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Sample records for adsorption equilibrium constant

  1. A procedure to find thermodynamic equilibrium constants for CO2 and CH4 adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Trinh, T T; van Erp, T S; Bedeaux, D; Kjelstrup, S; Grande, C A

    2015-03-28

    Thermodynamic equilibrium for adsorption means that the chemical potential of gas and adsorbed phase are equal. A precise knowledge of the chemical potential is, however, often lacking, because the activity coefficient of the adsorbate is not known. Adsorption isotherms are therefore commonly fitted to ideal models such as the Langmuir, Sips or Henry models. We propose here a new procedure to find the activity coefficient and the equilibrium constant for adsorption which uses the thermodynamic factor. Instead of fitting the data to a model, we calculate the thermodynamic factor and use this to find first the activity coefficient. We show, using published molecular simulation data, how this procedure gives the thermodynamic equilibrium constant and enthalpies of adsorption for CO2(g) on graphite. We also use published experimental data to find similar thermodynamic properties of CO2(g) and of CH4(g) adsorbed on activated carbon. The procedure gives a higher accuracy in the determination of enthalpies of adsorption than ideal models do.

  2. Use of lipophilic ion adsorption isotherms to determine the surface area and the monolayer capacity of a chromatographic packing, as well as the thermodynamic equilibrium constant for its adsorption.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, T

    2005-04-29

    A method that champions the approaches of two independent research groups, to quantitate the chromatographic stationary phase surface available for lipophilic ion adsorption, is presented. For the first time the non-approximated expression of the electrostatically modified Langmuir adsorption isotherm was used. The non approximated Gouy-Chapman (G-C) theory equation was used to give the rigorous surface potential. The method helps model makers, interested in ionic interactions, determine whether the potential modified Langmuir isotherm can be linearized, and, accordingly, whether simplified retention equations can be properly used. The theory cultivated here allows the estimates not only of the chromatographically accessible surface area, but also of the thermodynamic equilibrium constant for the adsorption of the amphiphile, the standard free energy of its adsorption, and the monolayer capacity of the packing. In addition, it establishes the limit between a theoretical and an empirical use of the Freundlich isotherm to determine the surface area. Estimates of the parameters characterising the chromatographic system are reliable from the physical point of view, and this greatly validates the present comprehensive approach.

  3. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  4. Equilibrium Constants You Can Smell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Michael; Buckley, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Presents a simple experiment involving the sense of smell that students can accomplish during a lecture. Illustrates the important concepts of equilibrium along with the acid/base properties of various ions. (JRH)

  5. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  6. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  7. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  8. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane. PMID:23684695

  9. [Dichotomizing method applied to calculating equilibrium constant of dimerization system].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guo-zhong; Ye, Zhi-xiang

    2002-06-01

    The arbitrary trivariate algebraic equations are formed based on the combination principle. The univariata algebraic equation of equilibrium constant kappa for dimerization system is obtained through a series of algebraic transformation, and it depends on the properties of monotonic functions whether the equation is solvable or not. If the equation is solvable, equilibrium constant of dimerization system is obtained by dichotomy and its final equilibrium constant of dimerization system is determined according to the principle of error of fitting. The equilibrium constants of trisulfophthalocyanine and biosulfophthalocyanine obtained with this method are 47,973.4 and 30,271.8 respectively. The results are much better than those reported previously.

  10. A chemical equilibrium model for metal adsorption onto bacterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Jeremy B.; Daughney, Christopher J.; Yee, Nathan; Davis, Thomas A.

    1997-08-01

    This study quantifies metal adsorption onto cell wall surfaces of Bacillus subtilis by applying equilibrium thermodynamics to the specific chemical reactions that occur at the water-bacteria interface. We use acid/base titrations to determine deprotonation constants for the important surface functional groups, and we perform metal-bacteria adsorption experiments, using Cd, Cu, Pb, and Al, to yield site-specific stability constants for the important metal-bacteria surface complexes. The acid/base properties of the cell wall of B. subtilis can best be characterized by invoking three distinct types of surface organic acid functional groups, with pK a values of 4.82 ± 0.14, 6.9 ± 0.5, and 9.4 ± 0.6. These functional groups likely correspond to carboxyl, phosphate, and hydroxyl sites, respectively, that are displayed on the cell wall surface. The results of the metal adsorption experiments indicate that both the carboxyl sites and the phosphate sites contribute to metal uptake. The values of the log stability constants for metal-carboxyl surface complexes range from 3.4 for Cd, 4.2 for Pb, 4.3 for Cu, to 5.0 for Al. These results suggest that the stabilities of the metal-surface complexes are high enough for metal-bacterial interactions to affect metal mobilities in many aqueous systems, and this approach enables quantitative assessment of the effects of bacteria on metal mobilities.

  11. Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for geochemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, D.C.; Parkhurst, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Theory is derived from the work of Urey (Urey H. C. [1947] The thermodynamic properties of isotopic substances. J. Chem. Soc. 562-581) to calculate equilibrium constants commonly used in geochemical equilibrium and reaction-transport models for reactions of individual isotopic species. Urey showed that equilibrium constants of isotope exchange reactions for molecules that contain two or more atoms of the same element in equivalent positions are related to isotope fractionation factors by ?? = (Kex)1/n, where n is the number of atoms exchanged. This relation is extended to include species containing multiple isotopes, for example 13C16O18O and 1H2H18O. The equilibrium constants of the isotope exchange reactions can be expressed as ratios of individual isotope equilibrium constants for geochemical reactions. Knowledge of the equilibrium constant for the dominant isotopic species can then be used to calculate the individual isotope equilibrium constants. Individual isotope equilibrium constants are calculated for the reaction CO2g = CO2aq for all species that can be formed from 12C, 13C, 16O, and 18O; for the reaction between 12C18 O2aq and 1H218Ol; and among the various 1H, 2H, 16O, and 18O species of H2O. This is a subset of a larger number of equilibrium constants calculated elsewhere (Thorstenson D. C. and Parkhurst D. L. [2002] Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for implementation in geochemical models. Water-Resources Investigation Report 02-4172. U.S. Geological Survey). Activity coefficients, activity-concentration conventions for the isotopic variants of H2O in the solvent 1H216Ol, and salt effects on isotope fractionation have been included in the derivations. The effects of nonideality are small because of the chemical similarity of different isotopic species of the same molecule or ion. The temperature dependence of the individual isotope equilibrium constants can be calculated from the temperature dependence of the fractionation

  12. Equilibrium and kinetic analysis of CO2-N2 adsorption separation by concentration pulse chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiyuan; Tezel, F Handan

    2007-09-01

    CO2 and N(2) adsorption kinetics and equilibrium behaviours have been studied with silicalite, NaY and 13X by using concentration pulse chromatography for the separation of these gases in the present study. Adsorption Henry's Law constants, the heat of adsorption values, micropore diffusion coefficients and corresponding activation energies are determined experimentally and the three different mass transfer mechanisms are discussed. From the equilibrium data, the corresponding separation factors are obtained for the adsorption separation processes. The heat of adsorption values as well as the Henry's Law adsorption equilibrium constants of CO(2) are much higher than those of N(2) for all the adsorbents studied. 13X, NaY and silicalite all have good separation factors for CO(2)/N(2) system based on equilibrium processes. The order of the equilibrium separation factors is 13X (Ceca)>13X (Zeochem)>NaY (UOP)>silicalite (UOP). Equilibrium selectivity favours CO(2) over N(2). Micropore diffusion resistance is the definite dominant mass transfer mechanism for CO(2) with silicalite and NaY.

  13. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  14. Constant Entropy Properties for an Approximate Model of Equilibrium Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick; Hodge, Marion E.

    1961-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions for properties of equilibrium air up to 15,000 K have been programmed for machine computation. Temperature, compressibility, enthalpy, specific heats, and speed of sound are tabulated as constant entropy functions of temperature. The reciprocal of acoustic impedance and its integral with respect to pressure are also given for the purpose of evaluating the Riemann constants for one-dimensional, isentropic flow.

  15. Microcomputer Calculation of Equilibrium Constants from Molecular Parameters of Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1989-01-01

    Lists a BASIC program which computes the equilibrium constant as a function of temperature. Suggests use by undergraduates taking a one-year calculus-based physical chemistry course. Notes the program provides for up to four species, typically two reactants and two products. (MVL)

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption study of a cationic dye by a natural adsorbent--silkworm pupa.

    PubMed

    Noroozi, B; Sorial, G A; Bahrami, H; Arami, M

    2007-01-01

    In this work the use of silkworm pupa, which is the waste of silk spinning industries has been investigated as an adsorbent for the removal of C.I. Basic Blue 41. The amino acid nature of the pupa provided a reasonable capability for dye removal. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed by using various adsorption isotherm models and the results have shown that adsorption behavior of the dye could be described reasonably well by either Langmuir or Freundlich models. The characteristic parameters for each isotherm have been determined. The monolayer adsorption capacity was determined to be 555 mg/g. Kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption follows pseudo-second-order kinetics with a rate constant of 0.0434 and 0.0572 g/min mg for initial dye concentration of 200 mg/l at 20 and 40 degrees C, respectively. Kinetic studies showed that film diffusion and intra-particle diffusion were simultaneously operating during the adsorption process. The rate constant for intra-particle diffusion was estimated to be 1.985 mg/g min(0.5).

  17. Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium study for removal of mercuric chloride by CuCl2-impregnated activated carbon sorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Liu, Zhouyang; Lee, Joo-Youp

    2013-05-15

    The intrinsic adsorption kinetics of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) was studied for raw, 4% and 10% CuCl2-impregnated activated carbon (CuCl2-AC) sorbents in a fixed-bed system. An HgCl2 adsorption kinetic model was developed for the AC sorbents by taking into account the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium, and internal and external mass transfer. The adsorption kinetic constants determined from the comparisons between the simulation and experimental results were 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5m(3)/(gs) for DARCO-HG, 4%(wt), and 10%(wt) CuCl2-AC sorbents, respectively, at 140 °C. CuCl2 loading was found to slightly increase the adsorption kinetic constant or at least not to decrease it. The HgCl2 equilibrium adsorption data based on the Langmuir isotherm show that high CuCl2 loading can result in high binding energy of the HgCl2 adsorption onto the carbon surface. The adsorption equilibrium constant was found to increase by ~10 times when CuCl2 loading varied from 0 to 10%(wt), which led to a decrease in the desorption kinetic constant (k2) by ~10 times and subsequently the desorption rate by ~50 times. Intraparticle pore diffusion considered in the model showed good accuracy, allowing for the determination of intrinsic HgCl2 adsorption kinetics.

  18. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation.

  19. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation. PMID:26683820

  20. Equilibrium and kinetic data and process design for adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Emrah; Ozacar, Mahmut; Sengil, I Ayhan

    2008-06-15

    The adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite in a batch adsorber has been studied. Four kinetic models, the pseudo first- and second-order equations, the Elovich equation and the intraparticle diffusion equation, were selected to follow the adsorption process. Kinetic parameters; rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and correlation coefficients, for each kinetic equation were calculated and discussed. It was shown that the adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite could be described by the pseudo second-order equation. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin equations. Adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite followed the Langmuir isotherm. A single stage batch adsorber was designed for different adsorbent mass/treated effluent volume ratios using the Langmuir isotherm. PMID:18055111

  1. Equilibrium and kinetic aspects of sodium cromoglycate adsorption on chitosan: mass uptake and surface charging considerations.

    PubMed

    de Lima, C R M; Pereira, M R; Fonseca, J L C

    2013-09-01

    Chitosan has more and more been suggested as a material for use as adsorbent in the treatment of effluents as well as in the synthesis of drug-loaded nanoparticles for controlled release. In both cases, a good understanding of the process of adsorption, both kinetically and in terms of equilibrium, has an importance of its own. In this manuscript we study the interaction between sodium cromoglycate, a drug used in asthma treatment, and chitosan. Equilibrium experiments showed that Sips (or Freundlich-Langmuir) isotherm described well the resultant data and adsorption possibly occurred as in multilayers. A model based on ordinary reaction-rate theory, compounded of two processes, each one with a correlated velocity constant, described the kinetics of sorption. Kinetic and equilibrium data suggested the possibility of surface rearrangement, favored by the increase of temperature.

  2. Computational calculation of equilibrium constants: addition to carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; González-Pérez, Marina; Pérez-Prior, María Teresa; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2009-10-22

    Hydration reactions are relevant for understanding many organic mechanisms. Since the experimental determination of hydration and hemiacetalization equilibrium constants is fairly complex, computational calculations now offer a useful alternative to experimental measurements. In this work, carbonyl hydration and hemiacetalization constants were calculated from the free energy differences between compounds in solution, using absolute and relative approaches. The following conclusions can be drawn: (i) The use of a relative approach in the calculation of hydration and hemiacetalization constants allows compensation of systematic errors in the solvation energies. (ii) On average, the methodology proposed here can predict hydration constants within +/- 0.5 log K(hyd) units for aldehydes. (iii) Hydration constants can be calculated for ketones and carboxylic acid derivatives within less than +/- 1.0 log K(hyd), on average, at the CBS-Q level of theory. (iv) The proposed methodology can predict hemiacetal formation constants accurately at the MP2 6-31++G(d,p) level using a common reference. If group references are used, the results obtained using the much cheaper DFT-B3LYP 6-31++G(d,p) level are almost as accurate. (v) In general, the best results are obtained if a common reference for all compounds is used. The use of group references improves the results at the lower levels of theory, but at higher levels, this becomes unnecessary. PMID:19761202

  3. Computational Calculation of Equilibrium Constants: Addition to Carbonyl Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; González-Pérez, Marina; Pérez-Prior, María Teresa; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2009-09-01

    Hydration reactions are relevant for understanding many organic mechanisms. Since the experimental determination of hydration and hemiacetalization equilibrium constants is fairly complex, computational calculations now offer a useful alternative to experimental measurements. In this work, carbonyl hydration and hemiacetalization constants were calculated from the free energy differences between compounds in solution, using absolute and relative approaches. The following conclusions can be drawn: (i) The use of a relative approach in the calculation of hydration and hemiacetalization constants allows compensation of systematic errors in the solvation energies. (ii) On average, the methodology proposed here can predict hydration constants within ± 0.5 log Khyd units for aldehydes. (iii) Hydration constants can be calculated for ketones and carboxylic acid derivatives within less than ± 1.0 log Khyd, on average, at the CBS-Q level of theory. (iv) The proposed methodology can predict hemiacetal formation constants accurately at the MP2 6-31++G(d,p) level using a common reference. If group references are used, the results obtained using the much cheaper DFT-B3LYP 6-31++G(d,p) level are almost as accurate. (v) In general, the best results are obtained if a common reference for all compounds is used. The use of group references improves the results at the lower levels of theory, but at higher levels, this becomes unnecessary.

  4. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics for SO2, NO, CO2 on zeolites FAU and LTA.

    PubMed

    Yi, Honghong; Deng, Hua; Tang, Xiaolong; Yu, Qiongfen; Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Haiyan

    2012-02-15

    In order to develop a single-step process for removing SO(2), NO, CO(2) in flue gas simultaneously by co-adsorption method. Pure component adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of SO(2), NO, and CO(2) on zeolite NaY, NaX, CaA were obtained respectively. Equilibrium data were analyzed by equilibrium model and Henry's law constant. The results suggest that Adsorption affinity follows the trend SO(2)>CO(2)>NO for the same adsorbent. Zeolite with stronger polar surface is a more promising adsorbent candidate. Kinetics behavior was investigated using the breakthrough curve method. The overall mass transfer coefficient and diffusivity factor were determined by a linear driving force model. The results are indicative of micropore diffusion controlling mechanism. NaY zeolite has the minimum resistance of mass transfer duo to the wide pore distribution and large pore amount. CaA zeolite exhibits the highest spatial hindered effect. Finally, co-adsorption effect of SO(2), NO, and CO(2) were investigated by multi-components breakthrough method. SO(2) and NO may form new adsorbed species, however, CO(2) presents a fast breakthrough. Chemical adsorption causes SO(2) transforms to SO(4)(2-), however, element N and C are not detected in adsorbed zeolites.

  5. Adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of gasoline vapors onto polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lijuan; Yu, Weihua; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2014-03-01

    The emission of gasoline vapors is becoming a significant environmental problem especially for the population-dense area and also results in a significant economic loss. In this study, adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of gasoline vapors onto macroporous and hypercrosslinked polymeric resins at 308 K were investigated and compared with commercial activated carbon (NucharWV-A 1100). The results showed that the equilibrium and breakthrough adsorption capacities of virgin macroporous and hypercrosslinked polymeric resins were lower than virgin-activated carbon. Compared with origin adsorbents, however, the breakthrough adsorption capacities of the regenerated activated carbon for gasoline vapors decreased by 58.5 % and 61.3 % when the initial concentration of gasoline vapors were 700 and 1,400 mg/L, while those of macroporous and hypercrosslinked resins decreased by 17.4 % and 17.5 %, and 46.5 % and 45.5 %, respectively. Due to the specific bimodal property in the region of micropore (0.5-2.0 nm) and meso-macropore (30-70 nm), the regenerated hypercrosslinked polymeric resin exhibited the comparable breakthrough adsorption capacities with the regenerated activated carbon at the initial concentration of 700 mg/L, and even higher when the initial concentration of gasoline vapors was 1,400 mg/L. In addition, 90 % of relative humidity had ignorable effect on the adsorption of gasoline vapors on hypercrosslinked polymeric resin. Taken together, it is expected that hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent would be a promising adsorbent for the removal of gasoline vapors from gas streams.

  6. Conjugate Acid-Base Pairs, Free Energy, and the Equilibrium Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Darrell H.

    1969-01-01

    Describes a method of calculating the equilibrium constant from free energy data. Values of the equilibrium constants of six Bronsted-Lowry reactions calculated by the author's method and by a conventional textbook method are compared. (LC)

  7. Equilibrium constants and protonation site for N-methylbenzenesulfonamides

    PubMed Central

    Rosa da Costa, Ana M; García-Río, Luis; Pessêgo, Márcia

    2011-01-01

    Summary The protonation equilibria of four substituted N-methylbenzenesulfonamides, X-MBS: X = 4-MeO (3a), 4-Me (3b), 4-Cl (3c) and 4-NO2 (3d), in aqueous sulfuric acid were studied at 25 °C by UV–vis spectroscopy. As expected, the values for the acidity constants are highly dependent on the electron-donor character of the substituent (the pK BH+ values are −3.5 ± 0.2, −4.2 ± 0.2, −5.2 ± 0.3 and −6.0 ± 0.3 for 3a, 3b, 3c and 3d, respectively). The solvation parameter m* is always higher than 0.5 and points to a decrease in the importance of solvation on the cation stabilization as the electron-donor character of the substituent increases. Hammett plots of the equilibrium constants showed a better correlation with the σ+ substituent parameter than with σ, which indicates that the initial protonation site is the oxygen atom of the sulfonyl group. PMID:22238552

  8. Using nonequilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM) for simultaneous determination of concentration and equilibrium constant.

