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Sample records for adsorption energy distribution

  1. Optimal smoothing of site-energy distributions from adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F.; Travis, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    The equation for the adsorption isotherm on a heterogeneous surface is a Fredholm integral equation. In solving it for the site-energy distribution (SED), some sort of smoothing must be carried out. The optimal amount of smoothing will give the most information that is possible without introducing nonexistent structure into the SED. Recently, Butler, Reeds, and Dawson proposed a criterion (the BRD criterion) for choosing the optimal smoothing parameter when using regularization to solve Fredholm equations. The BRD criterion is tested for its suitability in obtaining optimal SED's. This criterion is found to be too conservative. While using it never introduces nonexistent structure into the SED, significant information is often lost. At present, no simple criterion for choosing the optimal smoothing parameter exists, and a modeling approach is recommended.

  2. Site energy distribution analysis of Cu (Ⅱ) adsorption on sediments and residues by sequential extraction method.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiang; Yang, Yan; Dong, Xianbin; Fang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Many models (e.g., Langmuir model, Freundlich model and surface complexation model) have been successfully used to explain the mechanism of metal ion adsorption on the pure mineral materials. These materials usually have a homogeneous surface where all sites have the same adsorption energies. However, it's hardly appropriate for such models to describe the adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces (e.g., sediment surface), site energy distribution analysis can be to. In the present study, the site energy distribution analysis was used to describe the surface properties and adsorption behavior of the non-residual and residual components extracted from the natural aquatic sediment samples. The residues were prepared "in-situ" by using the sequential extraction procedure. The present study is intended to investigate the roles of different components and the change of site energy distribution at different temperatures of the sediment samples in controlling Cu (Ⅱ) adsorption. The results of the site energy distribution analysis indicated firstly, that the sorption sites of iron/manganese hydrous oxides (IMHO) and organic matter (OM) have higher energy. Secondly, light fraction (LF) and carbonates have little influence on site energy distribution. Finally, there was increase in site energies with the increase of temperature. Specially, low temperature (5 °C) significantly influenced the site energies of IMHO and OM, and also had obvious effect on the energy distribution of the sediments after removing target components. The site energy distribution analysis proved to be a useful method for us to further understand the energetic characteristics of sediment in comparison with those previously obtained. PMID:26552542

  3. Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Silica for Energy-efficient Adsorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Akira; Komori, Kou; Inagi, Yuki; Fujisaki, Satoko; Yamamoto, Takuji

    Energy-efficient adsorption systems, such as adsorption heat pump, desiccant cooling, humidity control system, and so on, are expected as a energy exchange process because they are able to utilize low temperature exhaust heat. As an adsorbent for such systems, materials with large adsorption capacity in the pressure range of practical operation are preferable. To enable the design and synthesis of materials with large heat storage capacity, the pore structure of adsorbents should be optimized for each systems. In this paper, we synthesized ordered mesoporous silica (MPS) with an arrow pore size distribution of around 2nm by a solvent evaporation method and evaluated their water adsorption properties. The adsorption isotherms for MPSs showed steep increase at a relative humidity corresponding to their pore size. Since MPSs have a large adsorption capacity than conventional materials in the relative humidity region of practical operation, they are expected for new adsorbents for energy-efficient adsorption systems.

  4. Methane Adsorption on Aggregates of Fullerenes: Site-Selective Storage Capacities and Adsorption Energies

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Alexander; Zöttl, Samuel; Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael; Denifl, Stephan; Echt, Olof; Scheier, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Methane adsorption on positively charged aggregates of C60 is investigated by both mass spectrometry and computer simulations. Calculated adsorption energies of 118–281 meV are in the optimal range for high-density storage of natural gas. Groove sites, dimple sites, and the first complete adsorption shells are identified experimentally and confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, using a newly developed force field for methane–methane and fullerene–methane interaction. The effects of corrugation and curvature are discussed and compared with data for adsorption on graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. PMID:23744834

  5. Pore size distribution and supercritical hydrogen adsorption in activated carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purewal, J. J.; Kabbour, H.; Vajo, J. J.; Ahn, C. C.; Fultz, B.

    2009-05-01

    Pore size distributions (PSD) and supercritical H2 isotherms have been measured for two activated carbon fiber (ACF) samples. The surface area and the PSD both depend on the degree of activation to which the ACF has been exposed. The low-surface-area ACF has a narrow PSD centered at 0.5 nm, while the high-surface-area ACF has a broad distribution of pore widths between 0.5 and 2 nm. The H2 adsorption enthalpy in the zero-coverage limit depends on the relative abundance of the smallest pores relative to the larger pores. Measurements of the H2 isosteric adsorption enthalpy indicate the presence of energy heterogeneity in both ACF samples. Additional measurements on a microporous, coconut-derived activated carbon are presented for reference.

  6. Pore size distribution and supercritical hydrogen adsorption in activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Purewal, J J; Kabbour, H; Vajo, J J; Ahn, C C; Fultz, B

    2009-05-20

    Pore size distributions (PSD) and supercritical H2 isotherms have been measured for two activated carbon fiber (ACF) samples. The surface area and the PSD both depend on the degree of activation to which the ACF has been exposed. The low-surface-area ACF has a narrow PSD centered at 0.5 nm, while the high-surface-area ACF has a broad distribution of pore widths between 0.5 and 2 nm. The H2 adsorption enthalpy in the zero-coverage limit depends on the relative abundance of the smallest pores relative to the larger pores. Measurements of the H2 isosteric adsorption enthalpy indicate the presence of energy heterogeneity in both ACF samples. Additional measurements on a microporous, coconut-derived activated carbon are presented for reference. PMID:19420660

  7. Computation of Adsorption Energies of Some Interstellar Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil, Milan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Majumdar, Liton; Gorai, Prasanta; Etim, Emmanuel; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption energies of surface species are most crucial for chemical complexity of interstellar grain mantle. Aim of this work is to study the variation of the adsorption energies depending upon the nature of adsorbent. We use silicate and carbonaceous grains for the absorbents. For silicate grains, we use very simple crystalline ones, namely, Enstatite (MgSiO_3)_n, Ferrosilite (FeSiO_3)_n, Forsterite (Mg_2SiO_4)_n and Fayalite (Fe_2SiO_4)_n. We use n=1, 2, 4, 8 to study the variation of adsorption energies with the increase in cluster size. For carbonaceous grain, we use Coronene (polyaromatic hydrocarbon surface). Adsorption energy of all these species are calculated by means of quantum chemical calculation using self consistent density functional theory (DFT). MPWB1K hybrid meta-functional is employed since it has been proven useful to study the systems with weak interactions such as van der Waals interactions. Optimization are also carried out with MPWB1K/6-311g(d) and MPWB1K/6311g(d,p) and a comparison of adsorption energies are discussed for these two different basis sets. We use crystalline structure of the adsorbent. The adsorbate is placed in the different site of the grain with a suitable distance. The energy of adsorption for a species on the grain surface is defined as follows: E_a_d_s = E_s_s - (E_s_u_r_f_a_c_e + E_s_p_e_c_i_e_s), where E_a_d_s is the adsorption energy, E_s_s is the optimized energy for species placed in a suitable distance from the grain surface, E_s_u_r_f_a_c_e and E_s_p_e_c_i_e_s respectively are the optimized energies of the surface and species separately.

  8. The role of beaded activated carbon's pore size distribution on heel formation during cyclic adsorption/desorption of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The effect of activated carbon's pore size distribution (PSD) on heel formation during adsorption of organic vapors was investigated. Five commercially available beaded activated carbons (BAC) with varying PSDs (30-88% microporous) were investigated. Virgin samples had similar elemental compositions but different PSDs, which allowed for isolating the contribution of carbon's microporosity to heel formation. Heel formation was linearly correlated (R(2)=0.91) with BAC micropore volume; heel for the BAC with the lowest micropore volume was 20% lower than the BAC with the highest micropore volume. Meanwhile, first cycle adsorption capacities and breakthrough times correlated linearly (R(2)=0.87 and 0.93, respectively) with BAC total pore volume. Micropore volume reduction for all BACs confirmed that heel accumulation takes place in the highest energy pores. Overall, these results show that a greater portion of adsorbed species are converted into heel on highly microporous adsorbents due to higher share of high energy adsorption sites in their structure. This differs from mesoporous adsorbents (low microporosity) in which large pores contribute to adsorption but not to heel formation, resulting in longer adsorbent lifetime. Thus, activated carbon with high adsorption capacity and high mesopore fraction is particularly desirable for organic vapor application involving extended adsorption/regeneration cycling. PMID:27173087

  9. Peptide adsorption on the hydrophobic surface: A free energy perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yuebiao; Wang, Wei; Chen, P.

    2011-05-01

    Protein adsorption is a very attractive topic which relates to many novel applications in biomaterials, biotechnology and nanotechnology. Ionic complementary peptides are a group of novel nano-biomaterials with many biomedical applications. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations of the ionic-complementary peptide EAK16-II on a hydrophobic graphite surface were performed under neutral, acidic and basic solution conditions. Adsorption free energy contour maps were obtained by analyzing the dynamical trajectories. Hydrophobic interactions were found to govern the adsorption of the first peptide molecule, and both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contributed to the adsorption of the second peptide molecule. Especially under acidic and basic solution conditions, interplay existed among chain-chain hydrophobic, chain-surface hydrophobic and chain-chain electrostatic interactions during the adsorption of the second peptide molecule. Non-charged residues were found to lie on the graphite surface, while charged residue side-chains oriented towards the solution after the peptide deposited on the surface. These results provide a basis for understanding peptide adsorption on the hydrophobic surface under different solution conditions, which is useful for novel applications such as bioactive implant devices and drug delivery material design.

  10. Xe adsorption site distributions on Pt(111), Pt(221) and Pt(531)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellman, Andrew J.; Baker, L.; Holsclaw, B. S.

    2016-04-01

    The ideal structures of the Pt(111), Pt(221) and Pt(531) surfaces expose adsorption sites that can be qualitatively described as terrace sites on Pt(111), both step and terrace sites on Pt(221), and kink sites on Pt(531). The real surface structures of these surfaces can be complicated by imperfections such as misorientation, reconstruction and thermal roughening, all of which will influence their distributions of adsorption sites. Xe adsorption sites on the Pt(111), Pt(221) and Pt(531) surfaces have been probed using both photoemission of adsorbed Xe (PAX) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of Xe. Both PAX and Xe TPD are sensitive to the adsorption sites of the Xe and serve as complementary means of assessing the distributions of adsorption sites on these three Pt surfaces. The adsorption of Xe is sufficiently sensitive to detect the presence of residual steps on the Pt(111) surface at a density of ~ 1.5% step atoms per Pt atom. On the Pt(221) surface, PAX and Xe TPD reveal adsorption at both terrace and step sites simultaneously. Although the ideal structure of the Pt(531) surface has no well-defined steps or terraces, Xe adsorption indicates that its adsorption sites are best described as a distribution of both step and kink sites with roughly twice as many steps sites as kinks.

  11. Phenolic resin-based porous carbons for adsorption and energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramaratne, Nilantha P.

    The main objective of this dissertation research is to develop phenolic resin based carbon materials for range of applications by soft-templating and Stober-like synthesis strategies. Applications Studied in this dissertation are adsorption of CO2, bio-molecular and heavy metal ions, and energy storage devices. Based on that, our goal is to design carbon materials with desired pore structure, high surface area, graphitic domains, incorporated metal nanoparticles, and specific organic groups and heteroatoms. In this dissertation the organic-organic self-assembly of phenolic resins and triblock copolymers under acidic conditions will be used to obtain mesoporous carbons/carbon composites and Stober-like synthesis involving phenolic resins under basic condition will be used to prepare polymer/carbon particles and their composites. The structure of this dissertation consists of an introductory chapter (Chapter 1) discussing the general synthesis of carbon materials, particularly the soft-templating strategy and Stober-like carbon synthesis. Also, Chapter 1 includes a brief outline of applications namely adsorption of CO2, biomolecule and heavy metal ions, and supercapacitors. Chapter 2 discusses the techniques used for characterization of the carbon materials studied. This chapter starts with nitrogen adsorption analysis, which is used to measure the specific surface area, pore volume, distribution of pore sizes, and pore width. In addition to nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution thermogravimetric analysis (HR-TGA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and CHNS elemental analysis (EA) are mentioned too. Chapter 3 is focused on carbon materials for CO2 adsorption. There are different types of porous solid materials such as silicate, MOFs, carbons, and zeolites studied for CO2 adsorption. However, the carbon based materials are considered to be the best candidates for CO 2 adsorption to the industrial point of

  12. Influence of pore size distribution on the adsorption of phenol on PET-based activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Lorenc-Grabowska, Ewa; Diez, María A; Gryglewicz, Grazyna

    2016-05-01

    The role of pore size distribution in the adsorption of phenol in aqueous solutions on polyethylene terephthalate (PET)-based activated carbons (ACs) has been analyzed. The ACs were prepared from PET and mixtures of PET with coal-tar pitch (CTP) by means of carbonization and subsequent steam and carbon dioxide activation at 850 and 950 °C, respectively. The resultant ACs were characterized on the basis of similarities in their surface chemical features and differences in their micropore size distributions. The adsorption of phenol was carried out in static conditions at ambient temperature. The pseudo-second order kinetic model and Langmuir model were found to fit the experimental data very well. The different adsorption capacities of the ACs towards phenol were attributed to differences in their micropore size distributions. Adsorption capacity was favoured by the volume of pores with a size smaller than 1.4 nm; but restricted by pores smaller than 0.8 nm. PMID:26890386

  13. Pore size distribution analysis of activated carbons prepared from coconut shell using methane adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadpour, A.; Okhovat, A.; Darabi Mahboub, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    The application of Stoeckli theory to determine pore size distribution (PSD) of activated carbons using high pressure methane adsorption data is explored. Coconut shell was used as a raw material for the preparation of 16 different activated carbon samples. Four samples with higher methane adsorption were selected and nitrogen adsorption on these adsorbents was also investigated. Some differences are found between the PSD obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms and their PSD resulting from the same analysis using methane adsorption data. It is suggested that these differences may arise from the specific interactions between nitrogen molecules and activated carbon surfaces; therefore caution is required in the interpretation of PSD obtained from the nitrogen isotherm data.

  14. Surface free energy analysis of adsorbents used for radioiodine adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, C. M.; Román, S.; González, J. F.; Sabio, E.; Ledesma, B.

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the surface free energy of biomass-based activated carbons, both fresh and impregnated with triethylenediamine, has been evaluated. The contribution of Lifshitz van der Waals components was determined by the model proposed by van Oss et al. The results obtained allowed predicting the most probable configurations of the impregnant onto the carbon surface and its influence on the subsequent adsorption of radioactive methyl iodide.

  15. Statistical physics studies of multilayer adsorption isotherm in food materials and pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouaini, F.; Knani, S.; Ben Yahia, M.; Ben Lamine, A.

    2015-08-01

    Water sorption isotherms of foodstuffs are very important in different areas of food science engineering such as for design, modeling and optimization of many processes. The equilibrium moisture content is an important parameter in models used to predict changes in the moisture content of a product during storage. A formulation of multilayer model with two energy levels was based on statistical physics and theoretical considerations. Thanks to the grand canonical ensemble in statistical physics. Some physicochemical parameters related to the adsorption process were introduced in the analytical model expression. The data tabulated in literature of water adsorption at different temperatures on: chickpea seeds, lentil seeds, potato and on green peppers were described applying the most popular models applied in food science. We also extend the study to the newest proposed model. It is concluded that among studied models the proposed model seems to be the best for description of data in the whole range of relative humidity. By using our model, we were able to determine the thermodynamic functions. The measurement of desorption isotherms, in particular a gas over a solid porous, allows access to the distribution of pore size PSD.

  16. A surface structural approach to ion adsorption: The charge distribution (CD) model

    SciTech Connect

    Hiemstra, T.; Van Riemsdijk, W.H.

    1996-05-10

    Cation and anion adsorption at the solid/solution interface of metal hydroxides plays an important role in several fields of chemistry, including colloid and interface chemistry, soil chemistry and geochemistry, aquatic chemistry, environmental chemistry, catalysis, and chemical engineering. An ion adsorption model for metal hydroxides has been developed which deals with the observation that in the case of inner sphere complex formation only part of the surface complex is incorporated into the surface by a ligand exchange reaction while the other part is located in the Stern layer. The charge distribution (CD) concept of Pauling, used previously in the multi site complexation (MUSIC) model approach, is extended to account for adsorbed surface complexes. In the new model, surface complexes are not treated as point charges, but are considered as having a spatial distribution of charge in the interfacial region. The new CD model can describe within a single conceptual framework all important experimental adsorption phenomena, taking into account the chemical composition of the crystal surface. The CD model has been applied to one of the most difficult and challenging ion adsorption phenomena, i.e., PO{sub 4} adsorption on goethite, and successfully describes simultaneously the basic charging behavior of goethite, the concentration, pH, and salt dependency of adsorption, the shifts in the zeta potentials and isoelectric point (IEP), and the OH/P exchange ratio. This is all achieved within the constraint that the experimental surface speciation found from in situ IR spectroscopy is also described satisfactorily.

  17. Probing the Adsorption Behavior of 4,5-Diazafluoren-9-one and Its Schiff Base Derivatives on SIlver and Gold Nanosurfaces Using Raman Spectroscopy, Density Functional Theory and Potential Energy Distribution Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Rhonda Patrice

    4,5-Diazafluoren-9-one (DAFO) is an aromatic ketone synthesized by oxidizing 1,10-phenanthroline with potassium permanganate. In this present study, the Raman spectra of DAFO in the solid and solution states were recorded in the 100-2000 cm-1 spectral region using 1064, 633, 532, and 514 nm excitation sources. A normal mode analysis of DAFO was performed using density functional theory; the BLYP and B3LYP functionals, each with the 6-31G(d) and 6-311(d) basis sets were employed. The fundamental modes on the Raman spectrum of DAFO were assigned with the appropriate symmetry element using the BLYP functional and 6-31G(d) basis set. The vibrational modes were described and quantified by potential energy distribution calculations. The Raman frequencies for the solid and solution spectra were compared; the observed frequency shifts are attributed to hydrogen bonding or dipole-dipole interactions occurring between the solvent and DAFO ligand. To further assess solute-solvent interactions the UV-vis spectra of DAFO was obtained in hydrogen bonding, polar aprotic, and non-polar solvents. The fine structure of the band observed at lambda max becomes more resolved as solvent polarity decreases, therefore confirming solute-solvent interactions in polar solvents. A silver complex of DAFO was synthesized with the intent of understanding how coordination affected the Raman frequencies. The bands assigned to pyridine ring bending, nu(C=N), and nu(C=O) were shifted because of coordination. These shifts have been attributed to the molecule being perturbed because of coordination. Therefore, the Ag-DAFO complex was analyzed by X-Ray diffraction and the molecular geometries of the free and coordinated ligand were compared. The resolved crystalline structure revealed the silver ion coordinated DAFO using the lone pairs of electrons from the nitrogens in the pyridine ring. Analysis of the molecular geometry revealed the C=O bond increases in double bond character and the C5-C14 bond

  18. Distribution of trace impurities of metals during their adsorption from solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Toranov, A.N.; Evseeva, N.K.; Kremenskaya, I.N.

    1986-09-01

    The phase distribution of trace impurities of metals between solutions of phosphoric acid and a polymer adsorbent based on a copolymer of styrene with divinylbenzene, impregnated with di-2-ethylhexyldithiophosphoric acid, was investigated. The influence of the composition of the aqueous and solid phases on the distribution coefficients of trace impurities of metals is discussed. It was shown that the coefficients of interfacial distribution in the case of adsorption by an impregnated adsorbent is higher than in the case of liquid extraction.

  19. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, John; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Seifert, Gary

    2009-01-31

    This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho.

  20. The distribution and adsorption behavior of aliphatic amines in marine and lacustrine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuchen; Lee, C. )

    1990-10-01

    The methylated amines - monomethyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethyl amine (MMA, DMA, TMA) - are commonly found in aquatic environments, apparently as a result of decomposition processes. Adsorption of these amines to clay minerals and organic matter significantly influences their distribution in sediments. Laboratory measurements using {sup 14}C-radiolabelled amines and application of a linear partitioning model resulted in calculated adsorption coefficients of 2.4-4.7 (MMA), 3.3 (DMA), and 3.3-4.1 (TMA). Further studies showed that adsorption of amines is influenced by salinity of the porewaters, and clay mineral and organic matter content of the sediment solid phase. Concentrations of monomethyl- and dimethyl amine were measured in the porewaters and the solid phase of sediment samples collected from Flax Pond and Lake Ronkonkoma (NY), Long Island Sound, and the coastal Peru upwelling area. These two amines were present in all sediments investigated. A clear seasonal increase in the solid-phase concentration of MMA and DMA in Flax Pond sediments was likely related to the annual senescence of salt marsh grasses, either directly as a source of these compounds or indirectly by providing additional exchange capacity to the sediments. The distribution of amines in the solid and dissolved phases observed in all sediments investigated suggests that the distribution of these compounds results from a balance among production, decomposition, and adsorption processes.

  1. Effect of surface charge distribution on the adsorption orientation of proteins to lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin

    2010-09-01

    The adsorption orientation of the proteins lysozyme and ribonuclease A (RNase A) to a neutral 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and a negatively charged stearic acid lipid film was investigated by means of X-ray reflectivity. Both proteins adsorbed to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, whereas at the neutral monolayer, no adsorption was observed. For acquiring comprehensive information on the proteins' adsorption, X-ray reflectivity data were combined with electron densities obtained from crystallographic data. With this method, it is possible to determine the orientation of adsorbed proteins in solution underneath lipid monolayers. While RNase A specifically coupled with its positively charged active site to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, lysozyme prefers an orientation with its long axis parallel to the Langmuir film. In comparison to the electrostatic maps of the proteins, our results can be explained by the discriminative surface charge distribution of lysozyme and RNase A. PMID:20707324

  2. An improved single crystal adsorption calorimeter for determining gas adsorption and reaction energies on complex model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer-Wolfarth, Jan-Henrik; Hartmann, Jens; Farmer, Jason A.; Flores-Camacho, J. Manuel; Campbell, Charles T.; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2011-02-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum microcalorimeter for measuring heats of adsorption and adsorption-induced surface reactions on complex single crystal-based model surfaces is described. It has been specifically designed to study the interaction of gaseous molecules with well-defined model catalysts consisting of metal nanoparticles supported on single crystal surfaces or epitaxial thin oxide films grown on single crystals. The detection principle is based on the previously described measurement of the temperature rise upon adsorption of gaseous molecules by use of a pyroelectric polymer ribbon, which is brought into mechanical/thermal contact with the back side of the thin single crystal. The instrument includes (i) a preparation chamber providing the required equipment to prepare supported model catalysts involving well-defined nanoparticles on clean single crystal surfaces and to characterize them using surface analysis techniques and in situ reflectivity measurements and (ii) the adsorption/reaction chamber containing a molecular beam, a pyroelectric heat detector, and calibration tools for determining the absolute reactant fluxes and adsorption heats. The molecular beam is produced by a differentially pumped source based on a multichannel array capable of providing variable fluxes of both high and low vapor pressure gaseous molecules in the range of 0.005-1.5 × 1015 molecules cm-2 s-1 and is modulated by means of the computer-controlled chopper with the shortest pulse length of 150 ms. The calorimetric measurements of adsorption and reaction heats can be performed in a broad temperature range from 100 to 300 K. A novel vibrational isolation method for the pyroelectric detector is introduced for the reduction of acoustic noise. The detector shows a pulse-to-pulse standard deviation ≤15 nJ when heat pulses in the range of 190-3600 nJ are applied to the sample surface with a chopped laser. Particularly for CO adsorption on Pt(111), the energy input of 15 nJ (or 120 nJ cm

  3. An improved single crystal adsorption calorimeter for determining gas adsorption and reaction energies on complex model catalysts.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Wolfarth, Jan-Henrik; Hartmann, Jens; Farmer, Jason A; Flores-Camacho, J Manuel; Campbell, Charles T; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2011-02-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum microcalorimeter for measuring heats of adsorption and adsorption-induced surface reactions on complex single crystal-based model surfaces is described. It has been specifically designed to study the interaction of gaseous molecules with well-defined model catalysts consisting of metal nanoparticles supported on single crystal surfaces or epitaxial thin oxide films grown on single crystals. The detection principle is based on the previously described measurement of the temperature rise upon adsorption of gaseous molecules by use of a pyroelectric polymer ribbon, which is brought into mechanical∕thermal contact with the back side of the thin single crystal. The instrument includes (i) a preparation chamber providing the required equipment to prepare supported model catalysts involving well-defined nanoparticles on clean single crystal surfaces and to characterize them using surface analysis techniques and in situ reflectivity measurements and (ii) the adsorption∕reaction chamber containing a molecular beam, a pyroelectric heat detector, and calibration tools for determining the absolute reactant fluxes and adsorption heats. The molecular beam is produced by a differentially pumped source based on a multichannel array capable of providing variable fluxes of both high and low vapor pressure gaseous molecules in the range of 0.005-1.5 × 10(15) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) and is modulated by means of the computer-controlled chopper with the shortest pulse length of 150 ms. The calorimetric measurements of adsorption and reaction heats can be performed in a broad temperature range from 100 to 300 K. A novel vibrational isolation method for the pyroelectric detector is introduced for the reduction of acoustic noise. The detector shows a pulse-to-pulse standard deviation ≤15 nJ when heat pulses in the range of 190-3600 nJ are applied to the sample surface with a chopped laser. Particularly for CO adsorption on Pt(111), the energy input of 15 n

  4. Adsorption and Distribution of Fluorescent Solutes near the Articular Surface of Mechanically Injured Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Sarah G.A.; Moeini, Mohammad; Chin, Hooi Chuan; Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Quinn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of cartilage-specific imaging agents supports the improvement of tissue assessment by minimally invasive means. Techniques for highlighting cartilage surface damage in clinical images could provide for sensitive indications of posttraumatic injury and early stage osteoarthritis. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that fluorescent solutes interact with cartilage surfaces strongly enough to affect measurement of their partition coefficients within the tissue bulk. In this study, these findings were extended by examining solute adsorption and distribution near the articular surface of mechanically injured cartilage. Using viable cartilage explants injured by an established protocol, solute distributions near the articular surface of three commonly used fluorophores (fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC), and carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)) were observed after absorption and subsequent desorption to assess solute-specific matrix interactions and reversibility. Both absorption and desorption processes demonstrated a trend of significantly less solute adsorption at surfaces of fissures compared to adjacent intact surfaces of damaged explants or surfaces of uninjured explants. After adsorption, normalized mean surface intensities of fissured surfaces of injured explants were 6%, 40%, and 32% for FITC, TRITC, and TAMRA, respectively, compared to uninjured surfaces. Similar values were found for sliced explants and after a desorption process. After desorption, a trend of increased solute adsorption at the site of intact damaged surfaces was noted (316% and 238% for injured and sliced explants exposed to FITC). Surface adsorption of solute was strongest for FITC and weakest for TAMRA; no solutes negatively affected cell viability. Results support the development of imaging agents that highlight distinct differences between fissured and intact cartilage surfaces. PMID:24268155

  5. Protein Adsorption Patterns and Analysis on IV Nanoemulsions—The Key Factor Determining the Organ Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Cornelia M.; Jansch, Mirko; Müller, Rainer H.

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous nanoemulsions have been on the market for parenteral nutrition since the 1950s; meanwhile, they have also been used successfully for IV drug delivery. To be well tolerable, the emulsions should avoid uptake by the MPS cells of the body; for drug delivery, they should be target-specific. The organ distribution is determined by the proteins adsorbing them after injection from the blood (protein adsorption pattern), typically analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 2-D PAGE. The article reviews the 2-D PAGE method, the analytical problems to be faced and the knowledge available on how the composition of emulsions affects the protein adsorption patterns, e.g., the composition of the oil phase, stabilizer layer and drug incorporation into the interface or oil core. Data were re-evaluated and compared, and the implications for the in vivo distribution are discussed. Major results are that the interfacial composition of the stabilizer layer is the main determining factor and that this composition can be modulated by simple processes. Drug incorporation affects the pattern depending on the localization of the drug (oil core versus interface). The data situation regarding in vivo effects is very limited; mainly, it has to be referred to in the in vivo data of polymeric nanoparticles. As a conclusion, determination of the protein adsorption patterns can accelerate IV nanoemulsion formulation development regarding optimized organ distribution and related pharmacokinetics. PMID:24300396

  6. Scaling Properties of Adsorption Energies for Hydrogen-Containing Molecules on Transition-Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abild-Pedersen, F.; Greeley, J.; Studt, F.; Rossmeisl, J.; Munter, T. R.; Moses, P. G.; Skúlason, E.; Bligaard, T.; Nørskov, J. K.

    2007-07-01

    Density functional theory calculations are presented for CHx, x=0,1,2,3, NHx, x=0,1,2, OHx, x=0,1, and SHx, x=0,1 adsorption on a range of close-packed and stepped transition-metal surfaces. We find that the adsorption energy of any of the molecules considered scales approximately with the adsorption energy of the central, C, N, O, or S atom, the scaling constant depending only on x. A model is proposed to understand this behavior. The scaling model is developed into a general framework for estimating the reaction energies for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

  7. Optimization of adsorption processes for climate control and thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, S; Yang, S; Kim, H; Wang, EN

    2014-10-01

    Adsorption based heat-pumps have received significant interest owing to their promise of higher efficiencies and energy savings when coupled with waste heat and solar energy compared to conventional heating and cooling systems. While adsorption systems have been widely studied through computational analysis and experiments, general design guidelines to enhance their overall performance have not been proposed. In this work, we identified conditions suitable for the maximum utilization of the adsorbent to enhance the performance of both intermittent as well as continuously operating adsorption systems. A detailed computational model was developed based on a general framework governing adsorption dynamics in a single adsorption layer and pellet. We then validated the computational analysis using experiments with a model system of zeolite 13X-water for different operating conditions. A dimensional analysis was subsequently carried out to optimize adsorption performance for any desired operating condition, which is determined by the choice of adsorbent-vapor pair, adsorption duration, operational pressure, intercrystalline porosity, adsorbent crystal size, and intracrystalline vapor diffusivity. The scaling analysis identifies the critical dimensionless parameters and provides a simple guideline to determine the most suitable geometry for the adsorbent particles. Based on this selection criterion, the computational model was used to demonstrate maximum utilization of the adsorbent for any given operational condition. By considering a wide range of parametric variations for performance optimization, these results offer important insights for designing adsorption beds for heating and cooling systems. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multiscale characterization of pore size distributions using mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Tarquis, A. M.; Miranda, J. G. V.; Vidal Vázquez, E.

    2009-04-01

    The soil pore space is a continuum extremely variable in size, including structures smaller than nanometres and as large as macropores or cracks with millimetres or even centimetres size. Pore size distributions (PSDs) affects important soil functions, such as those related with transmission and storage of water, and root growth. Direct and indirect measurements of PSDs are becoming increasingly used to characterize soil structure. Mercury injection porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption isotherms are techniques commonly employed for assessing equivalent pore size diameters in the range from about 50 nm to 100 m and 2 to 500 nm, respectively. The multifractal formalism was used to describe Hg injection curves and N2 adsorption isotherms from two series of a Mollisol cultivated under no tillage and minimum tillage. Soil samples were taken from 0-10, 10-20 and 20-30 cm depths in two experimental fields located in the north of Buenos Aires and South of Santa Fe provinces, Argentina. All the data sets analyzed from the two studied soil attributes showed remarkably good scaling trends as assessed by singularity spectrum and generalized dimension spectrum. Both, experimental Hg injection curves and N2 adsorption isotherms could be fitted reasonably well with multifractal models. A wide variety of singularity and generalized dimension spectra was found for the variables. The capacity dimensions, D0, for both Hg injection and N2 adsorption data were not significantly different from the Euclidean dimension. However, the entropy dimension, D1, and correlation dimension, D2, obtained from mercury injection and nitrogen adsorption data showed significant differences. So, D1 values were on average 0.868 and varied from 0.787 to 0.925 for Hg intrusion curves. Entropy dimension, D1, values for N2 adsorption isotherms were on average 0.582 significantly lower than those obtained when using the former technique. Twenty-three out of twenty-four N2 isotherms had D1 values in a

  9. Pore Scale Heterogeneity in the Mineral Distribution, Surface Area and Adsorption in Porous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P. E. P.; Krevor, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of heterogeneity in chemical transport and reaction is not understood in continuum (Darcy/Fickian) models of reactive transport. This is manifested in well-known problems such as scale dependent dispersion and discrepancies in reaction rate observations made at laboratory and field scales [1]. Additionally, this is a source of uncertainty for carbon dioxide injection, which produces a reactive fluid-rock system particularly in carbonate rock reservoirs. A potential cause is the inability of the continuum approach to incorporate the impact of heterogeneity in pore-scale reaction rates. This results in part from pore-scale heterogeneities in surface area of reactive minerals [2, 3]. We use x-ray micro tomography to describe the non-normal 3-dimensional distribution of reactive surface area within a porous medium according to distinct mineral groups. Using in-house image processing techniques, thin sections, nitrogen BET surface area, backscattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy, we compare the surface area of each mineral phase to those obtained from x-ray CT imagery. In all samples, there is little correlation between the reactive surface area fraction and the volumetric fraction of a mineral in a bulk rock. Berea sandstone was far less heterogeneous and has a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. In carbonates, heterogeneity is more complex and surface area must be characterized at multiple length scales for an accurate description of reactive transport. We combine the mineral specific surface area characterisation to dynamic tomography, imaging the flow of water and solutes, to observe flow dependent and mineral specific adsorption. The observations may contribute to the incorporation of experimentally based statistical descriptions of pore scale heterogeneity in reactive transport into upscaled models, moving it closer to predictive capabilities for field scale

  10. Screened Hybrid Exact Exchange Schemes to Adsorption Energies on Perovskite Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Elton; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Norskov, Jens K.

    The bond formation between an oxide surface and oxygen, which is one of the important intermediates for oxygen evolution reaction, is investigated using hybrid functionals. We show that there exists a linear correlation between the adsorption energies of oxygen on LaMO3 (M =Sc-Cu) oxides at hybrid calculations to those computed using semilocal density functionals through the magnetic properties of the bulk phase. The energetics of the spin-polarized surfaces follow the same trend as corresponding bulk systems, which can be treated at a much lower computational cost. The difference in adsorption energy due to magnetism is linearly correlated to the magnetization energy of bulk, i.e., the energy difference between the spin-polarized and the non spin-polarized solutions. This suggests that one could estimate the correction to the semilocal density functional adsorption energies directly from the hybrid bulk magnetization energy.

  11. Probability distributions of turbulent energy.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Mahdi; Müller, Wolf-Christian

    2008-05-01

    Probability density functions (PDFs) of scale-dependent energy fluctuations, P[deltaE(l)] , are studied in high-resolution direct numerical simulations of Navier-Stokes and incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. MHD flows with and without a strong mean magnetic field are considered. For all three systems it is found that the PDFs of inertial range energy fluctuations exhibit self-similarity and monoscaling in agreement with recent solar-wind measurements [Hnat, Geophys. Res. Lett. 29, 86 (2002)]. Furthermore, the energy PDFs exhibit similarity over all scales of the turbulent system showing no substantial qualitative change of shape as the scale of the fluctuations varies. This is in contrast to the well-known behavior of PDFs of turbulent velocity fluctuations. In all three cases under consideration the P[deltaE(l)] resemble Lévy-type gamma distributions approximately Delta;{-1} exp(-|deltaE|/Delta)|deltaE|;{-gamma} The observed gamma distributions exhibit a scale-dependent width Delta(l) and a system-dependent gamma . The monoscaling property reflects the inertial-range scaling of the Elsässer-field fluctuations due to lacking Galilei invariance of deltaE . The appearance of Lévy distributions is made plausible by a simple model of energy transfer. PMID:18643170

  12. Pesticide adsorption in relation to soil properties and soil type distribution in regional scale.

    PubMed

    Kodešová, Radka; Kočárek, Martin; Kodeš, Vít; Drábek, Ondřej; Kozák, Josef; Hejtmánková, Kateřina

    2011-02-15

    Study was focused on the evaluation of pesticide adsorption in soils, as one of the parameters, which are necessary to know when assessing possible groundwater contamination caused by pesticides commonly used in agriculture. Batch sorption tests were performed for 11 selected pesticides and 13 representative soils. The Freundlich equations were used to describe adsorption isotherms. Multiple-linear regressions were used to predict the Freundlich adsorption coefficients from measured soil properties. Resulting functions and a soil map of the Czech Republic were used to generate maps of the coefficient distribution. The multiple linear regressions showed that the K(F) coefficient depended on: (a) combination of OM (organic matter content), pH(KCl) and CEC (cation exchange capacity), or OM, SCS (sorption complex saturation) and salinity (terbuthylazine), (b) combination of OM and pH(KCl), or OM, SCS and salinity (prometryne), (c) combination of OM and pH(KCl), or OM and ρ(z) (metribuzin), (d) combination of OM, CEC and clay content, or clay content, CEC and salinity (hexazinone), (e) combination of OM and pH(KCl), or OM and SCS (metolachlor), (f) OM or combination of OM and CaCO(3) (chlorotoluron), (g) OM (azoxystrobin), (h) combination of OM and pH(KCl) (trifluralin), (i) combination of OM and clay content (fipronil), (j) combination of OM and pH(KCl), or OM, pH(KCl) and CaCO(3) (thiacloprid), (k) combination of OM, pH(KCl) and CEC, or sand content, pH(KCl) and salinity (chlormequat chloride). PMID:21144657

  13. Enhanced distributed energy resource system

    DOEpatents

    Atcitty, Stanley; Clark, Nancy H.; Boyes, John D.; Ranade, Satishkumar J.

    2007-07-03

    A power transmission system including a direct current power source electrically connected to a conversion device for converting direct current into alternating current, a conversion device connected to a power distribution system through a junction, an energy storage device capable of producing direct current connected to a converter, where the converter, such as an insulated gate bipolar transistor, converts direct current from an energy storage device into alternating current and supplies the current to the junction and subsequently to the power distribution system. A microprocessor controller, connected to a sampling and feedback module and the converter, determines when the current load is higher than a set threshold value, requiring triggering of the converter to supply supplemental current to the power transmission system.

  14. Illite spatial distribution controls Cr(VI) adsorption capacity and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, L.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    In the natural surbsurface, clays typically are the major sorbing minerals for contaminants. Clays are known to distribute unevenly with low permeability 'clay' zones, which can have significant impacts on the sorption of contaminants. In this work, the effects of illite spatial distribution on Cr(VI) adsorption was examined using column experiments and reactive transport modeling. Three columns were set up with the same volume fraction of illite (10%). The Mixed column has illite evenly distributed within a quartz matrix; the Flow-transverse column has illite distributed in one horizontal zone in the direction that is perpendicular to the main flow; the Flow-parallel column has illite distributed in one cylindrical zone in the direction parallel to the main flow direction. Cr(VI) adsorption experiments were carried out under flow velocities of 0.58, 2.93, and 14.67 m/day. Two-dimensional reactive transport modeling was used to understand the role of illite distribution in determining Cr(VI) sorption capacity and kinetics. The result showed that illite spatial distribution strongly influence Cr(VI) sorption, the extent of which depend on the flow conditions . The Cr(VI) sorption kinectics was influenced by the permeability contrast and the preferential flow paths were taken place in high permeability zones. Under the flow rate of 0.58 m/day, the Cr(VI) adsorption in the Mixed and Flow-transverse columns was very similar, showing similar breakthrough time and sorption capacity. In contrast, an early breakthrough and an extended of Cr(VI) occured in the Flow-parallel column. The 2D reactive transport model showed that the inlet fluids flow through the quartz zone and bypass the lower permeability illite zone. Cr(VI) was first adsorbed on the illite-quartz interface early on and gradually diffuse into the illite zone over time. At the flow velocity of 2.93 m/day, the difference among the three columns was similar to the difference at the flow rate of 0.58 m/day. At

  15. Correlation between oxygen adsorption energy and electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kexi; Lei, Yinkai; Wang, Guofeng

    2013-11-28

    Oxygen adsorption energy is directly relevant to the catalytic activity of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we established the correlation between the O{sub 2} adsorption energy and the electronic structure of transition metal macrocyclic complexes which exhibit activity for ORR. To this end, we have predicted the molecular and electronic structures of a series of transition metal macrocyclic complexes with planar N{sub 4} chelation, as well as the molecular and electronic structures for the O{sub 2} adsorption on these macrocyclic molecules, using the density functional theory calculation method. We found that the calculated adsorption energy of O{sub 2} on the transition metal macrocyclic complexes was linearly related to the average position (relative to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the macrocyclic complexes) of the non-bonding d orbitals (d{sub z{sup 2}}, d{sub xy}, d{sub xz}, and d{sub yz}) which belong to the central transition metal atom. Importantly, our results suggest that varying the energy level of the non-bonding d orbitals through changing the central transition metal atom and/or peripheral ligand groups could be an effective way to tuning their O{sub 2} adsorption energy for enhancing the ORR activity of transition metal macrocyclic complex catalysts.

  16. Energy conservation in electric distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chong-Jin

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the potential for energy and power savings that exist in electric power delivery systems. These savings translate into significant financial and environmental benefits for electricity producers and consumers as well as for society in general. AlliedSignal`s knowledge and perspectives on this topic are the result of discussions with hundreds of utility executives, government officials and other industry experts over the past decade in conjunction with marketing our Amorphous Metal technology for electric distribution transformers. Amorphous metal is a technology developed by AlliedSignal that significantly reduces the energy lost in electric distribution transformers at an incremental cost of just a few cents per kilo-Watt-hour. The purpose of this paper is to discuss: Amorphous Metal Alloy Technology; Energy Savings Opportunity; The Industrial Barriers and Remedies; Worldwide Demand; and A Low Risk Strategy. I wish this presentation will help KEPCO achieve their stated aims of ensuring sound development of the national economy and enhancement of public life through the economic and stable supply of electric power. AlliedSignal Korea Ltd. in conjunction with AlliedSignal Amorphous Metals in the U.S. are here to work with KEPCO, transformer manufacturers, industry, and government agencies to achieve greater efficiency in power distribution.

  17. Pore size distribution calculation from 1H NMR signal and N2 adsorption-desorption techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Jamal

    2012-09-01

    The pore size distribution (PSD) of nano-material MCM-41 is determined using two different approaches: N2 adsorption-desorption and 1H NMR signal of water confined in silica nano-pores of MCM-41. The first approach is based on the recently modified Kelvin equation [J.V. Rocha, D. Barrera, K. Sapag, Top. Catal. 54(2011) 121-134] which deals with the known underestimation in pore size distribution for the mesoporous materials such as MCM-41 by introducing a correction factor to the classical Kelvin equation. The second method employs the Gibbs-Thompson equation, using NMR, for melting point depression of liquid in confined geometries. The result shows that both approaches give similar pore size distribution to some extent, and also the NMR technique can be considered as an alternative direct method to obtain quantitative results especially for mesoporous materials. The pore diameter estimated for the nano-material used in this study was about 35 and 38 Å for the modified Kelvin and NMR methods respectively. A comparison between these methods and the classical Kelvin equation is also presented.

  18. Scaling Relationships for Adsorption Energies of C2 Hydrocarbons on Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G

    2011-08-18

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C{sub 2}H{sub x}-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws for AH{sub x}-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure transition metal catalysts. Comparison with the corresponding full density functional theory calculations shows excellent agreement.

  19. Atlas of quasar energy distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.; Green, Richard F.; Bechtold, Jill; Willner, S. P.; Oey, M. S.; Polomski, Elisha; Cutri, Roc

    1994-01-01

    We present an atlas of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of normal, nonblazar, quasars over the whole available range (radio to 10 keV X-rays) of the electromagnetic spectrum. The primary (UVSX) sample includes 47 quasars for which the spectral energy distributions include X-ray spectral indices and UV data. Of these, 29 are radio quiet, and 18 are radio loud. The SEDs are presented both in figures and in tabular form, with additional tabular material published on CD-ROM. Previously unpublished observational data for a second set of quasars excluded from the primary sample are also tabulated. The effects of host galaxy starlight contamination and foreground extinction on the UVSX sample are considered and the sample is used to investigate the range of SED properties. Of course, the properties we derive are influenced strongly by the selection effects induced by quasar discovery techniques. We derive the mean energy distribution (MED) for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and present the bolometric corrections derived from it. We note, however, that the dispersion about this mean is large (approximately one decade for both the infrared and ultraviolet components when the MED is normalized at the near-infrared inflection). At least part of the dispersion in the ultraviolet may be due to time variability, but this is unlikely to be important in the infrared. The existence of such a large dispersion indicates that the MED reflects only some of the properties of quasars and so should be used only with caution.

  20. Microgravimetric Analysis Method for Activation-Energy Extraction from Trace-Amount Molecule Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengcheng; Yu, Haitao; Li, Xinxin

    2016-05-01

    Activation-energy (Ea) value for trace-amount adsorption of gas molecules on material is rapidly and inexpensively obtained, for the first time, from a microgravimetric analysis experiment. With the material loaded, a resonant microcantilever is used to record in real time the adsorption process at two temperatures. The kinetic parameter Ea is thereby extracted by solving the Arrhenius equation. As an example, two CO2 capture nanomaterials are examined by the Ea extracting method for evaluation/optimization and, thereby, demonstrating the applicability of the microgravimetric analysis method. The achievement helps to solve the absence in rapid quantitative characterization of sorption kinetics and opens a new route to investigate molecule adsorption processes and materials. PMID:27100734

  1. Benchmark Experimental Data Set and Assessment of Adsorption Free Energy for Peptide-Surface Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing interest in protein adsorption in fields ranging from bionanotechnology to biomedical engineering, there is a growing need to understand protein-surface interactions at a fundamental level, such as the interaction between individual amino acid residues of a protein and functional groups presented by a surface. However, relatively little data are available that experimentally provide a quantitative, comparative measure of these types of interactions. To address this deficiency, the objective of this study was to generate a database of experimentally measured standard state adsorption free energy (ΔGoads) values for a wide variety of amino acid residue-surface interactions using a host-guest peptide and alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with polymer-like functionality as the model system. The host-guest amino acid sequence was synthesized in the form of TGTG-X-GTGT where G & T are glycine and threonine amino acid residues and X represents a variable residue. In this paper, we report ΔGoads values for the adsorption of twelve different types of the host-guest peptides on a set of nine different SAM surfaces, for a total of 108 peptide-surface systems. The ΔGoads values for these 108 peptide-surface combinations show clear trends in adsorption behavior that are dependent on both peptide composition and surface chemistry. These data provide a benchmark experimental data set from which fundamental interactions that govern peptide and protein adsorption behavior can be better understood and compared. PMID:19432493

  2. Water films on transition metal surfaces: A physical disclosure of adsorption energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla-López, Guillem; López, Nuria; Theoretical Heterogeneous Catalysis Group Team

    2014-03-01

    Our work reports novel physical models derived from DFT calculations including van der Waals forces for the adsorption of different water motifs: ice bilayer, √37 x √37-R 25.3° and rosette on transition metal surfaces. This energy decomposition scheme is obtained by analyzing the two driving energies of adsorption: water-water and water-metal interactions. The former explained by single water adsorption and the latter by ice resonance stabilization. These two magnitudes drive, to different extent, the adsorption of ice bilayer and √37 whereas rosette motif lacks the resonance contribution. The equations successfully reproduce and predict the experimental results for the wettability and the dissociation of water films on the fcc(111) and hcp(0001) facets of Pd, Pt, Ru Ir, Rh, Au, and Ag. So happens for the temperature of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic water film transition and for the effect of the surface roughness on it. Furthermore, the metastability and the wettability of other water films like √39 x √39-R 16.1° can be anticipated by the rationalization of their geometry and their dissociation state. The authors thank the ERC-2010-StG-258406 Bio2chem-d project, MINECO (CTQ2012-33826) and BSC-RES for supporting this work.

  3. Identical Binding Energies and Work Functions for Distinct Adsorption Structures: Olympicenes on the Cu(111) Surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Schuler, Bruno; Xu, Yong; Moll, Nikolaj; Meyer, Gerhard; Gross, Leo; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-03-17

    Reliability is one of the major concerns and challenges in designing organic/inorganic interfaces for (opto)electronic applications. Even small structural differences for molecules on substrates can result in a significant variation in the interface functionality, due to the strong correlation between geometry, stability, and electronic structure. Here, we employed state-of-the-art first-principles calculations with van der Waals interactions, in combination with atomic force microscopy experiments, to explore the interaction mechanism for three structurally related olympicene molecules adsorbed on the Cu(111) surface. The substitution of a single atom in the olympicene molecule switches the nature of adsorption from predominantly physisorptive character [olympicene on Cu(111)], to an intermediate state [olympicene-derived ketone on Cu(111)], then to chemisorptive character [olympicene radical on Cu(111)]. Despite the remarkable difference in adsorption structures (by up to 0.9 Å in adsorption height) and different nature of bonding, the olympicene, its ketone, and its radical derivatives have essentially identical binding energies and work functions upon interaction with the metal substrate. Our findings suggest that the stability and work functions of molecular adsorbates could be rendered insensitive to their adsorption structures, which could be a useful property for (opto)electronic applications. PMID:26928143

  4. Linear solvation energy relationships (LSER) for adsorption of organic compounds by carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ersan, Gamze; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this paper was to create a comprehensive database for the adsorption of organic compounds by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and to use the Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (LSER) technique for developing predictive adsorption models of organic compounds (OCs) by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Adsorption data for 123 OCs by MWCNTs and 48 OCs by SWCNTs were compiled from the literature, including some experimental results obtained in our laboratory. The roles of selected OCs properties and CNT types were examined with LSER models. The results showed that the r(2) values of the LSER models displayed small variability for aromatic compounds smaller than 220 g/mol, after which a decreasing trend was observed. The data available for aliphatics was mainly for molecular weights smaller than 250 g/mol, which showed a similar trend to that of aromatics. The r(2) values for the LSER model on the adsorption of aromatic and aliphatic OCs by SWCNTs and MWCNTs were relatively similar indicating the linearity of LSER models did not depend on the CNT types. Among all LSER model descriptors, V term (molecular volume) for aromatic OCs and B term (basicity) for aliphatic OCs were the most predominant descriptors on both type of CNTs. The presence of R term (excess molar refractivity) in LSER model equations resulted in decreases for both V and P (polarizability) parameters without affecting the r(2) values. Overall, the results demonstrate that successful predictive models can be developed for the adsorption of OCs by MWCNTs and SWCNTs with LSER techniques. PMID:27064209

  5. Unified method for the total pore volume and pore size distribution of hierarchical zeolites from argon adsorption and mercury intrusion.

    PubMed

    Kenvin, Jeffrey; Jagiello, Jacek; Mitchell, Sharon; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-02-01

    A generalized approach to determine the complete distribution of macropores, mesopores, and micropores from argon adsorption and mercury porosimetry is developed and validated for advanced zeolite catalysts with hierarchically structured pore systems in powder and shaped forms. Rather than using a fragmented approach of simple overlays from individual techniques, a unified approach that utilizes a kernel constructed from model isotherms and model intrusion curves is used to calculate the complete pore size distribution and the total pore volume of the material. An added benefit of a single full-range pore size distribution is that the cumulative pore area and the area distribution are also obtained without the need for additional modeling. The resulting complete pore size distribution and the kernel accurately model both the adsorption isotherm and the mercury porosimetry. By bridging the data analysis of two primary characterization tools, this methodology fills an existing gap in the library of familiar methods for porosity assessment in the design of materials with multilevel porosity for novel technological applications. PMID:25603366

  6. Theoretical study of the aluminum distribution effects on the double proton transfer mechanisms upon adsorption of 4,4'-bipyridine on H-ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Akacem, Yamina; Castellà-Ventura, Martine; Kassab, Emile

    2012-02-01

    The aluminum distribution effects on the adsorption of 4,4'-bipyridine (44BPY) in the straight channel of H-ZSM-5 simulated by two ten-membered ring clusters (2-10T) have been investigated by DFT methods. The energetic and structural properties of the complexes formed upon interaction of 44BPY with the zeolite Brønsted acid sites for six different aluminum distributions were determined by B3LYP/6-31+G* calculations. Dispersion energies were estimated by performing single point calculations at the MP2 and M06-2X levels. Interaction energies were corrected for basis set superposition error (BSSE). The minimum energy pathways of the double proton transfer from H-ZSM-5 to 44BPY were characterized. Two mechanisms are proposed: a concerted mechanism in which both protons are simultaneously transferred giving the bidentate ion pair complex (44BPYH₂²⁺/2-10T²⁻) and a consecutive mechanism in which one proton is transferred directly leading to the monodentate ion pair complex (44BPYH⁺/2-10T⁻), whereas the second proton can be transferred according to Al distribution. The formation of monodentate or bidentate complexes strongly depends on the Al distribution. PMID:22220497

  7. Revisiting Bangham's law of adsorption-induced deformation: changes of surface energy and surface stress.

    PubMed

    Gor, Gennady Y; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-04-14

    When fluids are adsorbed on a solid surface they induce noticeable stresses, which cause the deformation of the solid. D. H. Bangham and co-authors performed a series of experimental measurements of adsorption-induced strains, and concluded that physisorption causes expansion, which is proportional to the lowering of the surface energy Δγ. This statement is referred to as the Bangham effect or Bangham's law. However, it is known that the quantity that controls the deformation is actually the change in surface stress Δf rather than surface energy Δγ, but this difference has not been considered in the context of adsorption-induced deformation of mesoporous materials. We use the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) theory to derive both values and show the difference between them. We find the condition when the difference between the two vanishes, and Bangham's law is applicable; it is likely that this condition is satisfied in most cases, and prediction of strain based on Δγ is a good approximation. We show that this is the case for adsorption of argon and water on Vycor glass. Finally, we show that the difference between Δγ and Δf can explain some of the experimental data that contradicts Bangham's law. PMID:27001041

  8. A protocol for quantum energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Masahiro

    2008-08-01

    In this Letter, a protocol called quantum energy distribution (QED) is proposed in which multi-parties can simultaneously extract positive energy on average from spin chains by use of common secret keys shared by an energy supplier. QED is robust against impersonation. An adversary, who does not have common secret keys and attempts to get energy, cannot obtain but give energy to spin chains. Total amount of energy transfer gives a lower bound of residual energy of a local cooling process by the energy supplier.

  9. First principles total energy studies of the adsorption of disilane on Ge(001)-c(2x4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Sanchez-Castillo, A.; Takeuchi, N.

    2004-03-01

    We perform first principles total energy calculations to investigate the energetics and the atomic structure of the adsorption of silane (SiH_4) and disilane (Si_2H_6) on the Ge(001)-c(2× 4) surface. The adsorption of Si_2H6 is a dissociative process which first yields SiH3 and then SiH2 fragments. We first study the adsorption of SiH2 considering two different models; the intra-row and the on-dimer geometries. Our results show that the on-dimer site is more stable than the intra-row geometry. This is not a surprise since in the absence of H atoms adsorption in the on-dimer site leaves no dangling bonds. In contrast, when the SiH2 fragment is considered together with two H atoms, the intra-row geometry is favored energetically as compared with the on-dimer site. Similar results have been previously obtained for the adsorption of SiH2 on Si(001). Disilane adsorption is explored according to two different geometries. In the first one, we have considered the adsorption as two SiH3 fragments, while in the second, we have considered the adsorption as two SiH2 fragments plus 2 H fragments. It is found that the later geometry is energetically more favorable.

  10. Resilient Core Networks for Energy Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntze, Nicolai; Rudolph, Carsten; Leivesley, Sally; Manz, David O.; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara E.

