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Sample records for adsorption chromatographic xad

  1. RECOVERY OF MUTAGENICITY FROM DISINFECTED WATER BY XAD RESIN ADSORPTION COMPARED TO REVERSE OSMOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recovery of Mutagenicity from Disinfected Water Samples by XAD Resin Adsorption Compared to Reverse Osmosis

    K. M. Schenck1, T. F. Speth1, R. J. Miltner1, M. Sivaganesan1 and J. E. Simmons2

    1U.S. EPA, Office of Research and Development, NRMRL
    2U.S. EPA, Office of...

  2. RECOVERY OF MUTAGENICITY FROM DISINFECTED WATER BY XAD RESIN ADSORPTION COMPARED TO REVERSE OSMOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recovery of Mutagenicity from Disinfected Water Samples by XAD Resin Adsorption Compared to Reverse Osmosis

    K. M. Schenck1, T. F. Speth1, R. J. Miltner1, M. Sivaganesan1 and J. E. Simmons2

    1U.S. EPA, Office of Research and Development, NRMRL
    2U.S. EPA, Office of...

  3. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF REVERSE OSMOSIS MEMBRANE AND XAD RESIN ADSORPTION CONCENTRATES OF WATER DISINFECTED BY CHLORINATION OR OZONATION/CHLORINATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Chemical Analysis of Reverse Osmosis Membrane and XAD Resin Adsorption Concentrates of Water Disinfected by Chlorination or Ozonation/Chlorination Processes.

    J. E. Simmons1, S.D. Richardson2, K.M. Schenck3, T. F. Speth3, R. J. Miltner3 and A. D. Thruston2

    1 NHEE...

  4. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF REVERSE OSMOSIS MEMBRANE AND XAD RESIN ADSORPTION CONCENTRATES OF WATER DISINFECTED BY CHLORINATION OR OZONATION/CHLORINATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Chemical Analysis of Reverse Osmosis Membrane and XAD Resin Adsorption Concentrates of Water Disinfected by Chlorination or Ozonation/Chlorination Processes.

    J. E. Simmons1, S.D. Richardson2, K.M. Schenck3, T. F. Speth3, R. J. Miltner3 and A. D. Thruston2

    1 NHEE...

  5. Synthesis and application of Amberlite xad-4 functionalized with alizarin red-s for preconcentration and adsorption of rhodium (III)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A new chelating resin was prepared by coupling Amberlite XAD-4 with alizarin red-s through an azo spacer, characterized by infra-red spectroscopy and thermal analysis and studied for Rh(III) preconcentration using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for rhodium monitoring in the environment. The optimum pH for sorption of the metal ion was 6.5. The sorption capacity was found 2.1 mg/g of resin for Rh(III). A recovery of 88% was obtained for the metal ion with 1.5 M HCl as eluting agent. Kinetic adsorption data were analyzed by adsorption and desorption times of Rh(III) on modified resin. Scat chard analysis revealed that the homogeneous binding sites were formed in the polymers. The linear regression equation was Q/C = –1.3169Q + 27.222 (R2 = 0.9239), for Rh were formed in the SPE sorbent,Kd and Qmax for the affinity binding sites were calculated to be 0.76 μmol/mL and 20.67 μmol/g, respectively. The equilibrium data and parameters of Rh(III) adsorption on modified resin were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Redlich–Peterson models. The experimental adsorption isotherm was in good concordance with Langmuir and Freundlich models (R2 > 0.998) and based on the Langmuir isotherm the maximum amount of adsorption (qmax) was 4.842 mg/g. The method was applied for rhodium ions determination in environmental samples. with high recovery (>80%). PMID:23369526

  6. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of imipramine, trimipramine and desipramine employing titanium dioxide nanoparticles and an Amberlite XAD-2 modified glassy carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Sanghavi, Bankim J; Srivastava, Ashwini K

    2013-03-07

    An Amberlite XAD-2 (XAD2) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs) modified glassy carbon paste electrode (XAD2-TNP-GCPE) was developed for the determination of imipramine (IMI), trimipramine (TRI) and desipramine (DES). The electrochemical behavior of these molecules was investigated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronocoulometry (CC), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry (AdSDPV). After optimization of analytical conditions using a XAD2-TNP-GCPE electrode at pH 6.0 phosphate buffer (0.1 M), the peak currents were found to vary linearly with its concentration in the range of 1.30 × 10(-9) to 6.23 × 10(-6) M for IMI, 1.16 × 10(-9) to 6.87 × 10(-6) M for TRI and 1.43 × 10(-9) to 5.68 × 10(-6) M for DES. The detection limits (S/N = 3) of 3.93 × 10(-10), 3.51 × 10(-10) and 4.35 × 10(-10) M were obtained for IMI, TRI and DES respectively using AdSDPV. The prepared modified electrode showed several advantages such as a simple preparation method, high sensitivity, very low detection limits and excellent reproducibility. The proposed method was employed for the determination of IMI, TRI and DES in pharmaceutical formulations, blood serum and urine samples.

  7. Mutagenic activity in disinfected waters and recovery of the potent bacterial mutagen "MX" from water by XAD resin adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backlund, Peter; Wondergem, Erik; Kronberg, Leif

    Chlorination of humic water generated mutagenic activity in the Ames test. The formation of the potent bacterial mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and mutagenic activity were favoured by acidic chlorination conditions and high chlorine doses. Chlorinated humic waters from different locations differed slightly in the level of mutagenicity as well as in the proportion of activity derived from MX. Chlorination of an industrially polluted surface water with a low content of humic material generated an approximately equal level of mutagenicity (per mg of DOC) as that of chlorinated humic water, but only a minor part (26%) of the activity could be explained by the presence of MX. The mutagenicity and the amount of MX generated were substantially lower when using combined treatment methods (ClO2+Cl2, O3+Cl2) or when substituting chlorine by monochloramine or chlorine dioxide. The recovery of MX by XAD adsorption from water acidified to pH 2 was found to be quantitative.

  8. The Calculation of Adsorption Isotherms from Chromatographic Peak Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between adsorption isotherms and elution peak shapes in gas chromatography, and describes a laboratory experiment which involves the adsorption of hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene on alumina at different temperatures. (MLH)

  9. The Calculation of Adsorption Isotherms from Chromatographic Peak Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between adsorption isotherms and elution peak shapes in gas chromatography, and describes a laboratory experiment which involves the adsorption of hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene on alumina at different temperatures. (MLH)

  10. New Method for Evaluating Irreversible Adsorption and Stationary Phase Bleed in Gas Chromatographic Capillary Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Bob W.; Wright, Cherylyn W.

    2012-10-26

    A novel method for the evaluation of gas chromatographic (GC) column inertness has been developed using a tandem GC approach. Typically column inertness is measured by analyte peak shape evaluation. In general, silica, glass, and metal surfaces are chemically reactive and can cause analyte adsorption, which typically is observed as chromatographic peak tailing. Adsorption processes produce broad, short chromatographic peaks that confound peak area determinations because a significant portion can reside in the noise. In addition, chromatographic surfaces and stationary phases can irreversibly adsorb certain analytes without obvious degradation of peak shape. The inertness measurements described in this work specifically determine the degree of irreversible adsorption behavior of specific target compounds at levels ranging from approximately 50 picograms to 1 nanogram on selected gas chromatographic columns. Chromatographic columns with 5% phenylmethylsiloxane, polyethylene glycol (wax), trifluoropropylsiloxane, and 78% cyanopropylsiloxane stationary phases were evaluated with a variety of phosphorus- and sulfur- containing compounds selected as test compounds due to their ease of adsorption and importance in trace analytical detection. In addition, the method was shown effective for characterizing column bleed.

  11. Chromatographic determination of the differential isosteric adsorption enthalpies and differential entropies on ordered silica materials.

    PubMed

    Grajek, H; Paciura-Zadrozna, J; Witkiewicz, Z

    2008-06-13

    The adsorption properties of the ordered mesoporous siliceous materials: MCM-41C16 (denoted as C16), MCM-41C16-SH and MCM-41C16-NH(2) (known as MCMs) having different surface functionalities were studied by inverse gas chromatography to assess their suitability for adsorption of analytes from gas and liquid phases. Polar and non-polar adsorbates were employed. The differential isosteric enthalpies, -DeltaH(ads), and differential entropies, -DeltaS(ads), of adsorption of different 'molecular probes' were determined chromatographically. A mathematical link between the -DeltaH(ads), and -DeltaS(ads) magnitudes and experimental data was derived through an Antoine-type equation. The present studies have been entirely restricted to the region of low adsorbate concentration. The problem of the interrelationship between the -DeltaH(ads), and -DeltaS(ads) values, known as the 'thermodynamic compensation effect', and interpretation of chromatographic data for the adsorption of different adsorbates on the MCMs have been considered in the light of both experimental data obtained in the present studies and the data available in the literature for siliceous adsorbents with randomly ordered structures. It was shown chromatographically that there is substantial parallelism between the magnitudes of the differential isosteric enthalpy and differential entropy for some 'molecular probes' chromatographed on C16 and its derivatives. Complementary information was obtained by atomic-force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy.

  12. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Castro, Nathan J; Condon, Brian; Costable, Carmen; Goheen, Steven C

    2012-05-01

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatographic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressings is adsorption and accumulation of proteins like albumin at the solid-liquid interface of the biological fluid and wound dressing fiber. To better understand the effect of fiber charge and molecular modifications in cellulose-containing fibers on the binding of serum albumin as observed in protease sequestrant dressings, albumin binding to modified cotton fibers was compared with traditional and chromatographic isotherms. Modified cotton including carboxymethylated, citrate-crosslinked, dialdehyde and phosphorylated cotton, which sequester elastase and collagenase, were compared for their albumin binding isotherms. Albumin isotherms on citrate-cellulose, cross-linked cotton demonstrated a two-fold increased binding affinity over untreated cotton. A comparison of albumin binding between traditional, solution isotherms and chromatographic isotherms on modified cellulose yielded similar equilibrium constants. Application of the binding affinity of albumin obtained in the in vitro protein isotherm to the in vivo wound dressing uptake of the protein is discussed. The chromatographic approach to assessment of albumin isotherms on modified cellulose offers a more rapid approach to evaluating protein binding on modified cellulose over traditional solution approaches.

  13. Importance of the accuracy of experimental data in the nonlinear chromatographic determination of adsorption energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, B.J.; Guiochon, G. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1994-11-01

    Adsorption energy distributions (AEDs) are calculated from the classical, fundamental integral equation of adsorption using adsorption isotherms and the expectation-maximization method of parameter estimation. The adsorption isotherms are calculated from nonlinear elution profiles obtained from gas chromatographic data using the characteristic points method of finite concentration chromatography. Porous layer open tubular capillary columns are used to support the adsorbent. The performance of these columns is compared to that of packed columns in terms of their ability to supply accurate isotherm data and AEDs. The effect of the finite column efficiency and the limited loading factor on the accuracy of the estimated energy distributions is presented. This accuracy decreases with decreasing efficiency, and approximately 5000 theoretical plates are needed when the loading factor, L[sub f], equals 0.56 for sampling of a unimodal Gaussian distribution. Increasing L[sub f] further increases the contribution of finite efficiency to the AED and causes a divergence at the low-energy endpoint if too high. This occurs as the retention time approaches the holdup time. Data are presented for diethyl ether adsorption on porous silica and its C-18-bonded derivative. 36 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. pH-dependence of single-protein adsorption and diffusion at a liquid chromatographic interface.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Kourentzi, Katerina; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2016-02-01

    pH is a common mobile phase variable used to control protein separations due to the tunable nature of amino acid and adsorbent charge. Like other column variables such as column density and ligand loading density, pH is usually optimized empirically. Single-molecule spectroscopy extracts molecular-scale data to provide a framework for mechanistic optimization of pH. The adsorption and diffusion of a model globular protein, α-lactalbumin, was studied by single-molecule microscopy at a silica-aqueous interface analogous to aqueous normal phase and hydrophilic interaction chromatography and capillary electrophoresis interfaces at varied pH. Electrostatic repulsion resulting in free diffusion was observed at pH above the isoelectric point of the protein. In contrast, at low pH strong adsorption and surface diffusion with either no (D ∼ 0.01 μm(2) /s) or translational (D ∼ 0.3 μm(2) /s) motion was observed where the protein likely interacted with the surface through electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bonding forces. The fraction of proteins immobilized could be increased by lowering the pH. These results show that retention of proteins at the silica interface cannot be viewed solely as an adsorption/desorption process and that the type of surface diffusion, which ultimately leads to ensemble chromatographic separations, can be controlled by tuning long-range electrostatic and short-range hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding forces with pH.

  15. Adsorption saturation and chromatographic distortion effects on passive headspace sampling with activated charcoal in fire debris analysis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mary R; Fernandes, Denise; Bridge, Candice; Dorrien, Derek; Elliott, Stefanie; Sigman, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Distortion of the chromatographic profile obtained for hydrocarbons that have been sampled by adsorption onto activated charcoal is a well-known phenomenon. The work reported here helps to better define the causes of chromatographic profile distortion and offers a potential method to avoid chromatographic distortion in some cases through a subsampling technique. The recovery of hydrocarbons from an equimolar mixture was investigated to determine the influence of hydrocarbon concentration on the molar ratios of recovered components. In a one-quart container, hydrocarbon volumes as small as 24 microL (liquid) were sufficient to saturate the surface area available for adsorption on a 99.0 mm2 square of activated charcoal, resulting in significant distortions in the molar ratio and the chromatographic profile of the recovered hydrocarbons. Passive headspace sampling of a similarly small volume of unweathered gasoline spiked onto carpet padding resulted in a significant distortion of the chromatographic profile. The chromatographic profile of the recovered hydrocarbons closely resembled 75% weathered gasoline. Heating the container spiked with unweathered gasoline to evenly distribute the components and then removing a subsample of the carpet padding to a second container for passive headspace analysis greatly reduced the amount of distortion in the resulting chromatogram.

  16. Time-resolved chromatographic analysis and mechanisms in adsorption and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Roubani-Kalantzopoulou, Fani

    2009-03-06

    The main object of this review is the study of fundamentals of adsorption and heterogeneous catalysis, a benefit for the understanding of adsorptive and catalytic properties. This work aims to define and record, with the utmost accuracy, the phenomena and the possible reactions. A new methodology for the study of the adsorption is presented, which is a version of the well-known inverse gas chromatography. This reversed-flow inverse gas chromatography (RF-IGC) is technically very simple, and it is combined with a mathematical analysis that gives the possibility for the estimation of various physicochemical parameters related to adsorbent or catalyst characterization, under conditions compatible with the operation of real adsorbents and catalysts. On this base, this methodology has been successfully applied to the study of the impact of air pollutants, volatile organic and/or inorganic, on many solids such as marbles, ceramics, oxide-pigments of works of art, building materials, authentic statues of the Greek Archaeological Museums. Moreover, this methodology proved to be a powerful tool for studying the topography of active sites of heterogeneous surfaces in the nano-scale domain. Thus, some very important local quantities for the surface chemistry have been determined experimentally for many solids including thin films. These physicochemical local quantities (among which adsorption energy and entropy, surface diffusion coefficient, probability density function) have been determined from the experimental pairs of height of extra chromatographic peaks and time by a nonlinear least-squares method, through personal computer programs written in GW BASIC and lately in FORTRAN. Through the time-resolved analysis the surface characterization of the examined materials took place. In addition, the kinetic constants responsible for adsorption/desorption and surface chemical reactions have also been calculated. Thus, important answers have been provided to the following

  17. Isolation of organic acids from large volumes of water by adsorption chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, George R.

    1984-01-01

    The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon from most natural waters ranges from 1 to 20 milligrams carbon per liter, of which approximately 75 percent are organic acids. These acids can be chromatographically fractionated into hydrophobic organic acids, such as humic substances, and hydrophilic organic acids. To effectively study any of these organic acids, they must be isolated from other organic and inorganic species, and concentrated. Usually, large volumes of water must be processed to obtain sufficient quantities of material, and adsorption chromatography on synthetic, macroporous resins has proven to be a particularly effective method for this purpose. The use of the nonionic Amberlite XAD-8 and Amberlite XAD-4 resins and the anion exchange resin Duolite A-7 for isolating and concentrating organic acids from water is presented.

  18. Calibration of polydimethylsiloxane and XAD-Pocket passive air samplers (PAS) for measuring gas- and particle-phase SVOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeme, Joseph O.; Saini, Amandeep; Yang, Congqiao; Zhu, Jiping; Smedes, Foppe; Klánová, Jana; Diamond, Miriam L.

    2016-10-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has seen wide use as the stationary phase of gas chromatographic columns, a passive sampler in water, and recently as a personal exposure sampler, while styrene divinyl-benzene copolymer (XAD) has been used extensively as a passive air sampler outdoors and indoors. We have introduced PDMS and XAD-Pocket as new indoor passive air samplers (PASs). The XAD-Pocket was designed to maximize the surface area-to-volume ratio of XAD and to minimize obstruction of air flow by the sampler housing. Methods were developed to expedite the use of these PASs for measuring phthalates, novel brominated flame-retardants (NFRs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) indoors. Sampling rates, Rs, (m3 day-1), were measured during a 7-week calibration study. Variability within and between analyte groups was not statistically significant. As a result, generic values of 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.5 ± 0.3 m3 day-1 dm-2 are recommended for PDMS and XAD-Pocket for a 50-day deployment time, respectively. PDMS has a higher uptake rate and is easier to use than XAD-Pocket.

  19. Adsorption/desorption characteristics and separation of anthocyanins from muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia) juice pomace by use of macroporous adsorbent resins.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Amandeep K; Gu, Liwei

    2013-02-20

    In this study, the adsorption/desorption characteristics of anthocyanins on five Amberlite resins (FPX-66, XAD-7HP, XAD-16N, XAD-1180, and XAD-761) were evaluated. FPX-66 and XAD-16N showed the highest adsorption and desorption capacities and ratios for anthocyanins from muscadine pomace extract, while XAD-7HP had the lowest adsorption and desorption capacities and ratios. On the basis of static adsorption and desorption tests, three resins (FPX-66, XAD-16N, and XAD-1180) were selected for adsorption kinetics and isotherms. The adsorption mechanism was better explained by the pseudo-first-order kinetics for FPX-66 and XAD-16N; however, for XAD-1180, pseudo-second-order kinetics was the most suitable model. The experimental data fitted best to Langmuir isotherm model for all three resins. Dynamic testing was done on a column packed with FPX-66 resin and breakthrough volume was reached at 17 bed volumes of muscadine pomace water extract during adsorption. Three bed volumes of aqueous ethanol (70%) resulted in complete desorption. Resin adsorption resulted in a concentrated pomace extract that contained 13% (w/w) anthocyanins with no detectable sugars.

  20. Preparation of a novel hydrophobic affinity cryogel for adsorption of lipase and its utilization as a chromatographic adsorbent for fast protein liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ünlüer, Özlem Biçen; Özcan, Ayça; Uzun, Lokman

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have prepared a hydrophobic cryogel for the chromatographic separation of lipase from its aqueous solutions including single protein and protein mixture and also Yarrowia lipolytica cell extract. N-methacryloyl-(l)-phenylalanine methyl ester was used as a monomer to provide the hydrophobic character to the prepared cryogels. The highest adsorption capacity was observed at pH 5.0 at 0.5 mL min(-1) flow rate. The chromatographic separation of lipase was achieved from a binary mixture of lipase:bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lipase:lysozyme, and was also achieved from triple-mixture of lipase:lysozyme:BSA by using fast protein liquid chromatography. Finally, lipase purification was performed from Yarrowia lipolytica cell extract used as a natural source. These studies have shown that the hydrophobic cryogel has good chromatographic performance for the separation and purification of lipase not only from aqueous solution, but also from cell extract as a natural source of lipase. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  1. Comparative study of the dynamic gravimetric and pulse chromatographic methods for the determination of Henry constants of adsorption for VOC zeolite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokerman, J.; Canet, X.; Mougin, P.; Limborg-Noetinger, S.; Frère, M.

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a comparative study between a gravimetric apparatus operating under dynamic conditions and a pulse chromatographic device developed for the determination of Henry constants of adsorption for VOC-zeolite systems. In both cases, we provide a description of the experimental set-up and procedure, as well as a complete report on the treatment of the rough experimental data. The experimental errors are also discussed. The comparison work is based on the study of the adsorption of toluene on a NaY zeolite (Si/Al 2.43) for temperatures ranging from 503 to 623 K. The maximal discrepancy found between the experimental Henry constants was 15.0%. The pulse chromatographic method is only dedicated to high-temperature measurements. For low-temperature experiments, the rough data cannot be treated in an efficient way, and it is not possible to obtain reliable Henry constant values. The dynamic gravimetric method is not temperature limited. It is however time-consuming, especially when low-temperature measurements (not presented in this paper) are concerned. Both methods are complementary if the determination of Henry constants is required in a wide temperature range.

  2. Comparison of humic substances isolated from peatbog water by sorption on DEAE-cellulose and amberlite XAD-2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hejzlar, J.; Szpakowska, B.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    Aquatic humic substances (AHS) were isolated from peatbog water by adsorption (1) on diethylaminoethyl cellulose (DEAE-C) and (2) on Amberlite XAD-2 (XAD) to compare yields of the methods and the composition of the isolated AHS. To provide a detailed comparison, the isolates were fractionated using size-exclusion and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography on Sephadex G-50. The fractions were characterized by ultraviolet-visible, infrared and 13C-nuclear magnetic spectroscopies and analyzed for elemental, functional-group, carbohydrate and amino acid compositions. More AHS adsorbed onto DEAE-C than onto XAD-2 (94 and 74%, respectively). However, only 76% of the AHS adsorbed onto DEAE-C was recovered using 0.1 M NaOH, whereas 98% of the AHS adsorbed onto XAD was released by consecutive elution with 1 M NH4OH (91%) and methanol (7%). Four main fractions of different composition were obtained from each of the alkali-desorbed AHS samples by Sephadex-gel chromatography. General agreement was found in relative amounts, spectroscopic characteristics and composition of corresponding fractions of both isolates except nitrogen content, which was significantly higher in AHS isolated with XAD, apparently due to the reaction of AHS with NH4OH used for the desorption from the resin.Aquatic humic substances (AHS) were isolated from peatbog water by adsorption (1) on diethylaminoethyl cellulose (DEAE-C) and (2) on Amberlite XAD-2 (XAD) to compare yields of the methods and the composition of the isolated AHS. To provide a detailed comparison, the isolates were fractionated using size-exclusion and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography on Sephadex G-50. The fractions were characterized by ultraviolet-visible, infrared and 13C-nuclear magnetic spectroscopies and analyzed for elemental, functional-group, carbohydrate and amino acid compositions. More AHS adsorbed onto DEAE-C than onto XAD-2 (94 and 74%, respectively). However, only 76% of the AHS adsorbed onto DEAE-C was recovered

  3. Quantitative evaluation of XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins used in tandem for removing organic solutes from water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.; MacCarthy, P.

    1992-01-01

    The combined XAD-8 and XAD-4 resin procedure for the isolation of dissolved organic solutes from water was found to isolate 85% or more of the organic solutes from Lake Skjervatjern in Norway. Approximately 65% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was first removed on XAD-8 resin, and then an additional 20% of the DOC was removed on XAD-4 resin. Approximately 15% of the DOC solutes (primarily hydrophilic neutrals) were not sorbed or concentrated by the procedure. Of the 65% of the solutes removed on XAD-8 resin, 40% were fulvic acids, 16% were humic acids, and 9% were hydrophobic neutrals. Approximately 20% of the hydrophilic solutes that pass through the XAD-8 resin were sorbed solutes on the second resin, XAD-4 (i.e., they were hydrophobic relative to the XAD-4 resin). The fraction sorbed on XAD-4 resin was called XAD-4 acids because it represented approximately 85-90% of the hydrophilic XAD-8 acid fraction according to the original XAD-8 fractionation procedure. The recovery of hydrophobic acids (fulvic acids and humic acids) and the hydrophobic neutral fraction from XAD-8 resin was essentially quantitative at 96%, 98%, and 86%, respectively. The recovery of XAD-4 acids from the XAD-4 resin was only about 50%. The exact reason for this moderately low recovery is unknown, but could result from ??-?? bonding between these organic solutes and the aromatic matrix of XAD-4. The hydrophobic/hydrophilic solute separation on XAD-8 resin for water from background Side A and Side B of the lake was almost identical at 65 and 67%, respectively. This result suggested that both sides of the lake are similar in organic chemical composition even though the DOC variation from side to side is 20%.

  4. Enrichment and purification of marine polyphenol phlorotannins using macroporous adsorption resins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Yoon, Minseok; Yang, Hyejin; Jo, Jinho; Han, Daeseok; Jeon, You-Jin; Cho, Suengmok

    2014-11-01

    Phlorotannins are one of the most important bioactive polyphenols; however, their purification using chromatographic methods has not been explored. Here, we studied purification of phlorotannins from the crude phlorotannin extract (CPhE) of the brown seaweed Ecklonia cava using macroporous adsorption resins. For purification of phlorotannins, four resins (HP-20, SP-850, XAD-7HP, and XAD-2) were screened. Among them, HP-20 resin showed the highest adsorption and desorption capacities. In static adsorption tests, the adsorption capacity of HP-20 increased with increasing temperature (25-45°C). Optimal conditions for the dynamic experiments can be summarized as follows: total phlorotannin content (TPhC) in loading solution: 1.5mg PGE/mL, processing volume: 4 BV, flow rate: 1 mL/min, temperature: 45°C, desorption solvent: 40% ethanol solution. After purification, TPhC (452 mg PGE/g) and arsenic (180 μg/g) of CPhE increased and decreased to 905 mg PGE/g and 48 μg/g, respectively. Recovery rate of phlorotannins from CPhE was 92%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prediction of the sorption capacities and affinities of organic chemicals by XAD-7.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Qi, Long; Wei, Wei; Wu, Wenhao; Lin, Daohui

    2016-01-01

    Macro-porous resins are widely used as adsorbents for the treatment of organic contaminants in wastewater and for the pre-concentration of organic solutes from water. However, the sorption mechanisms for organic contaminants on such adsorbents have not been systematically investigated so far. Therefore, in this study, the sorption capacities and affinities of 24 organic chemicals by XAD-7 were investigated and the experimentally obtained sorption isotherms were fitted to the Dubinin-Ashtakhov model. Linear positive correlations were observed between the sorption capacities and the solubilities (SW) of the chemicals in water or octanol and between the sorption affinities and the solvatochromic parameters of the chemicals, indicating that the sorption of various organic compounds by XAD-7 occurred by non-linear partitioning into XAD-7, rather than by adsorption on XAD-7 surfaces. Both specific interactions (i.e., hydrogen-bonding interactions) as well as nonspecific interactions were considered to be responsible for the non-linear partitioning. The correlation equations obtained in this study allow the prediction of non-linear partitioning using well-known chemical parameters, namely SW, octanol-water partition coefficients (KOW), and the hydrogen-bonding donor parameter (αm). The effect of pH on the sorption of ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) could also be predicted by combining the correlation equations with additional equations developed from the estimation of IOC dissociation rates. The prediction equations developed in this study and the proposed non-linear partition mechanism shed new light on the selective removal and pre-concentration of organic solutes from water and on the regeneration of exhausted XAD-7 using solvent extraction.

  6. Comparison of XAD macroporous resins for the concentration of fulvic acid from aqueous solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Five macroreticular, nonlonlc AmberlHe XAD resins were evaluated for concentration and Isolation of fulvlc acid from aqueous solution. The capacity of each resin for fulvlc acid was measured by both batch and column techniques. Elution efficiencies were determined by desorptlon with 0.1 N NaOH. Highest recoveries were obtained with the acrylic ester resins which proved to be most efficient for both adsorption and elution of fulvlc acid. Compared to the acrylic ester resins, usefulness of the styrene dvlnybenzene resins to remove fulvlc acid is limited because of slow diffusion-controlled adsorption and formation of charge-transfer complexes, which hinders elution. ?? 1979 American Chemical Society.

  7. Adsorption of pesticides on resins.

    PubMed

    Kyriakopoulos, Grigorios; Hourdakis, Adamadia; Doulia, Danae

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the capability of organic hydrophobic polymeric resins Amberlite XAD-4 and XAD-7 to remove the pesticides alachlor and amitrole from water. The pesticides adsorption on the two different adsorbents was measured by batch equilibrium technique and isotherm types and parameters were estimated. Two theoretical models were applied based on a Freundlich and a Langmuir isotherms. The effect of pesticides chemical composition and structure as well as the nature of solid surface on the efficiency of adsorption was evaluated. The influence of pH also was studied. In low pH solutions adsorption of amitrole was higher upon the nonionic aliphatic acrylic ester copolymer XAD-7 in comparison to the nonionic, crosslinked macroreticular copolymer of styrene divinylbenzene XAD-4. In neutral and intermediate pH solutions the polar acrylic ester copolymer XAD-7 was more effective to the retention of alachlor. The acrylic ester copolymer showed at pH 3 the lower effectiveness in alachlor removal from water. The data of the adsorption isotherms of pesticides upon the examined polymeric resins seemed to conform to both the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherm models.

  8. Sodium citrate and potassium phosphate as alternative adsorption buffers in hydrophobic and aromatic thiophilic chromatographic purification of plasmid DNA from neutralized lysate.

    PubMed

    Bonturi, Nemailla; Radke, Vanessa Soraia Cortez Oliveira; Bueno, Sônia Maria Alves; Freitas, Sindélia; Azzoni, Adriano Rodrigues; Miranda, Everson Alves

    2013-03-01

    The number of studies on gene therapy using plasmid vectors (pDNA) has increased in recent years. As a result, the demand for preparations of pDNA in compliance with recommendations of regulatory agencies (EMEA, FDA) has also increased. Plasmid DNA is often obtained through fermentation of transformed Escherichia coli and purification by a series of unit operations, including chromatography. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and thiophilic aromatic chromatography (TAC), both using ammonium sulfate buffers, are commonly employed with success. This work was aimed at studying the feasibility of utilizing alternative salts in the purification of pDNA from neutralized lysate with phenyl-agarose (HIC) and mercaptopyrimidine-agarose (TAC) adsorbents. Their selectivity toward sc pDNA was evaluated through adsorption studies using 1.5 mol/L sodium citrate and 2.0 mol/L potassium phosphate as adsorption buffers. Chromatography with mercaptopyrimidine-agarose adsorbent and 1.5 mol/L sodium citrate was able to recover 91.1% of the pDNA with over 99.0% removal of gDNA and endotoxin. This represents a potential alternative for the primary recovery of sc pDNA. However, the most promising result was obtained using 2.0 mol/L potassium phosphate buffer and a mercaptopyrimidine-agarose column. In a single chromatographic step, this latter buffer/adsorbent system recovered 68.5% of the pDNA with 98.8% purity in accordance with the recommendations of regulatory agencies with regard to RNA and endotoxin impurity.

  9. Energy-efficient recovery of butanol from model solutions and fermentation broth by adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N; Hughes, S; Maddox, I S; Cotta, M A

    2005-07-01

    This article discusses the separation of butanol from aqueous solutions and/or fermentation broth by adsorption. Butanol fermentation is also known as acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) or solvent fermentation. Adsorbents such as silicalite, resins (XAD-2, XAD-4, XAD-7, XAD-8, XAD-16), bone charcoal, activated charcoal, bonopore, and polyvinylpyridine have been studied. Use of silicalite appears to be the more attractive as it can be used to concentrate butanol from dilute solutions (5 to 790-810 g L(-1)) and results in complete desorption of butanol (or ABE). In addition, silicalite can be regenerated by heat treatment. The energy requirement for butanol recovery by adsorption-desorption processes has been calculated to be 1,948 kcal kg(-1) butanol as compared to 5,789 kcal kg(-1) butanol by steam stripping distillation. Other techniques such as gas stripping and pervaporation require 5,220 and 3,295 kcal kg(-1) butanol, respectively.

  10. Comparison of two polarity measurements of hydrophobic organic matter for the evaluation of water treatment processes: XAD resin and PRAM.

    PubMed

    Philibert, Marc; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando; Suffet, Mel

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a mixture of thousands of organic molecules wide-ranging in molecular weight, polarity and physicochemical properties. DOM is responsible for multiple water treatment issues such as trihalomethane (THM) formation potential and membrane fouling. Two methods of evaluating the polarity of DOM are being used for water treatment application: a serial XAD resin adsorption method at acid pH and the polarity rapid assessment method (PRAM) by parallel solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges at natural pH. These two methods have been described by their authors as able to define a hydrophobic fraction though they do so by sorption onto different types of material at different pHs. The first part of this study compared the PRAM and XAD methods and showed that the hydrophobic fractions defined by the two approaches were not correlated. This result highlighted the difficulties in defining fractions as 'hydrophobic material'. It appeared that the sorbents for XAD-8 (an acrylic polymer containing oxygen) at pH <3 and C-18 (a pure hydrocarbon polymer coating on silica particles) at neutral or pH <3 did not retain similar hydrophobic fractions. This hypothesis was verified by fluorescence spectroscopy of the effluent of the XAD-8 resin and PRAM C-18 SPE cartridge. Finally the study concentrated on the use of fluorescence and ultrafiltration methods in series with PRAM to gain more insight into the structure and characteristics of the hydrophobic DOM present in drinking water sources. This evaluation showed that the smaller molecular weight fraction of DOM (<1 kDa) had a higher percentage of hydrophobic character and that the fluorescence-defined aromatic protein fraction was the most hydrophilic.

  11. Selective adsorption of flavor-active components on hydrophobic resins.

    PubMed

    Saffarionpour, Shima; Sevillano, David Mendez; Van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Noordman, T Reinoud; Brouwer, Eric; Ottens, Marcel

    2016-12-09

    This work aims to propose an optimum resin that can be used in industrial adsorption process for tuning flavor-active components or removal of ethanol for producing an alcohol-free beer. A procedure is reported for selective adsorption of volatile aroma components from water/ethanol mixtures on synthetic hydrophobic resins. High throughput 96-well microtiter-plates batch uptake experimentation is applied for screening resins for adsorption of esters (i.e. isoamyl acetate, and ethyl acetate), higher alcohols (i.e. isoamyl alcohol and isobutyl alcohol), a diketone (diacetyl) and ethanol. The miniaturized batch uptake method is adapted for adsorption of volatile components, and validated with column breakthrough analysis. The results of single-component adsorption tests on Sepabeads SP20-SS are expressed in single-component Langmuir, Freundlich, and Sips isotherm models and multi-component versions of Langmuir and Sips models are applied for expressing multi-component adsorption results obtained on several tested resins. The adsorption parameters are regressed and the selectivity over ethanol is calculated for each tested component and tested resin. Resin scores for four different scenarios of selective adsorption of esters, higher alcohols, diacetyl, and ethanol are obtained. The optimal resin for adsorption of esters is Sepabeads SP20-SS with resin score of 87% and for selective removal of higher alcohols, XAD16N, and XAD4 from Amberlite resin series are proposed with scores of 80 and 74% respectively. For adsorption of diacetyl, XAD16N and XAD4 resins with score of 86% are the optimum choice and Sepabeads SP2MGS and XAD761 resins showed the highest affinity towards ethanol.

  12. Themodynamics of adsorption and patterns of the gas-chromatographic retention of cyclic amines on surfaces of graphitized thermal carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashkina, E. A.; Yashkin, S. N.; Svetlov, D. A.; Gorshkov, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption (TCA) of aniline, cyclohexylamine, and some of their derivatives on surfaces of graphitized thermal carbon black (GTC) are experimentally determined under conditions of gas-adsorption chromatography. It is concluded that the TCA values for the studied compounds depend to a large extent on the features of the geometrical and electronic structure of molecules in the gas phase. The effect of the sp 3- sp 2-rehybridization of nitrogen atoms upon moving from molecules of unsubstituted aniline to N-methyl- and N,N-dimethylanilines are determined, along with the ortho-effects in 2-methyland 2,6-dimethylanilines on the TCA values. It is shown that the above intramolecular effects result in nonadditive contributions to the energy of adsorption of the NH2-group in the a number of the studied compounds. Values of the thermal component of adsorption entropy are calculated, allowing conclusions on the physical state of the molecules of the studied compounds in the field of GTC adsorption forces. The mobility of adsorbate molecules is estimated using models of delocalized and localized adsorption. It is shown that in the series of ortho- meta- para-substituted anilines, the para-isomer is characterized by the highest values of retention on GTC, while the relative order of ortho- and meta-isomer elution is determined by the Van der Waals sizes of substituents in aromatic rings. A conclusion is reached on the high structural selectivity of a GTC surface in respect to positional isomers in the series of studied aniline derivatives.

  13. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of adlay bran free phenolics on macroporous resins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingyun; Zhao, Mouming; Lin, Lianzhu

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of six macroporous resins including XAD-7HP, XAD-16, HP-20, HP-2MGL, SP-207 and SP-825 for enrichment of adlay bran free phenolics were studied. XAD-16, SP-207 and SP-825 were chosen for further study due to their strong adsorption and desorption capacities. XAD-16, SP-207 and SP-825 had similar phenolics adsorption/desorption behaviors. Pseudo-second-order kinetics model and Freundlich isotherm model were suitable for describing the whole exothermic and physical adsorption processes of adlay bran free phenolics on XAD-16, SP-207 and SP-825. After treatment with gradient elution on XAD-16 resin column, the free phenolics were mostly enriched (from 89.61 to 1015.26mg/100g) in 50% ethanol fraction. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity of 50% ethanol fraction was eight times higher than that of the crude extract. Therefore, the production of highly concentrated phenolics might expand the application of adlay bran used as a bioactive ingredient in functional food.

  14. Synergistic adsorption of phenol from aqueous solution onto polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Ming, Zhang W; Long, Chen J; Cai, Pan B; Xing, Zhang Q; Zhang, B

    2006-02-06

    Adsorption of phenol from aqueous solution onto a nonpolar adsorbent, aminated adsorbent and weak base adsorbent (Amberlite XAD4, NDA103 and Amberlite IRA96C, respectively) at temperatures from 293 to 313K was studied for the weak interactions between the phenol molecules and the polymeric adsorbents. Isotherms of Langmuir and Freundlich equation with characteristic parameters for different adsorbents were well fitted to the batch equilibrium adsorption data. The adsorption capacity on NDA103 driven by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interaction together is higher than that on IRA96C driven by hydrogen bonding interaction only and on XAD4 driven by van der Waals interaction only. For evaluating synergistic adsorption for phenol-water systems onto polymeric adsorbents, the adsorption capacity is normalized to the amounts of specific surface area and amino groups of adsorbents. The synergistic effect with other weak interactions would contribute more to the adsorption as acting simultaneously than that of acting individually.

  15. Purification of siderophores of Alcaligenes faecalis on Amberlite XAD.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, R Z; Chincholkar, S B

    2006-05-01

    Studies on siderophore production using Alcaligenes faecalis BCCM ID 2374 revealed hydroxamate and catecholate type of siderophores at 347 microg mL-1. These fractions were purified on Amberlite XAD-4 column, which resulted in the separation of two bands having absorption maxima at 264 and 224 nm. The amount of pure siderophore obtained in powdered form from first and second fraction was 297 and 50 microg mL-1 respectively.

  16. Preliminary feasibility study for the use of an adsorption/bio-regeneration system for molinate removal from effluents.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mónica; Fernandes, Ana; Mendes, Adélio; Manaia, Célia M; Nunes, Olga C

    2004-06-01

    This work studies the feasibility of the use of a combined physical-biological remediation procedure for treatment of effluents contaminated with molinate, where the herbicide is removed through adsorption and biodegraded in a subsequent stage, with the regeneration of the adsorbent. In order to select the most adequate absorbent for molinate, different materials were tested, namely pine bark, activated carbon and resin Amberlite XAD-4. Activated carbon and resin Amberlite XAD-4 were the most efficient on the removal of molinate from solutions, although the activated carbon used proved not to be bio-regenerable. It was also observed that factors such as temperature, pH, and conductivity did not affect significantly molinate adsorption onto resin Amberlite XAD-4. Resin Amberlite XAD-4 was successfully bio-regenerated, being observed that biodegradation was mainly dependent on spontaneous desorption of the molinate. After bio-regeneration, the resin could be re-utilised as adsorbent.

  17. Solid phase extraction and preconcentration of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) on Duolite XAD761 prior to their inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric determination.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Funda Armagan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2007-04-15

    A simple and effective method is presented for the separation and preconcentration of thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) by solid phase extraction on Duolite XAD761 adsorption resin. Thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) 9-phenyl-3-fluorone chelates are formed and adsorbed onto the Duolite XAD761. Thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) are quantitatively eluted with 2molL(-1) HCl and determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The influences of analytical parameters including pH, amount of reagents, amount of Duolite XAD761 and sample volume, etc. were investigated on the recovery of analyte ions. The interference of a large number of anions and cations has been studied and the optimized conditions developed have been utilized for the trace determination of uranium and thorium. A preconcentration factor of 30 for uranium and thorium was achieved. The relative standard deviation (N=10) was 2.3% for uranium and 4.5% for thorium ions for 10 replicate determinations in the solution containing 0.5mug of uranium and thorium. The three sigma detection limits (N=15) for thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) ions were found to be 4.5 and 6.3ngL(-1), respectively. The developed solid phase extraction method was successively utilized for the determination of traces thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) in environmental samples by ICP-MS.

  18. Unfolding and aggregation of a glycosylated monoclonal antibody on a cation exchange column. Part I. Chromatographic elution and batch adsorption behavior.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Zhang, Shaojie; Carta, Giorgio

    2014-08-22

    A glycosylated IgG2 monoclonal antibody exhibits a two-peak elution behavior when loaded on a strong cation exchange column and eluted with either a linear salt gradient or two salt steps at increasing salt concentrations. The two-peak behavior is more pronounced for conditions where the initial antibody binding is stronger, i.e. at lower pH and buffer concentration, where the hold time prior to elution is longer, where the protein mass load is lower, and where the load flow rate is higher. The effect is also dependent on the resin type, being prominent for the polymer-functionalized resin Fractogel EMD SO₃(-) and virtually absent for a macroporous resin with similar backbone but no grafted polymers. Size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering show that the early eluting peak consists exclusively of the native monomeric species while the late eluting peak is a mixture of monomeric and aggregated species. Batch adsorption/desorption experiments show that the bound protein can be desorbed in two steps, with a fraction desorbed in 0.33 M NaCl, corresponding to native monomer, and a second fraction desorbed in 1M NaCl. The latter fraction decreases with protein mass load and becomes almost negligible when the resin is initially completely saturated with protein. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the two-peak elution/desorption behavior is related to the unique kinetics of protein binding in the Fractogel resin. Following partial loading of the resin, the bound protein migrates toward the center of the particles during a hold step and is redistributed across the particle volume attaining low local bound protein concentrations. For these conditions the protein is apparently destabilized forming a strongly-bound unfolded intermediate that, in turn, generates aggregates upon elution in high salt. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of extracts and toxicities of organic compounds in drinking water concentrated by single and composite XAD resins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue; Xiang, Lunhui; Wu, Fenghong; Peng, Xiaoling; Xie, Hong; Wang, Jiachun; Yang, Kedi; Lu, Wenqing; Wu, Zhigang

    2013-12-01

    We compared extracts and toxicities of organic compounds (OCs) in drinking water concentrated by composite XAD-2/8 resin (mixed with an equal volume of XAD-2 and XAD-8 resins) with those extracted by single XAD-2 (non-polar) and XAD-8 (polar) resins. Drinking water was processed from raw water of the Han River and the Yangtze River in Wuhan section, China. The extraction efficiency of all resins was controlled at 30%. The types of extracted OCs were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were assessed by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and comet assays, respectively, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Our results showed that XAD-2/8 extracted a larger variety of OCs, compared with XAD-8 and XAD-2. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of extracted OCs were in the order of XAD-8> XAD-2/8> XAD-2 at almost all tested concentrations after 24 h treatment (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that single XAD resin selectively extracts either polar or non-polar OCs, which would lead to over- or under-estimation of the toxicity of drinking water. Nevertheless, composite resin extracts both polar and non-polar OCs, and could be utilized as a useful extraction technique to evaluate the level and toxicity of OCs in drinking water.

  20. Adsorption properties of macroporous adsorbent resins for separation of anthocyanins from mulberry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Zhang, Weijie; Zhao, Ting; Li, Fang; Zhang, Min; Li, Jing; Zou, Ye; Wang, Wei; Cobbina, Samuel J; Wu, Xiangyang; Yang, Liuqing

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the adsorption/desorption characteristics of mulberry anthocyanins (MA) on five types of macroporous resins (XAD-7HP, AB-8, HP-20, D-101 and X-5) were evaluated, XAD-7HP and AB-8 showed higher adsorption/desorption capacities. On the basis of static adsorption test, XAD-7HP and AB-8 resins were selected for kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamics. The adsorption mechanism indicated that the process was better explained by pseudo-first-order kinetics and the Langmuir isotherm model, and the thermodynamics tests showed that the processes were exothermic, spontaneous and thermodynamically feasible. Dynamic tests were performed on a column packed with XAD-7HP and AB-8, and breakthrough volume was reached at 15 and 14 bed volumes of MA solution, respectively. The purity of the fraction by 40% ethanol elution on XAD-7HP reached 93.6%, from which cyanidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-rutinoside were identified by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The method could be used to prepare high purity anthocyanins from mulberry fruits as well as other plants.

  1. Adsorption characteristics and preparative separation of chaetominine from Aspergillus fumigatus mycelia by macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changqing; Jiao, Ruihua; Yao, Lingyun; Zhang, Yupeng; Lu, Yanhua; Tan, Renxiang

    2016-03-15

    Chaetominine (CHA) is a quinazolinone alkaloid with strong anti-cancer activity produced by Aspergillus fumigatus CY018. For recovering CHA from A. fumigates efficiently, adsorption and desorption capacities of eight macroporous resins were tested in this work. Based on batch experiments, XAD-16 resin was revealed the best adsorption and desorption performance among all the tested resins. Then, adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms were constructed on XAD-16 resin, and the experimental data were fitted well to the pseudo first-order kinetics and Freundlick isotherm model. In the dynamic adsorption and desorption, the purity of CHA increased from 0.0314% (w/w) in the crude extract to 57.86% in the final product with recovery yield of 70.56% by a one-step treatment. Moreover, the experiments were also performed in a lab scale-up scale, in which the purity and recovery of CHA were 56.12% (w/w) and 68.02%, respectively. In addition, XAD-16 resin could be recycled 3 times for CHA separation after regeneration without adverse effects on adsorption/desorption performance. These results suggested that XAD-16 resin adsorption could act as a useful and economic method for recovering CHA from A. fumigatus.

  2. Assessing the presence of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in piggery wastewater and their adsorption behaviour onto solid materials, with a newly developed chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Parpounas, Andreas; Litskas, Vassilis; Hapeshi, Evroula; Michael, Costas; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo

    2017-08-25

    Veterinary antibiotics could enter the environment after the application of manure or farm wastewater on soil as fertilizer. In this study, a UPLC-MS/MS analytical method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of enrofloxacin (ENR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) at environmental relevant concentrations in piggery wastewater, piggery wastewater solids, agricultural soil and ground water with good performance characteristics. The method recovery for ENR and CIP was 94.2 and 89.9% in the filtered piggery wastewater, 81.3 and 82% in the wastewater solid material, 78.1 and 76.8% in the soil and 95.6 and 97.3% in the ground water. The Limit of Detection (LOD) and Limit of Quantification (LOQ) for ENR were 21 and 64 ng L(-1) and for CIP was 18 and 54 ng L(-1), respectively. The method was implemented to monitor ENR and CIP in the wastewater of a piggery facility in Cyprus which applied anaerobic treatment before the final disposal of the reclaimed water. The highest antibiotic concentrations were measured in the wastewater samples collected from the nursery, where ENR is continuously used, with average concentration 31.4 μg L(-1) for ENR and 16.0 μg L(-1) for CIP. After the anaerobic digester, the two antibiotics were found only on the solid matter of the treated wastewater with an average concentration of 1.7 μg kg(-1) for ENR and 1.0 μg kg(-1) for CIP. The antibiotics adsorption at pH = 7 on clay soil, quartz sand and on solid matter isolated from the piggery wastewater was found to be higher than 95% for all solid materials. The concentration of the antibiotics in soil samples taken from a field where reclaimed piggery wastewater was applied for 10 years and in samples of groundwater from a nearby well was found for all samples below the LOD.

  3. New generation Amberlite XAD resin for the removal of metal ions: A review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Akil; Siddique, Jamal Akhter; Laskar, Mohammad Asaduddin; Kumar, Rajeev; Mohd-Setapar, Siti Hamidah; Khatoon, Asma; Shiekh, Rayees Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    The direct determination of toxic metal ions, in environmental samples, is difficult because of the latter's presence in trace concentration in association with complex matrices, thereby leading to insufficient sensitivity and selectivity of the methods used. The simultaneous removal of the matrix and preconcentration of the metal ions, through solid phase extraction, serves as the promising solution. The mechanism involved in solid phase extraction (SPE) depends on the nature of the sorbent and analyte. Thus, SPE is carried out by means of adsorption, ion exchange, chelation, ion pair formation, and so forth. As polymeric supports, the commercially available Amberlite resins have been found very promising for designing chelating matrices due to its good physical and chemical properties such as porosity, high surface area, durability and purity. This review presents an overview of the various works done on the modification of Amberlite XAD resins with the objective of making it an efficient sorbent. The methods of modifications which are generally based on simple impregnation, sorption as chelates and chemical bonding have been discussed. The reported results, including the preconcentration limit, the detection limit, sorption capacity, preconcentration factors etc., have been reproduced. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. A model predictive control approach for the Italian LBE XADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammi, Antonio; Casella, Francesco; Luzzi, Lelio; Milano, Alessandro; Ricotti, Marco E.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, model predictive control (MPC) is applied to the Italian 80 MW th experimental accelerator driven system (XADS), referring to a simple, non-linear model for the dynamic simulation of the plant, which has been developed and described in a previous work [A. Cammi, L. Luzzi, A.A. Porta, M.E. Ricotti, Prog. Nucl. Energ. 48 (2006) 578], in order to describe the interactions among the different subsystems: i.e., the accelerator-core coupling, the lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) primary system, the secondary system with diathermic oil and air coolers batteries, which reject the thermal power to the environment. Hereinafter, a model predictive controller is proposed, with the objective to minimize the difference between the average temperature of the diathermic oil and its reference value, while also minimizing the variations of the control input, which is the air coolers mass flow rate. The dynamic response of the LBE-XADS has been evaluated with reference to a reduction of 20% in the reactor power from nominal load conditions: this transient is very demanding for the overall plant, nevertheless the obtained results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  5. Influences of wind on the uptake of XAD passive air sampler in the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Xiande

    2016-04-01

    The passive air sampler based on XAD-2 resin (XAD-PAS) is a useful tool for studying the long-range atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the remote or high-altitude regions. Due to its opening bottom, the sampling processes of XAD-PAS was influenced by wind or air turbulence. By now, there were no studies focusing on the wind impact on the sampling rates (R values) in field. In this study, three sampling sites in the Tibetan Plateau, a high-altitude region with large range of wind speed (v), were chosen to calibrate XAD-PAS. In the low-wind regions, the R values fitted for the predicted values by ambient tempratrue (T) and air pressure (P). In the windy regions, not only T and P but also v impacted the R values, and an equation for estimating the R values was developed in the windy regions. Air turbulence may introduce the uncertainties of the R values, therefore, the improved type with spoilers on the bottom of XAD-PAS were designed to decrease the uncertainties. The observed R values of the improved XAD-PAS in field were good agreement with the predicted R values only by T^1.75/P, indicating that the improved XAD-PAS can decrease the influence of wind.

  6. Absorption and desorption behaviour of the flavonoids from Glycyrrhiza glabra L. leaf on macroporous adsorption resins.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yi; Zhao, Mouming; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Zhuang, Mingzhu; Chen, Huiping; Feng, Mengying; Lin, Lianzhu

    2015-02-01

    The kinetics of adsorption and desorption behaviours of five macroporous resins for enriching flavonoids from Glycyrrhizaglabra L. leaf were investigated. All five resins showed similar and effective adsorption and desorption properties. A pseudo-second-order kinetics model was suitable for evaluating the whole adsorption process. Additionally, two representative resins (XAD-16 and SP825) were chosen for adsorption thermodynamics study. The adsorption of the representative resins was an exothermic and physical adsorption process. Further column chromatography of XAD-16 and SP825 showed that the total flavonoids (from 16.8% to 55.6% by XAD-16 and to 53.9% by SP825) and pinocembrin (from 5.49% to 15.2% by XAD-16 and to 19.8% by SP825) were enriched in 90% ethanol fractions. Meanwhile, the antioxidant capacities and nitrite-scavenging capacities were 2-3times higher than those of the crude extract. The fractions with high flavonoid and pinocembrin contents could be used as biologically active ingredients in functional food. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 2, 4 dichlorophenol (2, 4-DCP) sorption from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon and polymeric adsorbents and studies on effect of temperature on activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ghatbandhe, A S; Yenkie, M K N

    2008-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), one of the most commonly used chlorophenol, onto bituminous coal based Filtrasorb-400 grade granular activated carbon, were studied in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to temperature. Uptake capacity of activated carbon found to increase with temperature. Langmuir isotherm models were applied to experimental equilibrium data of 2, 4-DCP adsorption and competitive studies with respect to XAD resin were carried out. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir equilibrium model. Adsorbent monolayer capacity 'Q0, Langmuir constant 'b' and adsorption rate constant 'k(a)' were evaluated at different temperatures for activated carbon adsorption. This data was then used to calculate the energy of activation of adsorption and also the thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy of adsorption, deltaG0, enthalpy of adsorption, deltaH0 and the entropy of adsorption deltaS0. The obtained results showed that the monolayer capacity increases with the increase in temperatures. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters showed that adsorption of 2,4 DCP is an endothermic process. Synthetic resin was not found efficient to adsorb 2,4 DCP compared to activated carbon. The order of adsorption efficiencies of three resins used in the study found as XAD7HP > XAD4 > XAD1180.

  8. Batch and column study: sorption of perfluorinated surfactants from water and cosolvent systems by Amberlite XAD resins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feng; Davidsavor, Kerry Jade; Park, Sangyoo; Nakayama, Michio; Phillips, Brian Ray

    2012-02-15

    Amberlite XAD resins have been employed to a great extent as the sorbent for removing or concentrating organic compounds from different matrices. We present for the first time a systematic study on the sorption of perfluorochemical (PFC) surfactants, an emerging class of environmental contaminants, by XAD-7HP (moderately polar) and XAD-2 (nonpolar). The results show that XAD-7HP can strongly sorb PFCs at circumneutral pH; the isotherm-determined linear sorption coefficient can reach 10(6)L/kg. On the other hand, the sorption coefficient for XAD-2 was two orders of magnitude lower than that for XAD-7HP. PFC sorption on XAD-7HP increased with an increase of the perfluorocarbon chain length of PFC and a decrease of the solution pH, indicating the importance of hydrophobic and electrostatic effects. The sorption coefficient for XAD-7HP reduced markedly with increasing fraction of the organic cosolvent (methanol) in the water-cosolvent mixture; however, the trend could not be predicted by a log-linear cosolvency model. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of column test results showed that after regeneration XAD-7HP can be used at least eight times without significant loss of performance. Finally, the experimental results imply that XAD-7HP sorption of shorter-chained PFCs (≤5 perfluorinated carbons) from water can be thermodynamically favorable. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR PRE-CLEANING FILTERS AND XAD-2 (SOP-5.10)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP summarizes the method for pre-cleaning XAD-2 resin and quartz fiber filters. The procedure provides a cleaning method to help reduce potential background contamination in the resin and filters.

  10. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR PRE-CLEANING FILTERS AND XAD-2 (SOP-5.10)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP summarizes the method for pre-cleaning XAD-2 resin and quartz fiber filters. The procedure provides a cleaning method to help reduce potential background contamination in the resin and filters.

  11. Equilibrium and heat of adsorption of diethyl phthalate on heterogeneous adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.M.; Xu, Z.W.; Pan, B.C.; Hong, C.H.; Jia, K.; Jiang, P.J.; Zhang, Q.J.; Pan, B.J.