    PubMed

    Kanoatov, Mirzo; Galievsky, Victor A; Krylova, Svetlana M; Cherney, Leonid T; Jankowski, Hanna K; Krylov, Sergey N

    2015-03-01

    Nonequilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM) is a versatile tool for studying affinity binding. Here we describe a NECEEM-based approach for simultaneous determination of both the equilibrium constant, K(d), and the unknown concentration of a binder that we call a target, T. In essence, NECEEM is used to measure the unbound equilibrium fraction, R, for the binder with a known concentration that we call a ligand, L. The first set of experiments is performed at varying concentrations of T, prepared by serial dilution of the stock solution, but at a constant concentration of L, which is as low as its reliable quantitation allows. The value of R is plotted as a function of the dilution coefficient, and dilution corresponding to R = 0.5 is determined. This dilution of T is used in the second set of experiments in which the concentration of T is fixed but the concentration of L is varied. The experimental dependence of R on the concentration of L is fitted with a function describing their theoretical dependence. Both K(d) and the concentration of T are used as fitting parameters, and their sought values are determined as the ones that generate the best fit. We have fully validated this approach in silico by using computer-simulated NECEEM electropherograms and then applied it to experimental determination of the unknown concentration of MutS protein and K(d) of its interactions with a DNA aptamer. The general approach described here is applicable not only to NECEEM but also to any other method that can determine a fraction of unbound molecules at equilibrium.

  9. [Characteristics of DNA adsorption and desorption in variable and constant charge soil colloids].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dai-Zhang; Wang, Shen-Yang; Jiang, Xin; Heng, Li-Sha; Tan, Jin-Fang; Liu, Shi-Liang; Cao, Yong-Xian

    2009-09-15

    The characteristics of adsorption and desorption of DNA by Red soil colloid, Latosol colloid, Chao colloid and Cinnamon colloid at different pH values were studied using a batch method. It showed that there was an increase of solution pH after adsorption of DNA by the four soil colloids in both NaCl and KCl electrolyte systems. The increasing ranges of pH values were in order of Red soil colloid > Latosol colloid > Chao colloid > Cinnamon colloid, and NaCl electrolyte system > KCl electrolyte system. The amounts of DNA adsorption on soil colloids decreased with the increase of pH value. The maximum amounts of DNA adsorption in different colloids were about 13.1-14.8 microg x mg(-1) when pH values were 2-4. The decreasing ranges of the amounts of DNA adsorption were about 5.5 microg x mg(-1) in NaCl electrolyte system and 2.1 Mg x mg(-1) in KCl electrolyte system in Red soil colloid and Latosol colloid after the rising of equilibrium solution pH from 4.2 to 8.6, whereas the remarked decreasing ranges of the adsorption amounts of DNA were about 8.3-12.2 microg x mg(-1) on Chao colloid and Cinnamon colloid in two electrolyte systems. The decreasing ranges of DNA adsorption were in order of the constant charge (Chao soil and Cinnamon) colloids > the variable charge (Red soil and Latosol) colloids. The differences of desorption on the variable and the constant charge colloids are very significant while the DNA adsorbed was desorbed with NaOAc solution and NaH2 PO4 solution. The desorption percent desorption of DNA as NaH2PO4 desorbent was 23.5%-40.2% larger on the variable charge colloids than 8.8%-21.6% on the constant charge of colloids at the three different solution pH values of 3, 5 and 7, while that as NaOAc desorbent was 72.3%-85.9% larger on the constant charge colloids than 10%-24.5% on the variable charge colloids. These results implied that the ligand exchange played a more important role in DNA adsorption on the variable charge colloids, and electrostatic

  10. Equilibrium studies of copper ion adsorption onto palm kernel fibre.

    PubMed

    Ofomaja, Augustine E

    2010-07-01

    The equilibrium sorption of copper ions from aqueous solution using a new adsorbent, palm kernel fibre, has been studied. Palm kernel fibre is obtained in large amounts as a waste product of palm oil production. Batch equilibrium studies were carried out and system variables such as solution pH, sorbent dose, and sorption temperature were varied. The equilibrium sorption data was then analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Temkin isotherms. The fit of these isotherm models to the equilibrium sorption data was determined, using the linear coefficient of determination, r(2), and the non-linear Chi-square, chi(2) error analysis. The results revealed that sorption was pH dependent and increased with increasing solution pH above the pH(PZC) of the palm kernel fibre with an optimum dose of 10g/dm(3). The equilibrium data were found to fit the Langmuir isotherm model best, with a monolayer capacity of 3.17 x 10(-4)mol/g at 339K. The sorption equilibrium constant, K(a), increased with increasing temperature, indicating that bond strength between sorbate and sorbent increased with temperature and sorption was endothermic. This was confirmed by the increase in the values of the Temkin isotherm constant, B(1), with increasing temperature. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm parameter, free energy, E, was in the range of 15.7-16.7kJ/mol suggesting that the sorption mechanism was ion exchange. Desorption studies showed that a high percentage of the copper was desorbed from the adsorbent using acid solutions (HCl, HNO(3) and CH(3)COOH) and the desorption percentage increased with acid concentration. The thermodynamics of the copper ions/palm kernel fibre system indicate that the process is spontaneous and endothermic. PMID:20346574

  11. Equilibrium studies of copper ion adsorption onto palm kernel fibre.

    PubMed

    Ofomaja, Augustine E

    2010-07-01

    The equilibrium sorption of copper ions from aqueous solution using a new adsorbent, palm kernel fibre, has been studied. Palm kernel fibre is obtained in large amounts as a waste product of palm oil production. Batch equilibrium studies were carried out and system variables such as solution pH, sorbent dose, and sorption temperature were varied. The equilibrium sorption data was then analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Temkin isotherms. The fit of these isotherm models to the equilibrium sorption data was determined, using the linear coefficient of determination, r(2), and the non-linear Chi-square, chi(2) error analysis. The results revealed that sorption was pH dependent and increased with increasing solution pH above the pH(PZC) of the palm kernel fibre with an optimum dose of 10g/dm(3). The equilibrium data were found to fit the Langmuir isotherm model best, with a monolayer capacity of 3.17 x 10(-4)mol/g at 339K. The sorption equilibrium constant, K(a), increased with increasing temperature, indicating that bond strength between sorbate and sorbent increased with temperature and sorption was endothermic. This was confirmed by the increase in the values of the Temkin isotherm constant, B(1), with increasing temperature. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm parameter, free energy, E, was in the range of 15.7-16.7kJ/mol suggesting that the sorption mechanism was ion exchange. Desorption studies showed that a high percentage of the copper was desorbed from the adsorbent using acid solutions (HCl, HNO(3) and CH(3)COOH) and the desorption percentage increased with acid concentration. The thermodynamics of the copper ions/palm kernel fibre system indicate that the process is spontaneous and endothermic.

  12. Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for implementation in geochemical models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, Donald C.; Parkhurst, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Theory is derived from the work of Urey to calculate equilibrium constants commonly used in geochemical equilibrium and reaction-transport models for reactions of individual isotopic species. Urey showed that equilibrium constants of isotope exchange reactions for molecules that contain two or more atoms of the same element in equivalent positions are related to isotope fractionation factors by , where is n the number of atoms exchanged. This relation is extended to include species containing multiple isotopes, for example and , and to include the effects of nonideality. The equilibrium constants of the isotope exchange reactions provide a basis for calculating the individual isotope equilibrium constants for the geochemical modeling reactions. The temperature dependence of the individual isotope equilibrium constants can be calculated from the temperature dependence of the fractionation factors. Equilibrium constants are calculated for all species that can be formed from and selected species containing , in the molecules and the ion pairs with where the subscripts g, aq, l, and s refer to gas, aqueous, liquid, and solid, respectively. These equilibrium constants are used in the geochemical model PHREEQC to produce an equilibrium and reaction-transport model that includes these isotopic species. Methods are presented for calculation of the individual isotope equilibrium constants for the asymmetric bicarbonate ion. An example calculates the equilibrium of multiple isotopes among multiple species and phases.

  13. Determination of the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of adsorption of copper(II) ions onto seeds of Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Adnan; Ozcan, A Safa; Tunali, Sibel; Akar, Tamer; Kiran, Ismail

    2005-09-30

    Adsorption of copper ions onto Capsicum annuum (red pepper) seeds was investigated with the variation in the parameters of pH, contact time, adsorbent and copper(II) concentrations and temperature. The nature of the possible adsorbent and metal ion interactions was examined by the FTIR technique. The copper(II) adsorption equilibrium was attained within 60 min. Adsorption of copper(II) ions onto C. annuum seeds followed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Maximum adsorption capacity (q(max)) of copper(II) ions onto red pepper seeds was 4.47x10(-4) molg(-1) at 50 degrees C. Three kinetic models including the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equations were selected to follow the adsorption process. Kinetic parameters such as rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and related correlation coefficients, for each kinetic model were calculated and discussed. It was indicated that the adsorption of copper(II) ions onto C. annuum seeds could be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and also followed the intraparticle diffusion model up to 60 min, but diffusion is not only the rate controlling step. Thermodynamics parameters such as the change of free energy, enthalpy and entropy were also evaluated for the adsorption of copper(II) ions onto C. annuum seeds.

  14. Adsorption Properties of Tetracycline onto Graphene Oxide: Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghadim, Ehsan Ezzatpour; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Soleimani, Gholamreza; Hosseini, Hadi; Kimiagar, Salimeh; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticle is a high potential effective absorbent. Tetracycline (TC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic produced, indicated for use against many bacterial infections. In the present research, a systematic study of the adsorption and release process of tetracycline on GO was performed by varying pH, sorption time and temperature. The results of our studies showed that tetracycline strongly loads on the GO surface via π–π interaction and cation–π bonding. Investigation of TC adsorption kinetics showed that the equilibrium was reached within 15 min following the pseudo-second-order model with observed rate constants of k2 = 0.2742–0.5362 g/mg min (at different temperatures). The sorption data has interpreted by the Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption of 323 mg/g (298 K). The mean energy of adsorption was determined 1.83 kJ/mol (298 K) based on the Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) adsorption isotherm. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° values for the adsorption were estimated which indicated the endothermic and spontaneous nature of the sorption process. The electrochemistry approved an ideal reaction for the adsorption under electrodic process. Simulation of GO and TC was done by LAMMPS. Force studies in z direction showed that tetracycline comes close to GO sheet by C8 direction. Then it goes far and turns and again comes close from amine group to the GO sheet. PMID:24302989

  15. Measurement of both the equilibrium constant and rate constant for electronic energy transfer by control of the limiting kinetic regimes.

    PubMed

    Vagnini, Michael T; Rutledge, W Caleb; Wagenknecht, Paul S

    2010-02-01

    Electronic energy transfer can fall into two limiting cases. When the rate of the energy transfer back reaction is much faster than relaxation of the acceptor excited state, equilibrium between the donor and acceptor excited states is achieved and only the equilibrium constant for the energy transfer can be measured. When the rate of the back reaction is much slower than relaxation of the acceptor, the energy transfer is irreversible and only the forward rate constant can be measured. Herein, we demonstrate that with trans-[Cr(d(4)-cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) as the donor and either trans-[Cr([15]ane-ane-N(4))(CN)(2)](+) or trans-[Cr(cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) as the acceptor, both limits can be obtained by control of the donor concentration. The equilibrium constant and rate constant for the case in which trans-[Cr([15]ane-ane-N(4))(CN)(2)](+) is the acceptor are 0.66 and 1.7 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The equilibrium constant is in good agreement with the value of 0.60 determined using the excited state energy gap between the donor and acceptor species. For the thermoneutral case in which trans-[Cr(cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) is the acceptor, an experimental equilibrium constant of 0.99 was reported previously, and the rate constant has now been measured as 4.0 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1).

  16. A Unified Kinetics and Equilibrium Experiment: Rate Law, Activation Energy, and Equilibrium Constant for the Dissociation of Ferroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattar, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) is the basis of a suite of four experiments spanning 5 weeks. Students determine the rate law, activation energy, and equilibrium constant for the dissociation of the complex ion in acid solution and base dissociation constant for phenanthroline. The focus on one chemical system simplifies a daunting set of…

  17. The Rigorous Evaluation of Spectrophotometric Data to Obtain an Equilibrium Constant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, John R.; Drago, Russell S.

    1982-01-01

    Most students do not know how to determine the equilibrium constant and estimate the error in it from spectrophotometric data that contain experimental errors. This "dry-lab" experiment describes a method that may be used to determine the "best-fit" value of the 1:1 equilibrium constant to spectrophotometric data. (Author/JN)

  18. Quantifying differences in the impact of variable chemistry on equilibrium uranium(VI) adsorption properties of aquifer sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-09-16

    Uranium adsorption-desorption on sediment samples collected from the Hanford 300-Area, Richland, WA varied extensively over a range of field-relevant chemical conditions, complicating assessment of possible differences in equilibrium adsorption properties. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in 500-1000 hours although dissolved uranium concentrations increased over thousands of hours owing to changes in aqueous chemical composition driven by sediment-water reactions. A non-electrostatic surface complexation reaction, >SOH + UO22+ + 2CO32- = >SOUO2(CO3HCO3)2-, provided the best fit to experimental data for each sediment sample resulting in a range of conditional equilibrium constants (logKc) from 21.49 to 21.76. Potential differences in uranium adsorption properties could be assessed in plots based on the generalized mass-action expressions yielding linear trends displaced vertically by differences in logKc values. Using this approach, logKc values for seven sediment samples were not significantly different. However, a significant difference in adsorption properties between one sediment sample and the fines (<0.063 mm) of another could be demonstrated despite the fines requiring a different reaction stoichiometry. Estimates of logKc uncertainty were improved by capturing all data points within experimental errors. The mass-action expression plots demonstrate that applying models outside the range of conditions used in model calibration greatly increases potential errors.

  19. Quantifying differences in the impact of variable chemistry on equilibrium uranium(VI) adsorption properties of aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Uranium adsorption-desorption on sediment samples collected from the Hanford 300-Area, Richland, WA varied extensively over a range of field-relevant chemical conditions, complicating assessment of possible differences in equilibrium adsorption properties. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in 500-1000 h although dissolved uranium concentrations increased over thousands of hours owing to changes in aqueous chemical composition driven by sediment-water reactions. A nonelectrostatic surface complexation reaction, >SOH + UO22+ + 2CO32- = >SOUO2(CO3HCO3)2-, provided the best fit to experimental data for each sediment sample resulting in a range of conditional equilibrium constants (logKc) from 21.49 to 21.76. Potential differences in uranium adsorption properties could be assessed in plots based on the generalized mass-action expressions yielding linear trends displaced vertically by differences in logKc values. Using this approach, logKc values for seven sediment samples were not significantly different. However, a significant difference in adsorption properties between one sediment sample and the fines (Kc uncertainty were improved by capturing all data points within experimental errors. The mass-action expression plots demonstrate that applying models outside the range of conditions used in model calibration greatly increases potential errors.

  20. Calculation of cooperativity and equilibrium constants of ligands binding to G-quadruplex DNA in solution.

    PubMed

    Kudrev, A G

    2013-11-15

    Equilibrium model of a ligand binding with DNA oligomer has been considered as a process of small molecule adsorption onto a lattice of multiple binding sites. An experimental example has been used to verify the assertion that during saturation of the macromolecule by a ligand should expect effect of cooperativity due to changes in DNA conformation or the mutual influence between bound ligands. Such phenomenon cannot be entirely described by the classical stepwise complex formation model. To evaluate a ligand binding affinity and cooperativity of ligand-oligomer complex formation the statistical approach has been proposed. This new computational approach used to re-examine previously studded ligand binding towards DNA quadruplexes targets with multiple binding sites. The intrinsic equilibrium constants K1-3 of the mesotetrakis-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (TMPyP4) binding with the [d(T4G4)]4 and with the [AG3(T2AG3)3] quadruplexes and the correction for the mutual influence between bound ligands (cooperativity parameters ω) was determined from the Job plots based upon the nonlinear least-squares fitting procedure. The re-examination of experimental curves reveals that the equilibrium is affected by the positive cooperative (ω>1) binding of the TMPyP4 ligand with tetramolecular [d(T4G4)]4. However for an intramolecular antiparallel-parallel hybrid structure [AG3(T2AG3)3] the weak anti-cooperativity of TMPyP4 accommodation (ω<1) onto two from three nonidentical sites was detected. PMID:24148442

  1. Equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption of Freon-12 at infinite dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, T.C.; Sircar, S. )

    1994-06-01

    Equilibrium and kinetic data for adsorption of trace CF[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] (Freon-12) from various carrier gased on BPL activated carbon are reported. Coadsorption of the bulk carrier gas can severely reduce the equilibrium adsorption capacity and adsorptive mass-transfer coefficient of strongly adsorbed CF[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The difference in size between CF[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] and the bulk carrier gas molecules plays a major role in establishing the binary or multicomponent equilibrium adsorption properties. The multisite (singe and multicomponent) Langmuir model, which accounts for differences in adsorbate sizes, provides a reasonable framework for describing the size effects. The adsorptive mass transfer of CF[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] under the experimental conditions investigated is dominated by surface diffusion into the pores of the activated carbon. The surface diffusivity is a strong function of the extent of coverage and strength of adsorption of the bulk components.

  2. Kinetics and equilibrium adsorption of nano-TiO 2 particles on synthetic biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahle-Demessie, Endalkachew; Tadesse, Haregewine

    2011-07-01

    Understanding the environmental behavior of nanoparticles includes their interaction with biofilms, which is a covering on the surface of a living or nonliving substrate composed of microorganisms. This study focuses on nano-TiO2 sorption mechanism by synthetic biofilm that was prepared as superporous spherical beads from agarose, using batch stirred flasks kept at room temperature. The pH plays an important part in these phenomena, by its influence on the nanoparticles and biofilm chemistry, where the biofilm nanoTiO2 uptake at neutral pH was enhanced over acidic conditions. Hydroxylation of TiO2 nanoparticles, dependent on pH and the salinity of the solution, influences the stability of colloids, the sorption kinetics via the nature of limiting phases: diffusion through the boundary layer or intrabiofilm mass transfer and the sorption mechanism. The sorption follows pseudo first-order adsorption kinetics with estimated average rate constants of 2.2 (min- 1). Equilibrium isotherms were evaluated using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms to obtain the maximum uptake at different solution pH and the free energy of the adsorption. The adsorption is apparently irreversible because biofilm limits diffusion of particles out of the pores and the complexation active binding sites on the surface hydrated biofilm to the hydrophilic TiO2 nanoparticles.

  3. Galvanic Cells and the Determination of Equilibrium Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosmer, Jonathan L.; Peters, Dennis G.

    2012-01-01

    Readily assembled mini-galvanic cells can be employed to compare their observed voltages with those predicted from the Nernst equation and to determine solubility products for silver halides and overall formation constants for metal-ammonia complexes. Results obtained by students in both an honors-level first-year course in general chemistry and…

  4. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  5. Profiles of equilibrium constants for self-association of aromatic molecules.

