valued Products from Chemical Plant and Refinery Waste Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Keith Ludwig

    2004-06-14

    Project Objective was to extend pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology into previously under-exploited applications such as polyolefin production vent gas recovery and H2 recovery from refinery waste gases containing significant amounts of heavy hydrocarbons, aromatics, or H2S.

  14. Theoretical structural study on the adsorption properties of aliphatic aldehydes on ZnO nanoclusters and graphene-like nanosheets systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayebee, R.; Zamand, N.; Hosseini-nasr, A.; Kargar Razi, M.

    2014-05-01

    The structure optimizations for some aliphatic aldehydes adsorbed on ZnO nanoclusters, and graphene-like nanosheets were carried out using the B3LYP/LanL2DZ calculations and the adsorption energies were calculated. It was considered that adsorption of the examined aldehydes on the ZnO nanoclusters and graphene-like nanosheets occurred through carbonyl oxygens of aldehyde molecules with the surface Zn2+ ions of the central ring. Aldehydes with the general formula of R-COH (R denotes a branched or linear aliphatic chain with maximum of three carbon atoms) were considered. Also, Effects of chain length were investigated on the orientation of the aldehyde molecules with respect to the nanosheet and nanocluster surfaces. Findings revealed that the adsorption energy was decreased with enhancing chain length. However, the most negative adsorption energy was obtained for iso-butyraldehyde, as a branched aldehyde. Interaction of the aldehyde molecules with the surfaces of nanosheets were analyzed by means of DOS analysis and Bader's method. We hope the obtained results be helpful in identifying the mechanism of cyclotrimerization of aliphatic aldehydes on the surface of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

  15. Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.

    2001-01-01

    Closing the oxygen loop in an air revitalization system based on four-bed molecular sieve and Sabatier reactor technology requires a vacuum pump-compressor that can take the low-pressure CO, from the 4BMS and compress and store for use by a Sabatier reactor. NASA Ames Research Center proposed a solid-state temperature-swing adsorption (TSA) compressor that appears to meet performance requirements, be quiet and reliable, and consume less power than a comparable mechanical compressor/accumulator combination. Under this task, TSA compressor technology is being advanced through development of a complete prototype system. A liquid-cooled TSA compressor has been partially tested, and the rest of the system is being fabricated. An air-cooled TSA compressor is also being designed.

  16. Preliminary Report on Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1998-12-11

    The Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team identified the adsorption kinetics of actinides and strontium onto monosodium titanate (MST) as a technical risk for several of the processing alternatives selected for additional evaluation in Phase III of their effort. The Flow Sheet Team requested that the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) examine the adsorption kinetics of MST for several process alternatives.This study consisted of a statistically designed set of tests to determine the rate of adsorption of strontium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium as a function of temperature, MST concentration, and concentrations of sodium, strontium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium. Additional tests incorporated into the design assess the effects of mixing as well as the influence from the presence of sludge solids and sodium tetraphenylborate.

  17. Carbonaceous materials for adsorptive refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, B.; Wolak, E.

    2012-06-01

    Carbon monoliths prepared from hard coal precursors were obtained. The porous structure of the monoliths was evaluated on the basis of nitrogen adsorption — desorption equilibrium data. The investigated monoliths have a well-developed microporous structure with significant specific surface area (S BET ). Equilibrium studies of methanol vapour adsorption were used to characterize the methanol adsorptive capacity that was determined using a volumetric method. The heat of wetting by methanol was determined in order to estimate the energetic effects of the adsorption process. The results of the investigations show that all monoliths exhibit high adsorption capacity and high heat of wetting with methanol.

  18. Ammonia Production Using Pressure Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose overall objective is to develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system that integrates reaction to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production.

  19. Differences in binding affinities of MDA, MDMA, MDEA, Amphetamine, Methamphetamine, and their deuterated analogues to solid-phase extraction cartridges.

    PubMed

    Romberg, R W; Ntamack, A G; Blacik, L J; Kazarian, C M; Snyder, J Jacob; Welsh, E R

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential for partial separation of drugs from their deuterated internal standards using Cerex(®) Polycrom™ CLIN II solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. After elution from the column and derivatization, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry results showed that the target compound eluted from the SPE cartridge prior to its deuterated form. This elution separation effect was greater for 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine (MAMP) than for the other drugs studied. When the drugs were eluted in 0.5 mL increments from a 50 mg sorbent bed, no drug appeared in the first fraction. The drug to internal standard ratios (expected value 1.00) for subsequent fractions collected were 1.30, 1.07, and 0.83 for MDA/MDA-d(5); 1.65, 1.18, 0.67, and 0.56 for MDMA/MDMAd(5); and 1.37, 1.18, and 0.95 for MDEA/MDEA-d(6). For d-AMP and d-MAMP, the expected ratio was 0.40. The subsequent ratios were 0.63, 0.46, 0.35, and 0.34 for d-AMP/d-AMP-d(11); and 1.00, 0.59, 0.25, and 0.18 for d-MAMP/d-MAMP-d(14). The affinity of d-MAMPd(14) was shown to be greater than that of d-MAMP-d(5), and deuteration at the propyl end of the molecule was shown to increase binding more than deuteration on the phenyl group.

  20. Linear adsorption of nonionic organic compounds from water onto hydrophilic minerals: Silica and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, Y.-H.; Zhu, Y.-G.; Sheng, G.; Chiou, C.T.

    2006-01-01

    To characterize the linear adsorption phenomena in aqueous nonionic organic solute-mineral systems, the adsorption isotherms of some low-molecular- weightnonpolar nonionic solutes (1,2,3-trichlorobenzene, lindane, phenanthrene, and pyrene) and polar nonionic solutes (1,3-dinitrobenzene and 2,4-dinitrotoluene) from single-and binary-solute solutions on hydrophilic silica and alumina were established. Toward this objective, the influences of temperature, ionic strength, and pH on adsorption were also determined. It is found that linear adsorption exhibits low exothermic heats and practically no adsorptive competition. The solute-solid configuration and the adsorptive force consistent with these effects were hypothesized. For nonpolar solutes, the adsorption occurs presumably by London (dispersion) forces onto a water film above the mineral surface. For polar solutes, the adsorption is also assisted by polar-group interactions. The reduced adsorptive forces of solutes with hydrophilic minerals due to physical separation by the water film and the low fractions of the water-film surface covered by solutes offer a theoretical basis for linear solute adsorption, low exothermic heats, and no adsorptive competition. The postulated adsorptive forces are supported by observations that ionic strength or pH poses no effect on the adsorption of nonpolar solutes while it exhibits a significant effect on the uptake of polar solutes. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  1. Multiwell cartridge with integrated array of amorphous silicon photosensors for chemiluminescence detection: development, characterization and comparison with cooled-CCD luminograph.

    PubMed

    Mirasoli, Mara; Nascetti, Augusto; Caputo, Domenico; Zangheri, Martina; Scipinotti, Riccardo; Cevenini, Luca; de Cesare, Giampiero; Roda, Aldo

    2014-09-01

    We propose a disposable multiwell microcartridge with integrated amorphous silicon photosensors array for bio- and chemiluminescence-based bioassays, where the enzymatic reactions and the detection unit are coupled on the same glass substrate. Each well, made in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) unit, hosts an enzymatic reaction that is monitored by one photosensor of the array. Photosensors were characterized in terms of their dark current background noise and response to different wavelengths of visible light in order to determine their suitability as detection devices for chemical luminescent phenomena. Calibration curves of the photosensors' response to different luminescent systems were then evaluated by using the chemiluminescent reactions catalyzed by alkaline phosphatase and horseradish peroxidase and the bioluminescent reaction catalyzed by firefly luciferase. Limits of detection in the order of attomoles for chemiluminescence enzymes and femtomoles for luciferase and sensitivities in the range between 0.007 and 0.1 pA pmol(-1) L were reached. We found that, without the need of cooling systems, the analytical performances of the proposed cartridge are comparable with those achievable with state-of-the-art thermoelectrically cooled charge-coupled device-based laboratory instrumentation. In addition, thanks to the small amount of generated output data, the proposed device allows the monitoring of long-lasting reactions with significant advantages in terms of data-storage needs, transmission bandwidth, ease of real-time signal processing and limited power consumption. Based on these results, the operation in model bioanalytical assays exploiting luminescent reactions was tested demonstrating that a-Si:H photosensors arrays, when integrated with PDMS microfluidic units, provide compact, sensitive and potentially low-cost microdevices for chemiluminescence and bioluminescence-based bioassays with a wide range of possible applications for in-field and point