    2008-09-15

    Removal of phthalate esters from water has been of considerable concern recently. In the present study, the adsorptive removal performance of diethyl phthalate (DEP) from water was investigated with the aminated polystyrene resin (NDA-101) and oxidized polystyrene resin (NDA-702). In addition, the commercial homogeneous polystyrene resin (XAD-4) and acrylic ester resin (Amberlite XAD-7) as well as coal-based granular activated carbon (AC-750) were chosen for comparison. The corresponding equilibrium isotherms are well described by the Freundlich equation and the adsorption capacities for DEP followed the order NDA-702 > NDA-101 > AC-750 > XAD-4 > XAD-7. Analysis of adsorption mechanisms suggested that these adsorbents spontaneously adsorb DEP molecules driven mainly by enthalpy change, and the adsorption process was derived by multiple adsorbent-adsorbate interactions such as hydrogen bonding, {pi}-{pi} stacking, and micropore filling. The information related to the adsorbent surface heterogeneity and the adsorbate-adsorbate interaction was obtained by Do's model. All the results indicate that heterogeneous resins NDA-702 and NDA-101 have excellent potential as an adsorption material for the removal of DEP from the contaminated water.

  12. Adsorption of tannic and gallic acids on a new polymeric adsorbent and the effect of Cu(II) on their removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinnan; Li, Aimin; Xu, Li; Zhou, Yang

    2009-09-30

    In this paper, a new polymeric adsorbent WJN-09 for adsorbing and removing tannic and gallic acids from water was prepared, and its adsorption capacities for these two natural organic acids were tested by using the commercial resins XAD-7, XAD-4 and NDA-7 as references. The adsorption capacities of WJN-09 for tannic and gallic acids were higher than those of XAD-4, XAD-7 and NDA-7 at 303 K, which may be attributed to its amino function groups, pore structure and Zeta potential. The adsorption enthalpy changes DeltaH exhibited that the adsorption of tannic acid by WJN-09 was a chemical and endothermic process. Furthermore, batch kinetic studies indicated that the tannic acid adsorbed to WJN-09 could be fitted well by both pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order adsorption equations, but the intra-particle diffusion played a dominant role in the adsorption of gallic acid. Changes of resin's Zeta potential and acids' average molecular size were observed when Cu(II) was added in solutions, which could explain the significant increase in WJN-09's adsorption capacity for tannic and gallic acids in the presence of Cu(II).

  13. Evaluations of the TiO2/simulated solar UV degradations of XAD fractions of natural organic matter from a bog lake using size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Sergio; Marín, Juan M; Restrepo, Gloria; Frimmel, Fritz H

    2013-09-15

    This work reports on the changes in compositions of humic acids (HAs) and fulvic acids (FAs) during photocatalytic degradation. The HAs and FAs were obtained from the XAD-resin fractionation of natural-organic matter (NOM) from a bog lake (Lake Hohloh, Black Forest, Germany). Degussa P-25 titanium dioxide (TiO2) in a suspension and a solar UV simulator (batch reactor) were used in the experiments. The photocatalytic degradation of the HAs and FAs were monitored using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) equipped with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and ultraviolet (UV254) detection (SEC-DOC and SEC-UV254) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The evolutions of the photocatalytic degradations of the HA and FA fractions were selective. The photocatalytic degradation started with the degradations of high molecular weight compounds with relatively high UV254 absorbances in the HA and FA fractions to yield low molecular weight compounds showing less specific UV254 absorbances. Observance of the same tendency for the original NOM from Lake Hohloh indicates that these XAD-fractions still having complex compound mixtures. However, the larger molecular weight fractions of the FAs showed higher preferential adsorptions onto TiO2, which caused their faster degradation rates. Furthermore, FAs showed a greater reduction of the total THM formation potential (TTHMFP) and the organic halogen compounds adsorbable on activated carbon formation potential (AOXFP), in comparison with the HAs.

  14. The presence of dichloromethane on cleaned XAD-2 resin: A potential problem and solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Holdren, M.W. ); Wilson, N.K. )

    1990-06-01

    Preparation of XAD-2 resin for indoor air sampling with commonly used cleaning methods, such as Soxhlet extraction with dichloromethane (DCM) followed by vacuum drying and nitrogen purging, can lead to elevated DCM levels (> 100 ppb) in the sampled indoor air, which result from DCM remaining in the resin after cleaning. Since DCM is a suspect human carcinogen, indoor human exposure to DCM should be minimized. Several procedures to remove residual DCM after Soxhlet extraction were evaluated. Removal by fluidizing the XAD-2 resin bed in a drying column with a nitrogen stream at 40{degree}C was best. The effectiveness of this procedure was demonstrated in parallel air sampling with a syringe sampler and with a prototype quiet sampler equipped with a quartz fiber filter and an XAD-2 cartridge in series. Sampling was conducted in an office and in residence. With the modified procedures, indoor DCM levels were at typical indoor values. (< 10 ppb).

  15. Presence of dichloromethane on cleaned XAD-2 resin: A potential problem and solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Holdren, M.W.; Wilson, N.K.

    1990-01-01

    Preparation of XAD-2 resin for indoor air sampling with commonly used cleaning methods, such as Soxhlet extraction with dichloromethane (DCM) followed by vacuum drying and nitrogen purging, can lead to elevated DCM levels (>100 ppb) in the sampled indoor air, which result from DCM remaining in the resin after cleaning. Since DCM is a suspect human carcinogen, indoor human exposure to DCM should be minimized. Several procedures to remove residual DCM after Soxhlet extraction were evaluated. Removal by fluidizing the XAD-2 resin bed in a drying column with a nitrogen stream at 40C was best. The effectiveness of this procedure was demonstrated in parallel air sampling with a syringe sampler and with a prototype quiet sampler equipped with a quartz fiber filter and an XAD-2 cartridge in series. Sampling was conducted in an office and in residences. With the modified procedures, indoor DCM levels were at typical indoor values (<10 ppb).

  16. A comparison of surface water natural organic matter in raw filtered water samples, XAD, and reverse osmosis isolates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maurice, P.A.; Pullin, M.J.; Cabaniss, S.E.; Zhou, Q.; Namjesnik-Dejanovic, K.; Aiken, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    This research compared raw filtered waters (RFWs), XAD resin isolates (XAD-8 and XAD-4), and reverse osmosis (RO) isolates of several surface water samples from McDonalds Branch, a small freshwater fen in the New Jersey Pine Barrens (USA). RO and XAD-8 are two of the most common techniques used to isolate natural organic matter (NOM) for studies of composition and reactivity; therefore, it is important to understand how the isolates differ from bulk (unisolated) samples and from one another. Although, any comparison between the isolation methods needs to consider that XAD-8 is specifically designed to isolate the humic fraction, whereas RO concentrates a broad range of organic matter and is not specific to humics. The comparison included for all samples: weight average molecular weight (Mw), number average molecular weight (Mn), polydispersity (??), absorbance at 280nm normalized to moles C (??280) (RFW and isolates); and for isolates only: elemental analysis, % carbon distribution by 13C NMR, and aqueous FTIR spectra. As expected, RO isolation gave higher yield of NOM than XAD-8, but also higher ash content, especially Si and S. Mw decreased in the order: RO>XAD-8>RFW>XAD-4. The Mw differences of isolates compared with RFW may be due to selective isolation (fractionation), or possibly in the case of RO to condensation or coagulation during isolation. 13C NMR results were roughly similar for the two methods, but the XAD-8 isolate was slightly higher in 'aromatic' C and the RO isolate was slightly higher in heteroaliphatic and carbonyl C. Infrared spectra indicated a higher carboxyl content for the XAD-8 isolates and a higher ester:carboxyl ratio for the RO isolates. The spectroscopic data thus are consistent with selective isolation of more hydrophobic compounds by XAD-8, and also with potential ester hydrolysis during that process, although further study is needed to determine whether ester hydrolysis does indeed occur. Researchers choosing between XAD and RO

  17. A comparison of surface water natural organic matter in raw filtered water samples, XAD, and reverse osmosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Patricia A; Pullin, Michael J; Cabaniss, Stephen E; Zhou, Qunhui; Namjesnik-Dejanovic, Ksenija; Aiken, George R

    2002-05-01

    This research compared raw filtered waters (RFWs), XAD resin isolates (XAD-8 and XAD-4), and reverse osmosis (RO) isolates of several surface water samples from McDonalds Branch, a small freshwater fen in the New Jersey Pine Barrens (USA). RO and XAD-8 are two of the most common techniques used to isolate natural organic matter (NOM) for studies of composition and reactivity; therefore, it is important to understand how the isolates differ from bulk (unisolated) samples and from one another. Although, any comparison between the isolation methods needs to consider that XAD-8 is specifically designed to isolate the humic fraction, whereas RO concentrates a broad range of organic matter and is not specific to humics. The comparison included for all samples: weight average molecular weight (Mw), number average molecular weight (Mn), polydispersity (rho), absorbance at 280 nm normalized to moles C (epsilon280) (RFW and isolates); and for isolates only: elemental analysis, % carbon distribution by 13C NMR, and aqueous FTIR spectra. As expected, RO isolation gave higher yield of NOM than XAD-8, but also higher ash content, especially Si and S. Mw decreased in the order: RO > XAD-8 > RFW > XAD-4. The Mw differences of isolates compared with RFW may be due to selective isolation (fractionation), or possibly in the case of RO to condensation or coagulation during isolation. 13C NMR results were roughly similar for the two methods, but the XAD-8 isolate was slightly higher in 'aromatic' C and the RO isolate was slightly higher in heteroaliphatic and carbonyl C. Infrared spectra indicated a higher carboxyl content for the XAD-8 isolates and a higher ester:carboxyl ratio for the RO isolates. The spectroscopic data thus are consistent with selective isolation of more hydrophobic compounds by XAD-8, and also with potential ester hydrolysis during that process, although further study is needed to determine whether ester hydrolysis does indeed occur. Researchers choosing between

  18. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  19. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  20. Calibration and application of a passive air sampler (XAD-PAS) for volatile methyl siloxanes.

    PubMed

    Krogseth, Ingjerd S; Zhang, Xianming; Lei, Ying D; Wania, Frank; Breivik, Knut

    2013-05-07

    Because the atmosphere is key to understanding the environmental behavior of volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS), a variety of reliable air sampling methods are needed. The purpose of this study was to calibrate and evaluate an existing, polystyrene-divinylbenzene copolymeric resin-based passive air sampler (XAD-PAS) for VMS. Sixteen XAD-PAS were deployed for 7-98 days at a suburban site in Toronto, Canada, while the VMS concentration in air was monitored by an active sampling method. This calibration and a subsequent field test further allowed for investigation of the temporal and spatial variability of VMS in the region. Uptake in the XAD-PAS of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and three linear VMS was linear throughout the whole deployment period. Sampling rates were between 0.4 and 0.5 m(3)/day. The XAD-PAS measured ∑VMS concentrations ranged from nondetects in rural areas (n = 3), to 169 ± 49 ng/m(3) in the urban region (n = 21), to levels above 600 ng/m(3) at sewage treatment plants (n = 2). Levels and composition of VMS within the urban area were remarkably uniform in space. Levels, but not composition, were highly variable in time and weakly correlated with temperature, wind speed, and wind direction.

  1. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  2. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, F.T.

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu/sub 5/ type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo/sub 4/ and CaNi/sub 5/, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen cn produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  3. Effect of the ionic strength of a mobile phase on the chromatographic retention and thermodynamic characteristics of the adsorption of enantiomers of α-phenylcarboxylic acids on a chiral adsorbent with grafted antibiotic eremomycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetova, E. N.

    2017-01-01

    The effect the ionic strength of an aqueous ethanol mobile phase containing buffer salt has the on retention and thermodynamics of adsorption of optical isomers of some α-phenylcarboxylic acids on chiral adsorbent Nautilus-E with grafted antibiotic eremomycin is investigated. It is shown that ion exchange processes participate in the adsorption of enantiomers of α-phenylcarboxylic acids. It is established that electrostatic interactions contribute to the retention of enantiomers of α-phenylcarboxylic acids and affect selectivity only slightly. The dependences of retention characteristics, selectivity, and thermodynamic parameters on the concentration of the buffer salt in the eluent are determined. A statistical analysis of enthalpy-entropy compensation is performed, and the compensation effect is shown to be true. It is found that the points corresponding to the investigated adsorbates are distributed over the compensation dependence according to the spatial structural characteristics of molecules.

  4. Application of XAD-4 solid sorbent to the collection of pesticides from water samples: Final report, November 1985-November 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Manning, D.L.

    1987-10-01

    This report summarizes work done to evaluate the efficiency of XAD-4 resin for removing pesticides from water for subsequent analysis. A limited number of pesticides, including lindane, aldrin, and 4,4'-DDT, were added to water, extracted by elution on XAD-4, and analyzed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection. The method was found to be reasonably effective, at least for semiquantitative purposes.

  5. Chromatographic Degradation of Phloridzin

    PubMed Central

    Grochowska, Maria J.

    1966-01-01

    Phloridzin, the main phenolic glucoside in apple leaves, has been found to undergo transformation during chromatography. When chromatographed repeatedly in ammoniacal solvents, at least 2 new derivatives appeared. One of these was identified as phloretic acid. When bioassayed in the presence of indole-3-acetic acid this substance behaved as though it promoted the destruction of the auxin. Comparative bioassay with naphthaleneacetic acid suggested that phloretic acid acts on indoleacetic acid destruction via stimulation of indoleacetic acid oxidase. However, at low concentration and in presence of a small amount of phloridzin it also showed a synergistic effect with indoleacetic acid. A substance with the same characteristics was obtained directly from apple leaves, which are known to contain phloridzin when the extracts were chromatographed only once in the same (alkaline) solvent. While not completely confirmed, this suggests that phloretic acid is normally present in apple leaves, where it may affect growth there by promoting indoleacetic acid oxidation. Images PMID:16656273

  6. Gas chromatograph injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Henderson, M. E.; Donaldson, R. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An injection system for a gas chromatograph is described which uses a small injector chamber (available in various configurations). The sample is placed in the chamber while the chamber is not under pressure and is not heated, and there is no chance of leakage caused by either pressure or heat. It is injected into the apparatus by changing the position of a valve and heating the chamber, and is volatilized and swept by a carrier gas into the analysis apparatus.

  7. AMS radiocarbon age for fossil bone by XAD-2 chromatography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Masayo; Nakamura, Toshio

    2000-10-01

    The XAD-2 chromatography method was examined for its ability to efficiently eliminate exogenous organic matter from fossil bones and to improve the accuracy of radiocarbon ( 14C) dating and stable isotope determinations on bone proteins. The fossil bones used in the experiment were animal fossil bones collected from the Awazu submarine archaeological site, Shiga, Japan. For comparison, the gelatin-extraction method was also applied to the same samples. It was found that the gelatin-extraction method is sufficient for 14C dating on well-preserved bones, but insufficient on poorly preserved bones, containing less than 1% extractable gelatin. The XAD-2 resin is useful for the clean up of proteins especially from poorly preserved bones. The carbon stable isotope fractionation of around 1‰ by XAD-2 treatment on modern collagen standards was larger than reported previously. The isotopic variation by sequential extraction of bones probably originates from changes in the amino acid composition and seems to be less sensitive to the indication of the removal of organic contamination.

  8. Chromatographic methods of fractionation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, A D

    1987-01-01

    Chromatography's functional versatility, separation efficiency, gentle non-denaturing separating process and ease of automation and scale-up make it attractive for industrial scale protein purification. The Winnipeg Rh Institute's new Plasma Fractionation facility is an example of the use of chromatography for the large scale purification of plasma protein fractions. The fractionation facility has a capacity to process 800 litres of plasma per batch into blood clotting factor VIII and IX, albumin and intravenous immune serum globulin (i.v. ISG). Albumin and i.v. ISG are purified using ion exchange columns of DEAE-Sepharose (230 litre size), DEAE-Biogel (150 litre size) and CM-Sepharose (150 litre size). The chromatographic process is automated using a Modicon 584 Programmable Logic Controller to regulate valves, pumps and sensors which control plasma flow during fractionation. The stainless steel tanks and piping are automatically cleaned-in-place. The high degree of automation and cleaning provides efficient operation and sanitary processing. Chromatographic methods (DEAE-Sepharose and metal chelation) are also being used at the pilot scale to purify the human blood products superoxide dismutase and hemoglobin from outdated red blood cells. Characterization of the protein fractions produced by chromatography has shown them to be of equal or higher quality than fractions produced by other techniques.

  9. Sorption of a diverse set of organic chemical vapors onto XAD-2 resin: Measurement, prediction and implications for air sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Stephen J.; Lei, Ying D.; Wania, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The wide-spread use of styrene-divinylbenzene-copolymeric resin (XAD-2) in air sampling necessitates a quantitative understanding of its sorption characteristics for organic chemicals. Inverse Gas Chromatography (IGC) was used to measure the sorption of a diverse set of 52 organic chemicals to XAD-2 at temperatures between 40 °C and 100 °C and at relative humidities between 0 and 87%. Even though relative humidity has been shown to influence sorption to other sorbents, it did not significantly influence most chemicals' sorption to XAD-2, indicating that water does not form a strong physical barrier to sorption on XAD-2 at high relative humidity. The resin-air partition coefficients ( KXAD) determined by IGC and the enthalpies of sorption derived from them were regressed against solute descriptors to derive poly-parameter Linear Free Energy Relationships (ppLFERs) which allow the estimation of KXAD for chemicals which are not sufficiently volatile to be amenable to IGC and for temperatures outside the experimental range. KXAD values at 20 °C estimated for a set of 296 chemicals for which solute descriptors are available, including polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and pesticides, indicate that for many of the substances commonly found in the atmosphere sorption is higher to XAD-2 than to poly-urethane foam, another popular air sampling sorbent.

  10. Basicity of aromatic amines from liquid chromatographic behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Mcnair, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic investigation was conducted to determine whether the adsorption of weakly basic aromatic amines on slightly acidic silica gel adsorbents could be used to study their relative basicity. Under proper conditions, a linear correlation between pKb and log of capacity factor was observed. This finding may prove useful in helping to predict the relative basicity of closely related aromatic diamines, especially new amines being synthesized for polymer synthesis.

  11. Permeabilization and in situ adsorption studies during growth and coumarin production in hairy root cultures of Cichorium intybus L.

    PubMed

    Bais, H P; Sudha, G; Suresh, B; Ravishankar, G A

    2001-06-01

    Effect of addition of a permeabilizing agent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and a solid adsorbent, XAD -7, on growth and coumarin production in hairy root cultures of C. intybus was studied. Continuous permeabilization of the hairy root cultures of C. intybus with DMSO has been shown to be an effective strategy for enhanced release of coumarins while preserving the root viability. DMSO at 0.2% (v/v) level showed the maximum growth and coumarin production but was less as compared to control on day 28. Treatment of cells with increasing concentrations of DMSO (0.3 - 0.6 % v/v) to hairy root cultures of C. intybus, showed an inverse relationship with growth and coumarin production. Growth and production of coumarins increased with 1% media filtrate (MF) of cultures of Phytopthora parasitica var. nicotiana treatment. It was observed that treatment with DMSO (0.2% v/v) and 1% MF of P. parasitica showed the better growth and coumarin production with an increased release of coumarins as compared to the control and other treatments. It was observed that treatment of hairy root cultures with XAD-7 resulted in lesser growth and coumarin production as compared to control during the culture period. Addition of XAD-7 along with 1% MF of P. parasitica showed enhanced growth, coumarin production and increased adsorption as compared to control and lone XAD-7 treatment. Combined addition of DMSO/XAD-7 with fungal elicitor showed synergistic response in terms of biomass and coumarin production. Excretion of coumarins in both the cases was dependent on the presence of DMSO/XAD-7. These results showed that continuous permeabilization of hairy root cultures of C. intybus by using DMSO at 0.2% (v/v) level coupled with 1% MF of P. parasitica maintained viability of tissues and produced coumarins at higher level.

  12. Quinalizarin anchored on Amberlite XAD-2. A new matrix for solid-phase extraction of metal ions for flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M; Rathore, D P; Singh, A K

    2001-06-01

    Amberlite XAD-2 has been functionalized by coupling it to quinalizarin [1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthraquinone] by means of an -N = N- spacer. Elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and infrared spectra were used to characterize the resulting new polymer matrix. The matrix has been used to preconcentrate Cu(II), Cd(II), Co(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and Mn(II) before their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). UO2(II) has been preconcentrated for fluorimetric determination. The optimum pH values for maximum adsorption of the metals are between 5.0 and 7.0. All these metal ions are desorbed (recovery 91-99%) with 4 mol L(-1) HNO3. The adsorptive capacity of the resin was found to be in the range 0.94-5.28 mg metal g(-1) resin and loading half-life (t1/2) between 5.3 and 15.0 min. The effects of NaF, NaCl, NaNO3, Na2SO4, Na3PO4, Ca(II), and Mg(II) on the adsorption of these metal ions (0.2 microg mL(-1)) are reported. The lower limits of detection for these metal ions are between 1 and 15.0 microg L(-1). After enrichment on this matrix flame AAS has been used to determine these metal ions (except the uranyl ion) in river water samples (RSD < or = 6.5%); fluorimetry was used to determine uranyl ion in well water samples (RSD < or = 6.3%). Cobalt from pharmaceutical vitamin tablets was preconcentrated by use of this chelating resin and estimated by FAAS (RSD approximately 4%).

  13. XadM, a novel adhesin of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, exhibits similarity to Rhs family proteins and is required for optimum attachment, biofilm formation, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Binod B; Ranjan, Manish; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2012-09-01

    By screening a transposon-induced mutant library of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice, we have identified a novel 5.241-kb open reading frame (ORF) named xadM that is required for optimum virulence and colonization. This ORF encodes a protein, XadM, of 1,746 amino acids that exhibits significant similarity to Rhs family proteins. The XadM protein contains several repeat domains similar to a wall-associated surface protein of Bacillus subtilis, which has been proposed to be involved in carbohydrate binding. The role of XadM in X. oryzae pv. oryzae adhesion was demonstrated by the impaired ability of an xadM mutant strain to attach and form biofilms. Furthermore, we show that XadM is exposed on the cell surface and its expression is regulated by growth conditions and plays an important role in the early attachment and entry inside rice leaves. Interestingly, XadM homologs are present in several diverse bacteria, including many Xanthomonas spp. and animal-pathogenic bacteria belonging to Burkholderia spp. This is the first report of a role for XadM, an Rhs family protein, in adhesion and virulence of any pathogenic bacteria.

  14. Microfabricated packed gas chromatographic column

    DOEpatents

    Kottenstette, Richard; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-16

    A new class of miniaturized gas chromatographic columns has been invented. These chromatographic columns are formed using conventional micromachining techniques, and allow packed columns having lengths on the order of a meter to be fabricated with a footprint on the order of a square centimeter.

  15. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    1996-01-01

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  16. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  17. Field Calibration of XAD-Based Passive Air Sampler on the Tibetan Plateau: Wind Influence and Configuration Improvement.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Xiande; Wania, Frank

    2017-05-16

    The passive air sampler based on XAD-2 resin (XAD-PAS) has proven useful for collecting atmospheric persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in remote regions. Whereas laboratory studies have shown that, due to the open bottom of its housing, the passive sampling rate (PSR) of the XAD-PAS is susceptible to wind and other processes causing air turbulence, the sampler has not been calibrated in the field at sites experiencing high winds. In this study, the PSRs of the XAD-PAS were calibrated at three sites on the Tibetan Plateau, covering a wide range in temperature (T), pressure (P) and wind speed (v). At sites with low wind speeds (i.e., in a forest and an urban site), the PSRs are proportional to the ratio T(1.75)/ P; at windy sites with an average wind speed above 3 m/s, the influence of v on PSRs cannot be ignored. Moreover, the open bottom of the XAD-PAS housing causes the PSRs to be influenced by wind angle and air turbulence caused by sloped terrain. Field calibration, wind speed measurements, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations indicate that a modified design incorporating an air spoiler consisting of 4 metal sheets dampens the turbulence caused by wind angle and sloped terrain and caps the PSR at ∼5 m(3)/day, irrespective of ambient wind. Therefore, the original XAD-PAS with an open bottom is suitable for deployment in urban areas and other less windy places, the modified design is preferable in mountain regions and other places where air circulation is complicated and strong.

  18. Preparation of a novel magnetic microporous adsorbent and its adsorption behavior of p-nitrophenol and chlorotetracycline.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Zhou, Qing; Li, Aimin; Shuang, Chendong; Shi, Qianqian; Zhang, Mancheng

    2014-02-15

    A novel method for fabricating hypercrosslinked magnetic polymer beads with improved acid resistance was developed. Magnetite nanoparticles were covered with tetraethoxysilane and vinyltriethoxysilane, followed by co-polymerization and post-crosslinking. The resulting M150 beads were highly stable at pH ≥ 2 and were superparamagnetic, with a saturation magnetization of 3.1 emu/g. M150 exhibited a specific surface area of 1022.4m(2)/g and an average pore width of 2.6 nm. The adsorption of p-nitrophenol and chlorotetracycline (CTC) onto M150 and the commercial non-magnetic resins NDA 150 and XAD-4 followed both pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations. M150 displayed much faster kinetics than the other resins because of its small particle size and abundant macropores. The adsorption isotherm of p-nitrophenol onto the three resins fitted the Freundlich equation (R(2)>0.98), whereas CTC adsorption was better described by the Langmuir isotherm. p-Nitrophenol adsorption was optimal at pH ≤ 4, whereas CTC adsorption was optimal at pH 5-6. All three sorbents showed high reusability for p-nitrophenol adsorption. XAD-4 demonstrated the highest reusability for CTC. The CTC adsorption capacities of M150 and NDA150 decreased by 12.42% and 20% after 10 adsorption-desorption cycles, respectively.

  19. Multilayer adsorption on fractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Péter; Felinger, Attila

    2014-01-10

    Multilayer adsorption is often observed in liquid chromatography. The most frequently employed model for multilayer adsorption is the BET isotherm equation. In this study we introduce an interpretation of multilayer adsorption measured on liquid chromatographic stationary phases based on the fractal theory. The fractal BET isotherm model was successfully used to determine the apparent fractal dimension of the adsorbent surface. The nonlinear fitting of the fractal BET equation gives us the estimation of the adsorption equilibrium constants and the monolayer saturation capacity of the adsorbent as well. In our experiments, aniline and proline were used as test molecules on reversed phase and normal phase columns, respectively. Our results suggest an apparent fractal dimension 2.88-2.99 in the case of reversed phase adsorbents, in the contrast with a bare silica column with a fractal dimension of 2.54. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of uranium, thorium, and zirconium using the partial least squares method after their preconcentration by alpha-benzoin oxime modified Amberlite XAD-2000 resin.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Jahan B; Zolfonoun, E

    2010-01-15

    A new solid phase extraction method for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of uranium, thorium, and zirconium in water samples is proposed. The procedure is based on the adsorption of U(VI), Th(IV) and Zr(IV) ions on a column of Amberlite XAD-2000 resin loaded with alpha-benzoin oxime prior to their simultaneous spectrophotometric determination with Arsenazo III using orthogonal signal correction partial least squares method. The enrichment factor for preconcentration of uranium, thorium, and zirconium was found to be 100. The detection limits for U(VI), Th(IV) and Zr(IV) were 0.50, 0.54, and 0.48microgL(-1), respectively. The precision of the method, evaluated as the relative standard deviation obtained by analyzing a series of 10 replicates, was below 4% for all elements. The practical applicability of the developed sorbent was examined using synthetic seawater, natural waters and ceramic samples.

  1. Investigation into adsorption mechanisms of sulfonamides onto porous adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiben; Zheng, Fangfang; Xue, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yiping

    2011-10-15

    The presence of sulfonamide antibiotics in aquatic environments poses potential ecological risks and dangers to human health. In this study, porous resins as adsorbents for the removal of two sulfonamides, sulfadiazine and sulfadimidine, from aqueous solutions were evaluated. Activated carbon F-400 was included as a comparative adsorbent. Despite the different surface properties and pore structures of the three resins, similar patterns of pH-dependent adsorption were observed, implying the importance of sulfonamide molecular forms to the adsorption process on the resins. Sulfonamide adsorption to the three resins exhibited different ionic strengths and temperature dependence consistent with sulfonamide speciation and the corresponding adsorption mechanism. Adsorption of sulfadiazine to F-400 was relatively insensitive to pH and ionic strength as micropore-filling mainly contributed to adsorption. The adsorption mechanism of sulfadiazine to the hypercrosslinked resin MN-200 was similar to that of the macroporous resin XAD-4 at lower pH values, whereas it was almost identical to the aminated resin MN-150 at higher pH. This work provided an understanding of adsorption behavior and mechanism of sulfonamide antibiotics on different adsorbents and should result in more effective applications of porous resin for antibiotics removal from industrial wastewater. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. N-benzoyl-n-phenylhydroxylamine impregnated Amberlite XAD-4 beads for selective removal of thorium.

    PubMed

    Chandramouleeswaran, S; Ramkumar, Jayshree

    2014-09-15

    n-Benzoyl-n-phenylhydroxylamine impregnated Amberlite XAD-4 beads were used for the removal of Th(IV) from a mixture of ions. The impregnated XAD was characterized using different techniques like weight and colour change, IR spectra, surface area and pore size measurements to confirm the presence of n-BPHA within the macroreticular resin structure. The experimental conditions were optimized to make the separation fast and selective. It was seen that the maximum sorption was achieved in the pH range of 3-7.5 and uptake was nearly complete within half an hour. The results obtained in the present study were subjected to extensive modelling in order to get a complete understanding of the sorption process. It is seen that the maximum uptake was calculated to be 500 mg/g and has very fast kinetics it was seen that the process is chemisorption. It was further deduced from the modelling that the overall sorption process was controlled dominantly by external mass transfer. Considering the simplicity this procedure, the present study has a possible application for the removal of thorium from different mixtures.

  3. Model-based design of peptide chromatographic purification processes.

    PubMed

    Gétaz, David; Stroehlein, Guido; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-04-05

    In this work we present a general procedure for the model-based optimization of a polypeptide crude mixture purification process through its application to a case of industrial relevance. This is done to show how much modeling can be beneficial to optimize complex chromatographic processes in the industrial environment. The target peptide elution profile was modeled with a two sites adsorption equilibrium isotherm exhibiting two inflection points. The variation of the isotherm parameters with the modifier concentration was accounted for. The adsorption isotherm parameters of the target peptide were obtained by the inverse method. The elution of the impurities was approximated by lumping them into pseudo-impurities and by regressing their adsorption isotherm parameters directly as a function of the corresponding parameters of the target peptide. After model calibration and validation by comparison with suitable experimental data, Pareto optimizations of the process were carried out so as to select the optimal batch process.

  4. A mass transfer model for the fixed-bed adsorption of ferulic acid onto a polymeric resin: axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion.

    PubMed

    Davila-Guzman, Nancy E; Cerino-Córdova, Felipe J; Soto-Regalado, Eduardo; Loredo-Cancino, Margarita; Loredo-Medrano, José A; García-Reyes, Refugio B

    2016-08-01

    In this study, amberlite XAD-16 (XAD-16) bed column system was used to remove ferulic acid (FA) from aqueous solutions. Laboratory-scale column experiments were conducted in downflow fixed bed at initial FA concentration of 1 g/L, initial pH 3, and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbent bed under different flow rates (1.3-7.7 mL/min) was studied. The bed utilization efficiency was in the range of 64.64-72.21% at the studied flow rates. A mass transfer model considering both axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion was developed to predict the breakthrough curves of FA adsorption on XAD-16. This model predicted the experimental data better than Bohart-Adams model and Thomas model, based on the low deviation between predicted and experimental data. The axial dispersion coefficient value varied from 6.45 × 10(-6) to 1.10 × 10(-6) m(2)/s at flow rate from 1.3 to 7.7 mL/min, whereas the intraparticle diffusion coefficient was 1.04 × 10(-10) m(2)/s, being this last resistance the rate-limiting step. In conclusion, axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion phenomena play the major role in predicting the adsorption of FA onto XAD-16 in fixed-bed columns.

  5. Isolation of organic acids from large volumes of water by adsorption on macroporous resins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, George R.; Suffet, I.H.; Malaiyandi, Murugan

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption on synthetic macroporous resins, such as the Amberlite XAD series and Duolite A-7, is routinely used to isolate and concentrate organic acids from forge volumes of water. Samples as large as 24,500 L have been processed on site by using these resins. Two established extraction schemes using XAD-8 and Duolite A-7 resins are described. The choice of the appropriate resin and extraction scheme is dependent on the organic solutes of interest. The factors that affect resin performance, selectivity, and capacity for a particular solute are solution pH, resin surface area and pore size, and resin composition. The logistical problems of sample handling, filtration, and preservation are also discussed.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and adsorption performance of a novel post-crosslinked adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaowei; Yao, Hongjie; Ma, Ning; Fan, Yunge; Wang, Chunhong; Shi, Rongfu

    2011-02-01

    In this paper a post-crosslinked polymeric adsorbent PDHT-2 with high specific surface area was prepared by Friedel-Crafts reaction of the pendant vinyl groups without an externally added crosslinking agent. It was obvious that both the specific surface area and the pore volume of starting copolymer PDHT-1 increased significantly after post-crosslinking. Batch adsorption runs of phenol from aqueous solution onto adsorbent PDHT-1 and PDHT-2 were researched, and commercial macroporous resin XAD-4 was chosen for comparison purpose. Experimental results showed that the adsorption isotherms could be fitted by Langmuir model and Freundlich model and the adsorption capacity onto PDHT-2 was much larger than that onto PDHT-1 and XAD-4 with respect to phenol and phenolic compound, which possibly resulted from its larger specific surface area. The adsorption process for phenol onto the three adsorbents was proved to be exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The thermodynamic parameters such as Gibb's free energy (ΔG), change in enthalpy (ΔH) and change in entropy (ΔS) had been calculated. The adsorption kinetic curves obeyed the pseudo-second order model and the intraparticle diffusion process was the rate-controlling step.

  7. Radioimmunological screening and gas chromatographic determination of morphine and related narcotic analgesics in post mortem blood.

    PubMed

    Cimbura, G; Koves, E

    1981-01-01

    A sensitive, reproducible, and relatively specific procedure is presented for the screening, identification, and quantitation of morphine, hydromorphone, codeine, oxycodone, and hydrocodone in autopsy blood. The drugs are isolated from whole blood by adsorption on an XAD-2 resin slurry and subsequent elution with an organic solvent mixture. Part of the resin extract is screened for morphine and related cross-reacting compounds by a commercially available radioimmunoassay (RIA) and the remainder of the same extract is analyzed by gas chromatography using a nitrogen/phosphorus detector (GC/NP). The procedure has been used frequently in forensic toxicological casework. Since toxic blood concentrations of hydrocodone have not been well documented, the results of toxicological examination of two fatalities involving this drug are presented.

  8. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1985-01-01

    A chromatographic system that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a non-transparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extremely low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  9. Dual liquid and gas chromatograph system

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    A chromatographic system is described that utilizes one detection system for gas chromatographic and micro-liquid chromatographic determinations. The detection system is a direct-current, atmospheric-pressure, helium plasma emission spectrometer. The detector utilizes a nontransparent plasma source unit which contains the plasma region and two side-arms which receive effluents from the micro-liquid chromatograph and the gas chromatograph. The dual nature of this chromatographic system offers: (1) extreme flexibility in the samples to be examined; (2) extreme low sensitivity; (3) element selectivity; (4) long-term stability; (5) direct correlation of data from the liquid and gas samples; (6) simpler operation than with individual liquid and gas chromatographs, each with different detection systems; and (7) cheaper than a commercial liquid chromatograph and a gas chromatograph.

  10. Deconvolution of gas chromatographic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, S.; Rayborn, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    The use of deconvolution methods on gas chromatographic data to obtain an accurate determination of the relative amounts of each material present by mathematically separating the merged peaks is discussed. Data were obtained on a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. Chromatograms of five xylenes with differing degrees of separation were generated by varying the column temperature at selected rates. The merged peaks were then successfully separated by deconvolution. The concept of function continuation in the frequency domain was introduced in striving to reach the theoretical limit of accuracy, but proved to be only partially successful.

  11. Preliminary numerical analysis of improved gas chromatograph model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodrow, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for the gas chromatograph was developed which incorporates the heretofore neglected transport mechanisms of intraparticle diffusion and rates of adsorption. Because a closed-form analytical solution to the model does not appear realizable, techniques for the numerical solution of the model equations are being investigated. Criteria were developed for using a finite terminal boundary condition in place of an infinite boundary condition used in analytical solution techniques. The class of weighted residual methods known as orthogonal collocation is presently being investigated and appears promising.

  12. Application of XAD-resin based passive air samplers to assess local (roadside) and regional patterns of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Paul; Thuens, Sabine; Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Westgate, John N; Wania, Frank; Radke, Michael

    2012-07-01

    We used XAD-resin based passive air samplers (PAS) to measure atmospheric levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at five ombrotrophic bogs in Eastern Canada. The aims of our study were to investigate the influence of local roads on contaminant levels in the bogs, to derive the regional pattern of atmospheric concentrations, and to assess the uncertainties of the method. Expanded uncertainties based on the duplicate PAS deployed at 24 sites were good for the PAHs, while the deployment period of approx. 100 days was too short to yield acceptable uncertainties for PCBs. The regional PAH distribution was in good agreement with the calculated source proximity of the sampled bogs. We conclude that XAD-resin based PAS deployed for comparatively short periods are well suited for measuring atmospheric concentrations of volatile PAHs, while in remote regions longer deployment is necessary for less volatile PAHs and for PCBs.

  13. A Simplified Method for Sampling and Analysis of High Volume Surface Water for Organic Contaminants Using XAD-2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Datta, S.; Do, L.V.; Young, T.M.

    2004-01-01

    A simple compressed-gas driven system for field processing and extracting water for subsequent analyses of hydrophobic organic compounds is presented. The pumping device is a pneumatically driven pump and filtration system that can easily clarify at 4L/min. The extraction device uses compressed gas to drive filtered water through two parallel XAD-2 resin columns, at about 200 mL/min. No batteries or inverters are required for water collection or processing. Solvent extractions were performed directly in the XAD-2 glass columns. Final extracts are cleaned-up on Florisil cartridges without fractionation and contaminants analyzed by GC-MS. Method detection limits (MDLs) and recoveries for dissolved organic contaminants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and pesticides are reported along with results of surface water analysis for the San Francisco Bay, CA.

  14. Comparison of the mutagenic activity of XAD4 and blue rayon extracts of surface water and related drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Kummrow, Fábio; Rech, Celia M; Coimbrão, Carlos A; Roubicek, Deborah A; Umbuzeiro, Gisela de A

    2003-11-10

    The combination of mutagenicity tests and selective extraction methodologies can be useful to indicate the possible classes of genotoxic organic contaminants in water samples. Treated and source water samples from two sites were analyzed: a river under the influence of an azo dye-processing plant discharge and a reservoir not directly impacted with industrial discharges, but contaminated with untreated domestic sewage. Organic extraction was performed in columns packed with XAD4 resin, that adsorbs a broad class of mutagenic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), arylamines, nitrocompounds, quinolines, antraquinones, etc., including the halogenated disinfection by-products; and with blue rayon that selectively adsorbs polycyclic planar structures. The organic extracts were tested for mutagenicity with the Salmonella assay using TA98 and TA100 strains and the potencies were compared. A protocol for cleaning the blue rayon fibers was developed and the efficiency of the reused fibers was analyzed with spiked samples. For the river water samples under the influence of the azo-type dye-processing plant, the mutagenicity was much higher for both blue rayon and XAD4 extracts when compared to the water from the reservoir not directly impacted with industrial discharges. For the drinking water samples, although both sites showed mutagenic responses with XAD4, only samples from the site under the influence of the industrial discharge showed mutagenic activity with the blue rayon extraction, suggesting the presence of polycyclic compounds in those samples. As expected, negative results were found with the blue rayon extracts of the drinking water collected from the reservoir not contaminated with industrial discharges. In this case, it appears that using the blue rayon to extract drinking water samples and comparing the results with the XAD resin extracts we were able to distinguish the mutagenicity caused by industrial contaminants from the halogenated

  15. Sulfinylcalix[4]arene-impregnated amberlite XAD-7 resin for the separation of niobium(V) from tantalum(V).

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Yasuno, Shizu; Iki, Nobuhiko; Miyano, Sotaro

    2005-10-07

    Amberlite XAD-7 resin was impregnated with p-tert-butylsulfinylcalix[4]arene. Niobium(V) was collected on the impregnated resin in yields of more than 90% around pH 5.4, whereas tantalum(V) was negligibly collected. The collected niobium(V) was desorbed with 9 M sulfuric acid nearly quantitatively, hence the separation of niobium(V) from tantalum(V) was successfully achieved.

  16. Regulation of isoflavone production in hydroponically grown Pueraria montana (kudzu) by cork pieces, XAD-4, and methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Kirakosyan, Ara; Kaufman, Peter B; Chang, Soo Chul; Warber, Sara; Bolling, Steven; Vardapetyan, Hrachik

    2006-12-01

    A mini-hydroponic growing system was employed for seedlings of kudzu vine (Pueraria montana) and contents of isoflavones (daidzein, genistein, daidzin, genistin, and puerarin) from shoot and root parts of seedlings were analyzed quantitatively. In addition, exogenous cork pieces, polymeric adsorbent, XAD-4, and universal elicitor, methyl jasmonate (MeJA), were used to regulate the production of these isoflavones. It was shown that cork pieces up-regulate the production of daidzein and genistein up to seven- and eight-fold greater than the levels obtained for control roots. In contrast, levels of glucosyl conjugates, daidzin and genistin, decrease up to five- and eight-fold, respectively. Cork treatment also induces the excretion of the root isoflavone constituents into the growth medium. Minimal levels of isoflavones are absorbed by the cork pieces. XAD-4 stimulates the production of glucosyl conjugates, daidzin and genistin, in root parts about 1.5-fold greater than that obtained in control roots. These are the highest amounts of daidzin and genistin that are observed (5.101 and 6.759 mg g(-1) dry weight, respectively). In contrast to these two adsorbents, MeJA increases the accumulation of isoflavones in shoot rather than in root parts of seedlings, about three- to four-fold over control levels, with the exception of genistein. These studies reveal new observations on the regulation of isoflavone production in hydroponically grown Pueraria montana plants by two adsorbents (cork pieces and XAD-4) and MeJA elicitor.

  17. Purification of olive mill wastewater phenols through membrane filtration and resin adsorption/desorption.

    PubMed

    Zagklis, Dimitris P; Vavouraki, Aikaterini I; Kornaros, Michael E; Paraskeva, Christakis A

    2015-03-21

    Olive tree cultivation has a long history in the Mediterranean countries, and even today consists an important cultural, economic, and environmental aspect of the area. The production of olive oil through 3-phase extraction systems, leads to the co-production of large quantities of olive mill wastewater (OMW), with toxic compounds that inhibit its biodegradation. Membrane filtration has been used for the exploitation of this byproduct, through the isolation of valuable phenolic compounds. In the current work, a fraction of the waste occurring from a membrane process was used. More specifically the reverse osmosis concentrate, after a nanofiltration, containing the low-molecular-weight compounds, was further treated with resin adsorption/desorption. The non ionic XAD4, XAD16, and XAD7HP resins were implemented, for the recovery of phenols and their separation from carbohydrates. The recovered phenolic compounds were concentrated through vacuum evaporation reaching a final concentration of 378 g/L in gallic acid equivalents containing 84.8 g/L hydroxytyrosol.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and adsorption properties of diethylenetriamine-modified hypercrosslinked resins for efficient removal of salicylic acid from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhan; Jin, Xiaoying; Mao, Jinglin; Yuan, Bin; Deng, Rujie; Deng, Shuguang

    2012-05-30

    We report an effective approach for tailoring the pore textural properties and surface polarity of a hypercrosslinked resin to enhance its adsorption capacity and selectivity for removing salicylic acid from aqueous solution. Four hypercrosslinked resins were synthesized by controlling the reaction time of the self Friedel-Crafts reaction of chloromethylated polystyrene-co-divinylbenzene, and then modified with diethylenetriamine to adjust their surface polarity. The resins were characterized with N(2) adsorption for pore textural properties, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) for surface functional groups, chemical analysis for residual chlorine content and weak basic exchange capacity. Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and breakthrough performance were determined for the removal of salicylic acid from aqueous solution on a selected resin HJ-M01. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of salicylic acid on HJ-M01 is significantly higher than that on its precursor HJ-11 and a few commercial adsorbents including AB-8, XAD-4 and XAD-7. The dynamic adsorption capacity of salicylic acid on HJ-M01 was found to be 456.4 mg/L at a feed concentration of 1000 mg/L and 294 K. The used resin could be fully regenerated with 1% sodium hydroxide solution. The hypercrosslinked resins being developed were promising alternatives to commercial adsorbents for removing salicylic acid and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous solution.

  19. Chromatographic method for controlling the quality of naphthalene

    SciTech Connect

    Mariic, L.I.; Ganzha, L.M.

    1982-03-01

    The use of the gas heterophase variant of chromatographic determination of impurities was suitable for monitoring impurities in naphthalene having crystallization temperatures <80.0/sup 0/C, while the gas adsorption method should be used when the crystallization temperature >80.0/sup 0/C. In the first case with the separation criterion of the naphthalene-thiophene pair K < 1.18 the determination limit of thionaphthene approx. = 0.3%, while in the second case with peak inversion and K = 1.6 the determination limit approx. = 0.01%. It has been shown that the principal impurity in reagent-grade naphthalene (T/sub cr/ = 80.28/sup 0/C) is thionaphthene, present in the concentration range 0.02-0.03%. Of the three methods for estimating the purity of naphthalene: determination of the crystallization temperature and of the index ..delta..t, and the chromatographic method, the last is the most sensitive to qualitative and quantitative changes of impurity contents. It has been shown that there is no correlation between the crystallization temperature and the index ..delta..t on the one hand, and the total impurity content determined by the chromatographic method on the other.

  20. Ask the experts: chromatographic baselines.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graeme; James, Christopher A; Scott, Rebecca; Woolf, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Bioanalysis invited a selection of leading researchers to express their views on chromatographic baseline assignment in the bioanalytical laboratory. The topics discussed include the challenges presented with ensuring automated baseline assignment is correct, when reintegration is necessary, regulation and consistency in terminology. Their enlightening responses provide a valuable insight into developing an industry consensus towards reintegration. An accompanying commentary article in this issue, authored by Howard Hill and colleagues (Huntingdon Life Sciences), provides background to this much debated topic.

  1. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  2. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chromatographic Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanne E. Pemberton

    2011-03-10

    Chromatographic separations play a central role in DOE-supported fundamental research related to energy, biological systems, the environment, and nuclear science. The overall portfolio of research activities in the Separations and Analysis Program within the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences includes support for activities designed to develop a molecular-level understanding of the chemical processes that underlie separations for both large-scale and analytical-scale purposes. The research effort funded by this grant award was a continuation of DOE-supported research to develop vibrational spectroscopic methods to characterize the interfacial details of separations processes at a molecular level.

  3. Comparison of two common adsorption materials for thermal desorption gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of biogenic volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Marcillo, Andrea; Jakimovska, Viktorija; Widdig, Anja; Birkemeyer, Claudia

    2017-09-08

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are commonly collected from gaseous samples by adsorption to materials such as the porous polymer Tenax TA. Adsorbed compounds are subsequently released from these materials by thermal desorption (TD) and separated then by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization (FID) or mass spectrometry (MS) detection. Tenax TA is known to be particularly suitable for non-polar to semipolar volatiles, however, many volatiles from environmental and biological samples possess a rather polar character. Therefore, we tested if the polymer XAD-2, which so far is widely used to adsorb organic compounds from aqueous and organic solvents, could provide a broader coverage for (semi)polar VOCs during gas-phase sampling. Mixtures of volatile compounds covering a wide range of volatility (bp. 20-256°C) and different chemical classes were introduced by liquid spiking into sorbent tubes with one of the two porous polymers, Tenax TA or XAD-2, and analyzed by TD/GC-MS. At first, an internal standard mixture composed of 17 authentic standards was used to optimize desorption temperature with respect to sorbent degradation and loading time for calibration. Secondly, we tested the detectability of a complex standard mixture composed of 57 volatiles, most of them common constituents of the body odor of mammals. Moreover, the performance of XAD-2 compared with Tenax TA was assessed as limit of quantitation and linearity for the internal standard mixture and 33 compounds from the complex standard mixture. Volatiles were analyzed in a range between 0.01-∼250ng/tube depending on the compound and material. Lower limits of quantitation were between 0.01 and 3 ng±<25% RSD (R(2)>0.9). Interestingly, we found different kinetics for compound adsorption with XAD-2, and a partially better sensitivity in comparison with Tenax TA. For these analytes, XAD-2 might be recommended as an alternative of Tenax TA for TD/GC-MS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  4. Experimental adsorption isotherms based on inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kalogirou, E; Bassiotis, I; Artemiadi, Th; Margariti, S; Siokos, V; Roubani-Kalantzopoulou, F

    2002-09-06

    A new chromatographic perturbation method is used for studying the adsorption-desorption equilibrium in various gas-solid heterogeneous systems. It is the reversed-flow method giving accurate and precise values of many physicochemical constants including the basic and necessary adsorption isotherm values. For four inorganic oxides, namely, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2 and PbO, and two aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene) these adsorption isotherms have been determined through a non-linear model.

  5. ADSORPTION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 45 minute PPT presentation will be given at three training courses sponsored by the OGWDW, OW, USEPA. Courses are being held at Phoenix, AZ on April 25; Sacramento, CA on April 29; and South Bend, IN on May 9.

    The presentation provides an overview of adsorptive media te...

  6. Comparison of XAD with other dissolved lignin isolation techniques and a compilation of analytical improvements for the analysis of lignin in aquatic settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, R.G.M.; Aiken, G.R.; Dyda, R.Y.; Butler, K.D.; Bergamaschi, B.A.; Hernes, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript highlights numerous incremental improvements in dissolved lignin measurements over the nearly three decades since CuO oxidation of lignin phenols was first adapted for environmental samples. Intercomparison of the recovery efficiency of three common lignin phenol concentration and isolation techniques, namely XAD, C18 with both CH3OH (C18M) and CH3CN (C18A) used independently for priming and elution steps, and tangential flow filtration (TFF) for a range of aquatic samples including fresh, estuarine and marine waters, was undertaken. With freshwater samples XAD8-1, C18M and TFF were all observed to recover ca. 80-90% of the lignin phenols and showed no fractionation effects with respect to diagnostic lignin parameters. With estuarine and marine samples more lignin phenols were recovered with C18M and XAD8-1 than TFF because of the increased prevalence of low molecular weight lignin phenols in marine influenced samples. For marine systems, differences were also observed between diagnostic lignin parameters isolated via TFF vs. C18M and XAD8-1 as a result of the high molecular weight lignin phenols being less degraded than the bulk. Therefore, it is recommended for future studies of marine systems that only one technique is utilized for ease of intercomparison within studies. It is suggested that for studies solely aimed at recovering bulk dissolved lignin in marine environments that C18M and XAD8-1 appear to be more suitable than TFF as they recover more lignin. Our results highlight that, for freshwater samples, all three common lignin phenol concentration and isolation techniques are comparable to whole water concentrated by rotary evaporation (i.e. not isolated) but, that for marine systems, the choice of concentration and isolation techniques needs to be taken into consideration with respect to both lignin concentration and diagnostic parameters. Finally, as the study highlights XAD8-1 to be a suitable method for the isolation of dissolved lignin

  7. Comparison of XAD with other dissolved lignin isolation techniques and a compilation of analytical improvements for the analysis of lignin in aquatic settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Aiken, George R.; Dyda, Rachael Y.; Butler, Kenna; Bergamaschi, Brian; Hernes, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript highlights numerous incremental improvements in dissolved lignin measurements over the nearly three decades since CuO oxidation of lignin phenols was first adapted for environmental samples. Intercomparison of the recovery efficiency of three common lignin phenol concentration and isolation techniques, namely XAD, C18with both CH3OH (C18M) and CH3CN (C18A) used independently for priming and elution steps, and tangential flow filtration (TFF) for a range of aquatic samples including fresh, estuarine and marine waters, was undertaken. With freshwater samples XAD8-1, C18M and TFF were all observed to recover ca. 80–90% of the lignin phenols and showed no fractionation effects with respect to diagnostic lignin parameters. With estuarine and marine samples more lignin phenols were recovered with C18M and XAD8-1 than TFF because of the increased prevalence of low molecular weight lignin phenols in marine influenced samples. For marine systems, differences were also observed between diagnostic lignin parameters isolated via TFF vs. C18M and XAD8-1 as a result of the high molecular weight lignin phenols being less degraded than the bulk. Therefore, it is recommended for future studies of marine systems that only one technique is utilized for ease of intercomparison within studies. It is suggested that for studies solely aimed at recovering bulk dissolved lignin in marine environments that C18M and XAD8-1 appear to be more suitable than TFF as they recover more lignin. Our results highlight that, for freshwater samples, all three common lignin phenol concentration and isolation techniques are comparable to whole water concentrated by rotary evaporation (i.e. not isolated) but, that for marine systems, the choice of concentration and isolation techniques needs to be taken into consideration with respect to both lignin concentration and diagnostic parameters. Finally, as the study highlights XAD8-1 to be a suitable method for the isolation of dissolved

  8. Modeling Aquatic Toxicity through Chromatographic Systems.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pumarega, Alejandro; Amézqueta, Susana; Farré, Sandra; Muñoz-Pascual, Laura; Abraham, Michael H; Fuguet, Elisabet; Rosés, Martí

    2017-08-01

    Environmental risk assessment requires information about the toxicity of the growing number of chemical products coming from different origins that can contaminate water and become toxicants to aquatic species or other living beings via the trophic chain. Direct toxicity measurements using sensitive aquatic species can be carried out but they may become expensive and ethically questionable. Literature refers to the use of chromatographic measurements that correlate to the toxic effect of a compound over a specific aquatic species as an alternative to get toxicity information. In this work, we have studied the similarity in the response of the toxicity to different species and we have selected eight representative aquatic species (including tadpoles, fish, water fleas, protozoan, and bacteria) with known nonspecific toxicity to chemical substances. Next, we have selected four chromatographic systems offering good perspectives for surrogation of the eight selected aquatic systems, and thus prediction of toxicity from the chromatographic measurement. Then toxicity has been correlated to the chromatographic retention factor. Satisfactory correlation results have been obtained to emulate toxicity in five of the selected aquatic species through some of the chromatographic systems. Other aquatic species with similar characteristics to these five representative ones could also be emulated by using the same chromatographic systems. The final aim of this study is to model chemical products toxicity to aquatic species by means of chromatographic systems to reduce in vivo testing.