    PubMed

    Beshnova, Daria A; Lantushenko, Anastasia O; Davies, David B; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2009-04-28

    Analysis of the noncovalent, noncooperative self-association of identical aromatic molecules assumes that the equilibrium self-association constants are either independent of the number of molecules (the EK-model) or change progressively with increasing aggregation (the AK-model). The dependence of the self-association constant on the number of molecules in the aggregate (i.e., the profile of the equilibrium constant) was empirically derived in the AK-model but, in order to provide some physical understanding of the profile, it is proposed that the sources for attenuation of the equilibrium constant are the loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom, the ordering of molecules in the aggregates and the electrostatic contribution (for charged units). Expressions are derived for the profiles of the equilibrium constants for both neutral and charged molecules. Although the EK-model has been widely used in the analysis of experimental data, it is shown in this work that the derived equilibrium constant, K(EK), depends on the concentration range used and hence, on the experimental method employed. The relationship has also been demonstrated between the equilibrium constant K(EK) and the real dimerization constant, K(D), which shows that the value of K(EK) is always lower than K(D).

  6. Copper adsorption on magnetite-loaded chitosan microspheres: A kinetic and equilibrium study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzus, P. E.; Debandi, M. V.; Daraio, M. E.

    2012-08-01

    A composite of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and the biopolymer chitosan, chemically crosslinked, was prepared as microspheres and used to adsorb copper ions, which were chosen as a model of contaminant metal in water. The adsorption of copper on the magnetic microspheres was studied in a batch process, with different aqueous solutions of Cu (II) at concentrations ranging from 40 to 1100 ppm. Kinetic and equilibrium aspects of the adsorption process were studied. The time-dependent Cu (II) adsorption data were well described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. It was found that the equilibrium data follow the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum adsorption capacity of around 500 mg Cu/g chitosan. The used microspheres were removed and after desorption the material was able to be reused as an adsorbent. The prepared microspheres proved efficient in the removal of copper ions through an adsorption process whose kinetic and equilibrium characteristics were analyzed.

  7. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-02-12

    Rates of contaminant U(VI) release from individual size fractions of a composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through batch reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. Variability in equilibrium adsorption among the various size fractions was determined in static batch reactors and analyzed using the surface complexation modeling approach. The estimated stoichiometric coefficients of U(VI) surface complexation reactions with respect to pH and carbonate concentrations varied with size fractions. This source of variability significantly increased the uncertainty in U(VI) conditional equilibrium constants over that estimated from experimental errors alone. A minimum difference between conditional equilibrium constants was established in order to evaluate statistically significant differences between sediment adsorption properties. A set of equilibrium and kinetic expressions for cation exchange, calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration, and silica dissolution were incorporated in a reaction-rate model to describe the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through batch experiments. Parameters in the reaction-rate model, calibrated using experimental data for select size fractions, predicted the changes in solute concentrations for the bulk, <2 mm, sediment sample. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multi-rate surface complexation model with an assumed lognormal distribution for the rate constants. The estimated mean and standard deviation were the same for all < 2mm size fractions, but differed in the 2-8mm size fraction. Micropore volumes in the varied size fractions were also similar as assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data. These findings provide further support for the link between microporosity and particle-scale mass transfer rates controlling kinetic U(VI) adsorption/desorption and for the utility of N2 desorption

  8. Adsorption of methylene blue onto bamboo-based activated carbon: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Hameed, B H; Din, A T M; Ahmad, A L

    2007-03-22

    Bamboo, an abundant and inexpensive natural resource in Malaysia was used to prepare activated carbon by physiochemical activation with potassium hydroxide (KOH) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) as the activating agents at 850 degrees C for 2h. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of methylene blue dye on such carbon were then examined at 30 degrees C. Adsorption isotherm of the methylene blue (MB) on the activated carbon was determined and correlated with common isotherm equations. The equilibrium data for methylene blue adsorption well fitted to the Langmuir equation, with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 454.2mg/g. Two simplified kinetic models including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equation were selected to follow the adsorption processes. The adsorption of methylene blue could be best described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The kinetic parameters of this best-fit model were calculated and discussed.

  9. The Equilibrium Constant for Bromothymol Blue: A General Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Using Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klotz, Elsbeth; Doyle, Robert; Gross, Erin; Mattson, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly undergraduate laboratory experiment is described in which students use visible spectroscopy to determine a numerical value for an equilibrium constant, K[subscript c]. The experiment correlates well with the lecture topic of equilibrium even though the subject of the study is an acid-base…

  10. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  11. Determination of gas phase adsorption isotherms--a simple constant volume method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekeun; Cai, Zhangli; Sorial, George A

    2006-08-01

    Single and ternary solute gas phase adsorption isotherms were conducted in this study to evaluate the effectiveness of a simple constant volume method, which was utilized by using Tedlar gas sampling bags as a constant volume batch reactor. For this purpose, gas phase adsorption of toluene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) on two types of activated carbons, BPL-bituminous base and OVC--coconut base, were investigated. For the single solute adsorption, the experimental adsorption data were found to be well correlated with Freundlich and Myers adsorption equations. The pore size distribution of adsorbents was found to affect their adsorption capacities; its effect was dependant on the solute concentration. The ternary adsorption experimental isotherms were accurately predicted by using the well-known model, i.e., ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST).

  12. Apparent equilibrium constants and standard transformed Gibbs energies of biochemical reactions involving carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Alberty, R A

    1997-12-01

    When carbon dioxide is produced in a biochemical reaction, the expression for the apparent equilibrium constant K' can be written in terms of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the gas phase or the total concentration of species containing CO2 in the aqueous phase, referred to here as [TotCO2]. The values of these two apparent equilibrium constants are different because they correspond to different ways of writing the biochemical equations. Their dependencies on pH and ionic strength are also different. The ratio of these two apparent equilibrium constants is equal to the apparent Henry's law constant K'H. This article provides derivations of equations for the calculation of the standard transformed Gibbs energies of formation of TotCO2 and values of the apparent Henry's law constant at various pH levels and ionic strengths. These equations involve the four equilibrium constants interconnecting the five species [CO2(g), CO2(aq), H2CO3, HCO3-, and CO3(2-)] of carbon dioxide. In the literature there are many errors in the treatment of equilibrium data on biochemical reactions involving carbon dioxide, and so several examples are discussed here, including calculation of standard transformed Gibbs energies of formation of reactants. This approach also applies to net reactions, and the net reaction for the oxidation of glucose to carbon dioxide and water is discussed.

  13. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solution onto untreated coffee grounds: equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Azouaou, N; Sadaoui, Z; Djaafri, A; Mokaddem, H

    2010-12-15

    Adsorption can be used as a cost effective and efficient technique for the removal of toxic heavy metals from wastewater. Waste materials with no further treatment such as coffee grounds from cafeterias may act as adsorbents for the removal of cadmium. Batch kinetic and equilibrium experiments were conducted to study the effects of contact time, adsorbent dose, initial pH, particle size, initial concentration of cadmium and temperature. Three adsorption isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich were used to analyse the equilibrium data. The Langmuir isotherm which provided the best correlation for Cd(2+) adsorption onto coffee grounds, shows that the adsorption was favourable and the adsorption capacity found was equal to 15.65 mg g(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and the adsorption was exothermic. The equilibrium was achieved less than 120 min. The adsorption kinetic data was fitted with first and second order kinetic models. Finally it was concluded that the cadmium adsorption kinetic onto coffee grounds was well fitted by second order kinetic model rather than first order model. The results suggest that coffee grounds have high possibility to be used as effective and economical adsorbent for Cd(2+) removal.

  14. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of phenol onto graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Liu, Tonghao; Sun, Jiankun; Jiao, Yuqin; Xia, Yanzhi; Xia, Linhua; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of temperature on phenol adsorbed by graphene shows that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of phenol increases with the increase in temperature from 285 to 333 K. Increasing adsorption capacities with temperature indicates that the adsorption of phenol is controlled by an endothermic reaction. Highlights: ► The graphene has high phenol adsorption capacity. ► The graphene has a high specific surface area of 305 m{sup 2}/g. ► The adsorption capacity is high at acidic pH range. ► The graphene has rapid phenol adsorption rate. ► Phenol adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. -- Abstract: Graphene, a new member of carbon family, has been prepared, characterized and used as adsorbent to remove phenol from aqueous solution. The effect parameters including pH, dosage, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption properties of phenol onto graphene were investigated. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity can reach 28.26 mg/g at the conditions of initial phenol concentration of 50 mg/L, pH 6.3 and 285 K. Adsorption data were well described by both Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene fit the pseudo second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene was endothermic and spontaneous.

  15. Equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Bennett D.

    2016-07-01

    A theory is developed to describe the equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels. The adsorption theory is developed in classical density functional theory, with the adsorbed phase and fluid phase chemical potentials modeled using thermodynamic perturbation theory. Adsorption of nonpatchy colloids in microchannels is typically achieved through nonequilibrium routes such as spin coating and evaporation. These methods are required due to the entropic penalty of adsorption. In this work we propose that the introduction of patches on the colloids greatly enhances the temperature dependent and reversible adsorption of colloids in microchannels. It is shown how bulk fluid density, temperature, patch size, and channel diameter can be manipulated to achieve the adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels.

  16. Equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Bennett D

    2016-07-01

    A theory is developed to describe the equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels. The adsorption theory is developed in classical density functional theory, with the adsorbed phase and fluid phase chemical potentials modeled using thermodynamic perturbation theory. Adsorption of nonpatchy colloids in microchannels is typically achieved through nonequilibrium routes such as spin coating and evaporation. These methods are required due to the entropic penalty of adsorption. In this work we propose that the introduction of patches on the colloids greatly enhances the temperature dependent and reversible adsorption of colloids in microchannels. It is shown how bulk fluid density, temperature, patch size, and channel diameter can be manipulated to achieve the adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels. PMID:27575187

  17. Classical calculation of the equilibrium constants for true bound dimers using complete potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Buryak, Ilya; Vigasin, Andrey A.

    2015-12-21

    The present paper aims at deriving classical expressions which permit calculation of the equilibrium constant for weakly interacting molecular pairs using a complete multidimensional potential energy surface. The latter is often available nowadays as a result of the more and more sophisticated and accurate ab initio calculations. The water dimer formation is considered as an example. It is shown that even in case of a rather strongly bound dimer the suggested expression permits obtaining quite reliable estimate for the equilibrium constant. The reliability of our obtained water dimer equilibrium constant is briefly discussed by comparison with the available data based on experimental observations, quantum calculations, and the use of RRHO approximation, provided the latter is restricted to formation of true bound states only.

  18. Classical calculation of the equilibrium constants for true bound dimers using complete potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryak, Ilya; Vigasin, Andrey A.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper aims at deriving classical expressions which permit calculation of the equilibrium constant for weakly interacting molecular pairs using a complete multidimensional potential energy surface. The latter is often available nowadays as a result of the more and more sophisticated and accurate ab initio calculations. The water dimer formation is considered as an example. It is shown that even in case of a rather strongly bound dimer the suggested expression permits obtaining quite reliable estimate for the equilibrium constant. The reliability of our obtained water dimer equilibrium constant is briefly discussed by comparison with the available data based on experimental observations, quantum calculations, and the use of RRHO approximation, provided the latter is restricted to formation of true bound states only.

  19. Classical calculation of the equilibrium constants for true bound dimers using complete potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Buryak, Ilya; Vigasin, Andrey A

    2015-12-21

    The present paper aims at deriving classical expressions which permit calculation of the equilibrium constant for weakly interacting molecular pairs using a complete multidimensional potential energy surface. The latter is often available nowadays as a result of the more and more sophisticated and accurate ab initio calculations. The water dimer formation is considered as an example. It is shown that even in case of a rather strongly bound dimer the suggested expression permits obtaining quite reliable estimate for the equilibrium constant. The reliability of our obtained water dimer equilibrium constant is briefly discussed by comparison with the available data based on experimental observations, quantum calculations, and the use of RRHO approximation, provided the latter is restricted to formation of true bound states only.

  20. Predicting Arsenate Adsorption by Soils Using Soil Chemical Parameters in the Constant Capacitance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, S. R.; Lesch, S. M.; Suarez, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    Prediction of arsenate, As(V), adsorption and transport in soils requires detailed studies of As(V) adsorption and subsequent determination of model parameters. Arsenate adsorption on 49 soil samples belonging to six different soil orders was investigated as a function of solution pH (3-10). The set of soils consisted of two subgroups: one from the Midwestern U.S. and one primarily from the southwestern U.S. For most soils, As(V) adsorption increased with increasing solution pH, reached a maximum around pH 6-7, and decreased with further increases in solution pH. The constant capacitance model, a chemical surface complexation model, was well able to describe As(V) adsorption on the soil samples as a function of solution pH by simultaneously optimizing three As(V) surface complexation constants. The ability to describe As(V) adsorption as a function of pH represents an advancement over the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm approaches. A general regression model was developed for predicting soil As(V) surface complexation constants from easily measured soil chemical characteristics using the As(V) adsorption data for 44 of the soils. These chemical properties were: cation exchange capacity (CEC), surface area (SA), inorganic carbon content (IOC), organic carbon content (OC), and iron oxide content (Fe). A preliminary analysis determined that the mean surface complexation constant values for the two soil subgroups were statistically different. For this reason, while the regression model equations for each soil subgroup contained common intercepts and ln(CEC) terms, the ln(IOC), ln(OC), ln(Fe), and ln(SA) terms were different. The constant capacitance model was able to predict As(V) adsorption on most of the 44 soils using the As(V) surface complexation constants predicted from the regression equations. The prediction equations were used to obtain values for As(V) surface complexation constants for the remaining five soils that had not been used to obtain the

  1. Estimation of the initial equilibrium constants in the formation of tetragonal lysozyme nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the equilibria, kinetic rates, and the aggregation pathway which leads from a lysozyme monomer crystal to a tetragonal crystal, using dialyzed and recrystallized commercial hen eggwhite lysozyme. Relative light scattering intensity measurements were used to estimate the initial equilibrium constants for undersaturated lysozyme solutions in the tetragonal regime. The K1 value was estimated to be (1-3) x 10 exp 4 L/mol. Estimates of subsequent equilibrium constants depend on the crystal aggregation model chosen or determined. Experimental data suggest that tetragonal lysozyme crystal grows by addition of aggregates preformed in the bulk solution, rather than by monomer addition.

  2. Adsorption kinetics at the solid/solution interface: statistical rate theory at initial times of adsorption and close to equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Azizian, Saeid; Bashiri, Hadis

    2008-10-21

    The kinetics of solute adsorption at the solid/solution interface has been studied by statistical rate theory (SRT) at two limiting conditions, one at initial times of adsorption and the other close to equilibrium. A new kinetic equation has been derived for initial times of adsorption on the basis of SRT. For the first time a theoretical interpretation based on SRT has been provided for the modified pseudo-first-order (MPFO) kinetic equation which was proposed empirically by Yang and Al-Duri. It has been shown that the MPFO kinetic equation can be derived from the SRT equation when the system is close to equilibrium. On the basis of numerically generated points ( t, q) by the SRT equation, it has been shown that we can apply the new equation for initial times of adsorption in a larger time range in comparison to the previous q vs radical t linear equation. Also by numerical analysis of the generated kinetic data points, it is shown that application of the MPFO equation for modeling of whole kinetic data causes a large error for the data at initial times of adsorption. The results of numerical analysis are in perfect agreement with our theoretical derivation of the MPFO kinetic equation from the SRT equation. Finally, the results of the present theoretical study were confirmed by analysis of an experimental system. PMID:18788819

  3. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics for multiple trace impurities in various gas streams on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, T.C.; Kumar, R. )

    1993-01-01

    Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption data for seven trace impurities (propylene, Freon-12 (CF[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]), n-butane, methylene chloride, acetone, n-hexane, toluene, and Freon-22 (CHFCl[sub 2])) from various carrier gases (helium, nitrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide) are provided. Activated carbon at several temperatures and pressures is used as the adsorbent. Two empirical characteristic curves, one relating equilibrium isotherms of trace impurities with their physical properties and the other relating mass-transfer coefficients with equilibrium properties, are generated. These can be used to predict equilibrium capacities and mass-transfer zone lengths for multiple trace impurities from a carrier gas and design a thermal swing adsorption clean-up system.

  4. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 2: Kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2009-10-30

    The application of several monosolute equilibrium models has previously shown that Bromacil adsorption on SA-UF (Norit) powdered activated carbon (PAC) is probably effective on two types of sites. High reactivity sites were found to be 10-20 less present in a carbon surface than lower reactivity sites, according to the q(m) values calculated by isotherm models. The aims of this work were trying, primarily, to identify the kinetic-determinant stage of the sorption of Bromacil at a wide range of initial pesticide concentrations (approximately 5 to approximately 500 microg L(-1) at pH 7.8), and secondly, to specify the rate constants and other useful design parameters for the application in water treatment. It was therefore not possible to specify a priori whether the diffusion or surface reaction is the key step. It shows that many of the tested models which describe the stage of distribution or the surface reaction are correctly applied. However, the diffusivity values (D and D(0)) were found to be constant only constants for some specific experimental concentrations. The HSDM model of surface diffusion in pores was also applied but the values of the diffusion coefficient of surface (D(s)) were widely scattered and reduce significantly with the initial concentration or the equilibrium concentration in Bromacil. The model of surface reaction of pseudo-second order fitted particularly well and led to constant values which are independent of the equilibrium concentration, except for the low concentrations where the constants become significantly more important. This last observation confirms perfectly the hypothesis based on two types of sites as concluded by the equilibrium data (part 1).

  5. Adsorptive removal of heavy metals by magnetic nanoadsorbent: an equilibrium and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsath, D. S.; Shirivastava, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    An efficient and new magnetic nanoadsorbent photocatalyst was fabricated by co-precipitation technique. This research focuses on understanding metal removal process and developing a cost-effective technology for treatment of heavy metal-contaminated industrial wastewater. In this investigation, magnetic nanoadsorbent has been employed for the removal of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions by a batch adsorption technique. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted very well to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The thermodynamics of Zn(II) ions adsorption onto the magnetic nanoadsorbents indicated that the adsorption was spontaneous, endothermic and physical in nature. Surface morphology of magnetic nanoadsorbent by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and elemental analysis by EDX technique. The structural and photocatalytic properties of magnetic nanoadsorbent were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR techniques. Also, the magnetic properties of synthesized magnetic nanoadsorbent were determined by vibrating spinning magnetometer (VSM).

  6. Reanalysis of boron adsorption on soils and soil minerals using the constant capacitance model

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, S.