  2. The adsorption of polyelectrolytes on nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun

    The adsorption of poly(N- isopropylacrylainide) (PNIPAM) and gelatin on surfactant- free polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles has been investigated by a combination of static and dynamic laser light scattering (LLS). We found that the coil-to-globule transition of thermo-sensitive PNIPAM chains at PS hydrophobic surface was three degrees lower than the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the free PNIPAM chains in water. The transition at surface in turn increased the adsorbed amount by additional adsorption when the temperature increased across the LCST. We established a method based on static LLS to calculate the adsorbed amount. By combining with dynamic LLS measurements, we were able to calculate the average density of the adsorbed layer. We made a general conclusion: For long linear flexible polymer chains adsorbed on a spherical surface driven by hydrophobic attraction, the volume of the adsorbed layer is proportional to the square of the adsorbed amount. We further proposed a simple scaling of the density profile for linear polymer chains on hydrophobic surface. For the adsorption of amphoteric polyelectrolyte gelatin on the same PS nanoparticles, we found that if pure water is used as a dispersing agent, the adsorption was driven by electrostatic attraction. However, by pre-dissolving gelatin in small amount of formamide and then repeating the adsorption processes, the adsorption was switched to the hydrophobic attraction driving and the same relationship between the shell volume and the adsorbed amount as that for PNIPAM/PS system recurred. Formamide is believed to have screened out the electrostatic interactions and possible hydrogen binding. We also found a general structural model in the study of different polymeric dispersions: the surface area per-stabilizer occupied is a constant; and successfully applied this model to the core-shell nanostructure formed by the self- assembly of block copolymer micelles. The preparation of narrowly distributed PS

  3. Adsorption of Gases on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbaye, Mamadou Thiao

    This research focus in studying the interaction between various classical and quantum gases with novel carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Since their discovery by the Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima [1] carbon nanotubes have, experimentally and theoretically, been subjected to many scientific investigation. Studies of adsorption on CNTs are particularly directed toward their better usage in gas storage, gas separation, catalyst, drug delivery, and water purification. We explore the adsorption of different gases entrapped in a single, double, or multi-bundles of CNTs using computer simulations. The first system we investigate consists of Ar and Kr films adsorbed on zigzag or armchair nanotubes. Our simulations revealed that Kr atoms on intermediate size zigzag NTs undergo two phase transitions: A liquid-vapor (L→V), and liquid-commensurate (L→CS) with a fractional coverage of one Kr atoms adsorbed for every four carbon atoms. For Ar on zigzag and armchair NTs, the only transition observed is a L→V. In the second problem, we explore the adsorption of CO2 molecules in a nanotube bundle and calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of the entrapped molecules within the groove. We observed that the lower the temperature, the higher the isosteric of adsorption. Last, we investigate the adsorption of hydrogen, Helium, and Neon gases on the groove site of two parallel nanotubes. At low temperature, the transverse motion on the plane perpendicular to the tubes' axis is frozen out and as a consequence, the heat capacity is reduced to 1/2. At high temperature, the atoms gain more degree of freedom and as a consequence the heat capacity is 5/2.

  4. Adsorption of humic acids and trace metals in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies concerning the interactions between suspended hydrous iron oxide and dissolved humic acids and trace metals are reported. As a major component of dissolved organic matters and its readiness for adsorption at the solid/water interface, humic acids may play a very important role in the organometallic geochemistry of suspended sediments and in determining the fate and distribution of trace metals, pesticides and anions in natural water systems. Most of the solid phases in natural waters contain oxides and hydroxides. The most simple promising theory to describe the interactions of hydrous iron oxide interface is the surface complex formation model. In this model, the adsorptions of humic acids on hydrous iron oxide may be interpreted as complex formation of the organic bases (humic acid oxyanions) with surface Fe ions. Measurements on adsorptions were made in both fresh water and seawater. Attempts have been made to fit our data to Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption equilibrium constants were determined.

  5. Effects of Humidity Swings on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Air purification systems are necessary to provide clean air in the closed environments aboard spacecraft. Trace contaminants are removed using adsorption. One major factor concerning the removal of trace contaminants is relative humidity. Water can reduce adsorption capacity and, due to constant fluctuations, its presence is difficult to incorporate into adsorption column designs. The purpose of the research was to allow for better design techniques in trace contaminant adsorption systems, especially for feeds with water present. Experiments and mathematical modeling research on effects of humidity swings on adsorption columns for air revitalization were carried out.

  6. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of arsenic onto ceria nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The rapid increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles [ENPs] has resulted in an increasing concern over the potential impacts of ENPs on the environmental and human health. ENPs tend to adsorb a large variety of toxic chemicals when they are emitted into the environment, which may enhance the toxicity of ENPs and/or adsorbed chemicals. The study was aimed to investigate the adsorption and desorption behaviors of arsenic on ceria NPs in aqueous solution using batch technique. Results show that the adsorption behavior of arsenic on ceria NPs was strongly dependent on pH and independent of ionic strength, indicating that the electrostatic effect on the adsorption of these elements was relatively not important compared to surface chemical reactions. The adsorption isotherms fitted very well to both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH0, ΔS0, and ΔG0) for the adsorption of arsenic were determined at three different temperatures of 283, 303, and 323 K. The adsorption reaction was endothermic, and the process of adsorption was favored at high temperature. The desorption data showed that desorption hysteresis occurred at the initial concentration studied. High adsorption capacity of arsenic on ceria NPs suggests that the synergistic effects of ceria NPs and arsenic on the environmental systems may exist when they are released into the environment. PMID:22269298

  7. Adsorption of oleic acid at sillimanite/water interface.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T V Vijaya; Prabhakar, S; Raju, G Bhaskar

    2002-03-15

    The interaction of oleic acid at sillimanite-water interface was studied by adsorption, FT-IR, and zeta potential measurements. The isoelectric point (IEP) of sillimanite obtained at pH 8.0 was found to shift in the presence of oleic acid. This shift in IEP was attributed to chemisorption of oleic acid on sillimanite. Adsorption experiments were conducted at pH 8.0, where the sillimanite surface is neutral. The adsorption isotherm exhibited a plateau around 5 micromol/m2 that correspond to a monolayer formation. Adsorption of oleic acid on sillimanite, alumina, and aluminum hydroxide was studied by FT-IR. Chemisorption of oleic acid on the above substrates was confirmed by FT-IR studies. Hydroxylation of mineral surface was found to be essential for the adsorption of oleic acid molecules. These surface hydroxyl sites were observed to facilitate deprotonation of oleic acid and its subsequent adsorption. Thus protons from oleic acid react with surface hydroxyl groups and form water molecules. Based on the experimental results, the mechanism of oleic acid adsorption on mineral substrate was proposed. Free energy of adsorption was estimated using the Stern-Graham equation for a sillimanite-oleate system. PMID:16290466

  8. Mechanism of amitriptyline adsorption on Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2).

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Hsiang; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Li, Zhaohui; Kuo, Chung-Yih; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Chen, Wan-Ru; Lv, Guocheng

    2014-07-30

    The uptake of amitriptyline (AMI) from aqueous environment by Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2) was studied in a batch system under different physicochemical conditions. The adsorbent was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. The AMI adsorption on SAz-2 obeyed the Langmuir isotherm with a capacity of 330mg/g (1.05mmol/g) at pH 6-7. The adsorption kinetics was fast, almost reaching equilibrium in 2h, and followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Desorption of exchangeable cations correlated with the AMI adsorption well, indicating that cation exchange was the major mechanism. X-ray diffraction patterns showing significant expansions of the d001 spacing and characteristic FTIR band shifts toward higher frequencies after AMI adsorption onto SAz-2 indicated that the adsorbed AMI molecules were intercalated into the interlayers of the mineral. Thermodynamic parameters based on partitioning coefficients suggested that the AMI adsorption was an endothermic physisorption at high adsorption levels. At low and higher AMI adsorption levels, the intercalated AMI molecules take a horizontal monolayer and bilayer conformation, respectively. The higher adsorption capacity suggested that SAz-2 could be a good candidate to remove AMI from wastewater and would be an important environmental sink for the fate and transport of AMI in soils and groundwater. PMID:24373983

  9. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  10. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M.; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S.; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers—or metal–organic frameworks (MOFs)—has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials.