  9. Reproductive responses of male fathead minnows exposed to wastewater treatment plant effluent, effluent treated with XAD8 resin, and an environmentally relevant mixture of alkylphenol compounds.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larry B; Lee, Kathy E; Swackhamer, Deborah L; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2007-04-20

    On-site, continuous-flow experiments were conducted during August and October 2002 at a major metropolitan wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) to determine if effluent exposure induced endocrine disruption as manifested in the reproductive competence of sexually mature male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). The fathead minnows were exposed in parallel experiments to WWTP effluent and WWTP effluent treated with XAD8 macroreticular resin to remove the hydrophobic-neutral fraction which contained steroidal hormones, alkylphenolethoxylates (APEs), and other potential endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). The effluent composition varied on a temporal scale and the continuous-flow experiments captured the range of chemical variability that occurred during normal WWTP operations. Exposure to WWTP effluent resulted in vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows, with greater response in October than in August. Concentrations of ammonia, APEs, 17beta-estradiol, and other EDCs also were greater in October than in August, reflecting a change in effluent composition. In the October experiment, XAD8 treatment significantly reduced vitellogenin induction in the male fathead minnows relative to the untreated effluent, whereas in August, XAD8 treatment had little effect. During both experiments, XAD8 treatment removed greater than 90% of the APEs. Exposure of fish to a mixture of APEs similar in composition and concentration to the WWTP effluent, but prepared in groundwater and conducted at a separate facility, elicited vitellogenin induction during both experiments. There was a positive relation between vitellogenin induction and hepatosomatic index (HSI), but not gonadosomatic index (GSI), secondary sexual characteristics index (SSCI), or reproductive competency. In contrast to expectations, the GSI and SSCI increased in males exposed to WWTP effluent compared to groundwater controls. The GSI, SSCI, and reproductive competency were positively affected by XAD8 treatment of

  10. Reproductive responses of male fathead minnows exposed to wastewater treatment plant effluent, effluent treated with XAD8 resin, and an environmentally relevant mixture of alkylphenol compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.; Lee, K.E.; Swackhamer, D.L.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2007-01-01

    On-site, continuous-flow experiments were conducted during August and October 2002 at a major metropolitan wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) to determine if effluent exposure induced endocrine disruption as manifested in the reproductive competence of sexually mature male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). The fathead minnows were exposed in parallel experiments to WWTP effluent and WWTP effluent treated with XAD8 macroreticular resin to remove the hydrophobic-neutral fraction which contained steroidal hormones, alkylphenolethoxylates (APEs), and other potential endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). The effluent composition varied on a temporal scale and the continuous-flow experiments captured the range of chemical variability that occurred during normal WWTP operations. Exposure to WWTP effluent resulted in vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows, with greater response in October than in August. Concentrations of ammonia, APEs, 17??-estradiol, and other EDCs also were greater in October than in August, reflecting a change in effluent composition. In the October experiment, XAD8 treatment significantly reduced vitellogenin induction in the male fathead minnows relative to the untreated effluent, whereas in August, XAD8 treatment had little effect. During both experiments, XAD8 treatment removed greater than 90% of the APEs. Exposure of fish to a mixture of APEs similar in composition and concentration to the WWTP effluent, but prepared in groundwater and conducted at a separate facility, elicited vitellogenin induction during both experiments. There was a positive relation between vitellogenin induction and hepatosomatic index (HSI), but not gonadosomatic index (GSI), secondary sexual characteristics index (SSCI), or reproductive competency. In contrast to expectations, the GSI and SSCI increased in males exposed to WWTP effluent compared to groundwater controls. The GSI, SSCI, and reproductive competency were positively affected by XAD8 treatment of

  11. Integration of coagulation and adsorption for removal of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) precursors from biologically treated municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miaomiao; Meng, Yingjie; Ma, Defang; Wang, Yan; Li, Fengli; Xu, Xing; Xia, Chufan; Gao, Baoyu

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potential of various dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions in biologically treated municipal wastewater by UF fractionation, XAD-8 resin adsorption isolation, and excitation and emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. Removal of various NDMA precursor fractions was also analyzed to evaluate the efficiency of traditional water treatment processes (coagulation, adsorption, and coagulation-adsorption). Results showed that NDMA were mainly formed by low molecular weight (MW) fractions (<30 kDa) and hydrophilic fractions (HiS) in biologically treated municipal wastewater. Integrated coagulation-adsorption treatments showed the highest reduction capacity for NDMA formation potential (57%), followed by isolated adsorption treatment (50%) and isolated coagulation treatment (28%). The powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption process could reduce the high MW precursors (>30 kDa) by 48%, which was higher than other treatments. In contrast, the highest uptake (66%) of low MW precursors (<30 kDa) was achieved by the coagulation-adsorption process. All treatments preferentially removed the hydrophobic acids (HoA) fraction compared to other fractions. Coagulation could remove more fulvic acid-like substances and adsorption could remove more microbial by-products and aromatic proteins.

  12. Enhanced adsorption of phenol from water by a novel polar post-crosslinked polymeric adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaowei; Fan, Yunge; Wu, Guolin; Wang, Chunhong; Shi, Rongfu

    2009-09-30

    A novel post-crosslinked polymeric adsorbent PDM-2 was prepared by Friedel-Crafts reaction of pendant vinyl groups without external crosslinking agent. Both the specific surface area and the pore volume of starting copolymer PDM-1 increased significantly after post-crosslinking. Batch adsorption runs of phenol from aqueous solution onto PDM-1 and PDM-2 were investigated. Commercial macroporous resins XAD-4 and AB-8 were chosen as the comparison. Experimental results showed that isotherms of phenol adsorption onto these four polymeric adsorbents could be represented by Freundlich model reasonably. PDM-2 exhibited higher adsorption capacity of phenol than other three adsorbents, which resulted from synergistic effect of larger specific surface area and polar groups on the network. The adsorption process for phenol was proved to be exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibb's free energy (DeltaG), change in enthalpy (DeltaH) and change in entropy (DeltaS) were calculated. Kinetics studies indicated that phenol uptake onto PDM-1 and PDM-2 followed the pseudo-second order model and the intraparticle diffusion process was a rate-controlling step. Column adsorption runs demonstrated that nearly 100% regeneration efficiency for PDM-2 by 3BV industrial alcohol and the adsorbate phenol can be easily recovered by further distilling. Continuous column adsorption-regeneration cycles indicated negligible capacity loss of PDM-2 during operation.

  13. Chromatographic analysis of tryptophan metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sadok, Ilona; Gamian, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway generates multiple tryptophan metabolites called collectively kynurenines and leads to formation of the enzyme cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The first step in this pathway is tryptophan degradation, initiated by the rate‐limiting enzymes indoleamine 2,3‐dioxygenase, or tryptophan 2,3‐dioxygenase, depending on the tissue. The balanced kynurenine metabolism, which has been a subject of multiple studies in last decades, plays an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as infections, autoimmunity, neurological disorders, cancer, cataracts, as well as pregnancy. Understanding the regulation of tryptophan depletion provide novel diagnostic and treatment opportunities, however it requires reliable methods for quantification of kynurenines in biological samples with complex composition (body fluids, tissues, or cells). Trace concentrations, interference of sample components, and instability of some tryptophan metabolites need to be addressed using analytical methods. The novel separation approaches and optimized extraction protocols help to overcome difficulties in analyzing kynurenines within the complex tissue material. Recent developments in chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry provide new opportunity for quantification of tryptophan and its degradation products in various biological samples. In this review, we present current accomplishments in the chromatographic methodologies proposed for detection of tryptophan metabolites and provide a guide for choosing the optimal approach. PMID:28590049

  14. Solid phase extraction for evaluation of occupational exposure to Pb (II) using XAD-4 sorbent prior to atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shahtaheri, Seyed Jamaleddin; Khadem, Monireh; Golbabaei, Farideh; Rahimi-Froushan, Abbas; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz

    2007-01-01

    Lead is an important constituent widely used in different industrial processes. For evaluation of workers' exposure to trace toxic metal of Pb (II), solid-phase extraction (SPE) was optimized. SPE using mini columns filled with XAD-4 resin was developed with regard to sample pH, ligand concentration, loading flow rate, elution solvent, sample volume, elution volume, the amount of resins, and sample matrix interferences. Lead ions were retained on a solid sorbent and then eluted, followed by a simple determination of analytes with flame atomic absorption spectrometery. The obtained recoveries of metal ions were greater than 92%. This method was validated with 3 different pools of spiked urine samples; it showed a good reproducibility over 6 consecutive days as well as 6 within-day experiments. This optimized method can be considered successful in simplifying sample preparation for a trace residue analysis of lead in different matrices when evaluating occupational and environmental exposures is required.

  15. Monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the atmosphere of southern Luxembourg using XAD-2 resin-based passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Schummer, Claude; Appenzeller, Brice M; Millet, Maurice

    2014-02-01

    XAD-2 resin-based passive samplers (PAS) with dimensions adapted to 100 mL accelerated solvent extraction cells were used to study the temporal and spatial variations of 17 PAHs on five sites in the atmosphere of southern Luxembourg. This new design allowed extracting the PAS without emptying the resin from the shelter. PAH analyses were done with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. PAS were deployed for 1 year with varying sampling periodicities, and 16 PAHs were detected with concentrations ranging from 1 ng/PAS for chrysene to 9,727 ng/PAS for naphthalene. The PAS were found adapted to the monitoring of temporal and spatial variations for lightweight PAHs (up to four aromatic rings) though not for heavy PAHs with five aromatic rings or more, as these compounds are preferably in the particle phase of the atmosphere and the amount of these PAHs trapped on the PAS will be too low.

  16. A Quantitative Gas Chromatographic Ethanol Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a gas chromatographic experiment for the quantitative determination of volume percent ethanol in water ethanol solutions. Background information, procedures, and typical results are included. Accuracy and precision of results are both on the order of two percent. (JN)

  17. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Enrivonmentally Significant Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudzinski, Walter E.; Beu, Steve

    1982-01-01

    A chromatographic procedure for analyzing organophosphorus pesticides (such as PCB's, nitrosamines, and phthalate esters) in orange juice is described, including a summary of the method, instrumentation, methodology, results/discussion, and calculations. (JN)

  18. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  19. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Enrivonmentally Significant Pesticides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudzinski, Walter E.; Beu, Steve

    1982-01-01

    A chromatographic procedure for analyzing organophosphorus pesticides (such as PCB's, nitrosamines, and phthalate esters) in orange juice is described, including a summary of the method, instrumentation, methodology, results/discussion, and calculations. (JN)

  20. A Quantitative Gas Chromatographic Ethanol Determination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leary, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a gas chromatographic experiment for the quantitative determination of volume percent ethanol in water ethanol solutions. Background information, procedures, and typical results are included. Accuracy and precision of results are both on the order of two percent. (JN)

  1. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  2. Liquid Chromatographic Analysis of Hydraulic Fluids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    ADOO36 ARMY MATERIALS AND MECHANICS RESEARCH CENTER WATERTOWN 9* F/s 7/4 LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF HYDRAULIC FLUIDS. (U) I NOV 79 & L...HABNAUER, 9 M DOWSEI UNCLASSIFIED AMMRC-TR-79-57 ML 2.EhhhEh MOOSO fllllfffflllfff AMMRC TR 79-57 ALWI i e LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS o.;OF HYDRAULIC...methods Liquid chromatography Quality control Chemical analysis 20. ABSTRACT (Continue en reverse aidet it necoserr end identifly by block number) (SEE

  3. Characterization and evaluation of a macroporous adsorbent for possible use in the expanded bed adsorption of flavonoids from Ginkgo biloba L.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Chase, Howard A

    2009-12-11

    The suitability of the use of macroporous adsorbent Amberlite XAD7HP in expanded bed adsorption processes for the isolation of flavonoids from crude extracts of Ginkgo biloba L. has been assessed. The expansion and hydrodynamic properties of expanded beds were investigated and analyzed. The bed expansion as a function of operational fluid velocity was measured and correlated with the Richardson-Zaki equation. Theoretical predictions of the correlation parameters (the terminal settling velocity u(t) and exponent n) were improved by modifying equations in the literature. Residence time distributions (RTDs) were studied using acetone as a tracer. Three measures of liquid phase dispersion (the height equivalent of theoretical plate, Bodenstein number and axial distribution coefficient) were investigated and compared to values previously obtained with commercial EBA adsorbents developed for protein purification. A suitable bed expansion ratio was found to be 1.25 times the settled bed height, which occurred at a corresponding flow velocity of 183 cm/h. For an initial settled bed height of 42 cm, the mean residence time of liquid in the expanded bed was around 28 min. Under these flow conditions, the axial mixing coefficient D(ax) was 7.54 x 10(-6) m(2)/s and the Bodenstein number was 28; the number of theoretical plates (N) was 19 and the height equivalent of a theoretical plate (HETP) was 2.77 cm. Rutin trihydrate was used as a model flavonoid for the characterization of the adsorption properties of Amberlite XAD7HP. Adsorption was observed to reach equilibrium within 3 h with 70% of the adsorption capacity being achieved within 30 min. The estimated maximum equilibrium adsorption capacity for rutin was estimated to be 43.0 mg/(gresin) when the results were fitted to Langmuir isotherms. The adsorption performance was not seriously impaired by the physical presence of G. biloba leaf powders. Assessment of the kinetics of the adsorption of rutin revealed that the rate

  4. Nanofluidic Size-Exclusion Chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Sabrina; Svehla, Danielle; Grunthaner, Frank; Feldman, Jason; Shakkottai, P.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts are under way to develop a nanofluidic size-exclusion chromatograph (SEC), which would be a compact, robust, lightweight instrument for separating molecules of interest according to their sizes and measuring their relative abundances in small samples. About as large as a deck of playing cards, the nanofluidic SEC would serve, in effect, as a laboratory on a chip that would perform the functions of a much larger, conventional, bench-top SEC and ancillary equipment, while consuming much less power and much smaller quantities of reagent and sample materials. Its compactness and low power demand would render it attractive for field applications in which, typically, it would be used to identify and quantitate a broad range of polar and nonpolar organic compounds in soil, ice, and water samples. Size-exclusion chromatography is a special case of high-performance liquid chromatography. In a conventional SEC, a sample plug is driven by pressure along a column packed with silica or polymer beads that contain uniform nanopores. The interstices between, and the pores in, the beads collectively constitute a size-exclusion network. Molecules follow different paths through the size-exclusion network, such that characteristic elution times can be related to sizes of molecules: basically, smaller molecules reach the downstream end of the column after the larger ones do because the smaller ones enter minor pores and stay there for a while, whereas the larger ones do not enter the pores. The volume accessible to molecules gradually diminishes as their size increases. All molecules bigger than a pore size elute together. For most substances, the elution times and sizes of molecules can be correlated directly with molecular weights. Hence, by measuring the flux of molecules arriving at the downstream end as a function of time, one can obtain a liquid mass spectrum for the molecules present in a sample over a broad range of molecular weights.

  5. Comparison among three anion exchange chromatographic supports to capture erythropoietin from cell culture supernatant.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Lourdes; Stewart, Diobel; Zumalacárregui, Lourdes; Amaro, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Affinity and ion exchange conventional chromatography have been used to capture erythropoietin (EPO) from mammalian cell culture supernatant. Currently, chromatographic adsorbent perfusion is available, however a limited number of applications have been found in the literature. In this work, three anion exchange chromatographic supports (gel, membrane and monolithic) were evaluated in the capture step of the recombinant erythropoietin purification process. The influences of load and flow rate on each support performance were analyzed. Also the purity of the EPO molecules was determined. A productivity analysis, as a decision tool for larger scale implementation, was done. As a conclusion, the evaluated supports are technically suitable to capture EPO with adequate recovery and good purity. However, the monolithic column admits high operating velocity, showing the highest adsorption capacity and productivity.

  6. Chemometric quality control of chromatographic purity.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Kristoffer; Frederiksen, Søren Søndergaard; Leuenhagen, Casper; Bro, Rasmus

    2010-10-15

    It is common practice in chromatographic purity analysis of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes to assess the quality of peak integration combined by visual investigation of the chromatogram. This traditional method of visual chromatographic comparison is simple, but is very subjective, laborious and seldom very quantitative. For high-purity drugs it would be particularly difficult to detect the occurrence of an unknown impurity co-eluting with the target compound, which is present in excess compared to any impurity. We hypothesize that this can be achieved through Multivariate Statistical Process Control (MSPC) based on principal component analysis (PCA) modeling. In order to obtain the lowest detection limit, different chromatographic data preprocessing methods such as time alignment, baseline correction and scaling are applied. Historical high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) chromatograms from a biopharmaceutical in-process analysis are used to build a normal operation condition (NOC) PCA model. Chromatograms added simulated 0.1% impurities with varied resolutions are exposed to the NOC model and monitored with MSPC charts. This study demonstrates that MSPC based on PCA applied on chromatographic purity analysis is a powerful tool for monitoring subtle changes in the chromatographic pattern, providing clear diagnostics of subtly deviating chromatograms. The procedure described in this study can be implemented and operated as the HPLC analysis runs according to the process analytical technology (PAT) concept aiming for real-time release. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Improvement of the fermentability of oxalic acid hydrolysates by detoxification using electrodialysis and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Jeong, So-Yeon; Trinh, Ly Thi Phi; Lee, Hong-Joo; Lee, Jae-Won

    2014-01-01

    A two-step detoxification process consisting of electrodialysis and adsorption was performed to improve the fermentability of oxalic acid hydrolysates. The constituents of the hydrolysate differed significantly between mixed hardwood and softwood. Acetic acid and furfural concentrations were high in the mixed hardwood, whereas 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) concentration was relatively low compared with that of the mixed softwood. The removal efficiency of acetic acid reached 100% by electrodialysis (ED) process in both hydrolysates, while those of furfural and HMF showed very low, due to non-ionizable properties. Most of the remaining inhibitors were removed by XAD-4 resin. In the mixed hardwood hydrolysate without removal of the inhibitors, ethanol fermentation was not completed. Meanwhile, both ED-treated hydrolysates successfully produced ethanol with 0.08 and 0.15 g/Lh ethanol productivity, respectively. The maximum ethanol productivity was attained after fermentation with 0.27 and 0.35 g/Lh of detoxified hydrolysates, which were treated by ED, followed by XAD-4 resin.

  8. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Eckels, Joel D.; Kimmons, James F.; Myers, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  9. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmons, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1996-06-11

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) is described for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units. 4 figs.

  10. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmins, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1994-12-31

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  11. Trapping of aromatic compounds by adsorption on hydrophobic sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Souchon, I.; Rojas, J.A.; Voilley, A.

    1996-11-01

    Trapping by adsorption on hydrophobic porous polymers was the selected method for removing aromatic compounds from aqueous diluted medium. The study was done with four aromatic compounds which are often found in foods and which play a role in organoleptic qualities at low concentrations: ethyl acetate, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 1-octen 3-ol, and {gamma}-decalactone. Several sorbents were tested: activated carbon and three porous polystyren-type polymers (Porapak Q, Chromosorb 105, and Amberlite XAD-4). Kinetic and equilibrium sorptions were investigated. The adsorption isotherms were determined for the four aromatics and all the adsorbents, and equilibrium data were correlated with a Freundlich or a Langmuir-type of isotherm equation. Kinetic experimental results were simulated for 1-octen 3-ol using an internal-external mass transfer resistance model. Good agreement was observed for the diffusion coefficient in the sorbent in the range of 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s{sup {minus}1}.

  12. Ion chromatographic determination of sulfur in fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizisin, C. S.; Kuivinen, D. E.; Otterson, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The sulfur content of fuels was determined using an ion chromatograph to measure the sulfate produced by a modified Parr bomb oxidation. Standard Reference Materials from the National Bureau of Standards, of approximately 0.2 + or - 0.004% sulfur, were analyzed resulting in a standard deviation no greater than 0.008. The ion chromatographic method can be applied to conventional fuels as well as shale-oil derived fuels. Other acid forming elements, such as fluorine, chlorine and nitrogen could be determined at the same time, provided that these elements have reached a suitable ionic state during the oxidation of the fuel.

  13. Chromatographic Separation of Glucose and Fructose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsevich, Yu E.; Larionov, Oleg G.; Stal'naya, I. D.; Nakhapetyan, L. A.; Pronin, A. Ya

    1987-03-01

    The structures, mutarotation, and the physicochemical properties of glucose and fructose as well as methods for their separation are examined. Their chromatographic separation on cation exchangers in the calcium-form is discussed in detail. A theory of the formation of complexes of carbohydrates with metal cations is described and the mechanism of the separation of glucose and fructose on cation exchangers in the calcium-form is discussed in detail. Factors influencing the chromatographic separation of glucose and fructose on sulphonic acid cation-exchange resins are also considered. The bibliography includes 138 references.

  14. Gas-chromatographic analysis of high-purity helium using a helium detector

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, V.A.; Aleksandrov, S.D.; Krasotskii, S.G.; Chernyatin, A.K.; Shkrunina, T.V.

    1986-10-10

    The limits of gas-chromatographic detection of neon, hydrogen, argon, nitrogen, krypton, and methane in helium have been determined using a helium ionization detector under saturation current conditions. The detection limits are restricted by the gas permeability of the detector Teflon body and the injection system. The dependence of extraction of impurity gases by cryogenic adsorption enrichment on their contents and enrichment time has been examined. the relative detection limit can be lowered by preconcentration of 3 x 10/sup -5/% for neon and to 4 x 10/sup -7/ to 2 x 10/sup -8/% for other gases.

  15. Enhanced adsorption of puerarin onto a novel hydrophilic and polar modified post-crosslinked resin from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaowei; Chen, Hongbo; Zheng, Yi; Tao, Wei; Fan, Yunge; Huang, Laiqiang; Mei, Lin

    2012-11-01

    A novel of hydrophilic and polar N-vinylpyrrolidone modified post-crosslinked resin was synthesized and the adsorption behaviors toward puerarin from aqueous solution were investigated. The post-crosslinked adsorbent PNVP-DVBpc was prepared by Friedel-Crafts reaction of residual double bonds without external crosslinking agent. The specific surface area of precursor PNVP-DVB increased obviously after post-crosslinking modification. The synthesized adsorbents were characterized by BET surface area, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adsorption behaviors of puerarin from aqueous solution onto precursor PNVP-DVB and post-crosslinked adsorbent PNVP-DVBpc were thoroughly researched. Commercial polymeric adsorbents Amberlite XAD-4 and AB-8 were chosen as the comparison. Among the four media, PNVP-DVBpc presented the largest adsorption capacity of puerarin, which resulted from the synergistic effect of high specific surface area and polar groups (amide groups) onto the adsorbent matrix. Experimental results showed that equilibrium isotherms could be fitted by Freundlich model and the kinetic data could be characterized by pseudo-second order model reasonably. Column adsorption experiments indicated that the puerarin could be completely desorbed by 4.0 BV industrial alcohol. Continuous column adsorption-regeneration cycles demonstrated the PNVP-DVBpc without any significant adsorption capacity loss during operation.

  16. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gas chromatograph. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.267 Gas...

  17. Numerical Simulation of an Optical Chromatographic Separator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-02

    its close relative, Bacillus thuringiensis ," Anal. Chem. 78, 3221-3225 (2006). 10. S. J. Hart, A. Terray, K. L. Kuhn, J. Arnold, and T. A. Leski...Terray, T. A. Leski, J. Arnold, and R. Stroud, "Discovery of a significant optical chromatographic difference between spores of Bacillus anthracis and

  18. Nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, D.; Feldman, S.; Feldman, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Shakkottai, P.; dle Castillo, L.; White, V.

    2002-01-01

    This poster describes the development of a nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph (nSEC) based on the principle that molecules traveling through a microcolumn containing nano-fabricated features will have characteristics elution times that directly correlate to molecular weight.

  19. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gas chromatograph. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.267 Gas...

  20. Chromatographic methods in the study of autism.

    PubMed

    Żurawicz, Ewa; Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Rynkowski, Jacek

    2013-10-01

    Research into biomarkers of autism is a new means of medical intervention in this disease. Chromatographic techniques, especially coupled with mass spectrometry, are widely used in determination of biomarkers and assessment of effectiveness of autism therapy owing to their sensitivity and selectivity. Among the chromatographic techniques gas chromatography and liquid chromatography, especially high-performance liquid chromatography, have found application in clinical trials. The high-performance liquid chromatography technique allows an analysis of liquid samples with a wide range of molecules, small and large, providing an opportunity to perform advanced assays within a short time frame. Gas chromatography with the appropriate preparation of samples (gaseous and liquid) and a selection of analysis conditions enables the separation of thermally stable, volatile and non-volatile organic substances in short runtimes. The chromatographic techniques that are currently used in metabolic studies in autism are designed to identify abnormalities in three areas: the metabolism of neurotransmitters, nutritional and metabolic status and manifestations of oxidative stress. This review presents a necessary theoretical introduction and examples of applications of chromatographic studies of disorder markers in autism.

  1. Nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, D.; Feldman, S.; Feldman, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Shakkottai, P.; dle Castillo, L.; White, V.

    2002-01-01

    This poster describes the development of a nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph (nSEC) based on the principle that molecules traveling through a microcolumn containing nano-fabricated features will have characteristics elution times that directly correlate to molecular weight.

  2. Functional chromatographic technique for natural product isolation†

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eric C.; Mason, Damian J.; Eichhorst, Nicole; Engelder, Pearce; Mesa, Celestina; Kithsiri Wijeratne, E. M.; Gunaherath, G. M. Kamal B.; Leslie Gunatilaka, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural product discovery arises through a unique interplay between chromatographic purification and biological assays. Currently, most techniques used for natural product purification deliver leads without a defined biological action. We now describe a technique, referred to herein as functional chromatography, that deploys biological affinity as the matrix for compound isolation. PMID:25588099

  3. Method to fabricate silicon chromatographic column comprising fluid ports

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Adkins, Douglas R.

    2004-03-02

    A new method for fabricating a silicon chromatographic column comprising through-substrate fluid ports has been developed. This new method enables the fabrication of multi-layer interconnected stacks of silicon chromatographic columns.

  4. A Small-Scale Low-Cost Gas Chromatograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gros, Natasa; Vrtacnik, Margareta

    2005-01-01

    The design and application of a small-scale portable gas chromatograph for learning of the basic concepts of chromatography is described. The apparatus consists of two basic separable units, which includes a chromatographic unit and an electronic unit.

  5. Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.

    1998-12-22

    An extraction chromatographic material is described for extracting metal cations from a liquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methane-diphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support. 7 figs.

  6. A Small-Scale Low-Cost Gas Chromatograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gros, Natasa; Vrtacnik, Margareta

    2005-01-01

    The design and application of a small-scale portable gas chromatograph for learning of the basic concepts of chromatography is described. The apparatus consists of two basic separable units, which includes a chromatographic unit and an electronic unit.

  7. Method for the chromatographic separation of cations from aqueous samples

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.L.

    1997-07-29

    An extraction chromatographic material is described for extracting metal cations from a liquid stream. The extraction chromatographic material is prepared by adsorbing a diesterified methanediphosphonic acid on an inert particulate support. 7 figs.

  8. Tadpole toxicity prediction using chromatographic systems.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pumarega, Alejandro; Amézqueta, Susana; Fuguet, Elisabet; Rosés, Martí

    2015-10-30

    Toxicity has been emulated in tadpole species through chromatographic systems. The parameter studied to evaluate the non-specific toxicity of a compound is the narcosis concentration (Cnar), which is defined as the concentration needed for the immobilization of the organism. Because experimental investigation with animals is lengthy, costly, technically difficult, and ethically questionable, there is a great interest in developing surrogate physicochemical systems able to emulate biological systems to obtain the same information in a faster, more economic, and easier manner. In order to see which chromatographic systems would be able to emulate tadpole narcosis, both, tadpole narcosis data and data in several chromatographic and electrophoretic systems, were fitted to a linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) model. Thus, by comparison of the models it was possible to see which of the chromatographic systems were more similar to the biological one. The physicochemical systems that best emulate tadpole narcosis were an HPLC system based on an immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) column, and two micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) systems based on sodium taurocholate (STC) and a mixture of sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and Brij 35 as surfactants. A system based on a RP18 HPLC column also was selected for comparison because it is a common column in most analytical laboratories. To establish the models, a set of compounds with known Cnar values were analyzed in the chromatographic, and electrophoretic selected systems and, then, the retention factor (k) was correlated to the concentration of narcosis. Statistics showed that the system based on STC micelles was the best to emulate toxicity in tadpoles. The robustness and predictive ability of the developed models were validated.

  9. Adsorption-driven translocation of polymer chain into nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2012-06-01

    The polymer translocation into nanopores is generally facilitated by external driving forces, such as electric or hydrodynamic fields, to compensate for entropic restrictions imposed by the confinement. We investigate the dynamics of translocation driven by polymer adsorption to the confining walls that is relevant to chromatographic separation of macromolecules. By using the self-consistent field theory, we study the passage of a chain trough a small opening from cis to trans compartments of spherical shape with adsorption potential applied in the trans compartment. The chain transfer is modeled as the Fokker-Plank diffusion along the free energy landscape of the translocation pass represented as a sum of the free energies of cis and trans parts of the chain tethered to the pore opening. We investigate how the chain length, the size of trans compartment, the magnitude of adsorption potential, and the extent of excluded volume interactions affect the translocation time and its distribution. Interplay of these factors brings about a variety of different translocation regimes. We show that excluded volume interactions within a certain range of adsorption potentials can cause a local minimum on the free energy landscape, which is absent for ideal chains. The adsorption potential always leads to the decrease of the free energy barrier, increasing the probability of successful translocation. However, the translocation time depends non-monotonically of the magnitude of adsorption potential. Our calculations predict the existence of the critical magnitude of adsorption potential, which separates favorable and unfavorable regimes of translocation.

  10. PROBING REACTIVITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION USING XAD-8 RESIN ADSORPTION AND ULTRAFILTRATION FRACTIONATION. (R828045)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection by-product (DBP) reactivity (yield and speciation upon reaction with chlorine) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from two surface waters was investigated. The source waters, each having significantly different specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA

  11. PROBING REACTIVITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION USING XAD-8 RESIN ADSORPTION AND ULTRAFILTRATION FRACTIONATION. (R828045)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection by-product (DBP) reactivity (yield and speciation upon reaction with chlorine) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from two surface waters was investigated. The source waters, each having significantly different specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA

  12. Transesterification of propylene glycol methyl ether in chromatographic reactors using anion exchange resin as a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jungmin; Sreedhar, Balamurali; Donaldson, Megan E; Frank, Timothy C; Schultz, Alfred K; Bommarius, Andreas S; Kawajiri, Yoshiaki

    2016-09-30

    Reactive chromatography using an anion exchange resin is proposed for a transesterification reaction of propylene glycol methyl ether (DOWANOL™ PM) with ethyl acetate to produce propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (DOWANOL™ PMA). This reaction is studied in batch and chromatographic reactors catalyzed by an anion exchange resin. Several anion exchange resins are tested and compared based on the performance of resin as an adsorbent and a catalyst. A chromatographic column is packed with a selected catalyst, AMBERLITE™ IRA904, and both reaction and chromatographic elution are studied at different temperatures and feed concentrations. The resulting chromatograms are fitted to a mathematical model to obtain adsorption equilibrium and reaction kinetic parameters by the inverse method. Compared to esterification investigated in a previous study, transesterification has advantages such as a higher conversion at lower temperature and easy removal of the byproduct which may lead to higher productivity. Deactivation of anion exchange resins is observed and potential solutions are suggested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparation of macroporous methacrylate-based monoliths for chromatographic applications by the Reactive Gelation Process.

    PubMed

    Bechtle, M; Butté, A; Storti, G; Morbidelli, M

    2010-07-09

    Polymeric monoliths are a relatively new separation medium for chromatographic applications. The innovative approach to produce such monoliths, the Reactive Gelation Process, presented by Marti et al. [1] for polystyrene macroporous materials is applied to a methacrylate-based material. It is shown that it is possible to create a macroporous structure by Reactive Gelation also with this polymer even if the properties of the material are different. Besides the analysis of the material by SEM and BET, several chromatographic methods are used to analyze the material properties. The ISEC experiments showed a much smaller size exclusion effect than in conventional packed beds. The permeability of the material is comparable to a packed bed with 4.13 μm particles. The column efficiency is not changing for increasing flow rates. Because of the high efficiency of the material, shorter columns are needed and therefore the comparatively low permeability is compensated. The monolith also exhibits a significant adsorption capacity for hydrophobic interaction, which makes it suitable for chromatographic purification processes.

  14. An effective way to hydrophilize gigaporous polystyrene microspheres as rapid chromatographic separation media for proteins.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jian-Bo; Zhou, Wei-Qing; Wei, Wei; Su, Zhi-Guo; Ma, Guang-Hui

    2008-12-02

    To overcome the disadvantages of protein denaturation and nonspecific adsorption on poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) (PS) medium as a chromatographic support, gigaporous PS microspheres prepared in our previous study were coated with hydrophobically modified agarose (phenoxyl agarose, Agap). Both the modification of agarose and the gigaporous structure of PS microspheres provided an advantage that facilitated the coating of Agap onto PS microspheres. The amount of Agap adsorbed onto the PS surface was examined as a function of the polymer concentration, and various samples of microspheres, differing in surface Agap density, were prepared. The adsorbed layer was then stabilized by chemical cross-linking and its stability was evaluated in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Results showed that PS microspheres were successfully coated with Agap, while the gigaporous structure could be well maintained. After coating, the nonspecific adsorption of proteins on PS microspheres was greatly reduced. Flow hydrodynamics experiments showed that the Agap-co-PS column had low backpressure, good permeability, and mechanical stability. Such a procedure could provide a hydrophilic low-pressure liquid chromatographic support for different types of chromatography, since the Agap layer may be easily derivatized by classical methods, and because of their good permeability, the coated microspheres have great potential applications in high-speed protein chromatography.

  15. A model free method for estimation of complicated adsorption isotherms in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Forssén, Patrik; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-08-28

    Here we show that even extremely small variations in the adsorption isotherm can have a tremendous effect on the shape of the overloaded elution profiles and that the earlier in the adsorption isotherms the variation take place, the larger its impact on the shape of the elution profile. These variations are so small that they can be "hidden" by the discretization and in the general experimental noise when using traditional experimental methods, such as frontal analysis, to measure adsorption isotherms. But as the effects of these variations are more clearly visible in the elution profiles, the Inverse Method (IM) of adsorption isotherm estimation is an option. However, IM usually requires that one selects an adsorption isotherm model prior to the estimation process. Here we show that even complicated models might not be able to estimate the adsorption isotherms with multiple inflection points that small variations might give rise to. We therefore developed a modified IM that, instead of fixed adsorption isotherm models, uses monotone piecewise interpolation. We first validated the method with synthetic data and showed that it can be used to estimate an adsorption isotherm, which accurately predicts an extremely "strange" elution profile. For this case it was impossible to estimate the adsorption isotherm using IM with a fixed adsorption model. Finally, we will give an example of a real chromatographic system where adsorption isotherm with inflection points is estimated by the modified IM.

  16. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Don D.

    1984-01-01

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a micro-column liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  17. Chromatographic fingerprint analysis of Pycnogenol dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei; Song, Fenhong; Lin, Long-Ze

    2009-01-01

    The bark of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton) has been widely used as a remedy for various degenerative diseases. A standard high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) procedure for Pycnogenol analysis is a method specified in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) monograph, which requires measurement of peak areas and identification of four components of the extract: caffeic acid, catechin, ferulic acid, and taxifolin. In this study, a fingerprint analysis using an HPLC method based on the USP monograph has been developed to provide additional qualitative information for the analysis of Pycnogenol-containing dietary supplements (PDS). Twelve commercially available PDS samples were purchased and analyzed along with a standard Pycnogenol extract. Their chromatographic fingerprints were analyzed using principal component analysis. The results showed that two of the samples were not consistent with the standard reference Pycnogenol extract. One contained other active ingredients in addition to Pycnogenol, and the other may have resulted from a quality control issue in manufacturing.

  18. Chromatographic purification of highly active yeast ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Meskauskas, Arturas; Leshin, Jonathan A; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2011-10-24

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are much more labile as compared to their eubacterial and archael counterparts, thus posing a significant challenge to researchers. Particularly troublesome is the fact that lysis of cells releases a large number of proteases and nucleases which can degrade ribosomes. Thus, it is important to separate ribosomes from these enzymes as quickly as possible. Unfortunately, conventional differential ultracentrifugation methods leaves ribosomes exposed to these enzymes for unacceptably long periods of time, impacting their structural integrity and functionality. To address this problem, we utilize a chromatographic method using a cysteine charged Sulfolink resin. This simple and rapid application significantly reduces co-purifying proteolytic and nucleolytic activities, producing high yields of intact, highly biochemically active yeast ribosomes. We suggest that this method should also be applicable to mammalian ribosomes. The simplicity of the method, and the enhanced purity and activity of chromatographically purified ribosome represents a significant technical advancement for the study of eukaryotic ribosomes.

  19. Use of a modified Tenax GC column packing for the direct gas chromatographic analysis of phenols in water at the ppm level.

    PubMed

    Bartle, K D; Elstub, J; Novotny, M; Robinson, R J

    1977-05-21

    Dilute solutions of phenols in water at the ppm level may be analysed gas chromatographically by direct injection onto a column with a packing similar to that used in the Viking 1975 spacecraft: Tenax GC (2,6-diphenyl-p-phenylene oxide polymer) modified with polymetaphenyl ether liquid phase to eradicate irreversible adsorption. Symmetrical peaks were observed for injections of less than 1 ng of phenol and some of its alkylated derivatives. Chromatographic properties of modified Tenax GC columns are reported along with their application to the analysis of some industrial effluents with previous work-up.

  20. Adsorption and desorption properties of macroporous resins for anthocyanins from the calyx extract of roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.).

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiu-Lian; Wang, Dong; Chen, Bi-Yun; Feng, Yong-Mei; Wen, Shao-Hong; Zhan, Peng-Yuan

    2012-03-07

    Adsorption of roselle anthocynins, a natural pigment, onto various macroporous resins was optimized to develop a simple and efficient process for industrial separation and purification of roselle anthocyanins. Nine different macroporous resins (AB-8, X-5, HPD-100, SP-207, XAD-4, LS-305A, DM-21, LS-610B, and LS-305) were evaluated for the adsorption properties of the anthocyanins extracted from the calyx extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. The influences of phase contact time, solution pH, initial anthocyanin concentration, and ethanol concentration with different citric acid amounts were studied by the static adsorption/desorption method. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm, and according to this model, LS-610B and LS-305 exhibited the highest monolayer sorption capacities of 31.95 and 38.16 mg/g, respectively. The kinetic data were modeled using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion equations. The experimental data were well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Continuous column adsorption-regeneration cycles indicated negligible capacity loss of LS-305 during operation. The overall yield of pigment product was 49.6 mg/g dried calyces. The content of roselle anthocynins in the pigment product was 4.85%.

  1. Adsorption of phenol and its derivatives from water using synthetic resins and low-cost natural adsorbents: a review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Su-Hsia; Juang, Ruey-Shin

    2009-03-01

    In this article, the technical feasibility of the use of activated carbon, synthetic resins, and various low-cost natural adsorbents for the removal of phenol and its derivatives from contaminated water has been reviewed. Instead of using commercial activated carbon and synthetic resins, researchers have worked on inexpensive materials such as coal fly ash, sludge, biomass, zeolites, and other adsorbents, which have high adsorption capacity and are locally available. The comparison of their removal performance with that of activated carbon and synthetic resins is presented in this study. From our survey of about 100 papers, low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for phenol and its derivatives compared to activated carbons. Adsorbents that stand out for high adsorption capacities are coal-reject, residual coal treated with H3PO4, dried activated sludge, red mud, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-modified montmorillonite. Of these synthetic resins, HiSiv 1000 and IRA-420 display high adsorption capacity of phenol and XAD-4 has good adsorption capability for 2-nitrophenol. These polymeric adsorbents are suitable for industrial effluents containing phenol and its derivatives as mentioned previously. It should be noted that the adsorption capacities of the adsorbents presented here vary significantly depending on the characteristics of the individual adsorbent, the extent of chemical modifications, and the concentrations of solutes.

  2. Nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, D.; Feldman, S.; Feldman, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Shakkottai, P.; Castillo, L. del; White, V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph (nSEC) based on the principle that molecules traveling through amicrocolumn containing nano-fabricated features will have characteristic elution times that directly correlate to molecular weight. Compared to conventional size exclusion chromatography, the nSEC offers greater control over the size exclusion process; mass fabrication; integration of the separation column with associated valves, pumps, and detectors; and dramatic reductions in instrument mass and power requirements.

  3. Nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, D.; Feldman, S.; Feldman, J.; Grunthaner, F.; Shakkottai, P.; Castillo, L. del; White, V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a nano-fabricated size exclusion chromatograph (nSEC) based on the principle that molecules traveling through amicrocolumn containing nano-fabricated features will have characteristic elution times that directly correlate to molecular weight. Compared to conventional size exclusion chromatography, the nSEC offers greater control over the size exclusion process; mass fabrication; integration of the separation column with associated valves, pumps, and detectors; and dramatic reductions in instrument mass and power requirements.

  4. Flow injection online spectrophotometric determination of uranium after preconcentration on XAD-4 resin impregnated with nalidixic acid.

    PubMed

    Shahida, Shabnam; Ali, Akbar; Khan, Muhammad Haleem; Saeed, Muhammad Mufazzal

    2013-02-01

    In this work, spectrophotometer was used as a detector for the determination of uranium from water, biological, and ore samples with a flow injection system coupled with solid phase extraction. In order to promote the online preconcentration of uranium, a minicolumn packed with XAD-4 resin impregnated with nalidixic acid was utilized. The system operation was based on U(VI) ion retention at pH 6 in the minicolumn at flow rate of 15.2 mL min(-1). The uranium complex was removed from the resin by 0.1 mol dm(-3) HCl at flow rate of 3.2 mL min(-1) and was mixed with arsenazo III solution (0.05 % solution in 0.1 mol dm(-3) HCl, 3.2 mL min(-1)) and driven to flow through cell of spectrophotometer where its absorbance was measured at 651 nm. The influence of chemical (pH and HCl (as eluent and reagent medium) concentration) and flow (sample and eluent flow rate and preconcentration time) parameters that could affect the performance of the system as well as the possible interferents was investigated. At the optimum conditions for 60 s preconcentration time (15.2 mL of sample volume), the method presented a detection limit of 1.1 μg L(-1), a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.8 % at 100 μg L(-1), enrichment factor of 30, and a sample throughput of 42 h(-1), whereas for 300 s of the preconcentration time (76 mL of sample volume), a detection limit of 0.22 μg L(-1), a RSD of 1.32 % at 10 μg L(-1), enrichment factor of 150, and a sampling frequency of 11 h(-1) were reported.

  5. BROAD SPECTRUM ANALYSIS FOR TRACE ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN LARGE VOLUMES OF WATER BY XAD RESINS-COLUMN DESIGN-FACTS AND MYTHS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibs, J.; Wicklund, A.; Suffet, I.H.

    1986-01-01

    The 'rule of thumb' that large volumes of water can be sampled for trace organic pollutants by XAD resin columns which are designed by small column laboratory studies or pure compounds is examined and shown to be a problem. A theory of multicomponent breakthrough is presented as a frame of reference to help solve the problem and develop useable criteria to aid the design of resin columns. An important part of the theory is the effect of humic substances on the breakthrough character of multicomponent chemical systems.

  6. Fractionation of Natural Organic Matter Upon Adsorption to the Bacterium, Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manecki, M.; Maurice, P. A.; Fein, J. B.

    2001-12-01

    High pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was used to measure changes in molecular weight distribution and average molecular weight upon adsorption of fulvic acid onto Bacillus subtilis at pH 3-7. The FA was an XAD-8 extract from a stream in the New Jersey Pine Barrens (USA), and had a weight average molecular weight of 1890 Da. Adsorption of aqueous FA onto B.subtilis was relatively fast, with steady state attained within 2 hours. An adsorption isotherm at pH 4.5 revealed a strong affinity of FA for the B.subtilis surface. The maximum adsorption capacity of a 20g bacteria/L suspension was greater than 9 mg C/L of FA at pH 4.5. Adsorption of FA onto B.subtilis was strongly pH dependent, increasing markedly with decreasing pH over the pH range 3-7. Comparison of HPSEC analysis of control (FA not reacted with bacteria) versus reacted samples showed that in all experiments, the weight average molecular weight (Mw) of FA remaining in solution decreased by several hundred Da. The observed decrease in solution Mw upon adsorption indicated that the higher molecular weight FA components adsorbed preferentially to the bacterial surfaces, at all studied pH values (3-7). Additionally, there was a low molecular weight FA fraction that did not adsorb, even at low pH. Our results suggest that hydrophobic interactions may be important for FA sorption to B.subtilis and that low molecular weight, more hydrophilic components may thus be less likely to adsorb than higher molecular weight, more hydrophobic components.

  7. [Optimization of two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatographic columns for highly efficient separation of intact proteins].

    PubMed

    Hong, Guangfeng; Gao, Mingxia; Yan, Guoquan; Guan, Xia; Tao, Qian; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2010-02-01

    In order to optimize two-dimensional liquid chromatographic (2D-LC) columns for highly efficient separation of proteins, several liquid chromatographic columns were investigated and evaluated. Weak anion-exchange (WAX) column was chosen as the first dimension because of its extensive protein separation power. By comparison of different WAX chromatographic columns for human liver protein separation, TSKgel DEAE-5PW column was selected as the first dimension of a 2D-LC system. For the second dimension, ten typical reversed-phase (RP) LC columns (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm, 30 nm) were investigated and evaluated. Their silica based RP stationary phases were butyl (C4), octyl (C8) or octadecyl (C18). To evaluate the retention behavior and non-specific protein adsorption ability of these ten columns, four neutral compounds (uracil, nitrobenzene, naphthalene and fluorene) and three standard proteins (cytochrome C, myoglobin and albumin from chicken egg white) were adopted and separated by RPLC. Meantime, WAX fractions were used to investigate the separation ability of different alkyl-bonded silica stationary phase columns for complex protein samples. By comparison of column separation efficiency, adsorption of intact proteins and sample analysis, Jupiter 300 C4 column was finally employed for its excellent separation ability. Optimization of WAX and RPLC columns offers reliable foundation for the construction of 2D-LC protein separation systems.

  8. Mesoscopic simulation of adsorption of peptides in a hydrophobic chromatography system.

    PubMed

    Makrodimitris, Kosta; Fernandez, Erik J; Woolf, Thomas B; O'Connell, John P

    2005-03-01

    Mesoscopic simulations using Langevin dipoles on a lattice for the solvent and calculated partial charges for the solute have been used to estimate free energies of adsorption from data on reversed-phase chromatography on nine protected peptides covering a wide range of structures. There is a single parameter, the effective solvent dipole moment, that is fit to data for one peptide and used to predict properties of the other eight peptides. Good agreement of adsorption chemical potentials, including order of chromatographic retention times, is found for calculations that are Boltzmann-averaged over a set of orientations. In addition, the results suggest that there are preferential orientations for each peptide at the model hydrophobic chromatographic surface. Estimation methods for adsorption based on molecular descriptors and hydrophobicity scales are shown to be unreliable for these systems. With refinements and extensions, this simulation method should be applicable to solvents containing salt, such as in hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and to larger solutes including proteins.

  9. Integrated immobilized cell reactor-adsorption system for beta-cyclodextrin production: a model study using PVA-cryogel entrapped Bacillus agaradhaerens cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Rita F; Plieva, Fatima M; Santos, Ana; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2003-09-01

    Production of cyclodextrins (CDs) by immobilized cells of the alkaliphilic Bacillus agaradhaerens LS-3C with integrated product recovery was studied. The microorganism was entrapped in polyvinyl alcohol-cryogel beads and used as a convenient source of immobilized cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase). On activation by incubation in the cultivation medium containing 1% (w/v) starch, the entrapped cells multiplied and secreted CGTase with an activity of 2-3 mg beta-cyclodextrin h(-1) g(-1) beads. The immobilized biocatalyst exhibited maximum activity at pH 9 and 50 degrees C, and formed cyclodextrins comprising 92-94% beta-CD and remaining alpha-CD. The cyclodextrin product from the immobilized cell bioreactor was continuously recovered by adsorption to Amberlite XAD-4 in a recycle batch mode. The product adsorption was facilitated at low temperature while hot water was used for elution.

  10. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) coupled to XAD fractionation: Method to algal organic matter characterization.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, Rudy; Leloup, Maud; Lachassagne, Delphine; Pinault, Emilie; Feuillade-Cathalifaud, Geneviève

    2015-05-01

    This work is focused on the development of an analytical procedure for the improvement of the Organic Matter structure characterization, particularly the algal matter. Two fractions of algal organic matter from laboratory cultures of algae (Euglena gracilis) and cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa) were extracted with XAD resins. The fractions were studied using laser desorption ionization (LDI) and Matrix-Assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). A comparison with the natural organic matter characteristics from commercial humic acids and fulvic acids extracted from Suwannee River was performed. Results show that algal and natural organic matters have unique quasi-polymeric structures. Significant repeating patterns were identified. Different fractions extracted from organic matter with common origin had common structures. Thus, 44, 114 and 169Da peaks separation for fractions from E. gracilis organic matter and 28, 58 and 100Da for M. aeruginosa ones were clearly observed. Using the developed protocol, a structural scheme and organic matter composition were obtained. The range 600-2000Da contained more architectural composition differences than the range 100-600Da, suggesting that organic matter is composed of an assembly of common small molecules. Associated to specific monomers, particular patterns were common to all samples but assembly and resulting structure were unique for each organic matter. Thus, XAD fractionation coupled to mass spectroscopy allowed determining a specific fingerprint for each organic matter.

  11. Determination of trace heavy metals in soil and sediments by atomic spectrometry following preconcentration with Schiff bases on Amberlite XAD-4.

    PubMed

    Kara, Derya; Fisher, Andrew; Hill, Steve J

    2009-06-15

    A matrix separation and analyte preconcentration system using Amberlite XAD copolymer resins functionalized by Schiff base reactions coupled with atomic spectrometry has been developed. Three different functionalized Amberlite XAD resins were synthesized using 4-phenylthiosemicarbazide, 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde as reagents. These resins could be used to preconcentrate transition and other trace heavy metal analytes from nitric acid digests of soil and sediment samples. Analyte retention was shown to work well at pH 6.0. After treatment of the digests with sodium fluoride and buffering to pH 6, samples that contain extremely large concentrations of iron were analysed for trace analytes without the excess iron overloading the capacity of the resin. The analytes Cd, Co, Cu, Ni and Pb were preconcentrated from acid extracts of certified soil/sediment samples and then eluted with 0.1M HNO(3) directly to the detection system. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used as a means of detection during the studies. The efficiency of the chelating resin and the accuracy of the proposed method were evaluated by the analysis of soil (SO-2) and sediment (LGC 6157 and MESS-3) certified reference materials.

  12. Hand-held multiple system gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2001-01-01

    A multiple parallel hand-held gas chromatograph (GC) system which includes several independent GCs. Each independent GC has its own injector, separation column, detector and oven and the GCs are mounted in a light weight hand-held assembly. Each GC operates independently and simultaneously. Because of different coatings in different separation columns, different retention times for the same gas will be measured. Thus, for a GC system with multiple parallel GCs, the system can measure, in a short period, different retention times and provide a cross-reference in the determination of the measured gas and to become a two-dimensional system for direct field use.

  13. High pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, Christian G.; Sakaji, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A gradient mixer which effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum "band-broadening".

  14. High-pressure liquid chromatographic gradient mixer

    DOEpatents

    Daughton, C.G.; Sakaji, R.H.

    1982-09-08

    A gradient mixer effects the continuous mixing of any two miscible solvents without excessive decay or dispersion of the resultant isocratic effluent or of a linear or exponential gradient. The two solvents are fed under low or high pressure by means of two high performance liquid chromatographic pumps. The mixer comprises a series of ultra-low dead volume stainless steel tubes and low dead volume chambers. The two solvent streams impinge head-on at high fluxes. This initial nonhomogeneous mixture is then passed through a chamber packed with spirally-wound wires which cause turbulent mixing thereby homogenizing the mixture with minimum band-broadening.

  15. Packed multi-channels for parallel chromatographic separations in microchips.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andrea; Gaspar, Attila

    2013-08-23

    Here we report on a simple method to fabricate microfluidic chip incorporating multi-channel systems packed by conventional chromatographic particles without the use of frits. The retaining effectivities of different bottlenecks created in the channels were studied. For the parallel multi-channel chromatographic separations several channel patterns were designed. The obtained multipackings were applied for parallel separations of dyes. The implementation of several chromatographic separation units in microscopic size makes possible faster and high throughput separations.

  16. [Contamination mechanism and regeneration strategies of chromatographic resin in separation process for expression product from mammary gland bioreactor].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiyan; Zhang, Yan; Li, Yan; Luo, Jian; Qin, Peiyong; Su, Zhiguo

    2011-11-01

    This study focused on the contamination mechanism and regeneration strategies of sulfopropyl ion exchange resin (SP Sepharose FF) during the separation of recombinant human lactoferrin from transgenic bovine milk. We analyzed primary constituents' contents in chromatorgraphic material and fractions. The results showed that the lipid in milk can clog the column or adhere to the resin through hydrophobic interaction, leading to an increase in column pressure. Some casein molecules were found to adsorb onto the resin through electrostatic interaction, therefore the adsorption capacity was decreased. There was no direct interaction between lactose and the resin in the chromatorgraphic process. Increased continuous chromatographic cycles and prolonged time interval between protein purification and column regeneration could enhance the undesirable interaction between the contaminants and resin, thus lowering the regeneration efficiency. NaOH was found to be effective in the removal of lipid and casein molecules from the column. Furthermore, normal microstructure and chromatographic performance of the ion exchanger was recovered after this cleaning procedure.

  17. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  18. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.M.

    1998-04-28

    The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a high performance hand-held, real time detection gas chromatograph (HHGC) by Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this hand-held gas chromatograph is about five lbs., with a physical size of 8{close_quotes} x 5{close_quotes} x 3{close_quotes} including carrier gas and battery. It consumes about 12 watts of electrical power with a response time on the order of one to two minutes. This HHGC has an average effective theoretical plate of about 40k. Presently, its sensitivity is limited by its thermal sensitive detector at PPM. Like a conventional G.C., this HHGC consists mainly of three major components: (1) the sample injector, (2) the column, and (3) the detector with related electronics. The present HHGC injector is a modified version of the conventional injector. Its separation column is fabricated completely on silicon wafers by means of MEMS technology. This separation column has a circular cross section with a diameter of 100 pm. The detector developed for this hand-held GC is a thermal conductivity detector fabricated on a silicon nitride window by MEMS technology. A normal Wheatstone bridge is used. The signal is fed into a PC and displayed through LabView software.

  19. Versatile gas/particle ion chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Ullah, S M Rahmat; Takeuchi, Masaki; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2006-02-01

    A new, compact gas/particle ion chromatograph has been developed for measuring ionic constituents in PM2.5 (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm) and water-soluble ionogenic gases. The instrument has separate sampling channels for gases and particles. In one, a membrane denuder collects soluble gases for preconcentration and analysis. In the other, a cyclone removes larger particles, a membrane denuder removes soluble gases, and a continuously wetted hydrophilic filter collects particles. A single, multiport, syringe pump handles liquid transport, and one conductivity detector measures anions and ammonium for both channels. Electrodialytically generated gradient hydroxide eluent permits 20 min chromatographic runs. Gas/particle samples are each collected for 40 min, butthe sampling intervals are staggered by 20 min. Liquid samples from the gas denuder and particle collector are aspirated and preconcentrated on sequential cation and anion concentrators and transferred respectively to an ammonia transfer device and an anion separation column. The flow configuration results in an ammonium peak before anion peaks in the chromatogram. The system measures ammonia, organic acids (such as acetic, formic, and oxalic acids), HCl, HONO, SO2, HNO3, and the corresponding ions in the aerosol phase. Low ng/m3 to sub-ng/m3 limits of detection (LODs) are attained for most common gases and particulate constituents, the LODs for gaseous SO2 to NH3 range, for example, from sub parts per trillion by volume (sub-pptv) to approximately 5 pptv.

  20. Multicomponent separations using a continuous annular chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. By continuously introducing the feed material to be separated at a stationary point at the top of the bed and eluent everywhere else around the annulus, elution chromatography occurs. The rotation rate of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence, the separation process is truly continuous. The continuous separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt from an ammoniacal leach liquor has been used to evaluate the behavior and capabilities of a variety of continuous annular chromatographs (CACs). The experimental units ranged in diameter from 89 to 445 mm and in annulus width from 6 to 51 mm. The effects of feed rate, feed concentration, rotation rate, eluent and eluent velocity, and column size were experimentally determined and modeled to show how they affect the performance of a CAC system. Use of the described models should allow confident design of new CAC units for performing continuous separations on a preparative scale. With its capability for continuously separating many components using one or a number of eluents, the CAC should make chromatography a competitive process in many industrial applications. 21 tables, 105 figures.

  1. Chromatographic behavior of the enantiomers of 2,2,2-trifluoro-1-(9-anthryl)ethanol on a quinidine-carbamate chiral stational phase

    SciTech Connect

    Asnin, Leonid; Gotmar, Gustaf; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-08-01

    The enantioseparation of 2,2,2-trifluoro-1-(9-anthryl)ethanol on silica-bonded quinidine carbamate was examined under linear chromatographic conditions. The significant impact of nonselective adsorption on the retention was demonstrated. The influences of a polar additive in the mobile phase on the retention, the selectivity and the thermodynamic quantities of the retention were measured. A small effect of the pressure on the selectivity and on the accuracy of the thermodynamic measurements was observed.