    1999-08-01

    Inclusion of microscopic information improved the ability of the constant capacitance model to provide a quantitative description of B adsorption on various Al and Fe oxides, clay minerals, and arid-zone soils as a function of solution pH. The same set of B surface complexation reactions was used for all adsorbing surfaces. This study tests the ability of the model to describe B adsorption using surface configurations that had been observed experimentally. In the present model application, both trigonal, B(OH){sub 3}, and tetrahedral, B(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}}, B surface complexes are postulated, consistent with experimental spectroscopic results. Boron surface complexation constants for Al and Fe oxides and kaolinites are not statistically significantly different from each other. Boron surface complexation constants for kaolinites are statistically significantly different from those for 2:1 clays and soils. Boron surface complexation constants for 2:1 clays and soils are not statistically significantly different from each other, reflecting the dominance of 2:1 clay minerals in B adsorption reactions in arid-zone soils. Average sets of B surface complexation constants provided adequate descriptions of B adsorption behavior on all adsorbents studied, indicating some predictive capability. The constant capacitance model was able to predict B adsorption behavior on additional arid-zone soils using the average set of B surface complexation constants.

  7. Does the Addition of Inert Gases at Constant Volume and Temperature Affect Chemical Equilibrium?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paiva, Joao C. M.; Goncalves, Jorge; Fonseca, Susana

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine three approaches, leading to different conclusions, for answering the question "Does the addition of inert gases at constant volume and temperature modify the state of equilibrium?" In the first approach, the answer is yes as a result of a common students' alternative conception; the second approach, valid only for ideal…

  8. Revealing equilibrium and rate constants of weak and fast noncovalent interactions.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Gleb G; Okhonin, Victor; Gorelsky, Serge I; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2011-03-15

    Rate and equilibrium constants of weak noncovalent molecular interactions are extremely difficult to measure. Here, we introduced a homogeneous approach called equilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (ECEEM) to determine k(on), k(off), and K(d) of weak (K(d) > 1 μM) and fast kinetics (relaxation time, τ < 0.1 s) in quasi-equilibrium for multiple unlabeled ligands simultaneously in one microreactor. Conceptually, an equilibrium mixture (EM) of a ligand (L), target (T), and a complex (C) is prepared. The mixture is introduced into the beginning of a capillary reactor with aspect ratio >1000 filled with T. Afterward, differential mobility of L, T, and C along the reactor is induced by an electric field. The combination of differential mobility of reactants and their interactions leads to a change of the EM peak shape. This change is a function of rate constants, so the rate and equilibrium constants can be directly determined from the analysis of the EM peak shape (width and symmetry) and propagation pattern along the reactor. We proved experimentally the use of ECEEM for multiplex determination of kinetic parameters describing weak (3 mM > K(d) > 80 μM) and fast (0.25 s ≥ τ ≥ 0.9 ms) noncovalent interactions between four small molecule drugs (ibuprofen, S-flurbiprofen, salicylic acid and phenylbutazone) and α- and β-cyclodextrins. The affinity of the drugs was significantly higher for β-cyclodextrin than α-cyclodextrin and mostly determined by the rate constant of complex formation.

  9. Methylene blue adsorption onto swede rape straw (Brassica napus L.) modified by tartaric acid: equilibrium, kinetic and adsorption mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanfang; Zhou, Hui; Liu, Guohua; Qiao, Jun; Wang, Jinhua; Lu, Haiying; Yang, Linzhang; Wu, Yonghong

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a promising and competitive bioadsorbent with the abundant of source, low price and environmentally friendly characters to remove cationic dye from wastewater. The swede rape straw (Brassica napus L.) modified by tartaric acid (SRSTA) was prepared, characterized and used to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution at varied operational conditions (including MB initial concentrations, adsorbent dose, etc.). Results demonstrated that the equilibrium data was well fitted by Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum MB adsorption capacity of SRSTA was 246.4 mg g(-1), which was comparable to the results of some previous studied activated carbons. The higher dye adsorption capacity could be attributed to the presence of more functional groups such as carboxyl group on the surface of SRSTA. The adsorption mechanism was also discussed. The results indicate that SRSTA is a promising and valuable absorbent to remove methylene blue from wastewater.

  10. Equilibrium and Kinetic Adsorption of Bacteria on Alluvial Sand and Surface Thermodynamic Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gang; Rockhold, Mark L.; Strevett, Keith A.

    2003-05-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of Escherichia coli HB 101, E. coli JM 109, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas sp. on alluvial sand from the Canadian River alluvium (Norman, OK) was investigated through column experiments. Equilibrium adsorption of these five bacterial strains followed the Freundlich expression and was a function of zero energy points, an indication of the zero energy buffer zone. Among the microorganisms studied, P. putida had the greatest equilibrium adsorption (162.4 x 108 cell/g sediment with a microbial injectate concentration of 108 cell/mL), followed by Pseudomonas sp. (127.9 x 108 cell/g sediment), E. coli HB 101 (62.8 x 108 cell/g sediment), E. coli JM 109 (58.4 x 108 cell/g sediment), and P. fluorescens (42.6 x 108 cell/g sediment). The first-order kinetic adsorption rate coefficient was an exponential function of the total interaction free energy between bacteria and sediment evaluated at the primary minimum, (PM). E. coli HB 101 had the greatest kinetic adsorption rate coefficient on the sediment (5.10 h-1), followed by E. coli JM 109 (4.52 h-1), P. fluorescens (2.12 h-1), P. putida (2.04 h-1), and Pseudomonas sp. (1.34 h-1).

  11. Adsorption of direct dye on palm ash: kinetic and equilibrium modeling.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, A A; Hameed, B H; Aziz, N

    2007-03-01

    Palm ash, an agriculture waste residue from palm-oil industry in Malaysia, was investigated as a replacement for the current expensive methods of removing direct blue 71 dye from an aqueous solution. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted well with Freundlich model in the range of 50-600mg/L. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of the palm ash was determined with the Langmuir equation and found to be 400.01mg dye per gram adsorbent at 30 degrees C. The rates of adsorption were found to conform to the pseudo-second-order kinetics with good correlation. The results indicate that the palm ash could be employed as a low-cost alternative to commercial activated carbon.

  12. Equilibrium theory analysis of liquid chromatography with non-constant velocity.

    PubMed

    Ortner, Franziska; Joss, Lisa; Mazzotti, Marco

    2014-12-19

    In liquid chromatography, adsorption and desorption lead to velocity variations within the column if the adsorbing compounds make up a high volumetric ratio of the mobile phase and if there is a substantial difference in the adsorption capacities. An equilibrium theory model for binary systems accounting for these velocity changes is derived and solved analytically for competitive Langmuir isotherms. Characteristic properties of concentration and velocity profiles predicted by the derived model are illustrated by two exemplary systems. Applicability of the model equations for the estimation of isotherm parameters from experimental data is investigated, and accurate results are obtained for systems with one adsorbing and one inert compound, as well as for systems with two adsorbing compounds.

  13. On the Henry constant and isosteric heat at zero loading in gas phase adsorption.

    PubMed

    Do, D D; Nicholson, D; Do, H D

    2008-08-01

    The Henry constant and the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero loading are commonly used as indicators of the strength of the affinity of an adsorbate for a solid adsorbent. It is assumed that (i) they are observable in practice, (ii) the Van Hoff's plot of the logarithm of the Henry constant versus the inverse of temperature is always linear and the slope is equal to the heat of adsorption, and (iii) the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero loading is either constant or weakly dependent on temperature. We show in this paper that none of these three points is necessarily correct, first because these variables might not be observable since they are outside the range of measurability; second that the linearity of the Van Hoff plot breaks down at very high temperature, and third that the isosteric heat versus loading is a strong function of temperature. We demonstrate these points using Monte Carlo integration and Monte Carlo simulation of adsorption of various gases on a graphite surface. Another issue concerning the Henry constant is related to the way the adsorption excess is defined. The most commonly used equation is the one that assumes that the void volume is the volume extended all the way to a boundary passing through the centres of the outermost solid atoms. With this definition the Henry constant can become negative at high temperatures. Although adsorption at these temperatures may not be practical because of the very low value of the Henry constant, it is more useful to define the Henry constant in such a way that it is always positive at all temperatures. Here we propose the use of the accessible volume; the volume probed by the adsorbate when it is in nonpositive regions of the potential, to calculate the Henry constant.

  14. On the Temperature Dependence of Intrinsic Surface Protonation Equilibrium Constants: An Extension of the Revised MUSIC Model.

    PubMed

    Machesky, Michael L.; Wesolowski, David J.; Palmer, Donald A.; Ridley, Moira K.

    2001-07-15

    The revised multisite complexation (MUSIC) model of T. Hiemstra et al. (J. Colloid Interface Sci. 184, 680 (1996)) is the most thoroughly developed approach to date that explicitly considers the protonation behavior of the various types of hydroxyl groups known to exist on mineral surfaces. We have extended their revised MUSIC model to temperatures other than 25 degrees C to help rationalize the adsorption data we have been collecting for various metal oxides, including rutile and magnetite to 300 degrees C. Temperature-corrected MUSIC model A constants were calculated using a consistent set of solution protonation reactions with equilibrium constants that are reasonably well known as a function of temperature. A critical component of this approach was to incorporate an empirical correction factor that accounts for the observed decrease in cation hydration number with increasing temperature. This extension of the revised MUSIC model matches our experimentally determined pH of zero net proton charge pH values (pH(znpc)) for rutile to within 0.05 pH units between 25 and 250 degrees C and for magnetite within 0.2 pH units between 50 and 290 degrees C. Moreover, combining the MUSIC-model-derived surface protonation constants with the basic Stern description of electrical double-layer structure results in a good fit to our experimental rutile surface protonation data for all conditions investigated (25 to 250 degrees C, and 0.03 to 1.0 m NaCl or tetramethylammonium chloride media). Consequently, this approach should be useful in other instances where it is necessary to describe and/or predict the adsorption behavior of metal oxide surfaces over a wide temperature range. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11426995

  15. Equilibrium constant for carbamate formation from monoethanolamine and its relationship with temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Aroua, M.K.; Benamor, A.; Haji-Sulaiman, M.Z.

    1999-09-01

    Removal of acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S using aqueous solutions of alkanolamines is an industrially important process. The equilibrium constant for the formation of carbamate from monoethanolamine was evaluated at various temperatures of 298, 308, 318, and 328 K and ionic strengths up to 1.7 M. From the plot of log{sub 10} K versus I{sup 0.5}, the variation of the thermodynamical constant with temperature follows the relationship log{sub 10} K{sub 1} = {minus}0.934 + (0.671 {times} 10{sup 3})K/T.

  16. Equilibrium adsorption of hexahistidine on pH-responsive hydrogel nanofilms.

    PubMed

    Longo, Gabriel S; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Szleifer, Igal

    2014-12-23

    We present a molecular theory to study the adsorption of different species within pH-sensitive hydrogel nanofilms. The theoretical framework allows for a molecular-level description of all the components of the system, and it explicitly accounts for the acid-base equilibrium. We concentrate on the adsorption of hexahistidine, one of the most widely used tags in bio-related systems, particularly in chromatography of proteins. The adsorption of hexahistidine within a grafted polyacid hydrogel film shows a nonmonotonic dependence on the solution pH. Depending on the salt concentration, the density of the polymer network, and the bulk concentration of peptide, substantial adsorption is predicted in the intermediate pH range where both the network and the amino acids are charged. To enhance the electrostatic attractions, the acid-base equilibrium of adsorbed hexahistidine is shifted significantly, increasing the degree of charge of the residues as compared to the bulk solution. Such a shift depends critically on the conditions of the environment at the nanoscale. At the same time, the degree of dissociation of the network becomes that of the isolated acid group in a dilute solution, which means that the network is considerably more charged than when there is no adsorbate molecules. This work provides fundamental information on the physical chemistry behind the adsorption behavior and the response of the hydrogel film. This information can be useful in designing new materials for the purification or separation/immobilization of histidine-tagged proteins. PMID:25434993

  17. Thermodynamic parameters for adsorption equilibrium of heavy metals and dyes from wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2014-05-01

    This meta-analysis evaluates adsorption studies that report thermodynamic parameters for heavy metals and dyes from wastewaters. The adsorbents were derived from agricultural waste, industrial wastes, inorganic particulates, or some natural products. The adsorption mechanisms, derivation of thermodynamic relationships, and possible flaws made in such evaluation are discussed. This analysis shows that conclusions from the examined standard enthalpy and entropy changes are highly contestable. The reason for this flaw may be the poor physical structure of adsorbents tested, such that pore transport controlled the solute flux, leaving a surface reaction process near equilibrium. PMID:24461254

  18. Prediction of equilibrium parameters of adsorption of lead (II) ions onto diatomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Taylan; Ardalı, Yüksel; Gamze Turan, N.

    2013-04-01

    Heavy metals from industrial wastewaters are one of the most important environmental issues to be solved today. Due to their toxicity and nonbiodegradable nature, heavy metals cause environmental and public health problems. Various techniques have been developed to remove heavy metals from aqueous solutions. These include chemical precipitation, reverse osmosis, ion Exchange and adsorption. Among them, adsorption is considered to be a particularly competitive and effective process for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions. There is growing interest in using low cost, commercially available materials for the adsorption of heavy metals. Diatomite is a siliceous sedimentary rock having an amorphous form of silica (SiO2. nH2O) containing a small amount of microcrystalline material. It has unique combination of physical and chemical properties such as high porosity, high permeability, small particle size, large surface area, and low thermal conductivity. In addition, it is available in Turkey and in various locations around the world. Therefore, diatomite has been successfully used as adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals. The aim of the study is to investigate the adsorption properties of diatomite. The equilibrium adsorption data were applied to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevic (D-R) isotherm models. Adsorption experiments were performed under batch process, using Pb (II) initial concentration, pH of solution and contact time as variables. The results demonstrated that the adsorption of Pb (II) was strongly dependent on pH of solution. The effect of pH on adsorption of Pb(II) on diatomite was conducted by varying pH from 2 to 12 at 20 oC. In the pH range of 2.0-4.0, the adsorption percentage increases slightly as the pH increasing. At pH>4, the adsorption percentage decreases with increasing pH because hydrolysis product and the precipitation begin to play an important role in the sorption of Pb (II). At pH4, the maximum adsorption

  19. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of adsorptive removal of phenol onto eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Daraei, H; Mittal, A; Noorisepehr, M; Daraei, F

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present research is to develop economic, fast, and versatile method for the removal of toxic organic pollutant phenol from wastewater using eggshell. The batch experiments are conducted to evaluate the effect of pH, phenol concentration, dosage of adsorbent, and contact time on the removal of phenol. The paper includes in-depth kinetic studies of the ongoing adsorption process. Attempts have also been made to verify Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The morphology and characteristics of eggshell have also been studied using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray fluorescence analysis. At ambient temperature, the maximum adsorption of phenol onto eggshells has been achieved at pH 9 and the contact time, 90 min. The experimental data give best-fitted straight lines for pseudo-first-order as well as pseudo-second-order kinetic models. Furthermore, the adsorption process verifies Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and on the basis of mathematical expressions of these models, various necessary adsorption constants have been calculated. Using adsorption data, various thermodynamic parameters like change in enthalpy (∆H(0)), change in entropy (∆S(0)), and change in free energy ∆G(0) have also been evaluated. Results clearly reveal that the solid waste material eggshell acts as an effective adsorbent for the removal of phenol from aqueous solutions. PMID:23274804

  20. Lignin-based activated carbons for adsorption of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Cotoruelo, Luis M; Marqués, María D; Rodríguez-Mirasol, José; Rodríguez, Juan J; Cordero, Tomás

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) from its aqueous solution at different temperatures has been studied using three activated carbons prepared in our laboratory. Lignin was used as raw material for the preparation of activated carbons (ACs). The results of the adsorption equilibrium were analyzed and fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic magnitudes were estimated as well, and their values indicated that the adsorption processes were spontaneous and exothermic. The kinetic study showed that the processes are of second apparent order related to the concentration of the vacant active centers on the surface of the activated carbons. The values of the effective internal diffusion coefficients have been calculated applying the equations developed by Crank and Vermeulen.

  1. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of monomer-dimer monoclonal antibody mixtures on a cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jason M; Pabst, Timothy M; Hunter, Alan K; Wang, Xiangyang; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-07-10

    Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics are determined for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) monomer and dimer species, individually and in mixtures, on a macroporous cation exchange resin both under the dilute limit of salt gradient elution chromatography and at high protein loads and low salt based on batch adsorption equilibrium and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiments. In the dilute limit and weak binding conditions, the dimer/monomer selectivity in 10mM phosphate at pH 7 varies between 8.7 and 2.3 decreasing with salt concentration in the range of 170-230mM NaCl. At high protein loads and strong binding conditions (0-60mM NaCl), the selectivity in the same buffer is near unity with no NaCl added, but increases gradually with salt concentration reaching high values between 2 and 15 with 60mM added NaCl. For these conditions, the two-component adsorption kinetics is controlled by pore diffusion and is predicted approximately by a dual shrinking core model using parameters based on single component equilibrium and kinetics measurements.

  2. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of monomer-dimer monoclonal antibody mixtures on a cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jason M; Pabst, Timothy M; Hunter, Alan K; Wang, Xiangyang; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-07-10

    Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics are determined for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) monomer and dimer species, individually and in mixtures, on a macroporous cation exchange resin both under the dilute limit of salt gradient elution chromatography and at high protein loads and low salt based on batch adsorption equilibrium and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiments. In the dilute limit and weak binding conditions, the dimer/monomer selectivity in 10mM phosphate at pH 7 varies between 8.7 and 2.3 decreasing with salt concentration in the range of 170-230mM NaCl. At high protein loads and strong binding conditions (0-60mM NaCl), the selectivity in the same buffer is near unity with no NaCl added, but increases gradually with salt concentration reaching high values between 2 and 15 with 60mM added NaCl. For these conditions, the two-component adsorption kinetics is controlled by pore diffusion and is predicted approximately by a dual shrinking core model using parameters based on single component equilibrium and kinetics measurements. PMID:26028510

  3. Equilibrium and kinetic modeling of adsorptive sulfur removal from gasoline by synthesized Ce-Y zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazerolghaem, Maryam; Rahimi, Amir; Seyedeyn-Azad, Fakhry

    2010-11-01

    In this research, the adsorption of a model sulfur compound, thiophene, from a simulated gasoline onto Ce-Y zeolite in pellet and powder forms was investigated. For this purpose, zeolite Na-Y was synthesized, and Ce-Y zeolite was prepared via solid-state ion-exchanged (SSIE) method. Adsorptive desulfurization of model gasoline was conducted in a batch reactor at ambient conditions to evaluate the equilibrium and kinetics of thiophene adsorption onto Ce-Y zeolite. The equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuire and Toth models. Pseudo-n-order and modified n-order models, LDF-base model, and intra-particle diffusion model were evaluated to fit the kinetic of the adsorption process and to determine the mechanism of it. The corresponding parameters and/or correlation coefficients of each model were reported. The LDF-base model was used also to fit the mass transfer coefficient for both powder and pellet forms of the adsorbent. The best fit estimates for the mass transfer coefficient were obtained 4 × 10-11 m/s and k = 3.1 × 10-12[exp( - t/τ) + 1/(t + 10-4)], for powder and pellet form adsorbents, respectively.