  11. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M.; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S.; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers—or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)—has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials.

  12. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions.

    PubMed

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-21

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers--or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)--has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials. PMID:27049950

  13. Treatment of arsenic-contaminated water using akaganeite adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Cadena C., Fernando; Johnson, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention comprises a method and composition using akaganeite, an iron oxide, as an ion adsorption medium for the removal of arsenic from water and affixing it onto carrier media so that it can be used in filtration systems.

  14. Adsorption edge study about cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc adsorption by variable charge soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, J. C.; Mouta, E. R.; Soares, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    The improper discharge of industrial and urban residues and the inadvertent use of fertilizers and pesticides can result in soil and water pollution and improve the potential of trace metals to enter in the human food chain. Adsorption reactions occur at the solid/liquid interface and are the most important mechanisms for controlling the activity of metal ions in soil solution. In a complex system with amphoteric behavior, the comprehension of the mobility, availability and fate of pollutants in the soil system is crucial for the prediction of the environmental consequences and for development of prevention/remediation strategies. A comparative study of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) adsorption by highly weathered soils was carried out. Surface (0-0.2m) and subsoil (B horizon) samples were taken from a Rhodic Kandiudalf (RH), an Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox (XA) and an Anionic "Rhodic" Acrudox (RA), located in brazilian humid tropical area. As the pH and the ionic strength are important environmental factors influencing the solution chemistry of heavy metals in variable charge systems, adsorption envelopes, in a batch adsorption experiment, were elaborated by reacting, for 24 h, soil samples with individual 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 aqueous solutions containing nitrate salts of the adsorptive heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) at the initial concentration of 5 mg L-1, with an increasing pH value from 3.0 to 8.0. pH50-100%, the difference between the pH of 100 and 50 percent metal adsorption was determined. A sharp increase of adsorption density (adsorption edge) was observed within a very narrow pH range, usually less than two pH units. Commonly, the relative affinity of a soil for a metal cation increases with the tendency of the cation to form inner-sphere surface complexes. This may be caused by differences in extent of hydrolysis of Cu ions and in affinity of adsorption sites for Cu. In general, subsurface samples showed low pH50

  15. Operating Room Environment Control. Part A: a Valve Cannister System for Anesthetic Gas Adsorption. Part B: a State-of-the-art Survey of Laminar Flow Operating Rooms. Part C: Three Laminar Flow Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. S.; Kosovich, J.

    1973-01-01

    An anesthetic gas flow pop-off valve canister is described that is airtight and permits the patient to breath freely. Once its release mechanism is activated, the exhaust gases are collected at a hose adapter and passed through activated coal for adsorption. A survey of laminar air flow clean rooms is presented and the installation of laminar cross flow air systems in operating rooms is recommended. Laminar flow ventilation experiments determine drying period evaporation rates for chicken intestines, sponges, and sections of pig stomach.

  16. Isosteric heat of hydrogen adsorption on MOFs: comparison between adsorption calorimetry, sorption isosteric method, and analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloutse, A. F.; Zacharia, R.; Cossement, D.; Chahine, R.; Balderas-Xicohténcatl, R.; Oh, H.; Streppel, B.; Schlichtenmayer, M.; Hirscher, M.

    2015-12-01

    Isosteric heat of adsorption is an important parameter required to describe the thermal performance of adsorptive storage systems. It is most frequently calculated from adsorption isotherms measured over wide ranges of pressure and temperature, using the so-called adsorption isosteric method. Direct quantitative estimation of isosteric heats on the other hand is possible using the coupled calorimetric-volumetric method, which involves simultaneous measurement of heat and adsorption. In this work, we compare the isosteric heats of hydrogen adsorption on microporous materials measured by both methods. Furthermore, the experimental data are compared with the isosteric heats obtained using the modified Dubinin-Astakhov, Tóth, and Unilan adsorption analytical models to establish the reliability and limitations of simpler methods and assumptions. To this end, we measure the hydrogen isosteric heats on five prototypical metal-organic frameworks: MOF-5, Cu-BTC, Fe-BTC, MIL-53, and MOF-177 using both experimental methods. For all MOFs, we find a very good agreement between the isosteric heats measured using the calorimetric and isosteric methods throughout the range of loading studied. Models' prediction on the other hand deviates from both experiments depending on the MOF studied and the range of loading. Under low-loadings of less than 5 mol kg-1, the isosteric heat of hydrogen adsorption decreases in the order Cu-BTC > MIL-53 > MOF-5 > Fe-BTC > MOF-177. The order of isosteric heats is coherent with the strength of hydrogen interaction revealed from previous thermal desorption spectroscopy measurements.

  17. Adsorption of DNA onto anionic lipid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Luque-Caballero, Germán; Faraudo, Jordi; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia

    2014-04-01

    Currently self-assembled DNA delivery systems composed of DNA multivalent cations and anionic lipids are considered to be promising tools for gene therapy. These systems become an alternative to traditional cationic lipid-DNA complexes because of their low cytotoxicity lipids. However, currently these nonviral gene delivery methods exhibit low transfection efficiencies. This feature is in large part due to the poorly understood DNA complexation mechanisms at the molecular level. It is well-known that the adsorption of DNA onto like charged lipid surfaces requires the presence of multivalent cations that act as bridges between DNA and anionic lipids. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms behind such adsorption phenomenon still remain unclear. Accordingly a historical background of experimental evidence related to adsorption and complexation of DNA onto anionic lipid surfaces mediated by different multivalent cations is firstly reviewed. Next, recent experiments aimed to characterise the interfacial adsorption of DNA onto a model anionic phospholipid monolayer mediated by Ca(2+) (including AFM images) are discussed. Afterwards, modelling studies of DNA adsorption onto charged surfaces are summarised before presenting preliminary results obtained from both CG and all-atomic MD computer simulations. Our results allow us to establish the optimal conditions for cation-mediated adsorption of DNA onto negatively charged surfaces. Moreover, atomistic simulations provide an excellent framework to understand the interaction between DNA and anionic lipids in the presence of divalent cations. Accordingly,our simulation results in conjunction go beyond the macroscopic picture in which DNA is stuck to anionic membranes by using multivalent cations that form glue layers between them. Structural aspects of the DNA adsorption and molecular binding between the different charged groups from DNA and lipids in the presence of divalent cations are reported in the last part of the study

  18. Generalized statistical model for multicomponent adsorption equilibria on zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Rota, R.; Gamba, G.; Paludetto, R.; Carra, S.; Morbidelli, M. )

    1988-05-01

    The statistical thermodynamic approach to multicomponent adsorption equilibria on zeolites has been extended to nonideal systems, through the correction of cross coefficients characterizing the interaction between unlike molecules. Estimation of the model parameters requires experimental binary equilibrium data. Comparisons with the classical model based on adsorbed solution theory are reported for three nonideal ternary systems. The two approaches provide comparable results in the simulation of binary and ternary adsorption equilibrium data at constant temperature and pressure.