  2. In situ and Ex situ adsorption and recovery of betalains from hairy root cultures of Beta vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Rudrappa, Thimmaraju; Neelwarne, Bhagyalakshmi; Aswathanarayana, Ravishankar G

    2004-01-01

    Various adsorbents were screened for in situ recovery of betalain pigments effluxed from hairy root cultures of red beet, Beta vulgaris. Alumina/silica (1:1) appeared ideal, showing in situ adsorption of 97% in a unit time of 30 min accounting for in situ recovery of 71.39% of the total betalaine effluxed. Other adsorbents such as Amberlite series (XAD-2 and -4), cyclodextrin, maltodextrin, dextrin white, and starches such as wheat starch and corn starch exhibited very poor in situ adsorption properties. Pretreatment of adsorbents with methanol significantly improved the adsorption capacities of some of the adsorbents, with a highest adsorption of 97.2% for alumina followed by alumina/silica (1:1) and higher adsorption by XAD-2 and -4. Complete in situ adsorption equilibrium was reached in 20 min for a solution containing 2.5 mg mL(-)(1) of betalain in adsorbents alumina, silica, and a mixture of alumina and silica. In situ betalain adsorption parameters for alumina/silica were determined using the Langmuir isotherm model where the adsorption capacity was found to be 0.174 mg g(-)(1) and the adsorption energy was 0.9 at pH 5.5 and 25 degrees C. Desorption of pigments from the adsorbents was invariably highest in poor adsorbents, indicating their poor adsorption energy for betalaines. Similarly, recovery by desorption was low in those adsorbents having high adsorption capacity, indicating that adsorbents such as activated ones with highest adsorption capacity with zero desorption property were unsuitable for the recovery of effluxed pigments. Ex situ recovery of betalain done using various combinations of alumina/silica and processed sand and different column geometries indicated that alumina with processed sand at a 2:1 ratio (w/w) and a minimum column material of 2 cm height and 2 cm diameter was good enough to cause 97% pigment adsorption from a solution containing 1.6 mg mL(-)(1). Desorption and recovery of pigments ex situ from columns were affected by various

  3. Gas-Chromatographic Determination Of Water In Freon PCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic apparatus measures small concentrations of water in specimens of Freon PCA. Testing by use of apparatus faster and provides greater protection against accidental contamination of specimens by water in testing environment. Automated for unattended operation. Also used to measure water contents of materials, other than Freon PCA. Innovation extended to development of purgeable sampling accessory for gas chromatographs.

  4. Gas-Chromatographic Determination Of Water In Freon PCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic apparatus measures small concentrations of water in specimens of Freon PCA. Testing by use of apparatus faster and provides greater protection against accidental contamination of specimens by water in testing environment. Automated for unattended operation. Also used to measure water contents of materials, other than Freon PCA. Innovation extended to development of purgeable sampling accessory for gas chromatographs.

  5. Removal of non-biodegradable organic matter from landfill leachates by adsorption.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J; Castrillón, L; Marañón, E; Sastre, H; Fernández, E

    2004-01-01

    Leachates produced at the La Zoreda landfill in Asturias, Spain, were recirculated through a simulated landfill pilot plant. Prior to recirculation, three loads of different amounts of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) were added to the plant, forming in this way consecutive layers. When anaerobic digestion was almost completed, the leachates from the landfill were recirculated. After recirculation, a new load of MSW was added and two new recirculations were carried out. The organic load of the three landfill leachates recirculated through the anaerobic pilot plant decreased from initial values of 5108, 3782 and 2560 mg/l to values of between 1500 and 1600 mg/l. Despite achieving reductions in the organic load of the leachate, a residual organic load still remained that was composed of non-biodegradable organic constituents such as humic substances. Similar values of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) were obtained when the landfill leachate was treated by a pressurised anoxic-aerobic process followed by ultrafiltration. After recirculation through the pilot plant, physico-chemical treatment was carried out to reduce the COD of the leachate. The pH of the leachate was decreased to a value of 1.5 to precipitate the humic fraction, obtaining a reduction in COD of about 13.5%. The supernatant liquid was treated with activated carbon and different resins, XAD-8, XAD-4 and IR-120. Activated carbon presented the highest adsorption capacities, obtaining COD values for the treated leachate in the order of 200mg/l. Similar results were obtained when treating with activated carbon, the leachate from the biological treatment plant at the La Zoreda landfill; in this case without decreasing the pH.

  6. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  7. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  8. Gas Chromatographic Detectors for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Humphry, Donald E.; Takeuchi, Nori; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ chemical analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. Future missions to Mars', comets, or planetary moons such as Europa, will perform experiments with complex analyses. In addition, instrumentation for such missions must perform under severely restricted conditions with limited resources. To meet these analytical requirements, improved methods and highly sensitive yet smaller instruments must continually be developed with increasingly greater capabilities. We describe here efforts to achieve this objective, for past and future missions, through the development of new or the improvement of existing sensitive, miniaturized gas chromatographic detectors.

  9. Detection system for a gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, John M.; Small, Gerald J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for the quantitative analysis of vaporizable compounds, and in particular of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which may be induced to fluoresce. The sample to be analyzed is injected into a gas chromatography column and is eluted through a narrow orifice into a vacuum chamber. The free expansion of the eluted sample into the vacuum chamber creates a supersonic molecular beam in which the sample molecules are cooled to the extent that the excited vibrational and rotational levels are substantially depopulated. The cooled molecules, when induced to fluoresce by laser excitation, give greatly simplified spectra suitable for analytical purposes. The laser induced fluorimetry provides great selectivity, and the gas chromatograph provides quantitative transfer of the sample to the molecular beam.

  10. Liquid chromatographic determination of melamine in beverages.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, H; Inoue, T; Yamazaki, T; Yoshihira, K

    1987-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method is described for the determination of melamine in beverages. Melamine is separated by column chromatography using cation and anion exchange resin and determined by ion-pair liquid chromatography using an ODS column and a mixture of acetonitrile and 0.05M phosphate buffer (pH 3.0) containing 0.005M sodium 1-laurylsulfate (1 + 4, v/v) as mobile phase. Recoveries of melamine ranged between 90.3 +/- 7.8 and 102.1 +/- 5.6% at levels of 0.6 to 2.4 ppm in 4 kinds of beverages. The quantitation limit was 2.5 micrograms melamine in 50 mL beverage. The method was applied to the migration test of melamine from melamine-formaldehyde resin products to the beverages.

  11. Chromatographic and electrophoretic approaches in ink analysis.

    PubMed

    Zlotnick, J A; Smith, F P

    1999-10-15

    Inks are manufactured from a wide variety of substances that exhibit very different chemical behaviors. Inks designed for use in different writing instruments or printing methods have quite dissimilar components. Since the 1950s chromatographic and electrophoretic methods have played important roles in the analysis of inks, where compositional information may have bearing on the investigation of counterfeiting, fraud, forgery, and other crimes. Techniques such as paper chromatography and electrophoresis, thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, gel electrophoresis, and the relatively new technique of capillary electrophoresis have all been explored as possible avenues for the separation of components of inks. This paper reviews the components of different types of inks and applications of the above separation methods are reviewed.

  12. Fast gas chromatographic separation of biodiesel.

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, R. E.

    2011-05-01

    A high-speed gas chromatographic method has been developed to determine the FAME distribution of B100 biodiesel. The capillary column used in this work has dimensions of 20 m x 0.100 mm and is coated with a polyethylene glycol film. Analysis times are typically on the order of 4-5 min depending upon the composition of the B100. The application of this method to a variety of vegetable and animal derived B100 is demonstrated. Quantitative results obtained with this method were in close agreement with those obtained by a more conventional approach on a 100 m column. The method, coupled with solid-phase extraction, was also found suitable to determine the B100 content of biodiesel-diesel blends.

  13. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  14. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  15. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everwhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separation components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m0-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory.

  16. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everywhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory. 17 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  17. High-capacity pressurized continuous chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Byers, C.H.; Sisson, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. The feed material is continuously introduced at a stationary point at the top of the bed, and eluent is allowed to flow everywhere else around the annulus. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effects of annulus width and diameter have been studied using the same device with annulus widths up to 114.3 mm. With this largest width, approximately 96% of the area available within the outer cylinder is devoted to the rotating sorbent bed. Further annulus-width studies have been pursued on units with 89- and 445-mm diameters. These geometric extensions to the basic concept allow extremely large capacity increases with minimal loss in separation and no increase in chromatograph diameter. The effects associated with increased feed concentration have also been studied. In this effort as well as in the annulus-width program, the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a carbonate solution was studied in detail. The nickel and cobalt components are found in the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Nominally 50-..mu..m-diam Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchange resin was used as the bed material. The nickel concentration of the feed was varied tenfold, from 136.1 to approximately 1400 meq/L. The combined effects of the bed loading and annulus width were studied and compared with nonlinear theory. 9 figures, 1 table.

  18. Quantitative structure-(chromatographic) retention relationships.

    PubMed

    Héberger, Károly

    2007-07-27

    Since the pioneering works of Kaliszan (R. Kaliszan, Quantitative Structure-Chromatographic Retention Relationships, Wiley, New York, 1987; and R. Kaliszan, Structure and Retention in Chromatography. A Chemometric Approach, Harwood Academic, Amsterdam, 1997) no comprehensive summary is available in the field. Present review covers the period of 1996-August 2006. The sources are grouped according to the special properties of kinds of chromatography: Quantitative structure-retention relationship in gas chromatography, in planar chromatography, in column liquid chromatography, in micellar liquid chromatography, affinity chromatography and quantitative structure enantioselective retention relationships. General tendencies, misleading practice and conclusions, validation of the models, suggestions for future works are summarized for each sub-field. Some straightforward applications are emphasized but standard ones. The sources and the model compounds, descriptors, predicted retention data, modeling methods and indicators of their performance, validation of models, and stationary phases are collected in the tables. Some important conclusions are: Not all physicochemical descriptors correlate with the retention data strongly; the heat of formation is not related to the chromatographic retention. It is not appropriate to give the errors of Kovats indices in percentages. The apparently low values (1-3%) can disorient the reviewers and readers. Contemporary mean interlaboratory reproducibility of Kovats indices are about 5-10 i.u. for standard non polar phases and 10-25 i.u. for standard polar phases. The predictive performance of QSRR models deteriorates as the polarity of GC stationary phase increases. The correlation coefficient alone is not a particularly good indicator for the model performance. Residuals are more useful than plots of measured and calculated values. There is no need to give the retention data in a form of an equation if the numbers of compounds are

  19. FTIR gas chromatographic analysis of perfumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, H.; Stout, Phillip J.; Hill, Stephen L.; Krishnan, K.

    1992-03-01

    Perfumes, natural or synthetic, are complex mixtures consisting of numerous components. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques have been extensively utilized for the analysis of perfumes and essential oils. A limited number of perfume samples have also been analyzed by FT-IR gas chromatographic (GC-FTIR) techniques. Most of the latter studies have been performed using the conventional light pipe (LP) based GC-FTIR systems. In recent years, cold-trapping (in a matrix or neat) GC-FTIR systems have become available. The cold-trapping systems are capable of sub-nanogram sensitivities. In this paper, comparison data between the LP and the neat cold-trapping GC- FTIR systems is presented. The neat cold-trapping interface is known as Tracer. The results of GC-FTIR analysis of some commercial perfumes is also presented. For comparison of LP and Tracer GC-FTIR systems, a reference (synthetic) mixture containing 16 major and numerous minor constituents was used. The components of the mixture are the compounds commonly encountered in commercial perfumes. The GC-FTIR spectra of the reference mixture was obtained under identical chromatographic conditions from an LP and a Tracer system. A comparison of the two sets of data thus generated do indeed show the enhanced sensitivity level of the Tracer system. The comparison also shows that some of the major components detected by the Tracer system were absent from the LP data. Closer examination reveals that these compounds undergo thermal decomposition on contact with the hot gold surface that is part of the LP system. GC-FTIR data were obtained for three commercial perfume samples. The major components of these samples could easily be identified by spectra search against a digitized spectral library created using the Tracer data from the reference mixture.

  20. Numerical estimation of adsorption energy distributions from adsorption isotherm data with the expectation-maximization method

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, B.J.; Guiochon, G. |

    1993-08-01

    The expectation-maximization (EM) method of parameter estimation is used to calculate adsorption energy distributions of molecular probes from their adsorption isotherms. EM does not require prior knowledge of the distribution function or the isotherm, requires no smoothing of the isotherm data, and converges with high stability towards the maximum-likelihood estimate. The method is therefore robust and accurate at high iteration numbers. The EM algorithm is tested with simulated energy distributions corresponding to unimodal Gaussian, bimodal Gaussian, Poisson distributions, and the distributions resulting from Misra isotherms. Theoretical isotherms are generated from these distributions using the Langmuir model, and then chromatographic band profiles are computed using the ideal model of chromatography. Noise is then introduced in the theoretical band profiles comparable to those observed experimentally. The isotherm is then calculated using the elution-by-characteristic points method. The energy distribution given by the EM method is compared to the original one. Results are contrasted to those obtained with the House and Jaycock algorithm HILDA, and shown to be superior in terms of robustness, accuracy, and information theory. The effect of undersampling of the high-pressure/low-energy region of the adsorption is reported and discussed for the EM algorithm, as well as the effect of signal-to-noise ratio on the degree of heterogeneity that may be estimated experimentally.

  1. Analytical solutions and moment analysis of chromatographic models for rectangular pulse injections.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Shamsul; Abbasi, Javeria N; Javeed, Shumaila; Shah, Munawar; Khan, Farman U; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2013-11-08

    This work focuses on the analysis of two standard liquid chromatographic models, namely the lumped kinetic model and the equilibrium dispersive model. Analytical solutions, obtained by means of Laplace transformation, are derived for rectangular single solute concentration pulses of finite length and breakthrough curves injected under linear conditions. In order to analyze the solute transport behavior by means of the two models, the temporal moments up to fourth order are calculated from the Laplace-transformed solutions. The limiting cases of continuous injection and negligible mass transfer limitations are evaluated. For validation, the analytical solutions are compared with the numerical solutions of models using the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. Results of different case studies are discussed for linear and nonlinear adsorption isotherms. The discontinuous Galerkin method is employed to obtain moments for both linear and nonlinear models numerically. Analytically and numerically determined concentration profiles and moments were found to be in good agreement.

  2. Rapid process development of chromatographic process using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry as a process analytical technology tool.

    PubMed

    Yan, Binjun; Chen, Teng; Xu, Zhilin; Qu, Haibin

    2014-06-01

    The concept of quality by design (QbD) is widely applied in the process development of pharmaceuticals. However, the additional cost and time have caused some resistance about QbD implementation. To show a possible solution, this work proposed a rapid process development method, which used direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool for studying the chromatographic process of Ginkgo biloba L., as an example. The breakthrough curves were fast determined by DART-MS at-line. A high correlation coefficient of 0.9520 was found between the concentrations of ginkgolide A determined by DART-MS and HPLC. Based on the PAT tool, the impacts of process parameters on the adsorption capacity were discovered rapidly, which showed a decreased adsorption capacity with the increase of the flow rate. This work has shown the feasibility and advantages of integrating PAT into QbD implementation for rapid process development.

  3. Adsorption bed models used in simulation of atmospheric control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    Two separate techniques were used to obtain important basic data for the adsorption of seven liquid and eight gaseous trace contaminants. A columetric system used in previous HSC studies was modified to determine the HSC capacity of all the contaminants. A second study of six of the liquids was performed in a gas chromatorgraph. The results of these two studies are reported in two parts. First, a brief summary of the chromatographic results are given. Second, a thesis is given which reports in some detail the results of the volumetric studies. Comparison of the data that are common to both studies are also included.

  4. Simultaneous preconcentration of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) from environmental samples on Amberlite XAD-2000 column and determination by FAAS.

    PubMed

    Duran, Celal; Senturk, Hasan Basri; Elci, Latif; Soylak, Mustafa; Tufekci, Mehmet

    2009-02-15

    A new method for the preconcentration of some trace metals (Co, Ni, Cu, and Cd) as complexed with ammonium pyrrolidynedithiocarbamate (APDC) was developed using a mini-column filled with Amberlite XAD-2000 resin. Metal contents were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) after the metal complexes accumulated on the resin were eluted with 1M HNO(3) in acetone. The effects of the analytical parameters such as sample pH, quantity of complexing agent, eluent type, resin quantity, sample volume, sample flow rate, and matrix ions were investigated on the recovery of the metals from aqueous solutions. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of the method was <6%. The validation of the method was confirmed using two certified reference materials (CRM TMDW-500 Drinking Water and CRM SA-C Sandy Soil C). The method was successfully applied to some stream waters and mushroom samples from Eastern Black Sea Region (Trabzon city) of Turkey.

  5. An advanced hybrid reprocessing system based on UF{sub 6} volatilization and chromatographic separation

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yuezhou; Liu, Ruiqin; Wu, Yan; Zu, Jianhua; Zhao, Long; Mimura, Hitoshi; Shi, Weiqun; Chai, Zhifang; Yang, Jinling; Ding, Youqian

    2013-07-01

    To recover U, Pu, MA (Np, Am, Cm) and some specific fission products FPs (Cs, Sr, Tc, etc.) from various spent nuclear fuels (LWR/FBR: Oxide, Metal Fuels), we are studying an advanced hybrid reprocessing system based on UF6 volatilization (Pyro) and chromatographic separation (Aqueous). Spent fuels are de-cladded by means of thermal and mechanical methods and then applied to the fluorination/volatilization process, which selectively recovers the most amount of U. Then, the remained fuel components are converted to oxides and dissolved by HNO{sub 3} solution. Compared to U, since Pu, MA and FPs are significantly less abundant in spent fuels, the scale of the aqueous separation process could become reasonably small and result in less waste. For the chromatographic separation processes, we have prepared different types of porous silica-based organic/inorganic adsorbents with fast diffusion kinetics, improved chemical stability and low pressure drop in a packed column. So they are advantageously applicable to efficient separation of the actinides and FP elements from the fuel dissolved solution. In this work, adsorption and separation behavior of representative actinides and FP elements was studied. Small scale separation tests using simulated and genuine fuel dissolved solutions were carried out to verify the feasibility of the proposed process. (authors)

  6. Comparison of polyurethane foam and XAD-2 sampling matrices to measure airborne organophosphorus pesticides and their oxygen analogs in an agricultural community.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jenna L; Fenske, Richard A; Yost, Michael G; Tchong-French, Maria; Yu, Jianbo

    2013-07-01

    Side-by-side active air sampling for the organophosphorus (OP) pesticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF) and its oxygen analog, chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-O) was conducted with two recommended air sampling matrices: OSHA Versatile Sampling (OVS) tubes with XAD-2 resin, polyurethane foam (PUF) tubes, and passive PUF deposition disks. The study compared the proportion of artificially transformed CPF-O in the laboratory and in the field during a tree fruit application in Washington State. Lab results demonstrated that the NIOSH-recommended OVS tubes artificially transformed up to 32% of CPF to CPF-O during the sampling process, whereas PUF tubes had little to no artificial transformation (⩽0.1%). In the field, the proportion of CPF-O in the sample was significantly higher on OVS tubes than on PUF tubes (p<0.001), confirming that OVS tubes were converting a significant portion of CPF to CPF-O. In addition, PUF tubes reported measurable levels CPF-O in the field even when no artificial transformation was expected. We conclude that the PUF matrix is the superior sampling medium for OP oxygen analogs when compared to XAD-two resin. Community-located PUF tube samples 24h post-application had considerably higher levels CPF-O (16-21ngm(-3)) than near field samples during application (2-14ngm(-3)), suggesting that the oxygen analog is volatile and formed during atmospheric transport. It is recommended that worker and community risk assessments begin to take into consideration the presence of the more toxic oxygen analogs when measuring for OP pesticide mixtures.

  7. Comparison of polyurethane foam and XAD-2 sampling matrices to measure airborne organophosphorus pesticides and their oxygen analogs in an agricultural community

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Jenna L.; Fenske, Richard A.; Yost, Michael G.; Tchong-French, Maria; Yu, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Side-by-side active air sampling for the organophosphorus (OP) pesticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF) and its oxygen analog, chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-O) was conducted with two recommended air sampling matrices: OSHA Versatile Sampling (OVS) tubes with XAD-2 resin, polyurethane foam (PUF) tubes, and passive PUF deposition disks. The study compared the proportion of artificially transformed CPF-O in the laboratory and in the field during a tree fruit application in Washington State. Lab results demonstrated that the NIOSH-recommended OVS tubes artificially transformed up to 32% of CPF to CPF-O during the sampling process, whereas PUF tubes had little to no artificial transformation (≤ 0.1%). In the field, the proportion of CPF-O in the sample was significantly higher on OVS tubes than on PUF tubes (p < 0.001), confirming that OVS tubes were converting a significant portion of CPF to CPF-O. In addition, PUF tubes reported measurable levels CPF-O in the field even when no artificial transformation was expected. We conclude that the PUF matrix is the superior sampling medium for OP oxygen analogs when compared to XAD-2 resin. Community-located PUF tube samples 24 hours post-application had considerably higher levels CPF-O (16–21 ng/m3) than near field samples during application (2–14 ng/m3), suggesting that the oxygen analog is volatile and formed during atmospheric transport. It is recommended that worker and community risk assessments begin to take into consideration the presence of the more toxic oxygen analogs when measuring for OP pesticide mixtures. PMID:23466277

  8. Kinetic of carbonic anhydrase immobilized onto amberlite xad 7 and it application in sequestration of co2 into caco3 precipitate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafidi, Siti Noor Hazirah Mohd; Nadia Abdullah, Siti; Hamzah, Fazlena

    2017-08-01

    Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) was immobilized onto Amberlite XAD 7 and was used in carbon dioxide sequestration purposes. The catalytic activities for free and immobilized CA were estimated by using para-Nitrophenyl Acetate (p-NPA) as the substrate in Tris-buffer containing 10% of acetonitrile. Lineweaver-Burk plot was employed to estimate the Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for both free and immobilized CA. Km value of free and immobilized CA were 2.92 mM and 5.7 mM respectively. Meanwhile the Vmax value of free and immobilized CA were 5.95 μ moles/min/ml and 2.67 μ moles/min/ml respectively. The kinetic value obtained in the present study shown that the immobilized CA has high affinity for its substrate. On the other hand, activity and stability study at various pH and temperature indicates that the optimum pH for free CA was found to be at pH 9 while for immobilized CA was at pH 10. For optimum temperature, a free CA was performed optimally at temperature 25°C and immobilized CA was working effectively at temperature 50°C. The immobilized CA onto Amberlite was tested in the CO2 sequestration process and the formation of the white CaCO3 precipitate was observed during the process. CaCO3 powder obtained during the process was validated with the XRD analysis. The finding indicated that immobilized CA onto Amberlite XAD7 retained it enzymatic activity and stability and thus perform well in the CO2 sequestration which gave the white CaCO3 precipitate.

  9. Pleurotus eryngii immobilized Amberlite XAD-16 as a solid-phase biosorbent for preconcentrations of Cd2+ and Co2+ and their determination by ICP-OES.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Sadin; Okumuş, Veysi; Kılınç, Ersin; Bilgetekin, Havin; Dündar, Abdurrahman; Ziyadanogˇulları, Berrin

    2012-09-15

    This article reports a method that is used for the preconcentration and determination of Cd(2+) and Co(2+) in vegetables, using Pleurotus eryngii immobilized Amberlite XAD-16 as a solid-phase biosorbent. The concentrations of metals were determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical spectrometry (ICP-OES). Critical parameters, such as the pH of the solution, flow rate, the amount of biosorbent, type and volume of eluent, and the sample volume, that affect the solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure were optimized. The optimum extraction conditions were determined as being a pH of 6.0 for Cd(2+) and of 5.0 for Co(2+); a sample flow rate of 2.0 mL min(-1); 200.0mg of biosorbent; and 5.0 mL of 1.0 mol L(-1) HCl as eluent. The capacities of the biosorbent for metal uptake were found to be 11.3 and 9.8 mg g(-1) for Cd(2+) and Co(2+) ions, respectively. Limit of quantitations (LOQs) were found to be 0.67 and 0.82 ng mL(-1), respectively, for Cd(2+) and Co(2+). The linear working curves were observed to be in the linear range from 1.0 to 50.0 ng mL(-1), and possessed high correlation coefficients. The use of the SPE method showed 50.7- and 35.7-fold improvements in the sensitivities of ICP-OES. The developed method was successfully applied to NCS ZC-73014 (a certified reference tea sample). Relative standard deviations (RSD) were lower than 5.0%. The Cd(2+) and Co(2+) concentrations in the different parts (leave, root, stem, and fruit) of purslane, onion, rocket, okra, and aubergine were determined after microwave digestion and solid-phase extraction by P. eryngii immobilized on Amberlite XAD-16.

  10. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatogrpahic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressin...

  11. Adsorption behavior of alpha -cypermethrin on cork and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Valentina F; Priolo, Giuseppe; Alves, Arminda C; Cabral, Miguel F; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2007-08-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the adsorption behavior of alpha -cypermethrin [R)-alpha -cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl(1S)-cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate, and (S)-alpha-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (1R)-cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate] in solutions on granules of cork and activated carbon (GAC). The adsorption studies were carried out using a batch equilibrium technique. A gas chromatograph with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) was used to analyze alpha -cypermethrin after solid phase extraction with C18 disks. Physical properties including real density, pore volume, surface area and pore diameter of cork were evaluated by mercury porosimetry. Characterization of cork particles showed variations thereby indicating the highly heterogeneous structure of the material. The average surface area of cork particles was lower than that of GAC. Kinetics adsorption studies allowed the determination of the equilibrium time - 24 hours for both cork (1-2 mm and 3-4 mm) and GAC. For the studied alpha -cypermethrin concentration range, GAC revealed to be a better sorbent. However, adsorption parameters for equilibrium concentrations, obtained through the Langmuir and Freundlich models, showed that granulated cork 1-2 mm have the maximum amount of adsorbed alpha-cypermethrin (q(m)) (303 microg/g); followed by GAC (186 microg/g) and cork 3-4 mm (136 microg/g). The standard deviation (SD) values, demonstrate that Freundlich model better describes the alpha -cypermethrin adsorption phenomena on GAC, while alpha -cypermethrin adsorption on cork (1-2 mm and 3-4 mm) is better described by the Langmuir. In view of the adsorption results obtained in this study it appears that granulated cork may be a better and a cheaper alternative to GAC for removing alpha -cypermethrin from water.

  12. Mechanisms of chain adsorption on porous substrates and critical conditions of polymer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Richard T; Rasmussen, Christopher J; Brun, Yefim; Neimark, Alexander V

    2016-11-01

    Polymer adsorption is a ubiquitous phenomenon with numerous technological and healthcare applications. The mechanisms of polymer adsorption on surfaces and in pores are complex owing to a competition between various entropic and enthalpic factors. Due to adsorption of monomers to the surface, the chain gains in enthalpy yet loses in entropy because of confining effects. This competition leads to the existence of critical conditions of adsorption when enthalpy gain and entropy loss are in balance. The critical conditions are controlled by the confining geometry and effective adsorption energy, which depends on the solvent composition and temperature. This phenomenon has important implications in polymer chromatography, since the retention at the critical point of adsorption (CPA) is chain length independent. However, the mechanisms of polymer adsorption in pores are poorly understood and there is an ongoing discussion in the theoretical literature about the very existence of CPA for polymer adsorption on porous substrates. In this work, we examine the mechanisms of chain adsorption on a model porous substrate using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. We distinguish three adsorption mechanisms depending on the chain location: on external surface, completely confined in pores, and also partially confined in pores in so-called "flower" conformations. The free energies of different conformations of adsorbed chains are calculated by the incremental gauge cell MC method that allows one to determine the partition coefficient as a function of the adsorption potential, pore size, and chain length. We confirm the existence of the CPA for chain length independent separation on porous substrates, which is explained by the dominant contributions of the chain adsorption at the external surface, in particular in flower conformations. Moreover, we show that the critical conditions for porous and nonporous substrates are identical and depend only on the surface chemistry. The theoretical

  13. Chromatographic analysis of olopatadine in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maksić, Jelena; Jovanović, Marko; Rakić, Tijana; Popović, Igor; Ivanović, Darko; Jančić-Stojanović, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, chromatographic analysis of active substance olopatadine hydrochloride, which is used in eye drops as antihistaminic agent, and its impurity E isomer by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and application of design of experiments (DoE) methodology are presented. In addition, benzalkonium chloride is very often used as a preservative in eye drops. Therefore, the evaluation of its chromatographic behavior in HILIC was carried out as well. In order to estimate chromatographic behavior and set optimal chromatographic conditions, DoE methodology was applied. After the selection of important chromatographic factors, Box-Behnken design was utilized, and on the basis of the obtained models factor effects were examined. Then, multi-objective robust optimization is performed aiming to obtain chromatographic conditions that comply with several quality criteria simultaneously: adequate and robust separation of critical peak pair and maximum retention of the first eluting peak. The optimal conditions are identified by using grid point search methodology. The experimental verification confirmed the adequacy of the defined optimal conditions. Finally, under optimal chromatographic conditions, the method was validated and applicability of the proposed method was confirmed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Adsorption and removal kinetics of phosphonate from water using natural adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Anil; Velayudhan, K T; Ramachandran, V; Bhai, R Susheela; Unnikrishnan, G; Vasu, K

    2010-01-01

    The removal of phosphonate from water was studied using some natural adsorbents. Potassium phosphonate is a fungicide used for the control of Phytophthora capsici, which is prevalent in black pepper (Piper nigrum L.). Batch adsorption kinetic experiments were conducted on the adsorption of phosphonate onto the adsorbents. The concentration of phosphonate was measured on a high-performance liquid chromatograph fitted with a conductivity detector. The percentage removal of phosphonate by powdered laterite stone (PLS) from water was 40.4%, within a residence time of 15 minutes. The mechanisms of the rate of adsorption were analyzed and compared using the pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models. The experimental data was found to correlate well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating adsorption as a chemisorption process. A possible reaction in the phosphonate-PLS system also has been proposed. The PLS can be used as a low-cost natural adsorbent for phosphonate removal from water.

  15. Chromatographic Separations of Enantiomers and Underivatized Oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying

    2004-01-01

    My graduate research has focused on separation science and bioanalytical analysis, which emphasized in method development. It includes three major areas: enantiomeric separations using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Super/subcritical fluid chromatography (SFC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE); drug-protein binding behavior studies using CE; and carbohydrate analysis using liquid chromatograph-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Enantiomeric separations continue to be extremely important in the pharmaceutical industry. An in-depth evaluation of the enantiomeric separation capabilities of macrocyclic glycopeptides CSPs with SFC mobile phases was investigated using a set of over 100 chiral compounds. It was found that the macrocyclic based CSPs were able to separate enantiomers of various compounds with different polarities and functionalities. Seventy percent of all separations were achieved in less than 4 min due to the high flow rate (4.0 ml/min) that can be used in SFC. Drug-protein binding is an important process in determining the activity and fate of a drug once it enters the body. Two drug/protein systems have been studied using frontal analysis CE method. More sensitive fluorescence detection was introduced in this assay, which overcame the problem of low sensitivity that is common when using UV detection for drug-protein studies. In addition, the first usage of an argon ion laser with 257 nm beam coupled with CCD camera as a frontal analysis detection method enabled the simultaneous observation of drug fluorescence as well as the protein fluorescence. LC-ESI-MS was used for the separation and characterization of underivatized oligosaccharide mixtures. With the limits of detection as low as 50 picograms, all individual components of oligosaccharide mixtures (up to 11 glucose-units long) were baseline resolved on a Cyclobond I 2000 column and detected using ESI-MS. This system is characterized by high chromatographic

  16. Studies on improved integrated membrane-based chromatographic process for bioseparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanke

    To improve protein separation and purification directly from a fermentation broth, a novel membrane filtration-cum-chromatography device configuration having a relatively impermeable coated zone near the hollow fiber module outlet has been developed. The integrated membrane filtration-cum-chromatography unit packed with chromatographic beads on the shell side of the hollow fiber unit enjoys the advantages of both membrane filtration and chromatography; it allows one to load the chromatographic media directly from the fermentation broth or lysate and separate the adsorbed proteins through the subsequent elution step in a cyclic process. Interfacial polymerization was carried out to coat the bottom section of the hollow fiber membrane while leaving the rest of the hollow fiber membrane unaffected. Myoglobin (Mb), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a-lactalbumin (a-LA) were used as model proteins in binary mixtures. Separation behaviors of binary protein mixtures were studied in devices using either an ultrafiltration (UF) membrane or a microfiltration (MF) membrane. Experimental results show that the breakthrough time and the protein loading capacities were dramatically improved after coating in both UF and MF modules. For a synthetic yeast fermentation broth feed, the Mb and a-LA elution profiles for the four consecutive cyclic runs were almost superimposable. Due to the lower transmembrane flux in this device plus the periodical washing-elution during the chromatographic separation, fouling was not a problem as it is in conventional microfiltration. A mathematical model describing the hydrodynamic and protein loading behaviors of the integrated device using UF membrane with a coated zone was developed. The simulation results for the breakthrough agree well with the experimental breakthrough curves. The optimal length of the coated zone was obtained from the simulation. A theoretical analysis of the protein mass transfer was performed using a diffusion-convection model

  17. Separative analyses of a chromatographic column packed with a core-shell adsorbent for lithium isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, T.; Sugura, K.; Enokida, Y.; Yamamoto, I.

    2015-03-15

    Lithium-6 is used as a blanket material for sufficient tritium production in DT fueled fusion reactors. A core-shell type adsorbent was proposed for lithium isotope separation by chromatography. The mass transfer model in a chromatographic column consisted of 4 steps, such as convection and dispersion in the column, transfer through liquid films, intra-particle diffusion and and adsorption or desorption at the local adsorption sites. A model was developed and concentration profiles and time variation in the column were numerically simulated. It became clear that core-shell type adsorbents with thin porous shell were saturated rapidly relatively to fully porous one and established a sharp edge of adsorption band. This is very important feature because lithium isotope separation requires long-distance development of adsorption band. The values of HETP (Height Equivalent of a Theoretical Plate) for core-shell adsorbent packed column were estimated by statistical moments of the step response curve. The value of HETP decreased with the thickness of the porous shell. A core-shell type adsorbent is, then, useful for lithium isotope separation. (authors)

  18. Tailing of chromatographic peaks in GC-MS caused by interaction of halogenated solvents with the ion source.

    PubMed

    Brocks, Jochen J; Hope, Janet M

    2014-07-01

    The injection of analytes into a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system using dichloromethane (DCM) as solvent led to gradual deterioration of chromatographic signals, with significant tailing and loss of sensitivity for C17+ hydrocarbons. The injector, gas chromatograph and transfer line were excluded as causes. Normal peak shape could only be restored by the insertion of a cleaned MS ion source. To elucidate potential surficial contaminants, the ion source was heated from 260 to 320°C, leading to the release of increasing concentrations of ferrous chloride [FeCl2(g)]. The ferrous chloride probably formed through the decomposition of DCM on metal surfaces in the ion source. We posit that the tailing was caused by the adsorption of analytes to sub-µm layers of FeCl2 at crystal defect sites in the metal, followed by the slow release of molecules back into the gas phase. There are at least two other cases in the literature in which tailing is specifically associated with the use of halogenated solvents. However, it is possible that the problem is relatively common, albeit rarely diagnosed and reported. The tailing of chromatographic peaks caused by the formation of ferrous chloride in the mass spectrometer can be diagnosed by scanning the MS background signal for the diagnostic isotopic pattern of FeCl2(+). The problem is easily solved by cleaning the MS ion source and avoiding halogenated solvents.

  19. Generalized random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarjus, G.; Schaaf, P.; Talbot, J.

    1990-12-01

    Adsorption of hard spherical particles onto a flat uniform surface is analyzed by using generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) models. These models are defined by releasing the condition of immobility present in the usual RSA rules to allow for desorption or surface diffusion. Contrary to the simple RSA case, generalized RSA processes are no longer irreversible and the system formed by the adsorbed particles on the surface may reach an equilibrium state. We show by using a distribution function approach that the kinetics of such processes can be described by means of an exact infinite hierarchy of equations reminiscent of the Kirkwood-Salsburg hierarchy for systems at equilibrium. We illustrate the way in which the systems produced by adsorption/desorption and by adsorption/diffusion evolve between the two limits represented by ``simple RSA'' and ``equilibrium'' by considering approximate solutions in terms of truncated density expansions.

  20. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  1. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  2. Mars surface gas chromatograph mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.

    2000-01-01

    A Mars surface lander Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) is described to measure the chemical composition of abundant and trace volatile species and isotope ratios for noble gases and other elements. These measurements are relevant to the study of atmospheric evolution and past climatic conditions. A Micromission plan is under study where a surface package including a miniaturized GCMS would be delivered to the surface by a solar heated hot air balloon based system. The balloon system would be deployed about 8 km above the surface of Mars, wherein it would rapidly fill with Martian atmosphere and be heated quickly by the sun. The combined buoyancy and parachuting effects of the solar balloon result in a surface package impact of about 5 m/sec. After delivery of the package to the surface, the balloon would ascend to about 4 km altitude, with imaging and magnetometry data being taken for the remainder of the daylight hours as the balloon is blown with the Martian winds. Total atmospheric entry mass of this mission is estimated to be approximately 50 kg, and it can fit as an Ariane 5 piggyback payload.

  3. Chromatographic Techniques for Rare Earth Elements Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhang, Huashan; Jiang, Zucheng; Hu, Bin

    2017-04-01

    The present capability of rare earth element (REE) analysis has been achieved by the development of two instrumental techniques. The efficiency of spectroscopic methods was extraordinarily improved for the detection and determination of REE traces in various materials. On the other hand, the determination of REEs very often depends on the preconcentration and separation of REEs, and chromatographic techniques are very powerful tools for the separation of REEs. By coupling with sensitive detectors, many ambitious analytical tasks can be fulfilled. Liquid chromatography is the most widely used technique. Different combinations of stationary phases and mobile phases could be used in ion exchange chromatography, ion chromatography, ion-pair reverse-phase chromatography and some other techniques. The application of gas chromatography is limited because only volatile compounds of REEs can be separated. Thin-layer and paper chromatography are techniques that cannot be directly coupled with suitable detectors, which limit their applications. For special demands, separations can be performed by capillary electrophoresis, which has very high separation efficiency.

  4. Chromatographic Separation of Vitamin E Enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ju-Yen; Htar, Thet-Thet; De Silva, Leanne; Tan, Doryn Meam-Yee; Chuah, Lay-Hong

    2017-02-04

    Vitamin E is recognized as an essential vitamin since its discovery in 1922. Most vegetable oils contain a mixture of tocopherols and tocotrienols in the vitamin E composition. Structurally, tocopherols and tocotrienols share a similar chromanol ring and a side chain at the C-2 position. Owing to the three chiral centers in tocopherols, they can appear as eight different stereoisomers. Plant sources of tocopherol are naturally occurring in the form of RRR while synthetic tocopherols are usually in the form of all-racemic mixture. Similarly, with only one chiral center, natural tocotrienols occur as the R-isoform. In this review, we aim to discuss a few chromatographic methods that had been used to separate the stereoisomers of tocopherols and tocotrienols. These methods include high performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography and combination of both. The review will focus on method development including selection of chiral columns, detection method and choice of elution solvent in the context of separation efficiency, resolution and chiral purity. The applications for separation of enantiomers in vitamin E will also be discussed especially in terms of the distinctive biological potency among the stereoisoforms.

  5. High performance hand-held gas chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C M; Koo, J C

    2001-01-10

    Gas chromatography is a prominent technique for separating complex gases and then analyzing the relative quantities of the separate components. This analytical technique is popular with scientists in a wide range of applications, including environmental restoration for air and water pollution, and chemical and biological analysis. Today the analytical instrumentation community is to working towards moving the analysis away from the laboratory to the point of origin of the sample (''the field'') to achieve real-time data collection and lower analysis costs. The Microtechnology Center of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has developed a hand-held, real-time detection gas chromatograph (GC) through Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) technology. The total weight of this GC is approximately 8 pounds, and it measures 8 inches by 5 inches by 3 inches. It consumes approximately 12 watts of electrical power and has a response time on the order of 2 minutes. The current detector is a glow discharge detector with a sensitivity of parts per billion. The average retention time is about 30 to 45 seconds. Under optimum conditions, the calculated effective plate number is 40,000. The separation column in the portable GC is fabricated completely on silicon wafers. Silicon is a good thermal conductor and provides rapid heating and cooling of the column. The operational temperature can be as high as 350 degrees Celsius. The GC system is capable of rapid column temperature ramping and cooling operations. These are especially important for organic and biological analyses in the GC applications.

  6. Hydrophilic interaction chromatographic analysis of anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Willemse, Chandré M; Stander, Maria A; de Villiers, André

    2013-12-06

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) provides an alternative separation mode for the analysis of phenolic compounds, in which aqueous-organic mobile phases with polar stationary phases are used. This paper reports the evaluation of HILIC for the analysis of the natural pigments anthocyanins, which are of importance because of their chromophoric properties and a range of health benefits associated with their consumption. Several HILIC stationary phases (silica, diol, amine, cyanopropyl and amide) and mobile phase combinations were evaluated, with the latter proving particularly important due to the distinctive chromatographic behaviour of anthocyanins. Diode array detection was used for selective detection of anthocyanins, while high resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS) was used for compound identification. The potential of HILIC separation is demonstrated for a range of anthocyanins varying in glycosylation and acylation patterns found in blueberries, grape skins, black beans, red cabbage and red radish. HILIC is shown to be a complementary separation method to reversed phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) due to the alternative retention mechanism.

  7. [Combination similarity algorithm on chromatographic fingerprints].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xueyan; Shi, Xinyuan; Duan, Tianxuan; Li, Lei; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2010-11-01

    The similarity of chromatographic fingerprints is one of the effective approaches evaluating the quality stability of Chinese medicine, and the cosine of angle plays an important role in the application of similarity. However, the cosine approach is insensitive to the data difference when the distribution range of the data sets is wide. When the data proportion of the reference sample and the test sample is greatly different, it confirms that the sensitivity of the cosine to the differences of the peaks owned by both the reference sample and the test sample differs from the peaks owned only by the reference sample or the test sample in this study. The method considers the peaks owned by one sample in addition to peaks owned by both samples, and determines their own appropriate weigh targeting for the maximal homostasis value of proportion among the peaks of all of Smilax glabra Roxb. samples. The method based on sample data could reflect the difference in the chemical composition area ratio between the reference sample and test samples sensitively, and measures the similarity among the nine Smilax glabra Roxb. samples, which is a new similarity algorithm for evaluating the quality stability of herbal medicines.

  8. Use of expanded bed adsorption to purify flavonoids from Ginkgo biloba L.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Chase, Howard A

    2009-12-11

    Three techniques (liquid-liquid extraction, packed bed adsorption and expanded bed adsorption) have been compared for the purification of flavonoids from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba L. A crude Ginkgo extract was obtained by refluxing with ethanol for 3h. The yield of flavonoids achieved by this crude extraction was about 19% (w/w) and the purity of flavonoids in the concentrated extract was between 1.9 and 2.3% (w/w). The crude extract was then dissolved in deionized water and centrifuged where necessary to prepare clarified feedstock for further purification. For the method using liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate, the purity, concentration ratio and yield of flavonoids were 25.4-31.0%, 16-18 and >98%, respectively. For the method using packed bed adsorption, Amberlite XAD7HP was selected as the adsorbent and clarified extract was used as the feedstock. The dynamic adsorption breakthrough curves and elution profiles were measured. For a feedstock containing flavonoids at a concentration of 0.25mg/mL, the appropriate loading volume to reach a 5% breakthrough point during the adsorption stage was estimated to be 550-600 mL for a packed bed of volume 53 mL and a flow rate of 183 cm/h. The results from the elution stage indicated that the majority of impurities were eluted by ethanol concentrations of 40% (v/v) or below and efficient separation of flavonoids from the impurities could be achieved by elution of the flavonoids with 50-80% ethanol reaching an average purity of approximately 25%. The recovery yield of flavonoids using the packed bed purification method was about 60% of the flavonoids present in the clarified feedstock (corresponding to around 30% for the total flavonoids in the unclarified crude extract). For the method using expanded bed adsorption also conducted with Amberlite XAD7HP as the adsorbent, the optimal operation conditions scouted during the packed bed experiments were used but unclarified crude extract could be loaded directly into

  9. Efficient wheat germ agglutinin purification with a chitosan-based affinity chromatographic matrix.

    PubMed

    Baieli, María F; Urtasun, Nicolás; Miranda, María V; Cascone, Osvaldo; Wolman, Federico J

    2012-01-01

    An efficient affinity chromatographic matrix based on chitosan for wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) purification was developed. The matrices assayed consisted of chitosan mini-spheres cross-linked with epichlorhydrin 45, 250 or 500 mM. The maximum adsorption capacity of pure WGA - calculated from the corresponding isotherms - was between 43.2 and 48.9 mg/g at pH 5.0 and between 16.6 and 27.6 mg/g at pH 8.5. However, the adsorption of agglutinin from wheat germ extract was higher at pH 8.5. In addition, 0.5 g of mini-spheres cross-linked with epichlorhydrin 250 mM adsorbed 94.5% of the WGA present in 5 mL of the concentrated extract. Acetic acid was able to elute 100% of the adsorbed WGA. The purity of the WGA obtained was greater than 95% and the purification factor was 56.8. The matrix was able to maintain an efficient performance of the purification process for three consecutive cycles. A new method to monitor the purification process by RP-HPLC was developed.

  10. CHROMATOGRAPHIC AND MASS SPECTRAL STUDIES OF PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONATE AND THREE PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONAMIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chromatographic and mass spectral characteristics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and three nitrogen-substituted perfluorooctanesulfonamides have been obtained. A methyl/phenol mixed phase fused silica capillary column was used for GC analysis, while a C18 reversed phase ...

  11. CHROMATOGRAPHIC AND MASS SPECTRAL STUDIES OF PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONATE AND THREE PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONAMIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chromatographic and mass spectral characteristics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and three nitrogen-substituted perfluorooctanesulfonamides have been obtained. A methyl/phenol mixed phase fused silica capillary column was used for GC analysis, while a C18 reversed phase ...

  12. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ISOPRENE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses gas chromatographic techniques for measuring isoprene in air. Such measurement basically consists of three parts: (1) collection of sufficient sample volume for representative and accurate quantitation, (2) separation (if necessary) of isoprene from interfer...

  13. Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  14. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Quantifying process tradeoffs in the operation of chromatographic sequences.

    PubMed

    Ngiam, Sheau-Huey; Bracewell, Daniel G; Zhou, Yuhong; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel J

    2003-01-01

    A method for the rapid representation of key process tradeoffs that need to be made during the analysis of chromatographic sequences has been proposed. It involves the construction of fractionation and maximum purification factor versus yield diagrams, which can be completed easily on the basis of chromatographic data. The output of the framework developed reflects the degree of tradeoff between levels of yield and purity and provides a fast and precise prediction of the sample fraction collection strategy needed to meet a desired process specification. The usefulness of this approach for the purposes of product purification and contaminant removal in a single chromatographic step has been successfully demonstrated in an earlier paper and it is now extended by application to a chromatographic sequence: the separation of a hypothetical three-component protein system by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The HIC operation has a strong impact upon the subsequent SEC step. The studies show how the analysis of performance in such a chromatographic sequence can be carried out easily and in a straightforward fashion using the fractionation diagram approach. The methodology proposed serves as a useful tool for identifying the process tradeoffs that must be made during operation of a sequence of chromatographic steps and indicates the impact on further processing of the cut-point decisions that are made.

  16. Chromatographic Enantioseparations in Achiral Environments: Myth or Truth?

    PubMed

    Martens, Jürgen; Bhushan, Ravi; Sajewicz, Mieczyslaw; Kowalska, Teresa

    2017-08-01

    Direct chromatographic enantioseparations are among the most important practical tasks of chromatography. The accepted rules and concepts of stereochemistry anticipated one type of chromatographic systems applicable only to such enantioseparations consisting either of chiral stationary phase, or chiral selector present in mobile phase. In such a model of chromatographic system, both racemic and non-racemic mixtures could be enantioseparated. Over the years, however, reports on successful chiral enantioseparations in non-chiral chromatographic systems have cumulated as well. To adapt the initial model to novel experimental evidence, an assumption had to be added stating that these were only non-racemic mixtures (and not racemic ones), which could be enantioseparated in achiral chromatographic systems, by granting them an inevitable chirality from the enantiomeric excess of a more abundant enantiomer. There still exists an overlooked portion of experimental evidence for successful enantioseparations of racemic mixtures in the non-chiral chromatographic systems, which cannot be explained by the accepted model. Facing this incompatibility between the model and practical results, we reflect on how to reconcile these two by questioning the possibility of pinpointing a true racemate with the help of our imperfect analytical tools. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Protein adsorption in polyelectrolyte brush type cation-exchangers.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Rushd; Coquebert de Neuville, Bertrand; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-11-04

    Ion exchange chromatography materials functionalized with polyelectrolyte brushes (PEB) are becoming an integral part of many protein purification steps. Adsorption onto these materials is different than that onto traditional materials, due to the 3D partitioning of proteins into the polyelectrolyte brushes. Despite this mechanistic difference, many works have described the chromatographic behavior of proteins on polyelectrolyte brush type ion exchangers with much of the same methods as used for traditional materials. In this work, unconventional chromatographic behavior on polyelectrolyte brush type materials is observed for several proteins: the peaks shapes reveal first anti-Langmuirian and then Langmuirian types of interactions, with increasing injection volumes. An experimental and model based description of these materials is carried out in order to explain this behavior. The reason for this behavior is shown to be the 3D partitioning of proteins into the polyelectrolyte brushes: proteins that fully and readily utilize the 3D structure of the PEB phase during adsorption show this behavior, whereas those that do not show traditional ion exchange behavior.

  18. Chromatographic separation of fructose from date syrup.

    PubMed

    Al Eid, Salah M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide a process for separating fructose from a mixture of sugars containing essentially fructose and glucose, obtained from date palm fruits. The extraction procedure of date syrup from fresh dates gave a yield of 86.5% solids after vacuum drying. A process for separating fructose from an aqueous solution of date syrup involved adding the date syrup solutions (20, 30 and 40% by weight) to a chromatographic column filled with Dowex polystyrene strong cation exchange gel matrix resin Ca2 + and divinylbenzene, a functional group, sulfonic acid, particle size 320 microm, with a flow rate of 0.025 and 0.05 bed volume/min, under 30 and 70 degrees C column temperature. After the date sugar solution batch, a calculated quantity of water was added to the column. Glucose was retained by the resin more weakly than fructose and proceeded faster into the water batch flowing ahead. Three fractions were collected: a glucose-rich fraction, a return fraction, and a fructose-rich fraction. The return fraction is based on when the peaks of fructose and glucose were reached, which could be determined by means of an analyzer (polarimeter) based on the property of glucose and fructose solutions to turn the polarization level of polarized light. A high yield of fructose is obtained at 70 degrees C column temperature with a flow rate of 0.025 bed volume/min and date syrup solution containing 40% sugar concentration. The low recovery by weight obtained using date syrup solutions having a sugar concentration of 20 and 30%, encourages the use of a concentration of 40%. However, with the 40% date syrup supply the average concentrations of glucose and fructose in the return fractions were more than 40%, which can be used for diluting the thick date syrup solution extracted from dates.

  19. Adsorption of star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, A.; Joanny, J. F.

    1991-06-01

    The adsorption of star polymers on a flat solid surface is analyzed by means of scalling arguments based on the Daoud-Cotton blob model. For the adsorption of a single star, consisting of f arms comprising each N monomers, we distinguish three regimes determined by the adsorption energy of a monomer at the surface, δ kT. 1) Strong adsorption characterized by the full adsorption of all arms occurs for δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) A “Sombrero” like structure comprising f_ads fully adsorbed arms and f{-}f_ads free arms is obtained for (f/N)^{3/5}> δ > f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. 3) Weakly adsorbed stars retain, essentially, the structure of a free star. This regime occurs for δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. The weakly adsorbed structure may also exist as a metastable state if δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}. Nous étudions l'adsorption de polymères en étoile sur une surface solide en utilisant une approche de lois d'échelles basée sur le modèle de blobs de Daoud et Cotton. Pour une étoile formée de f bras contenant chacun N monomères, nous distinguons trois régimes suivant la valeur de l'énergie d'adsorption d'un monomère sur la surface δ kT. 1) L'adsorption forte caractérisée par une adsorption complète de tous les bras se produit lorsque δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) Une structure en “sombrero” avec f_ads bras adsorbés et f{-}f_ads bras libres est obtenue si f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}δ < (f/N)^{3/5}. 3) Les étoiles faiblement adsorbées gardent une structure très similaire à celle des étoiles libres en solution. Ce régime existe si δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. La structure correspondant aux étoiles faiblement adsorbées peut aussi exister comme un état métastable si δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}.

  20. Laser temperature jump relaxation measurements of adsorption/desorption kinetics at liquid/solid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, S.W.; Harris, J.M.; Holzwarth, J.F.

    1995-04-15

    The iodine laser temperature jump method is used to study adsorption/desorption kinetics at a methylated silica/solution interface. A suspension of C1-derivatized fumed silica is used for the kinetic measurements. The colloidal silica does not significantly change the attenuation of near-IR radiation from the iodine laser and allows the surface site concentration to be varied so that adsorption and desorption rates can be determined. The temperature jump relaxation method was used to investigate the effect of electrolyte on adsorption of a charged solute (ANS) on a C1 silica surface. Adsorption equilibrium conditions were optimized to observe a maximum relaxation signal. Without electrolyte, the relaxation signal is biexponential, which is also reflected in a broad chromatographic peak shape and a two-site sorption isotherm. When electrolyte is added, the relaxation signal is primarily single exponential, which agrees with the linear adsorption isotherm. The adsorption rate and equilibrium constant were found to increase significantly with added electrolyte, which showed that adsorption kinetics can influence both band broadening and retention. 28 refs., 7 figs., 4 tab.

  1. [Adsorption therapy in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Hasper, D; Schefold, J C; Jörres, A

    2015-05-01

    The activation of multiple pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators is a key feature in the pathophysiology of sepsis. Many of these mediators may directly contribute to organ dysfunction and determine disease severity. So far our ability to modulate these upregulated mediator pathways is very limited. Therefore the adsorption of such mediators via an extracorporeal circuit may be a beneficial intervention during sepsis. Recent technical innovations have made this intervention feasible. Both systems for exclusive mediator adsorption and for adsorption beside a conventional renal replacement therapy are now available. Some of the membranes can adsorb a broad range of mediators by rather unspecific binding, whereas others specifically adsorb endotoxin or mediators. Whilst biochemical efficacy could be demonstrated by some of the systems, controlled and randomized studies demonstrating improved clinical endpoints are still lacking. Therefore the use of such therapies outside clinical studies cannot yet be recommended.