  4. Chemical modeling of boron adsorption by humic materials using the constant capacitance model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The constant capacitance surface complexation model was used to describe B adsorption behavior on reference Aldrich humic acid, humic acids from various soil environments, and dissolved organic matter extracted from sewage effluents. The reactive surface functional groups on the humic materials wer...

  5. Measuring Equilibrium Binding Constants for the WT1-DNA Interaction Using a Filter Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrium binding of WT1 to specific sites in DNA and potentially RNA molecules is central in mediating the regulatory roles of this protein. In order to understand the functional effects of mutations in the nucleic acid-binding domain of WT1 proteins and/or mutations in the DNA- or RNA-binding sites, it is necessary to measure the equilibrium constant for formation of the protein-nucleic acid complex. This chapter describes the use of a filter binding assay to make accurate measurements of the binding of the WT1 zinc finger domain to the consensus WT1-binding site in DNA. The method described is readily adapted to the measurement of the effects of mutations in either the WT1 zinc finger domain or the putative binding sites within a promoter element or cellular RNA.

  6. Equilibrium and dynamic osmotic behaviour of aqueous solutions with varied concentration at constant and variable volume.

    PubMed

    Minkov, Ivan L; Manev, Emil D; Sazdanova, Svetla V; Kolikov, Kiril H

    2013-01-01

    Osmosis is essential for the living organisms. In biological systems the process usually occurs in confined volumes and may express specific features. The osmotic pressure in aqueous solutions was studied here experimentally as a function of solute concentration (0.05-0.5 M) in two different regimes: of constant and variable solution volume. Sucrose, a biologically active substance, was chosen as a reference solute for the complex tests. A custom made osmotic cell was used. A novel operative experimental approach, employing limited variation of the solution volume, was developed and applied for the purpose. The established equilibrium values of the osmotic pressure are in agreement with the theoretical expectations and do not exhibit any evident differences for both regimes. In contrast, the obtained kinetic dependences reveal striking divergence in the rates of the process at constant and varied solution volume for the respective solute concentrations. The rise of pressure is much faster at constant solution volume, while the solvent influx is many times greater in the regime of variable volume. The results obtained suggest a feasible mechanism for the way in which the living cells rapidly achieve osmotic equilibrium upon changes in the environment.

  7. Does the ligand-biopolymer equilibrium binding constant depend on the number of bound ligands?

    PubMed

    Beshnova, Daria A; Lantushenko, Anastasia O; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2010-11-01

    Conventional methods, such as Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel analyses, used to treat ligand-biopolymer interactions, indirectly make the assumption that the microscopic binding constant is independent of the number of ligands, i, already bound to the biopolymer. Recent results on the aggregation of aromatic molecules (Beshnova et al., J Chem Phys 2009, 130, 165105) indicated that the equilibrium constant of self-association depends intrinsically on the number of molecules in an aggregate due to loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom on formation of the complex. The influence of these factors on the equilibrium binding constant for ligand-biopolymer complexation was analyzed in this work. It was shown that under the conditions of binding of "small" molecules, these factors can effectively be ignored and, hence, do not provide any hidden systematic error in such widely-used approaches, such as the Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel methods for analyzing ligand-biopolymer complexation. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 93: 932-935, 2010.

  8. Anomalously slow cyanide binding to Glycera dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin component II: Implication for the equilibrium constant

    SciTech Connect

    Mintorovitch, J.; Satterlee, J.D. )

    1988-10-18

    In comparison to sperm whale metmyoglobin, metleghemoglobin {alpha}, methemoglobins, and heme peroxidases, the purified Glycera dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin component II exhibits anomalously slow cyanide ligation kinetics. For the component II monomer methemoglobin this reaction has been studied under pseudo-first-order conditions at pH 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0, employing 100-250-fold mole excesses of potassium cyanide at each pH. The analysis shows that the concentration-independent bimolecular rate constant is small in comparison to those of the other heme proteins. Furthermore, the results show that the dissociation rate is extremely slow. Separation of the bimolecular rate constant into contributions from k{sub CN{sup {minus}}} (the rate constant for CN{sup {minus}} binding) and from k{sub HCN} (the rate constant for HCN binding) shows that the former is approximately 90 times greater. These results indicate that cyanide ligation reactions are not instantaneous for this protein, which is important for those attempting to study the ligand-binding equilibria. From the results presented here the authors estimate that the actual equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub D}) for cyanide binding to this G. dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin has a numerical upper limit that is at least 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported before the kinetic results were known.

  9. Determination of the Equilibrium Constants of a Weak Acid: An Experiment for Analytical or Physical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonham, Russell A.

    1998-05-01

    A simple experiment, utilizing readily available equipment and chemicals, is described. It allows students to explore the concepts of chemical equilibria, nonideal behavior of aqueous solutions, least squares with adjustment of nonlinear model parameters, and errors. The relationship between the pH of a solution of known initial concentration and volume of a weak acid as it is titrated by known volumes of a monohydroxy strong base is developed rigorously assuming ideal behavior. A distinctive feature of this work is a method that avoids dealing with the problems presented by equations with multiple roots. The volume of base added is calculated in terms of a known value of the pH and the equilibrium constants. The algebraic effort involved is nearly the same as the alternative of deriving a master equation for solving for the hydrogen ion concentration or activity and results in a more efficient computational algorithm. This approach offers two advantages over the use of computer software to solve directly for the hydrogen ion concentration. First, it avoids a potentially lengthy iterative procedure encountered when the polynomial exceeds third order in the hydrogen ion concentration; and second, it provides a means of obtaining results with a hand calculator that can prove useful in checking computer code. The approach is limited to weak solutions to avoid dealing with molalities and to insure that the Debye-Hückel limiting law is applicable. The nonlinear least squares algorithm Nonlinear Fit, found in the computational mathematics library Mathematica, is utilized to fit the measured volume of added base to the calculated value as a function of the measured pH subject to variation of all the equilibrium constants as parameters (including Kw). The experiment emphasizes both data collection and data analysis aspects of the problem. Data for the titration of phosphorous acid, H3PO3, by NaOH are used to illustrate the approach. Fits of the data without corrections

  10. The estimation of affinity constants for the binding of model peptides to DNA by equilibrium dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Standke, K C; Brunnert, H

    1975-01-01

    The binding of lysine model peptides of the type Lys-X-Lys, Lys-X-X-Lys and Lys-X-X-X-Lys (X = different aliphatic and aromatic amino acids) has been studied by equilibrium dialysis. It was shown that the strong electrostatic binding forces generated by protonated amino groups of lysine can be distinguished from the weak forces stemming from neutral and aromatic spacer amino acids. The overall binding strength of the lysine model peptides is modified by these weak binding forces and the apparent binding constants are influenced more by the hydrophobic character of the spacer amino acid side chains than by the chainlength of the spacers. PMID:1187347

  11. Equilibrium constant for the reversible reaction ClO + O2 - ClO-O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown here that the equilibrium constant for the reversible reaction ClO + O2 - ClO-O2 at stratospheric temperatures must be at least three orders of magnitude less than the current NASA upper limit. The new upper limit greatly diminishes the possible role of ClO-O2 in the chlorine-photosensitized decomposition of O3. Nevertheless, it does not preclude the possibility that it is a significant reservoir of ClO, as well as a possible reactant, at low temperatures characteristic of polar vortices.

  12. Equilibrium and heat of adsorption of diethyl phthalate on heterogeneous adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.M.; Xu, Z.W.; Pan, B.C.; Hong, C.H.; Jia, K.; Jiang, P.J.; Zhang, Q.J.; Pan, B.J.

    2008-09-15

    Removal of phthalate esters from water has been of considerable concern recently. In the present study, the adsorptive removal performance of diethyl phthalate (DEP) from water was investigated with the aminated polystyrene resin (NDA-101) and oxidized polystyrene resin (NDA-702). In addition, the commercial homogeneous polystyrene resin (XAD-4) and acrylic ester resin (Amberlite XAD-7) as well as coal-based granular activated carbon (AC-750) were chosen for comparison. The corresponding equilibrium isotherms are well described by the Freundlich equation and the adsorption capacities for DEP followed the order NDA-702 > NDA-101 > AC-750 > XAD-4 > XAD-7. Analysis of adsorption mechanisms suggested that these adsorbents spontaneously adsorb DEP molecules driven mainly by enthalpy change, and the adsorption process was derived by multiple adsorbent-adsorbate interactions such as hydrogen bonding, {pi}-{pi} stacking, and micropore filling. The information related to the adsorbent surface heterogeneity and the adsorbate-adsorbate interaction was obtained by Do's model. All the results indicate that heterogeneous resins NDA-702 and NDA-101 have excellent potential as an adsorption material for the removal of DEP from the contaminated water.

  13. Equilibrium of adsorption of mixed milk protein/surfactant solutions at the water/air interface.

    PubMed

    Kotsmar, C; Grigoriev, D O; Xu, F; Aksenenko, E V; Fainerman, V B; Leser, M E; Miller, R

    2008-12-16

    Ellipsometry and surface profile analysis tensiometry were used to study and compare the adsorption behavior of beta-lactoglobulin (BLG)/C10DMPO, beta-casein (BCS)/C10DMPO and BCS/C12DMPO mixtures at the air/solution interface. The adsorption from protein/surfactant mixed solutions is of competitive nature. The obtained adsorption isotherms suggest a gradual replacement of the protein molecules at the interface with increasing surfactant concentration for all studied mixed systems. The thickness, refractive index, and the adsorbed amount of the respective adsorption layers, determined by ellipsometry, decrease monotonically and reach values close to those for a surface covered only by surfactant molecules, indicating the absence of proteins from a certain surfactant concentration on. These results correlate with the surface tension data. A continuous increase of adsorption layer thickness was observed up to this concentration, caused by the desorption of segments of the protein and transforming the thin surface layer into a rather diffuse and thick one. Replacement and structural changes of the protein molecules are discussed in terms of protein structure and surface activity of surfactant molecules. Theoretical models derived recently were used for the quantitative description of the equilibrium state of the mixed surface layers.

  14. Temperature dependency of the equilibrium constant for the formation of carbamate from diethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Aroua, M.K.; Amor, A.B.; Haji-Sulaiman, M.Z.

    1997-07-01

    Aqueous alkanolamine solutions are frequently used to remove acidic components such as H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} from process gas streams. The equilibrium constant for the formation of diethanolamine carbamate was determined experimentally at (303, 313, 323, and 331) K for ionic strengths up to 1.8 mol/dm{sup 3}, the inert electrolyte being NaClO{sub 4}. A linear relationship was found to hole between log K and I{sup 0.5}. The thermodynamical constant has been determined and expressed by the equation log K{sub 1} = {minus}5.12 + 1.781 {times} 10{sup 3} K/T.

  15. Role of the solvent in the adsorption-desorption equilibrium of cinchona alkaloids between solution and a platinum surface: correlations among solvent polarity, cinchona solubility, and catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhen; Zaera, Francisco

    2005-01-13

    The role that the nature of the solvent plays in defining the extent of cinchona alkaloid adsorption-desorption equilibrium on platinum surfaces has been studied both by testing their solubility in 54 different solvents and by probing the stability of adsorbed cinchona in the presence of those solvents. The solubilities vary by as much as 5-6 orders of magnitude, display volcano-type correlations with solvent polarity and dielectric constant, and follow a cinchonine < cinchonidine < quinine, quinidine sequence. The adsorption-desorption equilibrium shifts toward the solution with increasing dissolving power of the solvent. The relevance of these results to the behavior of cinchona as chiral modifiers in hydrogenation catalysis is discussed.

  16. Surface-dependent chemical equilibrium constants and capacitances for bare and 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane coated silica nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, Jared; Pennathur, Sumita; Bruus, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the solid-liquid interface of fused-silica nanofabricated channels with and without a hydrophilic 3-cyanopropyldimethylchlorosilane (cyanosilane) coating. We develop a model that relaxes the assumption that the surface parameters C(1), C(2), and pK(+) are constant and independent of surface composition. Our theoretical model consists of three parts: (i) a chemical equilibrium model of the bare or coated wall, (ii) a chemical equilibrium model of the buffered bulk electrolyte, and (iii) a self-consistent Gouy-Chapman-Stern triple-layer model of the electrochemical double layer coupling these two equilibrium models. To validate our model, we used both pH-sensitive dye-based capillary filling experiments as well as electro-osmotic current-monitoring measurements. Using our model we predict the dependence of ζ potential, surface charge density, and capillary filling length ratio on ionic strength for different surface compositions, which can be difficult to achieve otherwise.

  17. Determination of equilibrium constants for the reaction between acetone and HO2 using infrared kinetic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grieman, Fred J; Noell, Aaron C; Davis-Van Atta, Casey; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P

    2011-09-29

    The reaction between the hydroperoxy radical, HO(2), and acetone may play an important role in acetone removal and the budget of HO(x) radicals in the upper troposphere. We measured the equilibrium constants of this reaction over the temperature range of 215-272 K at an overall pressure of 100 Torr using a flow tube apparatus and laser flash photolysis to produce HO(2). The HO(2) concentration was monitored as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The resulting [HO(2)] decay curves in the presence of acetone are characterized by an immediate decrease in initial [HO(2)] followed by subsequent decay. These curves are interpreted as a rapid (<100 μs) equilibrium reaction between acetone and the HO(2) radical that occurs on time scales faster than the time resolution of the apparatus, followed by subsequent reactions. This separation of time scales between the initial equilibrium and ensuing reactions enabled the determination of the equilibrium constant with values ranging from 4.0 × 10(-16) to 7.7 × 10(-18) cm(3) molecule(-1) for T = 215-272 K. Thermodynamic parameters for the reaction determined from a second-law fit of our van't Hoff plot were Δ(r)H°(245) = -35.4 ± 2.0 kJ mol(-1) and Δ(r)S°(245) = -88.2 ± 8.5 J mol(-1) K(-1). Recent ab initio calculations predict that the reaction proceeds through a prereactive hydrogen-bonded molecular complex (HO(2)-acetone) with subsequent isomerization to a hydroxy-peroxy radical, 2-hydroxyisopropylperoxy (2-HIPP). The calculations differ greatly in the energetics of the complex and the peroxy radical, as well as the transition state for isomerization, leading to significant differences in their predictions of the extent of this reaction at tropospheric temperatures. The current results are consistent with equilibrium formation of the hydrogen-bonded molecular complex on a short time scale (100 μs). Formation of the hydrogen-bonded complex will have a negligible impact on the

  18. Determination of equilibrium constants for the reaction between acetone and HO2 using infrared kinetic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grieman, Fred J; Noell, Aaron C; Davis-Van Atta, Casey; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P

    2011-09-29

    The reaction between the hydroperoxy radical, HO(2), and acetone may play an important role in acetone removal and the budget of HO(x) radicals in the upper troposphere. We measured the equilibrium constants of this reaction over the temperature range of 215-272 K at an overall pressure of 100 Torr using a flow tube apparatus and laser flash photolysis to produce HO(2). The HO(2) concentration was monitored as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The resulting [HO(2)] decay curves in the presence of acetone are characterized by an immediate decrease in initial [HO(2)] followed by subsequent decay. These curves are interpreted as a rapid (<100 μs) equilibrium reaction between acetone and the HO(2) radical that occurs on time scales faster than the time resolution of the apparatus, followed by subsequent reactions. This separation of time scales between the initial equilibrium and ensuing reactions enabled the determination of the equilibrium constant with values ranging from 4.0 × 10(-16) to 7.7 × 10(-18) cm(3) molecule(-1) for T = 215-272 K. Thermodynamic parameters for the reaction determined from a second-law fit of our van't Hoff plot were Δ(r)H°(245) = -35.4 ± 2.0 kJ mol(-1) and Δ(r)S°(245) = -88.2 ± 8.5 J mol(-1) K(-1). Recent ab initio calculations predict that the reaction proceeds through a prereactive hydrogen-bonded molecular complex (HO(2)-acetone) with subsequent isomerization to a hydroxy-peroxy radical, 2-hydroxyisopropylperoxy (2-HIPP). The calculations differ greatly in the energetics of the complex and the peroxy radical, as well as the transition state for isomerization, leading to significant differences in their predictions of the extent of this reaction at tropospheric temperatures. The current results are consistent with equilibrium formation of the hydrogen-bonded molecular complex on a short time scale (100 μs). Formation of the hydrogen-bonded complex will have a negligible impact on the

  19. Revealing model dependencies in "Assessing the RAFT equilibrium constant via model systems: an EPR study".

    PubMed

    Junkers, Thomas; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Coote, Michelle L

    2011-12-01

    In a recent article (W. Meiser, M. Buback, Assessing the RAFT Equilibrium Constant via Model Systems: An EPR Study, Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2011, 18, 1490-1494), it is claimed that evidence is found that unequivocally proves that quantum mechanical calculations assessing the equilibrium constant and fragmentation rate coefficients in dithiobenzoate-mediated reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) systems are beset with a considerable uncertainty. In the present work, we show that these claims made by Meiser and Buback are beset with a model dependency, as a critical key parameter in their data analysis - the addition rate coefficient of the radicals attacking the C=S double bond in the dithiobenzoate - induces a model insensitivity into the data analysis. Contrary to the claims made by Meiser and Buback, their experimental results can be brought into agreement with the quantum chemical calculations if a lower addition rate coefficient of cyanoisopropyl radicals (CIP) to the CIP dithiobenzoate (CPDB) is assumed. To resolve the model dependency, the addition rate coefficient of CIP radicals to CPDB needs to be determined as a matter of priority.

  20. Water dimers in the atmosphere III: equilibrium constant from a flexible potential.

    PubMed

    Scribano, Yohann; Goldman, Nir; Saykally, R J; Leforestier, Claude

    2006-04-27

    We present new results for the water dimer equilibrium constant K(p)(T) in the range 190-390 K, using a flexible potential energy surface fitted to spectroscopical data. The increased numerical complexity due to explicit consideration of the monomer vibrations is handled via an adiabatic (6 + 6)d decoupling between intra- and intermolecular modes. The convergence of the canonical partition function of the dimer is ensured by computing all energy levels up to dissociation for total angular momentum values J = 0-5 and using an extrapolation scheme to higher values. The newly calculated values for K(p)(T) are in very good agreement with available experimental data at room temperature. At higher temperatures, an analysis of the convergence of the partition function reveals that quasi-bound states are likely to contribute to the equilibrium constant. Additional thermodynamical quantities (deltaG, deltaH, deltaS, and C(p)) have also been determined and fit to quadratic expressions a + bT + cT2.

  1. Species-Specific Thiol-Disulfide Equilibrium Constant: A Tool To Characterize Redox Transitions of Biological Importance.

    PubMed

    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Somlyay, Máté; Noszál, Béla

    2015-08-13

    Microscopic redox equilibrium constants, a new species-specific type of physicochemical parameters, were introduced and determined to quantify thiol-disulfide equilibria of biological significance. The thiol-disulfide redox equilibria of glutathione with cysteamine, cysteine, and homocysteine were approached from both sides, and the equilibrium mixtures were analyzed by quantitative NMR methods to characterize the highly composite, co-dependent acid-base and redox equilibria. The directly obtained, pH-dependent, conditional constants were then decomposed by a new evaluation method, resulting in pH-independent, microscopic redox equilibrium constants for the first time. The 80 different, microscopic redox equilibrium constant values show close correlation with the respective thiolate basicities and provide sound means for the development of potent agents against oxidative stress.