    2014-07-28

    Abstract—Substations and their control are crucial for the availability of electricity in today’s energy distribution. Ad- vanced energy grids with Distributed Energy Resources require higher complexity in substations, distributed functionality and communication between devices inside substations and between substations. Also, substations include more and more intelligent devices and ICT based systems. All these devices are connected to other systems by different types of communication links or are situated in uncontrolled environments. Therefore, the risk of ICT based attacks on energy grids is growing. Consequently, security measures to counter these risks need to be an intrinsic part of energy grids. This paper introduces the concept of a Resilient Core Network to interconnected substations. This core network provides essen- tial security features, enables fast detection of attacks and allows for a distributed and autonomous mitigation of ICT based risks.

  11. Distribution System Voltage Regulation by Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Ceylan, Oguzhan; Liu, Guodong; Xu, Yan; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a control method to regulate voltages in 3 phase unbalanced electrical distribution systems. A constrained optimization problem to minimize voltage deviations and maximize distributed energy resource (DER) active power output is solved by harmony search algorithm. IEEE 13 Bus Distribution Test System was modified to test three different cases: a) only voltage regulator controlled system b) only DER controlled system and c) both voltage regulator and DER controlled system. The simulation results show that systems with both voltage regulators and DER control provide better voltage profile.

  12. The distribution of nitrogen species and adsorption of ammonium in sediments from the tidal Potomac River and estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, N. S.; Kennedy, M. M.

    1987-07-01

    The distribution of dissolved ammonium, adsorbed ammonium and residual, organic and total nitrogen was measured in Potomac River tidal, transition zone and lower estuary sediments to a depth of 66 cm. For these sediments, exchangeable ammonium, and thereby adsorbed ammonium concentrations, were determined directly using an ammonia electrode in alkaline sediment suspensions. Ammonia electrode data were comparable to data obtained by KCl extraction of fresh sediment. The conventional unitless ammonium adsorption coefficient, calculated as the slope of the regression line drawn when sediment-adsorbed ammonium (μmol g -1 dry wt of sediment) is plotted against interstitial water ammonium (μmol g -1 dry wt sediment), is 1·5 for this system. When a modified ammonium adsorption coefficient is calculated from sediment-adsorbed ammonium concentrations and a ratio of interstitial water ammonium and potassium concentrations, the regression equation through the data has a zero intercept and is more nearly linear than the regression equation of data based on conventional calculations. The use of a ratio including ammonium and potassium concentrations in the interstitial water term takes into account ionic strength variations in the estuary and competition between ammonium and potassium for adsorption sites.

  13. Distributed energy store railguns experiment and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic acceleration of projectiles holds the potential for achieving higher velocities than yet achieved by any other means. A railgun is the simplest form of electromagnetic macroparticle accelerator and can generate the highest sustained accelerating force. The practical length of conventional railguns is limited by the impedance of the rails because current must be carried along the entire length of the rails. A railgun and power supply system called the distributed energy store railgun was proposed as a solution to this limitation. The distributed energy store railgun used multiple current sources connected to the rails of a railgun at points distributed along the bore. These current sources (energy stores) are turned on in sequence as the projectile moves down the bore so that current is fed to the railgun from behind the armature. In this system the length of the rails that carry the full armature current is less than the total length of the railgun. If a sufficient number of energy stores is used, this removes the limitation on the length of a railgun. An additional feature of distributed energy store type railguns is that they can be designed to maintain a constant pressure on the projectile being accelerated. A distributed energy store railgun was constructed and successfully operated. In addition to this first demonstration of the distributed energy store railgun principle, a theoretical model of the system was also constructed.

  14. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY

    SciTech Connect

    LANDI, J.T.; PLIVELICH, R.F.

    2006-04-30

    Electro Energy, Inc. conducted a research project to develop an energy efficient and environmentally friendly bipolar Ni-MH battery for distributed energy storage applications. Rechargeable batteries with long life and low cost potentially play a significant role by reducing electricity cost and pollution. A rechargeable battery functions as a reservoir for storage for electrical energy, carries energy for portable applications, or can provide peaking energy when a demand for electrical power exceeds primary generating capabilities.

  15. Energy optimization of water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Energy costs associated with pumping treated water into the distribution system and boosting water pressures where necessary is one of the largest expenditures in the operating budget of a municipality. Due to the size and complexity of Detroit`s water transmission system, an energy optimization project has been developed to better manage the flow of water in the distribution system in an attempt to reduce these costs.

  16. Physical and chemical nature of the scaling relations between adsorption energies of atoms on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Calle-Vallejo, F; Martínez, J I; García-Lastra, J M; Rossmeisl, J; Koper, M T M

    2012-03-16

    Despite their importance in physics and chemistry, the origin and extent of the scaling relations between the energetics of adsorbed species on surfaces remain elusive. We demonstrate here that scalability is not exclusive to adsorbed atoms and their hydrogenated species but rather a general phenomenon between any set of adsorbates bound similarly to the surface. On the example of the near-surface alloys of Pt, we show that scalability is a result of identical variations of adsorption energies with respect to the valence configuration of both the surface components and the adsorbates. PMID:22540492

  17. Adsorption Energy Trends on UO2 and ThO2 Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomurski, F. N.; Shuller, L. C.; Ewing, R. C.; Becker, U.

    2006-05-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) comprises approximately 96 percent of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Therefore, the interaction of UO2 surfaces with adsorbates such as water and oxygen affects the stability of SNF as a wasteform in a geologic repository. While spectroscopic studies are used to observe surface-adsorbate interactions, questions remain regarding the mechanisms driving the initial reactions between UO2 surfaces and adsorbates. Through the use of quantum mechanical techniques, adsorption and dissociation interactions between different UO2 surfaces and oxygen and water are explored as a function of surface structure. Comparisons are also made with thorium dioxide (ThO2), a nuclear material that is isostructural with UO2, in order to test surface-adsorbate interactions as a function of insulating versus semi-conducting material properties, respectively. In this study, the density functional theory-based quantum mechanical code, CASTEP (CAmbridge Serial Total Energy Package), is used to calculate adsorption energies and changes in electronic structure between clean and adsorbate-covered UO2 and ThO2 surfaces. Four different adsorption cases are tested on the UO2 (111) and (110) surfaces: (i) one-half mono-layer (ML) of molecular water, (ii) one-half ML of dissociated water, (iii) one-half ML of dissociated oxygen, and (iv) a combined molecular water and dissociated oxygen case. The same cases are also tested on the ThO2 (111) surface. Calculations involving the oxidation of bulk UO2 are also performed for comparison with surface processes.

  18. Tailored ion energy distributions on plasma electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2013-09-15

    As microelectronic device features continue to shrink approaching atomic dimensions, control of the ion energy distribution on the substrate during plasma etching and deposition becomes increasingly critical. The ion energy should be high enough to drive ion-assisted etching, but not too high to cause substrate damage or loss of selectivity. In many cases, a nearly monoenergetic ion energy distribution (IED) is desired to achieve highly selective etching. In this work, the author briefly reviews: (1) the fundamentals of development of the ion energy distribution in the sheath and (2) methods to control the IED on plasma electrodes. Such methods include the application of “tailored” voltage waveforms on an electrode in continuous wave plasmas, or the application of synchronous bias on a “boundary electrode” during a specified time window in the afterglow of pulsed plasmas.

  19. Metal-phthalocyanine ordered layers on Au(110): Metal-dependent adsorption energy

    SciTech Connect

    Massimi, Lorenzo Angelucci, Marco; Gargiani, Pierluigi; Betti, Maria Grazia; Montoro, Silvia; Mariani, Carlo

    2014-06-28

    Iron-phthalocyanine and cobalt-phthalocyanine chains, assembled along the Au(110)-(1×2) reconstructed channels, present a strong interaction with the Au metallic states, via the central metal ion. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy from the metal-2p core-levels and valence band high-resolution ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy bring to light signatures of the interaction of the metal-phthalocyanine single-layer with gold. The charge transfer from Au to the molecule causes the emerging of a metal-2p core level component at lower binding energy with respect to that measured in the molecular thin films, while the core-levels associated to the organic macrocycle (C and N 1s) are less influenced by the adsorption, and the macrocycles stabilize the interaction, inducing a strong interface dipole. Temperature Programmed Desorption experiments and photoemission as a function of temperature allow to estimate the adsorption energy for the thin-films, mainly due to the molecule-molecule van der Waals interaction, while the FePc and CoPc single-layers remain adsorbed on the Au surface up to at least 820 K.

  20. Investigation of pore size and energy distributions by statistical physics formalism applied to agriculture products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouaini, Fatma; Knani, Salah; Yahia, Manel Ben; Bahloul, Neila; Ben Lamine, Abdelmottaleb; Kechaou, Nabil

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new investigation that allows determining the pore size distribution (PSD) in a porous medium. This PSD is achieved by using the desorption isotherms of four varieties of olive leaves. This is by the means of statistical physics formalism and Kelvin's law. The results are compared with those obtained with scanning electron microscopy. The effect of temperature on the distribution function of pores has been studied. The influence of each parameter on the PSD is interpreted. A similar function of adsorption energy distribution, AED, is deduced from the PSD.

  1. Adsorption of Organic Compounds to Diesel Soot: Frontal Analysis and Polyparameter Linear Free-Energy Relationship.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhijiang; MacFarlane, John K; Gschwend, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Black carbons (BCs) dominate the sorption of many hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in soils and sediments, thereby reducing the HOCs' mobilities and bioavailabilities. However, we do not have data for diverse HOCs' sorption to BC because it is time-consuming and labor-intensive to obtain isotherms on soot and other BCs. In this study, we developed a frontal analysis chromatographic method to investigate the adsorption of 21 organic compounds with diverse functional groups to NIST diesel soot. This method was precise and time-efficient, typically taking only a few hours to obtain an isotherm. Based on 102 soot-carbon normalized sorption coefficients (KsootC) acquired at different sorbate concentrations, a sorbate-activity-dependent polyparameter linear free-energy relationship was established: logKsootC = (3.74 ± 0.11)V + ((-0.35 ± 0.02)log ai)E + (-0.62 ± 0.10)A + (-3.35 ± 0.11)B + (-1.45 ± 0.09); (N = 102, R(2) = 0.96, SE = 0.18), where V, E, A, and B are the sorbate's McGowan's characteristic volume, excess molar refraction, and hydrogen acidity and basicity, respectively; and ai is the sorbate's aqueous activity reflecting the system's approach to saturation. The difference in dispersive interactions with the soot versus with the water was the dominant factor encouraging adsorption, and H-bonding interactions discouraged this process. Using this relationship, soot-water and sediment-water or soil-water adsorption coefficients of HOCs of interest (PAHs and PCBs) were estimated and compared with the results reported in the literature. PMID:26587648

  2. Energy distribution in the quantum spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen

    2015-11-01

    At first this paper summarizes the current situation and historical development of the spectrum research, the difficulties and demand background. Then it introduces the research status of quantum spectrum and research ideas of energy distribution in quantum spectrum. We explain the concept of quantum spectrum, the difference between quantum spectrum and spectrum. We elaborate energy distribution in quantum spectrum from three aspects, which are representation, feature and mechanism of quantum spectrum energy distribution. Finally we describe the application of monochrome quantum spectrum about imaging and detection aspects and give an overview of the quantum spectrum. Based on above research results we continue to study and achieve the detection of multi-spectral imaging, which provide the technical basis for the application. We try access to an advanced stage of quantum spectrum study as soon as possible.

  3. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Matthew A; Hurst, Marc

    2016-01-01

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes. PMID:27466230

  4. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Hurst, Marc

    2016-07-01

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes.

  5. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning

    PubMed Central

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Hurst, Marc

    2016-01-01

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes. PMID:27466230

  6. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A

    2015-09-14

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S-C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments. PMID:26374051

  7. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A. E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr

    2015-09-14

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S–C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments.

  8. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A.

    2015-09-01

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S-C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments.

  9. Electron energy-distribution functions in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchford, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical calculation of the electron energy distribution functions in the regime of drift tube experiments is discussed. The discussion is limited to constant applied fields and values of E/N (ratio of electric field strength to neutral density) low enough that electron growth due to ionization can be neglected. (GHT)

  10. The energy distribution of Sirius B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1979-01-01

    The origin of the X-ray emission observed from the DA white dwarf Sirius B is investigated on the basis of low-resolution short wavelength IUE spectrum. Following a correction for the influence of scattered light from Sirius A, the intensity distribution of Sirius B is obtained as a function of wavelength. Comparison of the continuous energy distribution with model atmosphere energy distributions indicates an effective temperature of 25,500 K, which is not high enough to explain the observed X rays as normal photospheric radiation. In addition, with the exception of an unusual feature in the neighborhood of the C I 1657 line, no clear evidence is found of emission lines indicative of a corona, chromosphere or disk, and the origin of the X rays remains unknown.

  11. Energy Storage and Distributed Energy Generation Project, Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwank, Johannes; Mader, Jerry; Chen, Xiaoyin; Mi, Chris; Linic, Suljo; Sastry, Ann Marie; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Thompson, Levi; Varde, Keshav

    2008-03-31

    This report serves as a Final Report under the “Energy Storage and Distribution Energy Generation Project” carried out by the Transportation Energy Center (TEC) at the University of Michigan (UM). An interdisciplinary research team has been working on fundamental and applied research on: -distributed power generation and microgrids, -power electronics, and -advanced energy storage. The long-term objective of the project was to provide a framework for identifying fundamental research solutions to technology challenges of transmission and distribution, with special emphasis on distributed power generation, energy storage, control methodologies, and power electronics for microgrids, and to develop enabling technologies for novel energy storage and harvesting concepts that can be simulated, tested, and scaled up to provide relief for both underserved and overstressed portions of the Nation’s grid. TEC’s research is closely associated with Sections 5.0 and 6.0 of the DOE "Five-year Program Plan for FY2008 to FY2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs, August 2006.”

  12. Facile synthesis of ultrahigh-surface-area hollow carbon nanospheres for enhanced adsorption and energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fei; Tang, Zhiwei; Huang, Siqi; Chen, Luyi; Liang, Yeru; Mai, Weicong; Zhong, Hui; Fu, Ruowen; Wu, Dingcai

    2015-06-01

    Exceptionally large surface area and well-defined nanostructure are both critical in the field of nanoporous carbons for challenging energy and environmental issues. The pursuit of ultrahigh surface area while maintaining definite nanostructure remains a formidable challenge because extensive creation of pores will undoubtedly give rise to the damage of nanostructures, especially below 100 nm. Here we report that high surface area of up to 3,022 m2 g-1 can be achieved for hollow carbon nanospheres with an outer diameter of 69 nm by a simple carbonization procedure with carefully selected carbon precursors and carbonization conditions. The tailor-made pore structure of hollow carbon nanospheres enables target-oriented applications, as exemplified by their enhanced adsorption capability towards organic vapours, and electrochemical performances as electrodes for supercapacitors and sulphur host materials for lithium-sulphur batteries. The facile approach may open the doors for preparation of highly porous carbons with desired nanostructure for numerous applications.

  13. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Capacity Scaling with Adsorbate Molecular Weight and Adsorbent Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Purnendu; Golas, Avantika; Barnthip, Naris; Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Silanized-glass-particle adsorbent capacities are extracted from adsorption isotherms of human serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa) for adsorbent surface energies sampling the observable range of water wettability. Adsorbent capacity expressed as either mass-or-moles per-unit-adsorbent-area increases with protein molecular weight (MW) in a manner that is quantitatively inconsistent with the idea that proteins adsorb as a monolayer at the solution-material interface in any physically-realizable configuration or state of denaturation. Capacity decreases monotonically with increasing adsorbent hydrophilicity to the limit-of-detection (LOD) near τo = 30 dyne/cm (θ~65o) for all protein/surface combinations studied (where τo≡γlvocosθ is the water adhesion tension, γlvo is the interfacial tension of pure-buffer solution, and θ is the buffer advancing contact angle). Experimental evidence thus shows that adsorbent capacity depends on both adsorbent surface energy and adsorbate size. Comparison of theory to experiment implies that proteins do not adsorb onto a two-dimensional (2D) interfacial plane as frequently depicted in the literature but rather partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase region that separates the physical surface from bulk solution. This interphase has a finite volume related to the dimensions of hydrated protein in the adsorbed state (defining “layer” thickness). The interphase can be comprised of a number of adsorbed-protein layers depending on the solution concentration in which adsorbent is immersed, molecular volume of the adsorbing protein (proportional to MW), and adsorbent hydrophilicity. Multilayer adsorption accounts for adsorbent capacity over-and-above monolayer and is inconsistent with the idea that protein adsorbs to surfaces primarily through protein/surface interactions because proteins within second (or higher

  14. Stepwise assembling of polypeptide chain energy distributions.

    PubMed

    Jacchieri, S G

    2001-03-01

    The principles and application of conformational analysis software that makes use of a new algorithm are described. It is known that the existence of a local energy minimum in the energy landscape is in general related to the clustering of polypeptide chain conformations near that energy value or, in other words, to a high density of states. A criterion based on this principle is part of an algorithm employed to select subsets of polypeptide chain conformations in broad energy ranges. Chain fragments belonging to these subsets are then combined to build larger polypeptide chains and the corresponding energy distributions. The functionality of the various operations employed in the process is described and the FORTRAN 77 source code that defines the algorithm is listed. The methodology is illustrated with a calculation involving three chain fragments belonging to the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). PMID:11219430

  15. Calculation of adsorption free energy for solute-surface interactions using biased replica-exchange molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of a biomolecule, such as a peptide or protein, to a functionalized surface is of fundamental importance for a broad range of applications in biotechnology. The adsorption free energy for these types of interactions can be determined from a molecular dynamics simulation using the partitioning between adsorbed and nonadsorbed states, provided that sufficient sampling of both states is obtained. However, if interactions between the solute and the surface are strong, the solute will tend to be trapped near the surface during the simulation, thus preventing the adsorption free energy from being calculated by this method. This situation occurs even when using an advanced sampling algorithm such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). In this paper, the authors demonstrate the fundamental basis of this problem using a model system consisting of one sodium ion (Na+) as the solute positioned over a surface functionalized with one negatively charged group (COO−) in explicit water. With this simple system, the authors show that sufficient sampling in the coordinate normal to the surface cannot be obtained by conventional REMD alone. The authors then present a method to overcome this problem through the use of an adaptive windowed-umbrella sampling technique to develop a biased-energy function that is combined with REMD. This approach provides an effective method for the calculation of adsorption free energy for solute-surface interactions. PMID:19768127

  16. Adsorption, uptake and distribution of gold nanoparticles in Daphnia magna following long term exposure.

    PubMed

    Botha, Tarryn Lee; Boodhia, Kailen; Wepener, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (nAu) have recently been studied and developed within the biological and photothermal therapeutic contexts. The major clinical interest is within the application of novel drug delivery systems. Environmental exposure to nanoparticles can occur in different stages of the lifecycle of the product; from their synthesis, applications, product weathering and their disposal. Freshwater Daphnids, specifically Daphnia magna, have been used since the 1960s as a standard species in acute and chronic aquatic toxicity testing. Visualization of the interactions and uptake of nAu by D. magna was related to reproduction and molting patterns. Exposure to nAu was done using a chronic reproduction test performed for 14 days at six concentrations (0.5mg/L, 2mg/L, 5mg/L, 10mg/L, 15mg/L and 20mg/L). Microscopy was used to determine whether there was any uptake or interaction of nAu with daphnia. However the concentration of nAu in the media and the charge of particles played a role in the uptake and surface adsorption. As exposure concentrations of nAu increased it appeared that the nAu aggregated onto the surface and in the gut of the organisms in higher concentrations. There was no evidence of nAu internalization into the body cavity of the daphnia. Aquatic exposure to nAu resulted in increased adhesion of the particles to the carapace of daphnia, ingestion and uptake into the gut of daphnia and had no significant effect on reproduction and molting patterns. PMID:26650707

  17. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  18. Adsorption of nicotine from aqueous solution onto hydrophobic zeolite type USY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarevic, Natasa; Adnadjevic, Borivoj; Jovanovic, Jelena

    2011-07-01

    The isothermal adsorption of nicotine from an aqueous solution onto zeolite type USY was investigated. The adsorption isotherms of nicotine onto the zeolite at different temperatures ranging from 298 to 322 K were determined. It was found that the adsorption isotherms can be described by the model of Freundlich adsorption isotherm. Based on the adsorption isotherms the changes of adsorption heat, free energy and entropy with adsorption degree were determined. The determined decrease of adsorption heat with adsorption degree can be explained by the presence of the adsorption centers of different energy and concentration on interface of zeolite-nicotine solution. It was found that the probability function of density distribution of the heat of adsorption (DDF) has exponential form. It was concluded that the possibility of fitting the adsorption isotherms of nicotine onto the zeolite by Freundlich adsorption isotherm was a direct consequence of that. The determined increase in entropy with the increase in adsorption degree can be explained with the change of phase state of adsorbed nicotine.

  19. Energy distribution in disordered elastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, Gustavo R.

    2010-09-01

    Disordered networks are found in many natural and artificial materials, from gels or cytoskeletal structures to metallic foams or bones. Here, the energy distribution in this type of networks is modeled, taking into account the orientation of the struts. A correlation between the orientation and the energy per unit volume is found and described as a function of the connectivity in the network and the relative bending stiffness of the struts. If one or both parameters have relatively large values, the struts aligned in the loading direction present the highest values of energy. On the contrary, if these have relatively small values, the highest values of energy can be reached in the struts oriented transversally. This result allows explaining in a simple way remodeling processes in biological materials, for example, the remodeling of trabecular bone and the reorganization in the cytoskeleton. Additionally, the correlation between the orientation, the affinity, and the bending-stretching ratio in the network is discussed.

  20. The Adsorption of Arsenic on Iron Pipes in Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to remain compliant with the U.S. EPA’s Lead and Copper rule, it is pivotal to understand the relationship between factors affecting lead release in drinking water distribution systems. Lead solids were synthesized in cell experiments using a pH range of 6-11 with both 1...

  1. Distributed energy store railgun; The limiting case

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, R.A. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that when the limiting case of a distributed energy store railgun is analyzed, i.e., the case where the space between adjacent energy stores become indefinitely small, three important results are obtained. First, the shape of the current pulse delivered by each store is sinusoidal and an exponential tail. Second, the rail-to-rail voltage behind the rear-most active store approaches zero. Third, it is not possible to choose parameters in such a way that capacitor crowbars can be eliminated.

  2. Potential of mean force calculation of the free energy of adsorption of Type I winter flounder antifreeze protein on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Keith; Alan Salter, E.; Wesley Edmunds, R.; Wierzbicki, Andrzej

    2010-04-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that inhibit ice growth without changing the melting point of ice. In this work, we study the detailed molecular mechanism of interactions between the hydrophobic side of the winter flounder (WF) AFP and two mutants, AAAA and SSSS, in which threonine residues are substituted by serines and alanines, respectively. Umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations of the separation of the proteins from the (2 0 1) surface in an explicit water box is carried out to calculate the potential of mean force free energies of adsorption using AMBER10i. We estimate wild-type WF's free energy of adsorption to ice to be about -12.0 kcal/mol. Gas-phase pseudopotential plane-wave calculations of methane adsorption onto select surfaces of ice are also carried out under periodic boundary conditions to address the possible enthalpic role of WF's methyl groups in binding. The contributions of hydrophobic residues to the free energy of adsorption are discussed.

  3. The spectral energy distribution of NGC 1275

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, G. A.; Oke, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of absolute spectral energy distributions of interstellar gas for a galaxy (NGC 1275) is presented. Infrared spectra data shows heavy reddening. It is proposed that the interstellar gas may be ionized by shock waves or by nonthermal or stellar radiation. It is suggested, that high velocity, emission-line knots are H2 regions in a Perseus cluster galaxy or intergalactic gas cloud seen in projection against NGC 1275.

  4. Adsorption energies of poly(ethylene oxide)-based surfactants and nanoparticles on an air-water surface.

    PubMed

    Zell, Zachary A; Isa, Lucio; Ilg, Patrick; Leal, L Gary; Squires, Todd M

    2014-01-14

    The self-assembly of polymer-based surfactants and nanoparticles on fluid-fluid interfaces is central to many applications, including dispersion stabilization, creation of novel 2D materials, and surface patterning. Very often these processes involve compressing interfacial monolayers of particles or polymers to obtain a desired material microstructure. At high surface pressures, however, even highly interfacially active objects can desorb from the interface. Methods of directly measuring the energy which keeps the polymer or particles bound to the interface (adsorption/desorption energies) are therefore of high interest for these processes. Moreover, though a geometric description linking adsorption energy and wetting properties through the definition of a contact angle can be established for rigid nano- or microparticles, such a description breaks down for deformable or aggregating objects. Here, we demonstrate a technique to quantify desorption energies directly, by comparing surface pressure-density compression measurements using a Wilhelmy plate and a custom-microfabricated deflection tensiometer. We focus on poly(ethylene oxide)-based polymers and nanoparticles. For PEO-based homo- and copolymers, the adsorption energy of PEO chains scales linearly with molecular weight and can be tuned by changing the subphase composition. Moreover, the desorption surface pressure of PEO-stabilized nanoparticles corresponds to the saturation surface pressure for spontaneously adsorbed monolayers, yielding trapping energies of ∼10(3) k(B)T. PMID:24328531

  5. Distribution or adsorption: the major dilemma in reversed-phase HPLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deineka, V. I.

    2008-06-01

    A method is suggested for analyzing the dependences obtained for different compositions of mobile eluent system phases, their slopes and intercepts, log k( i, B) = a + b log k ( i, A), where a is the intercept for the A and B stationary phases and b is the proportionality factor. An analysis requires parallel investigation of sorbate retention on at least three stationary phases with different lengths of grafted hydrocarbon radicals. The dependence of correlation parameters on the sorbate retention mechanism is discussed. It is shown that the hypothetical dependences coincide with the experimental dependences for surface sorption of resveratrol and volume distribution of triglycerides.

  6. Effect of seawater salinity on pore-size distribution on a poly(styrene)-based HP20 resin and its adsorption of diarrhetic shellfish toxins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin; Sun, Geng; Qiu, Jiangbing; Ma, Qimin; Hess, Philipp; Li, Aifeng

    2014-12-19

    In the present study, okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX1) were spiked into artificial seawater at low, medium and high estuarine salinities (9‰, 13.5‰ and 27‰). Passive samplers (HP20 resin) used for solid phase adsorption toxin tracking (SPATT) technology were exposed in these seawaters for 12-h periods. Adsorption curves well fitted a pseudo-secondary kinetics model. The highest initial sorption rates of both toxins occurred in the seawater of medium salinity, followed by seawater of low and high estuarine salinity. Pore volumes of micropores (<2 nm) and small mesopores (2 nmadsorption of toxins in seawater at high and low salinity but not in seawater at medium salinity, which demonstrated that the toxin molecules entered into micropores and mesopores (below 10nm in size) in seawaters of high and low salinity. More toxin or other matrix agglomerates were displayed on the surface of resin deployed in the seawater of medium salinity. Taking into consideration the pore-size distribution and surface images, it appears that intra-particle diffusion governs toxin adsorption in seawater at high salinity while film diffusion mainly controls the adsorption process in seawater at medium salinity. This is the first study to confirm that molecules of OA and DTX1 are able to enter into micropores (<2nm) and small mesopores (2-10nm) of HP20 resin in estuarine seawater with high salinity (∼27‰). PMID:25464996

  7. Adsorption of Water Monomer and Clusters on Platinum(111) Terrace and Related Steps and Kinks I. Configurations, Energies, and Hydrogen Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Arnadottir, Liney; Stuve, Eric M.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2010-10-01

    Adsorption and rotation of water monomer, dimer, and trimer on the (111) terrace, (221) and (322) stepped, and (763) and (854) kinked surfaces of platinum were studied by density functional theory calculations using the PW91 approximation to the energy functional. On the (111) terrace, water monomer and the donor molecule of the dimer and trimer adsorb at atop sites. The permolecule adsorption energies of the monomer, dimer, and trimer are 0.30, 0.45, and 0.48 eV, respectively. Rotation of monomers, dimers, and trimers on the terrace is facile with energy barriers of 0.02 eV or less. Adsorption on steps and kinks is stronger than on the terrace, as evidenced by monomer adsorption energies of 0.46 to 0.55 eV. On the (221) stepped surface the zigzag extended configuration is most stable with a per-molecule adsorption energy of 0.57 eV. On the (322) stepped surface the dimer, two configurations of the trimer, and the zigzag configuration have similar adsorption energies of 0.55 ± 0.02 eV. Hydrogen bonding is strongest in the dimer and trimer adsorbed on the terrace, with respective energies of 0.30 and 0.27 eV, and accounts for their increased adsorption energies relative to the monomer. Hydrogen bonding is weak to moderate for adsorption at steps, with energies of 0.04 to 0.15 eV, as the much stronger water-metal interactions inhibit adsorption geometries favorable to hydrogen bonding. Correlations of hydrogen bond angles and energies with hydrogen bond lengths are presented. On the basis of these DFT/PW91 results, a model for water cluster formation on the Pt(111) surface can be formulated where kink sites nucleate chains along the top of step edges, consistent with the experimental findings of Morgenstern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 77 (1996) 703.

  8. Radionuclide adsorption distribution coefficients measured in Hanford sediments for the low level waste performance assessment project

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.; Serne, R.J.; Owen, A.T.

    1996-08-01

    Preliminary modeling efforts for the Hanford Site`s Low Level Waste-Performance Assessment (LLW PA) identified {sup 129}I, {sup 237}Np, {sup 79}Se, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 234},{sup 235},{sup 238}U as posing the greatest potential health hazard. It was also determined that the outcome of these simulations was very sensitive to the parameter describing the extent to which radionuclides sorb to the subsurface matrix, i.e., the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}). The distribution coefficient is a ratio of the radionuclide concentration associated with the solid phase to that in the liquid phase. The objectives of this study were to (1) measure iodine, neptunium, technetium, and uranium K{sub d} values using laboratory conditions similar to those expected at the LLW PA disposal site, and (2) evaluate the effect of selected environmental parameters, such as pH, ionic strength, moisture concentration, and radio nuclide concentration, on K{sub d} values of selected radionuclides. It is the intent of these studies to develop technically defensible K{sub d} values for the PA. The approach taken throughout these studies was to measure the key radio nuclide K{sub d} values as a function of several environmental parameters likely to affect their values. Such an approach provides technical defensibility by identifying the mechanisms responsible for trends in K{sub d} values. Additionally, such studies provide valuable guidance regarding the range of K{sub d} values likely to be encountered in the proposed disposal site.

  9. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    The purpose is to develop controls for inverter-based renewable and non-renewable distributed energy systems to provide local voltage, power and power quality support for loads and the power grid. The objectives are to (1) develop adaptive controls for inverter-based distributed energy (DE) systems when there are multiple inverters on the same feeder and (2) determine the impact of high penetration high seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) air conditioning (A/C) units on power systems during sub-transmission faults which can result in an A/C compressor motor stall and assess how inverter-based DE can help to mitigate the stall event. The Distributed Energy Communications & Controls Laboratory (DECC) is a unique facility for studying dynamic voltage, active power (P), non-active power (Q) and power factor control from inverter-based renewable distributed energy (DE) resources. Conventionally, inverter-based DE systems have been designed to provide constant, close to unity power factor and thus not provide any voltage support. The DECC Lab interfaces with the ORNL campus distribution system to provide actual power system testing of the controls approach. Using mathematical software tools and the DECC Lab environment, we are developing and testing local, autonomous and adaptive controls for local voltage control and P & Q control for inverter-based DE. We successfully tested our active and non-active power (P,Q) controls at the DECC laboratory along with voltage regulation controls. The new PQ control along with current limiter controls has been tested on our existing inverter test system. We have tested both non-adaptive and adaptive control modes for the PQ control. We have completed several technical papers on the approaches and results. Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is

  10. Dynamic Voltage Regulation Using Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Rizy, D Tom; Li, Fangxing; Kueck, John D

    2007-01-01

    Many distributed energy resources (DE) are near load centres and equipped with power electronics converters to interface with the grid, therefore it is feasible for DE to provide ancillary services such as voltage regulation, nonactive power compensation, and power factor correction. A synchronous condenser and a microturbine with an inverter interface are implemented in parallel in a distribution system to regulate the local voltage. Voltage control schemes of the inverter and the synchronous condenser are developed. The experimental results show that both the inverter and the synchronous condenser can regulate the local voltage instantaneously, while the dynamic response of the inverter is faster than the synchronous condenser; and that integrated voltage regulation (multiple DE perform voltage regulation) can increase the voltage regulation capability, increase the lifetime of the equipment, and reduce the capital and operation costs.

  11. Prediction of binding free energy for adsorption of antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B on a POPC membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivcharuk, Victor; Tomberli, Bruno; Tolokh, Igor S.; Gray, C. G.

    2008-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the interaction of a zwitterionic palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer with the cationic antimicrobial peptide bovine lactoferricin (LFCinB) in a 100 mM NaCl solution at 310 K. The interaction of LFCinB with POPC is used as a model system for studying the details of membrane-peptide interactions, with the peptide selected because of its antimicrobial nature. Seventy-two 3 ns MD simulations, with six orientations of LFCinB at 12 different distances from a POPC membrane, are carried out to determine the potential of mean force (PMF) or free energy profile for the peptide as a function of the distance between LFCinB and the membrane surface. To calculate the PMF for this relatively large system a new variant of constrained MD and thermodynamic integration is developed. A simplified method for relating the PMF to the LFCinB-membrane binding free energy is described and used to predict a free energy of adsorption (or binding) of -1.05±0.39kcal/mol , and corresponding maximum binding force of about 20 pN, for LFCinB-POPC. The contributions of the ions-LFCinB and the water-LFCinB interactions to the PMF are discussed. The method developed will be a useful starting point for future work simulating peptides interacting with charged membranes and interactions involved in the penetration of membranes, features necessary to understand in order to rationally design peptides as potential alternatives to traditional antibiotics.

  12. Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, D. A.; Bendo, G. J.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Gordon, K. D.; Regan, M. W.; Armus, L.; Cannon, J. M.; Calzetti, D.; Draine, B. T.; Helou, G.; Joseph, R. D.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Li, A.; Murphy, E. J.; Roussel, H.; Walter, F.; Hanson, H. M.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kewley, L. J.; Lamanna, C. A.; Leitherer, C.; Meyer, M.; Rieke, G. H.; Rieke, M. J.; Sheth, K.; Smith, J. D. T.; Thornley, M. D.

    2005-05-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) is carrying out a comprehensive multi-wavelength survey on a sample of 75 nearby galaxies. The 1-850 \\micron\\ spectral energy distributions are presented for the first portion of the SINGS sample using broadband imaging data from Spitzer, 2MASS, ISO, IRAS, and SCUBA. The infrared colors derived from the globally-integrated Spitzer data are generally consistent with the previous generation of models that were developed based on global data for normal star-forming galaxies, though significant deviations are observed. Spitzer's excellent sensitivity and resolution also allow a detailed investigation of the infrared spectral energy distributions for various locations within the three large, nearby galaxies NGC 3031 (M 81), NGC 5194 (M 51), and NGC 7331. A wide variety of spectral shapes are found within each galaxy, especially for NGC 3031, the closest of the three targets and thus the galaxy for which the smallest spatial scales can be explored. The local star formation rate, as gauged by Hα emission, is shown to strongly correlate with local infrared fluxes and colors. If the galaxy-to-galaxy variations in spectral energy distributions seen in our sample are representative of the range present at high redshift then extrapolations of total infrared luminosities and star formation rates from the observed 24 \\micron\\ flux will be uncertain at the factor-of-five level. The corresponding uncertainties in the redshifted 8.0 \\micron\\ flux (e.g. observed 24 \\micron\\ flux for a z = 2 source) are factors of 5--10. Considerable caution should be used when interpreting such extrapolated infrared luminosities. Support for this work, part of the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Science Program, was provided by NASA through Contract Number 1224769 issued by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  13. On the energy distribution in Sirius B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.; Dettmann, T.; Kapranidis, S.

    1979-01-01

    A spectrum of Sirius B in the wavelength region 1100-1900 A taken with the IUE satellite shows an absolute flux and spectral energy distribution in the continuum in agreement with theoretical white-dwarf models with T(eff) of 26,000 K plus or minus 1000 K for log g equals 8.65 and R equals 5.08 x 10 to the 8th cm. The Lyman-alpha profile is also in agreement with these parameters. No obvious emission lines in the spectrum of Sirius B or A which could indicate the presence of a chromosphere or corona in either of the stars are observed.

  14. Facile synthesis of ultrahigh-surface-area hollow carbon nanospheres for enhanced adsorption and energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Tang, Zhiwei; Huang, Siqi; Chen, Luyi; Liang, Yeru; Mai, Weicong; Zhong, Hui; Fu, Ruowen; Wu, Dingcai

    2015-01-01

    Exceptionally large surface area and well-defined nanostructure are both critical in the field of nanoporous carbons for challenging energy and environmental issues. The pursuit of ultrahigh surface area while maintaining definite nanostructure remains a formidable challenge because extensive creation of pores will undoubtedly give rise to the damage of nanostructures, especially below 100 nm. Here we report that high surface area of up to 3,022 m2 g−1 can be achieved for hollow carbon nanospheres with an outer diameter of 69 nm by a simple carbonization procedure with carefully selected carbon precursors and carbonization conditions. The tailor-made pore structure of hollow carbon nanospheres enables target-oriented applications, as exemplified by their enhanced adsorption capability towards organic vapours, and electrochemical performances as electrodes for supercapacitors and sulphur host materials for lithium–sulphur batteries. The facile approach may open the doors for preparation of highly porous carbons with desired nanostructure for numerous applications. PMID:26072734

  15. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  16. Smart Operations in Distributed Energy Resources System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Li; Jie, Shu; Zhang-XianYong; Qing, Zhou

    Smart grid capabilities are being proposed to help solve the challenges concerning system operations due to that the trade-offs between energy and environmental needs will be constantly negotiated while a reliable supply of electricity needs even greater assurance in case of that threats of disruption have risen. This paper mainly explores models for distributed energy resources system (DG, storage, and load),and also reviews the evolving nature of electricity markets to deal with this complexity and a change of emphasis on signals from these markets to affect power system control. Smart grid capabilities will also impact reliable operations, while cyber security issues must be solved as a culture change that influences all system design, implementation, and maintenance. Lastly, the paper explores significant questions for further research and the need for a simulation environment that supports such investigation and informs deployments to mitigate operational issues as they arise.

  17. Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui,Afzal S.

    2006-06-16

    Distributed generation (DG) technologies, such as gas-fired reciprocating engines and microturbines, have been found to be economically beneficial in meeting commercial-sector electrical, heating, and cooling loads. Even though the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that offered by traditional central stations, combined heat and power (CHP) applications using recovered heat can make the overall system energy efficiency of distributed energy resources (DER) greater. From a policy perspective, however, it would be useful to have good estimates of penetration rates of DER under various economic and regulatory scenarios. In order to examine the extent to which DER systems may be adopted at a national level, we model the diffusion of DER in the US commercial building sector under different technical research and technology outreach scenarios. In this context, technology market diffusion is assumed to depend on the system's economic attractiveness and the developer's knowledge about the technology. The latter can be spread both by word-of-mouth and by public outreach programs. To account for regional differences in energy markets and climates, as well as the economic potential for different building types, optimal DER systems are found for several building types and regions. Technology diffusion is then predicted via two scenarios: a baseline scenario and a program scenario, in which more research improves DER performance and stronger technology outreach programs increase DER knowledge. The results depict a large and diverse market where both optimal installed capacity and profitability vary significantly across regions and building types. According to the technology diffusion model, the West region will take the lead in DER installations mainly due to high electricity prices, followed by a later adoption in the Northeast and Midwest regions. Since the DER market is in an early stage, both technology research and outreach programs have the potential to increase

  18. Determination of the surface energy distributions of different processed lactose.

    PubMed

    Thielmann, Frank; Burnett, Daniel J; Heng, Jerry Y Y

    2007-11-01

    Particulate interactions between drug and lactose carrier in dry powder inhaler formulations are affected by the heterogenous energy distribution on the surface of the individual compounds. A new method based on Inverse Gas Chromatography at finite concentration is applied to study the energy heterogeneity of untreated, milled, and recrystallized lactose of similar particle size distribution. Energy distributions for the dispersive surface energy and the specific free energy of ethanol are obtained. Milling causes an increase in surface energy due to formation of amorphous regions. Untreated and recrystallized materials have similar surface energies at low surface coverages but show clear differences in energy distribution. PMID:18058321

  19. Coordinated Collaboration between Heterogeneous Distributed Energy Resources

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abdollahy, Shahin; Lavrova, Olga; Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A power distribution feeder, where a heterogeneous set of distributed energy resources is deployed, is examined by simulation. The energy resources include PV, battery storage, natural gas GenSet, fuel cells, and active thermal storage for commercial buildings. The resource scenario considered is one that may exist in a not too distant future. Two cases of interaction between different resources are examined. One interaction involves a GenSet used to partially offset the duty cycle of a smoothing battery connected to a large PV system. The other example involves the coordination of twenty thermal storage devices, each associated with a commercial building.more » Storage devices are intended to provide maximum benefit to the building, but it is shown that this can have a deleterious effect on the overall system, unless the action of the individual storage devices is coordinated. A network based approach is also introduced to calculate some type of effectiveness metric to all available resources which take part in coordinated operation. The main finding is that it is possible to achieve synergy between DERs on a system; however this required a unified strategy to coordinate the action of all devices in a decentralized way.« less

  20. Advanced Energy Storage Management in Distribution Network

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Ceylan, Oguzhan; Xiao, Bailu; Starke, Michael R; Ollis, T Ben; King, Daniel J; Irminger, Philip; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    With increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG) in the distribution networks (DN), the secure and optimal operation of DN has become an important concern. In this paper, an iterative mixed integer quadratic constrained quadratic programming model to optimize the operation of a three phase unbalanced distribution system with high penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) panels, DG and energy storage (ES) is developed. The proposed model minimizes not only the operating cost, including fuel cost and purchasing cost, but also voltage deviations and power loss. The optimization model is based on the linearized sensitivity coefficients between state variables (e.g., node voltages) and control variables (e.g., real and reactive power injections of DG and ES). To avoid slow convergence when close to the optimum, a golden search method is introduced to control the step size and accelerate the convergence. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on modified IEEE 13 nodes test feeders with multiple PV panels, DG and ES. Numerical simulation results validate the proposed algorithm. Various scenarios of system configuration are studied and some critical findings are concluded.

  1. Energy Efficiency of Distributed Environmental Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khalifa, H. Ezzat; Isik, Can; Dannenhoffer, John F. III

    2011-02-23

    In this report, we present an analytical evaluation of the potential of occupant-regulated distributed environmental control systems (DECS) to enhance individual occupant thermal comfort in an office building with no increase, and possibly even a decrease in annual energy consumption. To this end we developed and applied several analytical models that allowed us to optimize comfort and energy consumption in partitioned office buildings equipped with either conventional central HVAC systems or occupant-regulated DECS. Our approach involved the following interrelated components: 1. Development of a simplified lumped-parameter thermal circuit model to compute the annual energy consumption. This was necessitated by the need to perform tens of thousands of optimization calculations involving different US climatic regions, and different occupant thermal preferences of a population of ~50 office occupants. Yearly transient simulations using TRNSYS, a time-dependent building energy modeling program, were run to determine the robustness of the simplified approach against time-dependent simulations. The simplified model predicts yearly energy consumption within approximately 0.6% of an equivalent transient simulation. Simulations of building energy usage were run for a wide variety of climatic regions and control scenarios, including traditional “one-size-fits-all” (OSFA) control; providing a uniform temperature to the entire building, and occupant-selected “have-it-your-way” (HIYW) control with a thermostat at each workstation. The thermal model shows that, un-optimized, DECS would lead to an increase in building energy consumption between 3-16% compared to the conventional approach depending on the climate regional and personal preferences of building occupants. Variations in building shape had little impact in the relative energy usage. 2. Development of a gradient-based optimization method to minimize energy consumption of DECS while keeping each occupant

  2. Characterizing the energy distribution around GPR antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamanti, Nectaria; Annan, A. Peter

    2013-12-01

    Antenna height, orientation, shielding and subsurface properties all impact GPR responses. Although the basic concepts are generally understood, clarifying the key relationships can aid interpretation. Our long term goal is to develop easily parameterized models of transmitting and receiving components of GPR systems that will provide for quantitative interpretation of data acquired with real systems. Our first step was to develop modeling capacity and response presentation tools to help with development; the initial results have been both informative and forced a better understanding of near and far field. We are using three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) modeling. Model results can be presented in a variety of forms. In this paper, we focus on presenting the emitted energy characteristics and use radiation pattern display format for infinitesimal dipoles, resistively loaded dipoles and shielded dipoles. Patterns are computed for a range of environments such as free-space and over loss-less half-spaces with various properties. The energy distribution patterns are presented to investigate the behavior with distance away from the transmitter feed point, and as a function of height above the ground surface. The numerical simulations provide expected insights plus demonstrate the benefit of ground-coupling and the impact of shielding on GPR responses. Further, using the total radiated energy parameter is a novel method for displaying directivity, for GPR transient emissions.

  3. Sub-ambient carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Tamilarasan, P.; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2015-04-14

    Carbon dioxide adsorption on carbon surface can be enhanced by doping the surface with heterogeneous atoms, which can increase local surface affinity. This study presents the carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene at low pressures (<100 kPa). Graphene was exposed to nitrogen plasma, which dopes nitrogen atoms into carbon hexagonal lattice, mainly in pyridinic and pyrrolic forms. It is found that nitrogen doping significantly improves the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at all temperatures, due to the enrichment of local Lewis basic sites. In general, isotherm and thermodynamic parameters suggest that doped nitrogen sites have nearly same adsorption energy of surface defects and residual functional groups. The isosteric heat of adsorption remains in physisorption range, which falls with surface coverage, suggesting the distribution of magnitude of adsorption energy. The absolute values of isosteric heat and entropy of adsorption are slightly increased upon nitrogen doping.

  4. Classical trajectory study of internal energy distributions in unimolecular processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, J. D.; Marcus, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Energy flow in a molecular system such as CD3Cl or CD3H representing a chemical activation experiment is studied by the method of classical trajectories. A correlation function method is used to obtain energy distributions before and after the breakup of the activated molecule. The energy distribution in the final product is found to be randomly distributed for a surface with no exit channel barrier or strong intermode couplings. Nonrandom energy distributions result when these special forces are present. Product channel barriers result in an excess of translational energy and exit channel intermode couplings result in nonrandom vibrational distributions.

  5. Distributed activation energy model parameters of some Turkish coals

    SciTech Connect

    Gunes, M.; Gunes, S.K.

    2008-07-01

    A multi-reaction model based on distributed activation energy has been applied to some Turkish coals. The kinetic parameters of distributed activation energy model were calculated via computer program developed for this purpose. It was observed that the values of mean of activation energy distribution vary between 218 and 248 kJ/mol, and the values of standard deviation of activation energy distribution vary between 32 and 70 kJ/mol. The correlations between kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model and certain properties of coal have been investigated.

  6. Advanced Energy Efficiency and Distributed Renewables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovins, Amory

    2007-04-01

    The US now wrings twice the GDP from each unit of energy that it did in 1975. Reduced energy intensity since then now provides more than twice as much service as burning oil does. Yet still more efficient end-use of energy -- explained more fully in a companion workshop offered at 1245 -- is the largest, fastest, cheapest, most benign, least understood, and least harnessed energy resource available. For example, existing technologies could save half of 2000 US oil and gas and three-fourths of US electricity, at lower cost than producing and delivering that energy from existing facilities. Saving half the oil through efficiency and replacing the other half with saved natural gas and advanced biofuels would cost an average of only 15/barrel and could eliminate US oil use by the 2040s, led by business for profit. Efficiency techniques and ways to combine and apply them continue to improve faster than they're applied, so the ``efficiency resource'' is becoming ever larger and cheaper. As for electricity, ``micropower'' (distributed renewables plus low-carbon cogeneration) is growing so quickly that by 2005 it provided a sixth of the world's electricity and a third of its new electricity, and was adding annually 4x the capacity and 11x the capacity added by nuclear power, which it surpassed in capacity in 2002 and in output in 2006. Together, micropower and ``negawatts'' (saved electricity) now provide upwards half the world's new electrical services, due to their far lower cost and lower financial risk than the central thermal power stations that still dominate policy discussions. For oil and electricity, each of which adds about two-fifths of the world's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, efficiency plus competitive alternative supplies can stabilize the earth's climate at a profit, as well as solving the oil and (largely) the nuclear proliferation problems. Conversely, costlier and slower options, notably nuclear power, would displace less carbon emission per

  7. Parameterization of an interfacial force field for accurate representation of peptide adsorption free energy on high-density polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Abramyan, Tigran M.; Snyder, James A.; Yancey, Jeremy A.; Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial force field (IFF) parameters for use with the CHARMM force field have been developed for interactions between peptides and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Parameterization of the IFF was performed to achieve agreement between experimental and calculated adsorption free energies of small TGTG–X–GTGT host–guest peptides (T = threonine, G = glycine, and X = variable amino-acid residue) on HDPE, with ±0.5 kcal/mol agreement. This IFF parameter set consists of tuned nonbonded parameters (i.e., partial charges and Lennard–Jones parameters) for use with an in-house-modified CHARMM molecular dynamic program that enables the use of an independent set of force field parameters to control molecular behavior at a solid–liquid interface. The R correlation coefficient between the simulated and experimental peptide adsorption free energies increased from 0.00 for the standard CHARMM force field parameters to 0.88 for the tuned IFF parameters. Subsequent studies are planned to apply the tuned IFF parameter set for the simulation of protein adsorption behavior on an HDPE surface for comparison with experimental values of adsorbed protein orientation and conformation. PMID:25818122

  8. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Jason, Andrew J.; Blind, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  9. The effect of ligand substitution and water co-adsorption on the adsorption dynamics and energy level matching of amino-phenyl acid dyes on TiO2.

    PubMed

    Manzhos, Sergei; Segawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-02-01

    We perform a comparative theoretical analysis of adsorption of dyes NK1 (2E,4E-2-cyano-5-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)penta-2,4-dienoic acid) and NK7 (2E,4E-2-cyano-5-(4-diphenylaminophenyl)penta-2,4-dienoic acid) on clean and water-covered anatase (101) surfaces of TiO(2). Ligand substitution away from the anchoring group changes the energy level matching between the dye's LUMO and the oxide's conduction band. Monodentate binding and bidentate binding configurations of the dyes to TiO(2) are found to have similar adsorption energies even though the injection from the bidentate mode is found to dominate. Water has a strong effect on adsorption, inducing deprotonation and affecting strongly and differently between the dyes the energy level matching, leading to a shut-off of the injection from NK7 of bidentate adsorption configuration. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show a strong effect of nuclear motion on energy levels, specifically, increasing the driving force for injection in the monodentate regime. PMID:22194034

  10. Small Deflection Energy Analyzer for Energy and Angular Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of the Small Deflection Energy Analyzer (SDEA) charged-particle spectrometer for energy and angle distributions responds to a longstanding need to measure the wind velocity vector in Earth s thermosphere, and to obtain the ion-drift vector in the ionosphere. The air and ions above 120 km are endowed with bulk velocities and temperatures just like air near the ground, but with separate spatial and temporal variations. It is important to understand these not only for study of the physics and chemistry of the Sun-Earth connection, but also for spacecraft orbit predictions, and communications through the ionosphere. The SDEA consists of a pair of parallel conducting plates separated by a small distance, with an entrance slit on one end, and an exit slit on the other. A voltage applied to these plates develops an electric field between the plates, and this field deflects ions passing through it. If an ion has too little energy, it will strike one of the plates. If it has too much, it will strike the back wall. An ion with the amount of energy being searched for will have its trajectory bent just enough to exit the back slit. The SDEA units are compact, rectangular, and operate with low voltages. The units can be built up into small arrays. These arrays could be used either to widen the field of view or to sharpen an existing one. This approach can also be used to obtain angular distributions in two planes simultaneously, thus cutting down the ion source power requirements in half. This geometry has enabled a new mass-spectrometer concept that can provide miniaturized mass spectrometers for use in industrial plants, air-pollution monitoring, and noxious-gas detection.

  11. Adsorption energy of small molecules on core-shell Fe@Au nanoparticles: tuning by shell thickness.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Magali; Tarrat, Nathalie; Morillo, Joseph

    2016-03-23

    The adsorption of several small molecules on different gold surfaces, Au(001), strained Au(001) and Au(001) epitaxied on Fe(001), has been characterized using density functional theory. The surface strain leads to a less energetically favourable adsorption for all studied molecules. Moreover, the presence of the iron substrate induces an additional decrease of the binding energy, for 1 and 2 Au monolayers. For carbon monoxide (CO), the structural and energetic variations with the number of Au monolayers deposited on Fe have been analyzed and correlated with the distance between the carbon atom and the gold surface. The effect of the subsurface layer has been evidenced for 1 and 2 monolayers. The other molecules show different quantitative behavior depending on the type of their interaction with the gold surface. However, the iron substrate weakens the interaction, either for the chemisorbed species or for the physisorbed species. 2 Au monolayers seem to be the best compromise to decrease the reactivity of the gold surface towards adsorption while preventing the Fe oxidation. PMID:26971708

  12. Can the Gibbs free energy of adsorption be predicted efficiently and accurately: an M05-2X DFT study.

    PubMed

    Michalkova, A; Gorb, L; Hill, F; Leszczynski, J

    2011-03-24

    This study presents new insight into the prediction of partitioning of organic compounds between a carbon surface (soot) and water, and it also sheds light on the sluggish desorption of interacting molecules from activated and nonactivated carbon surfaces. This paper provides details about the structure and interactions of benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and aromatic nitrocompounds with a carbon surface modeled by coronene using a density functional theory approach along with the M05-2X functional. The adsorption was studied in vacuum and from water solution. The molecules studied are physisorbed on the carbon surface. While the intermolecular interactions of benzene and hydrocarbons are governed by dispersion forces, nitrocompounds are adsorbed also due to quite strong electrostatic interactions with all types of carbon surfaces. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the method of prediction presented in this study allows one to approach the experimental level of accuracy in predicting thermodynamic parameters of adsorption on a carbon surface from the gas phase. The empirical modification of the polarized continuum model leads also to a quantitative agreement with the experimental data for the Gibbs free energy values of the adsorption from water solution. PMID:21361266

  13. Linear solvation energy relationship for the adsorption of synthetic organic compounds on single-walled carbon nanotubes in water.

    PubMed

    Ding, H; Chen, C; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    The linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was applied to predict the adsorption coefficient (K) of synthetic organic compounds (SOCs) on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A total of 40 log K values were used to develop and validate the LSER model. The adsorption data for 34 SOCs were collected from 13 published articles and the other six were obtained in our experiment. The optimal model composed of four descriptors was developed by a stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) method. The adjusted r(2) (r(2)adj) and root mean square error (RMSE) were 0.84 and 0.49, respectively, indicating good fitness. The leave-one-out cross-validation Q(2) ([Formula: see text]) was 0.79, suggesting the robustness of the model was satisfactory. The external Q(2) ([Formula: see text]) and RMSE (RMSEext) were 0.72 and 0.50, respectively, showing the model's strong predictive ability. Hydrogen bond donating interaction (bB) and cavity formation and dispersion interactions (vV) stood out as the two most influential factors controlling the adsorption of SOCs onto SWCNTs. The equilibrium concentration would affect the fitness and predictive ability of the model, while the coefficients varied slightly. PMID:26854726

  14. Controlling electron energy distributions for plasma technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The basic function of low temperature plasmas in society benefiting technologies is to channel power into specific modes of atoms and molecules to excite desired states or produce specified radicals. This functionality ultimately depends on the ability to craft an electron energy distribution (EED) to match cross sections. Given electric fields, frequencies, gas mixtures and pressures, predicting EEDs and excitation rates can in large part be reliably done. The inverse problem, specifying the conditions that produce a given EED, is less well understood. Early strategies to craft EEDs include adjusting gas mixtures, such as the rare gas-Hg mixtures in fluorescent lamps, and externally sustained discharges, such as electron-beam sustained plasmas for molecular lasers. More recent strategies include spiker-sustainer circuitry which produces desired EEDs in non-self-sustained plasmas; and adjusting frequency in capacitively coupled plasmas. In this talk, past strategies for customizing EEDs in low pressure plasmas will be reviewed and prospects for improved control of plasma kinetics will be discussed using results from 2-dimensional computer models.