  2. Recovery of polyphenols from rose oil distillation wastewater using adsorption resins--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rusanov, Krasimir; Garo, Eliane; Rusanova, Mila; Fertig, Orlando; Hamburger, Matthias; Atanassov, Ivan; Butterweck, Veronika

    2014-11-01

    The production of rose oil from rose flowers by water steam distillation leaves a water fraction of the distillate as main part of the waste. Therefore, the rose oil distillation wastewater represents a serious environmental problem due to the high content of polyphenols which are difficult to decompose and have to be considered as biopollutants when discarded into the drainage system and rivers. On the other hand, natural polyphenols are valuable compounds with useful properties as bioactive substances. Until now there is no established practice for processing of rose oil distillation wastewater and utilization of contained substances. Thus, it was the aim of this study to develop a strategy to separate this wastewater into a polyphenol depleted water fraction and a polyphenol enriched fraction which could be developed into innovative value-added products. In a first step, the phytochemical profile of rose oil distillation wastewater was determined. Its HPLC-PDA-MS analysis revealed the presence of flavan-3-ols, flavanones, flavonols and flavones. In a second step, the development of a stepwise concentration of rose oil distillation wastewater was performed. The concentration process includes a filtration process to eliminate suspended solids in the wastewater, followed by adsorption of the contained phenolic compounds onto adsorption resins (XAD and SP). Finally, desorption of the polyphenol fraction from the resin matrix was achieved using ethanol and/or aqueous ethanol. The result of the process was a wastewater low in soluble organic compounds and an enriched polyphenol fraction (RF20 SP-207). The profile of this fraction was similar to that of rose oil distillation wastewater and showed the presence of flavonols such as quercetin and kaempferol glycosides as major metabolites. These compounds were isolated from the enriched polyphenol fraction and their structures confirmed by NMR. In summary, a pilot medium scale system was developed using adsorption resins

  3. Sulphur adsorption on gold monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Damanpreet; Kaur, Sumandeep; Srivastava, Sunita

    2017-05-01

    We use Density Functional Theory to study the electronic and magnetic properties of two dimensional gold monolayer and investigate the effect of adsorption of sulphur atom on it. Of all the possible adsorption sites, hollow site was found to be the most favorable one for adsorption. On-top and bridge adsorption sites are found to exhibit net magnetic moment of adsorbed gold monolayer. This feature of small but non zero magnetic moment could find applications in building small molecular magnetic devices.

  4. Solid phase extraction method for the determination of iron, lead and chromium by atomic absorption spectrometry using Amberite XAD-2000 column in various water samples.

    PubMed

    Elci, Latif; Kartal, Aslihan A; Soylak, Mustafa

    2008-05-01

    This work describes a procedure for the separation-preconcentration of Fe(III), Pb(II) and Cr(III) from some water samples using a column-filled Amberlite XAD-2000 resin. The analyte ions retained on the column were eluted with 0.5 mol L(-1) HNO(3). The analytes in the effluent were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Several parameters governing the efficiency of the method were evaluated including pH, resin amount, sample volume, flow rates, eluent type and divers ion effects. The recoveries under the optimum working conditions were found to be as 100+/-1% Fe, 96+/-1% Pb and 93+/-2% Cr. The relative standard deviations and errors were less than 2% and 5%, respectively. The detection limit based on three standard deviations of the blank was found to be 0.32, 0.51 and 0.81 microg L(-1), for Fe, Pb and Cr, respectively. The procedure was applied to the determination of Fe, Cr and Pb in hot spring water and drinking water samples.

  5. Mutagenic potentials of Amberlite XAD-2-resin extracts obtained from river and drinking waters in the Northwest district of Chiba, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Ayako; Nishi, Iwaki; Kishi, Tomohiro; Kawakami, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yasuo; Onodera, Sukeo

    2010-12-01

    Amberlite XAD-2 resin extracts of river and drinking water sampled from the Northwest district of Chiba Prefecture in each month during the period from January to December 2008 were investigated to characterize and determine their mutagenic potentials and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels. The extracts from the river water were shown to be mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 (a flameshift mutagen) without S9 mix, with higher mutagenic responses in summer and early fall seasons. While the drinking water extracts exhibited weak mutagenicity in both the TA98 and TA100 strains (a base-pair substitution mutagen) without S9 mix, with high mutagenic responses in fall and early winter seasons. GC/MS determinations of the water concentrates showed some seasonal scatter in PAH levels in river water. In contrast, comparatively high concentrations of PAHs were observed for drinking water samples collected during warmer seasons. Statistical studies revealed that there is a lower correlation between the levels of flameshift mutagenicity and the concentrations of PAH in the river water concentrations, but a higher correlation between them in the drinking water samples.

  6. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  7. ADSORPTION TECHNOLOGIES - REDLAND, CA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides an overview of adsorptive media technology for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. The presentation is divided into four topics: Technology, Application, Design and Operation. Each topic is discussed in general and a number of photographs from t...

  8. ADSORPTION TECHNOLOGIES - GREEN BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides an overview of adsorptive media technology for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. The presentation is divided into four topics: Technology, Application, Design and Operation. Each topic is discussed in general and a number of photographs from ...

  9. ADSORPTION TECHNOLOGIES - EVERETT, WA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides an overview of adsorptive media technology for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. The presentation is divided into four topics: Technology, Application, Design and Operation. Each topic is discussed in general and a number of photographs from th...

  10. ADSORPTION TECHNOLOGIES - LAPEER, MI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides an overview of adsorptive media technology for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. The presentation is divided into four topics: Technology, Application, Design and Operation. Each topic is discussed in general and a number of photographs from th...

  11. Sulfate adsorption on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-10-15

    Recent spectroscopic work has suggested that only one surface species of sulfate is dominant on hematite. Sulfate is therefore a very suitable anion to test and develop adsorption models for variable charge minerals. The authors have studied sulfate adsorption on goethite covering a large range of sulfate concentrations, surface coverages, pH values, and electrolyte concentrations. Four different techniques were used to cover the entire range of conditions. For characterization at low sulfate concentrations, below the detection limit of sulfate with ICP-AES, the authors used proton-sulfate titrations at constant pH. Adsorption isotherms were studied for the intermediate sulfate concentration range. Acid-base titrations in sodium sulfate and electromobility were used for high sulfate concentrations. All the data can be modeled with one adsorbed species if it is assumed that the charge of adsorbed sulfate is spatially distributed in the interface. The charge distribution of sulfate follows directly from modeling the proton-sulfate adsorption stoichoimemtry sine this stoichiometry is independent of the intrinsic affinity constant of sulfate. The charge distribution can be related to the structure of the surface complex by use of the Pauling bond valence concept and is in accordance with the microscopic structure found by spectroscopy. The intrinsic affinity constant follows from the other measurements. Modeling of the proton-ion stoichoimetry with the commonly used 2-pK models, where adsorbed ions are treated as point charges, is possible only if at least two surface species for sulfate are used.

  12. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  13. SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, C.S.

    1959-06-16

    Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

  14. Evaluation and application of liquid chromatographic columns coated with 'intelligent' ligands: (I) acylcarnitine column.

    PubMed

    Kamimori, H; Konishi, M

    2001-09-21

    Unique stationary phases of octadecylsilica (ODS) coated with acylcarnitines have been developed for liquid chromatographic columns. The ODS column coated with acylcarnitine was readily prepared by recycling the solution containing acylcarnitine through an ODS column in a closed loop. Acylcarnitine was adsorbed on the ODS surfaces by hydrophobic interaction between the acyl group of acylcarnitine and the octadecyl group of the ODS phases. The ODS column coated with stearoylcarnitine (CN-18 column) was the most stable among the four columns coated with acylcarnitines of various acyl chain lengths (decanoylcarnitine, lauroylcarnitine, myristoylcarnitine, and stearoylcarnitine) under the condition of delivery of the mobile phase, indicating that adsorption of acylcarnitine on the ODS surfaces depended on the length of acyl chains. The CN-18 column was usable for delivering the mobile phase contained less than 20% (v/v) acetonitrile, retaining almost the same separation efficiency as the intact ODS column. The retention behavior of ionic solutes on the CN-18 column could be explained by both ionic and electrostatic interactions between the solutes and the stationary phase. The CN-18 column enabled efficient separation of inorganic anions, nicotinic acids, amino acids, and nucleotides. The chiral ODS column coated with enantiomer of stearoylcarnitine, L-stearoylcarnitine (L-CN-18 column) could achieve direct enantiomeric separation of DL-tryptophan, alpha-methyl-DL-tryptophan and DL-3-indolelactic acid using 100% water as the mobile phase. The L-CN-18 column could also separate enantiomers of amino acids and alpha-hydroxycarboxylic acids by ligand-exchange chromatographic mode using a mobile phase containing copper(II) ion. The chiral recognition is discussed for enantiomeric separation on the L-CN-18 column.

  15. Mathematical functions for the representation of chromatographic peaks.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, V B; Bombi, G G

    2001-10-05

    About ninety empirical functions for the representation of chromatographic peaks have been collected and tabulated. The table, based on almost 200 references, reports for every function: (1) the most used name; (2) the most convenient equation, with the existence intervals for the adjustable parameters and for the independent variable; (3) the applications; (4) the mathematical properties, in relation to the possible applications. The list includes also equations originally proposed to represent peaks obtained in other analytical techniques (e.g. in spectroscopy), which in many instances have proved useful in representing chromatographic peaks as well; the built-in functions employed in some commercial peak-fitting software packages were included, too. Some of the most important chromatographic functions, i.e. the Exponentially Modified Gaussian, the Poisson, the Log-normal, the Edgeworth/Cramér series and the Gram/Charlier series, have been reviewed and commented in more detail.

  16. Continuous melting and ion chromatographic analyses of ice cores.

    PubMed

    Huber, T M; Schwikowski, M; Gäggele, H W

    2001-06-22

    A new method for determining concentrations of organic and inorganic ions in ice cores by continuous melting and contemporaneous ion chromatographic analyses was developed. A subcore is melted on a melting device and the meltwater produced is collected in two parallel sample loops and then analyzed simultaneously by two ion chromatographs, one for anions and one for cations. For most of the analyzed species, lower or equal blank values were achieved with the continuous melting and analysis technique compared to the conventional analysis. Comparison of the continuous melting and ion chromatographic analysis with the conventional analysis of a real ice core segment showed good agreement in concentration profiles and total amounts of ionic species. Thus, the newly developed method is well suited for ice core analysis and has the advantages of lower ice consumption, less time-consuming sample preparation and lower risk of contamination.

  17. On the optimization of the solid core radius of superficially porous particles for finite adsorption rate.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof

    2011-02-18

    Packed chromatographic columns with the superficially porous particles (porous shell particles) guarantee higher efficiency. The theoretical equation of the Height Equivalent to a Theoretical Plate (HETP), for columns packed with spherical superficially porous particles, was used for the analysis of the column efficiency for finite rate of adsorption-desorption process. The HETP equation was calculated by the application of the moment analysis to elution peaks evaluated with the General Rate (GR) model. The optimal solid core radius for maximum column efficiency was estimated for a wide spectrum of internal and external mass transfer resistances, adsorption kinetic rate and axial dispersion. The separation power of the shell adsorbent for two component mixture, in analytical and preparative chromatography, was discussed. The conditions of the equivalence between the solutions of the General Rate model with slow adsorption kinetic and the Lumped Kinetic Model (LKM) or the Equilibrium Dispersive (ED) model were formulated.

  18. Binary and ternary adsorption of n-alkane mixtures on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kalies, G.; Braeuer, P.; Messow, U.

    1999-06-15

    The adsorption isotherms of the binary n-alkane mixtures n-hexane/n-octane, n-octane/n-tetradecane, and n-hexane/n-tetradecane on the activated carbon TA 95 are measured at 298 K and described with mathematical functions. About 40 experimental values of the adsorption excess of the ternary mixture n-hexane/n-octane/n-tetradecane on activated carbon TA 95 at 298 K are gas chromatographically measured inside the ternary triangle. The ternary data are represented in the three-dimensional space with the help of transformation of coordinates and by utilization of the conception of the quasi-two-component representation of the mole fractions. A consistency test for the specific wetting Gibbs energies calculated from the binary data is carried out. The possibilities for a mathematical prediction of ternary data from adsorption data for the constituent binary mixtures are proved.

  19. On-line gas chromatographic analysis of airborne particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, Susanne V; Goldstein, Allen H

    2012-01-03

    A method and apparatus for the in-situ, chemical analysis of an aerosol. The method may include the steps of: collecting an aerosol; thermally desorbing the aerosol into a carrier gas to provide desorbed aerosol material; transporting the desorbed aerosol material onto the head of a gas chromatography column; analyzing the aerosol material using a gas chromatograph, and quantizing the aerosol material as it evolves from the gas chromatography column. The apparatus includes a collection and thermal desorption cell, a gas chromatograph including a gas chromatography column, heated transport lines coupling the cell and the column; and a quantization detector for aerosol material evolving from the gas chromatography column.

  20. Gas chromatographic determination of phosgene and dichloroacetylene in air1

    PubMed Central

    Jeltes, R.; Burghardt, E.; Breman, J.

    1971-01-01

    Jeltes, R., Burghardt, E., and Breman, J. (1971). Brit. J. industr. Med., 28, 96-99. Gas chromatographic determination of phosgene and dichloroacetylene in air. Phosgene and dichloroacetylene vapours may be present in the working environment near places where chlorinated hydrocarbons are used, including exposure chambers and the like in which people or animals are deliberately exposed to chlorinated hydrocarbons to investigate the effects of these substances. A gas liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of sub-Threshold Limit Value concentrations of phosgene and dichloroacetylene. Using electron capture detection, concentrations from 0·02 ppm of each compound could be determined. Images PMID:5543634

  1. [Derivative gas chromatographic analysis of fructooligosaccharide in fermented sucrose].

    PubMed

    Cai, W M; Liu, H; Sun, X J

    2000-01-01

    As a new sweetener, fructooligosaccharide is paid more and more attention for its health improvement property. It includes trisaccharide, tetrasaccharide and pentasaccharide, and can be produced from sucrose by the fermentation of microorganism. In order to analyze the content of fructooligosaccharide in fermented sugar by gas chromatography, fructooligosaccharide was transformed into trimethylsilyl derivatives. Based on the modified gas chromatograph SP2308, and under the chosen chromatographic conditions with 0.53 mm capillary column of OV-101, the contents of fructose, glucose, sucrose and fructooligosaccharide were determined by programmed temperature chromatography. The recovery of fructooligosaccharide was satisfactory.

  2. Separation of phenolic compounds with modified adsorption resin from aqueous phase products of hydrothermal liquefaction of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaifei; Lyu, Hang; Hao, Shilai; Luo, Gang; Zhang, Shicheng; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-04-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction can be used to convert rice straw into an aqueous phase product that contains valuable phenolic compounds. In experiments, commercial adsorption resin XAD-4 was modified by a benzene ring - α,α'-dichloro-p-xylene (DCX) - in order to separate the phenolic compounds from the aqueous phase product; and, the optimal conditions for separation were explored. The results showed that, after modification of the resin, its adsorption capacity improved by 50%, due to increases in surface area, pore volume and micropore volume. The selectivity of the resin increased when the benzene ring was introduced as the ring formed hydrogen bonds with the compounds. The optimal conditions for separation were desorption agent of 40%, 45% and 55% ethanol solution, a flow rate of 2.5-5 mL/min, and a ratio of the sample volume to the column volume was 1:1. The total content of phenolic compounds in aqueous solution increased from 18% to 78% after separation.

  3. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  4. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  5. The adsorption of hetero- and alicyclic thiophene derivatives from water-acetonitrile solutions on the surface of porous graphitic carbon under high-performance liquid chromatography conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saifutdinov, B. R.; Emel'yanova, N. S.; Kurbatova, S. V.; Pimerzin, A. A.

    2012-07-01

    The adsorption of hetero- and alicyclic thiophene derivatives synthesized for the first time from water-acetonitrile solutions with various compositions on the surface of porous graphitic carbon was studied by the high-performance liquid chromatography method. The retention factor and Henry adsorption constant values and equilibrium constants of quasi-chemical reactions of the adsorption and solvation of the heterocyclic compounds studied were calculated using the Lanin-Nikitin equation. The influence of the structure of hetero- and alicyclic thiophene derivative molecules on their adsorption on the surface of porous graphitic carbon and solvation in water-acetonitrile solutions was discussed. The Lanin-Nikitin model was found to be more informative in the interpretation of the adsorption-chromatographic experiment data compared with the Snyder-Soczewinski and Scott-Kucera models.

  6. Control of ice chromatographic retention mechanism by changing temperature and dopant concentration.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Yuiko; Okada, Tetsuo

    2011-12-15

    A liquid phase coexists with solid water ice in a typical binary system, such as NaCl-water, in the temperature range between the freezing point and the eutectic point (t(eu)) of the system. In ice chromatography with salt-doped ice as the stationary phase, both solid and liquid phase can contribute to solute retention in different fashions; that is, the solid ice surface acts as an adsorbent, while a solute can be partitioned into the liquid phase. Thus, both adsorption and partition mechanisms can be utilized for ice chromatographic separation. An important feature in this approach is that the liquid phase volume can be varied by changing the temperature and the concentration of a salt incorporated into the ice stationary phase. Thus, we can control the relative contribution from the partition mechanism in the entire retention because the liquid phase volume can be estimated from the freezing depression curve. Separation selectivity can thereby be modified. The applicability of this concept has been confirmed for the solutes of different adsorption and partition abilities. The predicted retention based on thermodynamics basically agrees well with the corresponding experimental retention. However, one important inconsistency has been found. The calculation predicts a step-like discontinuity of the solute retention at t(eu) because the phase diagram suggests that the liquid phase abruptly appears at t(eu) when the temperature increases. In contrast, the corresponding experimental plots are continuous over the wider range including the subeutectic temperatures. This discrepancy is explained by the existence of the liquid phase below t(eu). A difference between predicted and measured retention factors allows the estimation of the volume of the subeutectic liquid phase.

  7. Note on the chromatographic analyses of marine polyunsaturated fatty acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, D.M.; Quinn, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography was used to study the effects of saponification/methylation and thin-layer chromatographic isolation on the analyses of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Using selected procedures, the qualitative and quantitative distribution of these acids in marine organisms can be determined with a high degree of accuracy. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  8. [The gas chromatographic detection of acetylene in cadaveric material].

    PubMed

    Iablochkin, V D

    1999-01-01

    Acetylene traces were detected by gas chromatography in the cadaveric right crural muscle of a 30-year-old man dead from an explosion of an acetylene reservoir at a plant. Acetylene was identified using the absolute calibration method on 3 standard gas chromatographic columns, reaction gas chromatography, and acetylene "deduction" by silver sulfate on silicagel.

  9. On the ion chromatographic determination of S(IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    Ion Chromatographie determination of S(IV) is described with special reference to the determination of SO 2(g) and/or aerosol S(IV) along with chloride, nitrate and sulfate in particulate matter. A method is presented for the baseline separation of the above species. The Chromatographic behavior of hydroxymethanesulfonate under various eluent conditions is discussed.

  10. Chromatographic profiles of Ginkgo biloba leaves and selected products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An LC-DAD-ESI/MS method was developed to obtain chromatographic profiles for the flavonoids and terpene lactones of Ginkgo biloba leaves and selected G. biloba products. The method was used to identify 46 glycosylated flavonols and flavones, 3 free flavonol aglycones, catechin, 10 biflavones, a dihy...

  11. Derivatization procedure for gas chromatographic determination of hydroxylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Pesselman, R.L.; Foral, M.J.; Langer, S.H.

    1987-04-15

    Hydroxylamine has been of special interest recently because of the possibilities of manufacturing it by using electrochemical methods in which ammonia might also be formed. Its general chemistry and applications have been described elsewhere. Presently, there are two gas chromatographic methods reported for the determination of hydroxylamine in aqueous media. The first involves reacting the hydroxylamine to form acetone oxime and subsequently injecting the aqueous solution directly into a gas chromatograph equipped with nitrogen and flame ionization detectors. The second involves oxidizing hydroxylamine to nitrous oxide and trapping the gas for determination in an electron capture equipped gas chromatograph. Limits of detection are in the micromolar range for the former and the nanomolar range for the latter. Here, an alternate gas chromatographic procedure for determining hydroxylamine as the acetone oxime is described. Neither direct aqueous injection nor elaborate instrumentation is required. Extraction of the oxime into an ether phase allows for concentrating the analyte ad facilitates the use of an internal standard. The limitations and inconveniences of direct aqueous injection are avoided included column degradation and filament burnout in mass spectrometry detectors.

  12. Performance of chromatographic systems to model soil-water sorption.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Rodríguez, Marta; Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Rosés, Martí

    2012-08-24

    A systematic approach for evaluating the goodness of chromatographic systems to model the sorption of neutral organic compounds by soil from water is presented in this work. It is based on the examination of the three sources of error that determine the overall variance obtained when soil-water partition coefficients are correlated against chromatographic retention factors: the variance of the soil-water sorption data, the variance of the chromatographic data, and the variance attributed to the dissimilarity between the two systems. These contributions of variance are easily predicted through the characterization of the systems by the solvation parameter model. According to this method, several chromatographic systems besides the reference octanol-water partition system have been selected to test their performance in the emulation of soil-water sorption. The results from the experimental correlations agree with the predicted variances. The high-performance liquid chromatography system based on an immobilized artificial membrane and the micellar electrokinetic chromatography systems of sodium dodecylsulfate and sodium taurocholate provide the most precise correlation models. They have shown to predict well soil-water sorption coefficients of several tested herbicides. Octanol-water partitions and high-performance liquid chromatography measurements using C18 columns are less suited for the estimation of soil-water partition coefficients.

  13. Chromatographic fingerprints analysis for evaluation of Ginkgo Biloba products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The leaf extract of Ginkgo biloba has purported value for improving mental capacities in Alzheimer’s patients. The flavonoids and the terpene lactones are considered to be the two main active components that influence human health. This paper compared an LC/UV chromatographic fingerprint method wi...

  14. Optimizing Chromatographic Separation: An Experiment Using an HPLC Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shalliker, R. A.; Kayillo, S.; Dennis, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    Optimization of a chromatographic separation within the time constraints of a laboratory session is practically impossible. However, by employing a HPLC simulator, experiments can be designed that allow students to develop an appreciation of the complexities involved in optimization procedures. In the present exercise, a HPLC simulator from "JCE…

  15. Optimizing Chromatographic Separation: An Experiment Using an HPLC Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shalliker, R. A.; Kayillo, S.; Dennis, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    Optimization of a chromatographic separation within the time constraints of a laboratory session is practically impossible. However, by employing a HPLC simulator, experiments can be designed that allow students to develop an appreciation of the complexities involved in optimization procedures. In the present exercise, a HPLC simulator from "JCE…

  16. An automated multidimensional preparative gas chromatographic system for isolation and enrichment of trace amounts of xenon from ambient air.

    PubMed

    Larson, Tuula; Östman, Conny; Colmsjö, Anders

    2011-04-01

    The monitoring of radioactive xenon isotopes is one of the principal methods for the detection of nuclear explosions in order to identify clandestine nuclear testing. In this work, a miniaturized, multiple-oven, six-column, preparative gas chromatograph was constructed in order to isolate trace quantities of radioactive xenon isotopes from ambient air, utilizing nitrogen as the carrier gas. The multidimensional chromatograph comprised preparative stainless steel columns packed with molecular sieves, activated carbon, and synthetic carbon adsorbents (e.g., Anasorb®-747 and Carbosphere®). A combination of purification techniques--ambient adsorption, thermal desorption, back-flushing, thermal focusing, and heart cutting--was selectively optimized to produce a well-defined xenon peak that facilitated reproducible heart cutting and accurate quantification. The chromatographic purification of a sample requires approximately 4 h and provides complete separation of xenon from potentially interfering components (such as water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide, and radon) with recovery and accuracy close to 100%. The preparative enrichment process isolates and concentrates a highly purified xenon gas fraction that is suitable for subsequent ultra-low-level γ-, ß/γ-spectroscopic or high-resolution mass spectrometric measurement (e.g., to monitor the gaseous fission products of nuclear explosions at remote locations). The Xenon Processing Unit is a free-standing, relatively lightweight, and transportable system that can be interfaced to a variety of sampling and detection systems. It has a relatively inexpensive, rugged, and compact modular (19-inch rack) design that provides easy access to all parts for maintenance and has a low power requirement.

  17. Chromatographic separation of platinum group metals from simulated high level liquid waste using macroporous silica-based adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanlai; Kim, Seong-Yun; Ito, Tatsuya; Tokuda, Haruki; Hitomi, Keitaro; Ishii, Keizo

    2013-10-18

    To separate platinum group metals (PGMs) from high level liquid waste, three novel macroporous silica-based adsorbents, namely, (Crea+Dodec)/SiO2-P, (Crea+TOA)/SiO2-P and (MOTDGA+TOA)/SiO2-P, were synthesized by introducing extractants Crea (N',N'-di-n-hexyl-thiodiglycolamide), TOA (Tri-n-octylamine), MOTDGA (N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-di-n-octyl-thiodiglycolamide) along with theirs modifier, Dodec (n-dodecyl alcohol), into 50μm diameter SiO2-P particles by impregnation. Chromatographic separation of PGMs from simulated high level liquid waste was investigated by column method. It was found that 100% of Pd(II) and Re(VII) could be eluted out from simulate HLLW in 3.0M HNO3 solution using three adsorbents. For Ru(III) and Rh(III), high temperature has distinct effect on the adsorption rate and a further study for Ru(III) and Rh(III) is necessary to separate them from HLLW completely. In all six column experiments, a relatively satisfactory chromatographic separation operating for PGMs from simulated HLLW was obtained using (Crea+TOA)/SiO2-P adsorbent packed column at 323K.

  18. Purge and trap with monolithic sorbent for gas chromatographic analysis of pesticides in honey.

    PubMed

    Chienthavorn, Orapin; Dararuang, Kanittha; Sasook, Anupop; Ramnut, Narumol

    2012-01-01

    Polydivinylbenzene (P-DVB) and silica monolithic materials were synthesised in capillaries and then used to adsorb nine organonitrogen pesticides extracted from honey. After adsorption, each monolith-capillary was connected to a gas chromatograph (GC) with nitrogen-phosphorous detector (NPD). The silica monolith gave better peak shape and intensity than the P-DVB monolith. Formulation of silica monolith with tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) as a sole initiator provided better separation and higher peak intensity, compared to those with methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) and (3:1) TMOS/MTMS initiators. The optimum internal diameter and length of silica monolith-capillary were 0.25 mm and 5 cm, respectively. The purge and trap conditions were optimised by purging with nitrogen and heating the honey sample solution at 100 °C for 60 min. Recovery of the method was in a range of 84.95-99.71% and the detection limits of the pesticides determined by using GC-NPD and GC-mass spectrometric detector (MSD) ranged between 0.36-1.75 and 0.13-0.25 ng g(-1), respectively.

  19. Loading capacity and chromatographic behavior of a porous graphitic carbon column for polychlorinated biphenyls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Echols, K.R.; Gale, R.W.; Feltz, K.; O'Laughlin, J.; Tillitt, D.E.; Schwartz, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    A porous graphitic carbon column (Hypercarb) was used for the fractionation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) into classes of 2-4 ortho chlorines, 1 ortho chlorine and 0 ortho chlorine congeners. A method was developed that combined the fractionation of PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in a variety of biotic environmental samples. Many of these samples have high concentrations of PCBs which cause fractionation problems as adsorption sites on the graphitic surface are occupied. The loading capacity of the column for PCBs was determined by injecting up to 1 mg of total PCBs and monitoring changes in chromatographic behavior of tetra-/di-ortho, mono-ortho and non-ortho substituted PCBs. Effective loading capacities were 1 mg for tetra-/di-ortho PCBs, but only 3–5 μg for non-ortho PCBs and about 2 μg for mono-ortho PCBs. Loading capacity of the PGC column for environmental fish and avian egg samples was determined to depend on the mono-ortho and non-ortho PCB levels found in these samples.

  20. Chromatographic behaviour of synthetic high pressure high temperature diamond in aqueous normal phase chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peristyy, Anton; Paull, Brett; Nesterenko, Pavel N

    2016-10-28

    The chromatographic properties of high pressure high temperature synthesised diamond (HPHT) are investigated under the conditions of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). A 50×4.6mm ID stainless steel column packed with HPHT particles of mean diameter 1.6μm and specific surface area 5.1m(2)g(-1) is used. According to the results of acid-base titration with NaOH the purified HPHT batch contains 4.59μeqg(-1) of protogenic, mainly carboxyl- and hydroxyl-, groups, which make this polar adsorbent suitable for use as a stationary phase in HILIC. The retention behaviour of several classes of polar compounds including benzoic and benzenesulfonic acids, nitro- and chlorophenols, various organic bases, and quaternary ammonium compounds are studied using acetonitrile and methanol based mobile phases containing 5-30v/v% of water. The effects of the buffer pH and concentration, column temperature and organic solvent content on retention of model compounds are also investigated. It is shown that both pH and acetonitrile/methanol ratio in the mobile phase can be used to vary the separation selectivity. Molecular adsorption mechanism (related to aqueous normal phase mode), rather than partitioning is established to be responsible for the retention.

  1. Kinetics and equilibria of the chromatographic separation of maltose and trehalose.

    PubMed

    He, Dengjun; Zhou, Jiachun; Xia, Quanming; Jiang, Lihua; Qiu, Yongjun; Zhao, Liming

    2015-07-01

    Trehalose, a nonreducing disaccharide, has been extensively applied to food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical goods. The resultant solution of trehalose prepared by enzymatic methods includes high amounts of maltose. However, it is quite difficult to separate maltose and trehalose on an industrial scale because of their similar properties. In this paper, a high-performance resin was selected as a stationary phase to separate trehalose and maltose, and the resolution of these sugars was 0.59. The potential of a cation exchange resin was investigated as the stationary phase in separating trehalose and maltose using deionized water as the mobile phase. Based on the equilibrium dispersive model, the axial dispersion coefficients and overall mass transfer coefficients of maltose and trehalose were determined by moment analysis at two different temperatures, 50 and 70°C. Other parameters, including the column void and the adsorption isotherms, were also determined and applied to simulate the elution curves of trehalose and maltose. The simulated results matched the experimental data, validating the parameters. The optimized parameters are critical to the chromatographic separation of trehalose and maltose on an industrial scale.

  2. Adsorption of the antiepileptic carbamazepine onto agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Calisto, Vania; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2012-05-01

    Carbamazepine is an antiepileptic pharmaceutical which is commonly found in environmental matrices. It passes through wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) almost completely unaffected and has been found to be highly persistent in the environment. The application of sludge in agricultural fields and the use of WWTP effluents for irrigation constitute a potential source of soil contamination. Consequently, the assessment of the interaction between carbamazepine and soils is of crucial importance to understand its fate in the environment. To monitor the sorption behavior of carbamazepine onto agricultural soils, batch equilibrium experiments were performed using soils subjected to distinct long-term fertilizations. In order to follow the adsorption experiments, an UV spectral deconvolution methodology was applied and the results compared with those from micellar electrokinetic chromatography. The results obtained by both methods did not present significant statistical differences at 95% confidence level. Therefore, it was proven that, in the context of adsorption studies, UV spectral deconvolution is a valid alternative to common chromatographic methods, with the major advantage of being a simple and fast procedure. The adsorption of carbamazepine onto the selected soils was satisfactorily described by the Freundlich model. The obtained Freundlich parameters (K(F)) (between 1.79 ± 0.07 and 4.8 ± 0.2 mg kg(-1) (mg L(-1))(-N)) indicate that the adsorption behavior of carbamazepine is dependent on the soil fertilization. Also, it is not extensively sorbed, indicating that carbamazepine present in soils can be a potential source of contamination of surface and ground waters through run-off and infiltration.

  3. Kafirin adsorption on ion-exchange resins: isotherm and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Lau, Pei Wen; Kale, Sandeep; Johnson, Stuart; Pareek, Vishnu; Utikar, Ranjeet; Lali, Arvind

    2014-08-22

    Kafirin is a natural, hydrophobic and celiac safe prolamin protein obtained from sorghum seeds. Today kafirin is found to be useful in designing delayed delivery systems and coatings of pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals where its purity is important and this can be obtained by adsorptive chromatography. This study is the first scientific insight into the isotherm and kinetic studies of kafirin adsorption on anion- and cation-exchange resins for practical applications in preparative scale chromatography. Adsorption isotherms of kafirin were determined for five anion- and two cation-exchange resins in batch systems. Isotherm parameters such as maximum binding capacity and dissociation constant were determined from Langmuir isotherm, and adsorptive capacity and affinity constant from Freundlich isotherm. Langmuir isotherm was found to fit the adsorption equilibrium data well. Batch uptake kinetics for kafirin adsorption on these resins was also carried out and critical parameters including the diffusion coefficient, film mass transfer coefficient, and Biot number for film-pore diffusion model were calculated. Both the isotherm and the kinetic parameters were considered for selection of appropriate resin for kafirin purification. UNOsphere Q (78.26 mg/ml) and Toyopearl SP-650M (57.4 mg/ml) were found to offer better kafirin binding capacities and interaction strength with excellent uptake kinetics under moderate operating conditions. With these adsorbents, film diffusion resistance was found to be major governing factor for adsorption (Bi<10 and δ<1). Based on designer objective function, UNOsphere Q was found be best adsorbent for binding of kafirin. The data presented is valuable for designing large scale preparative adsorptive chromatographic kafirin purification systems.

  4. Trace adsorption of positively charged proteins onto Sepharose FF and Sepharose FF-based anion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Ling; Sun, Yan

    2012-08-31

    Agarose-based matrices have been widely used in ion exchange chromatography (IEC). We have herein observed that positively charged proteins (lysozyme and cytochrome c) are adsorbed on the agarose-based anion-exchangers (Q and DEAE Sepharose FF gels) in a capacity of 10-40 μg/mL. In contrast, negatively charged protein (bovine serum albumin) is not adsorbed to Sepharose FF and SP Sepharose FF gels. Elemental analysis of the gel indicated that the residual anionic sulfate groups in agarose would have worked as the cation exchange groups for the positively charged proteins. The trace adsorption behavior of lysozyme onto Sepharose FF and Sepharose FF-based anion exchangers was studied and the effects of NaCl concentration and cation group density on the adsorption were examined for better understanding of the trace adsorption in chromatographic processes. At NaCl concentrations less than 0.05 mol/L, which is the normal adsorption condition in IEC, the trace adsorption kept at a high level, so this trace adsorption cannot be avoided in the ionic strength range of routine IEC operations. Grafting poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) chain of 60 kDa to a cation group density of 700 mmol/L could reduce the adsorption capacity to about 20 μg/mL, but further reduction was not possible by increasing the cation group density to 1200 mmol/L. Therefore, attentions need to be paid to the phenomenon in protein purification practice using agarose-based matrices. The research is expected to call attentions to the trace adsorption on agarose-based matrices and to the importance in the selection of the suitable solid matrices in the production of high-purity protein products in large-scale bioprocesses.

  5. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P.; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C.; Landes, Christy F.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally. PMID:24459184

  6. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-02-11

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally.

  7. Adsorption of polyethylene-glycolated bovine serum albumin on macroporous and polymer-grafted anion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mimi; Carta, Giorgio

    2014-01-24

    The chromatographic and adsorptive properties of BSA and BSA conjugated with 10 and 30kDa PEG polymers are determined for a macroporous anion exchanger (UNOsphere™ Diol Q) and for a polymer-grafted material having the same backbone matrix (Nuvia Q™). Chromatographic retention, adsorption capacity, and adsorption kinetics are enhanced in the polymer-grafted resin for both BSA and 10kDa PEG-BSA as a result of interactions with the grafted polymers. However, the difference between the two resins diminishes for 30kDa PEG-BSA indicating that size exclusion effects strongly affect binding in the polymer-grafted material for this larger conjugate. Images of intraparticle concentration profiles obtained by confocal scanning laser microscopy show that the transport mechanisms of both BSA and PEGylated BSA are very different in the two resins. The protein binding kinetics are dominated by ordinary pore diffusion and are essentially independent of the direction of transport for UNOsphere Diol Q as a result of its large pore size. Thus, for this material, displacement of PEGylated BSA by BSA is clearly evident at the intraparticle scale. On the other hand, the protein binding kinetics in Nuvia Q are consistent with a solid diffusion mechanism driven by the adsorbed protein concentration. For this material, protein transport is very fast for one component or two-component co-adsorption of BSA and PEGylated BSA but slows down dramatically for sequential adsorption of these species as a result of heightened diffusional hindrance when the two components counterdiffuse within the resin.

  8. Cd adsorption onto bacterial surfaces: A universal adsorption edge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Nathan; Fein, Jeremy

    2001-07-01

    In this study, we measure the thermodynamic stability constants for proton and Cd binding onto the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus megaturium, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Sporosarcina ureae, and Bacillus cereus. Potentiometric titrations and Cd-bacteria adsorption experiments yield average values for the carboxyl site pK a, site concentration, and log stability constant for the bacterial surface Cd-carboxyl complex of 5.0, 2.0 × 10 -3 mol/g and 4.0 respectively. Our results indicate that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit nearly identical Cd adsorption behavior as a function of pH. We propose that metal-bacteria adsorption is not dependent on the bacterial species involved, and we develop a generalized adsorption model which may greatly simplify the task of quantifying the effects of bacterial adsorption on dissolved mass transport in realistic geologic systems.

  9. Theoretical study of the accuracy of the pulse method, frontal analysis, and frontal analysis by characteristic points for the determination of single component adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption isotherms of selected compounds are our main source of information on the mechanisms of adsorption processes. Thus, the selection of the methods used to determine adsorption isotherm data and to evaluate the errors made is critical. Three chromatographic methods were evaluated, frontal analysis (FA), frontal analysis by characteristic point (FACP), and the pulse or perturbation method (PM), and their accuracies were compared. Using the equilibrium-dispersive (ED) model of chromatography, breakthrough curves of single components were generated corresponding to three different adsorption isotherm models: the Langmuir, the bi-Langmuir, and the Moreau isotherms. For each breakthrough curve, the best conventional procedures of each method (FA, FACP, PM) were used to calculate the corresponding data point, using typical values of the parameters of each isotherm model, for four different values of the column efficiency (N = 500, 1000, 2000, and 10,000). Then, the data points were fitted to each isotherm model and the corresponding isotherm parameters were compared to those of the initial isotherm model. When isotherm data are derived with a chromatographic method, they may suffer from two types of errors: (1) the errors made in deriving the experimental data points from the chromatographic records; (2) the errors made in selecting an incorrect isotherm model and fitting to it the experimental data. Both errors decrease significantly with increasing column efficiency with FA and FACP, but not with PM.

  10. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Gay, D.D.

    1982-08-12

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a microcolumn liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit is claimed. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  11. Intercalibration of chromatographic methods for auxino phytodrugs in Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, M C; Marengo, E; Gianotti, V; Angioi, S; Copeta, G

    2003-04-18

    Three chromatographic methods are considered for the determination in Solanaceae of auxino-similar phytodrugs, so called because their structure resembles an auxine plant hormone. The phytodrugs studied were: 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxypropionic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, naphthylacetic acid and 2-naphthyloxyacetic acid. Three chromatographic methods, respectively based on ion-interaction HPLC, GC-MS with intra-injector derivatisation and CC-MS with pre-injection derivatisation, were developed, optimised and validated. A comparative discussion of the advantages/disadvantages of the methods suggests a strategy for their preferential use, that is essentially a function of the matrix complexity.

  12. Catalytically-Promoted Analyte Derivatization Inside a Gas Chromatographic Inlet

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, William K.; Gamble, Kelly J.; Wright, Amber R.

    2010-01-01

    Reported here is a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of catalyzing on-line derivatization reactions inside the inlet (i.e., the injection port) of a gas chromatograph (GC) with solid heterogeneous catalysts. The experiments described here entail the installation of candidate catalysts inside the GC inlet liner and the subsequent injection of analyte/reagent mixtures onto the catalyst beds. Two catalysts are identified, each of which clearly catalyzes one of the chosen model derivatization reactions in the inlet of a GC. This result supports our hypothesis that on-line derivatizations can, in principle, be reproducibly catalyzed inside the GC inlet by solid heterogeneous catalysts and that the presence of such catalysts in the inlet do not necessarily cause a serious loss of instrument performance or chromatographic efficiency. PMID:20822662

  13. Accuracy of peak deconvolution algorithms within chromatographic integrators

    SciTech Connect

    Papas, A.N. ); Tougas, T.P. )

    1990-02-01

    The soundness of present-day algorithms to deconvolve overlapping skewed peaks was investigated. From simulated studies based on the exponentially modified Gaussian model (EMG), chromatographic peak area inaccuracies for unresolved peaks are presented for the two deconvolution methods, the tangent skim and the perpendicular drop method. These inherent inaccuracies, in many cases exceeding 50%, are much greater than those calculated from ideal Gaussian profiles. Multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to build models that predict the relative error for either peak deconvolution method. MLR also provided a means for determining influential independent variables, defining the required chromatographic relationships needed for prediction. Once forecasted errors for both methods are calculated, selection of either peak deconvolution method can be made by minimum errors. These selection boundaries are contrasted to method selection criteria of present data systems algorithms.

  14. Quantitative liquid chromatographic analysis of anthracyclines in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Maudens, Kristof E; Stove, Christophe P; Lambert, Willy E

    2011-09-01

    Anthracyclines are amongst the most widely used drugs in oncology, being part of the treatment regimen in most patients receiving systemic chemotherapy. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the sample preparation techniques and chromatographic methods that have been developed during the last two decades for the analysis of the 4 most administered anthracyclines, doxorubicin, epirubicin, daunorubicin and idarubicin in plasma, serum, saliva or urine, within the context of clinical and pharmacokinetic studies or for assessing occupational exposure. Following deproteinization, liquid-liquid extraction, solid phase extraction or a combination of these techniques, the vast majority of methods utilizes reversed-phase C18 stationary phases for liquid chromatographic separation, followed by fluorescence detection, or, more recently, tandem mass spectrometric detection. Some pros and cons of the different techniques are addressed, in addition to potential pitfalls that may be encountered in the analysis of this class of compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Techniques of preparing plant material for chromatographic separation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Romanik, G; Gilgenast, E; Przyjazny, A; Kamiński, M

    2007-03-10

    This paper discusses preparation techniques of samples of plant material for chromatographic analysis. Individual steps of the procedures used in sample preparation, including sample collection from the environment or from tissue cultures, drying, comminution, homogenization, leaching, extraction, distillation and condensation, analyte enrichment, and obtaining the final extracts for chromatographic analysis are discussed. The techniques most often used for isolation of analytes from homogenized plant material, i.e., Soxhlet extraction, ultrasonic solvent extraction (sonication), accelerated solvent extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, supercritical-fluid extraction, steam distillation, as well as membrane processes are emphasized. Sorptive methods of sample enrichment and removal of interferences, i.e., solid-phase extraction, and solid-phase micro-extraction are also discussed.

  16. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  17. Preparative purification of salidroside from Rhodiola rosea by two-step adsorption chromatography on resins.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chaoyang; Tang, Jian; Wang, Hongxin; Tao, Guangjun; Gu, Xiaohong; Hu, Liming

    2009-01-01

    Salidroside is an effective adaptogenic drug extracted from Rhodiola species. In the present study, a simple and efficient method for preparative separation and purification of salidroside from the Chinese medicinal plant Rhodiola rosesa was developed by adsorption chromatography on macroporous resins. The static adsorption isotherms and kinetics of some resins have been determined and compared for preparative separation of salidroside. According to our results, HPD-200 resin is the most appropriate medium for the separation of salidroside and its adsorption data fit the Langmuir isotherm well. Dynamic adsorption and desorption were carried out in glass columns packed with HPD-200 to optimize the separation process. After two adsorption and desorption runs, a product with a salidroside content of 92.21% and an overall recovery of 48.82% was achieved. In addition, pure lamellar crystals of salidroside with a purity of 99.00% could be obtained from this product. Its molecular weight was determined by an ESI-MS method. The simple purification scheme avoids toxic organic solvents used in silica gel and high-speed counter-current chromatographic separation processes and thus increases the safety of the process and can be helpful for large-scale salidroside production from Rhodiola rosea or other plant extracts.

  18. Can enantiomers be separated in achiral chromatographic systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davankov, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Consideration of chromatography of a nonracemic mixture on an achiral sorbent from a stereochemical point of view allows the claim that partial separation of the excess enantiomer zone from the racemate zone is possible only with analytes capable of self-associating under the conditions of the chromatographic column. It is from these positions that features of this process can be explained and conditions for its maximal proceeding formulated.

  19. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Thin-Layer Chromatographic Applications.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Claudia; Kutzscher, Christel; Drache, Franziska; Helten, Stella; Senkovska, Irena; Kaskel, Stefan

    2017-01-25

    Preparation of thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) plates based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as porous stationary phases is described. DUT-67 (DUT = Dresden University of Technology), a zirconium based MOF, was used in combination with a fluorescent indicator as stationary phase for analyzing a small selection of a wide spectrum of relevant analytes. The successful separation of benzaldehyde from trans-cinnamaldehyde and 4-aminophenol from 2-aminotoluene is reported as a model system using optimized eluent mixtures containing acetic acid.

  20. Multidimensional counter-current chromatographic system and its application.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Quan, J; Zhang, T Y; Ito, Y

    1998-04-17

    A multidimensional counter-current chromatographic system was set up for the first time with two sets of high-speed counter-current chromatography instruments. This system was successfully applied to the preparative separation of isorhamnetin, kaempferol and quercetin from crude flavone aglycones of Ginkgo biloba L. and Hippophae rhamnoides L. with a two-phase solvent system composed of chloroform-methanol-water (4:3:2, v/v/v).

  1. The chromatographic behaviour of wasp venom kinin, kallidin and bradykinin.

    PubMed

    MATHIAS, A P; SCHACHTER, M

    1958-09-01

    Wasp venom kinin which has hitherto appeared to be homogeneous can be resolved by ionexchange chromatography into a single major and two minor components. These are indistinguishable by their action on smooth muscle and by their rapid inactivation by chymotrypsin. All three components of wasp kinin are chromatographically different from kallidin or bradykinin. The close similarity of the latter compounds is confirmed by their identical behaviour on an ion-exchange resin.

  2. Application of XAD-2 resin-based passive samplers and SPME-GC-MS/MS analysis for the monitoring of spatial and temporal variations of atmospheric pesticides in Luxembourg.

    PubMed

    Schummer, Claude; Tuduri, Ludovic; Briand, Olivier; Appenzeller, Brice M; Millet, Maurice

    2012-11-01

    Passive air sampling has been shown to be a very interesting alternative to high-volume sampling by overcoming its disadvantages (size, weight, expensiveness). However, to date, only limited data is available about passive air sampling of current-use pesticides. In order to test if passive samplers allow monitoring of spatial and temporal variations of atmospheric pesticide concentrations, five XAD-2-resin based passive air samplers were deployed at five locations in Luxembourg. Samplers were analyzed using accelerated solvent extraction coupled to solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Collected data was used to study the spatial and temporal variations of the concentrations of the compounds. Twenty two pesticides were detected between March and October, while no pesticides were detected from November to February. Highest concentrations were measured on the rural sites, suggesting that the used XAD-2 resin-based passive samplers allow the simultaneous monitoring of multiple current-use pesticides and identifying spatial and temporal variations.

  3. Development of a simple technique for the coating of monolithic silica with pristine boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs): HPLC chromatographic applications.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Yves Claude; André, Claire

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a novel and very simple homogeneous coating of a monolithic silica HPLC support using pristine boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) was d0.escribed. The chromatographic support was coated with BNNTs in a non covalent way to preserve the nanotube structure. A solution of BNNTs dispersed in dimethylacetamide (DMAc) was pumped through the column at a flow-rate of 0.3mL/min for 24h at room temperature. Strong interaction between amino groups and the BNNT surfaces induces the adsorption of the BNNTs on the silica, while the stable solvation in DMAc hampers further adsorption of the tubes. The excellent stability of the non covalent BNNT-coating on the monolithic silica in view of application for HPLC was also demonstrated. It was shown that this novel stationary phase was efficient for the HPLC isocratic or gradient mode separation of molecules of different structure such as phenol derivatives, alkylbenzene or doping agents (steroids). As well, this simple technique of BNNT immobilization offers new perspectives for the BNNT-coating on the surfaces of a wide range of solid substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase in gas chromatographic separation and determination of argon, carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Maleki, Norooz; Doroodmand, Mohammad Mahdi

    2010-08-24

    A chromatographic technique is introduced based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as stationary phase for separation of Ar, CO(2) and H(2) at parts per million (ppm) levels. The efficiency of SWCNTs was compared with solid materials such as molecular sieve, charcoal, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers. The morphology of SWCNTs was optimized for maximum adsorption of H(2), CO(2) and Ar and minimum adsorption of gases such as N(2), O(2), CO and H(2)O vapour. To control temperature of the gas chromatography column, peltier cooler was used. Mixtures of Ar, CO(2) and H(2) were separated according to column temperature program. Relative standard deviation for nine replicate analyses of 0.2 mL H(2) containing 10 microL of each Ar or CO(2) was 2.5% for Ar, 2.8% for CO(2) and 3.6% for H(2). The interfering effects of CO, and O(2) were investigated. Working ranges were evaluated as 40-600 ppm for Ar, 30-850 ppm for CO(2) and 10-1200 ppm for H(2). Significant sensitivity, small relative standard deviation (RSD) and acceptable limit of detection (LOD) were obtained for each analyte, showing capability of SWCNTs for gas separation and determination processes. Finally, the method was used to evaluate the contents of CO(2) in air sample.

  5. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Chromatographic analysis and structure determination of biliverdins and bilirubins.

    PubMed

    Heirwegh, K P; Fevery, J; Blanckaert, N

    1989-11-10

    Recent applications of thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) procedures has revealed an unexpected wide variety of naturally occurring unconjugated and conjugated bilirubins. Biliverdins seems to occur only in unconjugated forms, mainly as the IX alpha isomer. Several synthetic biliverdins and bilirubins present interesting models for biochemical and metabolic studies. Owing to recent recognition of the astounding heterogeneity of natural bilirubins and to the various artifactual changes that bile pigments can undergo, considerable confusion has existed, and still exists, with regard to the nomenclature of the bile pigments and their derivatives. To set a background for further discussion, the present review starts with a brief discussion of nomenclature and of the various characteristic forms of lability of the bile pigments. TLC and HPLC procedures for preparation and analysis of unconjugated biliverdins and bilirubins and their methyl ester and sugar ester conjugates, as well as procedures for analysis of bilirubin-protein conjugates, are then discussed. Since, in view of the lability and pronounced heterogeneity of bile pigments, it is important to assess the composition and nature of chromatographically isolated pigments, the review is concluded by a brief evaluation of various structural tests.

  7. Prediction of pesticides chromatographic lipophilicity from the computational molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Casoni, Dorina; Petre, Jana; David, Victor; Sârbu, Costel

    2011-02-01

    Quantitative structure-property relationship models were developed for the prediction of pesticides and some PAH compounds lipophilicity based on a wide set of computational molecular descriptors and a set of experimental chromatographic data. The chromatographic lipophilicity of pesticides has been evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using different chemically bonded (C18, C8, CN and Phenyl HPLC columns) stationary phases and two different organic modifiers (methanol and acetonitrile, respectively) in the mobile phase composition. Through a systematic study, by using the classic multivariate analysis, several quantitative structure-property/lipophilicity multi-dimensional models were established. Multiple linear regression and genetic algorithm for the variable subset selection were used. The internal and external statistical evaluation procedures revealed some appropriate models for the chromatographic lipophilicity prediction of pesticides. Moreover, the statistical parameters of regression and those obtained by applying t-test for the intercept (a(0)) and for the slope (a(1)) in order to evaluate relationship between experimental and predicted octanol-water partition coefficients in case of the test set compounds, revealed two statistically valid models that can be successfully used in lipophilicity prediction of pesticides.

  8. Modeling anion adsorption on kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Weerasooriya, R.; Wickramarathna, H.U.S.

    1999-05-15

    Anion adsorption onto kaolinite was quantified using the triple layer surface complexation model. Fluoride adsorption data were described by both anion exchange and H-bonded complexation mechanisms. The outer-sphere complexation mechanism was used to describe the weak adsorption of Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, and I{sup {minus}} on kaolinite. The F{sup {minus}} adsorption in the presence of Br{sup {minus}} or I{sup {minus}} was decreased over a range of pH 4--5 whereas Cl{sup {minus}} showed a negligible effect. Competition for binding sites appeared to be an important factor in determining the adsorptive behavior of F{sup {minus}} in Br{sup {minus}} or I{sup {minus}} mediated systems.

  9. Radiational-thermal stability of hydrocarbons of aromatic oil obtained by adsorptive treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Alekhina, N.I.; Levinson, S.Z.; Voznesenskaya, S.V.; Kuritsina, N.I.; Oreshkova, N.S.; Kogan, L.O.

    1988-01-01

    The oil investigated was obtained in a continuous pilot unit for adsorptive treatment of a heavy coker gasoil, produced in a commercial delayed coking unit from medium-sulfur feed. The radiational and thermal stability of the constituent hydrocarbons and individual groups of compounds was evaluated from the changes of their content in the oil after gamma irradiation from a cobalt 60 source. Chemical group composition was determined chromatographically. Resinous compounds were least resistant to radiation. The resistance of the organosulfur components was dependent on molecular structure; benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene contents were increased by irradiation from the conversion of naphthenobenzothiophenes.

  10. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  11. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  12. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  13. Protein adsorption to poly(ethylenimine)-modified Sepharose FF. IV. Dynamic adsorption and elution behaviors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Yu, Lin-Ling; Sun, Yan

    2014-10-03

    We have previously investigated bovine serum albumin (BSA) uptake to poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-grafted Sepharose FF. It was found that there was a critical ionic capacity (cIC; 600mmol/L) for BSA, above which the protein adsorption capacity and uptake kinetics increased drastically. In this work, two poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-grafted resins with IC values of 271mmol/L (FF-PEI-L270) and 683mmol/L (FF-PEI-L680), which were below and above the cIC, respectively, were chosen to investigate the breakthrough and linear gradient elution (LGE) behaviors of BSA. Commercially available anion exchanger, Q Sepharose FF, was used for comparison. The DBC values of FF-PEI-L680 were much higher in the entire residence time range (2-10min) than the other two resins due to its high static adsorption capacity and uptake kinetics. At a residence time of 5.0min, the DBC of FF-PEI-L680 (104mg/mL) was about seven times that of FF-PEI-L270 and three times that of Q Sepharose FF. A rise-fall trend of the DBCs with increasing ionic strength (IS) was found for all the three resins studied, indicating the presence of electrostatic exclusion for protein uptake at low IS. With increasing NaCl concentration from 20 to 200mmol/L, FF-PEI-L680 kept very high DBC values (64-114mg/mL). In addition, FF-PEI-L270 showed more favorable adsorption properties than Q Sepharose FF at 100-300mmol/L NaCl. These results proved that the three-dimensional grafting ion exchange layer on the PEI resins enhanced their tolerance to IS. In the study of LGE, the three resins showed similar elution behaviors and no distinct peak tailings were observed. The salt concentrations at the elution peaks (IR) were in the order of FF-PEI-L680>FF-PEI-L270>Q Sepharose FF, indicating that the elution for the PEI resins needed higher salt concentrations, which was also an appearance of the salt-tolerant feature of the PEI resins. When protein loading amount was increased to the value equivalent to the DBC at 10% breakthrough, the

  14. Production of polygalacturonase from Coriolus versicolor grown on tomato pomace and its chromatographic behaviour on immobilized metal chelates.

    PubMed

    do Rosário Freixo, Maria; Karmali, Amin; Arteiro, José Maria

    2008-06-01

    Tomato pomace and pectin were used as the sole carbon sources for the production of polygalacturonase from a strain of Coriolus versicolor in submerged culture. The culture of C. versicolor grown on tomato pomace exhibited a peak of polygalacturonase activity (1,427 U/l) on the third day of culture with a specific activity of 14.5 U/mg protein. The production of polygalacturonase by C. versicolor grown on pectin as a sole carbon source increased with the time of cultivation, reaching a maximum activity of 3,207 U/l of fermentation broth with a specific activity of 248 U/mg protein. The levels of different isoenzymes of polygalacturonase produced during the culture growth were analysed by native PAGE. Differential chromatographic behaviour of lignocellulosic enzymes produced by C. versicolor (i.e. polygalacturonase, xylanase and laccase) was studied on immobilized metal chelates. The effect of ligand concentration, pH, the length of spacer arm and the nature of metal ion were studied for enzyme adsorption on immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). The adsorption of these lignocellulosic enzymes onto immobilized metal chelates was pH-dependent since an increase in protein adsorption was observed as the pH was increased from 6.0 to 8.0. The adsorption of polygalacturonase as well as other enzymes to immobilized metal chelates was due to coordination of histidine residues which are available at the protein surface since the presence of imidazole in the equilibration buffer abolished the adsorption of the enzyme to immobilized metal chelates. A one-step purification of polygalacturonase from C. versicolor was devised by using a column of Sepharose 6B-EPI 30-IDA-Cu(II) and purified enzyme exhibited a specific activity of about 150 U/mg protein, final recovery of enzyme activity of 100% and a purification factor of about 10. The use of short spacer arm and the presence of imidazole in equilibration buffer exhibited a higher selectivity for purification of

  15. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  16. Galactose adsorption on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, Matti; Puisto, Mikko

    2014-03-01

    In order to understand the valorisation of biomass, it is essential to study the behavior of sugar molecules on catalytic surfaces. We have studied the adsorption of galactose molecules on the Ru(0001) surface using first principles calculations. We present results for the fully relaxed configurations of the molecule at different adsorption sites. We also compare the effect of the inclusion of the van der Waals interactions on both the energetics of the free galactose molecule and the adsorption energy of galactose on Ru(0001). We compare our results, obtained using periodically repeated supercells, to those obtained with cluster calculations.