  2. Equilibrium study of selected divalent d-electron metals adsorption on A-type zeolite.

    PubMed

    Majdan, Marek; Pikus, Stanisław; Kowalska-Ternes, Monika; Głdysz-Płaska, Agnieszka; Staszczuk, Piotr; Fuks, Leon; Skrzypek, Henryk

    2003-06-15

    The objective of the presented study was to investigate the adsorption of Cu, Co, Mn, Zn, Cd and Mn on A-type zeolite. The isotherms for adsorption of metals from their nitrates were registered. The following adsorption constants K of metals were found: 162,890, 124,260, 69,025, 16,035, 10,254, and 151 [M(-1)] for Cu, Co, Mn, Zn, Cd, and Ni, respectively, for the concentration range 10(-4)-10(-3) M. On the other hand, the investigation of pH influence on the distribution constants of metals showed that the adsorption of metals proceeds essentially through an ion-exchange process, surface hydrolysis, and surface complexation. The supplementary results from DRIFT, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction methods confirmed the presumption about the possible connection between the electronic structure of divalent ions and their adsorption behavior, showing that ions with d5 and d10 configurations such as Mn2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, with much weaker hydrolytic properties than Cu2+ and Ni2+, strongly interact with the zeolite framework and therefore their affinity to the zeolite phase is much stronger when compared with that of the Ni2+ ion, but at the same time not as strong as the affinity of the Cu2+ ion, the latter forming a new phase during the interaction with zeolite framework. For Zn2+, during inspection of the correlation between the proton concentration H/Al and zinc concentration Zn/Al on the zeolite surface, the formation of the surface complex [triple bond]S-OZn(OH) was proposed. A correlation between the heterogeneity of proton concentrations H/Al on Me-zeolite surfaces and the hydrolysis constants pKh of Me2+ ions was found. PMID:16256612

  3. Melanoidin Removal Mechanism in An Aqueous Adsorption System: An Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Study.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Diego L; Oliveira, Leandro S; Franca, Adriana S

    2015-01-01

    Melanoidins are colored products that can be found in food and drinks, formed by Maillard reactions. Sometimes these compounds are considered undesirable in certain food products, because they impart a brownish color and must be removed. An overview of recent patents related to melanoidin removal indicates that it can be performed by chemical/biological degradation or by adsorption processes. Therefore, in the present study, the adsorption mechanism for synthetic melanoidin removal from aqueous solutions was studied using different Raphanus sativus press-cake sorbents, with the precursor material being carbonized in a microwave oven, either with direct heating or after a chemical activation process with phosphoric acid, nitric acid or potassium hydroxide. Physical and chemical modifications were evaluated by FTIR, pHPZC, thermogravimetry and BET. The adsorption kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second order model for all activated carbons (ACs). Evaluation of the diffusion process showed dependence on the initial melanoidin concentration due to the wide range of sizes of the adsorbed molecules. The equilibrium data were best fitted by the Langmuir model for the acid-treated AC and by the Freundlich model for the base-treated and non-chemically treated ACs. Melanoidin adsorption was characterized as a spontaneous, favorable and endothermic process involving hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions between the adsorbents surfaces and the adsorbed molecules. PMID:26013772

  4. Adsorptive removal of cadmium by natural red earth: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Mahatantila, Kushani; Vithanage, Meththika; Seike, Yasushi; Okumura, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Natural red earth (NRE), an iron-coated sand found in the north western part of Sri Lanka, was used to examine the retention behaviour of cadmium, a heavy metal postulated as a factor of chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka. Adsorption studies were conducted as a function of pH, ionic strength, initial Cd loading and time. The Cd adsorption increased from 6% to 99% with the pH increase from 4 to 8.5. The maximum adsorption was reached at pH > 7.5. Cadmium adsorption was not changed over 100-fold variations of NaNO3, providing evidence for the dominance of an inner-sphere bonding mechanism for both 10-fold variation of initial Cd concentrations. Surface complexation modelling suggests a monodentate bonding mechanism. Isotherm data were fairly fitted to a two-site Langmuir isotherm model and sorption maximums of 9.11 x 10(-6) and 3.89 x 10(-7) mol g(-1) were obtained for two surface sites. The kinetic study reveals that Cd uptake by NRE is so fast that the equilibrium was reached within 15 min and - 1 h for 4.44 and 44.4 microM initial Cd concentrations, respectively, and the chemisorption was the dominant mechanism over intra-particle diffusion. The study indicates the potential of NRE as a material for decontaminating environmental water polluted with Cd.

  5. Dye removal from textile industrial effluents by adsorption on exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Carvallho, Marilda N; da Silva, Karolyne S; Sales, Deivson C S; Freire, Eleonora M P L; Sobrinho, Maurício A M; Ghislandi, Marcos G

    2016-01-01

    The concept of physical adsorption was applied for the removal of direct and reactive blue textile dyes from industrial effluents. Commercial graphite nanoplatelets were used as substrate, and the quality of the material was characterized by atomic force and transmission electron microscopies. Dye/graphite nanoplatelets water solutions were prepared varying their pH and initial dye concentration. Exceptionally high values (beyond 100 mg/L) for adsorptive capacity of graphite nanoplatelets could be achieved without complicated chemical modifications, and equilibrium and kinetic experiments were performed. Our findings were compared with the state of the art, and compared with theoretical models. Agreement between them was satisfactory, and allowed us to propose novel considerations describing the interactions of the dyes and the graphene planar structure. The work highlights the important role of these interactions, which can govern the mobility of the dye molecules and the amount of layers that can be stacked on the graphite nanoplatelets surface. PMID:27148721

  6. Dye removal from textile industrial effluents by adsorption on exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Carvallho, Marilda N; da Silva, Karolyne S; Sales, Deivson C S; Freire, Eleonora M P L; Sobrinho, Maurício A M; Ghislandi, Marcos G

    2016-01-01

    The concept of physical adsorption was applied for the removal of direct and reactive blue textile dyes from industrial effluents. Commercial graphite nanoplatelets were used as substrate, and the quality of the material was characterized by atomic force and transmission electron microscopies. Dye/graphite nanoplatelets water solutions were prepared varying their pH and initial dye concentration. Exceptionally high values (beyond 100 mg/L) for adsorptive capacity of graphite nanoplatelets could be achieved without complicated chemical modifications, and equilibrium and kinetic experiments were performed. Our findings were compared with the state of the art, and compared with theoretical models. Agreement between them was satisfactory, and allowed us to propose novel considerations describing the interactions of the dyes and the graphene planar structure. The work highlights the important role of these interactions, which can govern the mobility of the dye molecules and the amount of layers that can be stacked on the graphite nanoplatelets surface.

  7. Density functional theory of equilibrium random copolymers: application to surface adsorption of aggregating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiqiang; Forsman, Jan; Woodward, Clifford E.

    2016-06-01

    We generalize a recently developed polymer density functional theory (PDFT) for polydisperse polymer fluids to the case of equilibrium random copolymers. We show that the generalization of the PDFT to these systems allows us to obtain a remarkable simplification compared to the monodispersed polymers. The theory is used to treat a model for protein aggregation into linear filaments in the presence of surfaces. Here we show that, for attractive surfaces, there is evidence of significant enhancement of protein aggregation. This behaviour is a consequence of a surface phase transition, which has been shown to occur with ideal equilibrium polymers in the presence of sufficiently attractive surfaces. For excluding monomers, this transition is suppressed, though an echo of the underlying ideal transition is present in the sudden change in the excess adsorption.

  8. Determining the association constant and adsorption properties of ion pairs in water by fitting surface tension data.

    PubMed

    Pradines, Vincent; Lavabre, Dominique; Micheau, Jean-Claude; Pimienta, Véronique

    2005-11-22

    Association constants and adsorption parameters of tetraalkylammoniumdodecyl sulfate (TAADS) ion pairs in water were determined. We have analyzed water/air surface tension measurements obtained for mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and tetraalkylammonium bromide of increasing chain lengths (TMAB, TEAB, TPAB, and TBAB). To reproduce the experimental isotherms, we coupled the association equilibrium of the ion pairs to the equations proposed by Fainerman and co-workers to model the adsorption of binary mixtures of surfactants (SDS and TAADS) with different molar areas at a nonideal surface layer. The parameters found showed that the model is not convenient to describe the effect of the addition of TMAB but a clear coherency was obtained for the three longer compounds. Ranging from TEADS to TBADS increasing hydrophobic interactions give rise to a higher associability but to a lower surface activity. Self-interactions coefficients extracted by the fitting procedure confirmed the importance of attractive interactions between the ion pairs. The calculated surface coverage showed that in every case the compound mainly adsorbed at the interface was the ion pair. For TBADS strong attractive interactions result in a phase transition at very low concentration.

  9. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of U(VI) release from individual dry-sieved size fractions of a field-aggregated, field-contaminated composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. The principal source of variability in equilibrium U(VI) adsorption properties of the various size fractions was the impact of variable chemistry on adsorption. This source of variability was represented using surface complexation models (SCMs) with different stoichiometric coefficients with respect to hydrogen ion and carbonate concentrations for the different size fractions. A reactive transport model incorporating equilibrium expressions for cation exchange and calcite dissolution, along with rate expressions for aerobic respiration and silica dissolution, described the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through reactor experiments. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multirate SCM with an assumed lognormal distribution for the mass-transfer rate coefficients. The estimated mean and standard deviation of the rate coefficients were the same for all <2 mm size fractions but differed for the 2–8 mm size fraction. Micropore volumes, assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data, were also the same for all dry-sieved <2 mm size fractions, indicating a link between micropore volumes and mass-transfer rate properties. Pore volumes for dry-sieved size fractions exceeded values for the corresponding wet-sieved fractions. We hypothesize that repeated field wetting and drying cycles lead to the formation of aggregates and/or coatings containing (micro)pore networks which provided an additional mass-transfer resistance over that associated with individual particles. The 2–8 mm fraction exhibited a larger average and standard deviation in the distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients, possibly caused by the abundance of

  10. "Assessing the RAFT equilibrium constant via model systems: an EPR study"--response to a comment.

    PubMed

    Meiser, Wibke; Buback, Michael

    2012-08-14

    We have presented an EPR-based approach for deducing the RAFT equilibrium constant, K(eq), of a dithiobenzoate-mediated system [Meiser, W. and Buback M. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2011, 32, 1490]. Our value is by four orders of magnitude below K(eq) from ab initio calculations for the identical monomer-free system. Junkers et al. [Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2011, 32, 1891] claim that our EPR approach would be model dependent and our data could be equally well fitted by assuming slow addition of radicals to the RAFT agent and slow fragmentation of the so-obtained intermediate radical as well as high cross-termination rate. By identification of all side products, our EPR-based method is shown to be model independent and to provide reliable K(eq) values, which demonstrate the validity of the intermediate radical termination model.

  11. Assessing the RAFT equilibrium constant via model systems: an EPR study.

    PubMed

    Meiser, Wibke; Buback, Michael

    2011-09-15

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) equilibrium constants, K(eq), for the model system cyano-iso-propyl dithiobenzoate (CPDB) - cyano-iso-propyl radical (CIP) have been deduced via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The CIP species is produced by thermal decomposition of azobis-iso-butyronitrile (AIBN). In solution of toluene at 70 °C, K(eq) has been determined to be (9 ± 1) L · mol(-1). Measurement of K(eq) = k(ad)/k(β) between 60 and 100 °C yields ΔE(a) = (-28 ± 4) kJ · mol(-1) as the difference in the activation energies of k(ad) and k(β). The data measured on the model system are indicative of fast fragmentation of the intermediate radical produced by addition of CIP to CPDB.

  12. Rough-to-smooth transition of an equilibrium neutral constant stress layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Purpose of research on rough-to-smooth transition of an equilibrium neutral constant stress layer is to develop a model for low-level atmospheric flow over terrains of abruptly changing roughness, such as those occurring near the windward end of a landing strip, and to use the model to derive functions which define the extent of the region affected by the roughness change and allow adequate prediction of wind and shear stress profiles at all points within the region. A model consisting of two bounding logarithmic layers and an intermediate velocity defect layer is assumed, and dimensionless velocity and stress distribution functions which meet all boundary and matching conditions are hypothesized. The functions are used in an asymptotic form of the equation of motion to derive a relation which governs the growth of the internal boundary layer. The growth relation is used to predict variation of surface shear stress.

  13. Equilibrium and kinetics of phosphorous adsorption onto bone charcoal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ghaneian, Mohammad Taghi; Ghanizadeh, Ghader; Alizadeh, Mohammad Tahghighi Haji; Ehrampoush, Mohammad Hasan; Said, Farhan Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Pyrolysis of fresh sheep bone led to the formation of bone charcoal (BC). The structural characteristics of BC and surface area were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). N2 gas adsorption-desorption was analysed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller isotherm model. The prepared BC was used as an effective sorbent for the removal of phosphate from aqueous solutions. The effect of major parameters, including initial phosphorous concentration, sorbent dosage, pH and temperature, was investigated in this study. Furthermore, adsorption isotherms and kinetics were evaluated. BC was an effective sorbent in phosphate removal from aqueous solution especially in phosphate concentration between 2 and 100 mg/L. The maximum amount of sorption capacity was 30.21 mg/g, which was obtained with 100 mg/L as the initial phosphate concentration and 0.2 g as the sorbent dosage. Best reported pH in this study is 4; in higher pH, adsorption rate decreased dramatically. By increasing the temperature from 20 to 40 degrees C sorption capacity increased; this phenomenon described that adsorption is endothermic. Equilibrium data were analysed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms. Pseudo first- and second-order and Elovich models were used to determine the kinetics of adsorption in this study. Collected data highly fitted with Freundlich isotherms and pseudo second-order kinetics. Achieved results have shown well the potentiality for the BC to be utilized as a natural sorbent to remove phosphorous from water and wastewater.

  14. The universal statistical distributions of the affinity, equilibrium constants, kinetics and specificity in biomolecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin

    2015-04-01

    We uncovered the universal statistical laws for the biomolecular recognition/binding process. We quantified the statistical energy landscapes for binding, from which we can characterize the distributions of the binding free energy (affinity), the equilibrium constants, the kinetics and the specificity by exploring the different ligands binding with a particular receptor. The results of the analytical studies are confirmed by the microscopic flexible docking simulations. The distribution of binding affinity is Gaussian around the mean and becomes exponential near the tail. The equilibrium constants of the binding follow a log-normal distribution around the mean and a power law distribution in the tail. The intrinsic specificity for biomolecular recognition measures the degree of discrimination of native versus non-native binding and the optimization of which becomes the maximization of the ratio of the free energy gap between the native state and the average of non-native states versus the roughness measured by the variance of the free energy landscape around its mean. The intrinsic specificity obeys a Gaussian distribution near the mean and an exponential distribution near the tail. Furthermore, the kinetics of binding follows a log-normal distribution near the mean and a power law distribution at the tail. Our study provides new insights into the statistical nature of thermodynamics, kinetics and function from different ligands binding with a specific receptor or equivalently specific ligand binding with different receptors. The elucidation of distributions of the kinetics and free energy has guiding roles in studying biomolecular recognition and function through small-molecule evolution and chemical genetics. PMID:25885453

  15. The Universal Statistical Distributions of the Affinity, Equilibrium Constants, Kinetics and Specificity in Biomolecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We uncovered the universal statistical laws for the biomolecular recognition/binding process. We quantified the statistical energy landscapes for binding, from which we can characterize the distributions of the binding free energy (affinity), the equilibrium constants, the kinetics and the specificity by exploring the different ligands binding with a particular receptor. The results of the analytical studies are confirmed by the microscopic flexible docking simulations. The distribution of binding affinity is Gaussian around the mean and becomes exponential near the tail. The equilibrium constants of the binding follow a log-normal distribution around the mean and a power law distribution in the tail. The intrinsic specificity for biomolecular recognition measures the degree of discrimination of native versus non-native binding and the optimization of which becomes the maximization of the ratio of the free energy gap between the native state and the average of non-native states versus the roughness measured by the variance of the free energy landscape around its mean. The intrinsic specificity obeys a Gaussian distribution near the mean and an exponential distribution near the tail. Furthermore, the kinetics of binding follows a log-normal distribution near the mean and a power law distribution at the tail. Our study provides new insights into the statistical nature of thermodynamics, kinetics and function from different ligands binding with a specific receptor or equivalently specific ligand binding with different receptors. The elucidation of distributions of the kinetics and free energy has guiding roles in studying biomolecular recognition and function through small-molecule evolution and chemical genetics. PMID:25885453

  16. The universal statistical distributions of the affinity, equilibrium constants, kinetics and specificity in biomolecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin

    2015-04-01

    We uncovered the universal statistical laws for the biomolecular recognition/binding process. We quantified the statistical energy landscapes for binding, from which we can characterize the distributions of the binding free energy (affinity), the equilibrium constants, the kinetics and the specificity by exploring the different ligands binding with a particular receptor. The results of the analytical studies are confirmed by the microscopic flexible docking simulations. The distribution of binding affinity is Gaussian around the mean and becomes exponential near the tail. The equilibrium constants of the binding follow a log-normal distribution around the mean and a power law distribution in the tail. The intrinsic specificity for biomolecular recognition measures the degree of discrimination of native versus non-native binding and the optimization of which becomes the maximization of the ratio of the free energy gap between the native state and the average of non-native states versus the roughness measured by the variance of the free energy landscape around its mean. The intrinsic specificity obeys a Gaussian distribution near the mean and an exponential distribution near the tail. Furthermore, the kinetics of binding follows a log-normal distribution near the mean and a power law distribution at the tail. Our study provides new insights into the statistical nature of thermodynamics, kinetics and function from different ligands binding with a specific receptor or equivalently specific ligand binding with different receptors. The elucidation of distributions of the kinetics and free energy has guiding roles in studying biomolecular recognition and function through small-molecule evolution and chemical genetics.

  17. Discovering a Change in Equilibrium Constant with Change in Ionic Strength: An Empirical Laboratory Experiment for General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzberg, Richard J.

    1999-05-01

    Students are challenged to investigate the hypothesis that an equilibrium constant, Kc, measured as a product and quotient of molar concentrations, is constant at constant temperature. Spectrophotometric measurements of absorbance of a solution of Fe3+(aq) and SCN-(aq) treated with different amounts of KNO3 are made to determine Kc for the formation of FeSCN2+(aq). Students observe a regular decrease in the value of Kc as the concentration of added KNO3 is increased.

  18. Partition functions and equilibrium constants for diatomic molecules and atoms of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, P. S.; Collet, R.