  15. The spectral energy distribution of NGC 1275

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, G. A.; Oke, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of absolute spectral energy distributions for NGC 1275 (Per A) covering the wavelength interval from 3300 A to 10,800 A is presented. The data are consistent with the heavy reddening discovered by Wampler (1971). The H-alpha intensity varied by less than 10% between the times of Wampler's earlier measurements and the two occasions of the present observations. The line-emitting region has a characteristic density of about 10 to the 4.5 power per cu cm, a mass of about 10 to the 5.5 power solar masses, and a volume filling factor of about 10 to the -6th power. The gas may be ionized by shock waves or by nonthermal or stellar radiation. It is suggested, in the vein of Minkowski's (1957) original proposal, that the high-velocity emission-line knots described by Minkowski are H II regions in a Perseus-cluster galaxy or intergalactic gas cloud seen in projection against NGC 1275.

  16. Evolution of Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Amanda; Kennefick, J.; Mahmood, A.

    2012-05-01

    A common practice when formulating quasar luminosity functions (QLF) has been to adopt an average spectral index, $\\alpha$, for the sample even though it is well known that quasars exhibit a broad range of spectral energy distributions (SED.) We have investigated the possible evolution of $\\alpha$ as a function of redshift, as any evolution in this parameter would introduce or mask evolution in the QLF. We imaged 103 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars in the optical and near-infrared bands, near in time to mitigate the effects of variability, in three redshift bins centered at $z\\approx 1.9$, $2.7$, and $4.0$, corresponding to look-back times of 10-12 billion years. We present restframe UV-optical SED’s and spectral indices and discuss possible evolution in our sample. We also use single epoch spectra of the quasars to estimate the mass of the central black hole and discuss possible correlations of quasar properties such as mass, luminosity, and spectral shape.

  17. Panchromatic spectral energy distributions of Herschel sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D.; Brisbin, D.; Cooray, A.; Franceschini, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hwang, H. S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S.; Page, M. J.; Popesso, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Roseboom, I.; Scott, D.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.

    2013-03-01

    Combining far-infrared Herschel photometry from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) guaranteed time programs with ancillary datasets in the GOODS-N, GOODS-S, and COSMOS fields, it is possible to sample the 8-500 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies with at least 7-10 bands. Extending to the UV, optical, and near-infrared, the number of bands increases up to 43. We reproduce the distribution of galaxies in a carefully selected restframe ten colors space, based on this rich data-set, using a superposition of multivariate Gaussian modes. We use this model to classify galaxies and build median SEDs of each class, which are then fitted with a modified version of the magphys code that combines stellar light, emission from dust heated by stars and a possible warm dust contribution heated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The color distribution of galaxies in each of the considered fields can be well described with the combination of 6-9 classes, spanning a large range of far- to near-infrared luminosity ratios, as well as different strength of the AGN contribution to bolometric luminosities. The defined Gaussian grouping is used to identify rare or odd sources. The zoology of outliers includes Herschel-detected ellipticals, very blue z ~ 1 Ly-break galaxies, quiescent spirals, and torus-dominated AGN with star formation. Out of these groups and outliers, a new template library is assembled, consisting of 32 SEDs describing the intrinsic scatter in the restframe UV-to-submm colors of infrared galaxies. This library is tested against L(IR) estimates with and without Herschel data included, and compared to eightother popular methods often adopted in the literature. When implementing Herschel photometry, these approaches produce L(IR) values consistent with each other within a median absolute deviation of 10-20%, the scatter being dominated more by fine tuning of the codes, rather than by the choice of

  18. Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

    2003-11-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

  19. Vibrational energy transfer near a dissociative adsorption transition state: State-to-state study of HCl collisions at Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geweke, Jan; Shirhatti, Pranav R.; Rahinov, Igor; Bartels, Christof; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we seek to examine the nature of collisional energy transfer between HCl and Au(111) for nonreactive scattering events that sample geometries near the transition state for dissociative adsorption by varying both the vibrational and translational energy of the incident HCl molecules in the range near the dissociation barrier. Specifically, we report absolute vibrational excitation probabilities for HCl(v = 0 → 1) and HCl(v = 1 → 2) scattering from clean Au(111) as a function of surface temperature and incidence translational energy. The HCl(v = 2 → 3) channel could not be observed—presumably due to the onset of dissociation. The excitation probabilities can be decomposed into adiabatic and nonadiabatic contributions. We find that both contributions strongly increase with incidence vibrational state by a factor of 24 and 9, respectively. This suggests that V-T as well as V-EHP coupling can be enhanced near the transition state for dissociative adsorption at a metal surface. We also show that previously reported HCl(v = 0 → 1) excitation probabilities [Q. Ran et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 237601 (2007)]—50 times smaller than those reported here—were influenced by erroneous assignment of spectroscopic lines used in the data analysis.

  20. Vibrational energy transfer near a dissociative adsorption transition state: State-to-state study of HCl collisions at Au(111).

    PubMed

    Geweke, Jan; Shirhatti, Pranav R; Rahinov, Igor; Bartels, Christof; Wodtke, Alec M

    2016-08-01

    In this work we seek to examine the nature of collisional energy transfer between HCl and Au(111) for nonreactive scattering events that sample geometries near the transition state for dissociative adsorption by varying both the vibrational and translational energy of the incident HCl molecules in the range near the dissociation barrier. Specifically, we report absolute vibrational excitation probabilities for HCl(v = 0 → 1) and HCl(v = 1 → 2) scattering from clean Au(111) as a function of surface temperature and incidence translational energy. The HCl(v = 2 → 3) channel could not be observed-presumably due to the onset of dissociation. The excitation probabilities can be decomposed into adiabatic and nonadiabatic contributions. We find that both contributions strongly increase with incidence vibrational state by a factor of 24 and 9, respectively. This suggests that V-T as well as V-EHP coupling can be enhanced near the transition state for dissociative adsorption at a metal surface. We also show that previously reported HCl(v = 0 → 1) excitation probabilities [Q. Ran et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 237601 (2007)]-50 times smaller than those reported here-were influenced by erroneous assignment of spectroscopic lines used in the data analysis. PMID:27497574

  1. Adsorption-driven translocation of polymer chain into nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2012-06-01

    The polymer translocation into nanopores is generally facilitated by external driving forces, such as electric or hydrodynamic fields, to compensate for entropic restrictions imposed by the confinement. We investigate the dynamics of translocation driven by polymer adsorption to the confining walls that is relevant to chromatographic separation of macromolecules. By using the self-consistent field theory, we study the passage of a chain trough a small opening from cis to trans compartments of spherical shape with adsorption potential applied in the trans compartment. The chain transfer is modeled as the Fokker-Plank diffusion along the free energy landscape of the translocation pass represented as a sum of the free energies of cis and trans parts of the chain tethered to the pore opening. We investigate how the chain length, the size of trans compartment, the magnitude of adsorption potential, and the extent of excluded volume interactions affect the translocation time and its distribution. Interplay of these factors brings about a variety of different translocation regimes. We show that excluded volume interactions within a certain range of adsorption potentials can cause a local minimum on the free energy landscape, which is absent for ideal chains. The adsorption potential always leads to the decrease of the free energy barrier, increasing the probability of successful translocation. However, the translocation time depends non-monotonically of the magnitude of adsorption potential. Our calculations predict the existence of the critical magnitude of adsorption potential, which separates favorable and unfavorable regimes of translocation.

  2. Adsorption-driven translocation of polymer chain into nanopores.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Neimark, Alexander V

    2012-06-01

    The polymer translocation into nanopores is generally facilitated by external driving forces, such as electric or hydrodynamic fields, to compensate for entropic restrictions imposed by the confinement. We investigate the dynamics of translocation driven by polymer adsorption to the confining walls that is relevant to chromatographic separation of macromolecules. By using the self-consistent field theory, we study the passage of a chain trough a small opening from cis to trans compartments of spherical shape with adsorption potential applied in the trans compartment. The chain transfer is modeled as the Fokker-Plank diffusion along the free energy landscape of the translocation pass represented as a sum of the free energies of cis and trans parts of the chain tethered to the pore opening. We investigate how the chain length, the size of trans compartment, the magnitude of adsorption potential, and the extent of excluded volume interactions affect the translocation time and its distribution. Interplay of these factors brings about a variety of different translocation regimes. We show that excluded volume interactions within a certain range of adsorption potentials can cause a local minimum on the free energy landscape, which is absent for ideal chains. The adsorption potential always leads to the decrease of the free energy barrier, increasing the probability of successful translocation. However, the translocation time depends non-monotonically of the magnitude of adsorption potential. Our calculations predict the existence of the critical magnitude of adsorption potential, which separates favorable and unfavorable regimes of translocation. PMID:22697566

  3. The ultraviolet energy distributions of late A stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1981-01-01

    Observed late A star energy distributions for the wavelength range 1400-2500 A are compared. No difference is found between energy distributions of Am stars and those of normal slowly rotating A stars. The fluxes of rapidly rotating stars, however, appear to be increased for wavelengths smaller than 1530 A; this cannot be understood as an effect of pole heating or reduced gravity. In addition, the comparison of the UV energy distributions with model atmosphere energy distributions of Kurucz indicates some problems with the theoretical Si I absorption edges at 1530 A.

  4. Atomistic simulations of crystal-melt interfaces in a model binary alloy: Interfacial free energies, adsorption coefficients, and excess entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, C. A.; Olmsted, D. L.; Asta, M.; Hoyt, J. J.; Foiles, S. M.

    2009-02-01

    Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics simulations are employed in a study of the equilibrium structural and thermodynamic properties of crystal-melt interfaces in a model binary alloy system described by Lennard-Jones interatomic interactions with zero size mismatch, a ratio of interaction strengths equal to 0.75, and interspecies interactions given by Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules. This alloy system features a simple lens-type solid-liquid phase diagram at zero pressure, with nearly ideal solution thermodynamics in the solid and liquid solution phases. Equilibrium density profiles are computed for (100)-oriented crystal-melt interfaces and are used to derive the magnitudes of the relative adsorption coefficients (Γi(j)) at six temperatures along the solidus/liquidus boundary. The values for Γ1(2) , the relative adsorption of the lower melting-point species (1) with respect to the higher melting point species (2), are found to vary monotonically with temperature, with values that are positive and in the range of a few atomic percent per interface site. By contrast, values of Γ2(1) display a much more complex temperature dependence with a large peak in the magnitude of the relative adsorption more than ten times larger than those found for Γ1(2) . The capillary fluctuation method is used to compute the temperature dependence of the magnitudes and anisotropies of the crystal-melt interfacial free energy (γ) . At all temperatures we obtain the ordering γ100>γ110>γ111 for the high-symmetry (100), (110), and (111) interface orientations. The values of γ monotonically decrease with decreasing temperature (i.e., increasing concentration of the lower melting-point species). Using the calculated temperature-dependent values of γ and Γ1(2) in the Gibbs adsorption theorem, we estimate that roughly 25% of the temperature dependence of γ for the alloys can be attributed to interface adsorption, while the remaining contribution arises from the relative excess entropy

  5. Electro-optic measurement of terahertz pulse energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. H.; Gallacher, J. G.; Brussaard, G. J. H.; Lemos, N.; Issac, R.; Huang, Z. X.; Dias, J. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    An accurate and direct measurement of the energy distribution of a low repetition rate terahertz electromagnetic pulse is challenging because of the lack of sensitive detectors in this spectral range. In this paper, we show how the total energy and energy density distribution of a terahertz electromagnetic pulse can be determined by directly measuring the absolute electric field amplitude and beam energy density distribution using electro-optic detection. This method has potential use as a routine method of measuring the energy density of terahertz pulses that could be applied to evaluating future high power terahertz sources, terahertz imaging, and spatially and temporarily resolved pump-probe experiments.

  6. Spectral Energy Distributions of Type 1 AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Heng

    The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are essential to understand the physics of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies. This thesis present a detailed study of AGN SED shapes in the optical-near infrared bands (0.3--3microm) for 413 X-ray selected Type 1 AGNs from the XMM-COSMOS Survey. We define a useful near-IR/optical index-index ('color-color') diagram to investigate the mixture of AGN continuum, host galaxy and reddening contributions. We found that ˜90% of the AGNs lie on mixing curves between the Elvis et al. (1994) mean AGN SED (E94) and a host galaxy, with only the modest reddening [E(B-V)=0.1--0.2] expected in type 1 AGNs. Lower luminosity and Eddington ratio objects have more host galaxy, as expected. The E94 template is remarkably good in describing the SED shape in the 0.3--3microrn decade of the spectrum over a range of 3.2 dex in LOPT, 2.7 dex in L/LEdd, and for redshifts up to 3. The AGN phenomenon is thus insensitive to absolute or relative accretion rate and to cosmic time. However, 10% of the AGNs are inconsistent with any AGN+host+reddening mix. These AGNs have weak or non-existent near-IR bumps, suggesting a lack of the hot dust characteristic of AGNs. The fraction of these hot-dust-poor AGNs evolves with redshift from 6% at low redshift (z < 2) to 20% at moderately high redshift (2 < z < 3.5). A similar fraction of HDP quasars are found in the Elvis et al. 1994 (BQS) and Richards et al. 2006 (SDSS) samples. The 1--3microm emission of the HDP quasars is a factor 2--4 smaller than the typical E94 AGN SED. The implied torus covering factor is 2%--29%, well below the 75% required by unified models. The weak hot dust emission seems to expose an extension of the accretion disk continuum in some of AGNs. For these, we estimate the outer edge of their accretion disks to lie at ˜104 Schwarzschild radii, more than ten times the gravitational stability radii. Either the host-dust is destroyed

  7. Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, D. A.; Bendo, G. J.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Gordon, K. D.; Regan, M. W.; Armus, L.; Cannon, J. M.; Calzetti, D.; Draine, B. T.; Helou, G.; Joseph, R. D.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Li, A.; Murphy, E. J.; Roussel, H.; Walter, F.; Hanson, H. M.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Jarrett, T. H.; Kewley, L. J.; Lamanna, C. A.; Leitherer, C.; Meyer, M. J.; Rieke, G. H.; Rieke, M. J.; Sheth, K.; Smith, J. D. T.; Thornley, M. D.

    2005-11-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) is carrying out a comprehensive multiwavelength survey on a sample of 75 nearby galaxies. The 1-850 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are presented using broadband imaging data from Spitzer, 2MASS, ISO, IRAS, and SCUBA. The infrared colors derived from the globally integrated Spitzer data are generally consistent with the previous generation of models that were developed using global data for normal star-forming galaxies, although significant deviations are observed. Spitzer's excellent sensitivity and resolution also allow a detailed investigation of the infrared SEDs for various locations within the three large, nearby galaxies NGC 3031 (M81), NGC 5194 (M51), and NGC 7331. A wide variety of spectral shapes is found within each galaxy, especially for NGC 3031, the closest of the three targets and thus the galaxy for which the smallest spatial scales can be explored. Strong correlations exist between the local star formation rate and the infrared colors fν(70 μm)/fν(160 μm) and fν(24 μm)/fν(160 μm), suggesting that the 24 and 70 μm emission are useful tracers of the local star formation activity level. Preliminary evidence indicates that variations in the 24 μm emission, and not variations in the emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 8 μm, drive the variations in the fν(8.0 μm)/fν(24 μm) colors within NGC 3031, NGC 5194, and NGC 7331. If the galaxy-to-galaxy variations in SEDs seen in our sample are representative of the range present at high redshift, then extrapolations of total infrared luminosities and star formation rates from the observed 24 μm flux will be uncertain at the factor of 5 level (total range). The corresponding uncertainties using the redshifted 8.0 μm flux (e.g., observed 24 μm flux for a z=2 source) are factors of 10-20. Considerable caution should be used when interpreting such extrapolated infrared luminosities.

  8. Two jet energy and rapidity distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Blazey, G.C.; For the D {O} Collaboration

    1992-11-01

    The D0 detector has been recording data at the Tevatron {bar p}p Collider since May 1992. Because the D0 calorimeter is hermetic and has large acceptance it is well suited for semi-exclusive final state jet studies. We present a primary measurement of the distribution d{sup 3}N/dE{sub t1}/d{eta}{sub 1}/d{eta}{sub 2} at {radical}s TeV over a large range of {eta}. The sensitivity of this cross-section to parton momentum distributions and the ability of D0 to discriminate between possible parton distributions is discussed.

  9. Energy Inputs Uncertainty: Total Amount, Distribution and Correlation Between Different Forms of Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Describes solar energy inputs contributing to ionospheric and thermospheric weather processes, including total energy amounts, distributions and the correlation between particle precipitation and Poynting flux.

  10. Energy distribution among reaction products. VII - H + F2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.; Sloan, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The 'arrested relaxation' variant of the IR chemiluminescence technique is used in a study of the distribution of vibrational, rotational and translational energies between the products of the reaction by which H + F2 yields HF + F. Diagrams are plotted and numerical values are obtained for the energy distribution rate constants.

  11. Effects of Distributed Energy Resources on Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR)

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ruchi; Tuffner, Francis K.; Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2011-10-10

    Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR) is one of the cheapest technologies which can be intelligently leveraged to provide considerable energy savings. The addition of renewables in the form of distributed resources can affect the entire power system, but more importantly, affects the traditional substation control schemes at the distribution level. This paper looks at the effect on energy consumption, peak load reduction, and voltage profile changes due to the addition of distributed generation in a distribution feeder using combinations of volt var control. An IEEE 13-node system is used to simulate the various cases. Energy savings and peak load reduction for different simulation scenarios are compared.

  12. Distribution of energy in corn plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenced by recent events in fossil fuel prices, both economic and environmental, as well as increased concerns about both climate change and energy independence, there is a growing interest in the development of renewable energy biomass feedstocks. These feedstocks include perennial grasses, timb...

  13. Ion adsorption and its influence on direct current electric field induced deformations of flexoelectric nematic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derfel, Grzegorz; Buczkowska, Mariola

    2011-07-01

    The influence of ion adsorption on the behavior of the nematic liquid crystal layers is studied numerically. The homeotropic flexoelectric layer subjected to the dc electric field is considered. Selective adsorption of positive ions is assumed. The analysis is based on the free energy formalism for ion adsorption. The distributions of director orientation angle, electric potential, and ion concentrations are calculated by numerical resolving of suitable torques equations and Poisson equation. The threshold voltages for the deformations are also determined. It was shown that adsorption affects the distributions of both cations and anions. Sufficiently large number of adsorbed ions leads to spontaneous deformation arising without any threshold if the total number of ions creates sufficiently strong electric field with significant field gradients in the neighborhood of electrodes. The spontaneous deformations are favored by strong flexoelectricity, large thickness, large ion concentrations, weak anchoring, and large adsorption energy.

  14. Energy distribution in parallel plate plasma accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicapua, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    A parallel plate accelerator operated in the quasi-steady regime of argon mass flow discharges permits, on account of its geometry, the appraisal of the initial ratio of energy disposition into the kinetic and thermal modes of the plasma while retaining the essential features of coaxial high power self-field MPD accelerators. The energy disposition ratio, calculated as the ratio of kinetic energy to enthalpy in the exhaust flow, shows reasonable agreement with the ratio of the induced emf in the accelerator to resistive voltage drop. Both these ratios indicate that the discharge imparts more energy to the flow by resistive heating than by direct body force acceleration. This is turn suggests that other acceleration mechanisms must be responsible for the high performance of conventional MPD arcs.

  15. Distributed energy storage: Time-dependent tree flow design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Ziaei, S.; Lorente, S.

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes "distributed energy storage" as a basic design problem of distributing energy storage material on an area. The energy flows by fluid flow from a concentrated source to points (users) distributed equidistantly on the area. The flow is time-dependent. Several scenarios are analyzed: sensible-heat storage, latent-heat storage, exergy storage vs energy storage, and the distribution of a finite supply of heat transfer surface between the source fluid and the distributed storage material. The chief conclusion is that the finite amount of storage material should be distributed proportionally with the distribution of the flow rate of heating agent arriving on the area. The total time needed by the source stream to "invade" the area is cumulative (the sum of the storage times required at each storage site) and depends on the energy distribution paths and the sequence in which the users are served by the source stream. Directions for future designs of distributed storage and retrieval are outlined in the concluding section.

  16. Energy Distributions in Small Populations: Pascal versus Boltzmann

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugel, Roger W.; Weiner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical distributions of a limited amount of energy among small numbers of particles with discrete, evenly-spaced quantum levels are examined systematically. The average populations of energy states reveal the pattern of Pascal's triangle. An exact formula for the probability that a particle will be in any given energy state is derived.…

  17. Kappa distribution in the presence of a potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2015-02-01

    The present paper develops the theory and formulations of the kappa distributions that describe particle systems characterized by a nonzero potential energy. As yet, kappa distributions were used for the statistical description of the velocity or kinetic energy of particles but not of the potential energy. With the results provided here, it is straightforward to use the developed kappa distributions to describe any particle population of space plasmas subject to a nonnegligible potential energy. Starting from the kappa distribution of the Hamiltonian function, we develop the distributions that describe either the complete phase space or the marginal spaces of positions and velocities. The study shows, among others: (a) The kappa distributions of velocities that describe space plasmas can be vastly different from the standard formulation of the kappa distribution, because of the presence of a potential energy; the correct formulation should be given by the marginal kappa distribution of velocities by integrating the distribution of the Hamiltonian over the potential energy. (b) The long-standing problem of the divergence of the Boltzmannian exponential distribution for bounded radial potentials is solved using kappa distributions of negative kappa index. (c) Anisotropic distributions of velocities can exist in the presence of a velocity-dependent potential. (d) A variety of applications, including derivations/verifications of the following: (i) the Jeans', the most frequent, and the maximum radii in spherical/linear gravitational potentials; (ii) the Virial theorem for power law potentials; (iii) the generalized barometric formula, (iv) the plasma density profiles in Saturnian magnetosphere, and (v) the average electron magnetic moment in Earth's magnetotail.

  18. Energy optimization of water distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    In order to analyze pump operating scenarios for the system with the computer model, information on existing pumping equipment and the distribution system was collected. The information includes the following: component description and design criteria for line booster stations, booster stations with reservoirs, and high lift pumps at the water treatment plants; daily operations data for 1988; annual reports from fiscal year 1987/1988 to fiscal year 1991/1992; and a 1985 calibrated KYPIPE computer model of DWSD`s water distribution system which included input data for the maximum hour and average day demands on the system for that year. This information has been used to produce the inventory database of the system and will be used to develop the computer program to analyze the system.

  19. I. Gas adsorption properties and porosity of transition metal-based cyanogels. II. Novel energy transfer processes in organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Rahul Shrikant

    The gas adsorption properties and porosity of cyanide-bridged transition metal-based gels are investigated in the first part of this dissertation. The cyanide bridges, connecting two transition metal centers, are characteristic of these gels; hence, these gels are termed cyanogels. Aerogel versus xerogel structures have a profound effect, both, on the thermodynamics and kinetics of gas adsorption on these cyanogels. Carbon dioxide is selectively adsorbed on palladium-cobalt-based cyanogels; the adsorption is fully reversible on both types of gels discussed. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the gas adsorption processes on these gels are analyzed here. From the ease and reproducibility of the CO2 desorption and the associated enthalpy values, it is concluded that CO2 is physisorbed on these gels. Both the adsorption and desorption processes are first-order in the gels. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on the palladium-cobalt cyanogels is also investigated. Unlike CO 2 physisorption, carbon monoxide is chemisorbed on these gels. An uptake of CO brings about a profound change in the xerogel morphology. The palladium-cobalt-based aerogels possess both micro- and mesoporosity; the xerogels are predominantly microporous with a narrow microporosity. The aerogel surfaces are found to be fractal as analyzed by gas adsorption. Unlike the aerogels, the xerogels do not possess surface fractality. The mechanism of adsorption of different gases on these gels is analyzed based on the gel morphologies. These transition metal-based gels are promising for a variety of applications such as heterogeneous catalysts, gas filters and magnetic materials. The porosity of these gels can be exploited to make gel-embedded filters to separate mixtures of gases based on the their differential adsorption propensities. The reversible adsorption of CO2 can be harnessed practically by using these gels as CO2 storage reservoirs. In the second part of this dissertation, the first, balanced, white

  20. Can carbon surface oxidation shift the pore size distribution curve calculated from Ar, N2 and CO2 adsorption isotherms? Simulation results for a realistic carbon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Terzyk, Artur P.; Gauden, Piotr A.; Harris, Peter J. F.; Kowalczyk, Piotr

    2009-08-01

    Using the virtual porous carbon model proposed by Harris et al, we study the effect of carbon surface oxidation on the pore size distribution (PSD) curve determined from simulated Ar, N2 and CO2 isotherms. It is assumed that surface oxidation is not destructive for the carbon skeleton, and that all pores are accessible for studied molecules (i.e., only the effect of the change of surface chemical composition is studied). The results obtained show two important things, i.e., oxidation of the carbon surface very slightly changes the absolute porosity (calculated from the geometric method of Bhattacharya and Gubbins (BG)); however, PSD curves calculated from simulated isotherms are to a greater or lesser extent affected by the presence of surface oxides. The most reliable results are obtained from Ar adsorption data. Not only is adsorption of this adsorbate practically independent from the presence of surface oxides, but, more importantly, for this molecule one can apply the slit-like model of pores as the first approach to recover the average pore diameter of a real carbon structure. For nitrogen, the effect of carbon surface chemical composition is observed due to the quadrupole moment of this molecule, and this effect shifts the PSD curves compared to Ar. The largest differences are seen for CO2, and it is clearly demonstrated that the PSD curves obtained from adsorption isotherms of this molecule contain artificial peaks and the average pore diameter is strongly influenced by the presence of electrostatic adsorbate-adsorbate as well as adsorbate-adsorbent interactions.

  1. Can carbon surface oxidation shift the pore size distribution curve calculated from Ar, N(2) and CO(2) adsorption isotherms? Simulation results for a realistic carbon model.

    PubMed

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A; Harris, Peter J F; Kowalczyk, Piotr

    2009-08-01

    Using the virtual porous carbon model proposed by Harris et al, we study the effect of carbon surface oxidation on the pore size distribution (PSD) curve determined from simulated Ar, N(2) and CO(2) isotherms. It is assumed that surface oxidation is not destructive for the carbon skeleton, and that all pores are accessible for studied molecules (i.e., only the effect of the change of surface chemical composition is studied). The results obtained show two important things, i.e., oxidation of the carbon surface very slightly changes the absolute porosity (calculated from the geometric method of Bhattacharya and Gubbins (BG)); however, PSD curves calculated from simulated isotherms are to a greater or lesser extent affected by the presence of surface oxides. The most reliable results are obtained from Ar adsorption data. Not only is adsorption of this adsorbate practically independent from the presence of surface oxides, but, more importantly, for this molecule one can apply the slit-like model of pores as the first approach to recover the average pore diameter of a real carbon structure. For nitrogen, the effect of carbon surface chemical composition is observed due to the quadrupole moment of this molecule, and this effect shifts the PSD curves compared to Ar. The largest differences are seen for CO(2), and it is clearly demonstrated that the PSD curves obtained from adsorption isotherms of this molecule contain artificial peaks and the average pore diameter is strongly influenced by the presence of electrostatic adsorbate-adsorbate as well as adsorbate-adsorbent interactions. PMID:21828590

  2. Subtleties in obtaining the electrostatic energy of continuous distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, M.; Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e.; Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Farina, C.

    2014-11-01

    The mathematical steps that generalize the expression for the electrostatic energy of a set of point charges to the corresponding expression for a continuous charge distribution involve a few subtleties that are not usually discussed in standard introductory or advanced electromagnetic textbooks. In this paper, we point out such subtleties and discuss how to deal with them in cases of volume and surface charge distributions. We also show explicitly that it is not possible to define electrostatic energy for a linear charge distribution, since this energy would be divergent. Finally, we use dimensional analysis to recover our results in a simpler and more elegant form.

  3. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-05-01

    The era of publicly mandated GHG emissions restrictions inthe United States has begun with recent legislation in California andseven northeastern states. Commercial and industrial buildings canimprove the carbon-efficiency of end-use energy consumption by installingtechnologies such as on-site cogeneration of electricity and useful heatin combined heat and power systems, thermally-activated cooling, solarelectric and thermal equipment, and energy storage -- collectively termeddistributed energy resources (DER). This research examines a collectionof buildings in California, the Northeast, and the southern United Statesto demonstrate the effects of regional characteristics such as the carbonintensity of central electricity grid, the climate-driven demand forspace heating and cooling, and the availability of solar insolation. Theresults illustrate that the magnitude of a realistic carbon tax ($100/tC)is too small to incent significant carbon-reducing effects oneconomically optimal DER adoption. In large part, this is because costreduction and carbon reduction objectives are roughly aligned, even inthe absence of a carbon tax.

  4. Triangular tessellation scheme for the adsorption free energy at the liquid-liquid interface: Towards nonconvex patterned colloids.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Joost; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2009-11-01

    We present a numerical technique, namely, triangular tessellation, to calculate the free energy associated with the adsorption of a colloidal particle at a flat interface. The theory and numerical scheme presented here are sufficiently general to handle nonconvex patchy colloids with arbitrary surface patterns characterized by a wetting angle, e.g., amphiphilicity. We ignore interfacial deformation due to capillary, electrostatic, or gravitational forces, but the method can be extended to take such effects into account. It is verified that the numerical method presented is accurate and sufficiently stable to be applied to more general situations than presented in this paper. The merits of the tessellation method prove to outweigh those of traditionally used semianalytic approaches, especially when it comes to generality and applicability. PMID:20364983

  5. Adsorption of gases on carbon molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vijayalakshmi, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Ganesh, K.S. )

    1994-12-01

    Adsorption on carbon molecular sieves (CMS) prepared by coke deposition has become an interesting area of adsorption due to its microporous nature and favorable separation factor on size and shape selectivity basis for many gaseous systems. In the present work CMS was synthesized from coconut shell through three major steps, namely, carbonization, activation, and coke deposition by hydrocarbon cracking. The crushed, washed, and sieved granules of coconut shell (particle size 2--3 mm) were pretreated with sodium silicate solution and oven-dried at 150 C to create the inorganic sites necessary for coke deposition. Carbonization and activation of the dried granules were carried out at 800 C, for 30 min each. The activated char thus produced was subjected to hydrocarbon cracking at 600 C for periods varying from 30 to 180 min. The product samples were characterized in terms of adsorption isotherm, kinetic adsorption curve, surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and characteristic energy for adsorption by using O[sub 2], N[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], C[sub 3]H[sub 6], and CH[sub 4].

  6. Adsorption energy and spin state of first-row transition metals adsorbed on MgO(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovits, A.; Paniagua, J. C.; López, N.; Minot, C.; Illas, F.

    2003-03-01

    Slab and cluster model spin-polarized calculations have been carried out to study various properties of isolated first-row transition metal atoms adsorbed on the anionic sites of the regular MgO(100) surface. The calculated adsorption energies follow the trend of the metal cohesive energies, indicating that the changes in the metal-support and metal-metal interactions along the series are dominated by atomic properties. In all cases, except for Ni at the generalized gradient approximation level, the number of unpaired electron is maintained as in the isolated metal atom. The energy required to change the atomic state from high to low spin has been computed using the PW91 and B3LYP density-functional-theory-based methods. PW91 fails to predict the proper ground state of V and Ni, but the results for the isolated and adsorbed atom are consistent within the method. B3LYP properly predicts the ground state of all first-row transition atom the high- to low-spin transition considered is comparable to experiment. In all cases, the interaction with the surface results in a reduced high- to low-spin transition energy.

  7. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Synopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is occurring in part because modern air-conditioner and heat pump compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage sag or dip than older motors. These motors can stall in less than three cycles (0.05 s) when a fault, for example, on the sub-transmission system, causes voltage on the distribution system to sag to 70% or less of nominal. We completed a new test system for A/C compressor motor stall testing at the DECC Lab. The A/C Stall test system is being used to characterize when and how compressor motors stall under low voltage and high compressor pressure conditions. However, instead of using air conditioners, we are using high efficiency heat pumps. We have gathered A/C stall characterization data for both sustained and momentary voltage sags of the test heat pump. At low enough voltage, the heat pump stalls (compressor motor stops and draws 5-6 times normal current in trying to restart) due to low inertia and low torque of the motor. For the momentary sag, we are using a fast acting contactor/switch to quickly switch from nominal to the sagged voltage in cycles.

  8. Electric Transport Traction Power Supply System With Distributed Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, E. Y.; Schurov, N. I.; Rozhkova, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    The paper states the problem of traction substation (TSS) leveling of daily-load curve for urban electric transport. The circuit of traction power supply system (TPSS) with distributed autonomous energy source (AES) based on photovoltaic (PV) and energy storage (ES) units is submitted here. The distribution algorithm of power flow for the daily traction load curve leveling is also introduced in this paper. In addition, it illustrates the implemented experiment model of power supply system.

  9. Changes in the size of the apparent surface area and adsorption energy of the rye roots by low pH and the presence of aluminium ions induced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatanik-Kloc, Alicja

    2016-07-01

    The plant reactions on Al-stress include i.a. change of the surface area of the roots, which in the physicochemistry of plants characterizes the transport of water and ions through the root. The object of this study is the specific surface area of the roots of plants which are tolerant to aluminium, such as rye. Plants of rye were grown in a nutrient solution for 14 days at pH 4.5 in the presence of Al3+ ions of concentration 10, 20, and 40 mg dm-3. The control plants were grown continuously at pH 7 or pH 4.5 without Al3+. The apparent surface area and adsorption energy of the plants roots were determined from water vapour adsorption - desorption data. The apparent surface area of roots growing in the aluminium was (with respect to control) statistically significantly lower. There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent surface area of the roots which grew in pH 7, pH 4.5 without Al3+. The average water vapour adsorption energy of the root surface, under stress conditions decreased. In the roots grown in the presence of Al+3, there was a slight decrease in high energy adsorption centres and an increase in the amount of low-energy centres.

  10. The role of vdW interactions in coverage dependent adsorption energies of atomic adsorbates on Pt(111) and Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, Hari; Kitchin, John R.

    2016-08-01

    Adsorption, a fundamental process in heterogeneous catalysis is known to be dependent on the adsorbate-adsorbate and surface-adsorbate bonds. van der Waals (vdW) interactions are one of the types of interactions that have not been examined thoroughly as a function of adsorbate coverage. In this work we quantify the vdW interactions for atomic adsorbates on late transition metal surfaces, and determine how these long range forces affect the coverage dependent adsorption energies. We calculate the adsorption energies of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, fluorine, bromine and chlorine species on Pt(111) and Pd(111) at coverages ranging from 1/4 to 1 ML using the BEEF-vdW functional. We observe that adsorption energies remain coverage dependent, and this coverage dependence is shown to be statistically significant. vdW interactions are found to be coverage dependent, but more significantly, they are found to be dependent on molecular properties such as adsorbate size, and consequently, correlate with the adsorbate effective nuclear charge. We observe that these interactions account for a reduction in the binding energy of the system, due to the destabilizing attractive interactions between the adsorbates which weaken its bond with the surface.

  11. Energy distribution among reaction products. V.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anlauf, K. G.; Horne, D. S.; Macdonald, R. G.; Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of three reactions, one point of theoretical interest being the predicted correlation between barrier height and barrier location. The H + Br 2 reaction having a lower activation barrier than H + Cl 2, should have an earlier barrier, and hence a greater percentage attractive energy release and higher efficiency of vibrational excitation. Information is developed concerning the effect of isotopic substitution in the pair of reactions H + Cl 2 and D + Cl 2. The 'arrested relaxation' method was used. Essentially, the method involves reacting two diffuse reagent beams in a reaction vessel with background pressure less than 0.001 torr, and with walls cooled by liquid nitrogen or liquid helium.

  12. TCE adsorption by GAC preloaded with humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Kilduff, J.E.; Karanfil, T.; Weber, W.J. Jr.

    1998-05-01

    Adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) by activated carbon preloaded with humic and fulvic acids was studied under several conditions in completely mixed batch systems. The authors investigated how molecular weight and molecular-weight distribution of preloaded humic substances affected subsequent adsorption of TCE. The capacity of carbon to adsorb TCE was most greatly reduced in carbon that was preloaded with humic acid components having molecular weights less than about 1,400 g/mol as polystyrene sulfonate. The adsorption capacity was greatly reduced in carbon that was preloaded with whole humic mixtures in which lower molecular weights predominated. The energy distributions of adsorbent indicate that preloaded compounds preferentially occupy high-energy sites, making them inaccessible to subsequently encountered TCE.

  13. Development of a high-energy distributed energy source electromagnetic railgun with improved energy conversion efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Tower, M.M.; Haight, C.H.

    1984-03-01

    Vought Corporation in cooperation with the Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas (CEM-UT) has developed under sponsorship by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Army Armament, Munitions, and Chemical Command (AMCCOM) a high-energy distributed energy source (DES) electromagnetic (EM) railgun accelerator. This paper discusses the development and current status of the DES railgun which has the design capability to launch projectile masses up to 60 grams to the 3-4 km/sec velocity regime with energy conversion efficiencies above 35 percent. These goals are being accomplished through utilization of scaled-energy CEM-UT railgun experiments for sequenced timing/staging and a full energy (575 kJ) design at Vought for high efficiency capability. The operational Vought single-pulse railgun forms the baseline for the full energy testing.

  14. Adsorption and interaction energy of π ethene on Pt(1 1 1) and Pt alloys: A detailed analysis of vibrational, energetic and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubrich, J.; Becker, C.; Wandelt, K.

    2009-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the electronic and geometric bonding properties of the model alkene ethene on different mono- and bimetallic surfaces to establish the difference between adsorption energy and interaction energy and to elucidate the chemical character of a single platinum atom in different chemical environments. The adsorption of ethene on Pt(1 1 1) at 100 K leads to two adsorption states, which are commonly described as being of di- σ-type (bidentate, μ 2η 2) and π-type (monodentate, μ 1η 2). While the later is the minority species on Pt(1 1 1) it is of larger abundance on the platinum alloys. We have chosen π-bonded ethene for our study since it can be found on Pt(1 1 1), the Pt 3Sn and Pt 2Sn surface alloys, and Cu 3Pt(1 1 1). Density functional theory calculations of the adsorption structures, site and decomposed densities of states, as well as partial charge densities in conjunction with vibrational spectroscopy show that the bonding, i.e. the interaction energy, of the π ethene is only weakly influenced by alloying. Even in a copper matrix - as in the case of Cu 3Pt(1 1 1) - the bonding platinum atom essentially keeps its chemical identity and the interaction energy is reduced by only 14% compared to Pt(1 1 1). This observation suggests that bonding on surfaces is a strongly localized phenomenon. However, the adsorption energy decreases significantly due to alloying, which is attributed to the varying local relaxation of the different metal surfaces.

  15. Optimal Operation of Energy Storage in Power Transmission and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan Hejazi, Seyed Hossein

    In this thesis, we investigate optimal operation of energy storage units in power transmission and distribution grids. At transmission level, we investigate the problem where an investor-owned independently-operated energy storage system seeks to offer energy and ancillary services in the day-ahead and real-time markets. We specifically consider the case where a significant portion of the power generated in the grid is from renewable energy resources and there exists significant uncertainty in system operation. In this regard, we formulate a stochastic programming framework to choose optimal energy and reserve bids for the storage units that takes into account the fluctuating nature of the market prices due to the randomness in the renewable power generation availability. At distribution level, we develop a comprehensive data set to model various stochastic factors on power distribution networks, with focus on networks that have high penetration of electric vehicle charging load and distributed renewable generation. Furthermore, we develop a data-driven stochastic model for energy storage operation at distribution level, where the distribution of nodal voltage and line power flow are modelled as stochastic functions of the energy storage unit's charge and discharge schedules. In particular, we develop new closed-form stochastic models for such key operational parameters in the system. Our approach is analytical and allows formulating tractable optimization problems. Yet, it does not involve any restricting assumption on the distribution of random parameters, hence, it results in accurate modeling of uncertainties. By considering the specific characteristics of random variables, such as their statistical dependencies and often irregularly-shaped probability distributions, we propose a non-parametric chance-constrained optimization approach to operate and plan energy storage units in power distribution girds. In the proposed stochastic optimization, we consider

  16. General theory for apparent energy distribution of sea waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke-Jian; Sun, Fu

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents a general theory for the apparent energy distribution of sea waves. Using the joint distribution of wave periods and heights proposed earlier by the second author, the authors define the generalized apparent energy distribution and derive the analytical form of the so called generalized outer frequency spectrum or nth-order frequency spectrum. Some possible relationships between it and the Fourier frequency spectrum are discussed. It is shown that the widely used Bretschneider spectrum can be easily obtained from the above definition and that generalized outer frequency spectrum has equilibrium range with exponent -( n+3) whose upper limit is -3.

  17. Densely-packed ZnTPPs Monolayer on the Rutile TiO2(110)-(1×1) Surface: Adsorption Behavior and Energy Level Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Sylvie; Ruggieri, Charles; Bartynski, Robert; Martínez, José Ignacio; Flores, Fernando; Ortega, José

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption of a densely packed Zinc(II) tetraphenylporphyrin monolayer on a rutile TiO2(110)-(1×1) surface has been studied using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods, aimed at analyzing the relation between adsorption behavior and barrier height formation. The adsorption configuration of ZnTPP was determined from scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) imaging, density functional theory (DFT) calculations and STM image simulation. The corresponding energy alignment was experimentally determined from X-ray and UV-photoemission spectroscopies and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. These results were found in good agreement with an appropriately corrected DFT model, pointing to the importance of local bonding and intermolecular interactions in the establishment of barrier heights. PMID:26998188

  18. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called “agents” from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing

  19. Recent Ion Energy Distribution Observations on MST RFP Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jerry; Titus, J. B.; Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A., III; Almagri, A. F.; Andeson, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Ion energy distribution and temperature measurements have been made on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) using the Florida A&M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA). The CNPA is a low energy (0.34-5.2 keV), high energy resolution (25 channels) neutral particle analyzer, with a radial view on MST. Recently, a retarding potential system was built to allow CNPA measurements to ensemble a complete ion energy distribution with high-energy resolution, providing insight into the dynamics of the bulk and fast ion populations. Recent work has also been done to improve the analysis techniques used to infer the ion temperature measurements, allowing us to understand temperature dynamics better during global magnetic reconnection events. Work supported in part by grants to FAMU and to UW from NSF and from Fusion Energy Sciences at DOE.

  20. Parallel Harmony Search Based Distributed Energy Resource Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Ceylan, Oguzhan; Liu, Guodong; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a harmony search based parallel optimization algorithm to minimize voltage deviations in three phase unbalanced electrical distribution systems and to maximize active power outputs of distributed energy resources (DR). The main contribution is to reduce the adverse impacts on voltage profile during a day as photovoltaics (PVs) output or electrical vehicles (EVs) charging changes throughout a day. The IEEE 123- bus distribution test system is modified by adding DRs and EVs under different load profiles. The simulation results show that by using parallel computing techniques, heuristic methods may be used as an alternative optimization tool in electrical power distribution systems operation.

  1. Distributed sensor coordination for advanced energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tumer, Kagan

    2015-03-12

    Motivation: The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reliable operation of advanced power systems. Recent advances in sensor technology have enabled some level of decision making directly at the sensor level. However, coordinating large numbers of sensors, particularly heterogeneous sensors, to achieve system level objectives such as predicting plant efficiency, reducing downtime or predicting outages requires sophisticated coordination algorithms. Indeed, a critical issue in such systems is how to ensure the interaction of a large number of heterogenous system components do not interfere with one another and lead to undesirable behavior. Objectives and Contributions: The long-term objective of this work is to provide sensor deployment, coordination and networking algorithms for large numbers of sensors to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. Our two specific objectives are to: 1. Derive sensor performance metrics for heterogeneous sensor networks. 2. Demonstrate effectiveness, scalability and reconfigurability of heterogeneous sensor network in advanced power systems. The key technical contribution of this work is to push the coordination step to the design of the objective functions of the sensors, allowing networks of heterogeneous sensors to be controlled. By ensuring that the control and coordination is not specific to particular sensor hardware, this approach enables the design and operation of large heterogeneous sensor networks. In addition to the coordination coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Impact: The impact of this work extends to a large class of problems relevant to the National Energy Technology Laboratory including sensor placement, heterogeneous sensor

  2. Features of the adsorption of naproxen enantiomers on weak chiral anion-exchangers in nonlinear chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Asnin, Leonid; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2008-01-01

    The retention mechanism of the enantiomers of naproxen on a Pirkle-type chiral stationary phase (CSP) was studied. This CSP is made of a porous silica grafted with quinidine carbamate. It can interact with the weak organic electrolyte naproxen either by adsorbing it or by ion-exchange. Using frontal chromatography, we explored the adsorption equilibrium under such experimental conditions that naproxen dissociates or cannot dissociate. Under conditions preventing ionic dissociation, the adsorption isotherms were measured, the adsorption energy distributions determined, and the chromatographic profiles calculated. Three different types of the adsorption sites were found for both enantiomers. The density and the binding energy of these sites depend on the nature of the organic modifier. Different solute species, anions, neutral molecules, solvent-ion associates, and solute dimers can coexist in solution, giving rise to different forms of adsorption. This study showed the unexpected occurrence of secondary steps in the breakthrough profiles of S-naproxen in the adsorption mode at high concentrations. Being enantioselective, this phenomenon was assumed to result from the association of solute molecules involving a chiral selector moiety. A multisite Langmuir adsorption model was used to calculate band profiles. Although this model accounts excellently for the experimental adsorption isotherms, it does not explain all the features of the breakthrough profiles. A comparison between the calculated and experimental profiles allowed useful conclusions concerning the effects of the adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-solvent interactions on the adsorption mechanism.

  3. Calculation of energy deposition distributions for simple geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    When high-energy charged particles pass through a thin detector, the ionization energy loss in that detector is subject to fluctuations or straggling which must be considered in interpreting the data. Under many conditions, which depend upon the charge and energy of the incident particle and the detector geometry, the ionization energy lost by the particle is significantly different from the energy deposited in the detector. This problem divides naturally into a calculation of the energy loss that results in excitation and low-energy secondary electrons which do not travel far from their production points, and a calculation of energy loss that results in high-energy secondary electrons which can escape from the detector. The first calculation is performed using a modification of the Vavilov energy loss distribution. A cutoff energy is introduced above which all electrons are ignored and energy transferred to low energy particles is assumed to be equivalent to the energy deposited by them. For the second calculation, the trajectory of the primary particle is considered as a source of secondary high-energy electrons. The electrons from this source are transported using Monte Carlo techniques and multiple scattering theory, and the energy deposited by them in the detector is calculated. The results of the two calculations are then combined to predict the energy deposition distribution. The results of these calculations are used to predict the charge resolution of parallel-plate pulse ionization chambers that are being designed to measure the charge spectrum of heavy nuclei in the galactic cosmic-ray flux.

  4. Laser energy distribution on detector under the different incident angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Chen, Q.; Hao, Y.; Zhang, W.; Li, H.; Ren, G.; Zhu, R.

    2015-11-01

    Laser active suppressing jamming is one of the most important technologies in the domain of electro-optical countermeasures. The propagation direction of laser is not always in the same line with the principal axis of electro-optical imaging system, so it is necessary to investigate laser energy distribution on detector under the different incident angle. This paper toke optical system with wide field of view for example. We firstly analyzed the system's structure based on the inverting prism and evaluated image quality. Laser energy distribution caused by diffraction effect of optical system was secondly simulated based on Kirchhoff 's diffraction theory. Thirdly, we built the system's analysis model of stray light, traced a large number of light propagation, and obtained laser energy distribution on detector caused by scattering effect. At last, combine the above two kinds of energy distribution into total laser energy distribution on detector. According to the detector's saturated threshold, we can count up the saturated number and evaluate laser disturbing effect. The research results can provide theoretical reference and technical support for evaluating laser disturbing effect of electro-optical imaging system.

  5. A rapid kinetic dye test to predict the adsorption of 2-methylisoborneol onto granular activated carbons and to identify the influence of pore volume distributions.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Michael J; Redding, Adam M; Cannon, Fred S

    2015-01-01

    The authors have developed a kinetic dye test protocol that aims to predict the competitive adsorption of 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) to granular activated carbons (GACs). The kinetic dye test takes about two hours to perform, and produces a quantitative result, fitted to a model to yield an Intraparticle Diffusion Constant (IDC) during the earlier times of dye sorption. The dye xylenol orange was probed into six coconut-based GACs and five bituminous-based GACs that hosted varied pore distributions. Correlations between xylenol orange IDCs and breakthrough of MIB at 4 ppt in rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs) were found with R²s of 0.85 and 0.95 for coconut carbons that processed waters with total organic carbon (TOCs) of 1.9 and 2.2 ppm, respectively, and with an R² of 0.94 for bituminous carbons that processed waters with a TOC of 2.5 ppm. The author sought to study the influence of the pore sizes, which provide the adsorption sites and the diffusion conduits that are necessary for the removal of those compounds. For coconut carbons, a linear correlation was established between the xylenol orange IDCs and the volume of pores in the range of 23.4-31.8 Å widths (R² = 0.98). For bituminous carbons, best correlation was to pores ranging from 74 to 93 Å widths (R² = 0.94). The differences in adsorption between coconut carbons and bituminous carbons have been attributed to the inherently dissimilar graphene layering resulting from the parent materials and the activation processes. When fluorescein dye was employed in the kinetic dye tests, the correlations to RSSCT-MIB performance were not as high as when xylenol orange was used. Intriguingly, it was the same pore size ranges that exhibited the strongest correlation for MIB RSSCT's, xylenol orange kinetics, and fluoroscein kinetics. When methylene blue dye was used, sorption occurred so rapidly as to be out of the scope of the IDC model. PMID:25462782

  6. Exploring Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Souhern California Edison Service Territory

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Therese K; Kingston, Tim

    2005-12-01

    Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention have been the desires to globally reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and concerns with interconnection on the distribution system. This study assesses the costs and benefits of DE to both consumers and distribution utilities and expands upon a precursory study done with Detroit Edison (DTE)1, by evaluating the combined impact of DE, energy-efficiency, photovoltaics (a use of solar energy), and demand response that will shape the grid of the future. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Gas Research Institute (GRI), American Electric Power (AEP), and Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) Distributed Energy Collaborative Program (DECP). It focuses on two real Southern California Edison (SCE) circuits, a 13 MW suburban circuit fictitiously named Justice on the Lincoln substation, and an 8 MW rural circuit fictitiously named Prosper on the Washington Substation. The primary objectives of the study were threefold: (1) Evaluate the potential for using advanced energy technologies, including DE, energy-efficiency (EE), demand response, electricity storage, and photovoltaics (PV), to reshape electric load curves by reducing peak demand, for real circuits. (2) Investigate the potential impact on guiding technology deployment and managing operation in a way that benefits both utilities and their customers by: (a) Improving grid load factor for utilities; (b) Reducing energy costs for customers; and (c) Optimizing electric demand growth. (3) Demonstrate benefits by reporting on a recently installed advanced energy system at a utility customer site. This

  7. High-energy tail distributions and resonant wave particle interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leubner, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    High-energy tail distributions (k distributions) are used as an alternative to a bi-Lorentzian distribution to study the influence of energetic protons on the right- and left-hand cyclotron modes in a hot two-temperature plasma. Although the parameters are chosen to be in a range appropriate to solar wind or magnetospheric configurations, the results apply not only to specific space plasmas. The presence of energetic particles significantly alters the behavior of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes, leading to a wide range of unstable frequencies and increased growth rates. From the strongly enhanced growth rates it can be concluded that high-energy tail distributions should not show major temperature anisotropies, which is consistent with observations.

  8. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  9. Energy distributions of sputtered copper neutrals and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Direct quantitative analysis of surfaces by secondary ion mass spectrometry will depend on an understanding of the yield ratio of ions to neutrals. This ratio as a function of the energy of the sputtered particles has been obtained for a clean polycrystalline copper surface sputtered by 1000-3000 eV Ar(+). The energy distributions of both neutral and ionized copper were measured with a retarding potential analyzer using potential modulation differentiation and signal averaging. The maximum for both distributions is identical and occurs near 2.5 eV. The energy distributions of neutrals is more sharply peaked than that of the ions, presumably as a consequence of more efficient nutralization of slow escaping ions by the mobile electrons of copper. The ion-neutral ratio is compared with results from various ionization models.

  10. Intensity distribution analysis of cathodoluminescence using the energy loss distribution of electrons.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Inami, Wataru; Ono, Atsushi; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2016-01-01

    We present an intensity distribution analysis of cathodoluminescence (CL) excited with a focused electron beam in a luminescent thin film. The energy loss distribution is applied to the developed analysis method in order to determine the arrangement of the dipole locations along the path of the electron traveling in the film. Propagating light emitted from each dipole is analyzed with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. CL distribution near the film surface is evaluated as a nanometric light source. It is found that a light source with 30 nm widths is generated in the film by the focused electron beam. We also discuss the accuracy of the developed analysis method by comparison with experimental results. The analysis results are brought into good agreement with the experimental results by introducing the energy loss distribution. PMID:26550930

  11. Energy distribution of nanoflares in the quiet solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanov, Artyom

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of flare-like events in low layer of solar corona detected with TESIS instrument onboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite in 171 {Å} during high-cadence (5 sec) time-series. The estimated thermal energies of these small events amount to 10^{23} - 10^{26} erg. According to modern classification flare-like events with such energies are usually referred to as nanoflares. The big number of registered events (above 2000) allowed us to obtain precise distributions of geometric and physical parameters of nanoflares, the most intriguing being energy distribution. Following Aschwanden et al. (2000) and other authors we approximated the calculated energy distribution with a single power law slope: N(E)dE ˜ N^{-α}dE. The power law index was derived to be α = 2.4 ± 0.2, which is very close to the value reported by Krucker & Benz (1998): α ≈ 2.3 - 2.4. The total energy input from registered events constitute about 10^4 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}, which is well beyond net losses in quiet corona (3 \\cdot 10^5 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}). However, the value of α > 2 indicates that nanoflares with lower energies dominate over nanoflares with bigger energies and could contribute considerably to quiet corona heating.

  12. Velocity and energy distributions in microcanonical ensembles of hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Scalas, Enrico; Gabriel, Adrian T; Martin, Edgar; Germano, Guido

    2015-08-01

    In a microcanonical ensemble (constant NVE, hard reflecting walls) and in a molecular dynamics ensemble (constant NVEPG, periodic boundary conditions) with a number N of smooth elastic hard spheres in a d-dimensional volume V having a total energy E, a total momentum P, and an overall center of mass position G, the individual velocity components, velocity moduli, and energies have transformed beta distributions with different arguments and shape parameters depending on d, N, E, the boundary conditions, and possible symmetries in the initial conditions. This can be shown marginalizing the joint distribution of individual energies, which is a symmetric Dirichlet distribution. In the thermodynamic limit the beta distributions converge to gamma distributions with different arguments and shape or scale parameters, corresponding respectively to the Gaussian, i.e., Maxwell-Boltzmann, Maxwell, and Boltzmann or Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution. These analytical results agree with molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations with different numbers of hard disks or spheres and hard reflecting walls or periodic boundary conditions. The agreement is perfect with our Monte Carlo algorithm, which acts only on velocities independently of positions with the collision versor sampled uniformly on a unit half sphere in d dimensions, while slight deviations appear with our molecular dynamics simulations for the smallest values of N. PMID:26382376

  13. Velocity and energy distributions in microcanonical ensembles of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalas, Enrico; Gabriel, Adrian T.; Martin, Edgar; Germano, Guido

    2015-08-01

    In a microcanonical ensemble (constant N V E , hard reflecting walls) and in a molecular dynamics ensemble (constant N V E PG , periodic boundary conditions) with a number N of smooth elastic hard spheres in a d -dimensional volume V having a total energy E , a total momentum P , and an overall center of mass position G , the individual velocity components, velocity moduli, and energies have transformed beta distributions with different arguments and shape parameters depending on d , N , E , the boundary conditions, and possible symmetries in the initial conditions. This can be shown marginalizing the joint distribution of individual energies, which is a symmetric Dirichlet distribution. In the thermodynamic limit the beta distributions converge to gamma distributions with different arguments and shape or scale parameters, corresponding respectively to the Gaussian, i.e., Maxwell-Boltzmann, Maxwell, and Boltzmann or Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution. These analytical results agree with molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations with different numbers of hard disks or spheres and hard reflecting walls or periodic boundary conditions. The agreement is perfect with our Monte Carlo algorithm, which acts only on velocities independently of positions with the collision versor sampled uniformly on a unit half sphere in d dimensions, while slight deviations appear with our molecular dynamics simulations for the smallest values of N .