  19. Random sequential adsorption on partially covered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Weroński, Paweł

    1998-06-01

    The random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach was used to analyze adsorption of hard spheres at surfaces precovered with smaller sized particles. Numerical simulations were performed to determine the available surface function φl of larger particles for various particle size ratios λ=al/as and surface concentration of smaller particles θs. It was found that the numerical results were in a reasonable agreement with the formula stemming from the scaled particle theory with the modification for the sphere/sphere geometry. Particle adsorption kinetics was also determined in terms of the RSA simulations. By extrapolating the θl vs τ-1/2 dependencies, the jamming concentrations of larger spheres θl∞ were determined as a function of the initial smaller sphere concentration. It was found that θl∞ were considerably reduced by the presence of smaller sized particles, especially for λ≫1. The pair correlation function g of larger particles in the jamming state was also determined, showing more short range ordering (at the same θl) in comparison with monodisperse systems. The theoretical predictions stemming from our calculations suggest that the presence of trace amounts of very small particles may exert a decisive influence on adsorption of larger particles.

  20. Adsorption of Polymers on Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, Abishek; Kuppa, Vikram

    2014-03-01

    Most of the surfaces encountered in nature display irregularity and self-similarity at certain length scales. Such real surfaces can be mimicked via fractal surfaces using an algorithm that produces random surfaces. The problem of polymer chains adsorbed on smooth surfaces has been well understood whereas adsorption on rough surfaces still remains unclear due to the complexity involved in equilibration and sampling of molecules in such systems. The enthalpic interactions between the monomers and the entropic penalty arising due to adsorption on rough surfaces are significantly different from smooth surfaces. In this study, we investigate the adsorption of freely rotating polymer chains on fractal surfaces by Monte-Carlo molecular simulations. Random fractal surfaces are generated using the diamond-square algorithm for different values of the Hurst parameter. Properties like monomer-surface interaction, density profiles, chain orientation profiles and distribution of adsorbed chain fractions are investigated. We also demonstrate the significant effect of fractal dimension on adsorption of polymers on rough surfaces.

  1. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that the GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.

  2. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that themore » GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.« less

  3. Rethinking Critical Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Peach, Sarah; Polak, Robert D.

    1996-03-01

    Recent reflectivity experiments on near-critical mixtures of carbon disulfide and nitromethane contained in glass cells footnote Niraj S. Desai, Sarah Peach, and Carl Franck, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4129 (1995) have shown that preferential adsorption of one liquid component onto the wall can be controlled by chemical modification of the glass. The glass was treated with varying amounts of hexamethyldisilazane to decrease surface polarity and therefore enhance the adsorption of carbon disulfide in a surprisingly continuous way. The effect of the glass wall on the local liquid composition can be described by two different scaling hypotheses: using a short range field on the liquid closest to the wall, or pinning the amplitude of the order parameter at the surface. We have found that only the second approach is consistent with the experimental data, although this is difficult to reconcile with observed wetting critical phenomena. We also have reexamined the issue of substrate inhomogeneity and conclude that the substrates were indeed homogeneous on relevant length scales. Supported by the NSF under DMR-9320910 and the central facilities of the Materials Science Center at Cornell University.

  4. Studies of gas adsorption in flexible Metal-Organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Sarmishtha

    Flexible Metal-Organic frameworks that exhibit a gate-opening (GO) adsorption mechanism have potential for gas separations and gas storage. The GO phenomenon occurs when molecular gates in the structure expand/contract in response to the activation/de-activation of a system variable e.g. temperature, pressure or gas. Sharp discontinuities in the isotherm leading to S-shapes and large adsorption-desorption hysteresis are typical of this phenomenon. This study investigates the kinetics and thermodynamics of the GO behavior by combining adsorption measurements and analytical modeling of adsorption kinetics and capacity as a function of adsorbate, GO pressure, and temperature. Basic understanding of GO mechanism will help harness GO-MOF's as adsorbents for gas separations and storage. Experiments were performed on two precharacterized MOFs with verified GO behavior. These are (1) Zn2(bpdc)2(bpee), which expands from a relative amorphous to crystalline structure and (2) Cu[(dhbc) 2(4,4f-bpy)]H2O, a mutually interdigitated 2-D structure (bpdc = biphenyldicarboxylate, bpee = 1,2]bipyridylethene; DMF = N,N-dimethyl formamide, dhbc= 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, bpy=bipyridine). Both sub- and super-critical adsorption data were collected using three adsorption units: a standard low-pressure volumetric adsorption unit, a commercial high-pressure gravimetric analyzer and a custom-built high-pressure differential volumetric unit. Collected laboratory data were combined with published adsorption rate and isotherm data for analysis to broaden the range of data collection. The accuracy of the high-pressure differential unit was improved by over 300-fold by changing analytical methods of processing data to establish a reliable null correction. A pronounced effect of the allowed experimental time was found at cryogenic temperatures on (1). Tightening the stability criteria used by the adsorption equipment to determine equilibration increased the experimental time from the order of

  5. The application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy to electrochemical systems: CO adsorption on Pt electrocatalysts at the aqueous-electrode interface

    SciTech Connect

    Yahnke, M.S.; Reimer, J.A.; Cairns, E.J.

    1996-12-01

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device, the continuous-flow analogue of the popular electrochemical storage device known as the battery. While the potential of fuel cells as power sources was recognized well over a century ago, they have since found limited application; a myriad of chemical, engineering and materials issues can be cited for this disappointing showing. Recent growing concern over the fate of the environment, however, has helped to renew interest in fuel cell research. This paper describes the methanol fuel cell and catalytic problems associated with the anode. On this task, the adsorption of carbon monoxide on platinum has been investigated.

  6. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    is reflected in decreasing equilibrium constants for selenite with increasing adsorption density and both experimental observations and modeling results suggest that manganese dioxide has fewer sites of higher energy for selenite adsorption than amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. Modeling and interpreting the adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on the oxides are made difficult by the lack of constraint in choosing surface species and the fact that equally good fits can be obtained with different surface species. Finally, predictions of anion competition using the model results from single adsorbate systems are not very successful because the model does not account for surface site heterogeneity. Selenite adsorption data from a multi-adsorbate system could be fit if the equilibrium constant for selenite is decreased with increasing anion adsorption density. ?? 1990.

  7. Randomized Comparison of Two Vaginal Self-Sampling Methods for Human Papillomavirus Detection: Dry Swab versus FTA Cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Catarino, Rosa; Vassilakos, Pierre; Bilancioni, Aline; Vanden Eynde, Mathieu; Meyer-Hamme, Ulrike; Menoud, Pierre-Alain; Guerry, Frédéric; Petignat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling (self-HPV) is valuable in cervical cancer screening. HPV testing is usually performed on physician-collected cervical smears stored in liquid-based medium. Dry filters and swabs are an alternative. We evaluated the adequacy of self-HPV using two dry storage and transport devices, the FTA cartridge and swab. Methods A total of 130 women performed two consecutive self-HPV samples. Randomization determined which of the two tests was performed first: self-HPV using dry swabs (s-DRY) or vaginal specimen collection using a cytobrush applied to an FTA cartridge (s-FTA). After self-HPV, a physician collected a cervical sample using liquid-based medium (Dr-WET). HPV types were identified by real-time PCR. Agreement between collection methods was measured using the kappa statistic. Results HPV prevalence for high-risk types was 62.3% (95%CI: 53.7–70.2) detected by s-DRY, 56.2% (95%CI: 47.6–64.4) by Dr-WET, and 54.6% (95%CI: 46.1–62.9) by s-FTA. There was overall agreement of 70.8% between s-FTA and s-DRY samples (kappa = 0.34), and of 82.3% between self-HPV and Dr-WET samples (kappa = 0.56). Detection sensitivities for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse (LSIL+) were: 64.0% (95%CI: 44.5–79.8) for s-FTA, 84.6% (95%CI: 66.5–93.9) for s-DRY, and 76.9% (95%CI: 58.0–89.0) for Dr-WET. The preferred self-collection method among patients was s-DRY (40.8% vs. 15.4%). Regarding costs, FTA card was five times more expensive than the swab (~5 US dollars (USD)/per card vs. ~1 USD/per swab). Conclusion Self-HPV using dry swabs is sensitive for detecting LSIL+ and less expensive than s-FTA. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 43310942 PMID:26630353

  8. Effect of pore blockage on adsorption isotherms and dynamics: Anomalous adsorption of iodine on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, S.K.; Liu, F.; Arvind, G.