  17. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  18. Water adsorption on goethite: Application of multilayer adsorption models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, C. D.; Tumminello, R.; Meredith, R.

    2016-12-01

    Adsorbed water on the surface of atmospheric mineral dust has recently been shown to significantly affect the ability of mineral dust aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei. We have studied water adsorption as a function of relative humidity (RH) on goethite (α-FeO(OH)), a common component of atmospheric mineral dust. The goethite surface area and particle size was determined using BET analysis and with N2 as an adsorbate and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Water adsorption on the sample was monitored using horizontal attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR) spectroscopy equipped with a flow cell. Water content was determined using Beer's law and the optical constants for bulk water. The results were analyzed using Type II adsorption isotherms to model multilayer adsorption, including BET (Brunauer, Emmet and Teller), FHH (Frenkel, Halsey and Hill) and Freundlich. BET fits to experimental data provide parameters of monolayer coverage, while the FHH and Freundlich isotherms provide insights into multilayer adsorption mechanisms. Results indicate that goethite contains 5% H2O by mass at 50% RH, which increases to 12% by mass at 90% RH. Adsorption parameters and experimental results will be presented.

  19. Dynamic adsorption of ammonia: apparatus, testing conditions, and adsorption capacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amid, Hooman; Mazé, Benoît; Flickinger, Michael C.; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2017-04-01

    There is a growing need for adsorbents with high capacities for adsorption of toxic gas molecules. Methods and conditions to test these materials introduce large discrepancies and overestimates (~90%) in the reported literature. This study describes a simple apparatus utilizing hand-held inexpensive gas sensors for testing adsorbents and hybrid adsorbent materials, explains possible sources for the observed discrepancies based on how the measurements are made, and provides guidelines for accurate measurements of adsorption capacity. Ammonia was the model gas and Ammonasorb™ activated carbon was the model commercial adsorbent. Inlet ammonia concentration, residence time, adsorbent pre-treatment (baking) and humidity, affected the measured adsorption capacities. Results suggest that the time lag in gas detection sensors leads to overestimated capacities. Monitoring both inlet and outlet concentrations using two calibrated sensors solved this issue. There was a direct relationship between adsorption capacity and residence time and capacities were higher at higher inlet concentrations. The size of the adsorbent particles did not show a significant effect on adsorption breakthrough, and the apparatus was able to quantify how humidity reduced the adsorption capacity.

  20. Bromide Adsorption by Reference Minerals and Soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bromide, Br-, adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous Al and Fe oxide, montmorillonite, kaolinite, and temperate and tropical soils. Bromide adsorption decreased with increasing solution pH with minimal adsorption occurring above pH 7. Bromide adsorption was higher for amorphous oxides t...

  1. Adsorption removal of carbon dioxide from the helium coolant of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Varezhin, A.V.; Fedoseenkov, A.N.; Khrulev, A.A.; Metlik, I.V.; Zel venskii, Y.D.

    1986-10-01

    This paper conducts experiments on the removal of CO/sub 2/ from helium by means of a Soviet-made adsorbent under the conditions characteristic of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cleaning systems. The adsorption of CO/sub 2/ from helium was studied under dynamic conditions with a fixed layer of adsorbent in a flow-through apparatus with an adsorber 16 mm in diameter. The analysis of the helium was carried out by means of a TVT chromatograph. In order to compare the adsorption of CO/sub 2/ on CaA zeolite under dynamic conditions from the helium stream under pressure with the equilibrium adsorption on the basis of pure CO/sub 2/, the authors determined the adsorption isotherm at 293 K by the volumetric method over a range of CO/sub 2/ equilibrium pressures from 260 to 11,970 Pa. Reducing the adsorption temperature to 273 K leads to a considerable reduction in the energy costs for regeneration, owing to the increase in adsorption and the decrease in the number of regeneration cycles; the amount of the heating gas used is reduced to less than half.

  2. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  3. Chromatographic selectivity study of 4-fluorophenylacetic acid positional isomers separation.

    PubMed

    Chasse, Tyson; Wenslow, Robert; Bereznitski, Yuri

    2007-07-13

    Unique properties of the fluorine atom stimulate widespread use and development of new organofluorine compounds in agrochemistry, biotechnology and pharmacology applications. However, relatively few synthetic methods exhibit a high degree of fluorination selectivity, which ultimately results in the presence of structurally related fluorinated isomers in the synthetic product. This outcome is undesirable from a pharmaceutical perspective as positional isomers possess different reactivity, biological activity and toxicity as compared to the desired product. It is advantageous to control positional isomers in the early stages of the synthetic process, as rejection and analysis of these isomers will likely become more difficult in later stages. The current work reports the development of a chromatographic analysis of 2- and 3-fluorophenylacetic acid positional isomer impurities in 4-fluorophenylacetic acid (4-FPAA), a building block in the synthesis of an active pharmaceutical ingredient. The method is employed as a part of a Quality by Design Approach to control purity of the starting material in order to eliminate the presence of undesirable positional isomers in the final drug substance. During method development, a wide range of chromatographic conditions and structurally related positional isomer probe molecules were exploited in an effort to gain insight into the specifics of the separation mechanism. For the systems studied it was shown that the choice of organic modifier played a key role in achieving acceptable separation. Further studies encompassed investigation of temperature influence on retention and selectivity of the FPAA isomers separation. Thermodynamic analysis of these data showed that the selectivity of the 2- and 4- fluorophenylacetic acids separation was dominated by an enthalpic process, while the selectivity of the 4- and 3-fluorophenylacetic acids separation was exclusively entropy driven (Delta(DeltaH degrees approximately 0). Studies of

  4. Rotating annular chromatograph for continuous metal separations and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Multicomponent liquid chromatographic separations have been achieved by using a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material. By continuously introducing the feed material to be separated at a stationary point at the top of the bed and eluent everywhere else around the annulus, elution chromatography occurs. The rotation of the sorbent bed causes the separated components to appear as helical bands, each of which has a characteristic, stationary exit point; hence, the separation process is truly continuous. The concept has been developed primarily on a 279-mm-diam by 0.6-m-long device with a 12.7-mm-wide annulus. The effect of annulus width and diameter has recently been studied using the same device with a 50.8-mm-wide annulus and another 0.6-m-long chromatograph with an 89-mm diameter and annulus widths of 6.4, 12.7, and 22.2 mm. These columns have been constructed of Plexiglas and typically operate at a gauge pressure of 175 kPa. To further study the effect of size and pressure, a new 445-mm-diam by 1-m-long column with a 31.8-mm-wide annulus has been fabricated. Its metal construction allows preparative-scale operation with a wide variety of liquids at pressures to 1.3 MPa. Three metal recovery systems have been explored: (1) separation of iron and aluminum in ammonium sulfate-sulfuric acid solutions; (2) separation of hafnium from zirconium in sulfuric acid solutions; and (3) the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt in ammonium carbonate solutions. This last system simulates the leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. It has been studied, using similar conditions, on each of the chromatographs, and the results demonstrate the effect of column dimensions on the quality and quantity of the separation. 8 figures, 1 table.

  5. Gas chromatographic concepts for the analysis of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, J. R.; Cullers, D. K.; Hall, K. W.; Krekorian, R. L.; Phillips, J. B.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last few years, new gas chromatographic (GC) concepts were developed for use on board spacecraft or any other restricted environments for determining the chemical composition of the atmosphere and surface material of various planetary bodies. Future NASA Missions include an entry probe that will be sent to Titan and various spacecraft that will land on Mars. In order to be able to properly respond to the mission science requirements and physical restrictions imposed on the instruments by these missions, GC analytical techniques are being developed. Some of these techniques include hardware and mathematical techniques that will improve GC sensitivity and increase the sampling rate of a GC descending through a planetary atmosphere. The technique of Multiplex Gas Chromatography (MGC) is an example of a technique that was studied in a simulated Titan atmosphere. In such an environment, the atmospheric pressure at instrument deployment is estimated to be a few torr. Thus, at such pressures, the small amount of sample that is acquired might not be enough to satisfy the detection requirements of the gas chromatograph. In MGC, many samples are pseudo-randomly introduced to the chromatograph without regard to elution of preceding components. The resulting data is then reduced using mathematical techniques such as cross-correlation of Fourier Transforms. Advantages realized from this technique include: improvement in detection limits of several orders of magnitude and increase in the number of analyses that can be conducted in a given period of time. Results proving the application of MGC at very low pressures emulating the same atmospheric pressures that a Titan Probe will encounter when the instruments are deployed are presented. The sample used contained hydrocarbons that are expected to be found in Titan's atmosphere. In addition, a new selective modulator was developed to monitor water under Martian atmospheric conditions. Since this modulator is selective only

  6. Gas chromatographic analysis of trace gas impurities in tungsten hexafluoride.

    PubMed

    Laurens, J B; de Coning, J P; Swinley, J M

    2001-03-09

    Highly reactive fluorinated gaseous matrices require special equipment and techniques for the gas chromatographic analysis of trace impurities in these gases. The impurities that were analysed at the low-microg/l levels included oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen. This paper describes the use of a system utilising backflush column switching to protect the columns and detectors in the analysis of trace gas impurities in tungsten hexafluoride. Two separate channels were used for the analysis of H2, O2, N2, CO, CO2 and SF6 impurities with pulsed discharge helium ionisation detection.

  7. Methods and apparatus for analysis of chromatographic migration patterns

    DOEpatents

    Stockham, Thomas G.; Ives, Jeffrey T.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sharpening signal peaks in a signal representing the distribution of biological or chemical components of a mixture separated by a chromatographic technique such as, but not limited to, electrophoresis. A key step in the method is the use of a blind deconvolution technique, presently embodied as homomorphic filtering, to reduce the contribution of a blurring function to the signal encoding the peaks of the distribution. The invention further includes steps and apparatus directed to determination of a nucleotide sequence from a set of four such signals representing DNA sequence data derived by electrophoretic means.

  8. Methods and apparatus for analysis of chromatographic migration patterns

    DOEpatents

    Stockham, T.G.; Ives, J.T.

    1993-12-28

    A method and apparatus are presented for sharpening signal peaks in a signal representing the distribution of biological or chemical components of a mixture separated by a chromatographic technique such as, but not limited to, electrophoresis. A key step in the method is the use of a blind deconvolution technique, presently embodied as homomorphic filtering, to reduce the contribution of a blurring function to the signal encoding the peaks of the distribution. The invention further includes steps and apparatus directed to determination of a nucleotide sequence from a set of four such signals representing DNA sequence data derived by electrophoretic means. 16 figures.

  9. Purification of helium for chromatographic analysis by electrical discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, I.V.; Budovich, V.L.; Myagkov, E.A.; Okhotnikov, B.P.

    1986-02-01

    In order to apply gas discharge purification of helium in chromotographic analysis, the authors have carried out the separation process in the present work at a pressure above the atmospheric pressure. They then carry out the purification in an arc discharge, because it is difficult to achieve a stationary glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. Cylinder discharge chambers were used in the experiments, made of stainless steel with Teflon flanges. A decrease in the nitrogen content by a factor of 7-10 has been obtained in the experiments. The proposed method can be used for the purification of helium from cylinders in different variants of chromatographic analysis.

  10. Gas chromatographic determination of propylene glycol dinitrate in rodent skin.

    PubMed

    Godin, C S; Pollard, D L

    1992-01-01

    A gas chromatographic (GC) method was developed for the detection of propylene glycol dinitrate (PGDN) in rodent skin following extraction with ethyl acetate. Known quantities of PGDN contained in the torpedo fuel Otto Fuel II were added to homogenates of rat skin, which were subsequently extracted with two 10-mL portions of ethyl acetate. An aliquot of each extract was analyzed by GC with a flame ionization detector. With this method, concentrations ranging from 0.0042 to 11.2 mg/mL were determined by comparison with a standard curve. The extraction efficiencies ranged from 85.7% for the lowest concentration to 101% for the highest concentration.

  11. [High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of propanidid and etomidate].

    PubMed

    Zawisza, P; Przyborowski, L

    1992-01-01

    High-performance reversed-phase liquid chromatographic determination of propanidid and etomidate was performed on ODS silica, after precipitation of the proteins in plasma with methanol, extraction of the drugs with diethyl ether, evaporation and dissolving in a mobile phase: acetonitrile-phosphate buffer pH 4.44 (7:3, v/v); UV detection at 254 nm. Dionine hydrochloride was used as an internal standard. Propanidid was determined in a range 5-25 microg/cm3 of plasma and etomidate in 0.1-0.5 microg/cm3 of plasma, thus enables the analysis of therapeutic levels of the drugs.

  12. Cation exchange chromatographic elution and separation of rubidium

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, V.P.; Khopkar, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    The systematic cation exchange chromatographic separation of rubidium on Dowex 50W-X8 was carried out with mineral acids and their salts as eluants.A selectivity scale for various eluants in terms of the elution constant was devised. Rubidium was separated from a large number of elements in binary mixtures by the process of gradient or selective elutions or selective sorption. The noteworthy feature of the method is the sequential separation of rubidium from alkali as well as alkaline earth elements.

  13. Liquid chromatographic determination of pyrantel tartrate in medicated formulations.

    PubMed

    Konrardy, Joyce A; Burner, Mary A; Garner, Tommy W; Litchman, Mark A; Webster, Gregory K

    2003-01-01

    The validation of a novel liquid chromatographic (LC) method for the determination of pyrantel tartrate in feed is presented. The method provides a significant improvement over the efficiency and precision of AOAC Official Method 978.30. The method was shown to be accurate, precise, linear, and robust for medicated articles. Unlike the official method, the LC method was shown to be a superior stability-indicating method. After the method was validated by using laboratory blends, the effectiveness of the method was demonstrated with marketed product as well.

  14. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  15. Adsorption hysteresis in nanopores

    PubMed

    Neimark; Ravikovitch; Vishnyakov

    2000-08-01

    Capillary condensation hysteresis in nanopores is studied by Monte Carlo simulations and the nonlocal density functional theory. Comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data on low temperature sorption of nitrogen and argon in cylindrical channels of mesoporous siliceous molecular sieves of MCM-41 type, we have revealed four qualitatively different sorption regimes depending on the temperature and pore size. As the pore size increases at a given temperature, or as the temperature decreases at a given pore size, the following regimes are consequently observed: volume filling without phase separation, reversible stepwise capillary condensation, irreversible capillary condensation with developing hysteresis, and capillary condensation with developed hysteresis. We show that, in the regime of developed hysteresis (pores wider than 5 nm in the case of nitrogen sorption at 77 K), condensation occurs spontaneously at the vaporlike spinodal while desorption takes place at the equilibrium. A quantitative agreement is found between the modeling results and the experimental hysteresis loops formed by the adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results obtained provide a better understanding of the general behavior of confined fluids and the specifics of sorption and phase transitions in nanomaterials.

  16. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  17. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-11

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than [Formula: see text] to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning-here through ion exchange-unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  18. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  19. Stacking-cyclodextrin-microchip electrokinetic chromatographic determination of gabapentinoid drugs in pharmaceutical and biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Zeid, Abdallah M; Kaji, Noritada; Nasr, Jenny Jeehan M; Belal, Fathalla F; Baba, Yoshinobu; Walash, Mohamed I

    2017-06-23

    A facile, rapid, and highly sensitive microchip-based electrokinetic chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of two gabapentinoid drugs, gabapentin (GPN) and pregabalin (PGN). Both drugs were first reacted with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F) via nucleophilic substitution reactions to yield highly fluorescent products with λex/em 470/540nm. Analyses of both fluorescently labeled compounds were achieved within 200s in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchip with a 30mm separation channel. Optimum separation was achieved using a borate buffer (pH 9.0) solution containing methylcellulose and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) as buffer additives. Methylcellulose acted as a dynamic coating to prevent adsorption of the studied compounds on the inner surfaces of the microchannels, while β-CD acted as a pseudo-stationary phase to improve the separation efficiency between the labeled drugs with high resolution (Rs>7). The fluorescence intensities of the labeled drugs were measured using a light emitting diode-induced fluorescence detector at 540nm after excitation at 470nm. The sensitivity of the method was enhanced 14- and 17-fold for PGN and GPN, respectively by field-amplified stacking relative to traditional pinched injection so that it could quantify 10ngmL(-1) for both analytes, with a detection limit lower than 3ngmL(-1). The developed method was efficiently applied to analyze PGN and GPN in their pharmaceutical dosage forms and in biological fluids. The extraction recoveries of the studied drugs from plasma and urine samples were more than 89% with%RSD values lower than 6.2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of Gas Chromatographic Methods for Analysis of Gasoline/Oxygenate Blends.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    determination of various oxygenated compounds in gasoline by gas chromotography have been developed.(3-6) These include gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of the...ID-Ai33 0i6 EVALUATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS FOR ANALYSIS i/t OF GASOLINE/OXYGEN.. (U) SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INST SAN ANTONIO TX ARMY FUELS...0 EVALUATION OF GAS -CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS FOR ANALYSIS OF GASOLINE/OXYGENATE BLENDS INTERIM REPORT

  1. Improving stability of virus-like particles by ion-exchange chromatographic supports with large pore size: advantages of gigaporous media beyond enhanced binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengran; Li, Yan; Zhang, Songping; Li, Xiunan; Yang, Yanli; Chen, Yi; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-02-28

    Limited binding capacity and low recovery of large size multi-subunits virus-like particles (VLPs) in conventional agarose-gel based chromatographic supports with small pores have long been a bottleneck limiting the large scale purification and application of VLPs. In this study, four anion exchange media including DEAE-Sepharose FF (DEAE-FF), DEAE-Capto, gigaporous DEAE-AP-120nm and DEAE-AP-280nm with average pore diameters of 32nm, 20nm, 120nm and 280nm, respectively, were applied for purification of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) VLPs. Pore size effects of media on the VLPs adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, dynamic binding capacity (DBC), and recovery were investigated in detail. According to the confocal laser scanning microscopy observation, adsorption of the VLPs in DEAE-FF and DEAE-Capto was mostly confined to a thin shell on the outer surface of the beads, leaving the underlying pore space and the binding sites inaccessibly, while the large pores in gigaporous media enabled the VLPs to access to the interior pore spaces by diffusion transport efficiently. Compared to the most widely used DEAE-FF, gigaporous media DEAE-AP-280nm gained about 12.9 times increase in static adsorption capacity, 8.0 times increase in DBC, and 11.4 times increase in effective pore diffusivity. Beyond increasing the binding capacity and enhancing the mass transfer, the gigaporous structure also significantly improved the stability of the VLPs during intensive adsorption-desorption process by lowing the multi-point interaction between the VLPs and binding sites in the pores. At 2.0mg/mL-media loading quantity, about 85.5% VLPs were correctly self-assembled after the chromatography with DEAE-AP-280nm media; oppositely about 85.2% VLPs lost their normal assembly with DEAE-FF due to irreversible disassembly. Comparative investigation was made to study the purifying performance of these four chromatographic media for actual VLPs purification from recombinant

  2. In-line gas chromatographic apparatus for measuring the hydrophobic micropore volume (HMV) and contaminant transformation in mineral micropores.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hefa; Reinhard, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Desorption of hydrophobic organic compounds from micropores is characteristically slow compared to surface adsorption and partitioning. The slow-desorbing mass of a hydrophobic probe molecule can be used to calculate the hydrophobic micropore volume (HMV) of microporous solids. A gas chromatographic apparatus is described that allows characterization of the sorbed mass with respect to the desorption rate. The method is demonstrated using a dealuminated zeolite and an aquifer sand as the model and reference sorbents, respectively, and trichloroethylene (TCE) as the probe molecule. A glass column packed with the microporous sorbent is coupled directly to a gas chromatograph that is equipped with flame ionization and electron capture detectors. Sorption and desorption of TCE on the sorbent was measured by sampling the influent and effluent of the column using a combination of switching and injection valves. For geosorbents, the HMV is quantified based on Gurvitsch's rule from the mass of TCE desorbed at a rate that is characteristic for micropores. Instrumental requirements, design considerations, hardware details, detector calibration, performance, and data analysis are discussed along with applications. The method is novel and complements traditional vacuum gravimetric and piezometric techniques, which quantify the total pore volume under vacuum conditions. The HMV is more relevant than the total micropore volume for predicting the fate and transport of organic contaminants in the subsurface. Sorption in hydrophobic micropores strongly impacts the mobility of organic contaminants, and their chemical and biological transformations. The apparatus can serve as a tool for characterizing microporous solids and investigating contaminant-solid interactions. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gas chromatographic retention characteristics of phenols with Superox-20M

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.M.; Li, N.C.

    1982-08-01

    The gas chromatographic retention characteristics of a variety of underivatized phenols have been studied by using Superox-20M coated on fused silica. The relative retention times of thes compounds were measured at 160, 150, and 140/sup 0/C in order to determine the effect of operating temperature on relative retention. This information is used to predict relative retention times of phenols for which we had no standards. The linear temperature-programmed retention indexes of the solutes were measured. The retention of phenols on this phase is a function of the compounds vapor pressure, its ability to hydrogen bond with the stationary phase, and the strengths of those hydrogen bonds. These properties are in turn governed by steric, inductive, and resonance effects of the substituents. Linear free-energy relations between the logarithm of the ratio of the activity coefficients of phenol to substituted phenol (calculated from relative retention data) and the chromatographic substituent constant, sigma/sub c/, have been determined for some phenols on Superox-20M. Lastly, it was shown by nuclear magnetic resonance experiments that Superox-20M is apparently a poly(ethylene glycol) (also called a polyoxiran or poly(ethylene oxide)). 5 figures, 3 tables.

  4. A discontinuous Galerkin method to solve chromatographic models.

    PubMed

    Javeed, Shumaila; Qamar, Shamsul; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Warnecke, Gerald

    2011-10-07

    This article proposes a discontinuous Galerkin method for solving model equations describing isothermal non-reactive and reactive chromatography. The models contain a system of convection-diffusion-reaction partial differential equations with dominated convective terms. The suggested method has capability to capture sharp discontinuities and narrow peaks of the elution profiles. The accuracy of the method can be improved by introducing additional nodes in the same solution element and, hence, avoids the expansion of mesh stencils normally encountered in the high order finite volume schemes. Thus, the method can be uniformly applied up to boundary cells without loosing accuracy. The method is robust and well suited for large-scale time-dependent simulations of chromatographic processes where accuracy is highly demanding. Several test problems of isothermal non-reactive and reactive chromatographic processes are presented. The results of the current method are validated against flux-limiting finite volume schemes. The numerical results verify the efficiency and accuracy of the investigated method. The proposed scheme gives more resolved solutions than the high resolution finite volume schemes.

  5. Thin layer chromatographic determination of deoxynivalenol in processed grain products.

    PubMed

    Trucksess, M W; Flood, M T; Page, S W

    1986-01-01

    The thin layer chromatographic (TLC) method of Trucksess et al. (J. Assoc. Off. Anal. Chem. (1984) 67, 40-43) was modified for the determination of deoxynivalenol (DON) in high-sugar breakfast cereals, corn syrup, and beer. Celite was added to the substrate before extraction with acetonitrile-water (84 + 16). After filtration through an alumina-charcoal-Celite (0.5 + 0.7 + 0.3) column, the filtrate was evaporated to dryness and redissolved in water, which was passed through an octylsilyl reverse phase column. DON was eluted with anhydrous ethyl ether. The residue remaining after the eluate was evaporated to dryness was dissolved in CHCl3-acetonitrile (4 + 1) and chromatographed on AlCl3-impregnated silica gel TLC plates. The blue fluorescent DON spot was quantitated fluorodensitometrically after the TLC plate was heated at 120 degrees C for 7 min. Recoveries of DON added to breakfast cereals at 100, 200, and 400 ng/g levels and to syrup and beer at 50, 100, and 200 ng/g levels averaged 86%. The limit of determination in these products was about 50 ng/g.

  6. Multi-objective optimization of chromatographic rare earth element separation.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Holmqvist, Anders; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-10-16

    The importance of rare earth elements in modern technological industry grows, and as a result the interest for developing separation processes increases. This work is a part of developing chromatography as a rare earth element processing method. Process optimization is an important step in process development, and there are several competing objectives that need to be considered in a chromatographic separation process. Most studies are limited to evaluating the two competing objectives productivity and yield, and studies of scenarios with tri-objective optimizations are scarce. Tri-objective optimizations are much needed when evaluating the chromatographic separation of rare earth elements due to the importance of product pool concentration along with productivity and yield as process objectives. In this work, a multi-objective optimization strategy considering productivity, yield and pool concentration is proposed. This was carried out in the frame of a model based optimization study on a batch chromatography separation of the rare earth elements samarium, europium and gadolinium. The findings from the multi-objective optimization were used to provide with a general strategy for achieving desirable operation points, resulting in a productivity ranging between 0.61 and 0.75 kgEu/mcolumn(3), h(-1) and a pool concentration between 0.52 and 0.79 kgEu/m(3), while maintaining a purity above 99% and never falling below an 80% yield for the main target component europium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Chromatographic separation of plasmid DNA by anion-exchange cryogel].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yantao; Shen, Shaochuan; Yun, Junxian; Yao, Kejian

    2012-08-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA) is used as an important vector for gene therapy, and its wide application is restricted by the purity and yield. To obtain high-purity pDNA, a chromatographic method based on anion-exchange supermacroporous cryogel was explored. The anion-exchange cryogel was prepared by grafting diethylaminoethyl-dextran to the epoxide groups of polyacrylamide-based matrix and pUC19 plasmid was used as a target to test the method. The plasmid was transferred into Escherichia coli DH5alpha, cultivated, harvested and lysed. The obtained culture was centrifuged and the supernatant was used as the plasmid feedstock, which was loaded into the anion-exchange cryogel bed for chromatographic separation. By optimizing the pH of running buffer and the elution conditions, high-purity pDNA was obtained by elution with 0.5 mol/L sodium chloride solution at pH 6.6. Compared to the traditional methods for purification of pDNA, animal source enzymes and toxic reagents were not involved in the present separation process, ensuring the safety of both the purification operations and the obtained pDNA.

  8. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer for the Huygens Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Bauer, S. J.; Biemann, K.; Block, B.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Frost, R. L.; Gautier, D.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D.; Hunten, D. M.; Israel, G.; Lunine, J. I.; Mauersberger, K.; Owen, T. C.; Raulin, F.; Richards, J. E.; Way, S. H.

    2002-07-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) on the Huygens Probe will measure the chemical composition of Titan's atmosphere from 170 km altitude (~1 hPa) to the surface (~1500 hPa) and determine the isotope ratios of the major gaseous constituents. The GCMS will also analyze gas samples from the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) and may be able to investigate the composition (including isotope ratios) of several candidate surface materials. The GCMS is a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employs five ion sources sequentially feeding the mass analyzer. Three ion sources serve as detectors for the GC columns and two are dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling respectively. The instrument is also equipped with a chemical scrubber cell for noble gas analysis and a sample enrichment cell for selective measurement of high boiling point carbon containing constituents. The mass range is 2 to 141 Dalton and the nominal detection threshold is at a mixing ratio of 10- 8. The data rate available from the Probe system is 885 bit/s. The weight of the instrument is 17.3 kg and the energy required for warm up and 150 minutes of operation is 110 Watt-hours.

  9. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer for the Huygens Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Atreya, S. K.; Bauer, S. J.; Biemann, K.; Block, B.; Carignan, G. R.; Donahue, T. M.; Frost, R. L.; Gautier, D.; Haberman, J. A.; Harpold, D.; Hunten, D. M.; Israel, G.; Lunine, J. I.; Mauersberger, K.; Owen, T. C.; Raulin, F.; Richards, J. E.; Way, S. H.

    2002-07-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) on the Huygens Probe will measure the chemical composition of Titan's atmosphere from 170 km altitude (˜1 hPa) to the surface (˜1500 hPa) and determine the isotope ratios of the major gaseous constituents. The GCMS will also analyze gas samples from the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) and may be able to investigate the composition (including isotope ratios) of several candidate surface materials. The GCMS is a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employs five ion sources sequentially feeding the mass analyzer. Three ion sources serve as detectors for the GC columns and two are dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling respectively. The instrument is also equipped with a chemical scrubber cell for noble gas analysis and a sample enrichment cell for selective measurement of high boiling point carbon containing constituents. The mass range is 2 to 141 Dalton and the nominal detection threshold is at a mixing ratio of 10- 8. The data rate available from the Probe system is 885 bit/s. The weight of the instrument is 17.3 kg and the energy required for warm up and 150 minutes of operation is 110 Watt-hours.

  10. Size-exclusion chromatographic NMR under HR-MAS.

    PubMed

    Lucena Alcalde, Guillermo; Anderson, Natalie; Day, Iain J

    2017-05-01

    The addition of stationary phases or sample modifiers can be used to modify the separation achievable in the diffusion domain of diffusion NMR experiments or provide information on the nature of the analyte-sample modifier interaction. Unfortunately, the addition of insoluble chromatographic stationary phases can lead to line broadening and degradation in spectral resolution, largely because of differences in magnetic susceptibility between the sample and the stationary phase. High-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) techniques can be used to remove this broadening. Here, we attempt the application of HR-MAS to size-exclusion chromatographic NMR with limited success. Observed diffusion coefficients for polymer molecular weight reference standards are shown to be larger than those obtained on static samples. Further investigation reveals that under HR-MAS it is possible to obtain reasonably accurate estimates of diffusion coefficients, using either full rotor synchronisation or sophisticated pulse sequences. The requirement for restricting the sample to the centre of the MAS rotor to ensure homogeneous magnetic and RF fields is also tested. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Gas chromatographic characterization of vegetable oil deodorization distillate.

    PubMed

    Verleyen, T; Verhe, R; Garcia, L; Dewettinck, K; Huyghebaert, A; De Greyt, W

    2001-07-06

    Because of its complex nature, the analysis of deodorizer distillate is a challenging problem. Deodorizer distillate obtained from the deodorization process of vegetable oils consists of many components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. A gas chromatographic method for the analysis of deodorizer distillate without saponification of the sample is described. After a concise sample preparation including derivatization and silylation, distillate samples were injected on column at 60 degrees C followed by a gradual increase of the oven temperature towards 340 degrees C. The temperature profile of the oven was optimized in order to obtain a baseline separation of the different distillate components including free fatty acids, tocopherols, sterols, squalene and neutral oil. Good recoveries for delta-tocopherol, alpha-tocopherol, stigmasterol and cholesteryl palmitate of 97, 94.4, 95.6 and 92%, respectively were obtained. Repeatability of the described gas chromatographic method was evaluated by analyzing five replicates of a soybean distillate. Tocopherols and sterols had low relative standard deviations ranging between 1.67 and 2.25%. Squalene, mono- and diacylglycerides had higher relative standard deviations ranging between 3.33 and 4.12%. Several industrial deodorizer distillates obtained from chemical and physical refining of corn, canola, sunflower and soybean have been analyzed for their composition.

  12. Adsorption properties and preparative separation of phenylethanoid glycosides from Cistanche deserticola by use of macroporous resins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boyan; Ouyang, Jie; Yuan, Xiaofan; Wang, Liwei; Zhao, Bing

    2013-10-15

    A simple and efficient chromatographic method for large-scale preparative separation of phenylethanoid glycosides (mainly contain echinacoside and acteoside) from Cistanche deserticola was developed. The adsorption properties of eight macroporous resins were evaluated. Three selected resins were further screened depending on the adsorption kinetics curves, in which HPD300 resin showed the best separation efficiency. The adsorption isotherm data on HPD300 resin were fitted to the Freundlich equation in certain concentration range. The dynamic adsorption and desorption experiments were carried out on columns packed with HPD300 resin to optimize the separation process. The breakthrough curves showed that acteoside had a higher affinity to the resin than echinacoside. The contents of echinacoside and acteoside in the product increased from 1.79% and 1.43% in the crude extracts to 16.66% and 15.17%, with recovery yields of 80.41% and 90.17%, respectively. The purity of total phenylethanoid glycosides in the product was 76.58%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemical and morphological changes in hydrochars derived from microcrystalline cellulose and investigated by chromatographic, spectroscopic and adsorption techniques.

    PubMed

    Diakité, Mamadou; Paul, Andrea; Jäger, Christian; Pielert, Judith; Mumme, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) can be used for converting the biomass into a carbon-rich material, whose application as a fuel requires higher heating value, whereas soil amendment needs stable carbon. This work was focused on the characterization of hydrochars derived from microcrystalline cellulose. The chars were investigated using elemental analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller technique, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Raman, Fourier transform infrared, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Severity in temperature between 230 and 270°C with reaction times between 2 and 10 h only affect the carbon content moderately. The results show that aromatization of HTC chars correlates well with temperature, which was further supported by the increase of organic radicals with decreasing g values at higher temperatures. Based on these results, the energetic use of chars favors mild HTC (T<230°C and t≤6 h), while the soil amendement favors serve conditions (T≥230°C, and t>6 h).

  14. Comparative study for separation of atmospheric humic-like substance (HULIS) by ENVI-18, HLB, XAD-8 and DEAE sorbents: elemental composition, FT-IR, 1H NMR and off-line thermochemolysis with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH).

    PubMed

    Fan, Xingjun; Song, Jianzhong; Peng, Ping'an

    2013-11-01

    Humic-like substances (HULIS) are significant constituents of aerosols, and the isolation and characterization of HULIS by solid-phase extraction methods are dependent on the sorbents used. In this study, we used the following five methods: ENVI-18, HLB-M, HLB-N, XAD-8 and DEAE, to isolate atmospheric HULIS at an urban site. Then we conducted a comparative investigation of the HULIS chemical characteristics by means of elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and off-line thermochemolysis with tetramethylammonium hydroxide. The results indicate that HULIS isolated using different methods show many similarities in chemical composition and structure. Some differences were however also observed between the five isolated HULIS: HULISHLB-M contains a relatively high content of OCH group, compared to HULISENVI-18 and HULISXAD-8; HULISXAD-8 contains a relatively high content of hydrophobic and aromatic components, compared to HULISENVI-18 and HULISHLB-M; HULISDEAE contains the highest content of aromatic functional groups, as inferred by (1)H NMR spectra, but a great amount of salts generally present in the HULISDEAE and thereby limited the choices for characterizing the materials (i.e., elemental analysis and TMAH thermochemolysis); HULISHLB-N has relatively high levels of H and N, a high N/C atomic ratio, and includes N-containing functional groups, which suggests that it has been altered by 2% ammonia introduced in the eluents. In summary, we found that ENVI-18, HLB-M, and XAD-8 are preferable methods for isolation and characterization of HULIS in atmospheric aerosols. These results also suggest that caution is required when applying DEAE and HLB-N isolating methods for characterizing atmospheric HULIS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrokinetic investigation of surfactant adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bellmann, C; Synytska, A; Caspari, A; Drechsler, A; Grundke, K

    2007-05-15

    Fuerstenau [D.W. Fuerstenau, in: M.L. Hair (Ed.), Dekker, New York, 1971, p. 143] has already discussed the role of hydrocarbon chain of surfactants, the effect of alkyl chain length, chain structure and the pH of the solution on the adsorption process of surfactants. Later Kosmulski [M. Kosmulski, Chemical Properties of Material Surfaces, Surfactant Science Series, vol. 102, Dekker, New York, Basel, 2001] included the effect of surfactant concentration, equilibration time, temperature and electrolyte in his approaches. Certainly, the character of the head groups of the surfactant and the properties of the adsorbent surface are the basis for the adsorption process. Different surfactants and adsorbents cause different adsorption mechanisms described firstly by Rosen [M.J. Rosen, Surfactants and Interfacial Phenomena, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1989]. These adsorption mechanisms and their influencing factors were studied by electrokinetic investigations. Here only changes of the charges at the surfaces could be detected. To control the results of electrokinetic investigations they were compared with results from ellipsometric measurements. In the case of surfactant adsorption the chain length was vitally important. It could be shown by the adsorption of alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromides onto polymer films spin coated at wafer surfaces. The influence of the chain length depending on surface properties of the polymer film was studied. Streaming potential measurements were applied for these investigations. The obtained results enabled us to calculate the molar cohesive free energy per mol of CH2-group in the alkaline chain of the surfactant if all other specific adsorption effects were neglected.

  16. Radical-mediated step-growth: Preparation of hybrid polymer monolithic columns with fine control of nanostructural and chromatographic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Filipa; Nischang, Ivo

    2015-09-18

    chromatographic separations of small molecules across wide ranges of retention factors over at least two orders of magnitude and wide ranges of mobile phase compositions. Such experimental observation is explained by a more homogeneous energetic distribution of partition and adsorption sites. A reference analysis of normalized plate height data at varied retention was performed and set in context with data of state-of-the-art silica- and polymer-based monoliths. This analysis clearly identifies the present materials to display performance behavior clearly located in the domain of derivatized silica-based monoliths.

  17. Statistical learning of peptide retention behavior in chromatographic separations: a new kernel-based approach for computational proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Nico; Leinenbach, Andreas; Huber, Christian G; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Background High-throughput peptide and protein identification technologies have benefited tremendously from strategies based on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in combination with database searching algorithms. A major problem with existing methods lies within the significant number of false positive and false negative annotations. So far, standard algorithms for protein identification do not use the information gained from separation processes usually involved in peptide analysis, such as retention time information, which are readily available from chromatographic separation of the sample. Identification can thus be improved by comparing measured retention times to predicted retention times. Current prediction models are derived from a set of measured test analytes but they usually require large amounts of training data. Results We introduce a new kernel function which can be applied in combination with support vector machines to a wide range of computational proteomics problems. We show the performance of this new approach by applying it to the prediction of peptide adsorption/elution behavior in strong anion-exchange solid-phase extraction (SAX-SPE) and ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (IP-RP-HPLC). Furthermore, the predicted retention times are used to improve spectrum identifications by a p-value-based filtering approach. The approach was tested on a number of different datasets and shows excellent performance while requiring only very small training sets (about 40 peptides instead of thousands). Using the retention time predictor in our retention time filter improves the fraction of correctly identified peptide mass spectra significantly. Conclusion The proposed kernel function is well-suited for the prediction of chromatographic separation in computational proteomics and requires only a limited amount of training data. The performance of this new method is demonstrated by applying it to peptide retention time prediction in IP

  18. Adsorption of oxygen on W/100/ - Adsorption kinetics and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, E.; Poppa, H.; Viswanath, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on W(100) single-crystal surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), flash desorption, low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and retarding-field work-function measurements. The AES results reveal stepwise changes in the sticking coefficients in the coverage range 0 to 1 and activated adsorption at higher coverages. Upon room-temperature adsorption, a series of complex LEED patterns is observed. In layers adsorbed at 1050 K and cooled to room temperature, the p(2 x 1) structure is the first ordered structure observed. This structure shows a reversible order-disorder transition between 700 and 1000 K and is characterized by a work function which is lower than that of the clean surface. Heating room-temperature adsorbates changes their structure irreversibly. At temperatures below 750 K, some new structures are observed.

  19. Adsorption of oxygen on W/100/ - Adsorption kinetics and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, E.; Poppa, H.; Viswanath, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on W(100) single-crystal surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), flash desorption, low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and retarding-field work-function measurements. The AES results reveal stepwise changes in the sticking coefficients in the coverage range 0 to 1 and activated adsorption at higher coverages. Upon room-temperature adsorption, a series of complex LEED patterns is observed. In layers adsorbed at 1050 K and cooled to room temperature, the p(2 x 1) structure is the first ordered structure observed. This structure shows a reversible order-disorder transition between 700 and 1000 K and is characterized by a work function which is lower than that of the clean surface. Heating room-temperature adsorbates changes their structure irreversibly. At temperatures below 750 K, some new structures are observed.

  20. Adsorptive desulfurization by activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Ankur; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra

    2009-10-30

    This study reports usage of commercial grade activated alumina (aluminum oxide) as adsorbent for the removal of sulfur from model oil (dibenthiophene (DBT) dissolved in n-hexane). Bulk density of alumina was found to be 1177.77 kg/m(3). The BET surface area of alumina was found to decrease from 143.6 to 66.4 m(2)/g after the loading of DBT at optimum conditions. The carbon-oxygen functional groups present on the surface of alumina were found to be effective in the adsorption of DBT onto alumina. Optimum adsorbent dose was found to be 20 g/l. The adsorption of DBT on alumina was found to be gradual process, and quasi-equilibrium reached in 24 h. Langmuir isotherm best represented the equilibrium adsorption data. The heat of adsorption and change in entropy for DBT adsorption onto alumina was found to be 19.5 kJ/mol and 139.2 kJ/mol K, respectively.

  1. Reduced protein adsorption by osmolytes.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Steitz, Roland; Tolan, Metin; Czeslik, Claus

    2011-06-07

    Osmolytes are substances that affect osmosis and are used by cells to adapt to environmental stress. Here, we report a neutron reflectivity study on the influence of some osmolytes on protein adsorption at solid-liquid interfaces. Bovine ribonuclease A (RNase) and bovine insulin were used as model proteins adsorbing at a hydrophilic silica and at a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. From the neutron reflectivity data, the adsorbed protein layers were characterized in terms of layer thickness, protein packing density, and adsorbed protein mass in the absence and presence of urea, trehalose, sucrose, and glycerol. All data point to the clear effect of these nonionic cosolvents on the degree of protein adsorption. For example, 1 M sucrose leads to a reduction of the adsorbed amount of RNase by 39% on a silica surface and by 71% on a polystyrene surface. Trehalose was found to exhibit activity similar to that of sucrose. The changes in adsorbed protein mass can be attributed to a decreased packing density of the proteins in the adsorbed layers. Moreover, we investigated insulin adsorption at a hydrophobic surface in the absence and presence of glycerol. The degree of insulin adsorption is decreased by even 80% in the presence of 4 M of glycerol. The results of this study demonstrate that nonionic cosolvents can be used to tune and control nonspecific protein adsorption at aqueous-solid interfaces, which might be relevant for biomedical applications.

  2. A biological oil adsorption filter.

    PubMed

    Pasila, Antti

    2004-12-01

    A new oil adsorption method called adsorption filtration (AF) has been developed. It is a technology where by oil residues can be cleaned from water by running it through a simple filter made from freeze treated, dried, milled and then fragmented plant material. By choosing suitable plants and fragmentation sizes it is possible to produce filters, which pass water but adsorb oil. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of manufacturing oil adsorbing filter materials from reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) or hemp fibre (Cannabis sativa L.). The oil (80 ml) was mixed with de-ionised water (200 ml) and this mixture was filtered through 10 or 20 g adsorption filters. Fine spring harvested hemp fibre (diameter less than 1 mm) and reed canary grass fragments adsorb 2-4 g of oil per gram of adsorption material compared to 1-3 g of water. Adsorption filtration is thus a novel way of gathering spilled oil in shallow coastal waters before the oil reaches the shore.

  3. Lateral interactions and enhanced adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikvold, Per Arne; Deakin, Mark R.

    1991-06-01

    We extend earlier work on the effects of lateral adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in systems with two different adsorbate species to consider in detail enhanced adsorption phenomena. We give a detailed explanation of the enhancement mechanism for a lattice-gas model in thermodynamic equilibrium, and provide explicit quantitative criteria which must be satisfied by the effective lateral interactions in systems exhibiting strong, intermediate, or weak enhancement behavior. It is the examination and understanding of the topological details of the ground-state and phase diagrams of the model that allow the formulation of these criteria. The theoretically obtained criteria are supported by precise numerical calculations (transfer-matrix with strip width six) of adsorption isotherms for a three-state lattice-gas model with nearest-neighbor interactions on a triangular lattice. The applicability of this theoretical framework is illustrated by an analysis of experimental adsorption isotherms for the electrochemical adsorption of naphthalene on copper and n-decylamine on nickel, previously obtained by Bockris et al. As suggested by Damaskin et al. we attribute the potential dependence of the organic coverage to the influence of coadsorbed hydrogen. We find that nonlinear least-squares fits of numerical lattice-gas isotherms to the experimental data produce good agreement between the experimental and numerical adsorption isotherms, as well as effective lattice-gas interaction energies consistent with independent estimates from the literature.

  4. Metal adsorption on mosses: Toward a universal adsorption model.

    PubMed

    González, A G; Pokrovsky, O S

    2014-02-01

    This study quantifies the adsorption of heavy metals on 4 typical moss species used for environmental monitoring in the moss bag technique. The adsorption of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto Hypnum sp., Sphagnum sp., Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachytecium rutabulum has been investigated using a batch reactor in a wide range of pH (1.3-11.0) and metal concentrations in solution (1.6μM-3.8mM). A Linear Programming Model (LPM) was applied for the experimental data to derive equilibrium constants and the number of surface binding sites. The surface acid-base titration performed for 4 mosses at a pH range of 3-10 in 0.1M NaNO3 demonstrated that Sphagnum sp. is the most efficient adsorbent as it has the maximal number of proton-binding sites on the surface (0.65mmol g(-1)). The pKa computed for all the moss species suggested the presence of 5 major functional groups: phosphodiester, carboxyl, phosphoryl, amine and polyphenols. The results of pH-edge experiments demonstrated that B. rutabulum exhibits the highest percentage of metal adsorption and has the highest number of available sites for most of the metals studied. However, according to the results of the constant pH "Langmuirian" isotherm, Sphagnum sp. can be considered as the strongest adsorbent, although the relative difference from other mosses is within 20%. The LPM was found to satisfactorily fit the experimental data in the full range of the studied solution parameters. The results of this study demonstrate a rather similar pattern of five metal adsorptions on mosses, both as a function of pH and as a metal concentration, which is further corroborated by similar values of adsorption constants. Therefore, despite the species and geographic differences between the mosses, a universal adsorption edge and constant pH adsorption isotherm can be recommended for 4 studied mosses. The quantitative comparison of metal adsorption with other common natural organic and inorganic materials demonstrates

  5. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption of polyatomics.

    PubMed

    Riccardo, J L; Ramirez-Pastor, A J; Romá, F

    2004-10-29

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane's statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory.

  6. Doxylamine: a cause for false-positive gas chromatographic assay for phencyclidine.

    PubMed

    Schaldenbrand, J D; McClatchey, K D; Patel, J A; Muilenberg, M J

    1981-01-01

    A 25-year-old white woman ingested an unknown quantity of doxylamine succinate and flurazepam. Urine immunoassay screen (EMIT-dau) was positive for benzodiazopine and negative for phencyclidine. Subsequent gas chromatographic assay of the urine revealed a markedly positive assay for phencyclidine. Doxylamine was ultimately found to be the cause for the false-positive gas chromatographic assay for phencyclidine.

  7. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  8. Application of monolithic chromatographic supports in virus research.

    PubMed

    Krajacic, Mladen; Ravnikar, Maja; Štrancar, Aleš; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion

    2017-05-12

    Key properties of monolithic chromatographic supports, make them suitable for separation and/or concentration of large biomolecules, especially virus particles and viral genomes. One by one, the studies that have been completed so far, contributed to the knowledge that monolith chromatography has hardly any limitation to be applied in virus research. Viruses of different sizes, possessing icosahedral structure and symmetrical morphology, as well as rod-shaped or filamentous viruses with helical structure, even enveloped ones, all of them could be successfully managed by means of monolith chromatography. Same is true for viral genomes, primarily when being distinct from other nucleic acid forms present in a host cell. This review is exclusively focused on viruses. It describes the application of monolith chromatography to different problematics within the virus research field. The reviewed achievements offer new possibilities and trigger new aspects in virology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Allyl-silica Hybrid Monoliths For Chromatographic Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenjuan

    Column technology continues to be the most investigated topics in the separation world, since the column is the place where the chromatographic separation happens, making it the heart of the separation system. Allyl-silica hybrid monolithic material has been exploited as support material and potential stationary phases for liquid chromatography; the stationary phase anchored to the silica surface by Si-C bond, which is more pH stable than traditional stationary phase. First, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to study the sol in the synthesis of allyl-silica hybrid monoliths. Allyl-trimethoxysilane (allyl-TrMOS), dimethyldimethoxysilane (DMDMOS) and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) have been served as co-precursors in the sol-gel synthesis of organo-silica hybrid monolithic columns for liquid chromatography (LC). 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 1H NMR spectroscopy were employed to monitor reaction profiles for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and initial condensation reactions of the individual precursor and the hybrid system. 29Si-NMR has also been used to identify different silane species formed during the reactions. The overall hydrolysis rate has been found to follow the trend DMDMOS > allyl-TrMOS > TMOS, if each precursor is reacted individually (homo-polymerization). Precursors show different hydrolysis rate when reacted together in the hybrid system than they are reacted individually. Cross-condensation products of TMOS and DMDMOS (QD) arise about 10 minutes of initiation of the reaction. The allyl-silica monolithic columns for capillary liquid chromatography can only be prepared in capillaries with 50 im internal diameter with acceptable performance. One of the most prominent problems related to the synthesis of silica monolithic structures is the volume shrinkage. The synthesis of allylfunctionalized silica hybrid monolithic structures has been studied in an attempt to reduce the volume shrinkage during aging, drying and heat treatment

  10. Fatty acids determination in Bronte pistachios by gas chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Pantano, Licia; Lo Cascio, Giovanni; Alongi, Angelina; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Vella, Antonio; Macaluso, Andrea; Cicero, Nicola; Migliazzo, Aldo; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    A gas chromatographic with flame ionization detector (GC-MS FID) method for the identification and quantification of fatty acids based on the extraction of lipids and derivatisation of free acids to form methyl esters was developed and validated. The proposed method was evaluated to a number of standard FAs, and Bronte pistachios samples were used for that purpose and to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. In this regard, repeatability, mean and standard deviation of the analytical procedure were calculated. The results obtained have demonstrated oleic acid as the main component of Bronte pistachios (72.2%) followed by linoleic acid (13.4%) and showed some differences in composition with respect to Tunisian, Turkish and Iranian pistachios.

  11. Liquid chromatographic determination of tetracycline residues in animal feeds.

    PubMed

    Martinez, E E; Shimoda, W

    1988-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method for the multiresidue determination of tetracyclines (TCs) in feeds is described. The levels of quantitation were 10 ppm each for tetracycline-HCl (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC), and chlortetracycline-HCl (CTC); the detection limit was 40 ppb for each. The calibration curves were linear between 2.5 and 100 ppm. The procedure involved double extraction with pH 2.0 and pH 4.5 McIlvain buffers, cleanup on a Sephadex LH-20 column, separation on a Nova-Pak C18 column, and detection at 370 nm. Recoveries of 10 micrograms/g of each TC in multiresidue feed samples ranged from 55.8 to 75.5% for OTC, 71.6 to 100% for TC, and 22.4 to 60.6% for CTC. The identities of the TCs were confirmed by thin layer chromatography.

  12. Gas chromatographic determination of sulphur compounds in town gas.

    PubMed

    Hoshika, Y; Iida, Y

    1977-04-11

    The gas chromatographic (GC) determination of the sulphur compounds in town gas (in the Nagoya area) was studied by using a flame-photometric detector (FPD) and the cold-trap method with liquid oxygen. The column packings used were 25% TCEP on Shimalite (AW, DMCS), 25% TCP on Shimalite (AW, DMCS), 10% PPE on Shimalite TPA, Porapak Q and silica gel. The major components identified were carbonyl sulphide, hydrogen sulphide, carbon disulphide, thiophene and tetrahydrothiophene (THT). The identities of thiophene and THT were also confirmed by GC combined with the use of a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The average concentrations and standard deviations of thiophene and THT were 8.8 +/- 1.8and 124 +/- 35 ng per 0.051, respectively. The latter value corresponds to 0.7 ppm, which is relatively high for the concentration of an odorant.

  13. Mathematical model for multicomponent separations on the continuous annular chromatograph

    SciTech Connect

    Bratzler, R.L.; Begovich, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    A model for multicomponent separations on ion exchange columns has been adapted for use in studying the performance of the continuous annular chromatograph. The model accurately predicts solute peak positions in the column effluent and qualitatively predicts trends in solute effluent resolution as a function of increasing bandwidth of the solute feed pulse. The major virtues of the model are its simplicity in terms of the calculations involved and the fact that it incorporates the nonlinear solute-resin binding isotherms common in many ion exchange separations. Because dispersion effects are not accounted for in the model, discrepancies exist between the shapes of the effluent peaks predicted by the model and those determined experimentally.

  14. Chromatographic separation of neodymium isotopes by using chemical exchange process.

    PubMed

    Ismail, I M; Ibrahim, M; Aly, H F; Nomura, M; Fujii, Y

    2011-05-20

    The neodymium isotope effects were investigated in Nd-malate ligand exchange system using the highly porous cation exchange resin SQS-6. The temperature of the chromatographic columns was kept constant at 50°C by temperature controlled water passed through the columns jackets. The separation coefficient of neodymium isotopes, ɛ's, was calculated from the isotopic ratios precisely measured by means of an ICP mass spectrometer equipped with nine collectors as ion detectors. The separation coefficient, ɛ×10(5), were calculated and found to be 1.4, 4.8, 5.4, 10.6, 16.8 and 20.2 for (143)Nd, (144)Nd, (145)Nd, (146)Nd, (148)Nd and (150)Nd, respectively.

  15. [Thin-layer chromatographic demonstration of the herbicide zenkor].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, Ts; Sergeeva, D; Grigorova, D

    1976-01-01

    Established were the thin-layer chromatography conditions for the demonstration of the herbicide Zenkor as a pure substance and a preparation. Comparative experiments were carried out applying Thomson and Stanley's thin-layer chromatography conditions and the authors' personal ones. Most adequate proved to be the following conditions: sorbent-Kieselgel 60F 254 (Merck); solvent -- chloroform: 1,4-dioxan (9:1); developer -- ultraviolet light (authors' technique). Essential with this method is the preliminary (prior to apply the pure substances on the thin-layer chromatographic plaque) moving of the plaque in the indicated mobile phase (authors' technique). Under these thin-layer chromatography conditions work is made feasible and the method is fast and simple, achieving high sensitivity -- 0.5 mug Zenkor.

  16. Solubilities in supercritical fluids: the application of chromatographic measurement methods

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Wright, B.W.; Yonker, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    New methods are described for the measurement of the solubilities of solids in supercritical fluids. These methods utilize instrumentation developed for capillary supercritical fluid chromatography consisting of deactivated, small diameter, fused silica tubing, coupled with detection methods based upon on flame ionization and mass spectrometric detectors. The methods involve (a) direct solubility determination where the fused silica capillary is used as an equilibrium cell, and (b) a pressure of threshold solubility technique which resembles chromatography and uses a programmed pressure increase and sensitive detection to determine the onset of solute migration. Results are also presented which suggest that solubilities can be determined, within certain limitations, from actual chromatographic experiments. The methods are illustrated using aromatic hydrocarbons and complex mycotoxins of the trichothecene group.

  17. Chromatographic Analysis of Inks for Forensic Science Applications.

    PubMed

    Tebbett, I R

    1991-12-01

    This article reviews the use of chromatography for the separation and comparison of ink components. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) is the standard chromatographic procedure presently employed for the comparison of inks. Thin layer chromatography systems are described for the separation of different types of ink. The greater sensitivity and resolution offered by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) make it an attractive alternative to TLC for ink analysis, and recent work in this field is also outlined. Both techniques have been used for the measurement of changes occurring in the composition of inks with time, as a means of determining the age of an ink. Related analytical techniques, recent research, and future trends in ink analysis are also described. Copyright © 1991 Central Police University.

  18. Chromatographic study of formation conditions of rhombododecahedral diamond crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhimulev, E. I.; Sonin, V. M.; Chepurov, A. I.; Tomilenko, A. A.