  14. Liquid-Phase Adsorption of Phenol onto Activated Carbons Prepared with Different Activation Levels.

    PubMed

    Hsieh; Teng

    2000-10-01

    The influence of the pore size distribution of activated carbon on the adsorption of phenol from aqueous solutions was explored. Activated carbons with different porous structures were prepared by gasifying a bituminous coal char to different extents of burn-off. The results of adsorption experiments show that the phenol capacity of these carbons does not proportionally increase with their BET surface area. This reflects the heterogeneity of the carbon surface for adsorption. The pore size distributions of these carbons, determined according to the Dubinin-Stoeckli equation, were found to vary with the burn-off level. By incorporating the distribution with the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation using an inverse proportionality between the micropore size and the adsorption energy, the isotherms for the adsorption of phenol onto these carbons can be well predicted. The present study has demonstrated that the heterogeneity of carbon surface for the phenol adsorption can be attributed to the different energies required for adsorption in different-size micropores. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10998301

  15. Energy Distributions and spectra of Orion B stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R. E.; Chaffee, F.

    1972-01-01

    New MK spectral types and energy distributions are presented for B stars in Orion for which far ultraviolet flux excesses have recently been discovered. Significant differences between HD spectral energy distributions show the Orion late B stars to have smaller Balmer discontinuities than do field stars of the same spectral types. For the late B stars, these effects cause the 1500 A fluxes to be under-estimated by approximately 0.5 mag. No comparable systematic effects were found for the early B stars.

  16. Comparison of Measured Dark Current Distributions with Calculated Damage Energy Distributions in HgCdTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, C. J.; Marshall, P. W.; Howe, C. L.; Reed, R. A.; Weller, R. A.; Mendenhall, M.; Waczynski, A.; Ladbury, R.; Jordan, T. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined Monte Carlo and analytic approach to the calculation of the pixel-to-pixel distribution of proton-induced damage in a HgCdTe sensor array and compares the results to measured dark current distributions after damage by 63 MeV protons. The moments of the Coulombic, nuclear elastic and nuclear inelastic damage distributions were extracted from Monte Carlo simulations and combined to form a damage distribution using the analytic techniques first described in [1]. The calculations show that the high energy recoils from the nuclear inelastic reactions (calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX [2]) produce a pronounced skewing of the damage energy distribution. While the nuclear elastic component (also calculated using the MCNPX) contributes only a small fraction of the total nonionizing damage energy, its inclusion in the shape of the damage across the array is significant. The Coulombic contribution was calculated using MRED [3-5], a Geant4 [4,6] application. The comparison with the dark current distribution strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not linearly correlated with nonionizing damage produced according to collision kinematics are responsible for the observed dark current increases. This has important implications for the process of predicting the on-orbit dark current response of the HgCdTe sensor array.

  17. A Petri Net model for distributed energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Konopko, Joanna

    2015-12-31

    Electrical networks need to evolve to become more intelligent, more flexible and less costly. The smart grid is the next generation power energy, uses two-way flows of electricity and information to create a distributed automated energy delivery network. Building a comprehensive smart grid is a challenge for system protection, optimization and energy efficient. Proper modeling and analysis is needed to build an extensive distributed energy system and intelligent electricity infrastructure. In this paper, the whole model of smart grid have been proposed using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets (GSPN). The simulation of created model is also explored. The simulation of the model has allowed the analysis of how close the behavior of the model is to the usage of the real smart grid.

  18. A Petri Net model for distributed energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopko, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Electrical networks need to evolve to become more intelligent, more flexible and less costly. The smart grid is the next generation power energy, uses two-way flows of electricity and information to create a distributed automated energy delivery network. Building a comprehensive smart grid is a challenge for system protection, optimization and energy efficient. Proper modeling and analysis is needed to build an extensive distributed energy system and intelligent electricity infrastructure. In this paper, the whole model of smart grid have been proposed using Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets (GSPN). The simulation of created model is also explored. The simulation of the model has allowed the analysis of how close the behavior of the model is to the usage of the real smart grid.

  19. Comparison of Measured Leakage Current Distributions with Calculated Damage Energy Distributions in HgCdTe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, C. J.; Ladbury, R.; Marshall, P. W.; Reed, R. A.; Howe, C.; Weller, B.; Mendenhall, M.; Waczynski, A.; Jordan, T. M.; Fodness, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a combined Monte Carlo and analytic approach to the calculation of the pixel-to-pixel distribution of proton-induced damage in a HgCdTe sensor array and compares the results to measured dark current distributions after damage by 63 MeV protons. The moments of the Coulombic, nuclear elastic and nuclear inelastic damage distribution were extracted from Monte Carlo simulations and combined to form a damage distribution using the analytic techniques first described in [I]. The calculations show that the high energy recoils from the nuclear inelastic reactions (calculated using the Monte Car10 code MCNPX [2]) produce a pronounced skewing of the damage energy distribution. The nuclear elastic component (also calculated using the MCNPX) has a negligible effect on the shape of the damage distribution. The Coulombic contribution was calculated using MRED [3,4], a Geant4 [4,5] application. The comparison with the dark current distribution strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not linearly correlated with nonionizing damage produced according to collision kinematics are responsible for the observed dark current increases. This has important implications for the process of predicting the on-orbit dark current response of the HgCdTe sensor array.

  20. Fabrication of Low Adsorption Energy Ni-Mo Cluster Cocatalyst in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Visible Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Wenlong; Gao, Haibo; Tian, Bin; Ma, Jiantai; Lu, Gongxuan

    2016-05-01

    An effective cocatalyst is crucial for enhancing the visible photocatalytic performance of the hydrogen generation reaction. By using density-functional theory (DFT) and frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory calculation analysis, the hydrogen adsorption free energy (ΔGH) of Ni-Mo alloy (458 kJ·mol(-1)) is found to be lower than that of Ni itself (537 kJ·mol(-1)). Inspired by these results, the novel, highly efficient cocatalyst NiMo@MIL-101 for photocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was fabricated using the double solvents method (DSM). In contrast with Ni@MIL-101 and Mo@MIL-101, NiMo@MIL-101 exhibited an excellent photocatalytic performance (740.2 μmol·h(-1) for HER), stability, and high apparent quantum efficiency (75.7%) under 520 nm illumination at pH 7. The NiMo@MIL-101 catalyst also showed a higher transient photocurrent, lower overpotential (-0.51 V), and longer fluorescence lifetime (1.57 ns). The results uncover the dependence of the photocatalytic activity of HER on the ΔGH of Ni-Mo (MoNi4) alloy nanoclusters, i.e., lower ΔGH corresponding to higher HER activity for the first time. The NiMo@MIL-101 catalyst could be a promising candidate to replace precious-metal catalysts of the HER. PMID:27070204

  1. A Bio-Based Fuel Cell for Distributed Energy Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Terrinoni; Sean Gifford

    2008-06-30

    The technology we propose consists primarily of an improved design for increasing the energy density of a certain class of bio-fuel cell (BFC). The BFCs we consider are those which harvest electrons produced by microorganisms during their metabolism of organic substrates (e.g. glucose, acetate). We estimate that our technology will significantly enhance power production (per unit volume) of these BFCs, to the point where they could be employed as stand-alone systems for distributed energy generation.

  2. Thermal electron energy distribution measurements in the ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.; Nagy, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    A recoverable payload instrumented for twilight airglow studies was launched by an Aerobee 150 from the White Sands Test Range on Feb. 8, 1971 at 13.56 UT. The payload included a low energy electron spectrometer (HARP) and a cylindrical Langmuir probe. The HARP electron spectrometer is a new device designed to make high resolution differential electron flux measurements. Measurements of ionospheric electron energy distribution in the range from about 0.2 to 4.0 eV are presented.

  3. How to buy energy-efficient distribution transformer

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    Section 161 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) encourages energy-efficient federal procurement. Executive Order 12902 and FAR section 23.704 direct agencies to purchase products in the upper 25% of energy efficiency. Agencies that use these guidelines to buy efficient products can realize substantial operating cost savings and help prevent pollution. As the world`s largest consumer, the federal government can help pull the entire US market towards greater energy efficiency, while saving taxpayer dollars. The efficiency levels in this Recommendation are the same as those in NEMA`s TP-1 standard. Additionally, the EPA/DOE ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program identifies efficient low-voltage distribution transformers with the ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} label. Complying models meet the same efficiency criteria specified in this Recommendation (and TP-1).

  4. Adsorption of Iodine and Potassium on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ Investigated by Low Energy Alkali Ion Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, G.D.; Gann, R.D.; Cao, J.X.; Wu, R.Q.; Wen, J.; Xu, Z.; Gu, G.D.; Yarmoff, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of K and I on the surface of the high-T{sub c} cuprate BSCCO-2212 is investigated with low-energy (0.8 to 2 keV) Na{sup +} ion scattering and density functional theory (DFT). Samples were cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum and charge-resolved spectra of the scattered ions were collected with time-of-flight. The spectra contain a single peak representing Na scattered from Bi, as the clean surfaces are terminated by BiO. The neutralization of scattered Na depends on the local potential above the target site, and the angular dependence indicates that the clean surface has an inhomogeneous potential. Neutralization is dependent on the coverage of I, but independent of K adsorption. DFT suggests high-symmetry sites for the adsorption of both I and K, and that the potential above the Bi sites is altered by I by an amount consistent with the experimental findings, while the potential is not affected by K adsorption. DFT also enables an experimental determination of the 'freezing distance,' which is the effective point beyond which charge exchange does not occur, to be 1.6 {+-} 0.1 {angstrom} from the outermost Bi layer.

  5. Review of Test Facilities for Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    AKHIL,ABBAS ALI; MARNAY,CHRIS; KIPMAN,TIMOTHY

    2003-05-01

    Since initiating research on integration of distributed energy resources (DER) in 1999, the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) has been actively assessing and reviewing existing DER test facilities for possible demonstrations of advanced DER system integration concepts. This report is a compendium of information collected by the CERTS team on DER test facilities during this period.

  6. Multi-objective optimal dispatch of distributed energy resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longe, Ayomide

    This thesis is composed of two papers which investigate the optimal dispatch for distributed energy resources. In the first paper, an economic dispatch problem for a community microgrid is studied. In this microgrid, each agent pursues an economic dispatch for its personal resources. In addition, each agent is capable of trading electricity with other agents through a local energy market. In this paper, a simple market structure is introduced as a framework for energy trades in a small community microgrid such as the Solar Village. It was found that both sellers and buyers benefited by participating in this market. In the second paper, Semidefinite Programming (SDP) for convex relaxation of power flow equations is used for optimal active and reactive dispatch for Distributed Energy Resources (DER). Various objective functions including voltage regulation, reduced transmission line power losses, and minimized reactive power charges for a microgrid are introduced. Combinations of these goals are attained by solving a multiobjective optimization for the proposed ORPD problem. Also, both centralized and distributed versions of this optimal dispatch are investigated. It was found that SDP made the optimal dispatch faster and distributed solution allowed for scalability.

  7. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System (AEDR): Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Buche, D. L.

    2008-07-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects.

  8. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Buche, D. L.; Perry, S.

    2007-10-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects.

  9. Energy loss analysis of an integrated space power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. D.; Ribeiro, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of studies related to conceptual topologies of an integrated utility-like space power system are described. The system topologies are comparatively analyzed by considering their transmission energy losses as functions of mainly distribution voltage level and load composition. The analysis is expedited by use of a Distribution System Analysis and Simulation (DSAS) software. This recently developed computer program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) uses improved load models to solve the power flow within the system. However, present shortcomings of the software with regard to space applications, and incompletely defined characteristics of a space power system make the results applicable to only the fundamental trends of energy losses of the topologies studied. Accountability, such as included, for the effects of the various parameters on the system performance can constitute part of a planning tool for a space power distribution system.

  10. Distributed Frequency Control of Prosumer-Based Electric Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nazari, MH; Costello, Z; Feizollahi, MJ; Grijalva, S; Egerstedt, M

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a distributed frequency regulation framework for prosumer-based electric energy systems, where a prosumer (producer-consumer) is defined as an intelligent agentwhich can produce, consume, and/or store electricity. Despite the frequency regulators being distributed, stability can be ensured while avoiding inter-area oscillations using a limited control effort. To achieve this, a fully distributed one-step model-predictive control protocol is proposed and analyzed, whereby each prosumer communicates solely with its neighbors in the network. The efficacy of the proposed frequency regulation framework is shown through simulations on two real-world electric energy systems of different scale and complexity. We show that prosumers can indeed bring frequency and power deviations to their desired values after small perturbations.

  11. Improvement of pesticide adsorption capacity of cellulose fibre by high-energy irradiation-initiated grafting of glycidyl methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László; Koczog Horváth, Éva; Fekete, Tamás; Borsa, Judit

    2012-09-01

    Cellulose as a renewable raw material was used for preparation of adsorbent of organic impurities in wastewater treatment. Hydrophobic surface of cellulose substrate was developed by grafting glycidyl methacrylate in simultaneous grafting using gamma irradiation initiation. Water uptake of cellulose significantly decreased while adsorption of phenol and a pesticide molecule (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid: 2,4-D) increased upon grafting. Adsorption equilibrium data fitted the Freundlich isotherm for both solutes.

  12. Transient electron energy distribution in supported Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merschdorf, M.; Kennerknecht, C.; Willig, K.; Pfeiffer, W.

    2002-11-01

    The electron relaxation in Ag nanoparticles supported on graphite is investigated by time-resolved multiphoton photoemission spectroscopy. The photoemission spectra map the transient electron energy distribution in the nanoparticles and reveal the internal thermalization and cooling of the electron gas. The excess energy stored in the electron gas is calculated using the free-electron model. In contrast to the behaviour of isolated nanoparticles the energy loss rate from the electron gas increases with the pump fluence. This indicates that the electron gas equilibration in Ag nanoparticles on graphite is modified by excited electron transport.

  13. Electron energy distribution in a dusty plasma: analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, I B; Kersten, H; Azarenkov, N A

    2015-09-01

    Analytical expressions describing the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a dusty plasma are obtained from the homogeneous Boltzmann equation for electrons. The expressions are derived neglecting electron-electron collisions, as well as transformation of high-energy electrons into low-energy electrons at inelastic electron-atom collisions. At large electron energies, the quasiclassical approach for calculation of the EEDF is applied. For the moderate energies, we account for inelastic electron-atom collisions in the dust-free case and both inelastic electron-atom and electron-dust collisions in the dusty plasma case. Using these analytical expressions and the balance equation for dust charging, the electron energy distribution function, the effective electron temperature, the dust charge, and the dust surface potential are obtained for different dust radii and densities, as well as for different electron densities and radio-frequency (rf) field amplitudes and frequencies. The dusty plasma parameters are compared with those calculated numerically by a finite-difference method taking into account electron-electron collisions and the transformation of high-energy electrons at inelastic electron-neutral collisions. It is shown that the analytical expressions can be used for calculation of the EEDF and dusty plasma parameters at typical experimental conditions, in particular, in the positive column of a direct-current glow discharge and in the case of an rf plasma maintained by an electric field with frequency f=13.56MHz. PMID:26465570

  14. Complementing the adsorption energies of CO2, H2S and NO2 to h-BN sheets by doping with carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagynbaeva, Myskal; Hussain, Tanveer; Panigrahi, Puspamitra; Johansson, Borje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-03-01

    We predict the adsorption proficiency of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheets to toxic gas molecules like CO2, H2S and NO2 on the basis of first-principles density functional theory calculations. The computed energies predict the pristine h-BN sheet to have very little affinity towards the mentioned gas molecules. However, while doping C at the N site of the h-BN sheet brings a significant enhancement to the estimated adsorption energies, doping C at B site of the sheet is found to be energetically not so favorable. To have a higher coverage effect, the concentration of C doping on the h-BN sheet is further increased which resulted in upsurging the adsorption energies for the mentioned gas molecules. Among the three, CO2, H2S are found to be physisorbed to the C-doped h-BN sheets, where as the C-doped sheets are found to have strong affinity towards NO2 gas molecules.

  15. Effects of Porous Polystyrene Resin Parameters on Candida antarctica Lipase B Adsorption, Distribution, and Polyester Synthesis Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,B.; Miller, M.; Gross, R.

    2007-01-01

    Polystyrene resins with varied particle sizes (35 to 350-600 {mu}m) and pore diameters (300-1000 {angstrom}) were employed to study the effects of immobilization resin particle size and pore diameter on Candida antarctica Lipase B (CALB) loading, distribution within resins, fraction of active sites, and catalytic properties for polyester synthesis. CALB adsorbed rapidly (saturation time {<=}4 min) for particle sizes 120 {mu}m (pore size = 300 {angstrom}). Infrared microspectroscopy showed that CALB forms protein loading fronts regardless of resin particle size at similar enzyme loadings ({approx}8%). From the IR images, the fractions of total surface area available to the enzyme are 21, 33, 35, 37, and 88% for particle sizes 350-600, 120, 75, 35 {mu}m (pore size 300 {angstrom}), and 35 {mu}m (pore size 1000 {angstrom}), respectively. Titration with methyl p-nitrophenyl n-hexylphosphate (MNPHP) showed that the fraction of active CALB molecules adsorbed onto resins was {approx}60%. The fraction of active CALB molecules was invariable as a function of resin particle and pore size. At {approx}8% (w/w) CALB loading, by increasing the immobilization support pore diameter from 300 to 1000 {angstrom}, the turnover frequency (TOF) of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone ({var_epsilon}-CL) to polyester increased from 12.4 to 28.2 s{sup -1}. However, the {var_epsilon}-CL conversion rate was not influenced by changes in resin particle size. Similar trends were observed for condensation polymerizations between 1,8-octanediol and adipic acid. The results herein are compared to those obtained with a similar series of methyl methacrylate resins, where variations in particle size largely affected CALB distribution within resins and catalyst activity for polyester synthesis.

  16. Strain energy release rate distributions for double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1991-01-01

    A 24-ply composite double cantilever-beam specimen under mode I (opening) loading has been analyzed by a 3D FEM code that calculated along a straight delamination starter for several different specimen materials. An isotropic specimen was found to have a strain-energy release rate distribution which varied along its delamination front due to the boundary-layer effect and another effect associated with the anticlastic curvature of the bent specimen arms. A 0-deg graphite-reinforced epoxy specimen had a nearly-uniform strain-energy release rate distribution which dropped only near the edge, due to the boundary-layer effect, and a +/- 45-deg graphite/epoxy specimen exhibited a pronounced strain-energy release rate variation across the specimen width.

  17. Benefits of Power Electronic Interfaces for Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Pink, C.; DeBlasio, R.; Thomas, H.; Simoes, M.; Sen, P. K.

    2006-01-01

    Optimization of overall electrical system performance is important for the long-term economic viability of distributed energy (DE) systems. With the increasing use of DE systems in industry and its technological advancement, it is becoming more important to understand the integration of these systems with the electric power systems. New markets and benefits for distributed energy applications include the ability to provide ancillary services, improve energy efficiency, enhance power system reliability, and allow customer choice. Advanced power electronic (PE) interfaces will allow DE systems to provide increased functionality through improved power quality and voltage/VAR support, increase electrical system compatibility by reducing the fault contributions, and flexibility in operations with various other DE sources, while reducing overall interconnection costs. This paper examines the system integration and optimization issues associated with DE systems and show the benefits of using PE interfaces for such applications.

  18. 78 FR 23335 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ...The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, prescribes energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including distribution transformers. EPCA also requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine whether more-stringent standards would be technologically feasible and economically justified, and would......

  19. Determination of energy distribution for photon and neutron microdosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, A. S.

    This work was undertaken to provide basic physical data for use in both microdosimetry and dosimetry of high energy photons and also in the neutron radiation field. Described is the formalism to determine the initial electron energy spectra in water irradiated by photons with energies up to 1 GeV. Calculations were performed with a Monte Carlo computer code, PHOEL-3, which is also described. The code treats explicitly the production of electron-positron pairs, Compton scattering, photoelectric absorption, and the emission of Auger electrons following the occurrence of K-shell vacancies in oxygen. The tables give directly the information needed to specify the absolute single-collision kerma in water, which approximates tissue, at each photon energy. Results for continuous photon energy spectra can be obtained by using linear interpolation with the tables. The conditions under which first-collision kerma approximate absorbed dose are discussed. A formula is given for estimating bremsstrahlung energy loss, one of the principal differences between kerma and absorbed dose in practical cases. A study has been carried out, on the use of cylindrical, energy-proportional pulse-height detector for determining microdosimetric quantities, as neutron fractional dose spectra, D (L), in the function of linear energy transfer (LET). In the present study the Hurst detector was used; this device satisfies the requirement of the Bragg-Gray principle. A Monte Carlo Method was developed to obtain the D(L) spectrum from a measured pulse-height spectrum H(h), and the knowledge of the distribution of recoil-particle track lenght, P(T) in the sensitive volume of the detector. These developed programs to find P(T) and D(L) are presented. The distribution of D(L) in LET were obtained using a known distribution of P(T) and the measured H(h) spectrum fromthe Cf-2 52 neutron source. All the results are discussed and the conclusions are presented.

  20. Optimal Voltage Regulation for Unbalanced Distribution Networks Considering Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Ceylan, Oguzhan; Xu, Yan; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    With increasing penetration of distributed generation in the distribution networks (DN), the secure and optimal operation of DN has become an important concern. In this paper, an iterative quadratic constrained quadratic programming model to minimize voltage deviations and maximize distributed energy resource (DER) active power output in a three phase unbalanced distribution system is developed. The optimization model is based on the linearized sensitivity coefficients between controlled variables (e.g., node voltages) and control variables (e.g., real and reactive power injections of DERs). To avoid the oscillation of solution when it is close to the optimum, a golden search method is introduced to control the step size. Numerical simulations on modified IEEE 13 nodes test feeders show the efficiency of the proposed model. Compared to the results solved by heuristic search (harmony algorithm), the proposed model converges quickly to the global optimum.

  1. The spectral energy distribution of Zeta Puppis and HD 50896

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, A. V.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The ultraviolet spectral energy distribution of the O5f star Zeta Pup and the WN5 star HD 50896 are derived from OAO-2 observations with the calibration of Bless, Code, and Fairchild (1976). An estimate of the interstellar reddening (0.12 magnitude) of the Wolf-Rayet star is determined from the size of the characteristic interstellar extinction bump at 4.6 inverse microns. After correction for extinction, both stars show a flat energy distribution in the ultraviolet. The distribution of HD 50896 from 1100 A to 2 microns is in good agreement with results of extended model atmospheres, but some uncertainty remains because of the interstellar-extinction correction. The absolute energy distribution of Zeta Pup is fitted by a 42,000-K plane-parallel model if the model's flux is adjusted for the effects of electron scattering in the stellar wind and for UV line blanketing that was determined empirically from high-resolution Copernicus satellite observations. To achieve this fit, it is necessary to push both the spectroscopically determined temperature and the ultraviolet calibration to the limits of their probable errors.

  2. Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

    2004-10-01

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary assessment of the cost effectiveness of distributed energy resources at Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) Building 1512. This study was conducted in response to the base's request for design assistance to the Federal Energy Management Program. Given the current tariff structure there are two main decisions facing NBVC: whether to install distributed energy resources (DER), or whether to continue the direct access energy supply contract. At the current effective rate, given assumptions about the performance and structure of building energy loads and available generating technology characteristics, the results of this study indicate that if the building installed a 600 kW DER system with absorption cooling and heat capabilities chosen by cost minimization, the energy cost savings would be about 14 percent, or $55,000 per year. However, under current conditions, this study also suggests that significant savings could be obtained if Building 1 512 changed from the direct access contract to a SCE TOU-8 (Southern California Edison time of use tariff number 8) rate without installing a DER system. At current SCE TOU-8 tariffs, the potential savings from installation of a DER system would be about 4 percent, or $15,000 per year.

  3. Steam distribution and energy delivery optimization using wireless sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Allgood, Glenn O; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Djouadi, Seddik M; Lake, Joe E

    2011-01-01

    The Extreme Measurement Communications Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) explores the deployment of a wireless sensor system with a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework in the ORNL campus. With particular focus on the 12-mile long steam distribution network in our campus, we propose an integrated system-level approach to optimize the energy delivery within the steam distribution system. We address the goal of achieving significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam valves/traps. Our approach leverages an integrated wireless sensor and real-time monitoring capabilities. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by mounting acoustic sensors on the steam pipes/traps/valves and observe the state measurements of these sensors. Our assessments are based on analysis of the wireless sensor measurements. We describe Fourier-spectrum based algorithms that interpret acoustic vibration sensor data to characterize flows and classify the steam system status. We are able to present the sensor readings, steam flow, steam trap status and the assessed alerts as an interactive overlay within a web-based Google Earth geographic platform that enables decision makers to take remedial action. We believe our demonstration serves as an instantiation of a platform that extends implementation to include newer modalities to manage water flow, sewage and energy consumption.

  4. Steam distribution and energy delivery optimization using wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Kuruganti, Teja P.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Djouadi, Seddik M.; Lake, Joe E.

    2011-05-01

    The Extreme Measurement Communications Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) explores the deployment of a wireless sensor system with a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework in the ORNL campus. With particular focus on the 12-mile long steam distribution network in our campus, we propose an integrated system-level approach to optimize the energy delivery within the steam distribution system. We address the goal of achieving significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam valves/traps. Our approach leverages an integrated wireless sensor and real-time monitoring capabilities. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by mounting acoustic sensors on the steam pipes/traps/valves and observe the state measurements of these sensors. Our assessments are based on analysis of the wireless sensor measurements. We describe Fourier-spectrum based algorithms that interpret acoustic vibration sensor data to characterize flows and classify the steam system status. We are able to present the sensor readings, steam flow, steam trap status and the assessed alerts as an interactive overlay within a web-based Google Earth geographic platform that enables decision makers to take remedial action. We believe our demonstration serves as an instantiation of a platform that extends implementation to include newer modalities to manage water flow, sewage and energy consumption.

  5. Initial energy and perihelion distributions of Oort-cloud comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model of stellar perturbations of the Oort cloud is used to study the distributions in energy and perihelion of comets entering the planetary region for the first time. The model is run for a variety of initial states and a range of velocity perturbations. In all cases the resulting orbits are uniformly distributed in perihelion distance in the planetary region, q less than 20 AU. Most orbits are confined to a fairly narrow range in 1/a and hyperbolic orbits are rare.

  6. Energy management and control of active distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariatzadeh, Farshid

    Advancements in the communication, control, computation and information technologies have driven the transition to the next generation active power distribution systems. Novel control techniques and management strategies are required to achieve the efficient, economic and reliable grid. The focus of this work is energy management and control of active distribution systems (ADS) with integrated renewable energy sources (RESs) and demand response (DR). Here, ADS mean automated distribution system with remotely operated controllers and distributed energy resources (DERs). DER as active part of the next generation future distribution system includes: distributed generations (DGs), RESs, energy storage system (ESS), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and DR. Integration of DR and RESs into ADS is critical to realize the vision of sustainability. The objective of this dissertation is the development of management architecture to control and operate ADS in the presence of DR and RES. One of the most challenging issues for operating ADS is the inherent uncertainty of DR and RES as well as conflicting objective of DER and electric utilities. ADS can consist of different layers such as system layer and building layer and coordination between these layers is essential. In order to address these challenges, multi-layer energy management and control architecture is proposed with robust algorithms in this work. First layer of proposed multi-layer architecture have been implemented at the system layer. Developed AC optimal power flow (AC-OPF) generates fair price for all DR and non-DR loads which is used as a control signal for second layer. Second layer controls DR load at buildings using a developed look-ahead robust controller. Load aggregator collects information from all buildings and send aggregated load to the system optimizer. Due to the different time scale at these two management layers, time coordination scheme is developed. Robust and deterministic controllers

  7. A fundamental study of the impact of pressure on the adsorption mechanism in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2016-07-29

    A fundamental investigation of the pressure effect on individual adsorption sites was undertaken based on adsorption energy distribution and adsorption isotherm measurements. For this purpose, we measured adsorption equilibrium data at pressures ranging from 100 to 1000bar at constant flow and over a wide concentration range for three low-molecular-weight solutes, antipyrine, sodium 2-naphthalenesulfonate, and benzyltriethylammonium chloride, on an Eternity C18 stationary phase. The adsorption energy distribution was bimodal for all solutes, remaining clearly so at all pressures. The bi-Langmuir model best described the adsorption in these systems and two types of adsorption sites were identified, one with a low and another with a high energy of interaction. Evidence exists that the low-energy interactions occur at the interface between the mobile and stationary phases and that the high-energy interactions occur nearer the silica surface, deeper in the C18 layer. The contribution of each type of adsorption site to the retention factor was calculated and the change in solute molar volume from the mobile to stationary phase during the adsorption process was estimated for each type of site. The change in solute molar volume was 2-4 times larger at the high-energy site, likely because of the greater loss of solute solvation layer when penetrating deeper into the C18 layer. The association equilibrium constant increased with increasing pressure while the saturation capacity of the low-energy site remained almost unchanged. The observed increase in saturation capacity for the high-energy site did not affect the column loading capacity, which was almost identical at 50- and 950-bar pressure drops over the column. PMID:27357740

  8. Global versus local adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Marloie, Gael; Markovits, Alexis; Ellinger, Yves

    2015-10-01

    The origin of the enantiomeric excess found in the amino acids present in the organic matter of carbonaceous meteorites is still unclear. Selective adsorption of one of the two enantiomers existing after a racemic formation could be part of the answer. Hereafter we report a comparative study of the adsorption of the R and S enantiomers of α-alanine and lactic acid on the hydroxylated { } chiral surface of α-quartz using numerical simulation techniques. Structurally different adsorption sites were found with opposite R versus S selectivity for the same molecule-surface couple, raising the problem of whether to consider adsorption as a local property or as a global response characteristic of the whole surface. To deal with the second term of this alternative, a statistical approach was designed, based on the occurrence of each adsorption site whose energy was calculated using first principle periodic density functional theory. It was found that R-alanine and S-lactic acid are the enantiomers preferentially adsorbed, even if the adsorption process on the quartz { } surface stays with a disappointingly poor enantio-selectivity. Nevertheless, it highlighted the important point that considering adsorption as a global property changes perspectives in the search for more efficient enantio-selective supports and more generally changes the way to apprehend adsorption processes in astro-chemistry/biology.

  9. Energy efficient wireless sensor networks using asymmetric distributed source coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Abhishek; Kulkarni, Murlidhar

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are networks of sensor nodes deployed over a geographical area to perform a specific task. WSNs pose many design challenges. Energy conservation is one such design issue. In literature a wide range of solutions addressing this issue have been proposed. Generally WSNs are densely deployed. Thus the nodes with the close proximity are more likely to have the same data. Transmission of such non-aggregated data may lead to an inefficient energy management. Hence the data fusion has to be performed at the nodes so as to combine the edundant information into a single data unit. Distributed Source Coding is an efficient approach in achieving this task. In this paper an attempt has been made in modeling such a system. Various energy efficient codes were considered for the analysis. System performance in terms of energy efficiency has been made.

  10. On Measuring Cosmic Ray Energy Spectra with the Rapidity Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    An important goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays up to 10(exp 16) eV. This goal cannot be achieved with an ionization calorimeter because the required instrument is too massive for space flight. An alternate method will be presented. This method is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11) -10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a conceptual design for a new instrument (KLEM) will be presented. Due to its light weight, this instrument can have a large aperture enabling the direct measurement of cosmic rays to 1016 eV.

  11. Effective coordination as a predictor of adsorption energies: A model study of NO on Rh(100) and Rh/MgO(100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpa, Raghani; Gironcoli, Stefano de; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2009-04-15

    We have studied the adsorption of NO, and the coadsorption of N and O, on four physical and hypothetical systems: unstrained and strained Rh(100) surfaces and monolayers of Rh atoms on strained and unstrained MgO(100) surfaces. We find that as we go from Rh(100) to Rh/Mg0(100), via the other two hypothetical systems, the effective coordination progressively decreases, the d band narrows and its center shifts closer to the Fermi level, and the strength of adsorption and coadsorption increases. Both the strain and the presence of the oxide substrate contribute significantly to this. However, charge transfer is found to play a negligible role due to a canceling out between donation and back-donation processes. Our results suggest that lowering the effective coordination of Rh catalysts by strain, roughening, or the use of inert substrates might lower activation energies for the dissociation of NO.

  12. Aqueous mercury adsorption by activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Pejman; To, Ming-Ho; Hui, Chi-Wai; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; McKay, Gordon

    2015-04-15

    Due to serious public health threats resulting from mercury pollution and its rapid distribution in our food chain through the contamination of water bodies, stringent regulations have been enacted on mercury-laden wastewater discharge. Activated carbons have been widely used in the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous effluents. The surface and textural characteristics of activated carbons are the two decisive factors in their efficiency in mercury removal from wastewater. Herein, the structural properties and binding affinity of mercuric ions from effluents have been presented. Also, specific attention has been directed to the effect of sulfur-containing functional moieties on enhancing the mercury adsorption. It has been demonstrated that surface area, pore size, pore size distribution and surface functional groups should collectively be taken into consideration in designing the optimal mercury removal process. Moreover, the mercury adsorption mechanism has been addressed using equilibrium adsorption isotherm, thermodynamic and kinetic studies. Further recommendations have been proposed with the aim of increasing the mercury removal efficiency using carbon activation processes with lower energy input, while achieving similar or even higher efficiencies. PMID:25644627

  13. A bolometer array for the spectral energy distribution (SPEED) camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Ali, S.; Bier, A.; Campano, B.; Chen, T. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Crawford, T. M.; Downes, T.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Logan, D.; Meyer, S. S.; O'dell, C.; Perera, T.; Sharp, E. H.; Timbie, P. T.; Wilson, G. W.

    2004-03-01

    The Spectral Energy Distribution (SPEED) Camera is being developed to study the spectral energy distributions of high redshift galaxies. Its initial use will be on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope and eventually on the Large Millimeter Telescope. SPEED requires a small cryogenic detector array of 2×2 pixels with each pixel having four frequency bands in the 150-375GHz range. Here we describe the development of the detector array of these high-efficiency Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSB). The FSB design provides the multi-pixel, multi-spectral band capability required for SPEED in a compact stackable array. The SPEED bolometers will use proximity effect superconducting transition edge sensors as their temperature-sensing element, allowing for higher levels of electronic multiplexing in future applications.

  14. Consistent energy barrier distributions in magnetic particle chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laslett, O.; Ruta, S.; Chantrell, R. W.; Barker, J.; Friedman, G.; Hovorka, O.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate long-time thermal activation behaviour in magnetic particle chains of variable length. Chains are modelled as Stoner-Wohlfarth particles coupled by dipolar interactions. Thermal activation is described as a hopping process over a multidimensional energy landscape using the discrete orientation model limit of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics. The underlying master equation is solved by diagonalising the associated transition matrix, which allows the evaluation of distributions of time scales of intrinsic thermal activation modes and their energy representation. It is shown that as a result of the interaction dependence of these distributions, increasing the particle chain length can lead to acceleration or deceleration of the overall relaxation process depending on the initialisation procedure.

  15. Detecting energy dependent neutron capture distributions in a liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, Matthew J. I.; Gamage, Kelum A. A.; Taylor, Graeme C.

    2015-03-01

    A novel technique is being developed to estimate the effective dose of a neutron field based on the distribution of neutron captures in a scintillator. Using Monte Carlo techniques, a number of monoenergetic neutron source energies and locations were modelled and their neutron capture response was recorded. Using back propagation Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) the energy and incident direction of the neutron field was predicted from the distribution of neutron captures within a 6Li-loaded liquid scintillator. Using this proposed technique, the effective dose of 252Cf, 241AmBe and 241AmLi neutron fields was estimated to within 30% for four perpendicular angles in the horizontal plane. Initial theoretical investigations show that this technique holds some promise for real-time estimation of the effective dose of a neutron field.

  16. Modeling Plasmas with a Kappa Electron Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2016-05-01

    Nonthermal kappa electron energy distributions have been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, and are likely also present in the solar corona and in solar flares. In order to model the spectra of these plasmas, it is necessary to obtain the appropriate collision rate coefficients. We show that this can be done simply by summing appropriately weighted Maxwellian rate coefficients. The resulting data have similar or better accuracies than are obtained with other approaches. Summing Maxwellians has the additional advantages of being easy to implement and extendable to many different collision processes. We apply this technique to modeling the charge state distribution (CSD) of kappa-distribution plasmas. In particular, we examine the influence of electron impact multiple ionization on the equilibrium CSD and calculate the time variation of the CSD during a solar flare.

  17. Modeling Plasmas with a Kappa Electron Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal kappa electron energy distributions have been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, and are likely also present in the solar corona and in solar flares. In order to model the spectra of these plasmas, it is necessary to obtain the appropriate collision rate coefficients. We show that this can be done simply by summing appropriately weighted Maxwellian rate coefficients. The resulting data have similar or better accuracies than are obtained with other approaches. Summing Maxwellians has the additional advantages of being easy to implement and extendable to many different collision processes. We apply this technique to modeling the charge state distribution (CSD) of kappa-distribution plasmas. In particular, we examine the influence of electron impact multiple ionization on the equilibrium CSD and calculate the time variation of the CSD during a solar flare.

  18. A Detailed Level Kinetics Model of NO Vibrational Energy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Gilmore, John; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Several contemporary problems have pointed to the desirability of a detailed level kinetics approach to modeling the distribution of vibrational energy in NO. Such a model is necessary when vibrational redistribution reactions are insufficient to maintain a Boltzmann distribution over the vibrational energy states. Recent calculations of the rate constant for the first reaction of the Zeldovich mechanism (N2 + O (goes to) NO + N) have suggested that the product NO is formed in high vibrational states. In shock layer flowfields, the product NO molecules may experience an insufficient number of collisions to establish a Boltzmann distribution over vibrational states, thus necessitating a level kinetics model. In other flows, such as expansions of high temperature air, fast, near-resonance vibrational energy exchanges with N2 and O2 may also require a level specific model for NO because of the relative rates of vibrational exchange and redistribution. The proposed report will integrate computational and experimental components to construct such a model for the NO molecule.

  19. Determination of the polar and total surface energy distributions of particulates by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Das, Shyamal C; Larson, Ian; Morton, David A V; Stewart, Peter J

    2011-01-18

    This Letter reports a technique of measuring polar surface energy distributions of lactose using inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The significance of this study is that the total surface energy distributions can now be characterized by combining the already known dispersive surface energy distribution with polar surface energy distribution determined in this study. The polar surface energy was calculated from the specific free energies for surface interactions with a monopolar basic probe, ethyl acetate, and a monopolar acidic probe, dichloromethane. PMID:21174410

  20. Network Capacity Assessment of CHP-based Distributed Generation on Urban Energy Distribution Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianjun

    The combined heat and power (CHP)-based distributed generation (DG) or dis-tributed energy resources (DERs) are mature options available in the present energy market, considered to be an effective solution to promote energy efficiency. In the urban environment, the electricity, water and natural gas distribution networks are becoming increasingly interconnected with the growing penetration of the CHP-based DG. Subsequently, this emerging interdependence leads to new topics meriting serious consideration: how much of the CHP-based DG can be accommodated and where to locate these DERs, and given preexisting constraints, how to quantify the mutual impacts on operation performances between these urban energy distribution networks and the CHP-based DG. The early research work was conducted to investigate the feasibility and design methods for one residential microgrid system based on existing electricity, water and gas infrastructures of a residential community, mainly focusing on the economic planning. However, this proposed design method cannot determine the optimal DG sizing and siting for a larger test bed with the given information of energy infrastructures. In this context, a more systematic as well as generalized approach should be developed to solve these problems. In the later study, the model architecture that integrates urban electricity, water and gas distribution networks, and the CHP-based DG system was developed. The proposed approach addressed the challenge of identifying the optimal sizing and siting of the CHP-based DG on these urban energy networks and the mutual impacts on operation performances were also quantified. For this study, the overall objective is to maximize the electrical output and recovered thermal output of the CHP-based DG units. The electricity, gas, and water system models were developed individually and coupled by the developed CHP-based DG system model. The resultant integrated system model is used to constrain the DG's electrical

  1. Energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons from double layer samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; Varga, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a theoretical description of the spectra of electrons elastically scattered from thin double layered Au-C samples. The analysis is based on the Monte Carlo simulation of the recoil and Doppler effects in reflection and transmission geometries of the scattering at a fixed angle of 44.3 ° and a primary energy of 40 keV. The relativistic correction is taken into account. Besides the experimentally measurable energy distributions the simulations give many partial distributions separately, depending on the number of elastic scatterings (single, and multiple scatterings of different types). Furthermore, we present detailed analytical calculations for the main parameters of the single scattering, taking into account both the ideal scattering geometry, i.e. infinitesimally small angular range, and the effect of the real, finite angular range used in the measurements. We show our results for intensity ratios, peak shifts and broadenings for four cases of measurement geometries and layer thicknesses. While in the peak intensity ratios of gold and carbon for transmission geometries were found to be in good agreement with the results of the single scattering model, especially large deviations were obtained in reflection geometries. The separation of the peaks, depending on the geometry and the thickness, generally smaller, and the peak width generally larger than it can be expected from the nominal values of the primary energy, scattering angle, and mean kinetic energy of the atoms. We also show that the peaks are asymmetric even for the case of the single scattering due to the finite solid angle. Finally, we present a qualitative comparison with the experimental data. We find our resulting energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons to be in good agreement with recent measurements.

  2. Topography, energy and the global distribution of bird species richness

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Richard G; Orme, C. David L; Storch, David; Olson, Valerie A; Thomas, Gavin H; Ross, Simon G; Ding, Tzung-Su; Rasmussen, Pamela C; Bennett, Peter M; Owens, Ian P.F; Blackburn, Tim M; Gaston, Kevin J

    2007-01-01

    A major goal of ecology is to determine the causes of the latitudinal gradient in global distribution of species richness. Current evidence points to either energy availability or habitat heterogeneity as the most likely environmental drivers in terrestrial systems, but their relative importance is controversial in the absence of analyses of global (rather than continental or regional) extent. Here we use data on the global distribution of extant continental and continental island bird species to test the explanatory power of energy availability and habitat heterogeneity while simultaneously addressing issues of spatial resolution, spatial autocorrelation, geometric constraints upon species' range dynamics, and the impact of human populations and historical glacial ice-cover. At the finest resolution (1°), topographical variability and temperature are identified as the most important global predictors of avian species richness in multi-predictor models. Topographical variability is most important in single-predictor models, followed by productive energy. Adjusting for null expectations based on geometric constraints on species richness improves overall model fit but has negligible impact on tests of environmental predictors. Conclusions concerning the relative importance of environmental predictors of species richness cannot be extrapolated from one biogeographic realm to others or the globe. Rather a global perspective confirms the primary importance of mountain ranges in high-energy areas. PMID:17311781

  3. Validated modeling of distributed energy resources at distribution voltages : LDRD project 38672.

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, Mark E.; Ginn, Jerry W.

    2004-03-01

    A significant barrier to the deployment of distributed energy resources (DER) onto the power grid is uncertainty on the part of utility engineers regarding impacts of DER on their distribution systems. Because of the many possible combinations of DER and local power system characteristics, these impacts can most effectively be studied by computer simulation. The goal of this LDRD project was to develop and experimentally validate models of transient and steady state source behavior for incorporation into utility distribution analysis tools. Development of these models had not been prioritized either by the distributed-generation industry or by the inverter industry. A functioning model of a selected inverter-based DER was developed in collaboration with both the manufacturer and industrial power systems analysts. The model was written in the PSCAD simulation language, a variant of the ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP), a code that is widely used and accepted by utilities. A stakeholder team was formed and a methodology was established to address the problem. A list of detailed DER/utility interaction concerns was developed and prioritized. The list indicated that the scope of the problem significantly exceeded resources available for this LDRD project. As this work progresses under separate funding, the model will be refined and experimentally validated. It will then be incorporated in utility distribution analysis tools and used to study a variety of DER issues. The key next step will be design of the validation experiments.

  4. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources using Model Predictive Control

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Butler-Purry, Karen

    2012-07-22

    In an isolated power system (rural microgrid), Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response can be used to complement fossil fueled generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with the goals of minimizing fuel costs and changes in power output of diesel generators, minimizing costs associated with low battery life of energy storage and maintaining system frequency at the nominal operating value. Two control modes are considered for controlling the energy storage to compensate either net load variability or wind variability. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve the aforementioned problem and the performance is compared to an open-loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies using high and low wind profiles, as well as, different MPC prediction horizons demonstrate the efficacy of the closed-loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties in wind and demand.

  5. Controlling the Electron Energy Distribution Function Using an Anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Barnat, Edward V.; Hopkins, Mathew M.

    2014-10-01

    Positively biased electrodes inserted into plasmas influence the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) by providing a sink for low energy electrons that would otherwise be trapped by ion sheaths at the chamber walls. We develop a model for the EEDF in a hot filament generated discharge in the presence of positively biased electrodes of various surface areas, and compare the model results with experimental Langmuir probe measurements and particle-in-cell simulations. In the absence of an anode, the EEDF is characterized by a cool trapped population at energies below the sheath energy, and a comparatively warm tail population associated with the filament primaries. Anodes that are small enough to collect a negligible fraction of the electrons exiting the plasma have little affect on the EEDF, but as the anode area approaches √{me /mi }Aw , where Aw is the chamber wall area, the anode collects most of the electrons leaving the plasma. This drastically reduces the density of the otherwise trapped population, causing an effective heating of the electrons and a corresponding density decrease. A global model is developed based on the EEDF model and current balance, which shows the interconnected nature of the electron temperature, density and the plasma potential. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94SL85000, and by the University of Iowa Old Gold Program.

  6. Thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors of trinitrotoluene adsorption on powdered activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.W.; Hwang, K.J.; Shim, W.G.; Moon, I.S.

    2006-07-01

    Regulations on the removal of trinitrotoluene (TNT) from wastewater have become increasingly more stringent, demanding faster, less expensive, and more efficient treatment. This study focuses on the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of TNT on powered activated carbons (PAC). Three types of PACs (i.e., wood based, coal based, and coconut-shell based) were studied as functions of temperature and pH. Thermodynamic properties including Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy, were evaluated by applying the Van't Hoff equation. In addition, the adsorption energy distribution functions which describe heterogeneous characteristics of porous solid sorbents were calculated by using the generalized nonlinear regularization method. Adsorption kinetic studies were carried out in batch adsorber under important conditions such as PAC types, temperature, pH, and concentration. We found that fast and efficient removal of TNT dissolved in water can be successfully achieved by PAC adsorption.

  7. Effect of the electron energy distribution on total energy loss with argon in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-15

    The total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is investigated with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The EEDFs are measured at various argon powers in RF inductively coupled plasma, and the EEDFs show a depleted distribution (a discontinuity occurring at the minimum argon excitation threshold energy level) with the bulk temperature and the tail temperature. The total energy loss per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is calculated from a power balance model with the Maxwellian EEDFs and the depleted EEDFs and then compared with the measured ε{sub T} from the floating probe. It is concluded that the small population of the depleted high energy electrons dramatically increases the collisional energy loss, and the calculated ε{sub T} from the depleted EEDFs has a value that is similar to the measured ε{sub T}.

  8. Effect of the electron energy distribution on total energy loss with argon in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost ɛT is investigated with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The EEDFs are measured at various argon powers in RF inductively coupled plasma, and the EEDFs show a depleted distribution (a discontinuity occurring at the minimum argon excitation threshold energy level) with the bulk temperature and the tail temperature. The total energy loss per electron-ion pair lost ɛT is calculated from a power balance model with the Maxwellian EEDFs and the depleted EEDFs and then compared with the measured ɛT from the floating probe. It is concluded that the small population of the depleted high energy electrons dramatically increases the collisional energy loss, and the calculated ɛT from the depleted EEDFs has a value that is similar to the measured ɛT.

  9. Heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and xylene over spent and chemically regenerated platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Kim, Sang Chai

    2010-06-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and o-xylene (BTX) over the spent platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon (Pt/AC) as well as the chemically treated spent catalysts were studied to understand their catalytic and adsorption activities. Sulfuric aqueous acid solution (0.1N, H 2SO 4) was used to regenerate the spent Pt/AC catalyst. The physico-chemical properties of the catalysts in the spent and chemically treated states were analyzed by using nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm and elemental analysis (EDX). The gravimetric adsorption and the light-off curve analysis were employed to study the BTX adsorption and oxidation on the spent catalyst and its modified Pt/AC catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the spent Pt/AC catalyst treated with the H 2SO 4 aqueous solution has a higher toluene adsorption and conversion ability than that of the spent Pt/AC catalyst. A further studies of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst on their catalytic and heterogeneous adsorption behaviours for BTX revealed that the activity of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst follows the sequence of benzene > toluene > o-xylene. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms of BTX on the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC were measured at different temperatures ranging from 120 to 180 °C. To correlate the equilibrium data and evaluate their adsorption affinity for BTX, the two sites localized Langmuir (L2m) isotherm model was employed. The heterogeneous surface feature of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC was described in detail with the information obtained from the results of isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distributions. Furthermore, the activity of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC about BTX was found to be directly related to the Henry's constant, isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distribution functions.

  10. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  11. Method of local increments for the calculation of adsorption energies of atoms and small molecules on solid surfaces. 2. CO/MgO(001).

    PubMed

    Staemmler, Volker

    2011-06-30

    The method of local increments is used in connection with an embedded cluster approach and wave function based quantum chemical ab initio methods to describe the adsorption of a single CO molecule on the MgO(001) surface. The first step in this approach is a conventional Hartree-Fock calculation. The occupied orbitals are then localized by means of the Foster-Boys localization procedure, and the full system is decomposed into several "subunits" that consist of the orbitals localized at the CO molecule and at the Mg and O atoms of the MgO cluster. The correlation energy is expanded into a series of local n-body increments that are evaluated separately and independently. In this way, big savings in computer time can be achieved because (a) the treatment of a large system is replaced with a series of much faster calculations for small subsystems and (b) the big basis sets necessary for describing dispersion effects are only needed for the atoms in the respective subsystem while all other atoms can be treated by medium size Hartree-Fock type basis sets. The coupled electron pair approach, CEPA, an approximate coupled cluster method, is used to calculate the correlation energies of the various subsystems. For the vertical adsorption of CO on top a Mg atom of the MgO(001) surface with the C atom toward Mg, the individual one- and two-body increments are calculated as functions of the CO-MgO separation and a full potential energy curve is constructed from them. A very shallow minimum with an adsorption energy of 0.016 eV at a Mg-C distance of 3.04 Å is found at the Hartree-Fock level, while inclusion of correlation (dispersion) effects shortens the Mg-C distance to 2.59 Å and yields a much larger adsorption energy of 0.124 eV. This is in very good agreement with the best experimental value of 0.14 eV. The basis set superposition error, BSSE, was fully corrected for by the counterpoise method and the bonding mechanism was analyzed at the Hartree-Fock level by means of

  12. Modeling of customer adoption of distributed energy resources

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Chard, Joseph S.; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Lipman, Timothy; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2001-08-01

    This report describes work completed for the California Energy Commission (CEC) on the continued development and application of the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This work was performed at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) between July 2000 and June 2001 under the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. Our research on distributed energy resources (DER) builds on the concept of the microgrid ({mu}Grid), a semiautonomous grouping of electricity-generating sources and end-use sinks that are placed and operated for the benefit of its members. Although a {mu}Grid can operate independent of the macrogrid (the utility power network), the {mu}Grid is usually interconnected, purchasing energy and ancillary services from the macrogrid. Groups of customers can be aggregated into {mu}Grids by pooling their electrical and other loads, and the most cost-effective combination of generation resources for a particular {mu}Grid can be found. In this study, DER-CAM, an economic model of customer DER adoption implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) optimization software is used, to find the cost-minimizing combination of on-site generation customers (individual businesses and a {mu}Grid) in a specified test year. DER-CAM's objective is to minimize the cost of supplying electricity to a specific customer by optimizing the installation of distributed generation and the self-generation of part or all of its electricity. Currently, the model only considers electrical loads, but combined heat and power (CHP) analysis capability is being developed under the second year of CEC funding. The key accomplishments of this year's work were the acquisition of increasingly accurate data on DER technologies, including the development of methods for forecasting cost reductions for these technologies, and the creation of a credible

  13. Physical Adsorption of Gases on Heterogeneous Solids and Equilibrium Studies of the Pressure Swing Adsorption Process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochun

    1990-01-01

    -parameter isotherm equation based on benzene adsorption isotherms. We extended further the TVFM to derive thermodynamic functions, such as the adsorption entropy, the adsorption enthalpy, and the adsorption energy distribution, and constructed these functions for various adsorption systems based on their adsorption isotherms. To explore the energetic heterogeneity of the adsorbent, we used two approaches. First, we used the overall integral isotherm equation to obtain the Langmuir -Freundlich isotherm; and second, we used the Gibb's relation to obtain an exponential isotherm equation. The adsorption energy-distribution function can be obtained from these isotherm equations. The pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process was studied based on Shandalman and Mitchell's equilibrium theory for a PSA system with a linear isotherm. This theory was extended to a PSA system with a non-linear isotherm. Relationships were established between the isotherms and process parameters, such as the enrichment factor, the critical recycle ratio, and the extent of the recovery.

  14. From single molecules to water networks: Dynamics of water adsorption on Pt(111).

    PubMed

    Naderian, Maryam; Groß, Axel

    2016-09-01

    The adsorption dynamics of water on Pt(111) was studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory calculations including dispersion corrections. Sticking probabilities were derived as a function of initial kinetic energy and water coverage. In addition, the energy distribution upon adsorption was monitored in order to analyze the energy dissipation process. We find that on the water pre-covered surface the sticking probability is enhanced because of the attractive water-water interaction and the additional effective energy dissipation channels to the adsorbed water molecules. The water structures forming directly after the adsorption on the pre-covered surfaces do not necessarily correspond to energy minimum structures. PMID:27609006

  15. Adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion-exchange resin Diaion WA21J.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shaobo; Pan, Tonglin; Liu, Xinqiang; Yuan, Lei; Wang, Jinchao; Zhang, Yongjian; Guo, Zhanchen

    2010-07-15

    It was found that Rh, Pd and Pt contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively extracted by dry chlorination with chlorine. In order to concentrate Rh(III) ions contained in the chloride solutions obtained, thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Rh(III) complexes from the chloride solutions on an anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. Rh, Pd, Pt, Al, Fe, Si, Zn and Pb from the chloride solution could be adsorbed on the resin. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) of Rh(III) decreased with the increase in initial Rh(III) concentration or in adsorption temperature. The isothermal adsorption of Rh(III) was found to fit Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich models under the adsorption conditions. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q(max) based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms were 6.39, 6.61 and 5.81 mg/g for temperatures 18, 28 and 40 degrees C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energy of Rh was about -7.6 kJ/mol and thus Rh(III) adsorption was a physical type. The experimental data obtained could be better simulated by pseudo-first-order kinetic model and the activation energy obtained was 6.54 J/mol. The adsorption rate of Rh(III) was controlled by intraparticle diffusion in most of time of adsorption process. PMID:20346581

  16. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  17. Modelling Framework and the Quantitative Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Future Distribution Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xue; Sandels, Claes; Zhu, Kun; Nordström, Lars

    2013-08-01

    There has been a large body of statements claiming that the large-scale deployment of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) could eventually reshape the future distribution grid operation in numerous ways. Thus, it is necessary to introduce a framework to measure to what extent the power system operation will be changed by various parameters of DERs. This article proposed a modelling framework for an overview analysis on the correlation between DERs. Furthermore, to validate the framework, the authors described the reference models of different categories of DERs with their unique characteristics, comprising distributed generation, active demand and electric vehicles. Subsequently, quantitative analysis was made on the basis of the current and envisioned DER deployment scenarios proposed for Sweden. Simulations are performed in two typical distribution network models for four seasons. The simulation results show that in general the DER deployment brings in the possibilities to reduce the power losses and voltage drops by compensating power from the local generation and optimizing the local load profiles.