    2000-04-18

    Isotherm hysteresis and pore-clocking effects of trapped molecules on adsorption dynamics is studied here, using the iodine-carbon system in the 300--343 K temperature range. It is found that a portion of the iodine is strongly adsorbed, and does not desorb, even over very long time scales, while the remainder adsorbs reversibly as a homogeneous monolayer with a Langmuirian isotherm in mesopores. The strongly adsorbed iodine appears to adsorb in micropores and at the mesopore mouths, hindering uptake of the reversible iodine. The uptake data for the adsorption and desorption dynamics of the reversible part is found to be best explained by means of a pore mouth resistance control mechanism. it is concluded that the dynamics of the adsorption and desorption at the pore mouth is important at early stages of the process.

  9. Experimental adsorption isotherms based on inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kalogirou, E; Bassiotis, I; Artemiadi, Th; Margariti, S; Siokos, V; Roubani-Kalantzopoulou, F

    2002-09-01

    A new chromatographic perturbation method is used for studying the adsorption-desorption equilibrium in various gas-solid heterogeneous systems. It is the reversed-flow method giving accurate and precise values of many physicochemical constants including the basic and necessary adsorption isotherm values. For four inorganic oxides, namely, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2 and PbO, and two aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene) these adsorption isotherms have been determined through a non-linear model. PMID:12385379

  10. Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon preadsorbed with naphtalene.

    PubMed

    Zimny, T; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2005-05-01

    The adsorption of water vapor on a microporous activated carbon derived from the carbonization of coconut shell has been studied. Preadsorption of naphthalene was used as a tool to determine the location and the influence of the primary adsorbing centers within the porous structure of active carbon. The adsorption was studied in the pressure range p/p0=0-0.95 in a static water vapor system, allowing the investigation of both kinetic and equilibrium experimental data. Modeling of the isotherms using the modified equation of Do and Do was applied to determine the effect of preadsorption on the mechanism of adsorption. PMID:15797395

  11. Automated measurement system employing eddy currents to adjust probe position and determine metal hardness

    DOEpatents

    Prince, James M.; Dodson, Michael G.; Lechelt, Wayne M.

    1989-01-01

    A system for measuring the hardness of cartridge cases employs an eddy current probe for inducing and sensing eddy currents in each cartridge case. A first component of the sensed signal is utilized in a closed loop system for accurately positioning the probe relative to the cartridge case both in the lift off direction and in the tangential direction, and a second component of the sensed signal is employed as a measure of the hardness. The positioning and measurement are carried out under closed loop microprocessor control facilitating hardness testing on a production line basis.

  12. Automated measurement system employing eddy currents to adjust probe position and determine metal hardness

    DOEpatents

    Prince, J.M.; Dodson, M.G.; Lechelt, W.M.

    1989-07-18

    A system for measuring the hardness of cartridge cases employs an eddy current probe for inducing and sensing eddy currents in each cartridge case. A first component of the sensed signal is utilized in a closed loop system for accurately positioning the probe relative to the cartridge case both in the lift off direction and in the tangential direction, and a second component of the sensed signal is employed as a measure of the hardness. The positioning and measurement are carried out under closed loop microprocessor control facilitating hardness testing on a production line basis. 14 figs.

  13. Global versus local adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Marloie, Gael; Markovits, Alexis; Ellinger, Yves

    2015-10-01

    The origin of the enantiomeric excess found in the amino acids present in the organic matter of carbonaceous meteorites is still unclear. Selective adsorption of one of the two enantiomers existing after a racemic formation could be part of the answer. Hereafter we report a comparative study of the adsorption of the R and S enantiomers of α-alanine and lactic acid on the hydroxylated { } chiral surface of α-quartz using numerical simulation techniques. Structurally different adsorption sites were found with opposite R versus S selectivity for the same molecule-surface couple, raising the problem of whether to consider adsorption as a local property or as a global response characteristic of the whole surface. To deal with the second term of this alternative, a statistical approach was designed, based on the occurrence of each adsorption site whose energy was calculated using first principle periodic density functional theory. It was found that R-alanine and S-lactic acid are the enantiomers preferentially adsorbed, even if the adsorption process on the quartz { } surface stays with a disappointingly poor enantio-selectivity. Nevertheless, it highlighted the important point that considering adsorption as a global property changes perspectives in the search for more efficient enantio-selective supports and more generally changes the way to apprehend adsorption processes in astro-chemistry/biology.

  14. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  15. Co-adsorption of phosphate and zinc(II) on the surface of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Runliang; Xu, Tianyuan; Xu, Yin; Ge, Fei; Xi, Yunfei; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping

    2016-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is of great importance in affecting the migration and transformation of heavy-metal cations and oxyanions. To advance the understanding of co-adsorption reactions on Fh surface, the co-adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) from aqueous solution to a synthesized Fh was determined. The batch experiments demonstrated a synergistic adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) on Fh. In the pH range of 3.5-6, the adsorption of the two contaminants showed strong pH dependence in the single solute adsorption systems, but the dependence alleviated in the simultaneous adsorption system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the chemical shifts of Zn 2p1/2 and Zn 2p3/2 binding energies were more significant than that of P 2p in the single and simultaneous adsorption systems. On the other side, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) observed increased formation of outer- and inner-sphere complexes of phosphate in the simultaneous system. Thus, the synergistic adsorption of the two contaminants could be attributed to the formation of ternary complexes as well as electrostatic interactions, while surface precipitation could not be completely ruled out. On the basis of the results from both the batch adsorption experiments and structural characterization, these two contaminants were likely to form phosphate-bridged ternary complexes (≡Fe-P-Zn) in the simultaneous adsorption system.

  16. Co-adsorption of phosphate and zinc(II) on the surface of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Runliang; Xu, Tianyuan; Xu, Yin; Ge, Fei; Xi, Yunfei; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping

    2016-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is of great importance in affecting the migration and transformation of heavy-metal cations and oxyanions. To advance the understanding of co-adsorption reactions on Fh surface, the co-adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) from aqueous solution to a synthesized Fh was determined. The batch experiments demonstrated a synergistic adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) on Fh. In the pH range of 3.5-6, the adsorption of the two contaminants showed strong pH dependence in the single solute adsorption systems, but the dependence alleviated in the simultaneous adsorption system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the chemical shifts of Zn 2p1/2 and Zn 2p3/2 binding energies were more significant than that of P 2p in the single and simultaneous adsorption systems. On the other side, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) observed increased formation of outer- and inner-sphere complexes of phosphate in the simultaneous system. Thus, the synergistic adsorption of the two contaminants could be attributed to the formation of ternary complexes as well as electrostatic interactions, while surface precipitation could not be completely ruled out. On the basis of the results from both the batch adsorption experiments and structural characterization, these two contaminants were likely to form phosphate-bridged ternary complexes (≡Fe-P-Zn) in the simultaneous adsorption system. PMID:26461439

  17. Enhanced adsorption of cesium on PVA-alginate encapsulated Prussian blue-graphene oxide hydrogel beads in a fixed-bed column system.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-10-01

    A continuous fixed-bed column study was performed using PVA-alginate encapsulated Prussian blue-graphene oxide (PB-GO) hydrogel beads as a novel adsorbent for the removal of cesium from aqueous solutions. The effects of different operating parameters, such as initial cesium concentration, pH, bed height, flow rate, and bead size, were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of the PB-GO hydrogel beads was 164.5mg/g at an initial cesium concentration of 5mM, bed height of 20cm, and flow rate of 0.83mL/min at pH 7. The Thomas, Adams-Bohart, and Yoon-Nelson models were applied to the experimental data to predict the breakthrough curves using non-linear regression. Although both the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models showed good agreement with the experimental data, the Yoon-Nelson model was found to provide the best representation for cesium adsorption on the adsorbent, based on the χ(2) analysis. PMID:27372009

  18. Adsorption Model for Off-Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2011-03-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed in gPROMS software. Inputs include gas stream constituents, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. It models dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions for a multiple component gas stream. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which the breakthrough data is obtained. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data will be input into the adsorption model to develop a model specific for iodine adsorption on silver mordenite as well as model(s) specific for krypton and xenon adsorption. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Another future off-gas modeling goal is to develop a model for the unit operation absorption. The off-gas models will be made available via the server or web for evaluation by customers.