    2009-06-01

    The results of chromatographic study of the formation of rhombododecahedral diamonds synthesized in the Fe-Ni-(Ti)-C system at 5.5-6.0 GPa and 1350-1450°C are presented, including crystals with rounded surfaces of the rhombododecahedron with parallel striation, which are morphological analogues of natural diamonds abundant at various kimberlite, lamproite, and placer deposits. Chromatography was performed at 150°C with mechanical breakup of diamonds. The stable release of methane when diamonds of habit {110} are crushed is established. It is concluded that the appearance of the habit rhombododecahedron may be related not only to the effect of temperature and pressure on crystal growth but also to reductive conditions of crystallization. At the same time, the appearance of significant amounts of hydrocarbons in the system probably results in stopping of the growth of faces {110} and {100} and, instead, formation of specific surfaces that are composed of microscopic accessories faced by planes {111}.

  19. Gas chromatographic analysis of toxic edemagenic inhalation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, M.L.; Smith, J.R.; McMonagle, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Different megabore column and packed column phases were evaluated for their suitability in the gas chromatographic analysis of three toxic polyhalogenated compounds (phosgene, TFD, and PFIB). Adsorbent type stationary phases provide better retention and separation for the volatile fluorocarbons than do polar and nonpolar liquid phases. The reactivity of phosgene precludes the use of many phases having hydroxy, amino, or cyano functional groups. Silica gel is still the column of choice for phosgene. The use of gas sampling bags and gas-tight syringes can provide reliable quantitation of these compounds in air samples. TFD and PFIB exhibit different electron capture mechanisms and detector temperature dependency. The mechanisms are supported by the results of negative ion mass spectrometry.

  20. High-pressure liquid chromatographic method for analysis of cephalosporins.

    PubMed Central

    Signs, S A; File, T M; Tan, J S

    1984-01-01

    A high-pressure liquid chromatographic method is described for the analysis of a wide range of cephalosporin congeners, using only three reagents for extraction and drug analysis. Plasma was treated with cold methanol-0.1 M sodium acetate to precipitate protein. Cephalosporins were resolved on a C-18 reverse-phase column, utilizing a mobile phase of various percentages of 0.01 M sodium acetate and acetonitrile-methanol. Compounds analyzed included cephalexin, cefamandole, cephalothin, cefotaxime, cefazolin, cephaloridine, cefoxitin, cefaclor, cephapirin, and cefoperazone. Each antibiotic demonstrated excellent linearity throughout the therapeutic range. The method of standard additions revealed recoveries of 93 to 101%, with detection limits ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 micrograms/ml for these drugs. Retention times ranged from 4 to 6 min. This method offers a rapid and simple means by which this group of cephalosporins may be reliably quantitated. PMID:6517553

  1. Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Amnesic Shellfish Poison in Mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2000-10-01

    A simple, rapid, high-performance liquid chromatographic experiment suitable for undergraduate students is described for determining amnesic shellfish poison in mussels. The poison itself is an unusual naturally occurring amino acid, domoic acid, that has been found in seafood, particularly shellfish, worldwide. The symptoms of poisoning include amnesia (memory loss), loss of balance, mental confusion, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, coma, and in extreme cases death. The domoic acid is extracted from homogenized mussel tissue by boiling in water for 5 minutes. The homogenate is cooled and centrifuged, and an aliquot of the supernatant is diluted and analyzed by isocratic HPLC using a C18 column and an acetonitrile-water mobile phase at pH 2.5 with UV detection at 242 nm.

  2. The gas chromatographic resolution of DL-isovaline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Bonner, W. A.; Van Dort, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    Isovaline is of cosmological interest because it is one of the 12 non-protein amino acids which have been isolated from the Murchison meteorite, and unlike the other chiral amino acids in this meteorite, it has no alpha-hydrogen at its asymmetric center and hence cannot racemize by the customary alpha-hydrogen-dependent mechanisms which engender racemization in ordinary amino acids. Experiments were conducted in which a .01 M solution of N-TFA-DL-isovalyl-L-leucine isopropyl ester in nitromethane was injected into the capillary column of a gas chromatograph coupled to a digital electronic integrator-recorder. Efflux times and integrated peak area percents are shown next to each diastereometer peak.

  3. Chromatographic evaluation of the toxicity in fish of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Saldaña, José María; Escuder-Gilabert, Laura; Medina-Hernández, María José; Villanueva-Camañas, Rosa María; Sagrado, Salvador

    2005-01-05

    Ecotoxicity assessment is essential before placing new chemical substances on the market. An investigation of the use of the chromatographic retention (log k) in biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC) as an in vitro approach to evaluate the toxicity in fish of pesticides (acute toxicity levels as pLC(50)) is proposed. A heterogeneous data set of 85 pesticides from six chemical families with available experimental fish toxicity data (ECOTOX database from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)) was used. For pesticides exhibiting non-polar narcosis mechanism in fish (non-specific toxicity), more reliable models and precise pLC(50) estimations are obtained from log k (quantitative retention-activity relationships, QRAR) than from log P (quantitative structure-activity relationships, QSAR) or ECOSAR (ECOSAR program from U.S. EPA).

  4. Hydrophilic chromatographic determination of carnosine, anserine, balenine, creatine, and creatinine.

    PubMed

    Mora, Leticia; Sentandreu, Miguel Angel; Toldrá, Fidel

    2007-06-13

    A new HPLC procedure based on hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) has been developed for the simultaneous determination of carnosine, anserine, balenine, creatine, and creatinine in meat. This is the first time that HILIC has been directly applied to the study of meat components, having the advantage of not requiring complex cleanup and/or sample derivatization procedures. The chromatographic separation has been developed using a silica column (4.6 x 150 mm, 3 microm), and the proposed methodology is simple, reliable, and fast (<13 min per sample). The method has been validated in terms of linearity, repeatability, reproducibility, and recovery and represents an interesting alternative to methods currently in use for determining the mentioned compounds and other polar substances. The detection limits are 5.64, 8.23, 3.66, 3.99, and 0.06 microg/mL for carnosine, anserine, balenine, creatine, and creatinine, respectively.

  5. RAPID MEASUREMENTS OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDATION STATES USING CHROMATOGRAPHIC RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; C Diprete, C; Mira Malek, M; Eddie Kyser, E

    2009-03-24

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H-Canyon facility uses ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) to separate impure neptunium (Np) from a high sulfate feed stream. The material is processed using a two-pass solvent extraction purification which relies on CAN to oxidize neptunium to Np(VI) during the first pass prior to extraction. Spectrophotometric oxidation-state analyses normally used to validate successful oxidation to Np(VI) prior to extraction were compromised by this feed stream matrix. Therefore, a rapid chromatographic method to validate successful Np oxidation was developed using Eichrom Industries TRU and TEVA{reg_sign} resins. The method was validated and subsequently transferred to existing operations in the process analytical laboratories.

  6. Gas chromatographic determination of oxalic acid in foods.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, H

    1985-01-01

    A new quantitative gas chromatographic (GC) method has been developed for the determination of oxalic acid in foods. Solid sample is extracted with water (soluble oxalic acid) or 2N hydrochloric acid (total oxalic acid) at room temperature. An aliquot of sample extract is evaporated to dryness, and the oxalic acid in the residue is methylated with 7% hydrochloric acid-methanol. The reaction mixture is extracted with chloroform, and dimethyl oxalate is quantitated by GC. Recovery of oxalic acid added to liquid samples averaged 100.6%; recoveries from extracts of solid samples were 96.2-99.5 and 97.2-100.1% for water and hydrochloric acid extractions, respectively. Results are shown for determination of oxalic acid in spinach and beverages. The technique is simple, rapid, and accurate, and small samples may be used. The limit of determination is 20 micrograms.

  7. Comparison of diesel engine exhaust using chromatographic profiling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, P.A.; Shala, F.J.; Cernansky, N.P.; Suffet, I.H. )

    1990-02-01

    An analytical method, developed for examining changes in the intensity and number of chemical compounds in the odorous fraction of diesel exhaust, has been applied to a variety of diesel engine systems. Comparisons were made using the chromatographic computer profiles of samples collected with the Diesel Odor Analysis System (DOAS) and dilution tunnel sampling systems. The different engine systems showed several areas of common peak patterns, but with distinctly different overall patterns. The benzaldehyde-odor correlation developed in a previous study worked for the engine systems tested. The differences in the overall patterns are attributed to the specific diesel fuels used and to the specific engine configurations. Samples obtained from raw and diluted (with a dilution tunnel) exhaust were compared. Diluted exhaust sample profiles were shown to contain a greater number of peaks, probably due to postcombustion reactions occurring in the dilution tunnel.

  8. Resolving and quantifying overlapped chromatographic bands by transmutation

    PubMed

    Malinowski

    2000-09-15

    A new chemometric technique called "transmutation" is developed for the purpose of sharpening overlapped chromatographic bands in order to quantify the components. The "transmutation function" is created from the chromatogram of the pure component of interest, obtained from the same instrument, operating under the same experimental conditions used to record the unresolved chromatogram of the sample mixture. The method is used to quantify mixtures containing toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, naphthalene, and biphenyl from unresolved chromatograms previously reported. The results are compared to those obtained using window factor analysis, rank annihilation factor analysis, and matrix regression analysis. Unlike the latter methods, the transmutation method is not restricted to two-dimensional arrays of data, such as those obtained from HPLC/DAD, but is also applicable to chromatograms obtained from single detector experiments. Limitations of the method are discussed.

  9. Chromatographic resolution of altered forms of protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Ashendel, C.L.; Minor, P.L.; Baudoin, P.A.; Carlos, M.

    1987-05-01

    Rapid chromatographic resolution of protein kinase C (PKC) in extracts of rat brain on DEAE-cellulose yielded two major peaks of activity. These fractions bound phorbol esters with identical affinity and specificity and had similar ratios of PKC to phorbol ester-binding activities. Chicken egg yolk antibodies raised to PKC in the first fraction reacted with 74 to 76 kilodalton peptides in the second fraction. Chromatography of each fraction on hydroxylapatite yielded similar distributions of three PKC isozymes. Rechromatography of the DEAE-cellulose fractions on DEAE-cellulose confirmed that these forms of PKC were not rapidly interconvertible. Results of experiments in which extracts or fractions were incubated with MgATP and phosphatase inhibitors were consistent with elution of dephospho-PKC in the first fraction while the second fraction contained phospho-PKC. If confirmed, this suggests that a substantial fraction of PKC in rat and mouse tissues exists in the phosphorylated form.

  10. Extraction, chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods for lipid analysis.

    PubMed

    Pati, Sumitra; Nie, Ben; Arnold, Robert D; Cummings, Brian S

    2016-05-01

    Lipids make up a diverse subset of biomolecules that are responsible for mediating a variety of structural and functional properties as well as modulating cellular functions such as trafficking, regulation of membrane proteins and subcellular compartmentalization. In particular, phospholipids are the main constituents of biological membranes and play major roles in cellular processes like transmembrane signaling and structural dynamics. The chemical and structural variety of lipids makes analysis using a single experimental approach quite challenging. Research in the field relies on the use of multiple techniques to detect and quantify components of cellular lipidomes as well as determine structural features and cellular organization. Understanding these features can allow researchers to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms by which lipid-lipid and/or lipid-protein interactions take place within the conditions of study. Herein, we provide an overview of essential methods for the examination of lipids, including extraction methods, chromatographic techniques and approaches for mass spectrometric analysis.

  11. Chromatographic hydrophobicity index: pH profile for polyprotic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2009-11-06

    The Chromatographic Hydrophobicity Index (CHI) has been measured for several diprotic compounds. In order to model the variation of CHI with pH, a general equation for polyprotic compounds which allows the calculation of CHI for each one of the species has been proposed. Different types of diprotic solutes have been selected: neutral acids, neutral bases, and amphiprotic compounds (non-zwitterionic and zwitterionic). The applicability of the model to these complex polyprotic compounds, its advantages and limitations, as well as the information provided by the fits is discussed. In general, the model fits the experimental behaviour of all kind of solutes very well, obtaining the higher hydrophobicity values for the neutral form of the compounds, except for the zwitterionic phenylalanine. The equation and parameters obtained allow an easy calculation of CHI of the compound at any pH value.

  12. Mass transfer in chromatographic columns studied by PFG NMR.

    PubMed

    Tallarek, U; van Dusschoten, D; Van As, H; Guiochon, G; Bayer, E

    1998-01-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied to study convective and diffusional transport in chromatographic columns packed with totally porous support particles. Here stagnant zones exist in the particle pores, and diffusional mass-transfer limitations between fluid molecules diffusing in the intraparticle pore network and flowing in the interparticle void space are detected quantitatively. Axial displacement probability distributions were measured for water over a range of Peclet numbers and observation times, with diffusion lengths between 0.15 and 0.91 times the average support particle diameter. The transition towards complete diffusional exchange is demonstrated, thereby also revealing the development of the classical convective dispersion process in a packed bed of (porous) particles.

  13. Improved Chromatographic Separation of Sitagliptin Phosphate and Metformin Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, Moataz S.

    2015-01-01

    New UPLC method was developed for determination of sitagliptin and metformin using Symmetry C18 column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 2.2 μm) and isocratic elution (methanol 20%), pH (3.5) as a mobile phase. The ultraviolet detector was operated at 220 nm and the column temperature was 50°C. Linearity parameters were acceptable over the concentration ranges of 2-12 μgml-1 and 5-35 μgml-1 for sitagliptin and metformin, respectively. The variables were premeditated to adjust the chromatographic conditions using design of experiment. The proposed method was proved to be accurate for the quality control of the mentioned drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage form. PMID:26759536

  14. Soil chromatographic movement of technetium-99 through selected Minnesota soils

    SciTech Connect

    Balogh, J.C.; Grigal, D.F.

    1980-11-01

    We monitored the movement of technetium-99 through 41 samples of Minnesota soils, using soil column layer chromatography (CLC), a modification of soil thin layer chromatography. Under the aerobic conditions of soil CLC, /sup 99/Tc occurs as the pertechnetate anion. Pertechnetate movement in the soils was characterized by the traditional R/sub f/ chromatographic parameter. Reduced R/sub f/ values were statistically related to elevated levels of soil organic matter. Complexation of /sup 99/Tc, related to soil organic matter, was weak. Elution patterns of /sup 99/Tc in the soil CLC columns were asymmetric, with pertechnetate retardation associated with both hydrodynamic dispersion and weak retention. Pertechnetate was less mobile than was Cl/sup -/ in selected soils by soil CLC.

  15. Understanding and design of existing and future chromatographic support formats.

    PubMed

    Billen, J; Desmet, G

    2007-10-19

    The present contribution reviews the use of alternative support formats as a means to surpass the chromatographic performance of the packed bed of spheres. First, a number of idealized structures are considered to obtain a general insight in how the performance of a chromatographic support depends on its shape and size, using the isocratic peak-capacity generation speed as the main performance indicator. Using this criterion, it is found that the packing density or, equivalently, the external porosity, is the most important of all geometrical shape factors. Depending on whether the sample consists of weakly or strongly retained components, the optimal external porosity can be expected to vary between 60% and a value near 100%. The optimal exploitation of a high external porosity, however, also requires overall shrinkage of the domain size, towards and into the sub-micron range. With the current fabrication technologies, this requirement seems difficult to achieve. In the presence of a lower limit on the characteristic support size, each range of desired plate numbers or peak capacities has its own optimal external porosity, ranging from a very low value (high packing density) for high speed, small peak capacity applications, to very high external porosities (low packing density) for applications requiring a very large peak capacity. Subsequently, the obtained theoretical insights are used to review and discuss the past and current research on alternative support formats. Finally, a number of emerging micro- and nano-fabrication technologies are introduced and their potential for the future production of supports with improved shape and homogeneity is discussed.

  16. Chemical characterization of Brickellia cavanillesii (Asteraceae) using gas chromatographic methods

    PubMed Central

    Eshiet, Etetor R; Zhu, Jinqiu; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Ernest E

    2014-01-01

    A methanol extract of lyophilized Brickellia cavanillesii was quantitatively analyzed using gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The chromatographic methods employed were (i) GC-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), (ii) GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and (iii) purge and trap GC-MS (P&T GC-MS). Thirteen compounds were identified with a quality match of 90% and above using GC-MS. The compounds were (1) Cyclohexene, 6-ethenyl-6-methyl-1-(1-methylethyl)-3-(1-methylethylidene)-, (S)-; (2) Bicylo (2.2.1) heptan-2-one, 1, 7, 7-trimethyl-(1S, 4S)-; (3) Phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)-; (4) Benzene, 1-(1, 5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-4-methyl-; (5) Naphthalene, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8a-hexahydro4, 7-dimethyl-1-1-(1-methylethyl)-, (1S-cis)-; (6) Phenol, 2-methoxy-; (7) Benzaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-; (8) 11, 13-Eicosadienoic acid, methyl ester; (9) 2-Furancarboxaldehyde, 5-methyl-; (10) Maltol; (11) Phenol; (12) Hydroquinone; (13) 1H-Indene, 1-ethylideneoctahydro-7a-methyl-, (1E, 3a.alpha, 7a.beta.). Other compounds (14) 3-methyl butanal; (15) (D)-Limonene; (16) 1-methyl-4-(1-methyl ethyl) benzene; (17) Butanoic acid methyl ester; (18) 2-methyl propanal; (19) 2-butanone; (20) 2-pentanone; and (21) 2-methyl butane were also identified when P&T GC-MS was performed. Of the 21 compounds identified, 12 were validated using chemical standards. The identified compounds were found to be terpenes, derivatives of terpenes, esters, ketones, aldehydes, and phenol-derived aromatic compounds; these are the primary constituents of the essential oils of many plants and flowers. PMID:24804069

  17. Chemical characterization of Brickellia cavanillesii (Asteraceae) using gas chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Eshiet, Etetor R; Zhu, Jinqiu; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Ernest E

    2014-03-01

    A methanol extract of lyophilized Brickellia cavanillesii was quantitatively analyzed using gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The chromatographic methods employed were (i) GC-flame ionization detector (GC-FID), (ii) GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and (iii) purge and trap GC-MS (P&T GC-MS). Thirteen compounds were identified with a quality match of 90% and above using GC-MS. The compounds were (1) Cyclohexene, 6-ethenyl-6-methyl-1-(1-methylethyl)-3-(1-methylethylidene)-, (S)-; (2) Bicylo (2.2.1) heptan-2-one, 1, 7, 7-trimethyl-(1S, 4S)-; (3) Phenol, 2-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)-; (4) Benzene, 1-(1, 5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-4-methyl-; (5) Naphthalene, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8a-hexahydro4, 7-dimethyl-1-1-(1-methylethyl)-, (1S-cis)-; (6) Phenol, 2-methoxy-; (7) Benzaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-; (8) 11, 13-Eicosadienoic acid, methyl ester; (9) 2-Furancarboxaldehyde, 5-methyl-; (10) Maltol; (11) Phenol; (12) Hydroquinone; (13) 1H-Indene, 1-ethylideneoctahydro-7a-methyl-, (1E, 3a.alpha, 7a.beta.). Other compounds (14) 3-methyl butanal; (15) (D)-Limonene; (16) 1-methyl-4-(1-methyl ethyl) benzene; (17) Butanoic acid methyl ester; (18) 2-methyl propanal; (19) 2-butanone; (20) 2-pentanone; and (21) 2-methyl butane were also identified when P&T GC-MS was performed. Of the 21 compounds identified, 12 were validated using chemical standards. The identified compounds were found to be terpenes, derivatives of terpenes, esters, ketones, aldehydes, and phenol-derived aromatic compounds; these are the primary constituents of the essential oils of many plants and flowers.

  18. Counterion release and electrostatic adsorption

    PubMed

    Sens; Joanny

    2000-05-22

    The effective charge of a rigid polyelectrolyte (PE) approaching an oppositely charged surface is studied. The cases of a weak (annealed) and strongly charged PE with condensed counterions (such as DNA) are discussed. In the most interesting case of the adsorption onto a substrate of low dielectric constant (such as a lipid membrane or a mica sheet) the condensed counterions are not always released as the PE approaches the substrate, because of the major importance of the image-charge effect. For the adsorption onto a surface with freely moving charges, the image-charge effect becomes less important and full release is often expected.

  19. Adsorption isotherms of charged nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Bakhshandeh, Amin; Diehl, Alexandre; Levin, Yan

    2016-10-19

    We present theory and simulations which allow us to quantitatively calculate the amount of surface adsorption excess of charged nanoparticles onto a charged surface. The theory is very accurate for weakly charged nanoparticles and can be used at physiological concentrations of salt. We have also developed an efficient simulation algorithm which can be used for dilute suspensions of nanoparticles of any charge, even at very large salt concentrations. With the help of the new simulation method, we are able to efficiently calculate the adsorption isotherms of highly charged nanoparticles in suspensions containing multivalent ions, for which there are no accurate theoretical methods available.

  20. [Advancement of colloidal gold chromatographic technique in screening of ochratoxin A].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-lu; Wang, Yu-ting; Kong, Wei-jun; Yang, Mei-hua; Zhao, Ming; Ou-Yang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a toxic secondary metabolite mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, existing in a variety of foodstuffs and Chinese medicines. OTA is difficult to be detected in practice because of the characteristics such as trace amounts, toxicity, existing in complex matrices. In the numerous detection technologies, colloidal gold chromatographic techniques are highly sensitive, specific, cost-effective and user-friendly, and are being used increasingly for OTA screening. Recently, with the development of aptamer technology and its application in chromatographic technique, a newly colloidal gold aptamer chromatographic technique has been developed. This review elaborates the structures and principles of both traditional and newly colloidal gold chromatographic techniques, focuses on newly colloidal gold aptamer chromatographic technique, summarizes and compares their use in rapid detection of OTA. Finally, in order to provide a reference for better research of related work, the development trends of this novel technique are prospected.

  1. Modeling experimental stable isotope results from CO2 adsorption and diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Transport of carbon dioxide through porous media can be affected by diffusion, advection and adsorption processes. Developing new tools to understand which of these processes dominates migration of CO2 or other gases in the subsurface is important to a wide range of applications including CO2 storage. Whereas advection rates are not affected by isotope substitution in CO2, adsorption and diffusion constants are. For example, differences in the binary diffusion constant calculated between C12O2-He and C13O2-He results in a carbon isotope fractionation whereby the front of the chromatographic peak is enriched in carbon-12 and the tail of the peak is enriched in carbon-13. Interestingly, adsorption is shown to have an opposite, apparent inverse affect whereby the lighter isotopologues of CO2 are preferentially retained by the chromatographic column and the heavier isotopologues are eluted first. This apparent inverse chromatographic effect has been ascribed to Van der Waals dispersion forces. Smaller molar volumes of the heavier isotopologues resulting from increased bond strength (shorter bond length) effectively decreases Van der Waals forces in heavier isotopologues compared to lighter isotopologues. Here we discuss the possible application of stable isotope values measured across chromatographic peaks to differentiate diffusion-dominated from adsorption-dominated transport processes for CO2. Separate 1-dimensional flow-through columns were packed with quartz and illite, and one remained empty. Dry helium was used as a carrier gas. Constant flow rate, temperature and column pressure were maintained. After background CO2 concentrations were minimized and constant, a sustained pulse of CO2 was injected at the head of the column and the effluent was sampled at 4 minute intervals for CO2 concentration, and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios. The quartz-sand packed and empty columns resulted in similar trends in concentration and isotope ratios whereby CO2 concentrations

  2. Gas chromatographic determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and smoked rice samples after solid-phase microextraction using multiwalled carbon nanotube loaded hollow fiber.

    PubMed

    Matin, Amir Abbas; Biparva, Pourya; Gheshlaghi, Mohammad

    2014-12-29

    A novel solid-phase microextraction fiber was prepared based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loaded on hollow fiber membrane pores. Stainless steel wire was used as unbreakable support. The major advantages of the proposed fiber are its (a) high reproducibility due to the uniform structure of the hollow fiber membranes, (b) high extraction capacity related to the porous structure of the hollow fiber and outstanding adsorptive characteristics of MWCNTs. The proposed fiber was applied for the microextraction of five representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from aqueous media (river and hubble-bubble water) and smoked rice samples followed by gas chromatographic determination. Analytical merits of the method, including high correlation coefficients [(0.9963-0.9992) and (0.9982-0.9999)] and low detection limits [(9.0-13.0ngL(-1)) and (40.0-150.0ngkg(-1))] for water and rice samples, respectively, made the proposed method suitable for the ultra-trace determination of PAHs.

  3. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  4. Adsorption of Organics from Domestic Water Supplies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Michael J.; Suffet, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    This article discusses the current state of the art of organics removal by adsorption. Various theoretical explanations of the adsorption process are given, along with practical results from laboratory, pilot-scale, and full-scale applications. (CS)

  5. Synthesis of metronidazole-imprinted molecularly imprinted polymers by distillation precipitation polymerization and their use as a solid-phase adsorbent and chromatographic filler.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Lu; Li Han Song, Le; Liu, Yuan; Tang, Hui; Li, Yingchun

    2015-04-01

    Metronidazole-imprinted polymers with superior recognition properties were prepared by a novel strategy called distillation-precipitation polymerization. The as-obtained polymers were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, laser particle size determination and scanning electron microscopy, and their binding performances were evaluated in detail by static, kinetic and dynamic rebinding tests, and Scatchard analysis. The results showed that when the fraction of the monomers was 5 vol% in the whole reaction system, the prepared polymers afforded good morphology, monodispersity, and high adsorption capacity and excellent selectivity to the target molecule, metronidazole. The optimal binding performance is 12.41 mg/g for metronidazole just before leakage occurred and 38.51 mg/g at saturation in dynamic rebinding tests. Metronidazole-imprinted polymers were further applied as packing agents in solid-phase extraction and as chromatographic filler, both of which served for the detection of metronidazole in fish tissue. The results illustrated the recoveries of spiked samples ranged from 82.97 to 87.83% by using molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction combined with a C18 commercial column and 93.7 to 101.2% by directly using the polymer-packed chromatographic column. The relative standard deviation of both methods was less than 6%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Improving the productivity of a multidimensional chromatographic preparative system by collecting pure chemicals after each of three chromatographic dimensions.

    PubMed

    Sciarrone, Danilo; Pantò, Sebastiano; Donato, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-12-02

    The enhanced sample collection capability of a heart-cutting three-dimensional GC-prep system is reported. In its original configuration, a highly pure component can be usually collected after the last (3D) column outlet by means of a dedicated preparative station. The latter is located after the last chromatographic column, and this poses the requirement for multiple heart cuts even for those components showing satisfactory degree of purity after the first (or second) separation dimension. The feasibility to collect pure components after each chromatographic dimension is here described, employing a three-dimension MDGC system equipped with high-temperature valves, located inside the first and second GC ovens, with the aim to improve the productivity of the collection procedure. In addition to a commercial preparative collector located at the 3D outlet, two laboratory-made collection systems were applied in the first and second dimension, reached by the effluent to be collected trough a high-temperature valve switching the heart-cut fraction between either the detector (FID), or the collector. Highly pure sesquiterpene components were collected, namely: patchouli alcohol after the first column [poly(5% diphenyl/95% dimethylsiloxane)], α-bulnesene after a second column coated with high molecular weight polyethylene glycol, and α-guaiene after an ionic-liquid based column (SLB-IL60), used as the third dimension. Purity levels ranging from 85 to 95% were achieved with an average collection recovery of 90% (n=5). The following average amounts were collected per run: 160μg for α-guaiene, 295μg for α-bulnesene, and 496μg for patchouli alcohol.

  7. [Adsorption characteristics of ciprofloxacin in ustic cambosols].

    PubMed

    Cui, Hao; Wang, Shu-ping

    2012-08-01

    In order to understand the adsorption characteristics of ciprofloxacin in ustic cambosols, static adsorption experiments were used to investigate dynamic and isothermal adsorption characteristics of ciprofloxacin in ustic cambosols, influence of pH on the adsorption process. Results showed that the absorption process of ciprofloxacin can be divided into two stages: fast adsorption and slow balance. The adsorption processes followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics, with adsorption rate of 1.138 x 10(-3) - 2.849 x 10(-2) kg x (min x mg)(-1). Adsorption isotherms of ciprofloxacin in ustic cambosols were well described by the Freundlich and Langmuir equation, Freundlich equation is more applicable than Langmuir equation, with the adsorption capacity (lgKf) of 2.725. Moreover, at the tested pH interval of 4-9, lgKd values of ciprofloxacin increased and then decreased with the increase of pH in ustic cambosols; the maximum adsorption of ciprofloxacin in ustic cambosols can be obtained when the pH value was 5 with lgKd value was 3.11; strong acid or alkali conditions were unfavorable to ciprofloxacin adsorption. It could be deduced that cationic adsorptions was one of the significant sorption mechanisms for ciprofloxacin in ustic cambosols.

  8. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  9. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  10. Protein Adsorption in Microengraving Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Microengraving is a novel immunoassay forcharacterizing multiple protein secretions from single cells. During the immunoassay, characteristic diffusion and kinetic time scales τD and τK determine the time for molecular diffusion of proteins secreted from the activated single lymphocytes and subsequent binding onto the glass slide surface respectively. Our results demonstrate that molecular diffusion plays important roles in the early stage of protein adsorption dynamics which shifts to a kinetic controlled mechanism in the later stage. Similar dynamic pathways are observed for protein adsorption with significantly fast rates and rapid shifts in transport mechanisms when C0* is increased a hundred times from 0.313 to 31.3. Theoretical adsorption isotherms follow the trend of experimentally obtained data. Adsorption isotherms indicate that amount of proteins secreted from individual cells and subsequently captured on a clean glass slide surface increases monotonically with time. Our study directly validates that protein secretion rates can be quantified by the microengraving immunoassay. This will enable us to apply microengraving immunoassays to quantify secretion rates from 104–105 single cells in parallel, screen antigen-specific cells with the highest secretion rate for clonal expansion and quantitatively reveal cellular heterogeneity within a small cell sample. PMID:26501282

  11. Protein adsorption in microengraving immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Song, Qing

    2015-10-16

    Microengraving is a novel immunoassay for characterizing multiple protein secretions from single cells. During the immunoassay, characteristic diffusion and kinetic time scales  and  determine the time for molecular diffusion of proteins secreted from the activated single lymphocytes and subsequent binding onto the glass slide surface respectively. Our results demonstrate that molecular diffusion plays important roles in the early stage of protein adsorption dynamics which shifts to a kinetic controlled mechanism in the later stage. Similar dynamic pathways are observed for protein adsorption with significantly fast rates and rapid shifts in transport mechanisms when  is increased a hundred times from 0.313 to 31.3. Theoretical adsorption isotherms follow the trend of experimentally obtained data. Adsorption isotherms indicate that amount of proteins secreted from individual cells and subsequently captured on a clean glass slide surface increases monotonically with time. Our study directly validates that protein secretion rates can be quantified by the microengraving immunoassay. This will enable us to apply microengraving immunoassays to quantify secretion rates from 10⁴-10⁵ single cells in parallel, screen antigen-specific cells with the highest secretion rate for clonal expansion and quantitatively reveal cellular heterogeneity within a small cell sample.

  12. Multivariate curve resolution based chromatographic peak alignment combined with parallel factor analysis to exploit second-order advantage in complex chromatographic measurements.

    PubMed

    Parastar, Hadi; Akvan, Nadia

    2014-03-13

    In the present contribution, a new combination of multivariate curve resolution-correlation optimized warping (MCR-COW) with trilinear parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) is developed to exploit second-order advantage in complex chromatographic measurements. In MCR-COW, the complexity of the chromatographic data is reduced by arranging the data in a column-wise augmented matrix, analyzing using MCR bilinear model and aligning the resolved elution profiles using COW in a component-wise manner. The aligned chromatographic data is then decomposed using trilinear model of PARAFAC in order to exploit pure chromatographic and spectroscopic information. The performance of this strategy is evaluated using simulated and real high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) datasets. The obtained results showed that the MCR-COW can efficiently correct elution time shifts of target compounds that are completely overlapped by coeluted interferences in complex chromatographic data. In addition, the PARAFAC analysis of aligned chromatographic data has the advantage of unique decomposition of overlapped chromatographic peaks to identify and quantify the target compounds in the presence of interferences. Finally, to confirm the reliability of the proposed strategy, the performance of the MCR-COW-PARAFAC is compared with the frequently used methods of PARAFAC, COW-PARAFAC, multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), and MCR-COW-MCR. In general, in most of the cases the MCR-COW-PARAFAC showed an improvement in terms of lack of fit (LOF), relative error (RE) and spectral correlation coefficients in comparison to the PARAFAC, COW-PARAFAC, MCR-ALS and MCR-COW-MCR results.

  13. Development and validation of a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic method for determination of aromatic amines in environmental water.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruiping; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Charles C; Lu, Rongrong; Huang, Yingping

    2010-03-12

    A simple, precise, and accurate hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic (HILIC) method has been developed for the determination of five aromatic amines in environmental water samples. Chromatography was carried out on a bare silica column, using a mixture of acetonitrile and a buffer of NaH(2)PO(4)-H(3)PO(4) (pH 1.5, containing 10mM NaH(2)PO(4)) (85:15, v/v) as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 1 mL min(-1). Aromatic amines were detected by UV absorbance at 254 nm. The linear range of amines was good (r(2)>0.998) and limit of detection (LOD) within 0.02-0.2 mg L(-1) (S/N=3). The retention mechanism for the analytes under the optimum conditions was determined to be a combination of adsorption, partition and ionic interactions. The proposed method was applied to the environmental water samples. Aromatic amines were isolated from aqueous samples using solid-phase extraction (SPE) with Oasis HLB cartridges. Recoveries of greater than 75% with precision (RSD) less than 12% were obtained at amine concentrations of 5-50 microg L(-1) from 100mL river water and influents from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The present HILIC technique proved to be a viable method for the analysis of aromatic amines in the environmental water samples.

  14. Modeling of the simulated countercurrent moving-bed chromatographic reactor used for the oxidative coupling of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkovich, A.L.Y.; Carr, R.W.

    1994-09-01

    The oxidative coupling reaction of methane (OCM) is a potential industrial reaction for the efficient production of ethylene. Replacement of current technologies requires significant product yield improvements. An experimental novel reactor design, the modified simulated countercurrent moving-bed chromatographic reactor (SCMCR), has reported improved ethane and ethylene product yields over other reported values. An understanding of the reactor operation is aided by concurrent mathematical modeling. The model mimics the exact experimental reactor configuration. Four sections are used; each section contains a reaction column and two separation columns connected in series. The feed is switched from section to section at discrete intervals. Reaction occurs in the first column and is followed by product and reactant separation in the ensuing section columns. Langmuir adsorption isotherms are used. The model does not incorporate the realistic and complex kinetics rising, from the OCM, rather a simplified reaction term is used to qualitatively gain insight into the operation of the modified SCMCR. A unimolecular reaction network is used in the model. The rate constants are set to permit a small fractional conversion, 5% per pass, at the concentrations during the first cycle. Similarly to the experimental reactor, the model adds a make-up feed (defined as percentage of the original feed, where excess methane is fed during the first cycle of the experimental reactor) to augment lost reactants.

  15. A simple and sensitive detection of diquat herbicide using a dental amalgam electrode: a comparison using the chromatographic technique.

    PubMed

    Melo, Luisa Célia; Salazar-Banda, Giancarlo Richard; Machado, Sergio Antonio Spinola; de Lima-Neto, Pedro; De Souza, Djenaine; Correia, Adriana Nunes

    2009-10-15

    This paper describes the use of a dental amalgam electrode (DAE) to evaluate the electrochemical behaviour and to develop an electroanalytical procedure for determination of diquat herbicide in natural water and potato samples. The work was based on the square wave voltammetry responses of diquat, which presented two well-defined and reversible reduction peaks, at -0.56 V (peak 1) and -1.00 V (peak 2). The experimental and voltammetric parameters were optimised, and the analytical curves were constructed and compared to similar curves performed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometric detector (HPLC/UV-vis). The responses were directly proportional to diquat concentration in a large interval of concentration, and the calculated detection limits were very similar, around 10 microg L(-1) (10 ppb) for voltammetric and chromatographic experiments. These values were lower than the maximum residue limit established for natural water by the Brazilian Environmental Agency. The recovery percentages in pure electrolyte, natural water and potato samples showed values from 70% to 130%, demonstrating that the voltammetric methodology proposed is suitable for determining any contamination by diquat in different samples, minimising the toxic residues due to the use of liquid mercury or the adsorptive process relative to use of other solid surfaces.

  16. Systematic interpolation method predicts protein chromatographic elution from batch isotherm data without a detailed mechanistic isotherm model.

    PubMed

    Creasy, Arch; Barker, Gregory; Yao, Yan; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-09-01

    Predicting protein elution for overloaded ion exchange columns requires models capable of describing protein binding over broad ranges of protein and salt concentrations. Although approximate mechanistic models are available, they do not always have the accuracy needed for precise predictions. The aim of this work is to develop a method to predict protein chromatographic behavior from batch isotherm data without relying on a mechanistic model. The method uses a systematic empirical interpolation (EI) scheme coupled with a lumped kinetic model with rate parameters determined from HETP measurements for non-binding conditions, to numerically predict the column behavior. For two experimental systems considered in this work, predictions based on the EI scheme are in excellent agreement with experimental elution profiles under highly overloaded conditions without using any adjustable parameters. A qualitative study of the sensitivity of predicting protein elution profiles to the precision, granularity, and extent of the batch adsorption data shows that the EI scheme is relatively insensitive to the properties of the dataset used, requiring only that the experimental ranges of protein and salt concentrations overlap those under which the protein actually elutes from the column and possess a ± 10% measurement precision.

  17. A study of surfactant adsorption with applications in surfactant assisted enhanced oil recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, N.P.

    1989-01-01

    A study is presented to assess the feasibility of high-pH preflushing to reduce surfactant adsorption in micellar flooding. Under static or dynamic flow conditions, adsorption of a pure anionic surfactant on Berea is eliminated at mild electrolyte above pH 8, 2 pH units above the experimental determined pzc. Static and dynamic studies of hydroxide consumption by Berea indicate mild dissolution at the pH range of interest. The effect of pH on the adsorption isotherm for Berea indicate a large increase in logarithmic slope at high pH. Similar studies are presented for kaolinite and alumina. A patch-wise, phase separation model is presented to quantify the relationship between adsorption, and bulk pH and salinity. The concept of the site-binding model is incorporated into the development of surface aggregates (both admicelles and hemimicelles), and it is confirmed that the aggregates are stabilized at high pH by the abstraction of positive charge to the surface beneath the aggregate, and by high counterion binding, allowing physical adsorption above the pzc. A novel sweep improvement process, surfactant assisted waterflooding, is presented. The chromatographic and phase separation behavior of dissimilar surfactants and their mixtures allows a selective and controllable blocking of watered-out zones of a reservoir. A mathematical model is developed, and the theory of coherence is extended to multidimensional, multiphase, multicomponent flow, allowing the development of a novel simulator, which is then applied. The results indicate that the blocking mechanism is very selective in markedly heterogeneous reservoir. Shorter reservoirs have the highest potential for application; high oil recoveries are then possible since blocking can be controlled to occur deep inside the watered out zones.

  18. Chromatographic and computational assessment of lipophilicity using sum of ranking differences and generalized pair-correlation.

    PubMed

    Andrić, Filip; Héberger, Károly

    2015-02-06

    Lipophilicity (logP) represents one of the most studied and most frequently used fundamental physicochemical properties. At present there are several possibilities for its quantitative expression and many of them stems from chromatographic experiments. Numerous attempts have been made to compare different computational methods, chromatographic methods vs. computational approaches, as well as chromatographic methods and direct shake-flask procedure without definite results or these findings are not accepted generally. In the present work numerous chromatographically derived lipophilicity measures in combination with diverse computational methods were ranked and clustered using the novel variable discrimination and ranking approaches based on the sum of ranking differences and the generalized pair correlation method. Available literature logP data measured on HILIC, and classical reversed-phase combining different classes of compounds have been compared with most frequently used multivariate data analysis techniques (principal component and hierarchical cluster analysis) as well as with the conclusions in the original sources. Chromatographic lipophilicity measures obtained under typical reversed-phase conditions outperform the majority of computationally estimated logPs. Oppositely, in the case of HILIC none of the many proposed chromatographic indices overcomes any of the computationally assessed logPs. Only two of them (logkmin and kmin) may be selected as recommended chromatographic lipophilicity measures. Both ranking approaches, sum of ranking differences and generalized pair correlation method, although based on different backgrounds, provides highly similar variable ordering and grouping leading to the same conclusions.

  19. Protein adsorption to poly(ethylenimine)-modified Sepharose FF: V. Complicated effects of counterions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Yu, Linling; Sun, Yan

    2015-07-24

    results indicate that protein adsorption and chromatographic performance with PEI-Sepharose can be improved by proper counterions. For the four counterions tested, SO4(2-) was the most favorable for providing the best adsorption and elution outcomes with FF-PEI-L680.

  20. Dye adsorption behavior of Luffa cylindrica fibers.

    PubMed

    Demir, H; Top, A; Balköse, D; Ulkü, S

    2008-05-01

    Using natural Luffa cylindrica fibers as adsorbent removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solutions at different temperatures and dye concentrations was investigated in this study. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were also investigated. The adsorption isotherms could be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters of methylene blue (MB) adsorption indicated that the adsorption is exothermic and spontaneous. The average MB adsorption capacity was found out as 49 mg/g and average BET surface area of fibers was calculated as 123 m(2)/g.

  1. Chromatographic Separation and NMR An Integrated Approach in Pharmaceutical Development.

    PubMed

    Gonnella, Nina C

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, major improvements in the performance of LC-NMR have been realized. The addition of postcolumn SPE, advances in probe technology including cryogenic probes and microcoil probes, improved solvent suppression pulse sequences, and shielded magnets with better homogeneity have all contributed to rapid advancements in this technology. Application of LC-NMR to problems in pharmaceutical development has had a major impact on structure elucidation studies. LC-NMR has been successfully applied to determine the structures of degradation products, impurities, mixtures of compounds, and metabolites. Use of stop flow techniques with LC-NMR experiments has been a critical means of identifying unstable compounds and studying conformational kinetics. The integration of SPE as an intermediate step between the LC unit and the NMR spectrometer has vastly improved the power of the hyphenated technique in trace analysis applications. Online postcolumn enrichment of chromatographic peaks by SPE dramatically reduces the NMR acquisition times by allowing repeated injections to be trapped onto the same cartridge or different cartridges. Because protonated solvents can be easily removed with a drying procedure, solvents and buffers may be freely chosen for maximizing chromatographic separation without compromising NMR spectral quality. The compound of interest may then be eluted from an SPE cartridge using deuterated organic solvent, which helps to reduce dynamic range issues. When combined with cryogenically cooled microcapillary probes, the sensitivity of the NMR signal increases about 10-fold over conventional room temperature probes, enabling full structure characterization at the microgram level. Heteronuclear experiments with concentrations previously only possible in a limited number of cases have now become standard experiments. The availability of HSQC and HMBC experiments and microcoil/cryogenic technology opens the possibility of using LC-(SPE) NMR for the

  2. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Investigation Of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Sushil; Harpold, Dan; Owen, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    A decade ago, on 14 January 2005, the Huygens probe of the Cassini-Huygens mission descended through the smog filled atmosphere of Titan and landed on the surface, revealing for the first time the extraordinary nature of Saturn's largest moon. One of the six payload instruments, the gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS), was crucial for measuring the composition of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan [1,2]. Most of the GCMS findings were "firsts", including the first direct identification of molecular nitrogen as the bulk constituent of the atmosphere, first vertical profile of Titan's second most abundant volatile, methane, first determination of primordial and radiogenic argon, first quantification of a number of stable gas isotopes, and the first measurements of the make-up of Titan's surface. These data are key to understanding why Titan is so unique amongst planetary moons in possessing a massive atmosphere [3], how Titan maintains a cycle of methane complete with surface reservoirs, evaporation and condensation like the hydrological cycle on earth [3,4,5], and what is responsible for the photochemical smog on Titan that plays a central role in the very existence of an atmosphere on Titan [3]. This presentation will discuss the GCMS investigation and how it helped shape our current view of Titan. [website for downloading pdf's of relevant papers: www.umich.edu/~atreya] [1] Niemann, H. B. et al., The abundances of constituents of Titan's atmosphere from the GCMS instrument on the Huygens probe, Nature 438, 779-784, 2005. [2] Niemann, H. B. et al., The composition of Titan's lower atmosphere and simple surface volatiles as measured by the Cassini-Huygens probe gas chromatograph mass spectrometer experiment, J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 115, 12006, 2010. [3] Atreya S. K., R. D. Lorenz and J. H. Waite, Volatile origin and cycles: Nitrogen and methane, in Titan from Cassini-Huygens, R. H. Brown, J. P. Lebreton and J. Waite, (eds.), Springer Dordrecht

  3. [Separation of chiral pharmaceutical drugs by chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques].

    PubMed

    Morin, P

    2009-07-01

    A large number of pharmaceutical drugs possess one or more centers of asymmetry giving rise to enantiomers whose pharmacological properties and toxicity are often different. At successive stages of drug discovery, the enantiomers of any chiral molecule must be isolated and analyzed and their enantiomeric purity determined. The electrophoretic and chromatographic techniques have become the most important tools to routinely determine the enantiomeric purity of pharmaceutical molecules. Liquid chromatography (LC) is the most widely used because of the large number of columns marketed, the variety of selectivities available and the ease at which analytical results can be scaled up to the preparative level. In particular, more than 80% of enantioseparations of pharmaceutical molecules are successful with polysaccharide-derivative stationary phases (cellulose, amylose) for multiple system solvents (normal phase, polar organic phase or reverse phase). Complementary selectivities can be achieved more rapidly with other types of stationary phase (glycopeptides, Pirkle, cyclodextrins) but their application is hindered by problems of stability (proteins) or transfer to the preparative scale (cyclodextrins). At the present time, glycopeptide phases offer very promising prospects for the separation of amino acids (and derivatives) and peptide enantiomers. In addition, because of its faster analysis and environmental benefits, supercritical chromatography (SFC) has given rise to renewed interest. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an orthogonal technique complementary to chromatographic methods. Its principle involves the formation of diastereoisomer complexes after addition of anionic (HS-beta-CD, HS-gamma-CD CM-beta-CD) or neutral (TM-beta -CD, HP-beta-CD, DM-beta-CD, HP-gamma-CD) cyclodextrins to the running buffer. Compared to LC, CE analyses are cheaper (no chiral column, no solvent, low consumption of chiral selector) and peak efficiencies are higher by one order of

  4. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  5. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC.

  6. Chromatographic separation and concentration of quercetin and (+)-catechin using mesoporous composites based on MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, S. I.; Belanova, N. A.; Korabel'nikova, E. O.; Nedosekina, I. V.; Roessner, F.; Selemenev, V. F.

    2015-05-01

    Data on chromatographic separation of quercetin and (+)-catechin-flavonoids with similar physicochemical (including sorption) properties—are presented. The highest efficiency of chromatographic process at high sorption capacity of the material with respect to quercetin and slightly lower capacity for (+)-catechin were observed when silylated composites of ordered MCM-41 type materials were used. The application of acetonitrile as a solvent increased the sorption capacity of the material and can be recommended for separation of related polyphenol substances and their determination using ordered MCM-41 modified with trimethylchlorosilane as a stationary phase in a chromatographic column.

  7. Considerations on the temperature dependence of the gas-liquid chromatographic retention.

    PubMed

    González, Francisco Rex

    2002-01-04

    A discussion on the temperature dependence of the partition coefficient K is developed. This discussion embraces topics such as the limitations of conventional thermodynamic approaches followed in the chromatographic literature, qualitative theoretical notions arising from molecular thermodynamics and the experimental information that is accessible through modern capillary gas chromatography. It is shown that the heat capacity difference of solute transfer for flexible molecules has at least one maximum in the chromatographic range of temperature. As a consequence, a great amount of experimental data is required for a correct thermodynamic interpretation of the chromatographic retention.

  8. Adsorption modeling for macroscopic contaminant dispersal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Axley, J.W.

    1990-05-01

    Two families of macroscopic adsorption models are formulated, based on fundamental principles of adsorption science and technology, that may be used for macroscopic (such as whole-building) contaminant dispersal analysis. The first family of adsorption models - the Equilibrium Adsorption (EA) Models - are based upon the simple requirement of equilibrium between adsorbent and room air. The second family - the Boundary Layer Diffusion Controlled Adsorption (BLDC) Models - add to the equilibrium requirement a boundary layer model for diffusion of the adsorbate from the room air to the adsorbent surface. Two members of each of these families are explicitly discussed, one based on the linear adsorption isotherm model and the other on the Langmuir model. The linear variants of each family are applied to model the adsorption dynamics of formaldehyde in gypsum wall board and compared to measured data.

  9. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal–halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the “Cl-down” configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable. PMID:27066160

  10. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations.

    PubMed

    Wruss, Elisabeth; Hofmann, Oliver T; Egger, David A; Verwüster, Elisabeth; Gerlach, Alexander; Schreiber, Frank; Zojer, Egbert

    2016-03-31

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal-halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the "Cl-down" configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable.

  11. Determination of organic compounds in landfill leachates treated by Fenton-Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Sosa, Dorian R; Castillo-Borges, Elba R; Méndez-Novelo, Roger I; Sauri-Riancho, María R; Barceló-Quintal, Manuel; Marrufo-Gómez, José M

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the organic compounds removed from the leachate when treated with Fenton-Adsorption by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in order to identify toxic compounds that could be harmful for the environment or human health. The physicochemical characterization of the raw leachate was carried out before and after the Fenton-Adsorption process. The effluent from each stage of this process was characterized: pH, Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD(5)), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Total Organic Carbon (TOC), Total Carbon (TC), Inorganic Carbon (IC), Total Solids (TS), Total Suspended Solids (TSS) and Color. The organic compounds were determined by GC-MS. The removal of COD and color reached over 99% in compliance with the Mexican Standard NOM-001-SEMARNAT-1996, which establishes the maximum permissible limits for contaminants present in wastewater discharges to water and national goods. The chromatographic analysis from the Fenton-Adsorption effluent proved that this treatment removed more than 98% of the organic compounds present in the initial sample. The mono (2-ethylhexyl) ester 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid persisted, although it is not considered as toxic compound by the NOM-052-SEMARNAT-2005. Therefore, the treated effluent can be safely disposed of into the environment. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Separation of chiral nanotubes with an opposite handedness by chiral oligopeptide adsorption: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2015-12-18

    The separation of enantiomeric chiral nanotubes that can form non-covalent complexes with an unlike stability upon adsorption of chiral molecules is a process of potential interest in different fields and applications. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we report in this paper a theoretical study of the adsorption and denaturation of an oligopeptide formed by 16 chiral amino acids having a helical structure in the native state on both the inner and the outer surface of the chiral (10, 20) and (20, 10) single-walled carbon nanotubes having an opposite handedness, and of the armchair (16, 16) nanotube with a similar diameter for comparison. In the final adsorbed state, the oligopeptide loses in all cases its native helical conformation, assuming elongated geometries that maximize its contact with the surface through all the 16 amino acids. We find that the complexes formed by the two chiral nanotubes and the chosen oligopeptide have a strongly unlike stability both when adsorption takes place on the outer convex surface of the nanotube, and when it occurs on the inner concave surface. Thus, our molecular simulations indicate that separation of chiral, enantiomeric carbon nanotubes for instance by chromatographic methods can indeed be carried out using oligopeptides of a sufficient length.

  13. Particle size effects on protein and virus-like particle adsorption on perfusion chromatography media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yige; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-01-02

    The resin structure, chromatographic behavior, and adsorption kinetics of proteins and virus-like-particles (VLPs) are studied for POROS HS 20 and POROS HS 50 (23 and 52 μm mean diameter, respectively) to determine the effects of particle size on perfusion chromatography and to determine the predictive ability of available models. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inverse size-exclusion chromatography (iSEC) show similar structures for the two resins, both containing 200-1000 nm pores that transect a network of much smaller pores. For non-binding conditions, trends of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) as a function of reduced velocity are consistent with perfusion. The estimated intraparticle flow fractions for these conditions are 0.0018 and 0.00063 for POROS HS 20 and HS 50, respectively. For strong binding conditions, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) shows asymmetrical intraparticle concentrations profiles and enhanced rates of IgG adsorption on POROS HS 20 at 1000 cm/h. The corresponding effective diffusivity under flow is 2-3 times larger than for non-flow conditions and much larger than observed for POROS HS 50, consistent with available models. For VLPs, however, adsorption is confined to a thin layer near the particle surface for both resins, suggesting that the bound VLPs block the pores.

  14. Enthalpy assisted size exclusion chromatography. Part 2. Adsorption retention mechanism.

    PubMed

    Russ, Albert; Berek, Dusan

    2007-08-01

    A novel high performance liquid chromatographic method for separation of synthetic polymers has been tested. It involves combination of the enthalpic and entropic retention mechanisms, resulting in increased selectivity of separation within a specific molar mass range. In this present case, the enthalpic retention mechanism is adsorption of macromolecules on a bare silica gel column packing. Under critical conditions of enthalpic interactions, homopolymers are known to elute irrespective of their molar mass. However, in the vicinity of critical conditions, a situation can be identified when retention volumes (V(R)) rapidly decrease with increasing molar mass. Typically, this happens for polymer species close to or above their exclusion limit observed with the same column in the absence of enthalpic interactions between macromolecules and packing, that is near "ideal SEC" conditions. The dependence of polymer retention volume on molar mass closely resembles size exclusion conditions. However, the witnessed rate of change in V(R )with polymer molar mass is more pronounced, thus indicating increased selectivity of separation. This situation not only offers the benefit of more selective separation according to molar mass but efficient discrimination of macromolecules possessing different nature and interactivity with the column packing can be accomplished as well.

  15. Liquid chromatographic determination of progestogens in animal fat.

    PubMed

    Andresen, M T; Fesser, A C

    1996-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method was developed for determination of 3 progestogens-melengestrol acetate, megestrol acetate, and chlormadinone acetate-found in edible tissue at concentrations between 10 and 1000 ppb. These progestogens are commonly used as feed additives to control herd estrus and to improve feed efficiency. Rendered fat was extracted with acetonitrile, washed with hexane, and dried. The remaining lipids were saponified with sodium hydroxide and precipitated with magnesium chloride. The progestogens were extracted from the basic solution with hexane, dried, and cleaned up on a cyanopropyl solid-phase extraction column in the normal-phase mode. The eluate was dried and reconstituted with acetonitrile-water (7 + 3, v/v). Chromatography was performed on a 5 microns high-carbon load C18 column with acetonitrile-water (7 + 3, v/v) at 1 mL/min and UV detection at 291 nm. Recoveries from fortified samples ranged from 84 to 116%. The limit of quantitation was 10 ppb for both beef and pork. The detection limit was 3 ppb.

  16. Comparison of three advanced chromatographic techniques for cannabis identification.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D; Albessard, F; Bigot, M C; Moulin, M

    1994-01-01

    The development of chromatography technology, with the increasing availability of easier-to-use mass spectrometers combined with gas chromatography (GC), the use of diode-array or programmable variable-wavelength ultraviolet absorption detectors in conjunction with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the availability of scanners capable of reading thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates in the ultraviolet and visible regions, has made for easier, quicker and more positive identification of cannabis samples that standard analytical laboratories are occasionally required to undertake in the effort to combat drug addiction. At laboratories that do not possess the technique of GC combined with mass spectrometry, which provides an irrefutable identification, the following procedure involving HPLC or TLC techniques may be used: identification of the chromatographic peaks corresponding to each of the three main cannabis constituents-cannabidiol (CBD), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabinol (CBN)-by comparison with published data in conjunction with a specific absorption spectrum for each of those constituents obtained between 200 and 300 nm. The collection of the fractions corresponding to the three major cannabinoids at the HPLC system outlet and the cross-checking of their identity in the GC process with flame ionization detection can further corroborate the identification and minimize possible errors due to interference.