  18. Patterns of inequality: Dynamics of income distribution in USA and global energy consumption distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Anand; Yakovenko, Victor

    2010-03-01

    Applying the principle of entropy maximization, we argued that the distribution of money in a closed economic system should be exponential [1], see also recent review [2]. In this talk, we show that income distribution in USA is exponential for the majority of population (about 97%). However, the high-income tail follows a power law and is highly dynamical, i.e., out of equilibrium. The fraction of income going to the tail swelled to 20% of all income in 2000 and 2006 at the peaks of speculative bubbles followed by spectacular crashes. Next, we analyze the global distribution of energy consumption per capita among different countries. In the first approximation, it is reasonably well captured by the exponential function. Comparing the data for 1990 and 2005, we observe that the distribution is getting closer to the exponential, presumably as a result of globalization of the world economy.[4pt] [1] A. A. Dragulescu and V. M. Yakovenko, Eur. Phys. J. B 17, 723 (2000). [2] V. M. Yakovenko and J. B. Rosser, to appear in Rev. Mod. Phys. (2009), arXiv:0905.1518.

  19. Energy and angular distributions of hyperthermal-energy Li{sup +} scattered from Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Behringer, E.R.; McLean, J.G.; Cooper, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    We have measured the in-plane energy and angular distributions of scattered Li{sup +} ions that result when Li{sup +} ion beams with incident energies {ital E}{sub {ital i}}=100 and 400 eV impinge on Cu(001) with an incident angle {theta}{sub {ital i}}=65{degree} and along the {l_angle}100{r_angle} azimuth. By comparing the energy and angular distributions with those generated by classical trajectory simulations, we extract information about the ion-surface interaction potential. A model ion-surface potential consisting of a sum of Hartree-Fock pair potentials and an attractive term produces good agreement with the measured distributions at both incident energies, while the universal potential of Ziegler, Biersack, and Littmarck does so only for {ital E}{sub {ital i}} = 400 eV. Analysis of the simulated distributions enables us to correlate different types of scattering events with features of the measured distributions (e.g., rainbows) and so obtain a detailed understanding of the scattering of Li{sup +}, which is more complex than has been previously observed for heavier alkali ions (e.g., Na{sup +} and K{sup +}). We find that the energy loss of the Li{sup +} ions can be mostly accounted for by momentum transfer to the surface atoms and that inelastic losses are small but significant for this system at these incident energies. We also find that the thermal vibrations of the surface atoms have dramatic effects on the simulated energy and angular distributions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Detection of the adsorption of water monolayers through the ion oscillation frequency in the magnesium oxide lattice by means of low energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Bertsch, M.; Ramírez-Hidalgo, G.; Chavarría-Sibaja, A.; Avendaño, E.; Araya-Pochet, J. A.; Herrera-Sancho, O. A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the variation of the oscillation frequency of the Mg2+ and O2- ions in the magnesium oxide lattice due to the interactions of the surface with water monolayers by means of Low Energy Electron Diffraction. Our key result is a new technique to determine the adsorbate vibrations produced by the water monolayers on the surface lattice as a consequence of their change in the surface Debye temperature and its chemical shift. The latter was systematically investigated for different annealing times and for a constant external thermal perturbation in the range of 110-300 K in order to accomplish adsorption or desorption of water monolayers in the surface lattice.

  1. Planck/LFI measures of Planets Spectral Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, Michele; Romelli, Erik; Gregorio, Anna; Zacchei, Andrea; Tomasi, Maurizio; Vassallo, Thomas; Sandri, Maura

    2015-08-01

    The spectral energy distribution at millimetric wavelengths of planets is an important benchmark to inter-calibrate different CMB experiments and a source of information on the atmospheric structure of planets. Planck/LFI observed Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune from three to eight times during its mission. In particular, as a calibrator Jupiter allows accurate comparison due to its high S/N ratio. Since planets are moving objects, the measure must account for their proper motion as well as a number of second order effects. Here we present the results of accurate measurements of brightness temperature Tb of planets, and we compare them with WMAP.

  2. Adoption and supply of a distributed energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Neil Douglas

    2000-12-01

    Technical and economic developments in distributed generation (DG) represent an opportunity for a radically different energy market paradigm, and potentially significant cuts in global carbon emissions. This thesis investigates DG along two interrelated themes: (1) Early adoption and supply of the DG technology of internal combustion (IC) engine cogeneration. (2) Private and social cost implications of DG for private investors and within an energy system. IC engine cogeneration of both power and heat has been a remarkable success in the Netherlands with over 5,000 installations and 1,500MWe of installed capacity by 1997. However, the technology has struggled in the UK with an installed capacity of 110Mwe, fulfilling only 10% of its large estimated potential. An investment simulation model of DG investments in the UK and Netherlands was used, together with analysis of site level data on all DG adoptions from 1985 through 1997. In the UK over 60% of the early installations were sized too small (<140kWe) to be economically attractive (suppliers made their money with maintenance contracts). In the Netherlands, most facilities were sized well above the economic size threshold of 100kWe (lower due to reduced operating and grid connection costs). Institutional players were key in improved sizing of DG. Aided by energy market and CO2 reduction regulatory policy, Dutch distributions utilities played a proactive role in DG. This involved joint ventures with engine cogen suppliers and users, offering improved electricity buy-back tariffs and lower connection costs. This has allowed flexible operation of distributed generation, especially in electricity sales to the grid. Larger units can be sized for on-site heat requirements with electricity export providing revenue and aiding in management of energy networks. A comparison of internal and external costs of three distributed and three centralized generation technologies over a range of heat to power ratios (HPR) was made

  3. Terahertz absorption spectra and potential energy distribution of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using potential energy distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave. PMID:26476072

  4. Energy dependent pitch angle distributions of auroral primary electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1988-01-01

    Double-layer/parallel-electric field accelerations and the subsequent electron-beam plasma interactions involving Cerenkov and anomalous cyclotron resonances are considered. It is found that these phenomena yield pitch angle distributions as noted from rocket and satellite studies. Although the electron acceleration by weak parallel electric fields forming a runaway electron tail is limited to a critical parallel energy determined by the anomalous cyclotron resonance, such a limitation does not occur with acceleration by a localized parallel electric field such as that in a double layer.

  5. Surface free energies and elemental surface compositions of human enamel after application of commercially available mouthrinses and adsorption of salivary constituents.

    PubMed

    Perdok, J F; Van Der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J; Genet, M J; Rouxhet, P G

    1990-01-01

    The adsorption of active agents from six commercially available mouthrinses to ground and polished enamel, with and without adsorbed salivary constituents, was monitored by contact angle measurements and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Human enamel samples were treated with mouthrinses containing chlorhexidine (Peridex), stannous fluoride/amine fluoride (Meridol), thymol/benzoic acid (Listerine), sanguinarine (Veadent), sodium fluoride (Prodent), or cetylpyridinium chloride (Merocet). XPS indicated a sizeable adsorption of both active and non-active components for all products. After treatment, all enamel surface free energies increased except for the stannous fluoride/amine fluoride containing mouthrinse. It is suggested that non-active components in the products cause an increase in surface free energy. Despite this thermodynamically unfavorable increase in surface free energy, all rinses have plaque reducing effects, indicating that this unfavorable surface characteristic is overruled by the antibacterial properties of the components. Replacement of non-active components by less adsorbing surfactants could increase the efficiency of the products tested. PMID:2090159

  6. Calculating fusion neutron energy spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Hellesen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Directional Relativistic Spectrum Simulator (DRESS) code can perform Monte-Carlo calculations of reaction product spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions, using fully relativistic kinematics. The code is set up to calculate energy spectra from neutrons and alpha particles produced in the D(d, n)3He and T(d, n)4He fusion reactions, but any two-body reaction can be simulated by including the corresponding cross section. The code has been thoroughly tested. The kinematics calculations have been benchmarked against the kinematics module of the ROOT Data Analysis Framework. Calculated neutron energy spectra have been validated against tabulated fusion reactivities and against an exact analytical expression for the thermonuclear fusion neutron spectrum, with good agreement. The DRESS code will be used as the core of a detailed synthetic diagnostic framework for neutron measurements at the JET and MAST tokamaks.

  7. Energy distribution of proton microbeam transmitted through two flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, G. U. L.; Rajta, I.; Bereczky, R. J.; Tőkési, K.

    2015-07-01

    The transmission of 1 MeV proton microbeam passing between two parallel flat plates was investigated. Three different materials were used in our experiments. As insulators we used Polytetrafluoroethylene and borosilicate glass plates and glass with gold layer on the surface as conductor. The surface of the plates was parallel to the beam axis and one of the plates was moved towards the beam. The energy distribution and the deflection of the transmitted beam were measured as the function of the sample distance relative to the beam. We found systematic differences between the behaviour of the metallic and insulator samples. The proton microbeam suffered significant deflection towards the sample surface due to the image acceleration when using conductor material. In case of the glass and Polytetrafluoroethylene plates the beam was deflected into the opposite direction, and the incident protons did not suffer significant energy loss, which is the consequence of the guiding effect.

  8. Long-distance distribution of genuine energy-time entanglement

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, A.; Carvacho, G.; Saavedra, G.; Cariñe, J.; Nogueira, W.A.T.; Figueroa, M.; Cabello, A.; Mataloni, P.; Lima, G.; Xavier, G.B.

    2013-01-01

    Any practical realization of entanglement-based quantum communication must be intrinsically secure and able to span long distances avoiding the need of a straight line between the communicating parties. The violation of Bell’s inequality offers a method for the certification of quantum links without knowing the inner workings of the devices. Energy-time entanglement quantum communication satisfies all these requirements. However, currently there is a fundamental obstacle with the standard configuration adopted: an intrinsic geometrical loophole that can be exploited to break the security of the communication, in addition to other loopholes. Here we show the first experimental Bell violation with energy-time entanglement distributed over 1 km of optical fibres that is free of this geometrical loophole. This is achieved by adopting a new experimental design, and by using an actively stabilized fibre-based long interferometer. Our results represent an important step towards long-distance secure quantum communication in optical fibres. PMID:24287678

  9. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte, C.; Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D.; Rainò, S.; Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Perri, M.; Richards, J.

    2011-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  10. Analyzing adsorption characteristics of CO2, N2 and H2O in MCM-41 silica by molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shing-Cheng; Chien, Shih-Yao; Chen, Chieh-Li; Chen, Cha'o.-Kuang

    2015-03-01

    The adsorption characteristics of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water molecules in MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieve have been investigated by the molecular simulation. We evaluate the pressure-adsorption isotherms and adsorption density profiles under variant gas pressure, operating temperature and mesopore radius of MCM-41 by the grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. According to the calculated adsorption energy distributions, the adsorption mechanisms of gas in MCM-41 are mainly divided into three types, namely "surface adsorption" on the pore wall, "multilayer adsorption" on the adsorbed gas molecules and "molecular self-aggregation" near the pore center. In addition, the adsorption characteristics of water molecules in MCM-41 are found to be quite different from those of carbon dioxide and nitrogen due to the hydrogen bonds effect. The results indicate that the MCM-41 is practicable in engineering application for the capture, storage, and re-use of water molecules, since it is temperature-sensitive and can achieve significant adsorption loadings within a small range of pressure values via the capillary condensation phenomena.

  11. Advanced Communication and Control Solutions of Distributed Energy Resources (DER)

    SciTech Connect

    Asgeirsson, Haukur; Seguin, Richard; Sherding, Cameron; de Bruet, Andre, G.; Broadwater, Robert; Dilek, Murat

    2007-01-10

    This report covers work performed in Phase II of a two phase project whose objective was to demonstrate the aggregation of multiple Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and to offer them into the energy market. The Phase I work (DE-FC36-03CH11161) created an integrated, but distributed, system and procedures to monitor and control multiple DERs from numerous manufacturers connected to the electric distribution system. Procedures were created which protect the distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. Using the web as the communication medium for control and monitoring of the DERs, the integration of information and security was accomplished through the use of industry standard protocols such as secure SSL,VPN and ICCP. The primary objective of Phase II was to develop the procedures for marketing the power of the Phase I aggregated DERs in the energy market, increase the number of DER units, and implement the marketing procedures (interface with ISOs) for the DER generated power. The team partnered with the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), the local ISO, to address the energy market and demonstrate the economic dispatch of DERs in response to market signals. The selection of standards-based communication technologies offers the ability of the system to be deployed and integrated with other utilities’ resources. With the use of a data historian technology to facilitate the aggregation, the developed algorithms and procedures can be verified, audited, and modified. The team has demonstrated monitoring and control of multiple DERs as outlined in phase I report including procedures to perform these operations in a secure and safe manner. In Phase II, additional DER units were added. We also expanded on our phase I work to enhance communication security and to develop the market model of having DERs, both customer and utility owned, participate in the energy market. We are proposing a two-part DER energy market model--a utility

  12. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  13. On Energy Trading Decision Methods in Distributed Energy Management Systems with Multiple Customers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Toshiyuki; Sugimoto, Yohei; Mori, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Takaya

    This paper addresses an operation and energy purchase planning problem under the CO2 emissions regulation for corporate entities. Considering energy trading, more efficient energy consumption may be possible. We have studied an agent-based planning system, called Distributed Energy Management Systems (DEMSs), which intends to reduce energy consumption. In the DEMSs, CO2 emissions regulation is imposed on each corporate entity, and electrical and thermal energy trading among the entities are allowed. We have proposed an energy trading decision method based on the Market Oriented Programming (MOP). In this paper, we propose trading decision methods for the group composed of several customers and several suppliers. Experimental results show effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Role for Distributed Energy Resources (DER) in the Digital Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Thomas S

    2007-11-01

    A large, and growing, part of the Nation's economy either serves or depends upon the information technology industry. These high-tech or "digital" enterprises are characterized by a dependence on electronic devices, need for completely reliable power supply, and intolerance to any power quality problems. In some cases these enterprises are densely populated with electronic loads and have very high energy usage per square foot. Serving these enterprises presents both electric power and equipment cooling challenges. Traditional electric utilities are often hard-pressed to deliver power that meets the stringent requirements of digital customers, and the economic and social consequences of a service quality or reliability problem can be large. New energy delivery and control options must be developed to effectively serve a digital economy. This report explores how distributed energy resources, partnerships between utility and customer to share the responsibility for service quality, innovative facility designs, higher energy efficiencies and waste-heat utilization can be coupled to meet the needs of a growing digital economy.

  15. Measurement of Gamma Energy Distributions and Multiplicities Using STEFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, E.; Smith, A. G.; Pollitt, A. J.; Matarranz, J.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Soldner, T.; Koster, U.; Biswas, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Prompt gamma-ray energy distributions and multiplicities released during thermally induced fission of 235U have been measured using STEFF (SpecTrometer for Exotic Fission Fragments). Thermal neutrons are provided by the high-flux reactor at the ILL, Grenoble. STEFF is a unique 2E2v device that uses a coincidence timing method to measure the emission of prompt gamma rays as a function of the fragment mass and energy. Following scission, the fission fragments contain excitation energy that is released via prompt neutron and gamma-ray emission as the fragment decays to the ground state. STEFF contains an array of 11 NaI detectors surrounding the uranium target providing a 6.8% photopeak detection efficiency for gamma rays released within 1 ns of the scission time. STEFF also consists of 7 NE213 detectors, which detect the emission of prompt neutrons, the release of which is associated with reduction of fragment energy and, to a lesser extent, fragment spin. This experiment acts as a direct response to the NEA high priority demand which requires more accurate knowledge of heating caused by gamma emission in the next generation of nuclear reactors.

  16. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC. PMID:26871732

  17. Microstructure-Dependent Gas Adsorption: Accurate Predictions of Methane Uptake in Nanoporous Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ihm, Yungok; Cooper, Valentino R; Gallego, Nidia C; Contescu, Cristian I; Morris, James R

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a successful, efficient framework for predicting gas adsorption properties in real materials based on first-principles calculations, with a specific comparison of experiment and theory for methane adsorption in activated carbons. These carbon materials have different pore size distributions, leading to a variety of uptake characteristics. Utilizing these distributions, we accurately predict experimental uptakes and heats of adsorption without empirical potentials or lengthy simulations. We demonstrate that materials with smaller pores have higher heats of adsorption, leading to a higher gas density in these pores. This pore-size dependence must be accounted for, in order to predict and understand the adsorption behavior. The theoretical approach combines: (1) ab initio calculations with a van der Waals density functional to determine adsorbent-adsorbate interactions, and (2) a thermodynamic method that predicts equilibrium adsorption densities by directly incorporating the calculated potential energy surface in a slit pore model. The predicted uptake at P=20 bar and T=298 K is in excellent agreement for all five activated carbon materials used. This approach uses only the pore-size distribution as an input, with no fitting parameters or empirical adsorbent-adsorbate interactions, and thus can be easily applied to other adsorbent-adsorbate combinations.

  18. Low energy ion distribution measurements in Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B. Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A.

    2014-06-15

    Charge-exchange neutrals contain information about the contents of a plasma and can be detected as they escape confinement. The Florida A and M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA), used to measure the contents of neutral particle flux, has been reconfigured, calibrated, and installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) for high temperature deuterium plasmas. The energy range of the CNPA has been extended to cover 0.34–5.2 keV through an upgrade of the 25 detection channels. The CNPA has been used on all types of MST plasmas at a rate of 20 kHz throughout the entire discharge (∼70 ms). Plasma parameter scans show that the ion distribution is most dependent on the plasma current. Magnetic reconnection events throughout these scans produce stronger poloidal electric fields, stronger global magnetic modes, and larger changes in magnetic energy all of which heavily influence the non-Maxwellian part of the ion distribution (the fast ion tail)

  19. SPHERICALLY SYMMETRIC STELLAR CLUSTERS WITH ANISOTROPY AND CUTOFF ENERGY IN MOMENTUM DISTRIBUTION. I. THE NEWTONIAN REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Gennady S.

    2009-09-20

    We construct numerical models of spherically symmetric Newtonian stellar clusters with anisotropic distribution functions. These models generalize solutions obtained earlier for isotropic Maxwellian distribution functions with an energy cutoff and take into account distributions with different levels of anisotropy.

  20. Comparison of the adsorption mechanisms of pyridine in hydrophilic interaction chromatography and in reversed-phase aqueous liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Pereira, Alberto dos Santos; Sandra, Pat; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-11-27

    The adsorption isotherms of pyridine were measured by frontal analysis (FA) on a column packed with shell particles of neat porous silica (Halo), using water-acetonitrile mixtures as the mobile phase at 295K. The isotherm data were measured for pyridine concentrations covering a dynamic range of four millions. The degree of heterogeneity of the surface was characterized by the adsorption energy distribution (AED) function calculated from the raw adsorption data, using the expectation-maximization (EM) procedure. The results showed that two different retention mechanisms dominate in Per aqueous liquid chromatography (PALC) at low acetonitrile concentrations and in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) at high acetonitrile concentrations. In the PALC mode, the adsorption mechanism of pyridine on the silica surface is controlled by hydrophobic interactions that take place on very few and ultra-active adsorption sites, which might be pores on the irregular and rugose surface of the porous silica particles. The surface is seriously heterogeneous, with up to five distinct adsorption sites and five different energy peaks on the AED of the packing material. In contrast, in the HILIC mode, the adsorption behavior is quasi-homogeneous and pyridine retention is governed by its adsorption onto free silanol groups. For intermediate mobile phase compositions, the siloxane and the silanol groups are both significantly saturated with acetonitrile and water, respectively, causing a minimum of the retention factor of pyridine on the Halo column. PMID:19853257

  1. The angular and energy distribution of the primary electron beam.

    PubMed

    Keall, P J; Hoban, P W

    1994-09-01

    The angular distribution for electron beams produced by the Siemens KD-2 linear accelerator has been found by simulating electron transport through the scattering foils and air using two methods: Fermi-Eyges multiple Coulomb scattering calculations, and EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations. Fermi-Eyges theory gives solutions where both the angular and spatial fluence distributions are Gaussian, with the angular standard deviation being invariant with off-axis distance. The EGS4 results show slightly non-Gaussian angular and lateral distributions as a result of the use of Moliére theory rather than Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, as well as the simulation of discrete bremsstrahlung and Møller interactions. However, the results from both methods are very similar. The angular standard deviations obtained by these methods agree very closely with those found experimentally. The similar shape of the Monte Carlo and Fermi-Eyges results indicate that a Gaussian approximation to the incident angular distribution will be adequate for use in treatment planning algorithms. Furthermore, the angular standard deviation may be determined using Fermi-Eyges theory as an alternative to experimental methods. Both Monte Carlo simulations, and Fermi-Eyges theory predict that the mean electron angle is proportional to off axis distance for all useful field sizes. For a 15 MeV electron beam, an effective source position of 99 cm and 98 cm from the nominal 100 SSD plane was obtained from Fermi-Eyges and Monte Carlo results respectively for a 15 MeV beam. The effective source position found experimentally for this energy was 98 cm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7980200

  2. Product energy distributions and energy partitioning in O atom reactions on surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Bret; Kori, Moris

    1987-01-01

    Surface reactions involving O atoms are likely to be highly exoergic, with different consequences if energy is channeled mostly to product molecules or surface modes. Thus the surface may become a source of excited species which can react elsewhere, or a sink for localized heat deposition which may disrupt the surface. The vibrational energy distribution of the product molecule contains strong clues about the flow of released energy. Two instructive examples of energy partitioning at surfaces are the Pt catalyzed oxidations: (1) C(ads) + O(ads) yields CO* (T is greater than 1000 K); and (2) CO(ads) + O(gas) yields CO2* (T is approx. 300 K). The infrared emission spectra of the excited product molecules were recorded and the vibrational population distributions were determined. In reaction 1, energy appeared to be statistically partitioned between the product CO and several Pt atoms. In reaction 2, partitioning was non-statistical; the CO2 asymmetric stretch distribution was inverted. In gas reactions these results would indicate a long lived and short lived activated complex. The requirement that Pt be heated in O atoms to promote reaction of atomic O and CO at room temperature is specifically addressed. Finally, the fraction of released energy that is deposited in the catalyst is estimated.

  3. Theoretical study of heavy metal Cd, Cu, Hg, and Ni(II) adsorption on the kaolinite(0 0 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian; He, Man-Chao

    2014-10-01

    Heavy metal pollution is currently of great concern because it has been recognized as a potential threat to air, water, and soil. Adsorption was one of the most popular methods for the removal of heavy metal. The adsorption of heavy metal Cd, Cu, Hg, and Ni(II) atoms on the hydroxylated (0 0 1) surface of kaolinite was investigated using density-functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation and a supercell approach. The coverage dependence of the adsorption structures and energetics were systematically studied for a wide range of coverage Θ [from 0.11 to 1.0 monolayers (ML)] and adsorption sites. The most stable among all possible adsorption sites for Cd(II) atom was the two-fold bridge site followed by the one-fold top site, and the top site was the most favorite adsorption site for Cu and Ni(II) atoms, while the three-fold hollow site was the most stable adsorption site for Hg(II) atom followed by the two-fold bridge site. The adsorption energy increases with the coverage for Cd, Cu, and Hg(II) atoms, thus indicating the higher stability of surface adsorption and a tendency to the formation of adsorbate islands (clusters) with increasing the coverage. However, the adsorption energy of Ni(II) atoms decreases when increasing the coverage. The adsorption capabilities of the kaolinite clay for the heavy metal atoms were in the order of Ni > Cu > Cd > Hg(II). The other properties of the Cd, Cu, Hg, and Ni(II)/kaolinite(0 0 1) system including the different charge distribution, the lattice relaxation, and the electronic density of states were also studied and discussed in detail.

  4. Adsorption of octylamine on titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwińska, Daria; Kołodziejczak-Radzimska, Agnieszka; Krysztafkiewicz, Andrzej; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2009-05-01

    Processes of adsorption and desorption of a model active substance (octylamine) on the surface of unmodified titanium dioxide (E 171) have been performed. The effects of concentration of octylamine and time of the process on the character of adsorption have been studied and the efficiency of the adsorption/desorption has been determined. The samples obtained have been studied by X-ray diffraction. The nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, particle size distribution and absorption capacities of water, dibutyl phthalate and paraffin oil have been determined. The efficiency of octylamine adsorption on the surface of the titanium dioxide has been found positively correlated with the concentration of octylamine in the initial solution. The desorption of octylamine has decreased with increasing concentration of this compound adsorbed. For octylamine in low concentrations the physical adsorption has been found to dominate, which is desirable when using TiO 2 in the production of pharmaceuticals.

  5. Adsorption Properties of Triethylene Glycol on a Hydrated {101̅4} Calcite Surface and Its Effect on Adsorbed Water.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Richard; Leirvik, Kim N; Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana

    2015-08-11

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and Born-Oppenheimer MD (BOMD) simulations were employed to investigate adsorption of aqueous triethylene glycol (TEG) on a hydrated {101̅4} calcite surface at 298 K. We analyzed the orientation of TEG adsorbed on calcite, as well as the impact of TEG on the water density and adsorption free energy. The adsorption energies of TEG, free energy profiles for TEG, details of hydrogen bonding between water and adsorbed TEG, and dihedral angle distribution of adsorbed TEG were estimated. We found that while the first layer of water was mostly unaffected by the presence of adsorbed TEG, the density of the second water layer was decreased by 71% at 75% surface coverage of TEG. TEG primarily attached to the calcite surface via two adjacent adsorption sites. Hydrogen bonds between water and adsorbed TEG in the second layer almost exclusively involved the hydroxyl oxygen of TEG. The adsorption energy of TEG on calcite in a vacuum environment calculated by classical MD amounted to 217 kJ/mol, which agreed very well with estimates found by using BOMD. Adsorption on hydrated calcite yielded a drastically lower value of 33 kJ/mol, with the corresponding adsorption free energy of 55.3 kJ/mol, giving an entropy increase of 22.3 kJ/mol due to adsorption. We found that the presence of TEG resulted in a decreased magnitude of the adsorption free energy of water, thus decreasing the calcite wettability. This effect can have a profound effect on oil and gas reservoir properties and must be carefully considered when evaluating the risk of hydrate nucleation. PMID:26161580

  6. 77 FR 10997 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... distribution transformers (72 FR 58190). The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005), Public Law 109-25, amended... transformers (77 FR 7282). Need for Correction As published, values in certain tables of the proposed rule are... February 10 NOPR. Corrections In proposed rule FR Doc. 2012-2642 appearing on page 7282 in the issue...

  7. Thylakoid protein phosphorylation: Regulation of light energy distribution in photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlan, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    It has become apparent that green plants possess the ability to adapt to changes in the spectral quality of ambient light. This phenomenon, state transitions, involves a reversible distribution of light energy between the two photosystems in response to changes in the excitation state of photosystems 1 and 2. Thus, the quantum efficiency of photosynthetic electron transport is maintained under different illumination conditions, and damage caused by excessive energetic input of light (photoinhibition) is prevented. This model comprises a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle of three major components: substrates, the protein kinase(s) and protein phosphatase(s) responsible for the specific phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of these of substrates, and the control mechanisms whereby the protein kinase(s) is activated/deactivated in response to redox and /or conformational changes in the thylakoid. This report considers the three components in some detail.

  8. A bolometer array for the SPEctral Energy Distribution (SPEED) Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Robert F.; Campano, Barbara; Chen, Tina C.; Cheng, Edward; Cottingham, David A.; Crawford, Thomas M.; Downes, Tom; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Logan, Dan; Meyer, Stephan S.; Perera, Thushara; Sharp, Elmer H.; Wilson, Grant W.

    2004-10-01

    The SPEED camera is being developed to study the spectral energy distributions of high redshift galaxies, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in X-ray clusters and other cold objects in the universe. Its initial runs will be done on the 10 m Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope (HHSMT), with later runs using the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). SPEED requires a 2x2 pixel cryogenic detector array of Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSB). Each of the pixels will have four frequency bands in the ~150-350 GHz range. Here we describe the development of the detector array of these high efficiency FSBs. The FSB design provides the multi-pixel multi-spectral band capability required for SPEED in a compact, light weight, stackable array. The SPEED FSB bolometers will use proximity effect superconducting transition edge sensors (TES) as their temperature-sensing element permitting significantly higher levels of electronic multiplexing in future applications where larger numbers of detectors may be required.

  9. Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA): Scopes and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Michał H.

    2013-10-01

    The principle of operations of the VEDA program written by the author for Potential Energy Distribution (PED) analysis of theoretical vibrational spectra is described. Nowadays, the PED analysis is indispensible tool in serious analysis of the vibrational spectra. To perform the PED analysis it is necessary to define 3N-6 linearly independent local mode coordinates. Already for 20-atomic molecules it is a difficult task. The VEDA program reads the input data automatically from the Gaussian program output files. Then, VEDA automatically proposes an introductory set of local mode coordinates. Next, the more adequate coordinates are proposed by the program and optimized to obtain maximal elements of each column (internal coordinate) of the PED matrix (the EPM parameter). The possibility for an automatic optimization of PED contributions is a unique feature of the VEDA program absent in any other programs performing PED analysis.

  10. Methane adsorption in nanoporous carbon: the numerical estimation of optimal storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, L.; Kuchta, B.; Firlej, L.; Roth, M. W.; Wexler, C.

    2016-05-01

    The efficient storage and transportation of natural gas is one of the most important enabling technologies for use in energy applications. Adsorption in porous systems, which will allow the transportation of high-density fuel under low pressure, is one of the possible solutions. We present and discuss extensive grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation results of the adsorption of methane into slit-shaped graphitic pores of various widths (between 7 Å and 50 Å), and at pressures P between 0 bar and 360 bar. Our results shed light on the dependence of film structure on pore width and pressure. For large widths, we observe multi-layer adsorption at supercritical conditions, with excess amounts even at large distances from the pore walls originating from the attractive interaction exerted by a very high-density film in the first layer. We are also able to successfully model the experimental adsorption isotherms of heterogeneous activated carbon samples by means of an ensemble average of the pore widths, based exclusively on the pore-size distributions (PSD) calculated from subcritical nitrogen adsorption isotherms. Finally, we propose a new formula, based on the PSD ensemble averages, to calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of heterogeneous systems from single-pore-width calculations. The methods proposed here will contribute to the rational design and optimization of future adsorption-based storage tanks.

  11. Evaluation Framework and Tools for Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Gumerman, Etan Z.; Bharvirkar, Ranjit R.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Marnay , Chris

    2003-02-01

    The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2002 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) forecast anticipates the need for 375 MW of new generating capacity (or about one new power plant) per week for the next 20 years, most of which is forecast to be fueled by natural gas. The Distributed Energy and Electric Reliability Program (DEER) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has set a national goal for DER to capture 20 percent of new electric generation capacity additions by 2020 (Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2000). Cumulatively, this amounts to about 40 GW of DER capacity additions from 2000-2020. Figure ES-1 below compares the EIA forecast and DEER's assumed goal for new DER by 2020 while applying the same definition of DER to both. This figure illustrates that the EIA forecast is consistent with the overall DEER DER goal. For the purposes of this study, Berkeley Lab needed a target level of small-scale DER penetration upon which to hinge consideration of benefits and costs. Because the AEO2002 forecasted only 3.1 GW of cumulative additions from small-scale DER in the residential and commercial sectors, another approach was needed to estimate the small-scale DER target. The focus here is on small-scale DER technologies under 500 kW. The technology size limit is somewhat arbitrary, but the key results of interest are marginal additional costs and benefits around an assumed level of penetration that existing programs might achieve. Berkeley Lab assumes that small-scale DER has the same growth potential as large scale DER in AEO2002, about 38 GW. This assumption makes the small-scale goal equivalent to 380,000 DER units of average size 100 kW. This report lays out a framework whereby the consequences of meeting this goal might be estimated and tallied up. The framework is built around a list of major benefits and a set of tools that might be applied to estimate them. This study lists some of the major effects of an emerging paradigm shift away from central

  12. Spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars. I - Continuum energy distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Patrick W.; Brownsberger, Kenneth R.; Conti, Peter S.; Massey, Philip; Vacca, William D.

    1993-01-01

    All available low-resolution IUE spectra are assembled for Galactic, LMC, and SMC W-R stars and are merged with ground-based optical and NIR spectra in order to collate in a systematic fashion the shapes of these energy distributions over the wavelength range 0.1-1 micron. They can be consistently fitted by a power law of the form F(lambda) is approximately equal to lambda exp -alpha over the range 1500-9000 A to derive color excesses E(B-V) and spectral indices by removing the 2175-A interstellar absorption feature. The WN star color excesses derived are found to be in good agreement with those of Schmutz and Vacca (1991) and Koesterke et al. (1991). Significant heterogeneity in spectral index values was generally seen with any given subtype, but the groups consisting of the combined set of Galactic and LMC W-R stars, the separate WN and WC sequences, and the Galactic and LMC W-R stars all showed a striking and consistent Gaussian-like frequency distribution of values.

  13. The Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; West, Donald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The origin of the infrared emission in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), whose strength is comparable to the optical/ultraviolet (OUV) emission, is generally thought to be a combination of thermal emission from dust and non-thermal, synchrotron emission. Although data are sparse, particularly in the far-infrared, the broad wavelength range of this emission suggests a wide range of temperatures and a combination of AGN and starburst heating mechanisms. The strength of the non-thermal emission is expected to be related to the radio emission. While this scenario is well-established, basic questions, such as the spatial and temperature distribution of the dust, the relative importance of AGN and starburst heating, and the significance of the non-thermal contribution remain largely undetermined. The wide wavelength range of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) combined with its arcmin spatial resolution and increased sensitivity facilitated the observation of a larger subset of the AGN population than previously covered, allowing these questions to be investigated in more detail. This paper will review the spectral energy distributions (SED) of AGN with particular emphasis on the infrared emission and on ISO's contributions to our knowledge. Preliminary results from ISO observations of X-ray selected and high-redshift AGN will be described.

  14. The Spectral Energy Distributions of Interacting Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, Sandra; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Besla, Gurtina; Patton, David R.; Privon, George C.

    2016-01-01

    We present spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the TiNy Titans survey, the first systematic study of interactions between dwarf galaxies. Galaxy interactions are known to be of fundamental importance to the evolution of massive galaxies -- they have been observed to impact morphology, star formation rates, and ISM composition. Such interactions also occur frequently between low mass dwarf galaxies, but this process is poorly understood and largely overlooked in comparison. Although the majority of mergers at all redshifts are expected to take place between low mass galaxies, until now there have not been comparable systematic studies of dwarf galaxy interactions, leaving open the question of whether interactions between low mass galaxies can strongly affect their own evolution. The TiNy Titans survey, a complete sample of isolated dwarf galaxy pairs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), is specifically designed to address this gap in our understanding of galaxy evolution. The SEDs presented here, generated from archival WISE, SDSS, and GALEX photometric data, allow us to characterize the typical interacting dwarf galaxy, as well as quantify the deviations from this average distribution. We also present trends in the SEDs as a function of projected radial separation, a proxy for interaction stage.

  15. A modal approach to modeling spatially distributed vibration energy dissipation.

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The nonlinear behavior of mechanical joints is a confounding element in modeling the dynamic response of structures. Though there has been some progress in recent years in modeling individual joints, modeling the full structure with myriad frictional interfaces has remained an obstinate challenge. A strategy is suggested for structural dynamics modeling that can account for the combined effect of interface friction distributed spatially about the structure. This approach accommodates the following observations: (1) At small to modest amplitudes, the nonlinearity of jointed structures is manifest primarily in the energy dissipation - visible as vibration damping; (2) Correspondingly, measured vibration modes do not change significantly with amplitude; and (3) Significant coupling among the modes does not appear to result at modest amplitudes. The mathematical approach presented here postulates the preservation of linear modes and invests all the nonlinearity in the evolution of the modal coordinates. The constitutive form selected is one that works well in modeling spatially discrete joints. When compared against a mathematical truth model, the distributed dissipation approximation performs well.

  16. Data intensive high energy physics analysis in a distributed cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, A.; Agarwal, A.; Anderson, M.; Armstrong, P.; Fransham, K.; Gable, I.; Harris, D.; Impey, R.; Leavett-Brown, C.; Paterson, M.; Podaima, W.; Sobie, R. J.; Vliet, M.

    2012-02-01

    We show that distributed Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) compute clouds can be effectively used for the analysis of high energy physics data. We have designed a distributed cloud system that works with any application using large input data sets requiring a high throughput computing environment. The system uses IaaS-enabled science and commercial clusters in Canada and the United States. We describe the process in which a user prepares an analysis virtual machine (VM) and submits batch jobs to a central scheduler. The system boots the user-specific VM on one of the IaaS clouds, runs the jobs and returns the output to the user. The user application accesses a central database for calibration data during the execution of the application. Similarly, the data is located in a central location and streamed by the running application. The system can easily run one hundred simultaneous jobs in an efficient manner and should scale to many hundreds and possibly thousands of user jobs.

  17. SATMC: Spectral energy distribution Analysis Through Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. P.; Wilson, G. W.; Tang, Y.; Scott, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    We present the general purpose spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting tool SED Analysis Through Markov Chains (SATMC). Utilizing Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) algorithms, SATMC fits an observed SED to SED templates or models of the user's choice to infer intrinsic parameters, generate confidence levels and produce the posterior parameter distribution. Here, we describe the key features of SATMC from the underlying MCMC engine to specific features for handling SED fitting. We detail several test cases of SATMC, comparing results obtained from traditional least-squares methods, which highlight its accuracy, robustness and wide range of possible applications. We also present a sample of submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) that have been fitted using the SED synthesis routine GRASIL as input. In general, these SMGs are shown to occupy a large volume of parameter space, particularly in regards to their star formation rates which range from ˜30 to 3000 M⊙ yr-1 and stellar masses which range from ˜1010 to 1012 M⊙. Taking advantage of the Bayesian formalism inherent to SATMC, we also show how the fitting results may change under different parametrizations (i.e. different initial mass functions) and through additional or improved photometry, the latter being crucial to the study of high-redshift galaxies.

  18. Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01

    This report describes Berkeley Lab's exploration of how the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models distributed generation (DG) and presents possible approaches for improving how DG is modeled. The on-site electric generation capability has been available since the AEO2000 version of NEMS. Berkeley Lab has previously completed research on distributed energy resources (DER) adoption at individual sites and has developed a DER Customer Adoption Model called DER-CAM. Given interest in this area, Berkeley Lab set out to understand how NEMS models small-scale on-site generation to assess how adequately DG is treated in NEMS, and to propose improvements or alternatives. The goal is to determine how well NEMS models the factors influencing DG adoption and to consider alternatives to the current approach. Most small-scale DG adoption takes place in the residential and commercial modules of NEMS. Investment in DG ultimately offsets purchases of electricity, which also eliminates the losses associated with transmission and distribution (T&D). If the DG technology that is chosen is photovoltaics (PV), NEMS assumes renewable energy consumption replaces the energy input to electric generators. If the DG technology is fuel consuming, consumption of fuel in the electric utility sector is replaced by residential or commercial fuel consumption. The waste heat generated from thermal technologies can be used to offset the water heating and space heating energy uses, but there is no thermally activated cooling capability. This study consists of a review of model documentation and a paper by EIA staff, a series of sensitivity runs performed by Berkeley Lab that exercise selected DG parameters in the AEO2002 version of NEMS, and a scoping effort of possible enhancements and alternatives to NEMS current DG capabilities. In general, the treatment of DG in NEMS is rudimentary. The penetration of DG is determined by an economic cash-flow analysis that determines adoption based on the

  19. Distributed Energy Alternative to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated Edison Service Territory

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, Tim; Kelly, John

    2008-08-01

    The nation's power grid, specifically the New York region, faces burgeoning energy demand and suffers from congested corridors and aging equipment that cost New York consumers millions of dollars. Compounding the problem is high-density buildup in urban areas that limits available space to expand grid capacity. Coincidently, these urban areas are precisely where additional power is required. DER in this study refers to combined heat and power (CHP) technology, which simultaneously generates heat and electricity at or near the point where the energy will be consumed. There are multiple CHP options available that, combined with a portfolio of other building energy efficiency (EE) strategies, can help achieve a more efficient supply-demand balance than what the grid can currently provide. As an alternative to expanding grid capacity, CHP and EE strategies can be deployed in a flexible manner at virtually any point on the grid to relieve load. What's more, utilities and customers can install them in a variety of potentially profitable applications that are more environmentally friendly. Under the auspices of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory representing the Office of Electricity of the U.S. Department of Energy, Gas Technology Institute (GTI) conducted this study in cooperation with Consolidated Edison to help broaden the market penetration of EE and DER. This study provides realistic load models and identifies the impacts that EE and DER can have on the electrical distribution grid; specifically within the current economic and regulatory environment of a high load growth area of New York City called Hudson Yards in Midtown Manhattan. These models can be used to guide new policies that improve market penetration of appropriate CHP and EE technologies in new buildings. The following load modeling scenarios were investigated: (1) Baseline: All buildings are built per the Energy Conservation

  20. Crystal Structures, Surface Stability, and Water Adsorption Energies of La-Bastnäsite via Density Functional Theory and Experimental Studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Srinivasan, Sriram Goverapet; Shivaramaiah, Radha; Kent, Paul R. C.; Stack, Andrew G.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Riman, Richard; Anderko, Andre; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2016-07-11

    Bastnasite is a fluoro-carbonate mineral that is the largest source of rare earth elements such as Y, La and Ce. With increasing demand for REE in many emerging technologies, there is an urgent need for improving the efficiency of ore beneficiation by froth flotation. In order to design improved flotation agents that can selectively bind to the mineral surface, a fundamental understanding of the bulk and surface properties of bastnasite is essential. Density functional theory calculations using the PBEsol exchange correlation functional and the DFT-D3 dispersion correction reveal that the most stable form of La bastnsite is isomorphic to themore » structure of Ce bastnasite belonging to the P2c space group, while the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database structure in the P2m space group is ca. 11.3 kJ/mol higher in energy per LaFCO3 formula unit. We report powder X-ray diffraction measurements on synthetic of La bastnasite to support these theoretical findings. Six different surfaces are studied by DFT, namely [100], [0001], [101], [102], [104] and [112]. Among these, the [100] surface is the most stable with a surface energy of 0.73 J/m2 in vacuum and 0.45 J/m2 in aqueous solution. We predicted the shape of a La bastnasite nanoparticle via thermodynamic Wulff construction to be a hexagonal prism with [100] and [0001] facets, chiseled at its ends by the [101] and [102] facets. The average surface energy of the nanoparticle in the gas phase is estimated to be 0.86 J/m2, in good agreement with a value of 1.11 J/m2 measured by calorimetry. The calculated adsorption energy of a water molecule varies widely with the surface plane and specific adsorption sites on a given surface. Moreover, the first layer of water molecules is predicted to adsorb strongly on the La-bastnasite surface, in agreement with water adsorption calorimetry experiments. Our work provides an important step towards a detailed atomistic understanding of the bastnasite water interface and designing

  1. An adsorption model of the heterogeneous nucleation of solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, W.T.; Cantor, B. . Oxford Centre for Advanced Materials and Composites)

    1994-09-01

    An adsorption model has been developed to describe the heterogeneous nucleation of solidification in an A-B eutectic or monotectic alloy system. The interface between A-rich [alpha] solid and B-rich liquid is treated as a mixture of A solid, B solid, A liquid and B liquid atoms, randomly distributed as a monolayer between the two phases. The interfacial energy is calculated by summing pairwise bonding energies, and is then minimized to determine the equilibrium interface solid fraction and composition. With decreasing temperature, the interface monolayer changes sharply from liquid to solid, with a composition close to pure B. This sharp onset of interface adsorption of solid B atoms corresponds to [alpha] acting as a catalyst for the heterogeneous nucleation of B-rich [beta] solid. Adsorption close to the eutectic temperature and therefore efficient nucleation catalysis is promoted by a large difference between the melting points of A and B, and a small difference between the solid and liquid immiscibilities of A and B. Predicted undercoolings for the onset of adsorption and nucleation catalysis can be obtained directly from simple phase diagram data, and give good agreement with previous measurements in the Ag-Pb and Al-Sn alloy systems.

  2. Optical Diagnostics of Electron Energy Distributions in Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Amy

    2011-05-01

    Passive, non-invasive optical emission measurements provide a means of probing important plasma parameters without introducing contaminants into plasma systems. We investigate the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in argon containing inductively-coupled plasmas due to dominant role in rates of gas-phase reactions for processing plasmas. EEDFs are determined using measurements of 3p5 4 p --> 3p5 4 s emissions in the 650-1150 nm wavelength range and measured metastable and resonant level concentrations, in conjunction with a radiation model that includes contributions from often neglected but critical processes such as radiation trapping and electron-impact excitation from metastable and resonant levels. Measurements over a wide range of operating conditions (pressure, RF power, Ar/Ne/N2 gas mixtures) show a depletion of the EEDF relative to the Maxwell- Boltzmann form at higher electron energy, in good agreement with measurements made with Langmuir probes and predictions of a global discharge model. This result is consistent with predictions of electron kinetics and can be explained in terms of reduced life times for energetic electrons due to wall losses and inelastic collisions. This example highlights the potential utility of this method as a tool for probing kinetics of many types of low-temperature plasma systems, which are typically characterized by non-Maxwellian EEDFs. This work was supported by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) and by NSF Grant CBET 0714600.

  3. Ion energy distribution functions in a supersonic plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldirola, S.; Roman, H. E.; Riccardi, C.

    2014-11-01

    Starting from experimental measurements of ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) in a low pressure supersonic plasma jet, we propose a model to simulate them numerically from first principles calculations. Experimentally we acquired IEDFs with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) collecting the argon ions produced from a inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and driven into a supersonic free gas expansion. From the discussion of these results and the physics of our system we developed a simulation code. Integrating the equations of motion the code evolves the trajectory of a single ion across the jet. Ar+- Ar collisions are modelled with a 12-4 Lennard-Jones potential which considers induced dipole interactions. IEDFs were simulated at different positions along the jet and compared with the experimental data showing good agreement. We have also implemented a charge transfer mechanism in which the ion releases its charge to a neutral atom which can take place at sufficiently close distances and is a function of the impact energy.

  4. The Spectral Energy Distribution of HH 100 IRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebenmorgen, Ralf

    1996-01-01

    Recent progress in the modeling of the radiative transfer in star forming regions has lead to improved dusty envelope models. Such models can now explain in great detail the observed infrared spectrum. The success of such models suggests that input parameters correspond to the true physical situation of the environment of the young stellar object. However, so far only minor attention has been given to models which include the spectroscopic signature of ice bands. Such models are applied to the Herbig-Haro energy source HH100 IRS. Calculations have been performed to interpret the spectral energy distribution as a function of dust parameters such as the grain size, the ice volume fraction, and the 'fluffiness' of the particles. The infrared spectrum together with the strength of the water ice band of HH 100 IRS is successfully reproduced if an upper limit of the grain size below 1 micron is used. Comet-like grains, with sizes above 1 micron, result in a poor fit of the observations.

  5. Equilibrium distribution of the wave energy in a carbyne chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovriguine, D. A.; Nikitenkova, S. P.

    2016-03-01

    The steady-state energy distribution of thermal vibrations at a given ambient temperature has been investigated based on a simple mathematical model that takes into account central and noncentral interactions between carbon atoms in a one-dimensional carbyne chain. The investigation has been performed using standard asymptotic methods of nonlinear dynamics in terms of the classical mechanics. In the first-order nonlinear approximation, there have been revealed resonant wave triads that are formed at a typical nonlinearity of the system under phase matching conditions. Each resonant triad consists of one longitudinal and two transverse vibration modes. In the general case, the chain is characterized by a superposition of similar resonant triplets of different spectral scales. It has been found that the energy equipartition of nonlinear stationary waves in the carbyne chain at a given temperature completely obeys the standard Rayleigh-Jeans law due to the proportional amplitude dispersion. The possibility of spontaneous formation of three-frequency envelope solitons in carbyne has been demonstrated. Heat in the form of such solitons can propagate in a chain of carbon atoms without diffusion, like localized waves.

  6. π adsorption of ethene on to the {111} surface of copper. A periodic ab initio study of the effect of k-point sampling on the energy, atomic and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, G. W.; Wells, R. P. K.; Willock, D. J.; Hutchings, G. J.

    2000-07-01

    The adsorption of ethene on the {111} surface of copper has been studied by using density functional theory calculations with gradient corrections. The surface is described by a periodic (3×3) slab, three layers thick, with ethene adsorbed on one side. The energy of the adsorption shows great sensitivity to the k-point sampling employed, with single k-point calculations overestimating the binding by over 800% when compared with a calculation converged with respect to the k-point sampling. In addition, the structure of the adsorbed molecule is considerably distorted, which is in contradiction with conclusions drawn from the experimental vibrational frequencies. Calculations that are converged with respect to the k-point sampling indicate a much weaker interaction between the molecule and the surface, with adsorption energies of 11.1 and 10.9 kJ mol -1 for atop-h and atop-b, respectively. This weaker interaction leads to a geometry for the adsorbed molecule that is close to the gas-phase ethene structure, in agreement with the vibrational frequencies. We have proposed a model of molecular adsorption that is a balance between attraction, resulting from localised bond formation, and repulsion, due to interaction between the extended electronic states and the molecule's electron density. If the extended electronic states are underestimated, as in cluster or low k-point calculations, the repulsion is underestimated. This results in stronger bonding to the surface and overestimation of the adsorption energy.

  7. Characterization of volatile organic compound adsorption on multiwall carbon nanotubes under different levels of relative humidity using linear solvation energy relationship.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Syue; Wu, Siang Chen; Shih, Yang-Hsin

    2016-09-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been used as an adsorbent for evaluating the gas/solid partitioning of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this study, 15 VOCs were probed to determine their gas/solid partitioning coefficient (LogKd) using inverse gas chromatography at different relative humidity (RH) levels. Interactions between MWCNTs and VOCs were analyzed by regressing the observed LogKd with the linear solvation energy relationship (LSER). The results demonstrate that the MWCNT carbonyl and carboxyl groups provide high adsorption capacity for the VOCs (LogKd 3.72-5.24g/kg/g/L) because of the π-/n-electron pair interactions and hydrogen-bond acidity. The increasing RH gradually decreased the LogKd and shifted the interactions to dipolarity/polarizability, hydrogen-bond basicity, and cavity formation. The derived LSER equations provided adequate fits of LogKd, which is useful for VOC-removal processes and fate prediction of VOC contaminants by MWCNT adsorption in the environment. PMID:27152974

  8. Exploring the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and the kinetics of protein adsorption: an in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Shokuie, Kaveh; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2008-09-16

    The high energy X-ray reflectivity technique has been applied to study the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and protein adsorption kinetics in situ. For this purpose, the adsorption of lysozyme at the hydrophilic silica-water interface has been chosen as a model system. The structure of adsorbed lysozyme layers was probed for various aqueous solution conditions. The effect of solution pH and lysozyme concentration on the interfacial structure was measured. Monolayer formation was observed for all cases except for the highest concentration. The adsorbed protein layers consist of adsorbed lysozyme molecules with side-on or end-on orientation. By means of time-dependent X-ray reflectivity scans, the time-evolution of adsorbed proteins was monitored as well. The results of this study demonstrate the capabilities of in situ X-ray reflectivity experiments on protein adsorbates. The great advantages of this method are the broad wave vector range available and the high time resolution. PMID:18715021

  9. Adsorption and dissociation of molecular hydrogen on the (0001) surface of double hexagonal close packed americium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dholabhai, P. P.; Ray, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen molecule adsorption on the (0001) surface of double hexagonal packed americium has been studied in detail within the framework of density functional theory using a full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbitals method (FP-L/APW+lo). Weak molecular hydrogen adsorptions were observed. Adsorption energies were optimized with respect to the distance of the adsorbates from the surface for three approach positions at three adsorption sites, namely t1 (one-fold top), b2 (two-fold bridge), and h3 (three-fold hollow) sites. Adsorption energies were computed at the scalar-relativistic level (no spin-orbit coupling NSOC) and at the fully relativistic level (with spin-orbit coupling SOC). The most stable configuration corresponds to a horizontal adsorption with the molecular approach being perpendicular to a lattice vector. The surface coverage is equivalent to one-fourth of a monolayer (ML), with the adsorption energies at the NSOC and SOC theoretical levels being 0.0997 eV and 0.1022 eV, respectively. The respective distance of the hydrogen molecule from the surface and hydrogen-hydrogen distance was found to be 2.645 Å and 0.789 Å, respectively. The work functions decreased and the net magnetic moments remained almost unchanged in all cases compared with the corresponding quantities of bare dhcp Am (0001) surface. The adsorbate-substrate interactions have been analyzed in detail using the partial charges inside the muffin-tin spheres, difference charge density distributions, and the local density of states. The effects of adsorption on the Am 5f electron localization-delocalization characteristics have been discussed. Reaction barrier for the dissociation of hydrogen molecule has been presented.

  10. Direct Energy Exchange Enhancement in Distributed Injection Light Gas Launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T W; Finucane, R G; Hall, J P; Penetrante, B M; Uphaus, T M

    2000-04-06

    initially contained in the reservoir. This results deserves emphasis: whereas conventional guns apply a few percent of the reservoir pressure to a fast moving projectile, our design is paradoxically capable of applying nearly double the contained pressure. We later confirmed this experimental result analytically and related it to a type of direct energy exchange between unsteady fluid flows. This physical approach was the basis for the German V-1 ''buzz bomb'' of World War II; it has been applied to a limited number of commercial applications. (This work should not be confused with the German WWII distributed injection missile launchers.) Direct fluid-energy exchange has not previously been applied to any gas-launcher technology. As a result of these discoveries, we estimate that a practical, 15 km/s, high-velocity launcher could be built using our direct-energy-exchange, distributed-injection approach. However, the radical nature of the results, the lack of confirming or allied work being carried out anywhere else, and the fact that it would take extensive time and resources to demonstrate targeted performance precluded further development. We plan to submit the results to a refereed journal to ensure that the work will not be lost to the launcher community.

  11. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi Bright Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Agudo, I.; Ajello, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Arkharov, A. A.; Axelsson, M.; Bach, U.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Benitiez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Marshall, F.; Scargle, J. D.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray /gamma-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these gamma-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log v-log v Fv representation, the typical broadband spectral signatures normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. We have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low- and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, alpha(sub ro) , and optical to X-ray, alpha(sub ox), spectral slopes) and from the gamma-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (v(sup S) (sub peak)) is positioned between 10(exp 12.5) and 10(exp 14) Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 17) Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the gamma-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the observed spectral variability. While more than

  12. The adsorption properties of CO molecules on single-layer graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Chenglong; Wang, Weidong Shen, Cuili

    2014-03-15

    The adsorption properties of CO molecules on graphene nanoribbons (GRNs) are studied through the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The AIREBO and LJ potentials are used to describe the C-C bonds in GNR and the interactions between the carbon atoms in GNR and CO molecules, respectively. The influences of the environmental pressure and charge density on the adsorption properties of CO molecules on GRNs are taken into account in this study. The effects of charges carried by GNRs on the adsorption properties are investigated in two aspects: atom distribution and energy evolution. Its observation from the results shows that the Coulomb force plays a more important role in the adsorption phenomenon than the van der Waals force, and the higher the charge density is, the larger the amount of the adsorbed CO molecules becomes. Low charge densities (<3.291 C/m{sup 2}) do little for the system, that is to say, the GNRs present similar properties to the ones with no charges. However, relatively high charge densities (>4.937 C/m{sup 2}) have an obvious effect on the whole system. The results also indicate that the environmental pressure has great influence on the adsorption properties of COs on GRN, and the higher the pressure is, the greater the adsorption energy becomes.