  19. Adsorption of Selected Pharmaceutical Compounds onto Activated Carbon in Dilute Aqueous Solutions Exemplified by Acetaminophen, Diclofenac, and Sulfamethoxazole

    PubMed Central

    Chang, E.-E.; Wan, Jan-Chi; Liang, Chung-Huei; Dai, Yung-Dun; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of three pharmaceuticals, namely, acetaminophen, diclofenac, and sulfamethoxazole onto granular activated carbon (GAC), was investigated. To study competitive adsorption, both dynamic and steady-state adsorption experiments were conducted by careful selection of pharmaceuticals with various affinities and molecular size. The effective diffusion coefficient of the adsorbate was increased with decease in particle size of GAC. The adsorption affinity represented as Langmuir was consistent with the ranking of the octanol-water partition coefficient, Kow. The adsorption behavior in binary or tertiary systems could be described by competition adsorption. In the binary system adsorption replacement occurred, under which the adsorbate with the smaller Kow was replaced by the one with larger Kow. Results also indicated that portion of the micropores could be occupied only by the small target compound, but not the larger adsorbates. In multiple-component systems the competition adsorption might significantly be affected by the macropores and less by the meso- or micropores. PMID:26078989

  20. Removal of water and iodine by solid sorbents: adsorption isotherms and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    2013-07-01

    Tritium and iodine-129 are two major radioactive elements that are present in off-gases from spent fuel reprocessing plants. Adsorption by solid sorbents is the state-of-the-art technique for removal of these species from off-gases. Modeling and simulating adsorption processes require accurate adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data to permit reasonable estimates of process parameters. We have developed a continuous flow single-pellet adsorption system to gather accurate adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data for adsorption of water by molecular sieve 3A and for adsorption of iodine by silver exchanged mordenite. In this paper, the design of the water and iodine adsorption experimental systems are briefly described and results of water adsorption experiments are presented and discussed. Water uptake curves are fitted with the linear-driving force (LDF) model and the shrinking-core model to determine kinetic parameters. It is shown that the kinetics of water adsorption on zeolite 3A under current experimental conditions is controlled by both the external film resistance and the macro-pore diffusion and can be predicted by both the LDF model and the shrinking-core model with the former one performing slightly better. Preliminary results from iodine adsorption experiments will be presented in the conference.

  1. The adsorption of plutonium IV and V on goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Arthur L.; Murray, James W.; Sibley, Thomas H.

    1985-11-01

    The adsorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) on goethite (αFeOOH) from NaNO 3 solution shows distinct differences related to the different hydrolytic character of these two oxidation states. Under similar solution conditions, the adsorption edge of the more strongly hydrolyzable Pu(IV) occurs in the pH range 3 to 5 while that for Pu(V) is at pH 5 to 7. The adsorption edge for Pu(V) shifts with time to lower pH values and this appears to be due to the reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) in the presence of the goethite surface. These results suggest that redox transformations may be an important aspect of Pu adsorption chemistry and the resulting scavenging of Pu from natural waters. Increasing ionic strength (from 0.1 M to 3 M NaCl or NaNO 3 and 0.03 M to 0.3 M Na 2SO 4) did not influence Pu(IV) or Pu(V) adsorption. In the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Pu(V) reduction to Pu(IV) occurred in solution. Pu(IV) adsorption on goethite decreased by 30% in the presence of 240 ppm natural DOC found in Soap Lake, Washington waters. Increasing concentrations of carbonate ligands decreased Pu(IV) and Pu(V) adsorption on goethite, with an alkalinity of 1000 meq/l totally inhibiting adsorption. The Pu-goethite adsorption system provides the data base for developing a thermodynamic model of Pu interaction with an oxide surface and with dissolved ligands, using the MINEQL computer program. From the model calculations we determined equilibrium constants for the adsorption of Pu(IV) hydrolysis species. The model was then applied to Pu adsorption in carbonate media to see how the presence of CO 3-2 could influence the mobility of Pu. The decrease in adsorption appears to be due to formation of a Pu-CO 3 complex. Model calculations were used to predict what the adsorption curves would look like if Pu-CO 3 complexes formed.

  2. Detection of nitroesters and moisture in combustible cartridge case wall by indicator strips and instruments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.H.; Moneyhun, J.H.; Agouridis, D.C.; Gayle, T.M.; Hurst, G.B.; Griest, W.H.

    1992-09-30

    Nitroester migration into the case wall from the propellant and moisture accumulation within the case have been identified as important internal and external (respectively) factors which contribute to the physical deterioration of combustible cartridge case (ccc) munitions. The latter factor also may hinder proper ignition of the ccc and cause incomplete combustion in firing. Visual indicators sensitive to these factors and affixed to ccc rounds would allow quality assurance specialists or gun crews in the field to rapidly determine the potential reliability of individual rounds. Previous work in this task identified chemistries suitable for the detection of nitroesters and moisture in the ccc wall. A version of the Griess reaction was modified for a dry colorimetric indicator which in the presence of nitroglycerin (NG) or diethyleneglycol dinitrate (DEGDN) generates a brilliant red color. Inorganic salts such as cupric chloride, which changes from brown to blue-green upon hydration, were suggested as promising visual indicators of moisture. This report describes the development and preliminary testing of prototype nitroester and moisture indicator strips, and the scoping of two instrumental techniques, infrared spectroscopy and electrical capacitance, which could lead to portable instruments for rapid and nondestructive testing of ccc in the field.

  3. Possibility of using adsorption refrigeration unit in district heating network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzebielec, Andrzej; Rusowicz, Artur; Jaworski, Maciej; Laskowski, Rafał

    2015-09-01

    Adsorption refrigeration systems are able to work with heat sources of temperature starting with 50 °C. The aim of the article is to determine whether in terms of technical and economic issues adsorption refrigeration equipment can work as elements that produce cold using hot water from the district heating network. For this purpose, examined was the work of the adsorption air conditioning equipment cooperating with drycooler, and the opportunities offered by the district heating network in Warsaw during the summer. It turns out that the efficiency of the adsorption device from the economic perspective is not sufficient for production of cold even during the transitional period. The main problem is not the low temperature of the water supply, but the large difference between the coefficients of performance, COPs, of adsorption device and a traditional compressor air conditioning unit. When outside air temperature is 25 °C, the COP of the compressor type reaches a value of 4.49, whereas that of the adsorption device in the same conditions is 0.14. The ratio of the COPs is 32. At the same time ratio between the price of 1 kWh of electric power and 1 kWh of heat is only 2.85. Adsorption refrigeration equipment to be able to compete with compressor devices, should feature COPads efficiency to be greater than 1.52. At such a low driving temperature and even changing the drycooler into the evaporative cooler it is not currently possible to achieve.

  4. Laboratory investigation of steam adsorption in geothermal reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Luetkehans, J.

    1988-02-01

    Some vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs and low-permeability gas reservoirs exhibit anomalous behavior that may be caused by surface adsorption. For example, geothermal reservoirs in the Larderello are of Italy and reservoirs in the Geysers Geothermal Field, California produce little, if any, liquid. Yet to satisfy material balance constraints, another phase besides steam must be present. If steam adsorption occurring in significant amounts is not accounted for, the reserves will be grossly under-estimated. In addition, well tests may be misinterpreted because the pressure response is delayed owing to be adsorbed material leaving or entering the gaseous phase. In the present research the role of adsorption in geothermal reservoirs in investigated. Two sets of laboratory equipment were constructed to measure adsorption isotherms of cores from Berea sandstone, Larderello, and The Geysers. Seven experimental runs were completed using nitrogen on the low temperature apparatus at -196/sup 0/C. Eight runs were conducted using steam on the high temperature apparatus at temperatures ranging from 150 C to 207/sup 0/C. The largest specific surface area and the greatest nitrogen adsorption isotherm were measured on the Berea sandstone, followed by a core from Larderello and then The Geysers. Difficulties in determining whether a system had reached equilibrium at the end of each step lead to questions regarding the magnitude of adsorption measured by the steam runs. Nevertheless, adsorption was observed and the difficulties themselves were useful indicators of needed future research.