    2016-04-01

    Partition functions and dissociation equilibrium constants are presented for 291 diatomic molecules for temperatures in the range from near absolute zero to 10 000 K, thus providing data for many diatomic molecules of astrophysical interest at low temperature. The calculations are based on molecular spectroscopic data from the book of Huber & Herzberg (1979, Constants of Diatomic Molecules) with significant improvements from the literature, especially updated data for ground states of many of the most important molecules by Irikura (2007, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 36, 389). Dissociation energies are collated from compilations of experimental and theoretical values. Partition functions for 284 species of atoms for all elements from H to U are also presented based on data collected at NIST. The calculated data are expected to be useful for modelling a range of low density astrophysical environments, especially star-forming regions, protoplanetary disks, the interstellar medium, and planetary and cool stellar atmospheres. The input data, which will be made available electronically, also provides a possible foundation for future improvement by the community. Full Tables 1-8 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A96

  19. [Effect of low molecular weight organic acids on Pb2+ adsorption and desorption by constant charge soil colloids].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yati; Wang, Xudong; Zhang, Yiping; Qu, Aihua

    2003-11-01

    The isothermal curves of Pb2+ adsorption-desorption by soil colloids followed Freundlich and Langmuir equation. The adsorption constant Ka showed the trend of old manured loessal soil > yellow loessal soil > dark cultivated loessal soil > yellow cinamon soil, which was consistent with surface charge density sigma 0, an indicator of the strength of Pb2+ adsorption by each soil colloid. Low molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) made Pb2+ adsorbed amount decreased and adsorption affinity increased, and the effect of citric acid was larger than that of oxalic acid. The constant Kd of residual Pb2+ adsorption after desorption showed the trend of old manured loessal soil > yellow cinamon soil > dark cultivated loessal soil > yellow loessal soil, which reflected the adsorption strength of residual Pb2+ after desorption, and was related to the contents of organic matter and free ferric oxide. The isothermal curves of Pb2+ desorption from soil colloids were obvious higher than those of Pb2+ adsorption. In NaNO3 and oxalic acid background solution, the isothermal curves of Pb2+ adsorption were far away from those of Pb2+ desorption, showing that the hysteretic degree between adsorption and desorption was very large. The isothermal curves of Pb2+ desorption from soil colloids were closed to those of Pb2+ adsorption in citric acid background solution, which showed that the Pb adsorption and desorption was reversible.

  20. Simultaneous adsorption of methyl red and methylene blue onto biochar and an equilibrium modeling at high concentration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guanyu; Wang, Buyun; Chen, Lingyu; Zhao, Shuangjiao

    2016-11-01

    Methyl red, methylene blue and biochar were used to investigate simultaneous adsorption of dyes onto low-cost adsorbent at different concentrations combinations. Langmuir mixed model could describe the adsorption well at low concentrations. However, it could not describe the adsorption anymore when concentrations of methyl red and methylene blue were higher than 255 and 300 mg L(-1) respectively with 0.5 g L(-1) biochar loading. A new model on the interaction among adsorbed adsorbates at equilibrium was developed. It could describe the adsorption at high concentrations well. According to the experimental results, interaction among dyes molecules would replace the competition onto adsorbent to be the main factor influencing adsorption when amount of adsorbed adsorbates were higher than those required to form a monolayer on all the adsorbing sites of adsorbent. The model was further verified by adsorption with other solute such as glucose or NaCl in solution.

  1. Simultaneous adsorption of methyl red and methylene blue onto biochar and an equilibrium modeling at high concentration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guanyu; Wang, Buyun; Chen, Lingyu; Zhao, Shuangjiao

    2016-11-01

    Methyl red, methylene blue and biochar were used to investigate simultaneous adsorption of dyes onto low-cost adsorbent at different concentrations combinations. Langmuir mixed model could describe the adsorption well at low concentrations. However, it could not describe the adsorption anymore when concentrations of methyl red and methylene blue were higher than 255 and 300 mg L(-1) respectively with 0.5 g L(-1) biochar loading. A new model on the interaction among adsorbed adsorbates at equilibrium was developed. It could describe the adsorption at high concentrations well. According to the experimental results, interaction among dyes molecules would replace the competition onto adsorbent to be the main factor influencing adsorption when amount of adsorbed adsorbates were higher than those required to form a monolayer on all the adsorbing sites of adsorbent. The model was further verified by adsorption with other solute such as glucose or NaCl in solution. PMID:27543677

  2. Catalytic cracking with FCCT loaded with tin metal traps: Adsorption constants for gas oil, gasoline, and light gases

    SciTech Connect

    Farag, H.; Blasetti, A.; Lasa, H. de . Faculty of Engineering Science)

    1994-12-01

    Catalysts, so-called FCCT (catalysts for fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) with in situ metal traps), were developed to achieve high dispersion of passivators. These FCCTs were extensively tested and demonstrated experimentally. The catalyst, steamed to achieve equilibrium conditions, was artificially impregnated with a tin compound (0--3,750 ppm) and with nickel and vanadium naphthenates. Experimental runs were performed in a microcatalytic fixed bed reactor using different carrier gas flows (120--150 std m/min) and different temperatures (510--550 C). The unsteady state pulse technique, gas oil pulses reacting with FCC catalyst, was used to study the effects of metal traps in a FCC catalyst contaminated with 3,000 ppm of Ni and 4,500 ppm of V. The four-lump model featuring gas oil, gasoline, light gases, and coke was used to evaluate the kinetic constants. The equations developed for the four-lump model were also used to evaluate the adsorption constants for gas oil, gasoline, and light gases. These parameters are of special importance for the simulation of industrial scale FCC risers. Experimental results demonstrated that gas oil conversion recovered significantly with FCCTs. It was also proven that the effects of the addition of the in situ metal traps were beneficial on gasoline yield, gasoline selectivity, and research octane number. A major contribution of the in situ metal traps was an important reduction in coke yield. Consistent with this result a reduced catalyst deactivation was observed with FCCTs.

  3. Non-Condon equilibrium Fermi's golden rule electronic transition rate constants via the linearized semiclassical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we test the accuracy of the linearized semiclassical (LSC) expression for the equilibrium Fermi's golden rule rate constant for electronic transitions in the presence of non-Condon effects. We do so by performing a comparison with the exact quantum-mechanical result for a model where the donor and acceptor potential energy surfaces are parabolic and identical except for shifts in the equilibrium energy and geometry, and the coupling between them is linear in the nuclear coordinates. Since non-Condon effects may or may not give rise to conical intersections, both possibilities are examined by considering: (1) A modified Garg-Onuchic-Ambegaokar model for charge transfer in the condensed phase, where the donor-acceptor coupling is linear in the primary mode coordinate, and for which non-Condon effects do not give rise to a conical intersection; (2) the linear vibronic coupling model for electronic transitions in gas phase molecules, where non-Condon effects give rise to conical intersections. We also present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression and a progression of more approximate expressions. The comparison is performed over a wide range of frictions and temperatures for model (1) and over a wide range of temperatures for model (2). The linearized semiclassical method is found to reproduce the exact quantum-mechanical result remarkably well for both models over the entire range of parameters under consideration. In contrast, more approximate expressions are observed to deviate considerably from the exact result in some regions of parameter space.

  4. Non-Condon equilibrium Fermi's golden rule electronic transition rate constants via the linearized semiclassical method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-06-28

    In this paper, we test the accuracy of the linearized semiclassical (LSC) expression for the equilibrium Fermi's golden rule rate constant for electronic transitions in the presence of non-Condon effects. We do so by performing a comparison with the exact quantum-mechanical result for a model where the donor and acceptor potential energy surfaces are parabolic and identical except for shifts in the equilibrium energy and geometry, and the coupling between them is linear in the nuclear coordinates. Since non-Condon effects may or may not give rise to conical intersections, both possibilities are examined by considering: (1) A modified Garg-Onuchic-Ambegaokar model for charge transfer in the condensed phase, where the donor-acceptor coupling is linear in the primary mode coordinate, and for which non-Condon effects do not give rise to a conical intersection; (2) the linear vibronic coupling model for electronic transitions in gas phase molecules, where non-Condon effects give rise to conical intersections. We also present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression and a progression of more approximate expressions. The comparison is performed over a wide range of frictions and temperatures for model (1) and over a wide range of temperatures for model (2). The linearized semiclassical method is found to reproduce the exact quantum-mechanical result remarkably well for both models over the entire range of parameters under consideration. In contrast, more approximate expressions are observed to deviate considerably from the exact result in some regions of parameter space. PMID:27369495

  5. SARS CoV main proteinase: The monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Vito; McGrath, William J; Yang, Lin; Mangel, Walter F

    2006-12-12

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, KD, have varied more than 65,0000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 microM. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded KD values of 5.8 +/- 0.8 microM (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 +/- 2.2 microM (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 +/- 1.5 microM (obtained from the forward scattering). The KD from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 +/- 1.1 microM, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 +/- 0.4 microM. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar KD values.

  6. Effects of resident water and non-equilibrium adsorption on the primary and enhanced coalbed methane gas recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahediesfanjani, Hossein

    The major part of the gas in coalbed methane and shale gas reservoirs is stored as the adsorbed gas in the coal and organic materials of the black shale internal surfaces. The sorption sites in both reservoirs are composed of several macropores that contain very small pore sizes. Therefore, the adsorption/desorption is very slow process and follows a non-equilibrium trend. The time-dependency of the sorption process is further affected by the reservoir resident water. Water can diffuse into the matrix and adsorption sites, plug the pores and affect the reservoir gas production. This study presents an experimental and theoretical procedure to investigate the effects of the resident water and time-dependency of the sorption process on coalbed and shale gas primary and enhanced recovery by simultaneous CO 2/N2 injection. Series of the experiments are conducted to construct both equilibrium and non-equilibrium single and multi-component isotherms with the presence of water. A novel and rapid data interpretation technique is developed based on the nonequilibrium adsorption/desorption thermodynamics, mass conservation law, and volume filling adsorption theory. The developed technique is implemented to construct both equilibrium and non-equilibrium multi-component multi-phase isotherms from the early time experimental measurements. The non-equilibrium isotherms are incorporated in the coalbed methane/shale gas reservoir simulations to account for the time-dependency of the sorption process. The experimental results indicate that the presence of water in the sorption system reduces both carbon dioxide and nitrogen adsorption rates. Reduction in the adsorption rate for carbon dioxide is more than nitrogen. The results also indicate that the resident water reduces the adsorption ability of low rank coals more than high rank ones. The results of the multi-component sorption tests indicate that increasing the initial mole fraction of the nitrogen gas in the injected CO2/N2

  7. A one-term extrapolation method for estimating equilibrium constants of aqueous reactions at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Gammons, C. H.; Bloom, M. S.

    1994-09-01

    A one-term method for extrapolating equilibrium constants for aqueous reactions is proposed which is based on the observation that the change in free energy of a well-balanced isocoulombic reaction is nearly independent of temperature. The current practice in extrapolating log K values for isocoulombic reactions is to omit the ΔCp term but include a ΔS term (i.e., the two-term extrapolation equation of LINDSAY, 1980). However, we observe that the ΔCp and ΔS terms for many isocoulombic reactions are not only small, but are often opposite in sign, and therefore tend to cancel one another. Thus, inclusion of an entropy term often yields estimates which are less accurate than omission of both terms. The one-term extrapolation technique is tested with literature data for a large number of isocoulombic reactions involving ion-ligand exchange, cation hydrolysis, acid-base neutralization, redox, and selected reactions involving solids. In most cases the extrapolated values are in excellent agreement with the experimental measurements, especially at higher temperatures where they are often more accurate than those obtained using the two-term equation of LINDSAY (1980). The results are also comparable to estimates obtained using the modified HKF model of TANGER and HELGESON (1988) and the density model of ANDERSON et al. (1991). It is also found to produce reasonable estimates for isocoulombic reactions at elevated pressure (up to P = 2 kb) and ionic strength (up to I = 1.0). The principal advantage of the one-term method is that accurate estimates of high temperature equilibrium constants may be obtained using only free energy data for the reaction of interest at one reference temperature. The principal disadvantage is that the accuracies of the estimates are somewhat dependent on the model reaction selected to balance the isocoulombic reaction. Satisfactory results are obtained for reactions that have minimal energetic, electrostatic, structural, and volumetric

  8. SPECIES - EVALUATING THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES & EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS OF AN 11-SPECIES AIR MODEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate numerical prediction of high-temperature, chemically reacting flowfields requires a knowledge of the physical properties and reaction kinetics for the species involved in the reacting gas mixture. Assuming an 11-species air model at temperatures below 30,000 degrees Kelvin, SPECIES (Computer Codes for the Evaluation of Thermodynamic Properties, Transport Properties, and Equilibrium Constants of an 11-Species Air Model) computes values for the species thermodynamic and transport properties, diffusion coefficients and collision cross sections for any combination of the eleven species, and reaction rates for the twenty reactions normally occurring. The species represented in the model are diatomic nitrogen, diatomic oxygen, atomic nitrogen, atomic oxygen, nitric oxide, ionized nitric oxide, the free electron, ionized atomic nitrogen, ionized atomic oxygen, ionized diatomic nitrogen, and ionized diatomic oxygen. Sixteen subroutines compute the following properties for both a single species, interaction pair, or reaction, and an array of all species, pairs, or reactions: species specific heat and static enthalpy, species viscosity, species frozen thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient, collision cross section (OMEGA 1,1), collision cross section (OMEGA 2,2), collision cross section ratio, and equilibrium constant. The program uses least squares polynomial curve-fits of the most accurate data believed available to provide the requested values more quickly than is possible with table look-up methods. The subroutines for computing transport coefficients and collision cross sections use additional code to correct for any electron pressure when working with ionic species. SPECIES was developed on a SUN 3/280 computer running the SunOS 3.5 operating system. It is written in standard FORTRAN 77 for use on any machine, and requires roughly 92K memory. The standard distribution medium for SPECIES is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the

  9. Low-pressure equilibrium binary argon-methane gas mixture adsorption on exfoliated graphite: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albesa, Alberto; Russell, Brice; Vicente, José Luis; Rafti, Matías

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium measurements of pure methane, pure argon, and binary mixtures over exfoliated graphite were carried for different initial compositions, temperatures, and total pressures in the range of 0.1-1.5 Torr using the volumetric static method. Diagrams for gas and adsorbed phase compositions were constructed for the conditions explored, and isosteric heats of adsorption were calculated. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained with Monte Carlo simulations and using the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST).

  10. Modeling Nonlinear Adsorption with a Single Chemical Parameter: Predicting Chemical Median Langmuir Binding Constants.

    PubMed

    Davis, Craig Warren; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2015-07-01

    Procedures for accurately predicting linear partition coefficients onto various sorbents (e.g., organic carbon, soils, clay) are reliable and well established. However, similar procedures for the prediction of sorption parameters of nonlinear isotherm models are not. The purpose of this paper is to present a procedure for predicting nonlinear isotherm parameters, specifically the median Langmuir binding constants, K̃L, obtained utilizing the single-chemical parameter log-normal Langmuir isotherm developed in the accompanying work. A reduced poly parameter linear free energy relationship (pp-LFER) is able to predict median Langmuir binding constants for graphite, charcoal, and Darco granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption data. For the larger F400 GAC data set, a single pp-LFER model was insufficient, as a plateau is observed for the median Langmuir binding constants of larger molecular volume sorbates. This volumetric cutoff occurs in proximity to the median pore diameter for F400 GAC. A log-linear relationship exists between the aqueous solubility of these large compounds and their median Langmuir binding constants. Using this relationship for the chemicals above the volumetric cutoff and the pp-LFER below the cutoff, the median Langmuir binding constants can be predicted with a root-mean square error for graphite (n = 13), charcoal (n = 11), Darco GAC (n = 14), and F400 GAC (n = 44) of 0.129, 0.307, 0.407, and 0.424, respectively. PMID:26035017

  11. Modeling Nonlinear Adsorption with a Single Chemical Parameter: Predicting Chemical Median Langmuir Binding Constants.

    PubMed

    Davis, Craig Warren; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2015-07-01

    Procedures for accurately predicting linear partition coefficients onto various sorbents (e.g., organic carbon, soils, clay) are reliable and well established. However, similar procedures for the prediction of sorption parameters of nonlinear isotherm models are not. The purpose of this paper is to present a procedure for predicting nonlinear isotherm parameters, specifically the median Langmuir binding constants, K̃L, obtained utilizing the single-chemical parameter log-normal Langmuir isotherm developed in the accompanying work. A reduced poly parameter linear free energy relationship (pp-LFER) is able to predict median Langmuir binding constants for graphite, charcoal, and Darco granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption data. For the larger F400 GAC data set, a single pp-LFER model was insufficient, as a plateau is observed for the median Langmuir binding constants of larger molecular volume sorbates. This volumetric cutoff occurs in proximity to the median pore diameter for F400 GAC. A log-linear relationship exists between the aqueous solubility of these large compounds and their median Langmuir binding constants. Using this relationship for the chemicals above the volumetric cutoff and the pp-LFER below the cutoff, the median Langmuir binding constants can be predicted with a root-mean square error for graphite (n = 13), charcoal (n = 11), Darco GAC (n = 14), and F400 GAC (n = 44) of 0.129, 0.307, 0.407, and 0.424, respectively.

  12. A rigorous multiple independent binding site model for determining cell-based equilibrium dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Drake, Andrew W; Klakamp, Scott L

    2007-01-10

    A new 4-parameter nonlinear equation based on the standard multiple independent binding site model (MIBS) is presented for fitting cell-based ligand titration data in order to calculate the ligand/cell receptor equilibrium dissociation constant and the number of receptors/cell. The most commonly used linear (Scatchard Plot) or nonlinear 2-parameter model (a single binding site model found in commercial programs like Prism(R)) used for analysis of ligand/receptor binding data assumes only the K(D) influences the shape of the titration curve. We demonstrate using simulated data sets that, depending upon the cell surface receptor expression level, the number of cells titrated, and the magnitude of the K(D) being measured, this assumption of always being under K(D)-controlled conditions can be erroneous and can lead to unreliable estimates for the binding parameters. We also compare and contrast the fitting of simulated data sets to the commonly used cell-based binding equation versus our more rigorous 4-parameter nonlinear MIBS model. It is shown through these simulations that the new 4-parameter MIBS model, when used for cell-based titrations under optimal conditions, yields highly accurate estimates of all binding parameters and hence should be the preferred model to fit cell-based experimental nonlinear titration data. PMID:17141800

  13. Equilibrium model for biodegradation and adsorption of mixtures in GAC columns

    SciTech Connect

    Erlanson, B.C.; Dvorak, B.I.; Speitel, G.E. Jr.; Lawler, D.F.

    1997-05-01

    Microbial activity in granular activated carbon (GAC) columns has received much attention over the last 15 years because biodegradation of one or more chemicals might increase the GAC service life, thereby decreasing costs. An equilibrium model for simultaneous biodegradation and adsorption was developed and verified with existing data. For simplicity the model was restricted to only two components: one biodegradable and one not. The results from modeling over 300 hypothetical situations identified conditions where biodegradation significantly extends the service life of granular activated carbon (GAC) columns. When the nonbiodegradable chemical controls the service life, the only significant gains in service life occurred when the biodegradable and nonbiodegradable chemical had similar adsorbabilities. When the biodegradable chemical controls the service life, the service life was 1.2--7 times that with adsorption alone, depending on the relative adsorbability of the two chemicals. The increase in service life can be maximized by ensuring that biodegradation begins as soon as possible after start-up. The model provides a good screening tool for initial assessments of process feasibility, preliminary economic analyses, and planning of detailed experimental and computer modeling studies. Examples are presented using benzene and TCE to illustrate how the general trends presented apply to specific cases.