  13. Dibenzothiophene adsorption at boron doped carbon nanoribbons studied within density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    López-Albarrán, P.; Navarro-Santos, P.; Garcia-Ramirez, M. A.; Ricardo-Chávez, J. L.

    2015-06-21

    The adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) on bare and boron-doped armchair carbon nanoribbons (ACNRs) is being investigated in the framework of the density functional theory by implementing periodic boundary conditions that include corrections from dispersion interactions. The reactivity of the ACNRs is characterized by using the Fukui functions as well as the electrostatic potential as local descriptors. Non-covalent adsorption mechanism is found when using the local Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof functional, regardless of the DBT orientation and adsorption location. The dispersion interactions addition is a milestone to describe the adsorption process. The charge defects introduced in small number (i.e., by doping with B atoms), within the ACNRs increases the selectivity towards sulfur mainly due to the charge depletion at B sites. The DBT magnitude in the adsorption energy shows non-covalent interactions. As a consequence, the configurations where the DBT is adsorbed on a BC{sub 3} island increase the adsorption energy compared to random B arrangements. The stability of these configurations can be explained satisfactorily in terms of dipole interactions. Nevertheless, from the charge-density difference analysis and the weak Bader charge-distribution interactions cannot be ruled out completely. This is why the electronic properties of the ribbons are analyzed in order to elucidate the key role played by the B and DBT states in the adsorbed configurations.

  14. Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions As A Function Of Physical Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Shonda; Ganguly, R.; Stark, M. A.; Derseweh, J. A.; Richmond, J. M.

    2012-05-01

    Galaxy evolution models have shown that quasars are a crucial ingredient in the evolution of massive galaxies. Outflows play a key role in the story of quasars and their host galaxies, by helping regulate the accretion process, the star-formation rate and mass of the host galaxy (i.e., feedback). The prescription for modeling outflows as a contributor to feedback requires knowledge of the outflow velocity, geometry, and column density. In particular, we need to understand how these depend on physical parameters and how much is determined stochastically (and with what distribution). In turn, models of outflows have shown particular sensitivity to the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED), depending on the UV luminosity to transfer momentum to the gas, the X-ray luminosity to regulate how efficiently that transfer can be, etc. To investigate how SED changes with physical properties, we follow up on Richards et al. (2006), who constructed SEDs with varying luminosity. Here, we construct SEDs as a function of redshift, and physical property (black hole mass, bolometric luminosity, Eddington ratio) for volume limited samples drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with photometry supplemented from 2MASS, WISE, GALEX, ROSAT, and Chandra. To estimate black hole masses, we adopt the scaling relations from Greene & Ho (2005) based on the H-alpha emission line FWHM. This requires redshifts less than 0.4. To construct volume-limited subsamples, we begin by adopting g=19.8 as a nominal limiting magnitude over which we are guaranteed to detect z<0.4 quasars. At redshift 0.4, we are complete down to Mg=-21.8, which yields 3300 objects from Data Release 7. At z=0.1, we are complete down to Mg=-18.5. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. 09-ADP09-0016 issued through the Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  15. Space and energy. [space systems for energy generation, distribution and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.

    1976-01-01

    Potential contributions of space to energy-related activities are discussed. Advanced concepts presented include worldwide energy distribution to substation-sized users using low-altitude space reflectors; powering large numbers of large aircraft worldwide using laser beams reflected from space mirror complexes; providing night illumination via sunlight-reflecting space mirrors; fine-scale power programming and monitoring in transmission networks by monitoring millions of network points from space; prevention of undetected hijacking of nuclear reactor fuels by space tracking of signals from tagging transmitters on all such materials; and disposal of nuclear power plant radioactive wastes in space.

  16. Design, modeling, simulation and evaluation of a distributed energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultura, Ambrosio B., II

    This dissertation presents the design, modeling, simulation and evaluation of distributed energy resources (DER) consisting of photovoltaics (PV), wind turbines, batteries, a PEM fuel cell and supercapacitors. The distributed energy resources installed at UMass Lowell consist of the following: 2.5kW PV, 44kWhr lead acid batteries and 1500W, 500W & 300W wind turbines, which were installed before year 2000. Recently added to that are the following: 10.56 kW PV array, 2.4 kW wind turbine, 29 kWhr Lead acid batteries, a 1.2 kW PEM fuel cell and 4-140F supercapacitors. Each newly added energy resource has been designed, modeled, simulated and evaluated before its integration into the existing PV/Wind grid-connected system. The Mathematical and Simulink model of each system was derived and validated by comparing the simulated and experimental results. The Simulated results of energy generated from a 10.56kW PV system are in good agreement with the experimental results. A detailed electrical model of a 2.4kW wind turbine system equipped with a permanent magnet generator, diode rectifier, boost converter and inverter is presented. The analysis of the results demonstrates the effectiveness of the constructed simulink model, and can be used to predict the performance of the wind turbine. It was observed that a PEM fuel cell has a very fast response to load changes. Moreover, the model has validated the actual operation of the PEM fuel cell, showing that the simulated results in Matlab Simulink are consistent with the experimental results. The equivalent mathematical equation, derived from an electrical model of the supercapacitor, is used to simulate its voltage response. The model is completely capable of simulating its voltage behavior, and can predict the charge time and discharge time of voltages on the supercapacitor. The bi-directional dc-dc converter was designed in order to connect the 48V battery bank storage to the 24V battery bank storage. This connection was

  17. Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Nearby Dwarf Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrance, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of G77-61 (Dahn et al. 1977) -- a star with a carbon-rich spectrum a mere 58 pc away and therefore of relatively low luminosity -- led to the recognition that _dwarf_ carbon (dC) stars exist. As more dCs are now known, the accepted paradigm of the presence of atmospheric carbon is that dCs must contain a white dwarf secondary. While the white dwarf companion was going through an AGB stage, it deposited carbon-rich material in the atmosphere of the lower-mass (and now brighter) dwarf star. Indeed, a handful of the dC's have exhibited radial velocity signatures consistent with this picture. To allow for the carbon to still be present in the atmosphere past the AGB stage, a replenishing outer shell or disk has been proposed. Current understanding of the formation and evolution of a dC is, however, limited by the small number of objects and observations. We present a full range of fluxes and flux limits from 1 - 160 um including 2MASS, WISE, Spitzer, and Herschel observations for a list of the nearest carbon dwarfs. We reconstruct the spectral energy distribution exploring the mid-infrared region where any residual debris disks would be detectable. The carbon dwarfs have been historically studied in the visible, and these new infrared observations provide a picture of the circumstellar dust.

  18. Electron energy distributions in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Sang-Heon E-mail: Sang-Heon.Song@us.tel.com; Yang, Yang; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-15

    Optimizing and controlling electron energy distributions (EEDs) is a continuing goal in plasma materials processing as EEDs determine the rate coefficients for electron impact processes. There are many strategies to customize EEDs in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), for example, pulsing and choice of frequency, to produce the desired plasma properties. Recent experiments have shown that EEDs in low pressure ICPs can be manipulated through the use of static magnetic fields of sufficient magnitudes to magnetize the electrons and confine them to the electromagnetic skin depth. The EED is then a function of the local magnetic field as opposed to having non-local properties in the absence of the magnetic field. In this paper, EEDs in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (mICP) sustained in Ar are discussed with results from a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model. Results are compared with experimental measurements. We found that the character of the EED transitions from non-local to local with application of the static magnetic field. The reduction in cross-field mobility increases local electron heating in the skin depth and decreases the transport of these hot electrons to larger radii. The tail of the EED is therefore enhanced in the skin depth and depressed at large radii. Plasmas densities are non-monotonic with increasing pressure with the external magnetic field due to transitions between local and non-local kinetics.

  19. Simulated galaxy interactions as probes of merger spectral energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Hernquist, Lars; Hayward, Christopher C.; Brassington, Nicola

    2014-04-10

    We present the first systematic comparison of ultraviolet-millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of observed and simulated interacting galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey and probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters. We use 31 galaxies in 14 systems which have been observed with Herschel, Spitzer, GALEX, and 2MASS. We create a suite of GADGET-3 hydrodynamic simulations of isolated and interacting galaxies with stellar masses comparable to those in our sample of interacting galaxies. Photometry for the simulated systems is then calculated with the SUNRISE radiative transfer code for comparison with the observed systems. For most of the observed systems, one or more of the simulated SEDs match reasonably well. The best matches recover the infrared luminosity and the star formation rate of the observed systems, and the more massive systems preferentially match SEDs from simulations of more massive galaxies. The most morphologically distorted systems in our sample are best matched to the simulated SEDs that are close to coalescence, while less evolved systems match well with the SEDs over a wide range of interaction stages, suggesting that an SED alone is insufficient for identifying the interaction stage except during the most active phases in strongly interacting systems. This result is supported by our finding that the SEDs calculated for simulated systems vary little over the interaction sequence.

  20. Energy Distribution of Electrons in Radiation Induced-Helium Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Energy distribution of high energy electrons as they slow down and thermalize in a gaseous medium is studied. The energy distribution in the entire energy range from source energies down is studied analytically. A helium medium in which primary electrons are created by the passage of heavy-charged particles from nuclear reactions is emphasized. A radiation-induced plasma is of interest in a variety of applications, such as radiation pumped lasers and gaseous core nuclear reactors.

  1. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420...

  2. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420...

  3. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420...

  4. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420...

  5. 16 CFR Table 4 to Part 1512 - Relative Energy Distribution of Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Relative Energy Distribution of Sources 4... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Table 4 Table 4 to Part 1512—Relative Energy Distribution of Sources Wave length (nanometers) Relative energy 380 9.79 390 12.09 400 14.71 410 17.68 420...

  6. 10 CFR 431.193 - Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... procedures for measuring the energy efficiency of distribution transformers for purposes of EPCA are... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Test Procedures... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test procedures for measuring energy consumption...

  7. 10 CFR 431.193 - Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... procedures for measuring the energy efficiency of distribution transformers for purposes of EPCA are... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Test Procedures... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test procedures for measuring energy consumption...

  8. 10 CFR 431.193 - Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... procedures for measuring the energy efficiency of distribution transformers for purposes of EPCA are... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Test Procedures... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Test procedures for measuring energy consumption...

  9. 10 CFR 431.193 - Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... procedures for measuring the energy efficiency of distribution transformers for purposes of EPCA are... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Test Procedures... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Test procedures for measuring energy consumption...

  10. 10 CFR 431.193 - Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... procedures for measuring the energy efficiency of distribution transformers for purposes of EPCA are... EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Test Procedures... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test procedures for measuring energy consumption...

  11. 76 FR 50148 - Notice of Intent to Negotiate Proposed Rule on Energy Efficiency Standards for Distribution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AC62 Notice of Intent to Negotiate Proposed Rule on Energy Efficiency Standards for Distribution Transformers AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy... Negotiated Rulemaking Act (NRA) to negotiate proposed Federal standards for the energy efficiency of...

  12. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOEpatents

    Chassin, David P.; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2006-12-12

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  13. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    DOEpatents

    Chassin, David P.; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2011-12-06

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  14. Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop Summary: August 24, 2006, Sacramento, California

    SciTech Connect

    Treanton, B.; Palomo, J.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop, sponsored by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was held Aug. 24, 2006, in Sacramento, Calif. The workshop provided a forum for industry stakeholders to share their knowledge and experience about technologies, manufacturing approaches, markets, and issues in power electronics for a range of distributed energy resources. It focused on the development of advanced power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications and included discussions of modular power electronics, component manufacturing, and power electronic applications.

  15. Lifetime optimization of wireless sensor network by a better nodes positioning and energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J. M.; Murad, N. M.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a method of energy distribution on a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). Nodes are randomly positioned and the sink is placed at the centre of the surface. Simulations show that relay nodes around the sink are too much requested to convey data, which substantially reduces their lifetime. So, several algorithmic solutions are presented to optimize the energy distribution on each node, compared to the classical uniform energy distribution. Their performance is discussed in terms of failure rate of data transmission and network lifetime. Moreover, the total energy distributed on all nodes before the deployment is invariable and some non-uniform energy distributions are created. Finally, simulations show that every energy distributions greatly improve the WSN lifetime and decrease the failure rate of data transmission.

  16. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided.

  17. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-06-15

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided. 5 figs.

  18. Development of a High-Speed Static Switch for Distributed Energy and Microgrid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Pink, C.; Lynch, J.; John, V.; Meor Daniel, S.; Benedict, E.; Vihinen, I.

    2007-01-01

    Distributed energy resources can provide power to local loads in the electric distribution system and benefits such as improved reliability. Microgrids are intentional islands formed at a facility or in an electrical distribution system that contains at least one distributed resource and associated loads. Microgrids that operate both electrical generation and loads in a coordinated manner can offer additional benefits to the customer and local utility. The loads and energy sources can be disconnected from and reconnected to the area or local utility with minimal disruption to the local loads, thereby improving reliability. This paper details the development and testing of a highspeed static switch for distributed energy and microgrid applications.

  19. The impact of the competitive adsorption of ions at surface sites on surface free energies and surface forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Drew F.; Salis, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between surface charge and surface potential at the solid-liquid interface is often determined by a charge regulation process, the chemisorption of a potential determining ion such as H+. A subtle ion-specific effect can be observed when other ions compete with the primary potential determining ion to bind to a surface site. Site competition may involve alternative ions competing for a first binding site, e.g., metals ions competing with H+ to bind to a negatively charged oxide or carboxyl site. Second-binding sites with site competition may also be found, including amphoteric OH2+ sites, or anion binding to amine groups. In this work, a general theoretical model is developed to describe the competitive adsorption of ions at surface sites. Applied to the calculation of forces, the theory predicts a 20% increase in repulsion between titania surfaces in 1 mM NaCl, and a 25% reduction in repulsion between silica surfaces in 0.1M NaCl compared to calculations neglecting ion site competition.

  20. The impact of the competitive adsorption of ions at surface sites on surface free energies and surface forces.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Drew F; Salis, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between surface charge and surface potential at the solid-liquid interface is often determined by a charge regulation process, the chemisorption of a potential determining ion such as H(+). A subtle ion-specific effect can be observed when other ions compete with the primary potential determining ion to bind to a surface site. Site competition may involve alternative ions competing for a first binding site, e.g., metals ions competing with H(+) to bind to a negatively charged oxide or carboxyl site. Second-binding sites with site competition may also be found, including amphoteric OH2 (+) sites, or anion binding to amine groups. In this work, a general theoretical model is developed to describe the competitive adsorption of ions at surface sites. Applied to the calculation of forces, the theory predicts a 20% increase in repulsion between titania surfaces in 1 mM NaCl, and a 25% reduction in repulsion between silica surfaces in 0.1M NaCl compared to calculations neglecting ion site competition. PMID:25854258

  1. The Effect of Distributed Energy Resource Competition with Central Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, SW

    2003-12-10

    Distributed Energy Resource (DER) has been touted as a clean and efficient way to generate electricity at end-use sites, potentially allowing the exhaust heat to be put to good use as well. However, despite its environmental acceptability compared to many other types of generation, it has faced some disapproval because it may displace other, cleaner generation technologies. The end result could be more pollution than if the DER were not deployed. On the other hand, the DER may be competing against older power plants. If the DER is built then these other plants may be retired sooner, reducing their emissions. Or it may be that DER does not directly compete against either new or old plant capacity at the decision-maker level, and increased DER simply reduces the amount of time various plants operate. The key factor is what gets displaced if DER is added. For every kWh made by DER a kWh (or more with losses) of other production is not made. If enough DER is created, some power plants will get retired or not get built so not only their production but their capacity is displaced. Various characteristics of the power system in a region will influence how DER impacts the operation of the grid. The growth in demand in the region may influence whether new plants are postponed or old plants retired. The generation mix, including the fuel types, efficiencies, and emission characteristics of the plants in the region will factor into the overall competition. And public policies such as ease of new construction, emissions regulations, and fuel availability will also come into consideration.

  2. Constructing and Analyzing Spectral Energy Distributions with the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurino, Omar; Busko, I.; Cresitello-Dittmar, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Doe, S.; Evans, J.; Pevunova, O.; Norris, P.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are a common and useful means of assessing the relative contributions of different emission processes occurring within an object. Iris, the Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) SED tool, seamlessly combines key features of several existing astronomical software applications to streamline and enhance the SED analysis process. With Iris, users may build and display SEDs, browse data and metadata and apply filters to them, fit models to SEDs, and calculate confidence limits on best-fit parameters. SED data may be built from a number of sources using the SED Builder. Iris supports the Simple Application Messaging Protocol for interoperability with other Virtual Observatory applications, like the VAO Data Discovery tool, and can directly fetch SEDs from the NASA Extragalactic Database SED service. Particular attention has been paid to the integration of user spectrophotometric data from files in several different formats. File readers for custom formats can be provided at runtime, as well as custom models to fit the data, as template libraries for template fitting or arbitrary python functions. New functionalities can be added by installing plugins, i.e. third party components that are developed using the Iris Software Development Kit. The VAO was established as a partnership of the Associated Universities, Inc. and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. Iris Individual components have also been supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) through the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the NASA contract NAS8-03060, and by the Space Telescope Science Institute, operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of

  3. Carbon monoxide adsorption on beryllium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, A.

    2013-02-01

    Density functional calculations are here carried out to study the carbon monoxide molecule adsorption on pristine, hydrogenated and hydroxylated beryllium Be (0001) surfaces. The adsorption energies and structures, the activation barriers to molecular adsorption and dissociation are calculated. These reactions are described in terms of potential energy surfaces and electronic density of states. The quantum results are discussed along two directions: the beryllium surface reactivity in the domain of nuclear fusion devices and the possible usage of beryllium as a catalyst of Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis.

  4. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  5. Optimal Combination of Distributed Energy System in an Eco-Campusof Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yongwen; Gao, Weijun; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris

    2006-06-14

    In this study, referring to the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) which was developed by the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), E-GAMS programmer is developed with a research of database of energy tariffs, DER (Distributed Energy Resources) technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption in Japan. E-GAMS is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills. In this research, by using E-GAMS, we present a tool to select the optimal combination of distributed energy system for an Ecological-Campus, Kitakyushu, Science and Research Park (KSRP). We discuss the effects of the combination of distributed energy technologies on the energy saving, economic efficiency and environmental benefits.

  6. Variations of Low-energy Ion Distributions Measured in the Heliosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Hill, M. E.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2010-12-30

    This report is an update of low-energy ion intensities and angular distributions measured recently by the Low Energy Charged Particle instruments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in the inner heliosheath.

  7. Charge state dependence of cathodic vacuum arc ion energy andvelocity distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Johanna; Schneider, Jochen M.; Anders, Andre

    2006-08-15

    In the literature, conflicting conclusions are reported concerning the charge state dependence of cathodic arc ion energy and velocity distributions. It appears that data from electrostatic energy analyzers indicate charge state dependence of ion energy, whereas time-of-flight methods support charge state independence of ion velocity. Here we present charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions and calculate the corresponding ion velocity distributions in aluminum vacuum arc plasma. We show that the conflicting conclusions reported in the literature for the two different characterization techniques may originate from the commonly employed data interpretation of energy and velocity, in which peak values and average values are not carefully distinguished.

  8. DFT modelling of hydrogen sulphide adsorption on α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Frank; Stashans, Arvids

    2016-05-01

    Density functional theory has been used to predict properties of hydrogen sulphide, H2S, adsorption on the α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface. Five energetically most favourable adsorption configurations have been selected for the study. Our work reveals adsorption geometries as well as discusses electronic and magnetic properties of the adsorbate on chromium oxide surface. It is shown that two different adsorption types, namely molecular adsorption and dissociative adsorption, can take place leading to two sets of adsorption energies. The most favourable arrangement is found to correspond to the case of dissociative adsorption with molecular hydrogen forming OH group at the α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface.

  9. Polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent counterions: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Both experiments and theory have evidenced that multivalent cations can mediate the interaction between negatively charged polyelectrolytes and like-charged objects, such as anionic lipoplexes (DNA-cation-anionic liposome complexes). In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the electrostatic interaction responsible for the trivalent-counterion-mediated adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto a like-charged planar surface. The evaluation of the Helmholtz free energy allows us to characterize both the magnitude and the range of the interaction as a function of the polyelectrolyte charge, surface charge density, [3:1] electrolyte concentration, and cation size. Both polyelectrolyte and surface charge favor the adsorption. It should be stressed, however, that the adsorption will be negligible if the surface charge density does not exceed a threshold value. The effect of the [3:1] electrolyte concentration has also been analyzed. In certain range of concentrations, the counterion-mediated attraction seems to be independent of this parameter, whereas very high concentrations of salt weaken the adsorption. If the trivalent cation diameter is doubled the adsorption moderates due to the excluded volume effects. The analysis of the integrated charge density and ionic distributions suggests that a delicate balance between charge inversion and screening effects governs the polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent cations. PMID:24811649

  10. Polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent counterions: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Both experiments and theory have evidenced that multivalent cations can mediate the interaction between negatively charged polyelectrolytes and like-charged objects, such as anionic lipoplexes (DNA-cation-anionic liposome complexes). In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the electrostatic interaction responsible for the trivalent-counterion-mediated adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto a like-charged planar surface. The evaluation of the Helmholtz free energy allows us to characterize both the magnitude and the range of the interaction as a function of the polyelectrolyte charge, surface charge density, [3:1] electrolyte concentration, and cation size. Both polyelectrolyte and surface charge favor the adsorption. It should be stressed, however, that the adsorption will be negligible if the surface charge density does not exceed a threshold value. The effect of the [3:1] electrolyte concentration has also been analyzed. In certain range of concentrations, the counterion-mediated attraction seems to be independent of this parameter, whereas very high concentrations of salt weaken the adsorption. If the trivalent cation diameter is doubled the adsorption moderates due to the excluded volume effects. The analysis of the integrated charge density and ionic distributions suggests that a delicate balance between charge inversion and screening effects governs the polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent cations.

  11. 76 FR 45471 - Energy Efficiency Standards for Distribution Transformers; Notice of Intent To Negotiate Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Chapter II RIN 1904-AC04 Energy Efficiency Standards for Distribution Transformers; Notice of Intent To Negotiate Proposed Rule AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable... Act (NRA) to negotiate proposed Federal standards for the energy efficiency of liquid immersed...

  12. Hydrogen adsorption on functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X B; Xiao, B; Fletcher, A J; Thomas, K M

    2005-05-12

    There is considerable interest in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes and porous carbons as a method of storage for transport and related energy applications. This investigation has involved a systematic investigation of the role of functional groups and porous structure characteristics in determining the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of porous carbons. Suites of carbons were prepared with a wide range of nitrogen and oxygen contents and types of functional groups to investigate their effect on hydrogen adsorption. The porous structures of the carbons were characterized by nitrogen (77 K) and carbon dioxide (273 K) adsorption methods. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were studied at 77 K and pressure up to 100 kPa. All the isotherms were Type I in the IUPAC classification scheme. Hydrogen isobars indicated that the adsorption of hydrogen is very temperature dependent with little or no hydrogen adsorption above 195 K. The isosteric enthalpies of adsorption at zero surface coverage were obtained using a virial equation, while the values at various surface coverages were obtained from the van't Hoff isochore. The values were in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ mol(-1) for the carbons studied. The thermodynamics of the adsorption process are discussed in relation to temperature limitations for hydrogen storage applications. The maximum amounts of hydrogen adsorbed correlated with the micropore volume obtained from extrapolation of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for carbon dioxide adsorption. Functional groups have a small detrimental effect on hydrogen adsorption, and this is related to decreased adsorbate-adsorbent and increased adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. PMID:16852056

  13. Adsorption in sparse networks. 2: Silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.; Calas, S.; Sempere, R.

    1998-06-15

    The model developed in Part 1 is applied to nitrogen adsorption isotherms obtained for a series of silica aerogels whose densities are varied by partial sintering. The isotherms are adequately described by a cubic network model, with all of the pores falling in the mesopore range; the adsorption and desorption branches are fit by the same pore size distribution. For the least dense gels, a substantial portion of the pore volume is not detected by condensation. The model attributes this effect to the shape of the adsorbate/adsorptive interface, which can adopt zero curvature even in mesopores, because of the shape of the network.

  14. The Spectral Energy Distribution of the Coldest Known Brown Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, K. L.; Esplin, T. L.

    2016-09-01

    WISE J085510.83–071442.5 (hereafter WISE 0855–0714) is the coldest known brown dwarf (∼250 K) and the fourth-closest known system to the Sun (2.2 pc). It has been previously detected only in the J band and two mid-IR bands. To better measure its spectral energy distribution (SED), we have performed deep imaging of WISE 0855–0714 in six optical and near-IR bands with Gemini Observatory, the Very Large Telescope, and the Hubble Space Telescope. Five of the bands show detections, although one detection is marginal (S/N ∼ 3). We also have obtained two epochs of images with the Spitzer Space Telescope for use in refining the parallax of the brown dwarf. By combining astrometry from this work and previous studies, we have derived a parallax of 0.449 ± 0.008″ (2.23 ± 0.04 pc). We have compared our photometry for WISE 0855–0714 to data for known Y dwarfs and to the predictions of three suites of models by Saumon et al. and Morley et al. that are defined by the presence or absence of clouds and nonequilibrium chemistry. Our estimates of Y ‑ J and J ‑ H for WISE 0855–0714 are redder than colors of other Y dwarfs, confirming a predicted reversal of near-IR colors to redder values at temperatures below 300–400 K. In color–magnitude diagrams, no single suite of models provides a clearly superior match to the sequence formed by WISE 0855–0714 and other Y dwarfs. Instead, the best-fitting model changes from one diagram to the next. Similarly, all of the models have substantial differences from the SED of WISE 0855–0714. As a result, we are currently unable to constrain the presence of clouds or nonequilibrium chemistry in its atmosphere. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini Observatory, and the ESO Telescopes at Paranal Observatory.

  15. MEAN SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND BOLOMETRIC CORRECTIONS FOR LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Mehta, Sajjan S.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2013-05-01

    We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.064 < z < 5.46 using mid-IR data from Spitzer and WISE, near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIDSS, optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and UV data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The mean SED requires a bolometric correction (relative to 2500 A) of BC{sub 2500A} =2.75 {+-} 0.40 using the integrated light from 1 {mu}m-2 keV, and we further explore the range of bolometric corrections exhibited by individual objects. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the mean SED on various parameters, particularly the UV luminosity for quasars with 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 and the properties of the UV emission lines for quasars with z {approx}> 1.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED-dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope ({alpha}{sub UV}), a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extreme UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possible models and explore the resulting bolometric corrections. Understanding these various SED-dependent effects will be important for accurate determination of quasar accretion rates.

  16. Energy distribution functions of kilovolt ions in a modified Penning discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The distribution function of ion energy parallel to the magnetic field of a Penning discharge was measured with a retarding potential energy analyzer. Simultaneous measurements of the ion energy distribution function perpendicular to the magnetic field were made with a charge-exchange neutral detector. The ion energy distribution functions are approximately Maxwellian, and their kinetic temperatures are equal within experimental error. This suggests that turbulent processes previously observed Maxwellianize the velocity distribution along a radius in velocity space, and result in an isotropic energy distribution. The kinetic temperatures are on the order of kilovolts, and the tails of the ion energy distribution functions are Maxwellian up to a factor of 7 e-folds in energy. When the distributions depart from Maxwellian, they are enhanced above the Maxwellian tail. Above densities of about 10 to the 10th power particles/cc, this enhancement appears to be the result of a second, higher temperature Maxwellian distribution. At these high particle energies, only the ions perpendicular to the magnetic field lines were investigated.

  17. VAR Support from Distributed Wind Energy Resources: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Romanowitz, H.; Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Yinger, R.

    2004-07-01

    As the size and quantity of wind farms and other distributed generation facilities increase, especially in relation to local grids, the importance of a reactive power compensator or VAR support from these facilities becomes more significant. Poorly done, it can result in cycling or inadequate VAR support, and the local grid could experience excessive voltage regulation and, ultimately, instability. Improved wind turbine and distributed generation power control technologies are creating VAR support capabilities that can be used to enhance the voltage regulation and stability of local grids. Locating VAR support near the point of consumption, reducing step size, and making the control active all improve the performance of the grid. This paper presents and discusses alternatives for improving the integration of VAR support from distributed generation facilities such as wind farms. We also examine the relative effectiveness of distributed VAR support on the local grid and how it can b e integrated with the VAR support of the grid operator.

  18. Low-energy ion distribution functions on a magnetically quiet day at geostationary altitude /L = 7/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Raitt, W. J.; Yasuhara, F.

    1982-01-01

    Ion energy and pitch angle distribution functions are examined for a magnetically quiet day using averaged data from ATS 6. For both field-aligned and perpendicular fluxes, the populations have a mixture of characteristic energies, and the distribution functions can be fairly well approximated by Maxwellian distributions over three different energy bands in the range 3-600 eV. Pitch angle distributions varying with local time, and energy distributions are used to compute total ion density. Pitch angle scattering mechanisms responsible for the observed transformation of pitch angle distribution are examined, and it is found that a magnetic noise of a certain power spectral density belonging to the electromagnetic ion cyclotron mode near the ion cyclotron frequency can be effective in trapping the field aligned fluxes by pitch angle scattering.

  19. Enhancement in ion adsorption rate and desalination efficiency in a capacitive deionization cell through improved electric field distribution using electrodes composed of activated carbon cloth coated with zinc oxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Laxman, Karthik; Myint, Myo Tay Zar; Bourdoucen, Hadj; Dutta, Joydeep

    2014-07-01

    Electrodes composed of activated carbon cloth (ACC) coated with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods are compared with plain ACC electrodes, with respect to their desalination efficiency of a 17 mM NaCl solution at different applied potentials. Polarization of the ZnO nanorods increased the penetration depth and strength of the electric field between the electrodes, leading to an increase in the capacitance and charge efficiency at reduced input charge ratios. Uniform distribution of the electric field lines between two electrodes coated with ZnO nanorods led to faster ion adsorption rates, reduced the electrode saturation time, and increased the average desalination efficiency by ∼45% for all applied potentials. The electrodes were characterized for active surface area, capacitance from cyclic voltammetry, theoretical assessment of surface area utilization, and the magnitude of electric field force acting on an ion of unit charge for each potential. PMID:24940607

  20. Proton and Cd adsorption onto natural bacterial consortia: Testing universal adsorption behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrok, David; Fein, Jeremy B.; Kulpa, Charles F.

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial surface adsorption can control metal distributions in some natural systems, yet it is unclear whether natural bacterial consortia differ in their adsorption behaviors. In this study, we conduct potentiometric titration and metal adsorption experiments to measure proton and Cd adsorption onto a range of bacterial consortia. We model the experimental data using a surface complexation approach to determine thermodynamic stability constants. Our results indicate that these consortia adsorb similar extents of protons and Cd and that the adsorption onto all of the consortia can be modeled using a single set of stability constants. Consortia of bacteria cultured from natural environments also adsorb metals to lesser extents than individual strains of laboratory-cultivated species. This study suggests that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit similar adsorption behaviors, potentially simplifying the task of modeling the distribution and speciation of metals in bacteria-bearing natural systems. Current models for bacteria-metal adsorption that rely on pure strains of laboratory-cultivated species likely overpredict the amount of bacteria-metal adsorption in natural systems.

  1. Energy storage management system with distributed wireless sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Bandhauer, Todd M.

    2015-12-08

    An energy storage system having a multiple different types of energy storage and conversion devices. Each device is equipped with one or more sensors and RFID tags to communicate sensor information wirelessly to a central electronic management system, which is used to control the operation of each device. Each device can have multiple RFID tags and sensor types. Several energy storage and conversion devices can be combined.

  2. Terminal energy distribution of blast waves from bursting spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, A. A.; Strehlow, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The calculation results for the total energy delivered to the surroundings by the burst of an idealized massless sphere containing an ideal gas are presented. The logic development of various formulas for sphere energy is also presented. For all types of sphere bursts the fraction of the total initial energy available in the sphere that is delivered to the surroundings is shown to lie between that delivered for the constant pressure addition of energy to a source region and that delivered by isentropic expansion of the sphere. The relative value of E sub/Q increases at fixed sphere pressure/surrounding pressure as sphere temperature increases because the velocity of sound increases.

  3. Adsorption of copper to different biogenic oyster shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jie; Clark, Malcolm; Yu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    The removal of copper from solution by oyster shell powder was investigated for potential wastewater treatment uses. In particular, adsorption behavior differences between the prismatic (PP) and nacreous (NP) shell layers, and how this affects copper removal, were investigated. Experimental results indicated that copper adsorption was highly pH-dependent with optimal copper removal at pH 5.5, where the powdered whole raw shell (RP) removed up to 99.9% of the copper within 24 h at a 10 mg/L initial copper concentration. Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to analyze the isotherm PP, NP and RP data. These results showed a strong homogeneous Langmuir model for low initial copper concentrations (5-30 mg/L) to both RP and PP layer, while strong agreement with a heterogeneous Freundlich model for high initial copper concentrations (30-200 mg/L); nevertheless, a homogeneous Langmuir model provided the best fit for the more dense NP layer across the initial concentration range (5-200 mg/L). The distribution coefficient (Kd) value of PP layer for each initial concentration investigated was substantially higher than the NP layer and it was also found that the PP layer dominated the adsorption process with an adsorption capacity of 8.9 mg/g, while the adsorption capacity of the NP layer was 2.6 mg/g. These differences are believed to be because of the more porous structure of the PP layer, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermogravimetry-differential thermal analyses.

  4. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  5. High-energy lasers by using distributed reflection: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Lasers may be made with higher energy photons than heretofore possible. It has been proposed that vacuum ultraviolet lasing can be obtained by bombarding superfluid helium with electron beam, while coupling acoustic energy into helium to set up standing waves in fluid.

  6. Method and apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Drost, Kevin; Vishwanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2004-06-08

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. In another aspect, the apparatus or methods utilize heat exchange channels of varying lengths that have volumes controlled to provide equal heat fluxes. Methods of fuel cell startup are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  7. Method for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  8. Apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2005-12-13

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  9. Optimum irradiance distribution of concentrated sunlight for photovoltaic energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, Pablo; Mohedano, Rubén

    1999-04-01

    The irradiance distribution on a concentration photovoltaic cell that produces maximum conversion efficiency has been found with the tools of Variational Calculus. The analysis is two dimensional and can be applied to a comb-like double busbar solar cell illuminated by a line-focus concentrator. The optimum distribution is, in general, nonuniform, and depends on the internal parameters of the solar cell: the higher the contribution of the grid to the global cell series resistance, the lower the uniformity of the optimum irradiance distribution. In practical cases, the efficiency for uniform illumination is close to that of the optimum, but in the latter the irradiance close to the busbar may be noticeable higher than the average.

  10. Electron-energy distribution in silicon under pulsed-laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensoussan, M.; Moison, J. M.

    1983-04-01

    By yield and energy-distribution measurements, we identify two photoemission regimes from silicon under nanosecond laser irradiation. At low fluence and high photon energy, two- and three-quantum processes are the main emission mechanisms; effects of initial and intermediate states are the dominant spectral features. At high fluence and low photon energy, thermoemission prevails and is characterized by a Maxwellian distribution with a temperature different from that of the lattice during the excitation pulse.

  11. Measurement Of Kinetic Energy Distribution Of Positive Ions From Electron Induced Dissociation Of Pyrimidine Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljevic, A. R.; Maljkovic, J. B.; Sevic, D.; Cadez, I.; Marinkovic, B. P.

    2010-07-01

    We report preliminary results on measurements of kinetic energy distribution of positive ions formed upon electron induced dissociative ionization of gaseous pyrimidine molecule (C4H4N2). The kinetic energy spectra were recorded without precedent mass/charge analysis, for different incident electron energies (50-250 eV) and different detection angles (40-90) with respect to the incident beam direction. An influence of the residual gas background to the recorded distributions has been investigated.

  12. Model for radial dependence of frequency distributions for energy imparted in nanometer volumes from HZE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D. T.; Decillo, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    This paper develops a deterministic model of frequency distributions for energy imparted (total energy deposition) in small volumes similar to DNA molecules from high-energy ions of interest for space radiation protection and cancer therapy. Frequency distributions for energy imparted are useful for considering radiation quality and for modeling biological damage produced by ionizing radiation. For high-energy ions, secondary electron (delta-ray) tracks originating from a primary ion track make dominant contributions to energy deposition events in small volumes. Our method uses the distribution of electrons produced about an ion's path and incorporates results from Monte Carlo simulation of electron tracks to predict frequency distributions for ions, including their dependence on radial distance. The contribution from primary ion events is treated using an impact parameter formalism of spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET) and energy-transfer straggling. We validate our model by comparing it directly to results from Monte Carlo simulations for proton and alpha-particle tracks. We show for the first time frequency distributions of energy imparted in DNA structures by several high-energy ions such as cosmic-ray iron ions. Our comparison with results from Monte Carlo simulations at low energies indicates the accuracy of the method.

  13. Model for radial dependence of frequency distributions for energy imparted in nanometer volumes from HZE particles.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Nikjoo, H; Goodhead, D T

    2000-04-01

    This paper develops a deterministic model of frequency distributions for energy imparted (total energy deposition) in small volumes similar to DNA molecules from high-energy ions of interest for space radiation protection and cancer therapy. Frequency distributions for energy imparted are useful for considering radiation quality and for modeling biological damage produced by ionizing radiation. For high-energy ions, secondary electron (delta-ray) tracks originating from a primary ion track make dominant contributions to energy deposition events in small volumes. Our method uses the distribution of electrons produced about an ion's path and incorporates results from Monte Carlo simulation of electron tracks to predict frequency distributions for ions, including their dependence on radial distance. The contribution from primary ion events is treated using an impact parameter formalism of spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET) and energy-transfer straggling. We validate our model by comparing it directly to results from Monte Carlo simulations for proton and alpha-particle tracks. We show for the first time frequency distributions of energy imparted in DNA structures by several high-energy ions such as cosmic-ray iron ions. Our comparison with results from Monte Carlo simulations at low energies indicates the accuracy of the method. PMID:10761008

  14. Bayes Node Energy Polynomial Distribution to Improve Routing in Wireless Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Thirumoorthy; Krishnasamy, Karthikeyan N

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Network monitor and control the physical world via large number of small, low-priced sensor nodes. Existing method on Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) presented sensed data communication through continuous data collection resulting in higher delay and energy consumption. To conquer the routing issue and reduce energy drain rate, Bayes Node Energy and Polynomial Distribution (BNEPD) technique is introduced with energy aware routing in the wireless sensor network. The Bayes Node Energy Distribution initially distributes the sensor nodes that detect an object of similar event (i.e., temperature, pressure, flow) into specific regions with the application of Bayes rule. The object detection of similar events is accomplished based on the bayes probabilities and is sent to the sink node resulting in minimizing the energy consumption. Next, the Polynomial Regression Function is applied to the target object of similar events considered for different sensors are combined. They are based on the minimum and maximum value of object events and are transferred to the sink node. Finally, the Poly Distribute algorithm effectively distributes the sensor nodes. The energy efficient routing path for each sensor nodes are created by data aggregation at the sink based on polynomial regression function which reduces the energy drain rate with minimum communication overhead. Experimental performance is evaluated using Dodgers Loop Sensor Data Set from UCI repository. Simulation results show that the proposed distribution algorithm significantly reduce the node energy drain rate and ensure fairness among different users reducing the communication overhead. PMID:26426701

  15. Bayes Node Energy Polynomial Distribution to Improve Routing in Wireless Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Thirumoorthy; Krishnasamy, Karthikeyan N.

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Network monitor and control the physical world via large number of small, low-priced sensor nodes. Existing method on Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) presented sensed data communication through continuous data collection resulting in higher delay and energy consumption. To conquer the routing issue and reduce energy drain rate, Bayes Node Energy and Polynomial Distribution (BNEPD) technique is introduced with energy aware routing in the wireless sensor network. The Bayes Node Energy Distribution initially distributes the sensor nodes that detect an object of similar event (i.e., temperature, pressure, flow) into specific regions with the application of Bayes rule. The object detection of similar events is accomplished based on the bayes probabilities and is sent to the sink node resulting in minimizing the energy consumption. Next, the Polynomial Regression Function is applied to the target object of similar events considered for different sensors are combined. They are based on the minimum and maximum value of object events and are transferred to the sink node. Finally, the Poly Distribute algorithm effectively distributes the sensor nodes. The energy efficient routing path for each sensor nodes are created by data aggregation at the sink based on polynomial regression function which reduces the energy drain rate with minimum communication overhead. Experimental performance is evaluated using Dodgers Loop Sensor Data Set from UCI repository. Simulation results show that the proposed distribution algorithm significantly reduce the node energy drain rate and ensure fairness among different users reducing the communication overhead. PMID:26426701

  16. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals. PMID:12149553

  17. Amorphous metal distribution transformers: The energy-efficient alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Garrity, T.F.

    1994-12-31

    Amorphous metal distribution transformers have been commercially available for the past 13 years. During that time, they have realized the promise of exceptionally high core efficiency as compared to silicon steel transformer cores. Utility planners today must consider all options available to meet the requirements of load growth. While additional generation capacity will be added, many demand-side initiatives are being undertaken as complementary programs to generation expansion. The efficiency improvement provided by amorphous metal distribution transformers deserves to be among the demand-side options. The key to understanding the positive impact of amorphous metal transformer efficiency is to consider the aggregate contribution those transformers can make towards demand reduction. It is estimated that distribution transformer core losses comprise at least 1% of the utility`s peak demand. Because core losses are continuous, any significant reduction in their magnitude is of great significance to the planner. This paper describes the system-wide economic contributions amorphous metal distribution transformers can make to a utility and suggests evaluation techniques that can be used. As a conservation tool, the amorphous metal transformer contributes to reduced power plant emissions. Calibration of those emissions reductions is also discussed in the paper.

  18. Radial Flux Distribution of Low-Energy Neutrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higinbotham, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to illustrate the basic principle involved in the process of moderation of fast neutrons by water, and the monitoring of the low-energy neutron flux using indium as a probe. (GA)

  19. Control of ions energy distribution in dual-frequency magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chao He, Haijie; Huang, Fupei; Liu, Yi; Wang, Xiangying

    2014-04-15

    The ion energy distributions (IEDs) in the dual-frequency magnetron sputtering discharges were investigated by retarding field energy analyzer. Increasing power ratio of 2 MHz to 13.56 (27.12 or 60) MHz led to the evolution of IEDs from a uni-modal distribution towards a uni-modal distribution with high-energy peak shoulder and a bi-modal distribution. While increasing power ratio of 13.56 MHz to 27.12 MHz and 27.12 MHz to 60 MHz, led to the increase of peak energy. The evolution of IEDs shape and the increase of peak energy are due to the change of ions responding to the average field of high-frequency period towards the instantaneous sheath potential of low-frequency period.

  20. Characterizing the energy distribution of laser-generated relativistic electrons in cone-wire targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, H.; Beg, F. N.; Higginson, D. P.; Ma, T.; Link, A.; Wilks, S. C.; McLean, H. S.; Perez, F.; Patel, P. K.

    2012-10-15

    Transport of relativistic electrons in a solid Cu wire target has been modeled with the implicit hybrid particle-in-cell code LSP to investigate the electron energy distribution and energy coupling from the high-intensity, short-pulse laser to electrons entering to the wire. Experiments were performed on the TITAN laser using a 1.5 mm long Cu wire attached to a Au cone tip at the laser intensity of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} which was irradiated into the cone. The simulated Cu K{alpha} wire profile and yields matched the measurements using a two-temperature energy distribution. These modeling results show that the cold component of the energy spectrum can be determined with {+-}100 keV accuracy from the fit to the initial experimental fall-off of the K{alpha} emission while the simulated profiles were relatively insensitive to the hotter component of the electron distribution (>4 MeV). The slope of measured escaped electrons was used to determine the hotter temperature. Using exponential energy distributions, the laser-to-electron-in-wire coupling efficiencies inferred from the fits decreased from 3.4% to 1.5% as the prepulse energy increases up to 1 J. The comparison of the energy couplings using the exponential and Relativistic Maxwellian distribution functions showed that the energy inferred in the cold component is independent of the type of the distribution function.

  1. Model Etch Profiles for Ion Energy Distribution Functions in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham-Shrauner, B.; Chen, W.; Woodworth, J.R.

    1998-12-14

    Rectangular trench profiles are modeled with analytic etch rates determined from measured ion distribution functions. The pattern transfer step for this plasma etch is for trilayer lithography. Argon and chlorine angular ion energy distribution functions measured by a spherical collector ring analyzer are fit to a sum of drifting Maxwellian velocity distribution functions with anisotropic temperatures. The fit of the model ion distribution functions by a simulated annealing optimization procedure converges adequately for only two drifting Maxwellians. The etch rates are proportional to analytic expressions for the ion energy flux. Numerical computation of the etch profiles by integration of the characteristic equations for profile points and connection of the profiles points is efficient.

  2. Energy distributions and radiation transport in uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.; Bathke, C.; Maceda, E.; Choi, C.

    1976-01-01

    An approximate analytic model, based on continuous electron slowing, has been used for survey calculations. Where more accuracy is required, a Monte Carlo technique is used which combines an analytic representation of Coulombic collisions with a random walk treatment of inelastic collisions. The calculated electron distributions have been incorporated into another code that evaluates both the excited atomic state densities within the plasma and the radiative flux emitted from the plasma.

  3. Stepanian's star - The energy distribution reveals a nontypical cataclysmic variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szkody, P.

    1981-01-01

    Einstein, IUE, optical multichannel spectrophotometry, and IR observations of Stepanian's star are discussed in terms of other known cataclysmics. While the X-ray flux and IUE emission-line data are similar to that of dwarf novae, the total continuum flux distribution from uv-IR is cooler (peaking near a 10,000 K blackbody) and is unlike either a stellar component or a classic steady-state disk. The IR data show no evidence for a late-type component.

  4. Anomalous broadening of energy distributions in photoemitted electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Vincenzo

    1996-06-01

    Photoemission is widely used to generate electron beams with an energy spread lower than by thermoemission. However, when a photocathode is illuminated by a multimode laser this feature is lost and an electron beam with several eV of energy spread is produced. We have developed an explanation for this anomalous behavior pointing out its origin in the combined effect of charge relaxation, taking place within the beam, together with the modulation of the laser power imposed by laser modes. The model permits a correct interpretation overall experimental evidences.

  5. Distributed Power Flow Control: Distributed Power Flow Control using Smart Wires for Energy Routing

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-24

    GENI Project: Smart Wire Grid is developing a solution for controlling power flow within the electric grid to better manage unused and overall transmission capacity. The 300,000 miles of high-voltage transmission line in the U.S. today are congested and inefficient, with only around 50% of all transmission capacity utilized at any given time. Increased consumer demand should be met in part with more efficient and an economical power flow. Smart Wire Grid’s devices clamp onto existing transmission lines and control the flow of power within—much like how internet routers help allocate bandwidth throughout the web. Smart wires could support greater use of renewable energy by providing more consistent control over how that energy is routed within the grid on a real-time basis. This would lessen the concerns surrounding the grid’s inability to effectively store intermittent energy from renewables for later use.

  6. Fuzzy Performance between Surface Fitting and Energy Distribution in Turbulence Runner

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhongwei; Liu, Xiaochu; Ye, Bangyan; Brauwer, Richard Kars

    2012-01-01

    Because the application of surface fitting algorithms exerts a considerable fuzzy influence on the mathematical features of kinetic energy distribution, their relation mechanism in different external conditional parameters must be quantitatively analyzed. Through determining the kinetic energy value of each selected representative position coordinate point by calculating kinetic energy parameters, several typical algorithms of complicated surface fitting are applied for constructing microkinetic energy distribution surface models in the objective turbulence runner with those obtained kinetic energy values. On the base of calculating the newly proposed mathematical features, we construct fuzzy evaluation data sequence and present a new three-dimensional fuzzy quantitative evaluation method; then the value change tendencies of kinetic energy distribution surface features can be clearly quantified, and the fuzzy performance mechanism discipline between the performance results of surface fitting algorithms, the spatial features of turbulence kinetic energy distribution surface, and their respective environmental parameter conditions can be quantitatively analyzed in detail, which results in the acquirement of final conclusions concerning the inherent turbulence kinetic energy distribution performance mechanism and its mathematical relation. A further turbulence energy quantitative study can be ensured. PMID:23213287

  7. Adsorption of sulfonamides on reduced graphene oxides as affected by pH and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei-Fei; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Shuguang; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-03-01

    With the significant increase in use and application of graphene and the frequent presence of sulfonamides (SAs) in water environments, their interactions have attracted extensive attention. In this study, adsorption of two selected SAs (sulfapyridine and sulfathiazole) by two reduced graphene oxides (rGO1 and rGO2) was examined as affected by pH and dissolved organic matter (DOM). Adsorption of SAs by rGOs was highly pH-dependent, and adsorption affinity of different SAs species followed the order of SA(0) > SA(+) > SA(-). The contribution of SA(0) to the overall adsorption was greater than its species fraction, implying the importance of the neutral species to adsorption. SAs adsorption isotherms at three selected pHs were in the order of pH 5.0 > pH 1.0 > pH 11.0, which was in accordance with the variation of site energy distribution analysis. Hydrophobic interaction, π-π EDA interaction and electrostatic interaction were the main mechanisms responsible for SAs adsorption by rGOs. Three representative natural DOMs including humic acid (HA), bovine serum albumin (BSA), and sodium alginate together with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) as a synthetic DOM were used to investigate their effect on SAs adsorption. The inhibition impact of DOM on SAs adsorption was lower for rGOs compared with carbon nanotubes and graphite, which might be attributed to the higher oxygen contents of rGOs. Also, the suppression effect of DOM generally followed an order of SDBS > HA ≥ BSA > alginate, indicating the importance role of DOM compositions. These results should be important for assessing the fate and transport of graphene and antibiotics in the environment. PMID:26708762

  8. Energy, ecology and the distribution of microbial life

    PubMed Central

    Macalady, Jennifer L.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Grettenberger, Christen L.; Jones, Daniel S.; Tsao, Leah E.; Burgos, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms that govern the coexistence of multiple biological species have been studied intensively by ecologists since the turn of the nineteenth century. Microbial ecologists in the meantime have faced many fundamental challenges, such as the lack of an ecologically coherent species definition, lack of adequate methods for evaluating population sizes and community composition in nature, and enormous taxonomic and functional diversity. The accessibility of powerful, culture-independent molecular microbiology methods offers an opportunity to close the gap between microbial science and the main stream of ecological theory, with the promise of new insights and tools needed to meet the grand challenges humans face as planetary engineers and galactic explorers. We focus specifically on resources related to energy metabolism because of their direct links to elemental cycling in the Earth's history, engineering applications and astrobiology. To what extent does the availability of energy resources structure microbial communities in nature? Our recent work on sulfur- and iron-oxidizing autotrophs suggests that apparently subtle variations in the concentration ratios of external electron donors and acceptors select for different microbial populations. We show that quantitative knowledge of microbial energy niches (population-specific patterns of energy resource use) can be used to predict variations in the abundance of specific taxa in microbial communities. Furthermore, we propose that resource ratio theory applied to micro-organisms will provide a useful framework for identifying how environmental communities are organized in space and time. PMID:23754819

  9. Analysis of swarm coefficients in a gas for bi-modal electron energy distribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govinda-Raju, Gorur

    2015-03-01

    Cross sections for collision between electrons and neutrals in a gas discharge are essential for theoretical and computational developments. They are also required to interpret and analyze the results of experimental studies on swarm parameters namely drift velocity, characteristic energy, and ionization and attachment coefficients. The cross sections and swarm coefficients are interconnected through the most important electron energy distribution function. The traditional method of solving the Boltzmann equation numerically yields the required distribution (EEDF). However there are many situations where a simpler approach is desirable for deriving the energy distribution analytically. Energy distribution in non-uniform electric fields, in crossed electric and magnetic fields, breakdown in mixtures of gases for electrical power or plasma applications, calculation of longitudinal diffusion coefficients are examples. In other studies the swarm parameters are employed to derive the cross sections in an unfolding procedure that also involves the energy distribution function. Application of Boltzmann solution method, though more rigorous, consumes enormous efforts in time and technical expertise. In an attempt to provide a simpler method the present author has previously suggested a bimodal electron energy distribution in gases. In this paper the author has generalized the idea of bi-modal energy distribution by considering a model gas with representative cross sections and adopted numerical methods for greater accuracy. The parameters considered are the nature of the two distributions, their relative ratio, and the dependence of cross sections on electron energy. A new method for determining the combination of distributions has been shown to be adequate for calculation of swarm parameters. The results for argon are shown to yield very good agreement with available experimental and theoretical values.

  10. Distributed Energy Resources and Dynamic Microgrid: An Integrated Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Duo Rick

    The overall goal of this thesis is to improve understanding in terms of the benefit of DERs to both utility and to electricity end-users when integrated in power distribution system. To achieve this goal, a series of two studies was conducted to assess the value of DERs when integrated with new power paradigms. First, the arbitrage value of DERs was examined in markets with time-variant electricity pricing rates (e.g., time of use, real time pricing) under a smart grid distribution paradigm. This study uses a stochastic optimization model to estimate the potential profit from electricity price arbitrage over a five-year period. The optimization process involves two types of PHEVs (PHEV-10, and PHEV-40) under three scenarios with different assumptions on technology performance, electricity market and PHEV owner types. The simulation results indicate that expected arbitrage profit is not a viable option to engage PHEVs in dispatching and in providing ancillary services without more favorable policy and PHEV battery technologies. Subsidy or change in electricity tariff or both are needed. Second, it examined the concept of dynamic microgrid as a measure to improve distribution resilience, and estimates the prices of this emerging service. An economic load dispatch (ELD) model is developed to estimate the market-clearing price in a hypothetical community with single bid auction electricity market. The results show that the electricity market clearing price on the dynamic microgrid is predominantly decided by power output and cost of electricity of each type of DGs. At circumstances where CHP is the only source, the electricity market clearing price in the island is even cheaper than the on-grid electricity price at normal times. Integration of PHEVs in the dynamic microgrid will increase electricity market clearing prices. It demonstrates that dynamic microgrid is an economically viable alternative to enhance grid resilience.

  11. Adsorption of selected volatile organic vapors on multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yang-hsin; Li, Mei-syue

    2008-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes are expected to play an important role in sensing, pollution treatment and separation techniques. This study examines the adsorption behaviors of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), n-hexane, benzene, trichloroethylene and acetone on two multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), CNT1 and CNT2. Among these VOCs, acetone exhibits the highest adsorption capacity. The highest adsorption enthalpies and desorption energies of acetone were also observed. The strong chemical interactions between acetone and both MWCNTs may be the result from chemisorption on the topological defects. The adsorption heats of trichloroethylene, benzene, and n-hexane are indicative of physisorption on the surfaces of both MWCNTs. CNT2 presents a higher adsorption capacity than CNT1 due to the existence of an exterior amorphous carbon layer on CNT2. The amorphous carbon enhances the adsorption capacity of organic chemicals on carbon nanotubes. The morphological and structure order of carbon nanotubes are the primary affects on the adsorption process of organic chemicals. PMID:17980962

  12. Assessment of grid-friendly collective optimization framework for distributed energy resources

    SciTech Connect

    Pensini, Alessandro; Robinson, Matthew; Heine, Nicholas; Stadler, Michael; Mammoli, Andrea

    2015-11-04

    Distributed energy resources have the potential to provide services to facilities and buildings at lower cost and environmental impact in comparison to traditional electric-gridonly services. The reduced cost could result from a combination of higher system efficiency and exploitation of electricity tariff structures. Traditionally, electricity tariffs are designed to encourage the use of ‘off peak’ power and discourage the use of ‘onpeak’ power, although recent developments in renewable energy resources and distributed generation systems (such as their increasing levels of penetration and their increased controllability) are resulting in pressures to adopt tariffs of increasing complexity. Independently of the tariff structure, more or less sophisticated methods exist that allow distributed energy resources to take advantage of such tariffs, ranging from simple pre-planned schedules to Software-as-a-Service schedule optimization tools. However, as the penetration of distributed energy resources increases, there is an increasing chance of a ‘tragedy of the commons’ mechanism taking place, where taking advantage of tariffs for local benefit can ultimately result in degradation of service and higher energy costs for all. In this work, we use a scheduling optimization tool, in combination with a power distribution system simulator, to investigate techniques that could mitigate the deleterious effect of ‘selfish’ optimization, so that the high-penetration use of distributed energy resources to reduce operating costs remains advantageous while the quality of service and overall energy cost to the community is not affected.