  5. Study of surfactant adsorption on colloidal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, P.G.; Staples, E. ); Penfold, J. )

    1990-05-03

    Surface tension and small-angle neutron scattering have been used to study the nature of surfactant adsorption on silica sols. This paper presents results on the characterization of the ludox silica sol and adsorbed layers of hexaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C{sub 12}E{sub 6}). Preliminary results are presented that demonstrate the presence of a lower consolute boundary for the composite system.

  6. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  7. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  8. Evaluation of silica-gel cartridges coated in situ with acidified 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine for sampling aldehydes and ketones in air

    SciTech Connect

    Tejada, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    A procedure for coating in-situ silica in commercially available prepacked cartridges with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) acidified with hydrochloric acid is described. The coated cartridge was compared with a validated DNPH impinger method for sampling organic carbonyl compounds (aldehydes and ketones) in diluted automotive exhaust emissions and in ambient air for subsequent analysis of the DNPH derivatives by high performance liquid chromatography. Qualitative and quantitative results show that the two sampling devices are equivalent. An unknown degradation product of acrolein has been tentatively identified as x-acrolein. The disappearance of acrolein in the analytical sample matrix correlated quantitatively almost on a mole-for-mole basis with the growth of x-acrolein. The sum of the concentration of acrolein and x-acrolein appears to be invariant with time. This sum could possibly be used as a more-accurate value of the concentration of acrolein in the integratated sample.

  9. Side-by-side comparison of disposable microchips with commercial capillary cartridges for application in capillary isoelectric focusing with whole column imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Ou, Junjie; Samy, Razim; Glawdel, Tomasz; Huang, Tiemin; Ren, Carolyn L; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2008-10-01

    Simple-structured, well-functioned disposable poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchips were developed for capillary isoelectric focusing with whole column imaging detection (CIEF-WCID). Side-by-side comparison of the developed microchips with well-established commercial capillary cartridges demonstrated that the disposable microchips have comparable performance as well as advantages such as absence of lens effect and possibility of high-aspect-ratio accompanied with a dramatic reduction in cost.

  10. Chromatographic Separations Using Solid-Phase Extraction Cartridges: Separation of Wine Phenolics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, Charles A.; Ebeler, Susan E.

    1999-12-01

    We describe a simple laboratory experiment that demonstrates the principles of chromatographic separation using solid-phase extraction columns and red wine. By adjusting pH and mobile phase composition, the wine is separated into three fractions of differing polarity. The content of each fraction can be monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy. When the experiment is combined with experiments involving HPLC or GC separations, students gain a greater appreciation for and understanding of the highly automated instrumental systems currently available. In addition, they learn about the chemistry of polyphenolic compounds, which are present in many foods and beverages and which are receiving much attention for their potentially beneficial health effects.

  11. Effects of air temperatures and humidities on efficiencies and lifetimes of air-purifying chemical respirator cartridges tested against methyl iodide.

    PubMed

    Wood, G O

    1985-05-01

    Methyl iodide penetration curves through three types of respirator cartridges and canisters were determined at several temperatures to identify the significance of temperatures of testing and use. Three charcoal types showed similar results: triethylenediamine (5% TEDA-impregnated, (2% TEDA + 5% KI3)-impregnated, and unimpregnated. Penetration curves were shifted at higher temperatures in the range 25-38 degrees C, keeping relative humidity constant in the range 50-70%, but allowing absolute humidities to increase correspondingly. These shifts were such that penetrations were increased and service lives were decreased significantly (4-15% per degrees C). At constant water vapor concentration, service life of the (2% TEDA + 5% KI3)-impregnated charcoal increased with temperature, illustrating the complexity of temperature effects. For one case (5% TEDA) using cartridges at humidity equilibrium, temperature and humidity effects were sorted out. Until these effects are better understood, air-purifying respirator cartridge and canister testing should be done at conditions more representative of possible use and at more closely controlled temperatures. PMID:4003276

  12. Effects of air temperatures and humidities on efficiencies and lifetimes of air-purifying chemical respirator cartridges tested against methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.O.

    1985-05-01

    Methyl iodide penetration curves through three types of respirator cartridges and canisters were determined at several temperatures to identify the significance of temperatures of testing and use. Three charcoal types showed similar results: triethylenediamine (5% TEDA-impregnated, (2% TEDA + 5% KI/sub 3/)-impregnated, and unimpregnated. Penetration curves were shifted at higher temperatures in the range 25-38/sup 0/C, keeping relative humidity constant in the range 50-70%, but allowing absolute humidities to increase correspondingly. These shifts were such that penetrations were increased and service lives were decreased significantly (4-15% per /sup 0/C). At constant water vapor concentration, service life of the (2% TEDA + 5% KI/sub 3/)-impregnated charcoal increased with temperature, illustrating the complexity of temperature effects. For one case (5% TEDA) using cartridges at humidity equilibrium, temperature and humidity effects were sorted out. Until these effects are better understood, air-purifying respirator cartridge and canister testing should be done at conditions more representative of possible use and at more closely controlled temperatures.

  13. Capture of the volatile carbonyl metabolite of flecainide on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine cartridge for quantitation by stable-isotope dilution mass spectrometry coupled with chromatography.

    PubMed

    Prokai, Laszlo; Szarka, Szabolcs; Wang, Xiaoli; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin

    2012-04-01

    Carbonyl compounds are common byproducts of many metabolic processes. These volatile chemicals are usually derivatized before mass spectrometric analysis to enhance the sensitivity of their detections. The classically used reagent for this purpose is 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) that forms the corresponding hydrazones. When DNPH is immobilized on specific cartridges it permits solvent-free collection and simultaneous derivatization of aldehydes and ketones from gaseous samples. The utility of this approach was tested by assembling a simple apparatus for the in vitro generation of trifluoroacetaldehyde (TFAA) and its subsequent capture on the attached DNPH cartridge. TFAA was generated via cytochrome P450-catalyzed dealkylation of flecainide, an antiarrhythmic agent, in pooled human liver microsomes. Stable-isotope dilution mass spectrometry coupled with GC and LC using negative chemical ionization (NCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) was evaluated for quantitative analyses. To eliminate isotope effects observed with the use of deuterium-labeled DNPH, we selected its (15)N(4)-labeled analog to synthesize the appropriate TFAA adduct, as internal standard. Quantitation by GC-NCI-MS using selected-ion monitoring outperformed LC-ESI-MS methods considering limits of detection and linearity of the assays. The microsomal metabolism of 1.5 μmol of flecainide for 1.5h resulted in 2.6 ± 0.5 μg TFAA-DNPH, corresponding to 9.3 ± 1.7 nmol TFAA, captured by the cartridge. PMID:22342210

  14. Capture of the volatile carbonyl metabolite of flecainide on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine cartridge for quantitation by stable-isotope dilution mass spectrometry coupled with chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Prokai, Laszlo; Szarka, Szabolcs; Wang, Xiaoli; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin

    2012-01-01

    Carbonyl compounds are common byproducts of many metabolic processes. These volatile chemical entities are usually derivatized before mass spectrometric analysis to enhance the sensitivity of their detections. The classically used reagent for this purpose is 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) that forms the corresponding hydrazones. When DNPH is immobilized on specific cartridges it permits solvent-free collection and simultaneous derivatization of aldehydes and ketones from gaseous samples. The utility of this approach was tested by assembling a simple apparatus for the in vitro generation of trifluoroacetaldehyde (TFAA) and its subsequent capture on the attached DNPH cartridge. TFAA was generated via cytochrome P450-catalyzed dealkylation of flecainide, an antiarrhythmic agent, in pooled human liver microsomes. Stable-isotope dilution mass spectrometry coupled with GC and LC using negative chemical ionization (NCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) was evaluated for quantitative analyses. To eliminate isotope effects observed with the use of deuterium-labeled DNPH, we selected its 15N4-labeled analog to synthesize the appropriate TFAA adduct, as internal standard. Quantitation by GC–NCI-MS using selected-ion monitoring outperformed LC–ESI-MS methods considering limits of detection and linearity of the assays. The microsomal metabolism of 1.5 μmol of flecainide for 1.5 h resulted in 2.6 ± 0.5 μg TFAA-DNPH, corresponding to 9.3 ± 1.7 nmol TFAA, captured by the cartridge. PMID:22342210

  15. Evaluation of silica gel cartridges coated in situ with acidified 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine for sampling aldehydes and ketones in air.