  17. Liquid chromatographic determination of beta-naphthoxyacetic acid in tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Gökmen, V; Acar, J

    1998-03-06

    An alternative high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of beta-naphthoxyacetic acid (BNOA) in tomatoes is described. BNOA was extracted from tomatoes with acetone-dichloromethane (2:1). The extract was cleaned up by Bio-Beads S-X3 gel-permeation chromatography and by partitioning. A reversed-phase C18 column was used for HPLC analysis. The mobile phase was acetonitrile-2% acetic acid in water (50:50, v/v) pumped at a flow-rate of 1.0 ml/min. Retention time of BNOA was ca. 7 min with a percentage coefficient of variation of 0.71. Resolution of BNOA was good on the column. Percentage recoveries of BNOA were 79.5 +/- 6.82, 94.8 +/- 2.70 and 86.4 +/- 16.43 for the corresponding spiking levels of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 micrograms per g tomato, respectively. Analysis of 10 greenhouse tomato samples from local markets in Ankara showed no BNOA residue.

  18. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  19. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrawes, F.; Holzer, G.; Roedder, E.; Gibson, E.K.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These inclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusions in a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crusing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the process involved in the history of the samples analyzed. ?? 1984.

  20. Novel reduced pressure-balance syringe for chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Windom, Bret C; Bruno, Thomas J

    2010-11-19

    When withdrawing a fluid sample (for additional chromatographic analyses) from an apparatus operated at a reduced pressure, a typical syringe proves to be ineffective (even if it is equipped with a gas tight plunger). It simply does not create enough pressure differential to remove a fluid sample from a reduced pressure environment. We encountered such a situation as part of efforts to extend the operation of the advanced distillation curve protocol to reduced pressures. The problem was solved by the development of a pressure balance syringe that allows reliable and precise sampling from an apparatus operating at sub-ambient pressures. This new device uses an external vacuum source to evacuate a syringe barrel, allowing a user to withdraw fluid samples from environments with pressures as low as 0.5kPa. To demonstrate the operation of the newly developed device, distillate analyses were performed on two fluids at low pressure: a predefined validation mixture, and a commercial soy based biodiesel fuel. The pressure balance syringe was used successfully for sampling in both cases. The use of the pressure balance syringe is not limited to reduced pressure distillations; indeed it can be used for a variety of applications in which chemical/compositional analyses are desired on a fluid contained in a reduced pressure environment.

  1. Characterisation of wax works of art by gas chromatographic procedures.

    PubMed

    Regert, M; Langlois, J; Colinart, S

    2005-10-14

    To identify the various natural and synthetic substances used by sculptors at the end of the 19th century, several contemporary reference samples were investigated by high temperature gas chromatography (HT GC) and HT GC-MS. Using specific chromatographic conditions and minimising sample preparation, we could separate, detect and identify a wide range of biomolecular markers covering a great variety of molecular weights and volatilities, with a minimum amount of sample, in a single run. Beeswax, spermaceti, carnauba, candellila and Japan waxes as well as pine resin derivatives, animal fats, paraffin, ozokerite and stearin, used as additives in wax works of art, were chemically investigated. In the case of low volatile compounds, transbutylation was performed. The structure of long-chain esters of spermaceti was elucidated for the first time by HT GC-MS analysis. Such a method was then carried out on 10 samples collected on a statuette of Junon by Antoine-Louis Barye (Louvre Museum, Paris, France) and on a sculpture by Aimé-Jules Dalou (Musée de la Révolution Française, Vizille, France). The analytical results obtained provide new data on the complex recipes elaborated by sculptors at the end of the 19th century.

  2. Liquid chromatographic determination of sennosides in Cassia angustifolia leaves.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Alpuna; Pandey, Richa; Verma, Ram K; Gupta, Madan M

    2006-01-01

    A simple liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of sennosides B and A in leaves of Cassia angustifolia. These compounds were extracted from leaves with a mixture of methanol-water (70 + 30, v/v) after defatting with hexane. Analyte separation and quantitation were achieved by gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography and UV absorbance at 270 nm using a photodiode array detector. The method involves the use of an RP-18 Lichrocart reversed-phase column (5 microm, 125 x 4.0 mm id) and a binary gradient mobile-phase profile. The various other aspects of analysis, namely, peak purity, similarity, recovery, repeatability, and robustness, were validated. Average recoveries of 98.5 and 98.6%, with a coefficient of variation of 0.8 and 0.3%, were obtained by spiking sample solution with 3 different concentration solutions of standards (60, 100, and 200 microg/mL). Detection limits were 10 microg/mL for sennoside B and 35 microg/mL for sennoside A, present in the sample solution. The quantitation limits were 28 and 100 microg/mL. The analytical method was applied to a large number of senna leaf samples. The new method provides a reliable tool for rapid screening of C. angustifolia samples in large numbers, which is needed in breeding/genetic engineering and genetic mapping experiments.

  3. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions.

    PubMed

    Andrawes, F; Holzer, G; Roedder, E; Gibson, E K; Oro, J

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These conclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusion on a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crushing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the processes involved in the history of the samples analyzed.

  4. Recent Advances in Water Analysis with Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, John A.; Tsikata, Edem

    2014-01-01

    We report on progress made in developing a water sampling system for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds in water with a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS). Two approaches are described herein. The first approach uses a custom water pre-concentrator for performing trap and purge of VOCs from water. The second approach uses a custom micro-volume, split-splitless injector that is compatible with air and water. These water sampling systems will enable a single GC-based instrument to analyze air and water samples for VOC content. As reduced mass, volume, and power is crucial for long-duration, manned space-exploration, these water sampling systems will demonstrate the ability of a GCMS to monitor both air and water quality of the astronaut environment, thereby reducing the amount of required instrumentation for long duration habitation. Laboratory prototypes of these water sampling systems have been constructed and tested with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer as well as a thermal conductivity detector. Presented herein are details of these water sampling system with preliminary test results.

  5. Chromatographic Studies of Protein-Based Chiral Separations.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cong; Zheng, Xiwei; Azaria, Shiden; Beeram, Sandya; Li, Zhao; Hage, David S

    2016-09-01

    The development of separation methods for the analysis and resolution of chiral drugs and solutes has been an area of ongoing interest in pharmaceutical research. The use of proteins as chiral binding agents in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been an approach that has received particular attention in such work. This report provides an overview of proteins that have been used as binding agents to create chiral stationary phases (CSPs) and in the use of chromatographic methods to study these materials and protein-based chiral separations. The supports and methods that have been employed to prepare protein-based CSPs will also be discussed and compared. Specific types of CSPs that are considered include those that employ serum transport proteins (e.g., human serum albumin, bovine serum albumin, and alpha1-acid glycoprotein), enzymes (e.g., penicillin G acylase, cellobiohydrolases, and α-chymotrypsin) or other types of proteins (e.g., ovomucoid, antibodies, and avidin or streptavidin). The properties and applications for each type of protein and CSP will also be discussed in terms of their use in chromatography and chiral separations.

  6. Chromatographic determination of harmalans in the urine of autistic children.

    PubMed

    Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Jóźwik-Pruska, Jagoda; Axt, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach to autism - a complex and still enigmatic condition. We present the results of our preliminary research which was based on the detection of the hallucinogenic substance 6- (or 10-)methoxyharmalan in the urine samples of autistic children with the use of chromatographic methods. Additionally, we aim to describe the relationship between the level of tryptophan and harmalan, and the influence of supplementation on the level of this compound. We applied HPLC-UV/vis, HPLC-DAD and LC-MS in order to determine McIsaac's compound in the urine samples obtained from autistic children (n = 132) and healthy individuals (n = 10). The level of tryptophan was quantified with the use of GC-MS. Our research shows the presence of the McIsaac's compound in 110 samples of ASD children contrary to healthy children, where it was not found. No relationship between the level of tryptophan and 6-methoxyharmalan was noticed. The study shows a strong influence of melatonin supplementation on the presence of the McIsaac's compound. We believe that the results of our research can contribute to a better understanding of autism spectrum disorders. Moreover, our findings can form the basis for other studies focused on autism, eventually making it possible to understand its etiology. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Authenticity analysis of pear juice employing chromatographic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Willems, Jamie L; Low, Nicholas H

    2014-12-03

    Pear juice is predominately composed of carbohydrates/polyols (>95% of the total soluble solids), making it susceptible to adulteration by the addition of less expensive commercial sweeteners. In this research, the major carbohydrate and polyol (fructose, glucose, sucrose, and sorbitol) content of 32 pure pear juices representing five world producing regions and three years of production was determined. Additionally, methods employing oligosaccharide profiling to detect the debasing of these samples with four commercial sweeteners (HFCS 55 and 90, TIS, and HIS) were developed using capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (CGC-FID) and high-performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-PAD). Detection limits for the four commercial sweeteners ranged from 0.5 to 5.0% (v/v). In addition, the developed CGC-FID method could be used to (a) detect the addition of pear to apple juice via arbutin detection and (b) determine if a pear juice was produced using enzymatic liquefaction via the presence of O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-d-glucopyranose (cellobiose), all within a single chromatographic analysis.

  8. Capillary gas chromatographic analysis of pans with luminol chemilumnescent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.; Bornick, R.; Chen, Yu-Harn; Marley, N.

    1996-12-31

    Peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) are important air pollutants in tropospheric chemistry. PANs are known to be potent phytotoxins at low ppb concentrations and are lachrymators. They can also transport the more reactive nitrogen dioxide long distances, because they are in equilibrium with that NO{sub x} species. Since PANs are trapped peroxyradicals, they are a direct measure of the peroxyradical levels and the of {open_quotes}photochemical age{close_quotes} of an air parcel. The PANs are typically measured in the atmosphere by using electron capture detection methods. These methods suffer from large background signals and detector responses to oxygen and water vapor. This paper describes the combination of a capillary gas chromatographic column with a modified luminol chemiluminescent nitrogen dioxide detector (Scintrex, Luminox) for rapid and sensitive detection of nitrogen dioxide, peroxyacetyl nitrate, peroxypropionyl nitrate, and peroxybutyryl nitrate. Detection limits for this approach in the low tens of parts per trillion have been observed with total analysis times of less than three minutes. We will discuss the potential application of this method to other compounds, particularly, organonitrates, in a pyrolysis system and/or with ozone addition to the sampling streams.

  9. Liquid chromatographic analysis of oxytocin and its related substances.

    PubMed

    Ashenafi, Dunge; Van Hemelrijck, Elise; Chopra, Shruti; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin

    2010-01-05

    A selective gradient liquid chromatographic (LC) method for the determination of oxytocin (OT) and its related substances in bulk drugs has been developed. The method uses a reversed-phase C18 column (25 cm x 4.0 mm i.d.), 5 microm kept at 40 degrees C. The mobile phases consist of acetonitrile, dihydrogen phosphate solution pH 4.4 and water. The flow rate is 1.0 ml/min. UV detection is performed at 220 nm. A system suitability test (SST) was developed to govern the quality of the separation. The separation towards OT components was investigated on different C18 columns. The developed method was further validated with respect to robustness, precision, sensitivity and linearity. A central composite design was applied to examine the robustness of the method. The method shows good precision, sensitivity, linearity and robustness. Two commercial OT samples were examined using this method. Furthermore, the method proved to be successful when applied to analyze a marketed OT formulation for injection.

  10. Preconcentration procedures for phthalate esters combined with chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xueju; Hao, Yi; Jia, Qiong

    2013-08-01

    Phthalate esters are endocrine disrupters or mutagens. They are widely used as plasticizers and can be usually found in environmental samples, such as food, soil and polluted air. However, it is difficult to directly determine phthalate esters owing to their relatively low concentration and complex matrices. Therefore, preconcentration and separation have become increasingly important. In recent years, many preconcentration methods have been successfully developed and widely used, such as liquid-liquid extraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and solid-phase extraction. These preconcentration methods for phthalate esters can be applied to various real samples, water, soil, air, food and cosmetics. The aim of this paper is to review recent literature studies (primarily from the last five years) about preconcentration techniques for phthalate esters coupled with chromatographic analysis. The following text describes several preconcentration approaches, including liquid-liquid extraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, cloud point extraction, solid-phase extraction, solid-phase microextraction and stir bar sorptive extraction. Their advantages and disadvantages are also summarized.

  11. Biphasic Affinity Chromatographic Approach for Deep Tyrosine Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenzhen; Dong, Mingming; Wang, Yan; Dong, Jing; Li, Shawn S-C; Zou, Hanfa; Ye, Mingliang

    2017-02-21

    Tyrosine phosphorylation (pTyr) is important for normal physiology and implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. Identification of pTyr sites is critical to dissecting signaling pathways and understanding disease pathologies. However, compared with serine/threonine phosphorylation (pSer/pThr), the analysis of pTyr at the proteome level is more challenging due to its low abundance. Here, we developed a biphasic affinity chromatographic approach where Src SH2 superbinder was coupled with NeutrAvidin affinity chromatography, for tyrosine phosphoproteome analysis. With the use of competitive elution agent biotin-pYEEI, this strategy can distinguish high-affinity phosphotyrosyl peptides from low-affinity ones, while the excess competitive agent is readily removed by using NeutrAvidin agarose resin in an integrated tip system. The excellent performance of this system was demonstrated by analyzing tyrosine phosphoproteome of Jurkat cells from which 3,480 unique pTyr sites were identified. The biphasic affinity chromatography method for deep Tyr phosphoproteome analysis is rapid, sensitive, robust, and cost-effective. It is widely applicable to the global analysis of the tyrosine phosphoproteome associated with tyrosine kinase signal transduction.

  12. Evaluation of nifedipine preparations by chromatographic-spectrophotometric methods.

    PubMed

    Marciniec, B; Kujawa, E; Ogrodowczyk, M

    1992-07-01

    The content of nifedipine in 10 currently available preparations (tablets, capsules, dragees and drops) was analyzed. In the qualitative analysis, a TLC method was employed, whereas in the quantitative analysis, a chromatographic-spectrophotometric method developed in our laboratory (TLC-UV), a TLC-UV method according to USP XXI, and the method of gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were employed. For all the preparations under study, the presence of at least one decomposition product as well as a decrease in the content of active component, in most cases proportional to the storage time, were observed. However, in none of the preparations pyridine nitro derivative decomposition products were found, but in each the presence of nitroso derivative was reported. As a result, it was stated that about a half of the preparations studied do not meet the requirements of USP XXI as for as the content of the active substance is concerned, which suggests that the expiration date is shorter by 6 to 12 months.

  13. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatographic analysis of anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Willemse, Chandré M; Stander, Maria A; Tredoux, Andreas G J; de Villiers, André

    2014-09-12

    Anthocyanins are naturally occurring plant pigments whose accurate analysis is hampered by their complexity and unique chromatographic behaviour associated with on-column conversion reactions. This paper reports the evaluation of off-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC) for the analysis of anthocyanins. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) was used in the first dimension in combination with reversed phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) in the second dimension. For the selective detection of anthocyanins, diode array detection was used, while high resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF) was used for compound identification. As application, the HILIC×RP-LC separation of diverse anthocyanins in blueberries, red radish, black beans, red grape skins and red cabbage is demonstrated. Off-line HILIC×RP-LC revealed information which could not be obtained by one-dimensional HPLC methods, while the structured elution order for the anthocyanins simplifies compound identification and facilitates the comparison of anthocyanin content of natural products by means of contour plots.

  14. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  15. [Gas chromatographic analysis of cannabinoids on tandem columns].

    PubMed

    Petri, G; Nyiredy, S; Veszki, P; Oroszlán, P; Turiák, G

    1995-05-01

    A simple, isotherm packed column gas chromatographic method was developed for the quantitative determination of neutral cannabinoids using 4-androstene-3,17-dion as internal standard. In order to achieve the best resolution and to avoid the evaluation of the disturbing hydrocarbon peaks a method was developed using "tandem" column made of 3% OV-1 (90%) and 3% OV-17 (10%) stationary phases. The psychotropic cannabinoids delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 1-THC) and delta 1(6)-tetrahydrocannabionol (delta 1(6)-THC), as well as, their main metabolites cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabichromene (CBC) were baseline separated except the cannabigerol (CBG) and cannabinol (CBN) pair, however for these compounds the separation was also satisfactory for the quantitative determinations. The Kováts retention indices were calculated for the most important cannabinoids and established the detection limits, respectively (20-50 ng range). The reproducibility was found excellent cv% = 1.06 for delta 1-THC and the analysis time was 55 minutes. The practical usefulness of the method was demonstrated by the comparative analyses on hashish- and fibre type hemps.

  16. Size exclusion chromatographic analysis of polyphenol-serum albumin complexes.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Tsutomu; Hori, Mami; Hemingway, Richard W; Yoshida, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    Formation of water-soluble polyphenol-protein complexes was investigated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The combination of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which did not form a precipitate after the solutions were mixed, showed an SEC peak due to complex formation 2-24 h after mixing. Peak size of the complex varied with time, suggesting slow change of the conformation of the protein accompanied by complexation. Formation of the complex was substantiated by ultrafiltration of the mixture; the complex did not pass through a membrane with a 100,000 nominal molecular weight limit (NMWL). The SEC profile varied with the combination of compounds. The peaks due to the complexes showed that the apparent value of the number average molecular weight (M(n)) of the EGCG-BSA complex was 2.8x10(5), while that of a pentagalloylglucose (PGG)-BSA complex was 9.5x10(5) under the conditions used. Dimeric hydrolyzable tannins, oenothein B and cornusiin A, also caused changes in the SEC profile of BSA, although the combinations did not show peaks attributable to formation of such large complexes observed for EGCG and PGG. Procyanidin B3 and (+)-catechin did not cause changes in the SEC profile of BSA. With cytochrome c, EGCG did not show any chromatographic changes.

  17. Liquid chromatographic profiles of individual compounds of technical toxaphene.

    PubMed

    Vetter, W; Costas, N P; Bartha, R; Martínez, A G; Luckas, B

    2000-07-21

    The elution orders of 20 hexa- to nonachlorobornanes and five hexa- to octachlorocamphenes were studied with normal-phase silica and amino phase HPLC, reversed-phase HPLC, as well as gel-permeation chromatography (GPC). Twenty-one compounds of technical toxaphene (CTTs) are commercially available and four were isolated from environmental samples. Structure-activity relationships and chromatographic properties were deduced from the data sets derived on these LC systems. The retention on silica (low-resolution LC and HPLC) increased with the polarity of the CTTs. The elution order of CTTs on amino normal-phase HPLC was, for the most part, the same as on silica normal-phase HPLC. The degree of chlorination determined the elution order of CTTs on C18 RP-HPLC. CTTs eluted from medium-pressure GPC with decreasing molecular size. Chlorobornanes with dichloro substituents on the six-membered ring eluted after the chloroboranes without geminal chlorine atoms on secondary carbons, indicating that these congeners are larger. Altogether, the results increase the knowledge of complex substance class and may serve as a tool in order to gain further standard components.

  18. Chromatographic Studies of Protein-Based Chiral Separations

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Cong; Zheng, Xiwei; Azaria, Shiden; Beeram, Sandya; Li, Zhao; Hage, David S.

    2016-01-01

    The development of separation methods for the analysis and resolution of chiral drugs and solutes has been an area of ongoing interest in pharmaceutical research. The use of proteins as chiral binding agents in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been an approach that has received particular attention in such work. This report provides an overview of proteins that have been used as binding agents to create chiral stationary phases (CSPs) and in the use of chromatographic methods to study these materials and protein-based chiral separations. The supports and methods that have been employed to prepare protein-based CSPs will also be discussed and compared. Specific types of CSPs that are considered include those that employ serum transport proteins (e.g., human serum albumin, bovine serum albumin, and alpha1-acid glycoprotein), enzymes (e.g., penicillin G acylase, cellobiohydrolases, and α-chymotrypsin) or other types of proteins (e.g., ovomucoid, antibodies, and avidin or streptavidin). The properties and applications for each type of protein and CSP will also be discussed in terms of their use in chromatography and chiral separations. PMID:28344977

  19. Interaction of Trace gas Species of Atmospheric Interest With ice: Measurement of the Adsorption Enthalpy of Acetone on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels-Rausch, T.; Guimbaud, C.; Gaggeler, H.; Ammann, M.

    2002-12-01

    Ice provides an important substrate for heterogeneous chemistry in the stratosphere, the upper troposphere, but also in the cold regions of the planetary boundary layer. Thus, we started to investigate the interaction of trace gases of atmospheric interest (acetone) with ice. In the upper troposphere, the photolysis of acetone is the main source of HOX, dominating the one from the reaction of O(1D) + H2O (Jaegle et al., 2001). Source and sinks of acetone need to be quantified to simulate the concentration of the main atmospheric oxidant (HOX). Ice cirrus clouds are suggested to be one of the acetone sinks. Thus, the adsorption enthalpy of acetone on ice needs to be investigated because it determines the mixing ratio of acetone between the gas and the particulate phase and the chemistry of the upper troposphere. In this paper, the chromatographic method applied for the measurement of the adsorption enthalpy of acetone on ice is described. This method uses a chromatographic ice-packed column similar to the one described by Bartels et al. (2002) and is combined with Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) for the monitoring of the acetone concentration in the gas phase. Preliminary results show that the measured standard adsorption enthalpy obtained with a column packed with ice spheres, i.e. (-54+/-8) kJ mol-1, and with a column packed with a snow sample, i.e. (-56+/-3) kJ mol-1, are similar and in agreement with the ones derived by Winkler et al. (2002) and from Domine and Hanot (2002), using a low pressure ice coated wall flow tube reactor and a volumetric method, respectively. More investigations are scheduled in the near future using different ice surfaces (ice crystals, fresh snow). We briefly address the atmospheric implication of this study as well as the perspective of the chromatographic & APCI-MS system to investigate other processes of atmospheric interest. References Bartels, T., B. Eichler, P. Zimmermann, H. W. Gäggeler, and M. Ammann, The

  20. Consequences of cavity size and chemical environment on the adsorption properties of isoreticular metal-organic frameworks: an inverse gas chromatography study.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Inés; Díaz, Eva; Vega, Aurelio; Ordóñez, Salvador

    2013-01-25

    The role of the structure of three isoreticular metal-organic frameworks (IRMOFs) on their adsorption behavior has been studied in this work, selecting different kinds of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as adsorbates (alkanes, alkenes, cycloalkanes, aromatics and chlorinated). For this purpose, three samples (IRMOF-1, IRMOF-8 and IRMOF-10) with cubic structure and without functionalities on the organic linkers were synthesized. Adsorption capacities at infinite dilution were derived from the adsorption isotherms, whereas thermodynamic properties have been determined from chromatographic retention volume. The capacity and the strength of adsorption were strongly influenced by the adsorbate size. This effect is especially relevant for n-alkanes adsorption, indicating the key role of the cavity size on this phenomenon, and hence the importance of the IRMOF structural properties. A different behavior has been observed for the polar compounds, where an enhancement on the specificity of the adsorption with the π-electron rich regions was observed. This fact suggests the specific interaction of these molecules with the organic linkers of the IRMOFs.

  1. Visualising fouling of a chromatographic matrix using confocal scanning laser microscopy.

    PubMed

    Siu, Sun Chau; Boushaba, Rihab; Topoyassakul, Vithaya; Graham, Alex; Choudhury, Sorwar; Moss, Guy; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel J

    2006-11-05

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) was used to visualise the spatial location of foulants during the fouling of Q Sepharose FF matrix in finite batch experiments and for examining the subsequent effectiveness of clean-in-place (CIP) treatments in cleaning the heavily fouled beads. Beads were severely fouled with partially clarified E. coli homogenate by contacting the beads with the foulant for contact times of 5 min, 1 or 12 h. The use of two different fluorescent dyes, PicoGreen and Cy5.5, for labelling genomic PicoGreen-labelled dsDNA and protein respectively, allowed the direct observation of the chromatographic beads. The extent of fouling was assessed by measuring the subsequent adsorption of Cy5.5-labelled BSA to the beads. Control studies established that the labelling of BSA did not affect significantly the protein properties. In the control case of contacting the unfouled matrix with Cy5.5-labelled BSA, protein was able to penetrate the entire matrix volume. After fouling, Cy5.5-labelled BSA was unable to penetrate the bead but only to bind near the bead surface where it slowly displaced PicoGreen-conjugated dsDNA, which bound only at the exterior of the beads. Labelled host cell proteins bound throughout the bead interior but considerably less at the core; suggesting that other species might have occupied that space. The gross levels of fouling achieved drastically reduced the binding capacity and maximum Cy5.5-labelled BSA uptake rate. The capacity of the resin was reduced by 2.5-fold when incubated with foulant for up to 1 h. However, when the resin was fouled for a prolonged time of 12 h a further sixfold decrease in capacity was seen. The uptake rate of Cy5.5-labelled BSA decreased with increased fouling time of the resin. Incubating the fouled beads in 1 M NaCl dissociated PicoGreen-labelled dsDNA from the bead exterior within 15 min of incubation but proved ineffective in removing all the foulant protein. Cy5.5-labelled BSA was still unable

  2. Thermodynamic features of dioxins' adsorption.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, Marina; Piemonte, Vincenzo; di Celso, Giuseppe Mazziotti; Ronconi, Silvia; Capocelli, Mauro

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, the six more poisonous species among all congeners of dioxin group are taken into account, and the P-T diagram for each of them is developed. Starting from the knowledge of vapour tensions and thermodynamic parameters, the theoretical adsorption isotherms are calculated according to the Langmuir's model. In particular, the Langmuir isotherm parameters (K and wmax) have been validated through the estimation of the adsorption heat (ΔHads), which varies in the range 20-24kJ/mol, in agreement with literature values. This result will allow to put the thermodynamical basis for a rational design of different process units devoted to dioxins removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Studies on Vapor Adsorption Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamsundar, N.; Ramotowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The project consisted of performing experiments on single and dual bed vapor adsorption systems, thermodynamic cycle optimization, and thermal modeling. The work was described in a technical paper that appeared in conference proceedings and a Master's thesis, which were previously submitted to NASA. The present report describes some additional thermal modeling work done subsequently, and includes listings of computer codes developed during the project. Recommendations for future work are provided.

  4. Acetonitrile adsorption on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotto, R.; Oliveira, M. C.; Pinto, M. M.; de León-Pérez, F.; Ferraz, A. C.

    2004-06-01

    In this work we employ the state of the art pseudopotential method, within a generalized gradient approximation to the density-functional theory, to investigate the adsorption process of acetonitrile on the silicon surface. Our first-principles calculations indicate that CH3 CN adsorb via a [2+2] cycloaddition reaction through the CN group ( di- σCN model) with an adsorption energy around 37 kcal/mol . Although the di- σCN model is found to be the most probable adsorbed structure from the energetic point of view, we have also found that the adsorption via the Si-N dative bond ( Si-Ndat model) is also possible. Based in our energetic analysis, and in the spectroscopy data by Bournel and co-workers, we suggest the existence of a mixed domain surface composed by both the di- σCN and Si-Ndat adsorbates, although the existence of the latter structure is disregarded by the core level shift analysis by Tao and co-workers. Possible reasons for the contrast between available data are addressed. We present theoretical scanning tunneling microscopy images of the possible adsorbed systems and suggest that this experimental procedure could possibly identify the existence of the proposed mixed domain structure. In addition, the electronic structure and surface states for both the di- σCN and Si-Ndat models are discussed in detail.

  5. Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, A. L.; Rojas, S.; Dias-Droguett, D. E.; Bhuyan, H.; Aomoa, N.; Kakati, M.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanoparticles using a quartz crystal microbalance. The carbon nanoparticles were synthesized from a thermal plasma jet at different pressure (15 - 263 torr) of the reactants and different current (50 - 250 A) to generate the plasma. The as-prepared carbon nanoparticles were directly deposited on top of the gold electrode of a quartz crystal and we monitored in-situ the changes in resonance frequency while the chamber was pressurized at different hydrogen pressures. These changes enabled determination of absorbed hydrogen mass in order to get H/C mass ratio curves as a function of H2 pressure. Adsorption curves obtained in some carbon nanoparticles indicated the formation of hydrogen monolayer inside the pores of the carbon nanoparticles. Using the value of the jump due to the formation of a H2\\ monolayer, a surface area was estimated between 40-60 m2/g for hydrogen adsorption. In other carbon samples, hydrogen uptake curves indicated that H2 was filling the sample's pores when pore volume was large. These observations will be discussed in detail for several carbon nanoparticles samples. Funds provided by VRI Puente 9/2012 and 10/2012

  6. Oxygen carrier for gas chromatographic analysis of inert gases in propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatographic determination of small quantities of inert gases in reactive propellants is discussed. Operating conditions used for specific analyses of helium in diborane and nitrogen in oxygen difluoride are presented in tabular form.

  7. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  8. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  9. 21 CFR 862.2230 - Chromatographic separation material for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chromatographic separation material for clinical use is a device accessory (e.g., ion exchange absorbents, ion exchagne resins, and ion papers) intended for use in ion exchange chromatography, a procedure in which...

  10. Miniaturized gas chromatograph-Paul ion trap system: applications to environmental monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, B. J.; Darrach, M. R.; Holland, Paul M.; Chutjian, A.

    2004-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph (GC) and miniature Paul ion trap (PT) mass spectrometer system has been developed for identifying and quantifying chemical species present in closed environments having a complex mixture of gases.

  11. HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION OF THE ENANTIOMERS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES ON POLYSACCHARIDE CHIRAL STATIONARY PHASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of the individual enantiomers of 12 organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) was obtained on polysaccharide enantioselective HPLC columns using alkane-alcohol mobile phase. The OP pesticides were crotoxyphos, dialifor, fonofos, fenamiph...

  12. Reversed-phase liquid chromatographic determination of cromolyn sodium in drug substance and select dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Ng, L L

    1994-01-01

    This study, presented as a technical communication, describes a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method for select commercial formulations, namely, inhalation solution, nasal solution, capsule and inhalation aerosol. Miscellaneous validation parameters are also discussed.

  13. A Miniature Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) for Planetary Atmospheres Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simcic, J.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Bae, B.; Nikolic, D.; Darrach, M.

    2016-10-01

    Presented herein are the latest achievements in developing an instrument with the same analytical performance of commercial Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer systems but approximately an order of magnitude smaller and optimized for space missions.

  14. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method has been developed for the determination of perchlorate in fertilizers. Materials are leached with deionized water to dissolve any soluble perchlorate compounds. Ion chromatographic separation is followed by suppressed conductivity for detection. Perchlorate is retained ...

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method has been developed for the determination of perchlorate in fertilizers. Materials are leached with deionized water to dissolve any soluble perchlorate compounds. Ion chromatographic separation is followed by suppressed conductivity for detection. Perchlorate is retained ...

  16. Comparison of high-performance liquid chromatographic and thin-layer chromatographic methods for determination of aloin in herbal products containing Aloe vera.

    PubMed

    Ramírez Durón, Rosalba; Ceniceros Almaguer, Lucía; Cavazos Rocha, Norma Cecilia; Silva Flores, Perla Giovanna; De Torres, Noemí Waksman

    2008-01-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant used worldwide to treat a variety of conditions and, as such, has important commercial value. Aloin is a principal component of aloe vera leaves and is used for quality control of products containing it. A semiquantitative thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) method for determining the concentration of aloin in aloe-based products was validated. The results were similar to those of a validated high-performance liquid chromatographic method; therefore, TLC, which is a simple, sensitive, specific, rapid, and cheap method, may be ideal for use in any laboratory for routine analysis of commercial products containing aloe vera.

  17. Adsorption of Gemini surfactants onto clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Salako, O; Lo, C; Couzis, A; Somasundaran, P; Lee, J W

    2013-12-15

    This work addresses the adsorption of two Gemini surfactants at the cyclopentane (CP) hydrate-water interface. The Gemini surfactants investigated here are Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 that have two anionic head groups and one hydrophobic tail group. The adsorption of these surfactants was quantified using adsorption isotherms and the adsorption isotherms were determined using liquid-liquid titrations. Even if the Gemini surfactant adsorption isotherms show multi-layer adsorption, they possess the first Langmuir layer with the second adsorption layer only evident in the 2A1 adsorption isotherm. Zeta potentials of CP hydrate particles in the surfactant solution of various concentrations of Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were measured to further explain their adsorption behavior at the CP hydrate-water interface. Zeta potentials of alumina particles as a model particle system in different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were also measured to confirm the configuration of all the surfactants at the interface. The determination of the isotherms and zeta-potentials provides an understanding framework for the adsorption behavior of the two Gemini surfactants at the hydrate-water interface. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Multidimensional High-Resolution Gas Chromatographic Investigations of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Various Turbine Engine Fuel Precursors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy . 15. B. Welton, Column Switching and Backflush Techniques with Open Tubular and...Packed Columns in Gas Chromatography, Paper presented at 1978 Pittsburgh Conference on Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy . 16. R. Miller... Applied Spectroscopy . 33. J. F. Pankow and L. M. Isabelle, Interface of the Direct Coupling of a Second Gas Chromatograph to a Gas Chromatograph/ Mass

  19. High-resolution gas chromatographic profiles of volatile organic compounds produced by microorganisms at refrigerated temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M L; Smith, D L; Freeman, L R

    1979-01-01

    Three different strains of bacteria isolated from spoiled, uncooked chicken were grown in pure culture on Trypticase soy agar supplemented with yeast extract. The volatile organic compounds produced by each culture were concentrated on a porous polymer precolumn and analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatographic mass spectrometry. Twenty different compounds were identified. Both qualitative and quantitative differences in the chromatographic profiles from each culture were found. PMID:104660

  20. Chromatographic extraction with di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid for production and purification of promethium-147

    DOEpatents

    Boll, Rose A [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-14

    A method of producing and purifying promethium-147 including the steps of: irradiating a target material including neodymium-146 with neutrons to produce promethium-147 within the irradiated target material; dissolving the irradiated target material to form an acidic solution; loading the acidic solution onto a chromatographic separation apparatus containing HDEHP; and eluting the apparatus to chromatographically separate the promethium-147 from the neodymium-146.

  1. Mars Solar Balloon Landed Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P.; Harpold, D.; Niemann, H.; Atreya, S.; Gorevan, S.; Israel, G.; Bertaux, J. L.; Jones, J.; Owen, T.; Raulin, F.

    1999-01-01

    A Mars surface lander Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) is described to measure the chemical composition of abundant and trace volatile species and isotope ratios for noble gases and other elements. These measurements are relevant to the study of atmospheric evolution and past climatic conditions. A Micromission plan is under study where a surface package including a miniaturized GCMS would be delivered to the surface by a solar heated hot air balloon based system. The balloon system would be deployed about 8 km above the surface of Mars, wherein it would rapidly fill with Martian atmosphere and be heated quickly by the sun. The combined buoyancy and parachuting effects of the solar balloon result in a surface package impact of about 5 m/sec. After delivery of the package to the surface, the balloon would ascend to about 4 km altitude, with imaging and magnetometry data being taken for the remainder of the daylight hours as the balloon is blown with the Martian winds. Total atmospheric entry mass of this mission is estimated to be approximately 50 kg, and it can fit as an Ariane 5 piggyback payload. The GCMS would obtain samples directly from the atmosphere at the surface and also from gases evolved from solid phase material collected from well below the surface with a Sample Acquisition and Transport Mechanism (SATM). The experiment envisioned in the Mars Micromission described would obtain samples from a much greater depth of up to one meter below the surface, and would search for organic molecules trapped in ancient stratified layers well below the oxidized surface. Insitu instruments on upcoming NASA missions working in concert with remote sensing measurement techniques have the potential to provide a more detailed investigation of mineralogy and the extent of simple volatiles such as CO2 and H2O in surface and subsurface solid phase materials. Within the context of subsequent mission opportunities such as those provided by the Ariane 5 piggyback

  2. Ion chromatographic identification and quantification of glycol degradation products.

    PubMed

    Madera, M; Höflinger, W; Kadnar, R

    2003-05-16

    In water-based heat transfer systems, frequently glycols are added to the water to obtain freeze protection. For this purpose, ethylene glycol (EG) is the most common substance used. When heated, the glycol will slowly degrade and the pH of the glycol-water mixture will decrease, leading to corrosion and foaming problems. Carboxylic acids were identified as the main degradation products. Quantification of the carboxylic acids is of importance to monitor the degradation reactions in order to identify hot spots or overheating, caused by severe heat exchanger scaling, where pH measurements will not be sufficient due to buffer substances added for corrosion protection. In this work, ion chromatographic methods havebeen developed to identify the main degradation products of EG in heat transfer systems and to monitor the degradation process. Possible acidic reaction products of EG are glycolic acid, glyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, acetic acid and formic acid. Separations with a Dionex AS9-HC column with Na2CO3 eluents of differing concentrations showed that only trace amounts of carboxylic acids are present in aged heat transfer media. Oxalic acid can be quantified simultaneously to nitrite or molybdate which are added as corrosion inhibitors. A Dionex AS10 separation column with Na2B4O7 eluent enabled base line separation of glycolic acid, acetic acid and formic acid. Heat transfer media, which are operated in different heat transfer systems under different conditions, were analysed. A system was identified, where severe overheating due to fluid maldistribution in the heat exchanger took place.

  3. Liquid chromatographic analysis of cinchona alkaloids in beverages.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masao; Oishi, Mitsuo; Ishikawa, Fusako; Shindo, Tetsuya; Yasui, Akiko; Ogino, Shuzo; Ito, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of Cinchona extract (whose main components are the alkaloids cinchonine, cinchonidine, quinidine, and quinine) in beverages by liquid chromatography was developed. A beverage with an alcohol content of more than 10% was loaded onto an OASIS HLB solid-phase extraction cartridge, after it was adjusted to pH 10 with 28% ammonium hydroxide. Other beverages were centrifuged at 4000 rpm for 5 min, and the supernatant was loaded onto the cartridge. The cartridge was washed with water followed by 15% methanol, and the Cinchona alkaloids were eluted with methanol. The Cinchona alkaloids in the eluate were chromatographed on an L-column ODS (4.6 mm id x 150 mm) with methanol and 20 mmol/L potassium dihydrogen phosphate (3 + 7) as the mobile phase. Cinchona alkaloids were monitored with an ultraviolet (UV) detector at 230 nm, and with a fluorescence detector at 405 nm for cinchonine and cinchonidine and 450 nm for quinidine and quinine (excitation at 235 nm). The calibration curves for Cinchona alkaloids with the UV detector showed good linearity in the range of 2-400 microg/mL. The detection limit of each Cinchona alkaloid, taken to be the concentration at which the absorption spectrum could be identified, was 2 microg/mL. The recovery of Cinchona alkaloids added at a level of 100 microg/g to various kinds of beverages was 87.6-96.5%, and the coefficients of variation were less than 3.3%. A number of beverage samples, some labeled to contain bitter substances, were analyzed by the proposed method. Quinine was detected in 2 samples of carbonated beverage.

  4. Chromatographic fingerprint similarity analysis for pollutant source identification.

    PubMed

    Xie, Juan-Ping; Ni, Hong-Gang

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, a similarity analysis method was proposed to evaluate the source-sink relationships among environmental media for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which were taken as the representative contaminants. Chromatographic fingerprint analysis has been widely used in the fields of natural products chemistry and forensic chemistry, but its application to environmental science has been limited. We established a library of various sources of media containing contaminants (e.g., plastics), recognizing that the establishment of a more comprehensive library allows for a better understanding of the sources of contamination. We then compared an environmental complex mixture (e.g., sediment, soil) with the profiles in the library. These comparisons could be used as the first step in source tracking. The cosine similarities between plastic and soil or sediment ranged from 0.53 to 0.68, suggesting that plastic in electronic waste is an important source of PBDEs in the environment, but it is not the only source. A similarity analysis between soil and sediment indicated that they have a source-sink relationship. Generally, the similarity analysis method can encompass more relevant information of complex mixtures in the environment than a profile-based approach that only focuses on target pollutants. There is an inherent advantage to creating a data matrix containing all peaks and their relative levels after matching the peaks based on retention times and peak areas. This data matrix can be used for source identification via a similarity analysis without quantitative or qualitative analysis of all chemicals in a sample.

  5. Liquid chromatographic determination of seven antioxidants in dry food.

    PubMed

    Page, B D; Charbonneau, C F

    1989-01-01

    The liquid chromatographic determinative step of the official method for propyl gallate, trihydroxybutyrophenone, tert-butylhydroquinone, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxymethylphenol, and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in fats and oils has been applied to their determination in a number of dry foods. A representative sample (10 g) is homogenized first with hexane (25 mL), then with 5 mL added water, and finally with 75 mL added acetonitrile. The hexane and acetonitrile are decanted, filtered, and separated; the hexane and rehydrated food are reextracted with 2 additional portions of acetonitrile, and the combined acetonitrile extracts are concentrated and diluted to 10 mL. An aliquot is analyzed as described in the official method, using a 150 x 4.6 mm 5 microns C-18 column. The need for rehydration to maximize the recovery of BHA and other antioxidants from marketplace dry food samples such as potato flakes, dry coffee whiteners, and dessert topping mixes was demonstrated. Rehydration was not required for cheese snacks, breakfast cereals, cake mixes, and some other foods. The need for rehydration should be determined by analyzing other foods with and without the addition of water. Potato and corn chips, popcorn and cheese snacks, breakfast cereals, dry beverage mixes, rice, potato flakes, french fried potatoes, and cake mixes were spiked with the above antioxidants at 10-50 ppm. Overall recoveries ranged from 64.3 to 105.6% and repeatabilities ranged from 0.7 to 10.8%. A total of 109 samples of the above foods were analyzed, and 64% contained detectable (greater than 1-2 ppm) antioxidants, mainly BHA and BHT.

  6. Gas chromatographic determination of yohimbine in commercial yohimbe products.

    PubMed

    Betz, J M; White, K D; der Marderosian, A H

    1995-01-01

    The bark of Pausinystalia yohimbe [K. Schumann] Pierre (Rubiaceae), long valued as an aphrodisiac in West Africa, recently has been promoted in the United States as a dietary supplement alternative to anabolic steroids for enhancement of athletic performance. As the number of yohimbe products on the retail market increases, concerns about their safety are raised because of the reported toxicity of yohimbine (the major alkaloid of the plant). Although plant materials are usually identified microscopically, we were unable to identify them in many of the products, because as their labels indicated, the products were mixtures of various botanicals or were bark extracts and contained little or no plant material. A method for extraction and capillary gas chromatographic (GC) separation of the alkaloids of P. yohimbe was, therefore, developed and used to analyze a number of commercial yohimbe products. The method involved solvent extraction and partitioning in chloroform-water followed by separation on a methyl silicone capillary GC column (N-P detection). Comparisons of chromatograms of extracts of authentic bark with those of commercial products indicated that, although many products contained measurable quantities of the alkaloid yohimbine, they were largely devoid of the other alkaloids previously reported in this species. Concentrations of yohimbine in the commercial products ranged from < 0.1 to 489 ppm, compared with 7089 ppm in the authentic material. Authentic bark has been reported to contain up to 6% total alkaloids, 10-15% of which are yohimbine. The possible presence of undeclared diluents in the products was indicated by peaks in product chromatograms but not in those of authentic bark.

  7. Liquid chromatographic determination of Alternaria toxins in carrots.

    PubMed

    Solfrizzo, Michele; De Girolamo, Annalisa; Vitti, Carolina; Visconti, Angelo; van den Bulk, Ruud

    2004-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method was developed for the determination of Alternaria radicina and A. alternata toxins in carrots. Toxins were extracted from carrot with an acidified mixture of water-methanol-acetonitrile. The filtered extract was divided in 2 parts that were purified by solid-phase extraction on a C18 column for the analysis of radicinin (RAD), altertoxin-I (ATX-I), alternariol (AOH), and alternariol methyl ether (AME), and on a polymeric Oasis HLB column for tenuazonic acid (TeA). Toxins were quantified by reversed-phase LC with UV diode array detection by using 2 consecutive isocratic mixtures of acetonitrile-sodium dihydrogen phosphate solution. Mean recoveries of TeA, ATX-I, AME, RAD, and AOH from carrots spiked at levels between 0.5 and 3.0 microg/g were 69, 71, 90, 36, and 78%, with mean within-laboratory repeatability of 14, 5, 4, 6, and 18%, respectively. The mean between-laboratory reproducibilities for the determination of TeA, ATX-I, AME, and RAD in spiked samples were 25, 22, 6, and 12%, respectively. Limits of detection (signal-to-noise ratio of 3) for RAD, TeA, ATX-I, AME, and AOH were 0.006, 0.02, 0.02, 0.01, and 0.005 microg/g, respectively. RAD was detected (0.16-13.9 microg/g) in 3 out of 266 carrot samples produced under organic conditions in 3 European locations, whereas A. alternata mycotoxins were not found in any tested samples.

  8. High ionic strength narrows the population of sites participating in protein ion-exchange adsorption: a single-molecule study.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Kulla, Eliona; Kang, Marci K; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-05-23

    The retention and elution of proteins in ion-exchange chromatography is routinely controlled by adjusting the mobile phase salt concentration. It has repeatedly been observed, as judged from adsorption isotherms, that the apparent heterogeneity of adsorption is lower at more-eluting, higher ionic strength. Here, we present an investigation into the mechanism of this phenomenon using a single-molecule, super-resolution imaging technique called motion-blur Points Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography (mbPAINT). We observed that the number of functional adsorption sites was smaller at high ionic strength and that these sites had reduced desorption kinetic heterogeneity, and thus narrower predicted elution profiles, for the anion-exchange adsorption of α-lactalbumin on an agarose-supported, clustered-charge ligand stationary phase. Explanations for the narrowing of the functional population such as inter-protein interactions and protein or support structural changes were investigated through kinetic analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and microscopy of agarose microbeads, respectively. The results suggest the reduction of heterogeneity is due to both electrostatic screening between the protein and ligand and tuning the steric availability within the agarose support. Overall, we have shown that single molecule spectroscopy can aid in understanding the influence of ionic strength on the population of functional adsorbent sites participating in the ion-exchange chromatographic separation of proteins.

  9. High ionic strength narrows the population of sites participating in protein ion-exchange adsorption: A single-molecule study

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P.; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Kulla, Eliona; Kang, Marci; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C.; Landes, Christy F.

    2014-01-01

    The retention and elution of proteins in ion-exchange chromatography is routinely controlled by adjusting the mobile phase salt concentration. It has repeatedly been observed, as judged from adsorption isotherms, that the apparent heterogeneity of adsorption is lower at more-eluting, higher ionic strength. Here, we present an investigation into the mechanism of this phenomenon using a single-molecule, super-resolution imaging technique called motion-blur Points Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography (mbPAINT). We observed that the number of functional adsorption sites was smaller at high ionic strength and that these sites had reduced desorption kinetic heterogeneity, and thus narrower predicted elution profiles, for the anion-exchange adsorption of α-lactalbumin on an agarose-supported, clustered-charge ligand stationary phase. Explanations for the narrowing of the functional population such as inter-protein interactions and protein or support structural changes were investigated through kinetic analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and microscopy of agarose microbeads, respectively. The results suggest the reduction of heterogeneity is due to both electrostatic screening between the protein and ligand and tuning the steric availability within the agarose support. Overall, we have shown that single molecule spectroscopy can aid in understanding the influence of ionic strength on the population of functional adsorbent sites participating in the ion-exchange chromatographic separation of proteins. PMID:24751557

  10. Combined HPLC/HPSEC study of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid adsorptive fractionation on α-aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Kreller, David I; Schlautman, Mark A; McGunigale, Samantha L

    2013-01-15

    A novel liquid chromatographic (LC) method with repeated injections of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) was used to investigate its adsorptive fractionation by synthetic α-Al(2)O(3). Eluent (i.e., non-retained) SRFA for each injection was monitored by two ultraviolet (UV) absorbance detection channels (300 and 365 nm) and one fluorescence detection channel (λ(ex)=350 nm, λ(em)=450 nm). Preferential adsorption of SRFA constituents was revealed by the different responses of the three LC detection channels. Samples of non-retained SRFA from injections of three independent replicate experiments were collected and aggregated for subsequent analysis by steady state ultraviolet-visible (UV/vis) absorption spectrometry and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The ratio of absorbance at 254 and 204 nm, a surrogate for specific UV absorbance at 254 nm, increased with increasing injection number for the non-retained SRFA, indicating the preferential adsorption of SRFA constituents containing aromatic moieties. SEC analysis confirmed the preferential adsorption of higher molecular weight (MW) SRFA constituents as the non-adsorbed SRFA fractions increased in MW across the series of injections. The SEC results also suggested that certain SRFA constituents in the ca. 2-5 kDa MW range adsorbed in early injections were displaced by higher MW species (ca. 5-10 kDa) in later injections.

  11. Fundamental studies of chalcogenide nanocrystals, carbonaceous nanoparticles, and chromatographic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Jared Scott

    2011-12-01

    influenced the temporal persistence of the nanocrystals; the pathway through which CdSe NCs degraded depended on the concentration of free, uncoordinated cysteinate. These findings indicate that solution-phase chemistry can determine whether NCs remain intact upon removal from their original reaction mixtures. Departing from the analysis of nanomaterials, an additional chapter focuses on the evaluation of a new chromatographic packing material. Two chromatographic columns packed with superficially porous packing material, Kinetex(TM) 1.7 mum and 2.6 mum C18 particles were evaluated in terms of their physical properties and performance characteristics. These columns were compared to a column packed with a sub-2 mum totally porous material and to a Halo(TM) column packed with 2.7 mum C18 superficially porous packing. The columns packed with superficially porous particles displayed a comparably narrower size distribution, which is narrower than the distribution of the totally porous sub-2 mum particles. Physical characteristics of the Kinetex(TM) particles were evaluated in terms of surface area, pore diameter, and specific pore volume. Total, external, internal and shell porosities among the four different columns were evaluated and compared. The specific permeability for the Kinetex columns showed values close to those predicted by the Kozeny-Carman equation. All four columns were evaluated in terms of their chromatographic performance and compared using the Knox equation. The columns packed with the 2.6 mum and 2.7 mum superficially porous materials showed reduced plate heights below 2, while the sub-2 mum particles showed values of 2.2 and above.

  12. Adsorption of goethite onto quartz and kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Weiner, Eugene R.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of colloidal goethite onto quartz and kaolinite substrates has been studied as a function of pH and NaCl concentration. Goethite adsorption was measured quantitatively by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that adsorption onto both substrates is due primarily to coulombic forces; however, the pH dependence of adsorption is very different for the two substrates. This is explained by the fact that the surface charge on quartz is entirely pH-dependent, while kaolinite has surface faces which carry a permanent negative charge. Adsorption of goethite on to kaolinite increases markedly with increasing NaCl concentration, while adsorption onto quartz is relatively independent of NaCl concentration. This can be explained by the influence of NaCl concentration upon the development of surface charge on the substrates. A method is described for separating surface-bound goethite from free goethite.

  13. DNA stickers promote polymer adsorption onto cellulose.

    PubMed

    Sato, Teruaki; Ali, Md Monsur; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2012-10-08

    Adsorption of oligonucleotides onto model cellulose surfaces was investigated by comparing the Boese and Breaker's cellulose binding oligonucleotide (CBO) with a nonspecific oligonucleotide control (NSO). Measurements using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technique confirmed that CBO adsorbed onto cellulose more than NSO, particularly at high ionic strengths (100 mM CaCl(2)). CBO showed a higher maximum adsorption on nanofibrillated and nanocrystalline cellulose than on regenerated cellulose, indicating a preference for the native cellulose I crystal structure under conditions that favored specific adsorption over calcium-mediated electrostatically driven adsorption. In addition, an anionic polyacrylamide (A-PAM) with grafted CBO also adsorbed onto the surface of cellulose in CaCl(2), whereas the unmodified A-PAM did not. This work shows that CBO performs as a "sticker", facilitating the adsorption of polyacrylamide onto cellulose, even under high ionic strength conditions where the adsorption of conventional polyelectrolytes is inhibited.

  14. NO adsorption on ice at low concentrations

    Treesearch

    Richard A. Sommerfeld; Martha H. Conklin; S. Kay Laird

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the properties of ice surfaces at different temperatures, the adsorption of a relatively insoluble gas, NO, was studied using a continuous-flow column experiment. Adsorption isotherms for NO on the surface of ice were measured for a temperature range of-1 to -70°C and a concentration range of 10 to 250 ppbv. Very little adsorption was measured;...

  15. The role of surface heterogeneity and lateral interactions in the adsorption of volatile organic compounds on rutile surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxa, E.; Kolliopoulos, A.; Agelakopoulou, T.; Roubani-Kalantzopoulou, F.

    2009-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are pollutants of great interest because they are very harmful for both human health and the environment, even at very low concentrations. In this work we present and discuss the results of the experimental chromatographic study of the role of surface heterogeneity and lateral interactions in the adsorption of volatile organic compounds - ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetone - on the surface of rutile (TiO 2), a typical oxide widely used as a white pigment and a photocatalyst, as well. The ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetone were chosen because they contain the same heteroatom (O) and they have small carbon-chains. The novel method of Reversed Flow-Inverse Gas Chromatography is used, which has a powerful mathematical background and comprises a simple experimental arrangement for the determination of energetic physicochemical quantities directly from the experimental data, by means of a time-resolved analysis. In particular, several important physicochemical quantities are determined, as local adsorption energy, local adsorption isotherm, local monolayer capacity, non-adsorbed gaseous concentration of adsorbate, density probability function for the adsorption energy values, as well as the differential energy of adsorption due to lateral interactions among molecules adsorbed on the heterogeneous solid surface of TiO 2. By means of these quantities, appropriate answers are achieved to critical questions of: (a) What is the type of the adsorption isotherm of a system? (b) Where are the adsorbed molecules located on the heterogeneous surface? (c) What is the nature of the surface bonds? (d) What is the type of non-ideality of the system and (e) How does the adsorbate affect the adsorbent properties?

  16. Chromatographic retention behaviour, modelling and separation optimisation of the quaternary ammonium salt isometamidium chloride and related compounds on a range of reversed-phase liquid chromatographic stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Schad, Gesa J; Euerby, Melvin R; Skellern, Graham G; Tettey, Justice N A

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the reversed-phase liquid chromatographic behaviour of the trypanocidal quaternary ammonium salt isometamidium chloride and its related compounds on a range of liquid chromatographic phases possessing alkyl and phenyl ligands on the same inert silica. In a parallel study with various extended polar selectivity phases which possessed different hydrophobic/silanophilic (hydrogen bonding) activity ratios, the chromatographic retention/selectivities of the quaternary ammonium salts was shown to be due to a co-operative mechanism between hydrophobic and silanophilic interactions. The highly aromatic and planar isometamidium compounds were found to be substantially retained on stationary phases containing aromatic functionality via strong π-π interactions. The chemometric approach of principal component analysis was used to characterise the chromatographic behaviour of the isometamidium compounds on the differing phases and to help identify the dominant retention mechanism(s). Two-dimensional (temperature/gradient) retention modelling was employed to develop and optimise a rapid liquid chromatography method for the separation of the six quaternary ammonium salts within 2.5 min which would be suitable for bioanalysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. This is the first reported systematic study of the relationship between stationary phase chemistries and retention/selectivity for a group of quaternary ammonium salts.

  17. Adsorption of acid dye onto organobentonite.

    PubMed

    Baskaralingam, P; Pulikesi, M; Elango, D; Ramamurthi, V; Sivanesan, S

    2006-02-06

    Removal of Acid Red 151 from aqueous solution at different dye concentrations, adsorbent doses and pH has been studied. The bentonite clay has been modified using cationic surfactants, which has been confirmed using XRD and FT-IR analyses. Experimental result has shown that the acidic pH favours the adsorption. The adsorption isotherms are described by means of Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption capacity has been found to be 357.14 and 416.66 mg g(-1) for the cetyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride-bentonite (CDBA-bent) and cetylpyridinium chloride-bentonite (CP-bent), respectively. Kinetic studies show that the adsorption followed second-order kinetics.

  18. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  19. Kinetic and thermodynamic control of protein adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Satulovsky, J.; Carignano, M. A.; Szleifer, I.

    2000-01-01

    Control of nonspecific protein adsorption is very important for the design of biocompatible and biomimetic materials as well as drug carriers. Grafted polymer layers can be used to prevent protein adsorption. We have studied the molecular factors that determine the equilibrium and kinetic control of protein adsorption by grafted polymer layers. We find that polymers that are not attracted to the surface are very effective for kinetic control but not very good for equilibrium reduction of protein adsorption. Polymers with attractions to the surface show exactly the opposite behavior. The implications for molecular design of biocompatible materials also are discussed in this paper. PMID:10908651

  20. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.