  13. Competitive adsorption of heavy metals onto sesame straw biochar in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Ok, Yong Sik; Kim, Seong-Heon; Cho, Ju-Sik; Heo, Jong-Soo; Delaune, Ronald D; Seo, Dong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objective of this research was to evaluate adsorption of heavy metals in mono and multimetal forms onto sesame straw biochar (SSB). Competitive sorption of metals by SSB has never been reported previously. The maximum adsorption capacities (mgg(-1)) of metals by SSB were in the order of Pb (102)≫Cd (86)≫Cr (65)>Cu (55)≫Zn (34) in the monometal adsorption isotherm and Pb (88)≫Cu (40)≫Cr (21)>Zn (7)⩾Cd (5) in the multimetal adsorption isotherm. Based on data obtained from the distribution coefficients, Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models, and three-dimensional simulation, multimetal adsorption behaviors differed from monometal adsorption due to competition. Especially, during multimetal adsorption, Cd was easily exchanged and substituted by other metals. Further competitive adsorption studies are necessary in order to accurately estimate the heavy metal adsorption capacity of biochar in natural environments. PMID:26082184

  14. Distributed SUSY breaking: dark energy, Newton's law and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; van Nierop, L.; Williams, M.

    2014-07-01

    We identify the underlying symmetry mechanism that suppresses the low-energy effective 4D cosmological constant within some 6D supergravity models, generically leading to results suppressed by powers of the KK scale, m {/K K 2}, relative to the much larger size, m 4, associated with mass- m particles localized in these models on codimension-2 branes. These models are examples for which the local conditions for unbroken supersymmetry can be satisfied locally everywhere within the extra dimensions, but are obstructed only by global conditions like flux quantization or by the mutual inconsistency of the boundary conditions required at the various branes. Consequently quantities (like vacuum energies) forbidden by supersymmetry cannot become nonzero until wavelengths of order the KK scale are integrated out, since only such long wavelength modes can see the entire space and so `know' that supersymmetry has broken. We verify these arguments by extending earlier rugby-ball calculations of one-loop vacuum energies within these models to more general pairs of branes within two warped extra dimensions. For the Standard Model confined to one of two otherwise identical branes, the predicted effective 4D vacuum energy density is of order ρ vac ⋍ C( mM g /4 πM p )4 = C(5 .6 × 10-5 eV)4, where M g ≳ 10 TeV (corresponding to extra-dimensional size r ≲ 1 μm) and M p = 2 .44 × 1018 GeV are the 6D and 4D rationalized Planck scales, and m is the heaviest brane-localized particle. (For numerical purposes we take m to be the top-quark mass and take M g as small as possible, consistent with energy-loss bounds from supernovae.) C is a constant depending on the details of the bulk spectrum, which could easily be of order 500 for each of hundreds of fields in the bulk. The value C ˜ 6 × 106 would give the observed Dark Energy density.

  15. Effects of energy distribution of interface traps on recombination dc current-voltage line shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zuhui; Jie, Bin B.; Sah, Chih-Tang

    2006-12-01

    The effects of energy distributions of Si /SiO2 interface traps in the energy gap of oxidized silicon on the current versus voltage line shape of the electron-hole recombination current are analyzed using the steady-state Shockley-Read-Hall kinetics. Slater's [Insulators, Semiconductors and Metals; Quantum Theory of Molecules and Solids (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1967)] localized bulk perturbation theory applied by us to the interface anticipates U-shaped energy distributions of the density of neutral electron and hole interface traps from random variations of the Si:Si and Si:O bond angles and lengths. Conservation in dissipative transition energy anticipates the rate of electron capture into neutral electron trap to be faster for electron trap energy levels nearer the conduction band edge, and similarly, the rate of hole capture into neutral hole trap to be faster for hole trap energy levels nearer the valence band edge. Line shape broadening is analyzed for discrete and U-shaped energy distributions of interface trap energy levels. The broadened line shapes observed in past experiments, previously attributed to spatial variations of surface dopant impurity concentrations, could also arise from energy distributions of interface trap energy levels.

  16. FEL and Optical Klystron Gain for an Electron Beam with Oscillatory Energy Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    If the energy spread of a beam is larger then the Pierce parameter, the FEL gain length increases dramatically and the FEL output gets suppressed. We show that if the energy distribution of such a beam is made oscillatory on a small scale, the gain length can be considerably decreased. Such an oscillatory energy distribution is generated by first modulating the beam energy with a laser via the mechanism of inverse FEL, and then sending it through a strong chicane. We show that this approach also works for the optical klystron enhancement scheme. Our analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  17. Electron energy distributions in uranium helium mixtures. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makowski, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    The high energy portion of the electron energy distribution for mixtures of uranium and helium at 1 atm, 5000 K, and a neutron flux of 2x10 to the 12th power/sq cm-sec have been calculated. The addition of He improves the heat transport characteristics of the plasma and has the feature that the He energy levels lie in the high energy portion of the electron distribution, potentially allowing non maxwellian excitation. It is concluded, however, that the resulting reaction rates are marginal relative to achieving inversion in He.

  18. Measurement of the B hadron energy distribution in Z0 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N. J.; Ash, W. W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barakat, M. B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T. L.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolen, B.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chou, A.; Church, E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyne, D. G.; Crawford, G.; D'Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C. J.; Daoudi, M.; de Groot, N.; de Sangro, R.; dell'Orso, R.; Dervan, P. J.; Dima, M.; Dong, D. N.; Du, P. Y.; Dubois, R.; Einsenstein, B. I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Fahey, S.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fernandez, J. P.; Fero, M. J.; Frey, R.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hart, E. L.; Harton, J. L.; Hasan, A.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasuko, K.; Hedges, S. J.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J. A.; Jiang, Z. Y.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H. J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H. W.; Kim, Y. D.; King, M. E.; King, R.; Kofler, R. R.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Labs, J. F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J. A.; Leith, D. W.; Lia, V.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Moore, T. B.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Narita, S.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Oishi, N.; Onoprienko, D.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, C. H.; Park, H.; Pavel, T. J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Punkar, G. D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Reidy, J.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Rensing, P. E.; Rochester, L. S.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schumm, B. A.; Schwiening, J.; Sen, S.; Serbo, V. V.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Sherden, D. J.; Shmakov, K. D.; Simopoulos, C.; Sinev, N. B.; Smith, S. R.; Smy, M. B.; Snyder, J. A.; Staengle, H.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Steiner, R.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Takahashi, T.; Taylor, F. E.; Torrence, E.; Trandafir, A. I.; Turk, J. D.; Usher, T.; Va'Vra, J.; Vannini, C.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Wagner, S. R.; Waite, A. P.; Watts, S. J.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yang, X.; Yashima, J.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zhou, J.

    1997-11-01

    We have measured the B hadron energy distribution in Z0 decays using a sample of semileptonic B decays recorded in the SLD experiment at SLAC. The energy of each tagged B hadron was reconstructed using information from the lepton and a partially reconstructed charm-decay vertex. We compared the scaled energy distribution with several models of heavy quark fragmentation. The average scaled energy of primary B hadrons was found to be =0.716+/-0.011(stat)+0.021-0.022(syst).

  19. An Application of the Market-Oriented Programming to Energy Trading Decision Method in Distributed Energy Management Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakire, Koji; Miyamoto, Toshiyuki; Kumagai, Sadatoshi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Takaya

    A control of CO2 emissions which is the main factor of global warming is one of the most important problems in the 21st century about preservation of earth environment. Therefore, efficient supply and use of energy are indispensable. We have proposed distributed energy management systems (DEMSs), where we are to obtain optimal plans that minimize both of costs and CO2 emissions through electrical and thermal energy trading. A DEMS consists of the plural entities that seek their own economic profits. In this paper, we propose a trading method that gives competitive equilibrium resource distribution by applying the market-oriented programming (MOP) to DEMSs.

  20. Energy dependence of mass, charge, isotopic, and energy distributions in neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasca, H.; Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kim, Y.

    2016-05-01

    The mass, charge, isotopic, and kinetic-energy distributions of fission fragments are studied within an improved scission-point statistical model in the reactions 235U+n and 239Pu+n at different energies of the incident neutron. The charge and mass distributions of the electromagnetic- and neutron-induced fission of 214,218Ra, 230,232,238U are also shown. The available experimental data are well reproduced and the energy-dependencies of the observable characteristics of fission are predicted for future experiments.

  1. 5 to 160 keV continuous-wave x-ray spectral energy distribution and energy flux density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tallon, R.W.; Koller, D.C.; Pelzl, R.M.; Pugh, R.D.; Bellem, R.D. . Microelectronics and Photonics Research Branch)

    1994-12-01

    In 1991, the USAF Phillips Laboratory Microelectronics and Photonics Research Branch installed a low energy x-ray facility (LEXR) for use in microelectronics radiation-effects analysis and research. Techniques developed for measuring the x-ray spectral energy distribution (differential intensity) from a tungsten-target bremsstrahlung x-ray source are reported. Spectra with end-point energies ranging from 20 to 160 keV were recorded. A separate effort to calibrate the dosimetry for the Phillips Laboratory low-energy x-ray facility established a need to know the spectral energy distributions at some point within the facility (previous calibration efforts had relies on spectra obtained from computer simulations). It was discovered that the primary discrepancy between the simulated and measured spectra was in the L- K-line data. The associated intensity (energy flux density) of the measured distributions was found to be up to 30% higher. Based on the measured distributions, predicted device responses were within 10% of the measured response as compared to about 30% accuracy obtained with simulated distributions.

  2. ARSENIC TREATMENT BY ADSORPTIVE TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the removal of arsenic from drinking water using the adsorptive media treatment process. Fundamental information is provided on the design and operation of adsorptive media technology including the selection of the adsorptive media. The information cites...

  3. Evaluation of the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero coverage for hydrogen on activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnke, E.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Olsen, R.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Activated carbons made from corn cob show promise as materials for high-capacity hydrogen storage. As part of our characterization of these materials, we are interested in learning how different production methods affect the adsorption energies. In this talk, we will show how hydrogen adsorption isotherms may be used to calculate these adsorption energies at zero coverage using Henry's law. We will additionally discuss differences between the binding energy and the isosteric heat of adsorption by applying this analysis at different temperatures.

  4. Photofragment energy distributions and dissociation pathways in dimethyl sulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Thorson, G.M.; Cheatum, C.M.; Coffey, M.J.; Fleming Crim, F.

    1999-06-01

    Photolysis of dimethyl sulfoxide in a molecular beam with 210 and 222 nm photons reveals the decomposition mechanism and energy disposal in the products. Using vacuum ultraviolet light and a time-of-flight spectrometer, we identify CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}SO as primary fragments and CH{sub 3} and SO as secondary fragments. From CH{sub 3} quantum yield measurements, we find that secondary decomposition is minor for 222 nm photolysis, occurring in only about 10{percent} of the fragments, but it increases to about 30{percent} in the 210 nm photolysis. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements on the B{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup {minus}}{l_arrow}X{sup 3}{Sigma}{sup {minus}} transition of SO in the 235 to 280 nm region determine the internal energy of that photoproduct. We compare our results to a simple statistical model that captures the essential features of the decomposition, predicting both the extent of secondary decomposition and the recoil energy of the primary and secondary methyl fragments. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Theoretical modeling for neutron elastic scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko

    2010-12-07

    One of the major issues of neutron scattering modeling in the fast energy range is the contribution of compound elastic and inelastic scattering to the total scattering process. The compound component may become large at very low energies where the angular distribution becomes 90-degree symmetric in the center-of-mass system. Together with the shape elastic component, the elastic scattering gives slightly forward-peaked angular distributions in the fast energy range. This anisotropic angular distribution gives high sensitivities to many important nuclear reactor characteristics, such as criticality and neutron shielding. In this talk we describe how the anisotropic angular distributions are calculated within the statistical model framework, including the case where strongly coupled channels exist, by combining the coupled-channels theory with the Hauser-Feshbach model. This unique capability extension will have significant advantages in understanding the neutron scattering process for deformed nuclei, like uranium or plutonium, on which advanced nuclear energy applications center.

  6. The Energy Distribution of a Noncommutative Reissner—Nordström Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourosh, Nozari; Yazdani, A.

    2013-09-01

    We study the energy distribution of a noncommutative Reissner—Nordström black hole. We consider both Einstein and Møller prescriptions, and compare our results with the corresponding results obtained recently for a Schwarzschild black hole.

  7. Energy Efficiency of Distributed Signal Processing in Wireless Networks: A Cross-Layer Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Giovanni; Wildemeersch, Matthias; Quek, Tony Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In order to meet the growing mobile data demand, future wireless networks will be equipped with a multitude of access points (APs). Besides the important implications for the energy consumption, the trend towards densification requires the development of decentralized and sustainable radio resource management techniques. It is critically important to understand how the distribution of signal processing operations affects the energy efficiency of wireless networks. In this paper, we provide a cross-layer framework to evaluate and compare the energy efficiency of wireless networks under different levels of distribution of the signal processing load: (i) hybrid, where the signal processing operations are shared between nodes and APs, (ii) centralized, where signal processing is entirely implemented at the APs, and (iii) fully distributed, where all operations are performed by the nodes. We find that in practical wireless networks, hybrid signal processing exhibits a significant energy efficiency gain over both centralized and fully distributed approaches.

  8. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  9. Unfolding the fission prompt gamma-ray energy and multiplicity distribution measured by DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J; Laptev, A

    2010-10-16

    The nearly energy independence of the {gamma}-ray efficiency and multiplicity response for the DANCE array, the unusual characteristic elucidated in our early technical report (LLNL-TR-452298), gives one a unique opportunity to derive the true prompt {gamma}-ray energy and multiplicity distribution in fission from the measurement. This unfolding procedure for the experimental data will be described in details and examples will be given to demonstrate the feasibility of reconstruction of the true distribution.

  10. Ultrahigh energy neutrino-nucleon scattering and parton distributions at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Ernest M.; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2006-05-01

    The cross section for ultrahigh energy neutrino-nucleon scattering is very sensitive to the parton distributions at very small values of Bjorken x (x{<=}10{sup -4}). We numerically investigate the effects of modifying the behavior of the gluon distribution function at very small x in the DGLAP evolution equation. We then use the Color Glass Condensate formalism to calculate the neutrino-nucleon cross section at ultrahigh energies and compare the result with those based on modification of DGLAP evolution equation.

  11. Adsorption mechanism in RPLC. Effect of the nature of the organic modifier

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-07-01

    The adsorption isotherms of phenol and caffeine were acquired by frontal analysis on two different adsorbents, Kromasil-C{sub 18} and Discovery-C{sub 18}, with two different mobile phases, aqueous solutions of methanol (MeOH/H{sub 2}O = 40/60 and 30/70, v/v) and aqueous solutions of acetonitrile (MeCN/H{sub 2}O = 30/70 and 20/80, v/v). The adsorption isotherms are always strictly convex upward in methanol/water solutions. The calculations of the adsorption energy distribution confirm that the adsorption data for phenol are best modeled with the bi-Langmuir and the tri-Langmuir isotherm models for Kromasil-C{sub 18} and Discovery-C{sub 18}, respectively. Because its molecule is larger and excluded from the deepest sites buried in the bonded layer, the adsorption data of caffeine follow bi-Langmuir isotherm model behavior on both adsorbents. In contrast, with acetonitrile/water solutions, the adsorption data of both phenol and caffeine deviate far less from linear behavior. They were best modeled by the sum of a Langmuir and a BET isotherm models. The Langmuir term represents the adsorption of the analyte on the high-energy sites located within the C{sub 18} layers and the BET term its adsorption on the low-energy sites and its accumulation in an adsorbed multilayer system of acetonitrile on the bonded alkyl chains. The formation of a complex adsorbed phase containing up to four layers of acetonitrile (with a thickness of 3.4 {angstrom} each) was confirmed by the excess adsorption isotherm data measured for acetonitrile on Discovery-C{sub 18}. A simple interpretation of this change in the isotherm curvature at high concentrations when methanol is replaced with acetonitrile as the organic modifier is proposed, based on the structure of the interface between the C{sub 18} chains and the bulk mobile phase. This new model accounts for all the experimental observations.

  12. New algorithms for the Vavilov distribution calculation and the corresponding energy loss sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, O. |

    1998-10-01

    Two new algorithms for the fast calculation of the Vavilov distribution within the interval 0.01 {le} {kappa} {le} 10, where neither the Gaussian approximation nor the Landau distribution may be used, are presented. These algorithms are particularly convenient for the sampling of the corresponding random energy loss. A comparison with the exact Vavilov distribution for the case of protons traversing Al slabs is given.

  13. A method for the assessment of specific energy distribution in a model tumor system

    SciTech Connect

    Noska, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    Due to the short range of alpha particles in tissue, the calculation of dose from internally deposited alpha emitters requires a detailed analysis of the microscopic distribution of the radionuclide in order to determine the spatial distribution of energy emission events and, from this, the spatial distribution of dose. In the present study, the authors used quantitative autoradiography (QAR) to assess the microdistribution of a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MAb) fragment in human glioma xenografts in mice.

  14. Cross Section Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Including Secondary Neutron Energy and Angular Distributions.

    1991-03-12

    Version 00 SUSD calculates sensitivity coefficients for one- and two-dimensional transport problems. Variance and standard deviation of detector responses or design parameters can be obtained using cross-section covariance matrices. In neutron transport problems, this code can perform sensitivity-uncertainty analysis for secondary angular distribution (SAD) or secondary energy distribution (SED).

  15. Electron energy distribution in a helium plasma created by nuclear radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.; Miley, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    An integral balance technique for calculation of the electron energy distribution in a radiation-induced plasma is described. Results predict W-values reasonably well and compare favorably with more complicated Monte-Carlo calculations. The distribution found differs from that in a normal electrical discharge and is of interest in radiation-pumped laser research.

  16. Extrapolation of multiplicity distribution in p+p(\\bar{p}) collisions to LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Ajay Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2010-02-01

    The multiplicity (Nch) and pseudorapidity distribution (dNch/dη) of primary charged particles in p + p collisions at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies of \\sqrt{s} = 10 and 14 TeV are obtained from extrapolation of existing measurements at lower \\sqrt{s}. These distributions are then compared to calculations from PYTHIA and PHOJET models. The existing \\sqrt{s} measurements are unable to distinguish between a logarithmic and power law dependence of the average charged particle multiplicity (langNchrang) on \\sqrt{s}, and their extrapolation to energies accessible at LHC give very different values. Assuming a reasonably good description of inclusive charged particle multiplicity distributions by negative binomial distribution (NBD) at lower \\sqrt{s} to hold for LHC energies, we observe that the logarithmic \\sqrt{s} dependences of langNchrang are favored by the models at midrapidity. The dNch/dη versus η distributions for the existing measurements are found to be reasonably well described by a function with three parameters which accounts for the basic features of the distribution, height at midrapidity, central rapidity plateau and the higher rapidity fall-off. Extrapolation of these parameters as a function of \\sqrt{s} is used to predict the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles at LHC energies. dNch/dη calculations from PYTHIA and PHOJET models are found to be lower compared to those obtained from the extrapolated dNch/dη versus η distributions for a broad η range.

  17. Effects of the Electron Energy Distribution Function on Modeled X-ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyaptseva, A S; Hansen, S B

    2004-02-19

    This paper presents the results of a broad investigation into the effects of the electron energy distribution function on the predictions of non-LTE collisional-radiative atomic kinetics models. The effects of non-Maxwellian and suprathermal (''hot'') electron distributions on collisional rates (including three-body recombination) are studied. It is shown that most collisional rates are fairly insensitive to the functional form and characteristic energy of the electron distribution function as long as the characteristic energy is larger than the threshold energy for the collisional process. Collisional excitation and ionization rates, however, are highly sensitive to the fraction of hot electrons. This permits the development of robust spectroscopic diagnostics that can be used to characterize the electron density, bulk electron temperature, and hot electron fraction of plasmas with non-equilibrium electron distribution functions (EDFs). Hot electrons are shown to increase and spread out plasma charge state distributions, amplify the intensities of emission lines fed by direct collisional excitation and radiative cascades, and alter the structure of satellite features in both K- and L-shell spectra. The characteristic energy, functional form, and spatial properties of hot electron distributions in plasmas are open to characterization through their effects on high-energy continuum and line emission and on the polarization of spectral lines.

  18. Nanoporous chalcogenides for adsorption and gas separation.

    PubMed

    Ori, Guido; Massobrio, Carlo; Pradel, Annie; Ribes, Michel; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-21

    The adsorption and gas separation properties of amorphous porous chalcogenides such as GeS2 are investigated using statistical mechanics molecular simulation. Using a realistic molecular model of such amorphous adsorbents, we show that they can be used efficiently to separate different gases relevant to environmental and energy applications (H2, CO2, CH4, N2). In addition to shedding light on the microscopic adsorption mechanisms, we show that coadsorption in this novel class of porous materials can be described using the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST). Such a simple thermodynamic model, which allows avoiding complex coadsorption measurements, describes the adsorption of mixture from pure component adsorption isotherms. Our results, which are found to be in good agreement with available experimental data, paves the way for the design of gas separation membranes using the large family of porous chalcogenides. PMID:27126718

  19. The Integration of Renewable Energy Sources into Electric Power Distribution Systems, Vol. II Utility Case Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Zaininger, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: the local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics, renewable energy source penetration level, whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied, and local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kW-scale applications may be connected to three+phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and y-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms, or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. In any case, the installation of small, distributed renewable energy sources is expected to have a significant impact on local utility distribution primary and secondary system economics. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications. The

  20. Quantitative analysis of the energy distributions of electrons backscattered elastically from polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; Varga, D.; Berényi, Z.

    2015-07-01

    We present results of theoretical and experimental studies of the spectra of electrons backscattered elastically from polyethylene in the primary energy range between 1 and 5 keV. The experiments were performed using a high energy resolution electron spectroscopy. The theoretical interpretation is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the recoil and Doppler effects. The separation between the carbon and hydrogen peak in the energy distributions is shown as a function of the primary electron energy. The simulations give many partial distributions separately, depending on the number of elastic scatterings (single, and multiple scatterings of different types). We show our results for intensity ratios, peak shifts and broadenings. We also present detailed analytical calculations for the main parameters of a single scattering. Finally, we present a qualitative comparison with the experimental data. We find our resulting energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons to be in good agreement with our measurements.

  1. The adsorption mechanism of nortryptiline on C18-bonded discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-08-01

    The adsorption isotherms of an ionizable compound, nortriptyline, were accurately measured by frontal analysis (FA) on a C{sub 18}-Discovery column, first without buffer (in an aqueous solution of acetonitrile at 15%, v/v of ACN), then with a buffer (in 28%, v/v ACN solution). The buffers were aqueous solutions containing 20 mM of formic acid or a phosphate buffer at pH 2.70. The linear range of the isotherm could not be reached with the non-buffered mobile phase using a dynamic range larger than 40,000 (from 1.2 x 10{sup -3} g/L to 50 g/L). With a 20 mM buffer in the liquid phase, the isotherm is linear for concentrations of nortriptyline inferior to 10{sup -3} g/L (or 3 {micro} mol/L). The adsorption energy distribution (AED) was calculated to determine the heterogeneity of the adsorption process. AED and FA were consistent and lead to a trimodal distribution. A tri-Moreau and a tri-Langmuir isotherm models accounted the best for the adsorption of nortriptyline without and with buffer, respectively. The nature of the buffer affects significantly the middle-energy sites while the properties of the lowest and highest of the three types of energy sites are almost unchanged. The desorption profiles of nortriptyline show some anomalies in relation with the formation of a complex multilayer adsorbed phase of acetonitrile whose excess isotherm was measured by the minor disturbance method. The C{sub 18}-Discovery column has about the same total saturation capacity, around 200 g of nortriptyline per liter of adsorbent (or 116 mg/g), with or without buffer. About 98-99% of the available surface consists in low energy sites. The coexistence of these different types of sites on the surface solves the McCalley's enigma, that the column efficiency begins to drop rapidly when the analyte concentration reaches values that are almost one hundred times lower than those that could be predicted from the isotherm data acquired under the same experimental conditions. Due to the

  2. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C.

    1994-06-01

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

  3. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H-Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Janke, Svenja M; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Kandratsenka, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H-Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab. PMID:26429033

  4. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H–Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Svenja M.; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H–Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  5. Improving Power Quality in Low-Voltage Networks Containing Distributed Energy Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, Sumit; Ghosh, Arindam; Zare, Firuz

    2013-05-01

    Severe power quality problems can arise when a large number of single-phase distributed energy resources (DERs) are connected to a low-voltage power distribution system. Due to the random location and size of DERs, it may so happen that a particular phase generates excess power than its load demand. In such an event, the excess power will be fed back to the distribution substation and will eventually find its way to the transmission network, causing undesirable voltage-current unbalance. As a solution to this problem, the article proposes the use of a distribution static compensator (DSTATCOM), which regulates voltage at the point of common coupling (PCC), thereby ensuring balanced current flow from and to the distribution substation. Additionally, this device can also support the distribution network in the absence of the utility connection, making the distribution system work as a microgrid. The proposals are validated through extensive digital computer simulation studies using PSCADTM.

  6. On the Electron Energy Distribution Index of Swift Gamma-ray Burst Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, P. A.; Evans, P. A.; de Pasquale, M.; Page, M. J.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy distribution index, p, is a fundamental parameter of the synchrotron emission from a range of astronomical sources. Here we examine one such source of synchrotron emission, gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows observed by the Swift satellite. Within the framework of the blast wave model, we examine the constraints placed on the distribution of p by the observed X-ray spectral indices and parameterize the distribution. We find that the observed distribution of spectral indices are inconsistent with an underlying distribution of p composed of a single discrete value but consistent with a Gaussian distribution centered at p = 2.36 and having a width of 0.59. Furthermore, accepting that the underlying distribution is a Gaussian, we find that the majority (gsim94%) of GRB afterglows in our sample have cooling break frequencies less than the X-ray frequency.

  7. Effects of wind-energy facilities on grassland bird distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, Jill A.; Buhl, Deb

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of renewable energy to meet worldwide demand continues to grow. Wind energy is one of the fastest growing renewable sectors, but new wind facilities are often placed in prime wildlife habitat. Long-term studies that incorporate a rigorous statistical design to evaluate the effects of wind facilities on wildlife are rare. We conducted a before-after-control-impact (BACI) assessment to determine if wind facilities placed in native mixed-grass prairies displaced breeding grassland birds. During 2003–2012, we monitored changes in bird density in 3 study areas in North Dakota and South Dakota (U.S.A.). We examined whether displacement or attraction occurred 1 year after construction (immediate effect) and the average displacement or attraction 2–5 years after construction (delayed effect). We tested for these effects overall and within distance bands of 100, 200, 300, and >300 m from turbines. We observed displacement for 7 of 9 species. One species was unaffected by wind facilities and one species exhibited attraction. Displacement and attraction generally occurred within 100 m and often extended up to 300 m. In a few instances, displacement extended beyond 300 m. Displacement and attraction occurred 1 year after construction and persisted at least 5 years. Our research provides a framework for applying a BACI design to displacement studies and highlights the erroneous conclusions that can be made without the benefit of adopting such a design. More broadly, species-specific behaviors can be used to inform management decisions about turbine placement and the potential impact to individual species. Additionally, the avoidance distance metrics we estimated can facilitate future development of models evaluating impacts of wind facilities under differing land-use scenarios.

  8. 40 CFR 796.2750 - Sediment and soil adsorption isotherm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to sediments and soils is an important process that affects a chemical's distribution in the.... “Adsorption, desorption of parathion as affected by soil organic matter,” Journal of Agricultural and Food... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sediment and soil adsorption...

  9. 40 CFR 796.2750 - Sediment and soil adsorption isotherm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to sediments and soils is an important process that affects a chemical's distribution in the.... “Adsorption, desorption of parathion as affected by soil organic matter,” Journal of Agricultural and Food... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sediment and soil adsorption...

  10. 40 CFR 796.2750 - Sediment and soil adsorption isotherm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to sediments and soils is an important process that affects a chemical's distribution in the.... “Adsorption, desorption of parathion as affected by soil organic matter,” Journal of Agricultural and Food... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sediment and soil adsorption...

  11. Momentum Distribution and Ground-State Energy of Liquid 4He at the Absolute Zero Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, T.; Watanabe, Y.

    1980-11-01

    In the scheme of the density and phase operator approach, the momentum distribution nk and the ground-state energy E0 are obtained by employing the structure factor and the radial distribution function calculated by Chang and Campbell for the Morse dipole-dipole potential. The condensate fraction, the ratio of the occupation number of the single-particle zero-momentum state N0/N amounts to 0.096. The momentum distribution diverges as k-1 in the low-wave number limit. The ground-state energy becomes E0=-6.9NK at the mean density ρ0=0.02185Å-3.

  12. Power Hardware-in-the-Loop (PHIL) Testing Facility for Distributed Energy Storage (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer.J.; Lundstrom, B.; Simpson, M.; Pratt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The growing deployment of distributed, variable generation and evolving end-user load profiles presents a unique set of challenges to grid operators responsible for providing reliable and high quality electrical service. Mass deployment of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) has the potential to solve many of the associated integration issues while offering reliability and energy security benefits other solutions cannot. However, tools to develop, optimize, and validate DESS control strategies and hardware are in short supply. To fill this gap, NREL has constructed a power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) test facility that connects DESS, grid simulator, and load bank hardware to a distribution feeder simulation.

  13. A quantum chemistry study of curvature effects on boron nitride nanotubes/nanosheets for gas adsorption.

    PubMed

    Sha, Haoyan; Faller, Roland

    2016-07-20

    Quantum chemistry calculations were performed to investigate the effect of the surface curvature of a Boron Nitride (BN) nanotube/nanosheet on gas adsorption. Curved boron nitride layers with different curvatures interacting with a number of different gases including noble gases, oxygen, and water on both their convex and concave sides of the surface were studied using density functional theory (DFT) with a high level dispersion corrected functional. Potential energy surfaces of the gas molecules interacting with the selected BN surfaces were investigated. In addition, the charge distribution and electrostatic potential contour of the selected BN surfaces are discussed. The results reveal how the curvature of the BN surfaces affects gas adsorption. In particular, small curvatures lead to a slight difference in the physisorption energy, while large curvatures present distinct potential energy surfaces, especially for the short-range repulsion. PMID:27399852

  14. Adsorption of ferrous ions onto montmorillonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dawei; Niu, Xia; Qiao, Min; Liu, Gang; Li, Hongxin; Meng, Zhenxiao

    2015-04-01

    The adsorption of Fe (II) onto montmorillonites was investigated through initial concentration, contact time, pH and temperature. During the whole adsorption process, the ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) was added as a kind of antioxidant, at the same time, deionized water (after boiling) and nitrogen protection were also used to avoid oxidation. The Fe2+/Fetotal ratio of the iron exists in the Fe-montmorillonites was found more than 95%. Two kinetic models, including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model, were used to analyze the adsorption process of Fe (II) on montmorillonites. The results of our study showed that adsorption process fitted with pseudo-second-order well. Adsorption isotherms showed that Langmuir model was better than Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters ΔG0 and ΔH0 were 3.696 kJ/mol and 6.689 kJ/mol (we just gave the values at 298 K), respectively. The positive values at different temperatures showed that the adsorption process was non-spontaneous and endothermic. The characteristics of materials were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Surface area and porosity analyzer, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and Zeta potential distribution.

  15. Adsorption of Zn2+ ions onto NaA and NaX zeolites: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Nibou, D; Mekatel, H; Amokrane, S; Barkat, M; Trari, M

    2010-01-15

    The adsorption of Zn(2+) onto NaA and NaX zeolites was investigated. The samples were synthesized according to a hydrothermal crystallization using aluminium isopropoxide (Al[OCH(CH(3))(2)](3)) as a new alumina source. The effects of pH, initial concentration, solid/liquid ratio and temperature were studied in batch experiments. The Freundlich and the Langmuir models were applied and the adsorption equilibrium followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The uptake distribution coefficient (K(d)) indicated that the Zn(2+) removal was the highest at minimum concentration. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The negative values of standard enthalpy of adsorption revealed the exothermic nature of the adsorption process whereas the negative activation entropies reflected that no significant change occurs in the internal structure of the zeolites solid matrix during the sorption of Zn(2+). The negative values of Gibbs free energy were indicative of the spontaneity of the adsorption process. Analysis of the kinetic and rate data revealed that the pseudo second-order sorption mechanism is predominant and the intra particle diffusion was the determining step for the sorption of zinc ions. The obtained optimal parameters have been applied to wastewater from the industrial zone (Algeria) in order to remove the contained zinc effluents. PMID:19773115

  16. THE ROLE AND DISTRIBUTION OF WRITTEN INFORMAL COMMUNICATION IN THEORETICAL HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LIBBEY, MILES A.; ZALTMAN, GERALD

    THIS STUDY OF "PREPRINT" DISTRIBUTION IN THEORECTICAL HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS USED A QUESTIONNAIRE CIRCULATED TO ALL KNOWN HIGH ENERGY THEORISTS. A SECOND QUESTIONNAIRE WAS SENT TO A REPRESENTATIVE SAMPLE OF "PREPRINT LIBRARIANS" AT VARIOUS INSTITUTIONS IN THE U.S. AND ABROAD. BASED ON THIS DATA, THE STUDY CONCLUDED THAT AN EXPERIMENT WITH CENTRALIZED…

  17. Laser-produced relativistic electron energy and angular distributions in thin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Rastunkov, V.S.; Krainov, V.P.

    2006-02-15

    Energy and angular distributions are obtained for electrons at the rear surface of thin foils irradiated by an oblique relativistic laser pulse. Vacuum heating at the front surface in the summary field of incident and reflected laser waves is considered as a main mechanism of electron heating up to relativistic ponderomotive energies.

  18. Suprathermal plasma analyzer for the measurement of low-energy electron distribution in the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, M.; Yau, A. W.; Oyama, K.-I.; Abe, T.

    2011-07-15

    It is commonly believed that an energy transfer from thermal to suprathermal electrons (energy budget of the ionosphere. However, observation of electron energy spectrum in this energy range is quite limited because of technical difficulties of measurement. We have developed an instrument to measure electron energy distribution from thermal to suprathermal energy continuously with high-energy resolution of about 0.15 eV. The measurement principle is based on the combination of a retarding potential analyzer with a channel electron multiplier (CEM) and the Druyvesteyn method, which derives energy distribution from the current-voltage characteristics. The capability of detecting plasma space potential enables absolute calibration of electron energy. The instrument with a small vacuum pump, which is required for the CEM to work in low-vacuum region, was first successfully tested by a sounding rocket S-310-37 in the ionospheric E region. The instrument is expected to provide new opportunities to measure energy distribution of thermal and non-thermal electrons in low-density plasma, where a Langmuir probe cannot measure electron temperature because of low plasma density.

  19. Suprathermal plasma analyzer for the measurement of low-energy electron distribution in the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, M; Oyama, K-I; Abe, T; Yau, A W

    2011-07-01

    It is commonly believed that an energy transfer from thermal to suprathermal electrons (energy budget of the ionosphere. However, observation of electron energy spectrum in this energy range is quite limited because of technical difficulties of measurement. We have developed an instrument to measure electron energy distribution from thermal to suprathermal energy continuously with high-energy resolution of about 0.15 eV. The measurement principle is based on the combination of a retarding potential analyzer with a channel electron multiplier (CEM) and the Druyvesteyn method, which derives energy distribution from the current-voltage characteristics. The capability of detecting plasma space potential enables absolute calibration of electron energy. The instrument with a small vacuum pump, which is required for the CEM to work in low-vacuum region, was first successfully tested by a sounding rocket S-310-37 in the ionospheric E region. The instrument is expected to provide new opportunities to measure energy distribution of thermal and non-thermal electrons in low-density plasma, where a Langmuir probe cannot measure electron temperature because of low plasma density. PMID:21806205

  20. Suprathermal plasma analyzer for the measurement of low-energy electron distribution in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoyama, M.; Oyama, K.-I.; Abe, T.; Yau, A. W.

    2011-07-01

    It is commonly believed that an energy transfer from thermal to suprathermal electrons (energy budget of the ionosphere. However, observation of electron energy spectrum in this energy range is quite limited because of technical difficulties of measurement. We have developed an instrument to measure electron energy distribution from thermal to suprathermal energy continuously with high-energy resolution of about 0.15 eV. The measurement principle is based on the combination of a retarding potential analyzer with a channel electron multiplier (CEM) and the Druyvesteyn method, which derives energy distribution from the current-voltage characteristics. The capability of detecting plasma space potential enables absolute calibration of electron energy. The instrument with a small vacuum pump, which is required for the CEM to work in low-vacuum region, was first successfully tested by a sounding rocket S-310-37 in the ionospheric E region. The instrument is expected to provide new opportunities to measure energy distribution of thermal and non-thermal electrons in low-density plasma, where a Langmuir probe cannot measure electron temperature because of low plasma density.

  1. The influence of the textural properties of activated carbons on acetaminophen adsorption at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Galhetas, Margarida; Andrade, Marta A; Mestre, Ana S; Kangni-foli, Ekoé; Villa de Brito, Maria J; Pinto, Moisés L; Lopes, Helena; Carvalho, Ana P

    2015-05-14

    The influence of temperature (20-40 °C) on the acetaminophen adsorption onto activated carbons with different textures was studied. Different temperature dependences, not explained by kinetic effects, were observed for carbons with different micropore size distribution patterns: adsorption capacity increased for pine gasification residues (Pi-fa) derived carbons and decreased for sisal based materials. No significant variation was seen for carbon CP. The species identified by (1)H NMR spectroscopy on the back-extraction solution proved that during the adsorption process exist the conditions required to promote the formation of acetaminophen oligomers which have constrained access to the narrow microporosity. The rotation energy of the dihedral angle between monomers (estimated by electronic DFT methods) showed that conformations in the planar form are less stable than the non-planar conformation (energy barrier of 70 and 23 kJ mol(-1)), but have critical dimensions similar to the monomer and can access most of the micropore volume. The enthalpy change of the overall process showed that the energy gain of the system (endothermic) for Pi-fa samples (≈40 kJ mol(-1)) was enough to allow a change in the dimer, or even a larger oligomer, conformation to the planar form. This will permit adsorption in the narrow micropores, thus explaining the uptake increase with temperature. Non-continuous micropore size distributions centered at pore widths close to the critical dimensions of the planar form seem to be crucial for a positive evolution of the adsorption capacity with temperature. PMID:25898008

  2. Molecular Simulations of Adsorption and Diffusion of RDX in IRMOF-1

    SciTech Connect

    Xong, Ruichang Xong; Fern, Jared T.; Keffer, David J.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Nicholson, Don M

    2009-01-01

    In order to test the feasibility of using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to pre-concentrate explosive molecules for detection, molecular simulations of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) within IRMOF-1 were performed. Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were used to generate adsorption isotherms for pure RDX, RDX in dry air, and RDX in wet air. In addition to the isotherms, the GCMC simulations provide adsorption energies and density distributions of the adsorbates within the MOF. Molecular dynamics simulations calculate diffusivities and provide a detailed understanding of the change in conformation of the RDX molecule upon adsorption. The presence of dry air has little influence on the amount of RDX that adsorbs. The presence of wet air increases the amount of RDX that adsorbs due to favorable interactions between RDX and water. We found a Henry's law constant of 21.2 mol/kg/bar for both pure RDX and RDX in dry air. The RDX adsorption sites are located (i) in big cages, (ii) near a vertex, and (iii) between benzene rings. The energy of adsorption of RDX at infinite dilution was found to be - 9.2 kcal/mol. The distributions of bond lengths, bond angles and torsion angles in RDX are uniformly slightly broader in the gas phase than in the adsorbed phase, but not markedly so. The self-diffusivity of RDX in IRMOF-1 is a strong function of temperature, with an activation energy of 6.0 kcal/mol.

  3. Energy spreading and angular distribution of a beam of electrons in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A Monte Carlo approach is used to obtain the energy spreading and angular distribution of initially monoenergetic and monodirectional beams of electron incident on a gas of molecular hydrogen. Several beams of primary electrons and the resultant secondaries are degraded in a step-by-step procedure which utilizes a detailed set of cross sections, together with reasonable approximations for the creation of secondary electrons. Particular attention is paid to the initial angular distribution of secondary electrons. An analytic function which characterizes current experimental differential cross-section data is used to provide realistic inputs into our calculations. The results for energy distribution as a function of distance and angular distribution at selected energies and distances are illustrated.

  4. Inferring the Energy Distribution of Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares from X-ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Su, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of the energy distribution of electrons accelerated in solar flares is important for constraining possible acceleration mechanisms and for understanding the relationships between flare X-ray sources, radio sources, and particles observed in space. Solar flare hard X-rays are primarily emitted from dense, thick-target regions in the lower atmosphere, but the electrons are understood to be accelerated higher in the corona. Various processes can distort the X-ray spectrum or the energy distribution of electrons before they reach the thick-target region. After briefly reviewing the processes that affect the X-ray spectrum and the electron distribution, I will describe recent results from a study of flare spectra from RHESSI to determine the importance of these processes in inferring the energy distribution of accelerated electrons.

  5. Electron energy distribution function by using probe method in electron cyclotron resonance multicharged ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakura, Sho Kurisu, Yosuke; Kimura, Daiju; Yano, Keisuke; Imai, Youta; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    We are constructing a tandem type electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (ECRIS). High-energy electrons in ECRIS plasma affect electron energy distribution and generate multicharged ion. In this study, we measure electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of low energy region (≦100 eV) in ECRIS plasma at extremely low pressures (10{sup −3}–10{sup −5} Pa) by using cylindrical Langmuir probe. From the result, it is found that the EEDF correlates with the electron density and the temperature from the conventional probe analysis. In addition, we confirm that the tail of EEDF spreads to high energy region as the pressure rises and that there are electrons with high energy in ECR multicharged ion source plasma. The effective temperature estimated from the experimentally obtained EEDF is larger than the electron temperature obtained from the conventional method.

  6. Implication of radiative forcing distribution for energy transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Radiative forcing of a homogeneous greenhouse gas can be very inhomogeneous because the forcing is dependent on other atmospheric and surface variables. In the case of doubling CO2, the mean instantaneous forcing at the top of the atmosphere is found to vary geographically and temporally from positive to negative values, with the range being more than three times the magnitude of the global mean value. The vertical temperature change across the atmospheric column (temperature lapse rate) is found to be the best single predictor for explaining forcing variation. In addition, the masking effects of clouds and water vapor also contribute to forcing inhomogeneity. A regression model that predicts forcing from geophysical variables is constructed. This model can explain more than 90% of the variance of the forcing. Applying this model to analyzing the forcing variation in the CMIP5 models, we find that inter-model discrepancy in CO2 forcing caused by model climatology leads to considerable discrepancy in their projected change in poleward energy transport.

  7. Tsallis nonextensive entropy and the multiplicity distributions in high energy leptonic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, Sandeep

    2016-06-01

    The nonextensive behavior of entropy is exploited to explain the regularity in multiplicity distributions in e+e‑ collisions at high energies. The experimental data are analyzed by using Tsallis q-statistics. We propose a new approach of applying Tsallis q-statistics, wherein the multiplicity distribution is divided into two components; two-jet and multijet components. A convoluted Tsallis distribution is fitted to the data. It is shown that this method gives the best fits which are several orders better than the conventional fit of Tsallis distribution.

  8. K-Eigenvalue sensitivities of secondary distributions of continuous-energy data

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, B. C.; Brown, F. B.

    2013-07-01

    MCNP6 has the capability to produce energy-resolved sensitivity profiles for secondary distributions (fission {Chi} and scattering laws). Computing both unconstrained and constrained profiles are possible. Verification is performed with analytic test problems and a comparison to TSUNAMI-3D, and the comparisons show MCNP6 calculates correct or consistent results. Continuous-energy calculations are performed for three fast critical experiments: Jezebel, Flattop, and copper-reflected Zeus. The sensitivities to the secondary distributions (integrated over chosen energy ranges) are of similar magnitude to those of many of the cross sections, demonstrating the possibility that integral experiments are useful for assessing the fidelity of these data as well. (authors)

  9. Spatial measurements of electron energy distribution and plasma parameters in a weakly magnetized inductive discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Do; Lee, Young-Kwang; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-02-15

    Spatial characteristics of plasma parameters such as electron temperature, plasma density, plasma potential, and electron energy distribution (EED) were studied in inductively coupled plasma with an axial dc magnetic field. With dc magnetic field, the measured EEDs in the total electron energy scale are spatially coincided except cutting of the low electron energy part indicating the conserved non-local electron kinetics in an axial direction, even though the dc magnetic field is applied. Spatial distributions of the plasma densities at axial positions have almost same trends with various magnetic field strengths. We also discuss the reduction of the ambipolar potential along the axial direction as the applied magnetic field increased.

  10. Ion energy and angular distributions in inductively driven RF discharges in chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, J.R.; Riley, M.E.; Hamilton, T.W.

    1996-03-01

    In this paper, the authors report values of ion energy distributions and ion angular distributions measured at the grounded electrode of an inductively-coupled discharge in pure chlorine gas. The inductive drive in the GEC reference cell produced high plasma densities (10{sup 11}/cm{sup 3} electron densities) and stable plasma potentials. As a result, ion energy distributions typically consisted of a single peak well separated from zero energy. Mean ion energy varied inversely with pressure, decreasing from 13 to 9 eV as the discharge pressure increased from 20 to 60 millitorr. Half-widths of the ion angular distributions in these experiments varied from 6 to 7.5 degrees, corresponding to transverse energies from 0.13 to 0.21 eV. Ion energies gradually dropped with time, probably due to the buildup of contaminants on the chamber walls. Cell temperature also was an important variable, with ion fluxes to the lower electrode increasing and the ion angular distribution narrowing as the cell temperature increased. Plasmas discharges are widely used to etch semiconductors, oxides and metals in the fabrication of integrated circuits.

  11. An Evaluation of Trading Methods for a Distributed Energy Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakire, Koji; Miyamoto, Toshiyuki; Kumagai, Sadatoshi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Takaya

    Control of CO2 emissions which is the main factor of global warming is one of the most important problems in the 21st century about preservation of earth environment. Therefore, efficient supply and use of energy are indispensable. We have proposed distributed energy management systems (DEMSs), where we are to obtain optimal plans that minimize both of costs and of CO2 emissions through electrical and thermal energy trading. In this paper, we evaluate trading methods for the DEMSs by computational experiments.

  12. Angular distribution, kinetic energy distributions, and excitation functions of fast metastable oxygen fragments following electron impact of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.; Faris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact was studied using the methods of translational spectroscopy and angular distribution analysis. Earlier time of flight studies revealed two overlapping spectra, the slower of which was attributed to metastable CO(a3 pi) fragments. The fast peak is the focus of this study. Threshold energy, angular distribution, and improve time of flight measurements indicate that the fast peak actually consists of five overlapping features. The slowest of the five features is found to consist of metastable 0(5S) produced by predissociation of a sigma u + state of CO2 into 0(5S) + CO(a3 pi). Oxygen Rydberg fragments originating directly from a different sigma u + state are believed to make up the next fastest feature. Mechanisms for producing the three remaining features are discussed.

  13. Dipole-strength distributions up to the particle-separation energies and photodissociation of Mo isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwengner, R.; Benouaret, N.; Beyer, R.; Dönau, F.; Erhard, M.; Frauendorf, S.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Klug, J.; Kosev, K.; Nair, C.; Nankov, N.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K. D.; Wagner, A.

    2007-05-01

    Dipole-strength distributions in the nuclides 92Mo, 98Mo and 100Mo have been investigated in photon-scattering experiments with bremsstrahlung at the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Rossendorf. A simulation of γ cascades was performed in order to estimate the distribution of inelastic transitions to low-lying states and thus to deduce the primary dipole-strength distribution up to the neutron-separation energies. The absorption cross sections obtained connect smoothly to ( γ, n) cross sections and give novel information about the low-energy tail of the Giant Dipole Resonance below the neutron-separation energies. The experimental cross sections are compared with predictions of a Quasiparticle-Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA) in a deformed basis. Photoactivation experiments were performed at various electron energies to study the 92Mo( γ, n), 92Mo( γ, p), 92Mo( γ, α) and 100Mo( γ, n) reactions. The deduced activation yields are compared with theoretical predictions.

  14. Efficient first-principles calculation of the quantum kinetic energy and momentum distribution of nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E

    2012-09-01

    Light nuclei at room temperature and below exhibit a kinetic energy which significantly deviates from the predictions of classical statistical mechanics. This quantum kinetic energy is responsible for a wide variety of isotope effects of interest in fields ranging from chemistry to climatology. It also furnishes the second moment of the nuclear momentum distribution, which contains subtle information about the chemical environment and has recently become accessible to deep inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Here, we show how, by combining imaginary time path integral dynamics with a carefully designed generalized Langevin equation, it is possible to dramatically reduce the expense of computing the quantum kinetic energy. We also introduce a transient anisotropic Gaussian approximation to the nuclear momentum distribution which can be calculated with negligible additional effort. As an example, we evaluate the structural properties, the quantum kinetic energy, and the nuclear momentum distribution for a first-principles simulation of liquid water. PMID:23005275

  15. Two Instruments for Measuring Distributions of Low-Energy Charged Particles in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bader, Michel; Fryer, Thomas B.; Witteborn, Fred C.

    1961-01-01

    Current estimates indicate that the bulk of interplanetary gas consists of protons with energies between 0 and 20 kev and concentrations of 1 to 105 particles/cu cm. Methods and instrumentation for measuring the energy and density distribution of such a gas are considered from the standpoint of suitability for space vehicle payloads. It is concluded that electrostatic analysis of the energy distribution can provide sufficient information in initial experiments. Both magnetic and electrostatic analyzers should eventually be used. Several instruments designed and constructed at the Ames Research Center for space plasma measurements, and the methods of calibration and data reduction are described. In particular, the instrument designed for operation on solar cell power has the following characteristics: weight, 1.1 pounds; size, 2 by 3 by 4 inches; and power consumption, 145 mw. The instrument is designed to yield information on the concentration, energy distribution, and the anisotropy of ion trajectories in the 0.2 to 20 kev range.

  16. An APL program for the distribution of energy deposition by charged particles passing through thin absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    An APL program which numerically evaluates the probability density function (PDF) for the energy deposited in a thin absorber by a charged particle is proposed, with application to the construction, pointing, and control of spacecraft. With this program, the PDF of the restricted energy loss distribution of Watts (1973) is derived, and Vavilov's (1957) distribution is obtained by proper parameter selection. The method is demonstrated with the example of the effect of charged particle induced radiation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) pointing accuracy. A Monte Carlo study simulates the photon noise caused by charged particles passing through the photomultiplier tube window, and the stochastic variation of energy loss is introduced into the simulation by generating random energy losses from a power law distribution. The program eliminates annoying loop procedures, and model parameter sensitivity can be studied using the graphical output.

  17. Visual discomfort and the spatial distribution of Fourier energy.

    PubMed

    Penacchio, Olivier; Wilkins, Arnold J

    2015-03-01

    Quite independently of what they represent, some images provoke discomfort, and even headaches and seizures in susceptible individuals. The visual system has adapted to efficiently process the images it typically experiences, and in nature these images are usually scale-invariant. In this work, we sought to characterize the images responsible for discomfort in terms of their adherence to low-level statistical properties typically seen in natural scenes. It has been conventional to measure scale invariance in terms of the one-dimensional Fourier amplitude spectrum, by averaging amplitude over orientations in the Fourier domain. However, this loses information on the evenness with which information at various orientations is represented. We therefore fitted a two-dimensional surface (regular circular cone 1/f in logarithmic coordinates) to the two-dimensional amplitude spectrum. The extent to which the cone fitted the spectrum explained an average of 18% of the variance in judgments of discomfort from images including rural and urban scenes, works of non-representational art, images of buildings and animals, and images generated from randomly disposed discs of varying contrast and size. Weighting the spectrum prior to fitting the surface to allow for the spatial frequency tuning of contrast sensitivity explained an average of 27% of the variance. Adjusting the shape of the cone to take account of the generally greater energy in horizontal and vertical orientations improved the fit, but only slightly. Taken together, our findings show that a simple measure based on first principles of efficient coding and human visual sensitivity explained more variance than previously published algorithms. The algorithm has a low computational cost and we show that it can identify the images involved in cases that have reached the media because of complaints. We offer the algorithm as a tool for designers rather than as a simulation of the biological processes involved. PMID:25576380

  18. Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources at Detroit Edison

    SciTech Connect

    Haukur Asgeirsson; Richard Seguin

    2004-01-31

    The project objective was to create the communication and control system, the process and the economic procedures that will allow owners (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) connected in parallel to the electric distribution to have their resources operated in a manner that protects the electric utility distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) (a power flow and short circuit modeling tool) was modified to calculate the real-time characteristics of the distribution network based on the real-time electric distribution network information and provide DER operating suggestions to the Detroit Edison system operators so that regional electric stability is maintained. Part of the suggestion algorithm takes into account the operational availability of DER’s, which is known by the Energy Aggregator, DTE Energy Technologies. The availability information will be exchanged from DTE Energy Technologies to Detroit Edison. For the calculated suggestions to be used by the Detroit Edison operators, procedures were developed to allow an operator to operate a DER by requesting operation of the DER through DTE Energy Technologies. Prior to issuing control of a DER, the safety of the distribution network and personnel needs to be taken into account. This information will be exchanged from Detroit Edison to DTE Energy Technologies. Once it is safe to control the DER, DTE Energy Technologies will issue the control signal. The real-time monitoring of the DECo system will reflect the DER control. Multi-vendor DER technologies’ representing approximately 4 MW of capacity was monitored and controlled using a web-based communication path. The DER technologies included are a photovoltaic system, energy storage, fuel cells and natural gas/diesel internal combustion engine generators. This report documents Phase I result for the Detroit Edison

  19. Accumulated distribution of material gain at dislocation crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakin, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    A model for slowing down the tangential growth rate of an elementary step at dislocation crystal growth is proposed based on the exponential law of impurity particle distribution over adsorption energy. It is established that the statistical distribution of material gain on structurally equivalent faces obeys the Erlang law. The Erlang distribution is proposed to be used to calculate the occurrence rates of morphological combinatorial types of polyhedra, presenting real simple crystallographic forms.

  20. Deriving star formation histories from photometry using energy balance spectral energy distribution modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Daniel J. B.; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2015-10-01

    Panchromatic spectral energy distribution fitting is a critical tool for determining the physical properties of distant galaxies, such as their stellar mass and star formation rate. One widely used method is the publicly available MAGPHYS code. We build on our previous analysis by presenting some modifications which enable MAGPHYS to automatically estimate galaxy star formation histories (SFHs), including uncertainties, based on ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry. We use state-of-the art synthetic photometry derived by performing three-dimensional dust radiative transfer on hydrodynamic simulations of isolated disc and merging galaxies to test how well the modified MAGPHYS is able to recover SFHs under idealized conditions, where the true SFH is known. We find that while the SFH of the model with the best fit to the synthetic photometry is a poor representation of the true SFH (showing large variations with the line of sight to the galaxy and spurious bursts of star formation), median-likelihood SFHs generated by marginalizing over the default MAGPHYS libraries produce robust estimates of the smoothly varying isolated disc simulation SFHs. This preference for the median-likelihood SFH is quantitatively underlined by our estimates of χ ^2_SFH (analogous to the χ2 goodness-of-fit estimator) and Δ M / M (the integrated absolute mass discrepancy between the model and true SFH) that strongly prefer the median-likelihood SFHs over those that best fit the UV-to-far-IR photometry. In contrast, we are unable to derive a good estimate of the SFH for the merger simulations (either best fit or median likelihood) despite being able to obtain a reasonable fit to the simulated photometry, likely because the analytic SFHs with bursts superposed in the standard MAGPHYS library are insufficiently general/realistic.