    PubMed

    Tejada, S B

    1986-01-01

    A procedure for coating in situ silica gel in prepacked cartridges with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) acidified with hydrochloric acid is described. The coated cartridge was compared with a validated DNPH impinger method for sampling organic carbonyl compounds (aldehydes and ketones) in diluted automotive exhaust emissions and in ambient air for subsequent analysis of the DNPH derivatives by high performance liquid chromatography. Qualitative and quantitative data are presented that show that the two sampling devices are equivalent. The coated cartridge is ideal for long-term sampling of carbonyls at sub to low parts-per-billion level in ambient air or for short-term sampling of carbonyls at low ppb to parts-per-million level in diluted automotive exhaust emissions. An unknown degradation product of acrolein has been tentatively identified as x-acrolein. The disappearance of acrolein in the analytical sample matrix correlates quantitatively almost on a mole for mole basis with the growth of x-acrolein. The sum of the concentration of acrolein and x-acrolein appears to be invariant with time. PMID:3019907

  16. A model free method for estimation of complicated adsorption isotherms in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Forssén, Patrik; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-08-28

    Here we show that even extremely small variations in the adsorption isotherm can have a tremendous effect on the shape of the overloaded elution profiles and that the earlier in the adsorption isotherms the variation take place, the larger its impact on the shape of the elution profile. These variations are so small that they can be "hidden" by the discretization and in the general experimental noise when using traditional experimental methods, such as frontal analysis, to measure adsorption isotherms. But as the effects of these variations are more clearly visible in the elution profiles, the Inverse Method (IM) of adsorption isotherm estimation is an option. However, IM usually requires that one selects an adsorption isotherm model prior to the estimation process. Here we show that even complicated models might not be able to estimate the adsorption isotherms with multiple inflection points that small variations might give rise to. We therefore developed a modified IM that, instead of fixed adsorption isotherm models, uses monotone piecewise interpolation. We first validated the method with synthetic data and showed that it can be used to estimate an adsorption isotherm, which accurately predicts an extremely "strange" elution profile. For this case it was impossible to estimate the adsorption isotherm using IM with a fixed adsorption model. Finally, we will give an example of a real chromatographic system where adsorption isotherm with inflection points is estimated by the modified IM.

  17. Dynamics and thermodynamics of toxic metals adsorption onto soil-extracted humic acid.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Medhat A; albishri, Hassan M

    2014-09-01

    Humic acids, HA represent a large portion of natural organic matter in soils, sediments and waters. They are environmentally important materials due to their extensive ubiquity and strong complexation ability, which can influence heavy metal removal and transportation in waters. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the adsorption of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) onto solid soil-derived HA have been investigated at optimum conditions of pH (5.5±0.1), metal concentration (10-100mmolL(-1)) and different temperatures (293-323K). The suitability of adsorption models such as Freundlich and Langmuir to equilibrium data was investigated. The adsorption was well described by Langmuir isotherm model in multi-detectable steps. Adsorption sites, i (i=A, B, C) with different capacities, νi are characterized. The stoichiometric site capacity is independent of temperature and equilibrium constant, Ki. Adsorption sites A and B are selectively occupied by Cr(VI) cations while sites A and C are selectively occupied by Cd(II) cations. The thermodynamic parameters of adsorption systems are correlated for each adsorption step. The adsorption is endothermic, spontaneous and favorable. Different kinetic models are applied and the adsorption of these heavy metals onto HA follows pseudo-second-order kinetics and equilibrium is achieved within 24h. The adsorption reaction is controlled by diffusion processes and the type of the adsorption is physical. PMID:24997970

  18. Adsorption of clofibric acid and ketoprofen onto powdered activated carbon: effect of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaohuan; Deshusses, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of two acidic pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), clofibric acid and ketoprofen, onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated with a particular focus on the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the PhACs. Suwannee River humic acids (SRHAs) were used as a substitute for NOM. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to obtain adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms with and without SRHAs in the system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption ofclofibric acid was not significantly affected by the presence of SRHAs at a concentration of 5 mg (as carbon) L(-1). An adsorption capacity of 70 to 140 mg g(-1) was observed and equilibrium was reached within 48 h. In contrast, the adsorption of ketoprofen was markedly decreased (from about 120 mg g(-1) to 70-100 mg g(-1)) in the presence of SRHAs. Higher initial concentrations of clofibric acid than ketoprofen during testing may explain the different behaviours that were observed. Also, the more hydrophobic ketoprofen molecules may have less affinity for PAC when humic acids (which are hydrophilic) are present. The possible intermolecular forces that could account for the different behaviour of clofibric acid and ketoprofen adsorption onto PAC are discussed. In particular, the relevance of electrostatic forces, electron donor-acceptor interaction, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces are discussed PMID:22439557

  19. A theoretical study of CO adsorption on FeCo(100) and the effect of alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochana, Panithita; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    FeCo catalysts are modeled for optimizing the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process since they can be tuned to enhance CO activity and resist poisoning. The electronic properties associated with CO adsorption are studied using plane-wave density functional theory (DFT). The range of computed adsorption energies from this work falls between the CO adsorption energies on pure Fe and Co surfaces. It was found that CO prefers to adsorb on the top site of the Co surface of FeCo alloys, whereas CO has stronger adsorption on pure Fe rather than pure Co surface. The trend in adsorption energy is top-Co > hollow-Fe > top-Fe > hollow-Co > bridge-Co > bridge-Fe. This change in preferable metal for adsorption ( i.e., from Fe in a pure system to Co in the FeCo alloy surface in the current investigation) is due to the shift in the d-band center of the alloyed material. It implies that alloying Fe with Co changes the properties of the pure metal and ultimately affects the CO adsorption energy; however, the mechanism of adsorption remains similar and can be explained using the Nilsson-Pettersson model. Additional CO configurations consisting of hollow-site adsorption with a tilted geometry, was also investigated. The corresponding adsorption energy was found to be slightly higher than the adsorption energy when CO is adsorbed on the top-Co site.

  20. Predicting the adsorption capacity and isotherm curvature of organic compounds onto activated carbons in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Hung, H W; Lin, T F

    2006-03-01

    A simple approach to predict the adsorption capacity and isotherm curvature of organic compounds onto activated carbon in natural water was investigated. A combination of the well-known equivalent background compound (EBC), and the simplified competitive adsorption model (SCAM) was employed to delineate the equilibrium capacity. This SCAM-EBC approach may reduce the numerical and experimental effort to obtain the parameters required to predict the adsorption capacity for a specific adsorption system. Several sets of experimental data, including weakly adsorbing (MTBE), strongly adsorbing compounds (TCP, atrazine, and chloroform), and two taste and odor causing compounds (MIB and geosmin) onto different activated carbons in three natural waters and a synthetic groundwater, were tested to verify the SCAM-EBC approach. Based on the approach, a parameter, called relative adsorptivity, describing the adsorption preference of the adsorbent between EBC and the target compound was employed to simulate the isotherm curvature in natural water. The relative adsorptivity of the SCAM-EBC approach is constant and can be directly obtained from the SCAM-EBC parameters in a specific adsorption system. The potential and extent of isotherm curvature can be simulated by only changing the parameter of relative adsorptivity. The marked isotherm curvature was found while the relative adsorptivity is larger than 2.0 to 4.0 for all the systems tested.