  1. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  2. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  3. Ion energy and angular distributions in inductively coupled Argon RF discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, J.R.; Riley, M.E.; Meister, D.C.

    1996-03-01

    We report measurements of the energies and angular distributions of positive ions in an inductively coupled argon plasma in a GEC reference cell. Use of two separate ion detectors allowed measurement of ion energies and fluxes as a function of position as well as ion angular distributions on the discharge centerline. The inductive drive on our system produced high plasma densities (up to 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3} electron densities) and relatively stable plasma potentials. As a result, ion energy distributions typically consisted of a single feature well separated from zero energy. Mean ion energy was independent of rf power and varied inversely with pressure, decreasing from 29 eV to 12 eV as pressure increased form 2.4 m Torr to 50 mTorr. Half-widths of the ion angular distributions in these experiments varied from 5 degrees to 12.5 degrees, or equivalently, transverse temperatures varied form 0.2 to 0.5 eV with the distributions broadening as either pressure or RF power were increased.

  4. Beam energy distribution influences on density modulation efficiency in seeded free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanglei; Zhang, Weiqing; Wu, Guorong; Dai, Dongxu; Yang, Xueming; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Meng; Deng, Haixiao; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2015-06-01

    The beam energy spread at the entrance of an undulator system is of paramount importance for efficient density modulation in high-gain seeded free-electron lasers (FELs). In this paper, the dependences of high harmonic bunching efficiency in high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) and phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation (PEHG) schemes on the electron beam energy spread distribution are studied. Theoretical investigations and multidimensional numerical simulations are applied to the cases of uniform and saddle beam energy distributions and compared to a traditional Gaussian distribution. It shows that the uniform and saddle electron energy distributions significantly enhance the bunching performance of HGHG FELs, while they almost have no influence on EEHG and PEHG schemes. A further start-to-end simulation example demonstrated that, with the saddle distribution of sliced beam energy spread controlled by a laser heater, the 30th harmonic can be directly generated by a single-stage HGHG scheme for a soft x-ray FEL facility.

  5. Efficient adsorption of phenanthrene by simply synthesized hydrophobic MCM-41 molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yun; He, Yinyun; Wang, Xiaowen; Wei, Chaohai

    2014-08-01

    Hydrophobic molecular sieve MCM-41 including surfactant template was synthesized by a simple method. The adsorption properties of this material toward phenanthrene were studied. The effects of adsorbent dose and pH value on the adsorption process as well as the adsorption mechanism and reuse performance were investigated. The template-containing MCM-41 showed a significant adsorption for phenanthrene, due to its hydrophobicity created by the surfactant template in MCM-41. The solution pH had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The adsorption kinetic could be fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption equilibrium was fitted well by the linear model, and the adsorption process followed the liquid/solid phase distribution mechanism. The thermodynamic results indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process.

  6. Effects of Home Energy Management Systems on Distribution Utilities and Feeders Under Various Market Structure; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, M.; Pratt, A.; Lunacek, M.; Mittal, S.; Wu, H.; Jones, W.

    2015-06-15

    The combination of distributed energy resources (DER) and retail tariff structures to provide benefits to both utility consumers and the utilities is not well understood. To improve understanding, an Integrated Energy System Model (IESM) is being developed to simulate the physical and economic aspects of DER technologies, the buildings where they reside, and feeders servicing them. The IESM was used to simulate 20 houses with home energy management systems on a single feeder under a time-of-use (TOU) tariff to estimate economic and physical impacts on both the households and the distribution utilities. Home energy management systems (HEMS) reduce consumers’ electric bills by precooling houses in the hours before peak electricity pricing. Utilization of HEMS reduce peak loads during high price hours but shifts it to hours with off-peak and shoulder prices, resulting in a higher peak load. used to simulate 20 houses with home energy management systems on a single feeder under a time-of-use (TOU) tariff to estimate economic and physical impacts on both the households and the distribution utilities. Home energy management systems (HEMS) reduce consumers’ electric bills by precooling houses in the hours before peak electricity pricing. Utilization of HEMS reduce peak loads during high price hours but shifts it to hours with off-peak and shoulder prices, resulting in a higher peak load.

  7. Quasi-linear simulations of inner radiation belt electron pitch angle and energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Jay M.; Starks, Michael J.; Horne, Richard B.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Glauert, Sarah A.

    2016-03-01

    "Peculiar" or "butterfly" electron pitch angle distributions (PADs), with minima near 90°, have recently been observed in the inner radiation belt. These electrons are traditionally treated by pure pitch angle diffusion, driven by plasmaspheric hiss, lightning-generated whistlers, and VLF transmitter signals. Since this leads to monotonic PADs, energy diffusion by magnetosonic waves has been proposed to account for the observations. We show that the observed PADs arise readily from two-dimensional diffusion at L = 2, with or without magnetosonic waves. It is necessary to include cross diffusion, which accounts for the relationship between pitch angle and energy changes. The distribution of flux with energy is also in good agreement with observations between 200 keV and 1 MeV, dropping to very low levels at higher energy. Thus, at this location radial diffusion may be negligible at subrelativistic as well as ultrarelativistic energy.

  8. Analysis of dose-LET distribution in the human body irradiated by high energy hadrons.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Tsuda, S; Sakamoto, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Niita, K

    2003-01-01

    For the purposes of radiological protection, it is important to analyse profiles of the particle field inside a human body irradiated by high energy hadrons, since they can produce a variety of secondary particles which play an important role in the energy deposition process, and characterise their radiation qualities. Therefore Monte Carlo calculations were performed to evaluate dose distributions in terms of the linear energy transfer of ionising particles (dose-LET distribution) using a newly developed particle transport code (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS) for incidences of neutrons, protons and pions with energies from 100 MeV to 200 GeV. Based on these calculations, it was found that more than 80% and 90% of the total deposition energies are attributed to ionisation by particles with LET below 10 keV microm(-1) for the irradiations of neutrons and the charged particles, respectively. PMID:14653335

  9. Surface anisotropy broadening of the energy barrier distribution in magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pérez, N; Guardia, P; Roca, A G; Morales, M P; Serna, C J; Iglesias, O; Bartolomé, F; García, L M; Batlle, X; Labarta, A

    2008-11-26

    The effect of surface anisotropy on the distribution of energy barriers in magnetic fine particles of nanometer size is discussed within the framework of the Tln(t/τ(0)) scaling approach. The comparison between the distributions of the anisotropy energy of the particle cores, calculated by multiplying the volume distribution by the core anisotropy, and of the total anisotropy energy, deduced by deriving the master curve of the magnetic relaxation with respect to the scaling variable Tln(t/τ(0)), enables the determination of the surface anisotropy as a function of the particle size. We show that the contribution of the particle surface to the total anisotropy energy can be well described by a size-independent value of the surface energy per unit area which permits the superimposition of the distributions corresponding to the particle core and effective anisotropy energies. The method is applied to a ferrofluid composed of non-interacting Fe(3-x)O(4) particles of 4.9 nm average size and x about 0.07. Even though the size distribution is quite narrow in this system, a relatively small value of the effective surface anisotropy constant K(s) = 2.9 × 10(-2) erg cm(-2) gives rise to a dramatic broadening of the total energy distribution. The reliability of the average value of the effective anisotropy constant, deduced from magnetic relaxation data, is verified by comparing it to that obtained from the analysis of the shift of the ac susceptibility peaks as a function of the frequency. PMID:21836285

  10. A Multiple Period Problem in Distributed Energy Management Systems Considering CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroda, Yuki; Miyamoto, Toshiyuki; Mori, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Takaya

    Consider a special district (group) which is composed of multiple companies (agents), and where each agent responds to an energy demand and has a CO2 emission allowance imposed. A distributed energy management system (DEMS) optimizes energy consumption of a group through energy trading in the group. In this paper, we extended the energy distribution decision and optimal planning problem in DEMSs from a single period problem to a multiple periods one. The extension enabled us to consider more realistic constraints such as demand patterns, the start-up cost, and minimum running/outage times of equipment. At first, we extended the market-oriented programming (MOP) method for deciding energy distribution to the multiple periods problem. The bidding strategy of each agent is formulated by a 0-1 mixed non-linear programming problem. Secondly, we proposed decomposing the problem into a set of single period problems in order to solve it faster. In order to decompose the problem, we proposed a CO2 emission allowance distribution method, called an EP method. We confirmed that the proposed method was able to produce solutions whose group costs were close to lower-bound group costs by computational experiments. In addition, we verified that reduction in computational time was achieved without losing the quality of solutions by using the EP method.

  11. Adsorption of heavy metal cations by Na-clinoptilolite: equilibrium and selectivity studies.

    PubMed

    Mihaly-Cozmuta, L; Mihaly-Cozmuta, A; Peter, A; Nicula, C; Tutu, H; Silipas, Dan; Indrea, Emil

    2014-05-01

    This paper summarizes the conclusions of experiments conducted on the adsorption of Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto zeolite. The focus of the experiments was to establish the influence of the initial pH of the contact solution as well as the selectivity of zeolite on the efficiency of the adsorption process. To this end, experimental adsorption isotherms were established for the pH values ranging from 1 to 4 by using the Na-form of clinoptilolite (particle size range 0.5-1 mm) as an adsorbent. Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Raduschkevich isotherm models were used to validate the experimental data and the Gibbs free energy was calculated based on the distribution coefficient. From the Langmuir model, correlations between the maximum adsorption capacity and selected physical-chemical parameters of the cations studied were established. The results of the experiments suggest that the selectivity of zeolite is strongly influenced by the pH of the contact solution, dehydration energy of cations, diffusion coefficient and the pH at which the precipitation of hydroxides occurs. PMID:24603029

  12. Adsorption of Ar on individual carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyubenko, Boris; Kahn, Joshua; Vilches, Oscar; Cobden, David

    2015-03-01

    We compare and contrast results of adsorption measurements of Ar on single-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphite. Adsorption isotherms on individual suspended nanotubes were obtained using both the mechanical resonance frequency shift (sensitive to mass adsorption) and the electrical conductance. Isotherms on graphene mounted on hexagonal boron nitride were obtained using only the conductance. New volumetric adsorption isotherms on bulk exfoliated graphite were also obtained, paying special attention to the very low coverage region (less than 2% of a monolayer). This allowed us to compare the degree of heterogeneity on the three substrate types, the binding energies, and the van der Waals 2D parameters. Research supported by NSF DMR 1206208.

  13. Correlation energy, structure factor, radial distribution function, and momentum distribution of the spin-polarized uniform electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, G.; Ballone, P.

    1994-07-01

    The properties of the three-dimensional uniform electron gas in the Fermi liquid regime are analyzed using variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo methods. Our study extends those of Ceperley [Phys. Rev. B 18, 3126 (1978)] and Ceperley and Alder [Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 566 (1980)] to larger system sizes with improved statistics and, more importantly, to partial spin polarization. The density range 0.8<=rs<=10, which is the most relevant for density functional computations, is studied in detail. We analyze the size dependence of the simulation results and present an extended set of correlation energies extrapolated to the thermodynamic limit. Using the VMC method we analyze the spin dependence of the correlation energy, and we compare our results to several interpolation formulas used in density functional calculations. We summarize our results by a simple interpolation formula. In addition, we present results for the radial distribution function, the structure factor, the momentum distribution, and triplet correlation functions, and we discuss the comparison with many-body semianalytic theories.

  14. Mapping the Surface Adsorption Forces of Nanomaterials in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xin R.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Mathur, Sanjay; Song, Xuefeng; Xiao, Lisong; Oldenberg, Steven J.; Fadeel, Bengt; Riviere, Jim E.

    2011-01-01

    The biological surface adsorption index (BSAI) is a novel approach to characterize surface adsorption energy of nanomaterials that is the primary force behind nanoparticle aggregation, protein corona formation, and other complex interactions of nanomaterials within biological systems. Five quantitative nanodescriptors were obtained to represent the surface adsorption forces (hydrophobicity, hydrogen bond, polarity/polarizability, and lone-pair electrons) of the nanomaterial interaction with biological components. We have mapped the surface adsorption forces over 16 different nanomaterials. When the five-dimensional information of the nanodescriptors was reduced to two dimensions, the 16 nanomaterials were classified into distinct clusters according their surface adsorption properties. BSAI nanodescriptors are intrinsic properties of nanomaterials useful for quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) model development. This is the first success in quantitative characterization of the surface adsorption forces of nanomaterials in biological conditions, which could open a quantitative avenue in predictive nanomedicine development, risk assessment, and safety evaluation of nanomaterials. PMID:21999618

  15. Adsorption of aqueous copper on peanut hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kanika Octavia

    A method was established for measuring the adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution to unmodified and modified peanut hulls at constant temperature and pH. Modification of the hulls was performed by oxidation with alkaline hydrogen peroxide. During the modification process, the hydrogen peroxide solubilizes the lignin component, making the surface more porous which increases the availability of binding sites, while simultaneously oxidizing the cellulose. The oxidation of alcohol groups creates more binding sites by creating functional groups such as COO-, which increases chelation to metal ions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms delignification of the peanut hulls by the disappearance of carboxyl peaks of the modified hulls, which were originally produced from the lignin content. Although, oxidation is not fully confirmed, it is not ruled out because the expected carboxylate peak (1680 cm-1) maybe overshadowed by a broad peak due to OH bending of water adsorbed to the hulls. Hulls adsorbed copper from solutions in the concentration range of 50-1000 ppm of CuCl2. Concentrations of pre- and post-adsorption solutions were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms were fit to known two and three-parameter models, evaluated and the binding mechanism was inferred. Maximum surface coverage was 3.5 +/- 0.6 mg Cu2+ /g hull for unmodified hulls and 11 +/- 1 mg Cu2+/g hull for modified hulls. The adsorption for the hulls is best described by the Langmuir model, suggesting monolayer, homogeneous adsorption. With a free energy of adsorption of 10.5 +/- 0.9 kJ/mol for unmodified hulls and 14.5 +/-0.4 kJ/mol for modified hulls, the process is categorized as chemisorption for both types of hulls. The adsorption for both hulls is also described by the Redlich-Peterson model, giving beta nearer to 1 than 0, which further suggests homogeneous adsorption described by the Langmuir model. After rinsing the hulls

  16. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyan, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-10-01

    This work describes development of a series of novel activated carbon materials and their testing for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorphenolate, PCP (a common herbicide/wood preservative). Although the application of activated carbons is an established technology for the treatment of public water supplies, there is a growing need for materials with higher selectivity and adsorptive capacities as well as high abrasion resistance. The materials that will be discussed include extruded wood-derived carbons with novel pore size distributions and high hardness, as well as activated carbon fiber composites. Comparisons will be made with commercial granular water treatment carbons.

  17. Adsorption of polyampholytes on charged surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ozon, F; di Meglio, J-M; Joanny, J-F

    2002-06-01

    We have studied the adsorption of neutral polyampholytes on model charged surfaces that have been characterized by contact angle and streaming current measurements. The loop size distributions of adsorbed polymer chains have been obtained using atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and compared to recent theoretical predictions. We find a qualitative agreement with theory; the higher the surface charge, the smaller the number of monomers in the adsorbed layer. We propose an original scenario for the adsorption of polyampholytes on surfaces covered with both neutral long-chain and charged short-chain thiols. PMID:15010954

  18. Observation of nonthermal energy distributions during the impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Fe XXV resonance line and dielectronic satellite intensities have been measured as functions of time for several flares recorded by the Naval Research Laboratory crystal spectrometer (SOLFLEX) flown on the US Air Force P78-I spacecraft. The intensity ratios of the Fe XXV resonance line, the Fe XXIV n = 2 satellite line j, and the Fe XXIV n = 3 satellite line d13 indicate that nonthermal electron energy distributions occur during the impulsive phase of the flares. For the electron energies at which the j and d13 satellites are formed (4.7 and 5.8 keV, respectively), the electron energy distributions during the impulsive phase are observed to have a bump or to be nearly flat. For all of the flares that were studied, hard X-ray bursts occurred near the time of the nonthermal distributions observed in the SOLFLEX data.

  19. Analysis of electron energy distribution function in the Linac4 H⁻ source.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, S; Mattei, S; Nishida, K; Hatayama, A; Lettry, J

    2016-02-01

    To understand the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) in the Radio Frequency Inductively Coupled Plasmas (RF-ICPs) in hydrogen negative ion sources, the detailed analysis of the EEDFs using numerical simulation and the theoretical approach based on Boltzmann equation has been performed. It is shown that the EEDF of RF-ICPs consists of two parts, one is the low energy part which obeys Maxwellian distribution and the other is high energy part deviated from Maxwellian distribution. These simulation results have been confirmed to be reasonable by the analytical approach. The results suggest that it is possible to enhance the dissociation of molecules and the resultant H(-) negative ion production by reducing the gas pressure. PMID:26931990

  20. Retarding field analyzer for ion energy distribution measurements at a radio-frequency biased electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Gahan, D.; Hopkins, M. B.; Dolinaj, B.

    2008-03-15

    A retarding field energy analyzer designed to measure ion energy distributions impacting a radio-frequency biased electrode in a plasma discharge is examined. The analyzer is compact so that the need for differential pumping is avoided. The analyzer is designed to sit on the electrode surface, in place of the substrate, and the signal cables are fed out through the reactor side port. This prevents the need for modifications to the rf electrode--as is normally the case for analyzers built into such electrodes. The capabilities of the analyzer are demonstrated through experiments with various electrode bias conditions in an inductively coupled plasma reactor. The electrode is initially grounded and the measured distributions are validated with the Langmuir probe measurements of the plasma potential. Ion energy distributions are then given for various rf bias voltage levels, discharge pressures, rf bias frequencies - 500 kHz to 30 MHz, and rf bias waveforms - sinusoidal, square, and dual frequency.

  1. Development, Demonstration, and Field Testing of Enterprise-Wide Distributed Generation Energy Management System: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, S.; Cooley, C.

    2005-01-01

    This report details progress on subcontract NAD-1-30605-1 between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and RealEnergy (RE), the purpose of which is to describe RE's approach to the challenges it faces in the implementation of a nationwide fleet of clean cogeneration systems to serve contemporary energy markets. The Phase 2 report covers: utility tariff risk and its impact on market development; the effect on incentives on distributed energy markets; the regulatory effectiveness of interconnection in California; a survey of practical field interconnection issues; trend analysis for on-site generation; performance of dispatch systems; and information design hierarchy for combined heat and power.

  2. Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Hirotsugu; Fukushima, Kenji; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2009-02-01

    We estimate the energy density and the gluon distribution associated with the classical fields describing the early-time dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. In the McLerran-Venugopalan model, we first decompose the energy density into the momentum components exactly, with the use of the Wilson line correlators. Then we evolve the energy density with the free-field equation, which is justified by the dominance of the ultraviolet modes near the collision point. We also discuss the improvement that occurs with the inclusion of nonlinear terms into the time evolution. Our numerical results at RHIC energy are fairly consistent with the empirical values.

  3. Initial energy density and gluon distribution from the glasma in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Hirotsugu; Fukushima, Kenji; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2009-02-15

    We estimate the energy density and the gluon distribution associated with the classical fields describing the early-time dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. In the McLerran-Venugopalan model, we first decompose the energy density into the momentum components exactly, with the use of the Wilson line correlators. Then we evolve the energy density with the free-field equation, which is justified by the dominance of the ultraviolet modes near the collision point. We also discuss the improvement that occurs with the inclusion of nonlinear terms into the time evolution. Our numerical results at RHIC energy are fairly consistent with the empirical values.

  4. Experimental electron energy distribution function investigation at initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Semenov, V. E.

    2012-02-15

    Experimental investigation is undertaken to study formation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at the initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside magnetic mirror trap. In experiment, where discharge was initiated by high power radiation of gyrotron operated in the mm-wavelength range, electrons were revealed to leave the trap having EEDF be quite different from Maxwellian one. Specifically, the EEDF was found to decrease slowly with energy up to 400-500 keV and drops abruptly further. The possible physical mechanisms are discussed to explain losses of high energy electrons from the trap and a limitation of their energy.

  5. Experimental electron energy distribution function investigation at initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance discharge.

    PubMed

    Golubev, S V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A; Semenov, V E

    2012-02-01

    Experimental investigation is undertaken to study formation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at the initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside magnetic mirror trap. In experiment, where discharge was initiated by high power radiation of gyrotron operated in the mm-wavelength range, electrons were revealed to leave the trap having EEDF be quite different from Maxwellian one. Specifically, the EEDF was found to decrease slowly with energy up to 400-500 keV and drops abruptly further. The possible physical mechanisms are discussed to explain losses of high energy electrons from the trap and a limitation of their energy. PMID:22380303

  6. The writhe distribution in DNA plasmids as derived from the free energy of supercoiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Irwin

    2000-10-01

    In theoretical work on the molecule, DNA is often treated, approximately, as a naturally straight, inextensible, isotropic elastic rod of circular cross section. It is shown that, consistent with this level of approximation, there exists a general connection between the free energy of supercoiling of plasmids formed by the DNA, and the writhe distribution in plasmids having a given value of the linking number difference, ΔLk. In particular, the writhe distribution in a collection of torsionally relaxed (ΔLk=0), but non-nicked, plasmids is completely determined once the free energy of supercoiling as a function of ΔLk is known. The writhe distribution in the supercoiled plasmids characterized by any other value of ΔLk, we shall also show, is simply related to the distribution in the relaxed plasmid, and, therefore, it, too, is completely determined. These general results are illustrated for two cases: Large plasmids for which the measured free energy of supercoiling, a quadratic function of ΔLk, implies a normal writhe distribution, and miniplasmids for which a theoretical expression for the free energy of supercoiling involving the frequencies of the normal modes of vibration of a circular elastic ring has recently become available. In this latter case, the writhe distribution for supercoiled plasmids is not normal, but shows a skewness related to a property of elastic rings, namely, the loss of stability of the circular equilibrium configuration of the rings when they are twisted beyond a critical value. Such a skewed writhe distribution for miniplasmids is, according to the model, associated with a free energy of supercoiling which is not, as has been assumed, a rigorously quadratic function of ΔLk.

  7. Evaluation of eruptive energy of a pyroclastic deposit applying fractal geometry to fragment size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes Marino, Joali; Morgavi, Daniele; Di Vito, Mauro; de Vita, Sandro; Sansivero, Fabio; Perugini, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Fractal fragmentation theory has been applied to characterize the particle size distribution of pyroclastic deposits generated by volcanic explosions. Recent works have demonstrated that fractal dimension on grain size distributions can be used as a proxy for estimating the energy associated with volcanic eruptions. In this work we seek to establish a preliminary analytical protocol that can be applied to better characterize volcanic fall deposits and derive the potential energy for fragmentation that was stored in the magma prior/during an explosive eruption. The methodology is based on two different techniques for determining the grain-size distribution of the pyroclastic samples: 1) dry manual sieving (particles larger than 297μm), and 2) automatic grain size analysis via a CamSizer-P4®device, the latter measure the distribution of projected area, obtaining a cumulative distribution based on volume fraction for particles up to 30mm. Size distribution data have been analyzed by applying the fractal fragmentation theory estimating the value of Df, i.e. the fractal dimension of fragmentation. In order to test our protocol we studied the Cretaio eruption, Ischia island, Italy. Results indicate that size distributions of pyroclastic fall deposits follow a fractal law, indicating that the fragmentation process of these deposits reflects a scale-invariant fragmentation mechanism. Matching the results from manual and automated techniques allows us to obtain a value of the "fragmentation energy" from the explosive eruptive events that generate the Cretaio deposits. We highlight the importance of these results, based on fractal statistics, as an additional volcanological tool for addressing volcanic risk based on the analyses of grain size distributions of natural pyroclastic deposits. Keywords: eruptive energy, fractal dimension of fragmentation, pyroclastic fallout.

  8. Using field emission to control the electron energy distribution in high-pressure microdischarges at microscale dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yingjie; Go, David B.

    2013-12-02

    Particle simulations of high-pressure microdischarges at gaps below 10 μm show that the electron energy distribution becomes non-continuous, with discrete peaks corresponding to specific inelastic collisions. The relative magnitude of these peaks and shape of the energy distribution can be directly controlled by the parameter pressure times distance (pd) and the applied potential across the gap. These parameters dictate inelastic collisions experienced by electrons and as both increase the distribution smooths into a Maxwellian-like distribution. By capitalizing on field emission at these dimensions, it is possible to control the energy distribution of free electrons to target specific, energy dependent reactions.

  9. Modeling of thermal storage systems in MILP distributed energy resource models

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, David; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Gonçalo; Groissböck, Markus; DeForest, Nicholas; Marnay, Chris

    2014-08-04

    Thermal energy storage (TES) and distributed generation technologies, such as combined heat and power (CHP) or photovoltaics (PV), can be used to reduce energy costs and decrease CO2 emissions from buildings by shifting energy consumption to times with less emissions and/or lower energy prices. To determine the feasibility of investing in TES in combination with other distributed energy resources (DER), mixed integer linear programming (MILP) can be used. Such a MILP model is the well-established Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); however, it currently uses only a simplified TES model to guarantee linearity and short run-times. Loss calculations are based only on the energy contained in the storage. This paper presents a new DER-CAM TES model that allows improved tracking of losses based on ambient and storage temperatures, and compares results with the previous version. A multi-layer TES model is introduced that retains linearity and avoids creating an endogenous optimization problem. The improved model increases the accuracy of the estimated storage losses and enables use of heat pumps for low temperature storage charging. Ultimately,results indicate that the previous model overestimates the attractiveness of TES investments for cases without possibility to invest in heat pumps and underestimates it for some locations when heat pumps are allowed. Despite a variation in optimal technology selection between the two models, the objective function value stays quite stable, illustrating the complexity of optimal DER sizing problems in buildings and microgrids.

  10. Observations of the directional distribution of the wind energy input function over swell waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Behnam; Babanin, Alex V.; Baldock, Tom E.

    2016-02-01

    Field measurements of wind stress over shallow water swell traveling in different directions relative to the wind are presented. The directional distribution of the measured stresses is used to confirm the previously proposed but unverified directional distribution of the wind energy input function. The observed wind energy input function is found to follow a much narrower distribution (β∝cos⁡3.6θ) than the Plant (1982) cosine distribution. The observation of negative stress angles at large wind-wave angles, however, indicates that the onset of negative wind shearing occurs at about θ≈ 50°, and supports the use of the Snyder et al. (1981) directional distribution. Taking into account the reverse momentum transfer from swell to the wind, Snyder's proposed parameterization is found to perform exceptionally well in explaining the observed narrow directional distribution of the wind energy input function, and predicting the wind drag coefficients. The empirical coefficient (ɛ) in Snyder's parameterization is hypothesised to be a function of the wave shape parameter, with ɛ value increasing as the wave shape changes between sinusoidal, sawtooth, and sharp-crested shoaling waves.

  11. Finite-temperature local protein sequence alignment: percolation and free-energy distribution.

    PubMed

    Wolfsheimer, S; Melchert, O; Hartmann, A K

    2009-12-01

    Sequence alignment is a tool in bioinformatics that is used to find homological relationships in large molecular databases. It can be mapped on the physical model of directed polymers in random media. We consider the finite-temperature version of local sequence alignment for proteins and study the transition between the linear phase and the biologically relevant logarithmic phase, where the free energy grows linearly or logarithmically with the sequence length. By means of numerical simulations and finite-size-scaling analysis, we determine the phase diagram in the plane that is spanned by the gap costs and the temperature. We use the most frequently used parameter set for protein alignment. The critical exponents that describe the parameter-driven transition are found to be explicitly temperature dependent. Furthermore, we study the shape of the (free-) energy distribution close to the transition by rare-event simulations down to probabilities on the order 10(-64). It is well known that in the logarithmic region, the optimal score distribution (T=0) is described by a modified Gumbel distribution. We confirm that this also applies for the free-energy distribution (T>0). However, in the linear phase, the distribution crosses over to a modified Gaussian distribution. PMID:20365196

  12. PHEV Energy Use Estimation: Validating the Gamma Distribution for Representing the Random Daily Driving Distance

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhenhong; Dong, Jing; Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David L

    2012-01-01

    The petroleum and electricity consumptions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are sensitive to the variation of daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT). Some studies assume DVMT to follow a Gamma distribution, but such a Gamma assumption is yet to be validated. This study finds the Gamma assumption valid in the context of PHEV energy analysis, based on continuous GPS travel data of 382 vehicles, each tracked for at least 183 days. The validity conclusion is based on the found small prediction errors, resulting from the Gamma assumption, in PHEV petroleum use, electricity use, and energy cost. The finding that the Gamma distribution is valid and reliable is important. It paves the way for the Gamma distribution to be assumed for analyzing energy uses of PHEVs in the real world. The Gamma distribution can be easily specified with very few pieces of driver information and is relatively easy for mathematical manipulation. Given the validation in this study, the Gamma distribution can now be used with better confidence in a variety of applications, such as improving vehicle consumer choice models, quantifying range anxiety for battery electric vehicles, investigating roles of charging infrastructure, and constructing online calculators that provide personal estimates of PHEV energy use.

  13. Environmental variation, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics and water/energy exchange at high latitudes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, A.D.; Wirth, C.; Apps, M.; Beringer, J.; Clein, J.; Epstein, H.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Bhatti, J.; Chapin, F. S., III; De Groot, B.; Efremov, D.; Eugster, W.; Fukuda, M.; Gower, T.; Hinzman, L.; Huntley, B.; Jia, G.J.; Kasischke, E.; Melillo, J.; Romanovsky, V.; Shvidenko, A.; Vaganov, E.; Walker, D.

    2002-01-01

    The responses of high latitude ecosystems to global change involve complex interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon dynamics, and water and energy exchange. These responses may have important consequences for the earth system. In this study, we evaluated how vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange are related to environmental variation spanned by the network of the IGBP high latitude transects. While the most notable feature of the high latitude transects is that they generally span temperature gradients from southern to northern latitudes, there are substantial differences in temperature among the transects. Also, along each transect temperature co-varies with precipitation and photosynthetically active radiation, which are also variable among the transects. Both climate and disturbance interact to influence latitudinal patterns of vegetation and soil carbon storage among the transects, and vegetation distribution appears to interact with climate to determine exchanges of heat and moisture in high latitudes. Despite limitations imposed by the data we assembled, the analyses in this study have taken an important step toward clarifying the complexity of interactions among environmental variables, vegetation distribution, carbon stocks and turnover, and water and energy exchange in high latitude regions. This study reveals the need to conduct coordinated global change studies in high latitudes to further elucidate how interactions among climate, disturbance, and vegetation distribution influence carbon dynamics and water and energy exchange in high latitudes.

  14. Compact floating ion energy analyzer for measuring energy distributions of ions bombarding radio-frequency biased electrode surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelberg, Erik A.; Perry, Andrew; Benjamin, Neil; Aydil, Eray S.

    1999-06-01

    A compact floating retarding-field ion energy analyzer and the accompanying electronics have been designed and built to measure the energy distribution of ions bombarding radio-frequency (rf) biased electrodes in high-density plasma reactors. The design consists of two main components, a compact retarding field vacuum probe and an integrated stack of floating electronics for providing output voltages, measuring currents and voltages and transmitting data to a computer. The operation and capabilities of the energy analyzer are demonstrated through ion energy distribution measurements conducted on a 4 MHz rf-biased electrostatic chuck in a 13.56 MHz high-density transformer coupled plasma (TCP) reactor. The analyzer is capable of operating while floating on several hundreds of volts of rf bias and at pressures up to 30 mTorr without differential pumping. The effects of pressure (2-30 mTorr), TCP power (500-1500 W), rf-bias power (0-800 W), gas composition, and ion mass on the ion energy distributions are demonstrated through Ar, Ne, and Ar/Ne discharges.

  15. Results on the neutron energy distribution measurements at the RECH-1 Chilean nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, P.; Molina, F.; Romero-Barrientos, J.

    2016-07-01

    Neutron activations experiments has been perform at the RECH-1 Chilean Nuclear Reactor to measure its neutron flux energy distribution. Samples of pure elements was activated to obtain the saturation activities for each reaction. Using - ray spectroscopy we identify and measure the activity of the reaction product nuclei, obtaining the saturation activities of 20 reactions. GEANT4 and MCNP was used to compute the self shielding factor to correct the cross section for each element. With the Expectation-Maximization algorithm (EM) we were able to unfold the neutron flux energy distribution at dry tube position, near the RECH-1 core. In this work, we present the unfolding results using the EM algorithm.

  16. HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING BASED ON REALISTIC SIX-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The high-energy electron cooling system for RHIC-II is unique compared to standard coolers. It requires bunched electron beam. Electron bunches are produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), and cooling is planned without longitudinal magnetic field. To address unique features of the RHIC cooler, a generalized treatment of cooling force was introduced in BETACOOE code which allows us to calculate friction force for an arbitrary distribution of electrons. Simulations for RHIC cooler based on electron distribution from ERL are presented.

  17. ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIALS IN RESIDENTIAL AND SMALL COMMERCIAL THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS - AN UPDATE

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2003-10-31

    This is an update of a report (Andrews and Modera 1991) that quantified the amounts of energy that could be saved through better thermal distribution systems in residential and small commercial buildings. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling from the space-conditioning equipment to the conditioned space. This update involves no basic change in methodology relative to the 1991 report, but rather a review of the additional information available in 2003 on the energy-use patterns in residential and small commercial buildings.

  18. High-frequency spectral distribution of the equilibrium radiation energy in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, V. B.; Trigger, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    We establish that the difference of the spectral distribution of the equilibrium radiation energy in matter from the Planck formula in the high-frequency range is determined by the imaginary part of the transverse dielectric permittivity of the matter. Based on this, we show that in a rarified high-temperature fully ionized nonrelativistic plasma, the high-frequency spectral distribution of the equilibrium radiation energy differs essentially from the Planck formula because of the power-law character of the decrease in the frequency, which is due to the presence of matter.

  19. Expansion-free evolving spheres must have inhomogeneous energy density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Le Denmat, G.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-04-15

    In a recent paper a systematic study on shearing expansion-free spherically symmetric distributions was presented. As a particular case of such systems, the Skripkin model was mentioned, which corresponds to a nondissipative perfect fluid with a constant energy density. Here we show that such a model is inconsistent with junction conditions. It is shown that in general for any nondissipative fluid distribution, the expansion-free condition requires the energy density to be inhomogeneous. As an example we consider the case of dust, which allows for a complete integration.

  20. Energy and mass distributions of impact ejecta blankets on the moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Okeefe, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The paper applies previously calculated impact-induced flow fields (O'Keefe and Ahrens, 1977) resulting from interaction of 5-cm radius gabbroic anorthosite impactor with a half-space of the same material, at various velocities, to obtain mass and energy ejecta distributions. Whereas earlier results described the ejecta distribution from a 15 km/s impact of an iron object on the moon in terms of mass vs. distance, the present results describe, at a given distance from the impact, the energy content as a function of depth, i.e., the thermal structure of ejecta blankets. Pertinent computational methods are included, and several tables and plots supplement the text.

  1. Ultra-High Energy Neutrino-Nucleon Scattering and Parton Distributions at Small x

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Ernest M.; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2006-11-17

    The cross section for ultra-high energy neutrino-nucleon scattering is very sensitive to the parton distributions at very small values of Bjorken x (x {<=} 10-4). We numerically investigate the effects of modifying the behavior of the gluon distribution function at very small x in the DGLAP evolution equation. We then use the Color Glass Condensate formalism to calculate the neutrino-nucleon cross section at ultra-high energies and compare the result with those based on modification of DGLAP evolution equation.

  2. Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. From 1982 through 1993, the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) was used by the EIA for its analyses, and the Gas Analysis Modeling System (GAMS) was used within IFFS to represent natural gas markets. Prior to 1982, the Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), also referred to as the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES), was employed. NEMS was developed to enhance and update EIA`s modeling capability by internally incorporating models of energy markets that had previously been analyzed off-line. In addition, greater structural detail in NEMS permits the analysis of a broader range of energy issues. The time horizon of NEMS is the midterm period (i.e., through 2015). In order to represent the regional differences in energy markets, the component models of NEMS function at regional levels appropriate for the markets represented, with subsequent aggregation/disaggregation to the Census Division level for reporting purposes.

  3. Optimized Switch Allocation to Improve the Restoration Energy in Distribution Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezaki, Hamed H.; Abyaneh, Hossein A.; Agheli, Ali; Mazlumi, Kazem

    2012-01-01

    In distribution networks switching devices play critical role in energy restoration and improving reliability indices. This paper presents a novel objective function to optimally allocate switches in electric power distribution systems. Identifying the optimized location of the switches is a nonlinear programming problem (NLP). In the proposed objective function a new auxiliary function is used to simplify the calculation of the objective function. The output of the auxiliary function is binary. The genetic algorithm (GA) optimization method is used to solve this optimization problem. The proposed method is applied to a real distribution network and the results reveal that the method is successful.

  4. Methanol adsorption on the clean CeO₂(111) surface: A density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Deskins, N. Aaron; Dupuis, Michel; Ge, Qingfeng

    2007-07-19

    Molecular and dissociative adsorption of methanol at various sites on the stoichiometric CeO₂(111) surface have been studied using density functional theory periodic calculations. At 0.25 monolayer (ML) coverage, the dissociative adsorption with an adsorption energy of 0.55 eV is slightly favored. The most stable state is the dissociative adsorption of methanol via C-H bond breaking, forming a coadsorbed hydroxymethyl group and hydrogen adatom on two separate O₃C surface sites. The strongest molecular adsorption occurs through an O-Ce₇subC connection with an adsorption energy of 0.48 eV. At methanol coverage of 0.5 ML, the dissociative adsorption and the molecular adsorption became competitive. The adsorption energy per methanol molecule for both adsorption modes falls into a narrow range of 0.46-0.55 eV. As methanol coverage increases beyond 0.5 ML, the molecular adsorption becomes more energetically favorable than the dissociative adsorption because of the attractive hydrogen bonding between coadsorbed methanol molecules. At full monolayer, the adsorption energy of molecular adsorption is 0.40 eV per molecule while the adsorption energy for total dissociative adsorption of methanol is only 0.17 eV. The results at different methanol coverages indicate that methanol can adsorb on a defect-free CeO₂(111) surface, which are also consistent with experimental observations. This research was performed using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which is a U.S. Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. Computing time was made available under a Computational Grand Challenge “Computational Catalysis”. This work also financially supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project of PNNL.

  5. Effect of temperature and NO2 surface adsorption on electrical properties of screen printed ITO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhi, I.; Meddeb, W.; Bouzid, B.; Saadoun, M.; Bessaïs, B.

    2015-11-01

    Indium tin oxide films with thicknesses of about 1 μm were prepared using the screen printing technique. Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies show that the formed ITO crystallizes in the cubic crystal system. The crystallite size (D) and the microstrain (ɛstr) were investigated using Scherrer formula and Williamson-Hall analysis. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy show that the ITO films are granular, essentially composed of uniformly distributed sub-spherical - like grains. The variation of the DC conductivity with temperature confirms the presence of three activation energies, indicating the presence of different scattering mechanisms essentially dominated by oxygen adsorption and thermal excitation of electrons in the conduction band. Detailed studies of the dielectric parameters (i.e., ɛ* and tan δ) of the compound as a function of temperature and NO2 adsorption (at various range of frequencies) reveal that their values are strongly dependent on temperature and NO2 adsorption.

  6. Beam energy dependence of pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sumit; Nayak, Tapan K.; Datta, Kaustuv

    2016-06-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN probe matter at extreme conditions of temperature and energy density. Most of the global properties of the collisions can be extracted from the measurements of charged-particle multiplicity and pseudorapidity (η ) distributions. We have shown that the available experimental data on beam energy and centrality dependence of η distributions in heavy-ion (Au +Au or Pb +Pb ) collisions from √{sNN}=7.7 GeV to 2.76 TeV are reasonably well described by the AMPT model, which is used for further exploration. The nature of the η distributions has been described by a double Gaussian function using a set of fit parameters, which exhibit a regular pattern as a function of beam energy. By extrapolating the parameters to a higher energy of √{sNN}=5.02 TeV, we have obtained the charged-particle multiplicity densities, η distributions, and energy densities for various centralities. Incidentally, these results match well with some of the recently published data by the ALICE Collaboration.

  7. Adsorption on Highly Ordered Porous Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistura, Giampaolo; Bruschi, Lorenzo; Lee, Woo

    2016-04-01

    Porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is characterized by a regular arrangement of the pores with a narrow pore size distribution over extended areas, uniform pore depth, and solid pore walls without micropores. Thanks to significant improvements in anodization techniques, structural engineering of AAO allows to accurately tailor the pore morphology. These features make porous AAO an excellent substrate to study adsorption phenomena. In this paper, we review recent experiments involving the adsorption in porous AAO. Particular attention will be devoted to adsorption in straight and structured pores with a closed end which shed new light on fundamental issues like the origin of hysteresis in closed end pores and the nature of evaporation from ink-bottle pores. The results will be compared to those obtained in other synthetic materials like porous silicon and silica.

  8. Investigation of Cost and Energy Optimization of Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

    PubMed

    Cherchi, Carla; Badruzzaman, Mohammad; Gordon, Matthew; Bunn, Simon; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2015-11-17

    Holistic management of water and energy resources through energy and water quality management systems (EWQMSs) have traditionally aimed at energy cost reduction with limited or no emphasis on energy efficiency or greenhouse gas minimization. This study expanded the existing EWQMS framework and determined the impact of different management strategies for energy cost and energy consumption (e.g., carbon footprint) reduction on system performance at two drinking water utilities in California (United States). The results showed that optimizing for cost led to cost reductions of 4% (Utility B, summer) to 48% (Utility A, winter). The energy optimization strategy was successfully able to find the lowest energy use operation and achieved energy usage reductions of 3% (Utility B, summer) to 10% (Utility A, winter). The findings of this study revealed that there may be a trade-off between cost optimization (dollars) and energy use (kilowatt-hours), particularly in the summer, when optimizing the system for the reduction of energy use to a minimum incurred cost increases of 64% and 184% compared with the cost optimization scenario. Water age simulations through hydraulic modeling did not reveal any adverse effects on the water quality in the distribution system or in tanks from pump schedule optimization targeting either cost or energy minimization. PMID:26461069

  9. Adsorption coefficients for TNT on soil and clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Rosángela; Pabón, Julissa; Pérez, Omarie; Muñoz, Miguel A.; Mina, Nairmen

    2007-04-01

    To understand the fate and transport mechanisms of TNT from buried landmines is it essential to determine the adsorption process of TNT on soil and clay minerals. In this research, soil samples from horizons Ap and A from Jobos Series at Isabela, Puerto Rico were studied. The clay fractions were separated from the other soil components by centrifugation. Using the hydrometer method the particle size distribution for the soil horizons was obtained. Physical and chemical characterization studies such as cation exchange capacity (CEC), surface area, percent of organic matter and pH were performed for the soil and clay samples. A complete mineralogical characterization of clay fractions using X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the presence of kaolinite, goethite, hematite, gibbsite and quartz. In order to obtain adsorption coefficients (K d values) for the TNT-soil and TNT-clay interactions high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used. The adsorption process for TNT-soil was described by the Langmuir model. A higher adsorption was observed in the Ap horizon. The Freundlich model described the adsorption process for TNT-clay interactions. The affinity and relative adsorption capacity of the clay for TNT were higher in the A horizon. These results suggest that adsorption by soil organic matter predominates over adsorption on clay minerals when significant soil organic matter content is present. It was found that, properties like cation exchange capacity and surface area are important factors in the adsorption of clayey soils.

  10. Characterization of micro- and mesoporous materials using accelerated dynamics adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qajar, Ali; Peer, Maryam; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Foley, Henry C

    2013-10-01

    Porosimetry is a fundamental characterization technique used in development of new porous materials for catalysis, membrane separation, and adsorptive gas storage. Conventional methods like nitrogen and argon adsorption at cryogenic temperatures suffer from slow adsorption dynamics especially for microporous materials. In addition, CO2, the other common probe, is only useful for micropore characterization unless being compressed to exceedingly high pressures to cover all required adsorption pressures. Here, we investigated the effect of adsorption temperature, pressure, and type of probe molecule on the adsorption dynamics. Methyl chloride (MeCl) was used as the probe molecule, and measurements were conducted near room temperature under nonisothermal condition and subatmospheric pressure. A pressure control algorithm was proposed to accelerate adsorption dynamics by manipulating the chemical potential of the gas. Collected adsorption data are transformed into pore size distribution profiles using the Horvath-Kavazoe (HK), Saito-Foley (SF), and modified Kelvin methods revised for MeCl. Our study shows that the proposed algorithm significantly speeds up the rate of data collection without compromising the accuracy of the measurements. On average, the adsorption rates on carbonaceous and aluminosilicate samples were accelerated by at least a factor of 4-5. PMID:23919893

  11. Effective interactions in multisite cells for adsorption in microporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demontis, Pierfranco; Pazzona, Federico G.; Suffritti, Giuseppe B.

    2009-04-01

    Local, discrete models of self-interacting multisite adsorption cells have been shown to be able to provide a coarse-grained representation of equilibrium properties of small molecules adsorbed in nanoporous materials at the mesoscopic scale. In the present work we show how the essential statistical properties of a host cell of structured sites with multiple adsorption energies and particle-particle interactions (that is the partition function, the average energy, and the average number of guests close to the windows connecting the cell to its surroundings) can be reproduced by a less-structured cell with two occupancy-dependent adsorption energy levels.

  12. Effect of grain size on uranium(VI) surface complexation kinetics and adsorption additivity.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M

    2011-07-15

    The contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption was studied using a sediment from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.053-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (<0.053 mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch and flow-cell experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms and kinetic uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. One important implication of this study is that grain-size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location. PMID:21648458

  13. High energy angular distribution measurements of the exclusive deuteron photodisintegration reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Elaine Schulte; et. Al.

    2002-10-01

    The first complete measurements of the angular distributions of the two-body deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section at photon energies above 1.6 GeV were performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The results show a persistent forward-backward asymmetry up to Egamma = 2.4 GeV, the highest-energy measured in this experiment. The Hard Rescattering and the Quark-Gluon string models are in fair agreement with the results.

  14. Energy distributions of constituent atoms of cluster impacts on solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Yasunori

    1991-12-01

    Using the time-evolution Monte Carlo simulation code DYACAT, the energy distributions of constituent atoms due to big cluster impacts on amorphous targets have been investigated, where the (Ag) n and (Al) n cluster (n being 10 to 500) with energies a few 100 eV/atom to keV/atom are bombarded on amorphous carbon and gold targets, respectively. It is found that the energy distribution of constituent atoms is strongly affected by the mass ratio M 2/M 1 (M 1 and M 2 being the atomic masses of the constituent atom and the target atom, respectively), the size of the cluster, and the cluster energy. In the case of the 1 keV/atom (Ag) 500 cluster impacts on C (M 2/M 1 < 1) the shape of the energy distribution of constituent atoms is trapezoidal, while in the case of the Al cluster impacts on Au (M 2/M 1 > 1) the high-energy tail of the energy distribution of Al atoms due to the big cluster impact ( n > 100) can be well described in terms of the Maxwell-Boltzmann function, and its temperature is linearly proportional to the energy. In the case of 1 keV/atom (Al) 500 cluster impact on Au, the quasi-equilibrium state continues for more than 0.6×10 -13 s, but the temperature of the cluster impact region decreases as time passes. The present simulation supports the recent Echenique, Manson and Ritchie's Ansatz in their theory of cluster impact fusion.

  15. Decoding Group Vocalizations: The Acoustic Energy Distribution of Chorus Howls Is Useful to Determine Wolf Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Vicente; López-Bao, José Vicente; Llaneza, Luis; Fernández, Carlos; Font, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Population monitoring is crucial for wildlife management and conservation. In the last few decades, wildlife researchers have increasingly applied bioacoustics tools to obtain information on several essential ecological parameters, such as distribution and abundance. One such application involves wolves (Canis lupus). These canids respond to simulated howls by emitting group vocalizations known as chorus howls. These responses to simulated howls reveal the presence of wolf litters during the breeding period and are therefore often used to determine the status of wolf populations. However, the acoustic structure of chorus howls is complex and discriminating the presence of pups in a chorus is sometimes difficult, even for experienced observers. In this study, we evaluate the usefulness of analyses of the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls to identify the presence of pups in a chorus. We analysed 110 Iberian wolf chorus howls with known pack composition and found that the acoustic energy distribution is concentrated at higher frequencies when there are pups vocalizing. We built predictive models using acoustic energy distribution features to determine the presence of pups in a chorus, concluding that the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls can be used to determine the presence of wolf pups in a pack. The method we outline here is objective, accurate, easily implemented, and independent of the observer's experience. These advantages are especially relevant in the case of broad scale surveys or when many observers are involved. Furthermore, the analysis of the acoustic energy distribution can be implemented for monitoring other social canids that emit chorus howls such as jackals or coyotes, provides an easy way to obtain information on ecological parameters such as reproductive success, and could be useful to study other group vocalizations. PMID:27144887

  16. Decoding Group Vocalizations: The Acoustic Energy Distribution of Chorus Howls Is Useful to Determine Wolf Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    López-Bao, José Vicente; Llaneza, Luis; Fernández, Carlos; Font, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Population monitoring is crucial for wildlife management and conservation. In the last few decades, wildlife researchers have increasingly applied bioacoustics tools to obtain information on several essential ecological parameters, such as distribution and abundance. One such application involves wolves (Canis lupus). These canids respond to simulated howls by emitting group vocalizations known as chorus howls. These responses to simulated howls reveal the presence of wolf litters during the breeding period and are therefore often used to determine the status of wolf populations. However, the acoustic structure of chorus howls is complex and discriminating the presence of pups in a chorus is sometimes difficult, even for experienced observers. In this study, we evaluate the usefulness of analyses of the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls to identify the presence of pups in a chorus. We analysed 110 Iberian wolf chorus howls with known pack composition and found that the acoustic energy distribution is concentrated at higher frequencies when there are pups vocalizing. We built predictive models using acoustic energy distribution features to determine the presence of pups in a chorus, concluding that the acoustic energy distribution in chorus howls can be used to determine the presence of wolf pups in a pack. The method we outline here is objective, accurate, easily implemented, and independent of the observer's experience. These advantages are especially relevant in the case of broad scale surveys or when many observers are involved. Furthermore, the analysis of the acoustic energy distribution can be implemented for monitoring other social canids that emit chorus howls such as jackals or coyotes, provides an easy way to obtain information on ecological parameters such as reproductive success, and could be useful to study other group vocalizations. PMID:27144887

  17. Adsorption in sparse networks. 1: Cylinder model

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.

    1998-06-15

    Materials with very low density, such as aerogels, are networks with polymers or chains of particles joined at nodes, where the spacing of the nodes is large compared to the thickness of the chains. In such a material, most of the solid surface has positive curvature, so condensation of an adsorbate is more difficult than condensation in a body containing cavities whose surfaces have negative curvature. A model is presented in which the network is represented by straight cylinders joined at nodes with coordination numbers 4, 6, or 12. The shape of the adsorbate/adsorptive interface is obtained for each network by minimizing its surface area. The adsorption behavior is found to depend on the ratio of the node separation, l, to the radius of the cylinders, a: if l/a exceeds a critical value (which depends on the coordination of the node), then the curvature of the adsorbate/adsorptive interface approaches zero while the adsorbate occupies a small fraction of the pore volume; if l/a is less than the critical value, then condensation occurs. Even in the latter case, interpretation of the adsorption isotherm in terms of cylindrical pores (as in the BJH model) yields apparent pore sizes much greater than the actual spacing of the nodes. In a companion paper, this model is applied to silica aerogels and found to give a good fit to both the adsorption and desorption curves with a single distribution of node spacings.

  18. Modeling investigation of membrane biofouling phenomena by considering the adsorption of protein, polysaccharide and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Demneh, Seyedeh Marzieh Ghasemi; Nasernejad, Bahram; Modarres, Hamid

    2011-11-01

    The importance of solute adsorption in the biofouling membrane has been clearly verified for the performance of membrane bioreactor (MBR). In order to quantify the mechanism of static adsorption in biofouling during of MBR process, we characterize membrane biofouling caused by model solutions containing a protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA), a humic substance (humic acid, HA) and a polysaccharide (alginic acid, Alg) on commercial hydrophilic polyethersulfone (PES) membrane. For static adsorption experiments, membranes were immersed in well-defined model solutions in three temperatures (298, 308 and 318 K) to obtain equilibrium data. To determine the characteristic parameters for this process, 7 isotherm models were applied to the experimental data. Three error analysis methods; the coefficient of nonlinear regression (R(2)), the sum of the squared errors (SSE) and standard deviation of residuals (S(yx)), were used to evaluate the data and determine the best fit isotherm for each model solutions. The error values demonstrated that the Sips isotherm model provided the best fit to the experimental data. AFM images were used for determination of changes in membrane surface after adsorption. These images confirmed the results obtained from adsorption isotherm study. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (Δ(r)G(θ)), enthalpy (Δ(r)H(θ)) and entropy (Δ(r)S(θ)) changes were determined; these adsorption processes were found to be feasible and endothermic but not spontaneous. The distribution of the substances adsorbed on PES surface were more chaotic than that in the aqueous solutions. Parameters obtained in this study can be used to determine the "fouling potential" of a given feed stream and a membrane. PMID:21798726

  19. Electron energy distribution functions in low-pressure oxygen plasma columns sustained by propagating surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, L.; Margot, J.; Moisan, M.; Khare, R.; Donnelly, V. M.

    2009-01-12

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) were measured in a 50 mTorr oxygen plasma column sustained by propagating surface waves. Trace-rare-gas-optical-emission spectroscopy was used to derive EEDFs by selecting lines to extract ''electron temperature''(T{sub e}) corresponding to either lower energy electrons that excite high-lying levels through stepwise excitation via metastable states or higher energy electrons that excite emission directly from the ground state. Lower energy T{sub e}'s decreased from 8 to 5.5 eV with distance from the wave launcher, while T{sub e}{approx_equal}6 eV for higher energy electrons and T{sub e}>20 eV for a high-energy tail. Mechanisms for such EEDFs are discussed.

  20. Observation of a power-law energy distribution in atom-ion hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Ziv; Akerman, Nitzan; Sikorsky, Tomas; Ben-Shlomi, Ruti; Dallal, Yehonatan; Ozeri, Roee

    2016-05-01

    Understanding atom-ion collision dynamics is at the heart of the growing field of ultra-cold atom-ion physics. The naive picture of a hot ion sympathetically-cooled by a cold atomic bath doesn't hold due to the time dependent potentials generated by the ion Paul trap. The energy scale of the atom-ion system is determined by a combination of the atomic bath temperature, the ion's excess micromotion (EMM) and the back action of the atom-ion attraction on the ion's position in the trap. However, it is the position dependent ion's inherent micromotion which acts as an amplifier for the ion's energy during random consecutive collisions. Due to this reason, the ion's energy distribution deviates from Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) characterized by an exponential tail to one with power-law tail described by Tsallis q-exponential function. Here we report on the observation of a strong deviation from MB to Tsallis energy distribution of a trapped ion. In our experiment, a ground-state cooled 88 Sr+ ion is immersed in an ultra-cold cloud of 87 Rb atoms. The energy scale is determined by either EMM or solely due to the back action on the ion position during a collision with an atom in the trap. Energy distributions are obtained using narrow optical clock spectroscopy.