  14. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qingling; Deng, Yali; Li, Huishu; Liu, Jie; Hu, Hongqing; Chen, Shouwen; Sa, Tongmin

    2009-02-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L -1. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy ( ΔGmθr) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy ( ΔHmθr) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  15. Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays to Measure Equilibrium Dissociation Constants: GAL4-p53 Binding DNA as a Model System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffler, Michael A.; Walters, Ryan D.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K[subscript D]) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel;…

  16. Rate and Equilibrium Constants for an Enzyme Conformational Change during Catalysis by Orotidine 5'-Monophosphate Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Goryanova, Bogdana; Goldman, Lawrence M; Ming, Shonoi; Amyes, Tina L; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2015-07-28

    complex between FOMP and the open enzyme, that the tyrosyl phenol group stabilizes the closed form of ScOMPDC by hydrogen bonding to the substrate phosphodianion, and that the phenyl group of Y217 and F217 facilitates formation of the transition state for the rate-limiting conformational change. An analysis of kinetic data for mutant enzyme-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP and FOMP provides estimates for the rate and equilibrium constants for the conformational change that traps FOMP at the enzyme active site.

  17. The 'Densitometric Image Analysis Software' and its application to determine stepwise equilibrium constants from electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

    PubMed

    van Oeffelen, Liesbeth; Peeters, Eveline; Nguyen Le Minh, Phu; Charlier, Daniël

    2014-01-01

    Current software applications for densitometric analysis, such as ImageJ, QuantityOne (BioRad) and the Intelligent or Advanced Quantifier (Bio Image) do not allow to take the non-linearity of autoradiographic films into account during calibration. As a consequence, quantification of autoradiographs is often regarded as problematic, and phosphorimaging is the preferred alternative. However, the non-linear behaviour of autoradiographs can be described mathematically, so it can be accounted for. Therefore, the 'Densitometric Image Analysis Software' has been developed, which allows to quantify electrophoretic bands in autoradiographs, as well as in gels and phosphorimages, while providing optimized band selection support to the user. Moreover, the program can determine protein-DNA binding constants from Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSAs). For this purpose, the software calculates a chosen stepwise equilibrium constant for each migration lane within the EMSA, and estimates the errors due to non-uniformity of the background noise, smear caused by complex dissociation or denaturation of double-stranded DNA, and technical errors such as pipetting inaccuracies. Thereby, the program helps the user to optimize experimental parameters and to choose the best lanes for estimating an average equilibrium constant. This process can reduce the inaccuracy of equilibrium constants from the usual factor of 2 to about 20%, which is particularly useful when determining position weight matrices and cooperative binding constants to predict genomic binding sites. The MATLAB source code, platform-dependent software and installation instructions are available via the website http://micr.vub.ac.be.

  18. Discrete site surface complexation constants for lanthanide adsorption to bacteria as determined by experiments and linear free energy relationships.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Bryne T; Magennis, Marisa; Olive, Valerie; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Ellam, Robert M

    2010-01-15

    Bacteria are abundant in many natural and engineered environments where they are thought to exert important controls on the cycling, mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity of metal contaminants. In order to probe their role in moderating the behavior of lanthanides, pH-dependent adsorption edges of 13 individual lanthanides and yttrium to the Gram-negative bacterium Pantoea agglomerans were used to generate discrete site surface complexation constants. The calculated surface complexation constants were compared with stability constants estimated using linear free energy relationships based on a number of hydroxyl-containing ligands. The experimental data suggests that lanthanide adsorption edges below pH 6.5 are consistent with adsorption to phosphate groups for the light and some of the middle lanthanides (La to Gd), whereas some of the middle and heavy lanthanides appear to favor carboxyl co-ordination (Tb to Yb), although exceptions occur in each grouping. The experimentally derived surface complexation constants for carboxyl coordination were of similar magnitude to stability constants estimated from linear free energy correlations using fulvic acid stability constants. The implication is that the adsorption of lanthanides to bacterial surfaces could be modeled reasonably well using lanthanide stability constants for natural organic matter, except perhaps at low pH where phosphate binding dominates. PMID:20000843

  19. Batch removal of malachite green from aqueous solutions by adsorption on oil palm trunk fibre: equilibrium isotherms and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Hameed, B H; El-Khaiary, M I

    2008-06-15

    Oil palm trunk fibre (OPTF)--an agricultural solid waste--was used as low-cost adsorbent to remove malachite green (MG) from aqueous solutions. The operating variables studied were contact time, initial dye concentration, and solution pH. Equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by three isotherms, namely the Freundlich isotherm, the Langmuir isotherm, and the multilayer adsorption isotherm. The best fit to the data was obtained with the multilayer adsorption. The monolayer adsorption capacity of OPTF was found to be 149.35 mg/g at 30 degrees C. Adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the Lagergren pseudo-first-order, Ho's pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. It was found that the Lagergren's model could be used for the prediction of the system's kinetics. The overall rate of dye uptake was found to be controlled by external mass transfer at the beginning of adsorption, then for initial MG concentrations of 25, 50, 100, 150, and 300 mg/L the rate-control changed to intraparticle diffusion at a later stage, but for initial MG concentrations 200 and 250 mg/L no evidence was found of intraparticle diffusion at any period of adsorption. It was found that with increasing the initial concentration of MG, the pore-diffusion coefficient increased while the film-diffusion coefficient decreased. PMID:18022316

  20. Equilibrium Fermi's Golden Rule Charge Transfer Rate Constants in the Condensed Phase: The Linearized Semiclassical Method vs Classical Marcus Theory.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-05-19

    In this article, we present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression for the equilibrium Fermi's golden rule rate constant and the progression of more approximate expressions that lead to the classical Marcus expression. We do so within the context of the canonical Marcus model, where the donor and acceptor potential energy surface are parabolic and identical except for a shift in both the free energies and equilibrium geometries, and within the Condon region. The comparison is performed for two different spectral densities and over a wide range of frictions and temperatures, thereby providing a clear test for the validity, or lack thereof, of the more approximate expressions. We also comment on the computational cost and scaling associated with numerically calculating the linearized semiclassical expression for the rate constant and its dependence on the spectral density, temperature, and friction.

  1. Rate and equilibrium constants for the addition of N-heterocyclic carbenes into benzaldehydes: a remarkable 2-substituent effect.

    PubMed

    Collett, Christopher J; Massey, Richard S; Taylor, James E; Maguire, Oliver R; O'Donoghue, AnnMarie C; Smith, Andrew D

    2015-06-01

    Rate and equilibrium constants for the reaction between N-aryl triazolium N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) precatalysts and substituted benzaldehyde derivatives to form 3-(hydroxybenzyl)azolium adducts under both catalytic and stoichiometric conditions have been measured. Kinetic analysis and reaction profile fitting of both the forward and reverse reactions, plus onwards reaction to the Breslow intermediate, demonstrate the remarkable effect of the benzaldehyde 2-substituent in these reactions and provide insight into the chemoselectivity of cross-benzoin reactions.

  2. The special features of protein adsorption isotherms on silica adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukhrai, E. S.; Atyaksheva, L. F.; Pilipenko, O. S.

    2011-05-01

    The adsorption isotherms of hemoglobin, peroxidase, and β-galactosidase on silochrome and mesoporous and biporous silicas were comparatively studied. Adsorption developed in two stages, including fast "reversible" protein adsorption (equilibrium was reached in t ≤ 1-2 h) and a "slow stage" of irreversible binding in t ≫ 24 h (multipoint adsorption). The corresponding equilibrium constants were determined. The mechanism of unlimited linear association of peroxidase in the adsorption layer on the surface of silochrome was established.

  3. Rapid Adsorption of Copper(II) and Lead(II) by Rice Straw/Fe3O4 Nanocomposite: Optimization, Equilibrium Isotherms, and Adsorption Kinetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B.; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:25815470

  4. Rapid adsorption of copper(II) and lead(II) by rice straw/Fe₃O₄ nanocomposite: optimization, equilibrium isotherms, and adsorption kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles.

  5. Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics investigation on the adsorption of lead(II) by coal-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhengji; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Mijia; Chen, Huilun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using activated coal-based activated carbon (CBAC) to adsorb Pb(II) from aqueous solutions through batch tests. Effects of contact time, pH, temperature and initial Pb(II) concentration on the Pb(II) adsorption were examined. The Pb(II) adsorption is strongly dependent on pH, but insensitive to temperature. The best pH for Pb(II) removal is in the range of 5.0-5.5 with more than 90 % of Pb(II) removed. The equilibrium time was found to be 60 min and the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Isotherm data followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 162.33 mg/g. The adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis suggested that CBAC possessed a porous structure and was rich in carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on its surface, which might play a major role in Pb(II) adsorption. These findings indicated that CBAC has great potential as an alternative adsorbent for Pb(II) removal. PMID:27504258

  6. Adsorption of cesium from aqueous solution using agricultural residue--walnut shell: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dahu; Zhao, Yingxin; Yang, Shengjiong; Shi, Wansheng; Zhang, Zhenya; Lei, Zhongfang; Yang, Yingnan

    2013-05-01

    A novel biosorbent derived from agricultural residue - walnut shell (WS) is reported to remove cesium from aqueous solution. Nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCF) was incorporated into this biosorbent, serving as a high selectivity trap agent for cesium. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) were utilized for the evaluation of the developed biosorbent. Determination of kinetic parameters for adsorption was carried out using pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order kinetic models and intra-particle diffusion models. Adsorption equilibrium was examined using Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherms. A satisfactory correlation coefficient and relatively low chi-square analysis parameter χ(2) between the experimental and predicted values of the Freundlich isotherm demonstrate that cesium adsorption by NiHCF-WS is a multilayer chemical adsorption. Thermodynamic studies were conducted under different reaction temperatures and results indicate that cesium adsorption by NiHCF-WS is an endothermic (ΔH° > 0) and spontaneous (ΔG° < 0) process.

  7. The effect of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of dissolved organic matter and atrazine on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd Schreiber; Viktor Schmalz; Thomas Brinkmann; Eckhard Worch

    2007-09-15

    The influence of water temperature on the adsorption of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) on activated carbon has not been investigated intensively yet. In this study, batch experiments with granular activated carbon (GAC) F300, from bituminous coal, have been carried out at three temperatures (5, 20, 35{sup o} C) using a humic acid model water and different types of surface water (lake, river, canal). Furthermore, the adsorption of an anthropogenic contaminant, atrazine, was quantified in the absence and presence of DOM. The results indicate a significant influence of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of DOM and atrazine. Contrary to expectations, DOM and atrazine adsorption in surface water tends to be increased with increasing water temperature, whereas the extent of this effect is dependent on the type and concentration of DOM. Furthermore, the temperature effect on atrazine adsorption is controlled by competition of DOM and atrazine on adsorption sites. Some assumptions are proposed and discussed for explaining the temperature effects observed in the batch studies. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Equilibrium and column adsorption studies of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) on surface modified granular activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Boddu, V M; Abburi, K; Fredricksen, A J; Maloney, S W; Damavarapu, R

    2009-02-01

    2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is used as a component extensively in the development of insensitive munitions. This may result in release of DNAN into the environment. Here, the results are reported of a study on the removal characteristics of DNAN through adsorption on granular activated carbon (GAC), chitosan coated granular activated carbon (CGAC), acid treated granular activated carbon (AGAC) and alkali treated granular activated carbon (BGAC) under equilibrium and column flow conditions. The effect of pH, contact time, concentration of DNAN, and presence of electrolytes on the uptake of DNAN by the adsorbents was investigated. The equilibrium data were fitted to different types of adsorption isotherms. The data were further analysed on the basis of Lagergren first-order, pseudo second-order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models. Breakthrough curves were obtained based on column flow results. All the adsorbents were capable of removing about 99% of DNAN from aqueous media, except CGAC which adsorbed about 87% of DNAN.

  9. The 'Densitometric Image Analysis Software' and its application to determine stepwise equilibrium constants from electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

    PubMed

    van Oeffelen, Liesbeth; Peeters, Eveline; Nguyen Le Minh, Phu; Charlier, Daniël

    2014-01-01

    Current software applications for densitometric analysis, such as ImageJ, QuantityOne (BioRad) and the Intelligent or Advanced Quantifier (Bio Image) do not allow to take the non-linearity of autoradiographic films into account during calibration. As a consequence, quantification of autoradiographs is often regarded as problematic, and phosphorimaging is the preferred alternative. However, the non-linear behaviour of autoradiographs can be described mathematically, so it can be accounted for. Therefore, the 'Densitometric Image Analysis Software' has been developed, which allows to quantify electrophoretic bands in autoradiographs, as well as in gels and phosphorimages, while providing optimized band selection support to the user. Moreover, the program can determine protein-DNA binding constants from Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSAs). For this purpose, the software calculates a chosen stepwise equilibrium constant for each migration lane within the EMSA, and estimates the errors due to non-uniformity of the background noise, smear caused by complex dissociation or denaturation of double-stranded DNA, and technical errors such as pipetting inaccuracies. Thereby, the program helps the user to optimize experimental parameters and to choose the best lanes for estimating an average equilibrium constant. This process can reduce the inaccuracy of equilibrium constants from the usual factor of 2 to about 20%, which is particularly useful when determining position weight matrices and cooperative binding constants to predict genomic binding sites. The MATLAB source code, platform-dependent software and installation instructions are available via the website http://micr.vub.ac.be. PMID:24465496

  10. An Equilibrium Model for the Combined Effect of Macromolecular Crowding and Surface Adsorption on the Formation of Linear Protein Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Travis; Minton, Allen P.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of linear protein fibrils has previously been shown to be enhanced by volume exclusion or crowding in the presence of a high concentration of chemically inert protein or polymer, and by adsorption to membrane surfaces. An equilibrium mesoscopic model for the combined effect of both crowding and adsorption upon the fibrillation of a dilute tracer protein is presented. The model exhibits behavior that differs qualitatively from that observed in the presence of crowding or adsorption alone. The model predicts that in a crowded solution, at critical values of the volume fraction of crowder or intrinsic energy of the tracer-wall interaction, the tracer protein will undergo an extremely cooperative transition—approaching a step function—from existence as a slightly self-associated species in solution to existence as a highly self-associated and completely adsorbed species. Criteria for a valid experimental test of these predictions are presented. PMID:25692600

  11. Adsorption of Rhodamine B on two novel polar-modified post-cross-linked resins: Equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiangfu; Huang, Jianhan

    2016-04-01

    We employed two polar monomers, triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) and butyl acrylate (BA), to copolymerize with divinylbenzene (DVB), and synthesized two starting copolymers labeled PDT and PDB. Then, the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction was performed for the two starting copolymers, and the residual pendent vinyl groups were consumed, and hence we obtained two novel polar-modified post-cross-linked resins PDTpc and PDBpc. The surface polarity greatly improved due to introduction of the polar monomers, and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume significantly increased after the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction. Compared with the starting copolymers, the non-polar post-cross-linked resin PDVBpc and some other adsorbents in the references, PDTpc and PDBpc possessed a much enhanced adsorption to Rhodamine B, and the equilibrium capacity reached 578.2mg/g and 328.7mg/g, respectively, at an equilibrium concentration of 100mg/L, and the Freundlich model characterized the equilibrium data very well. The adsorption was a fast process and the kinetic data obeyed the micropore diffusion model. These results confirmed that PDTpc and PDBpc had the potential superiority in adsorptive removal of Rhodamine B from aqueous solution. PMID:26803602

  12. A METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC TAUTOMERIC AND ZWITTERIONIC MICROSPECIES EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for the individual measurement of simultaneously occurring, unimolecular, site-specific "microequilibrium" constants as in, for example, prototropic tautomerism and zwitterionic equilibria. Our method represents an elaboration of that of Nygren et al. (Anal. ...

  13. METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC TAUTOMERIC AND ZWITTERIONIC MICROSPECIES EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for the individual measurement of simultaneously occurring, unimolecular, site-specific “microequilibrium” constants as in, for example, prototropic tautomerism and zwitterionic equilibria. Our method represents an elaboration of that of Nygren et al. (Anal. ...

  14. Adsorption behaviour of direct yellow 50 onto cotton fiber: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, L. F. M.; Sallam, H. B.; Abo Farha, S. A.; Gamal, A. M.; Mahmoud, G. E. A.

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the adsorption of direct yellow 50 onto cotton fiber from aqueous solution by using parameters, such as pH, temperature, contact time, initial dye concentration and the effect of sodium sulphate, tetrasodium edate and trisodium citrate. The extent of dye adsorption increased with increasing contact time, temperature and solution concentration. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. It was found that the Langmuir equation fit better than the Freundlich equation. The results show that the presence of SE and SC significantly enhance the dye adsorption onto cotton fiber. In addition, the adsorption data obtained at different temperatures of DY50 onto cotton fiber were applied to pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. The rates of adsorption were found to conform to pseudo second-order kinetics with good correlation. Also, free energy of adsorption (ΔG#), enthalpy (ΔH#), and entropy (ΔS#) changes were determined to predict the nature of adsorption. The positive value of the enthalpy change indicated that the adsorption is endothermic process. The activation energy, Ea, is ranged between 1.9 and 3.9 kJ mol-1 indicated that the adsorption process is a physisorption. This low value of Ea generally indicates diffusion controlled process.

  15. Experimental determination of equilibrium constant for the complexing reaction of nitric oxide with hexamminecobalt(II) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yan-Peng; Chen, Hua; Long, Xiang-Li; Xiao, Wen-de; Li, Wei; Yuan, Wei-Kang

    2009-02-15

    Ammonia solution can be used to scrub NO from the flue gases by adding soluble cobalt(II) salts into the aqueous ammonia solutions. The hexamminecobalt(II), Co(NH3)6(2+), formed by ammonia binding with Co2+ is the active constituent of eliminating NO from the flue gas streams. The hexamminecobalt(II) can combine with NO to form a complex. For the development of this process, the data of the equilibrium constants for the coordination between NO and Co(NH3)6(2+)over a range of temperature is very important. Therefore, a series of experiments were performed in a bubble column to investigate the chemical equilibrium. The equilibrium constant was determined in the temperature range of 30.0-80.0 degrees C under atmospheric pressure at pH 9.14. All experimental data fit the following equation well: [see text] where the enthalpy and entropy are DeltaH degrees = - (44.559 +/- 2.329)kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS degrees = - (109.50 +/- 7.126) J K(-1)mol(-1), respectively.

  16. Effect of charge regulation on steric mass-action equilibrium for the ion-exchange adsorption of proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Frey, Douglas D

    2005-06-24

    A thermodynamic formalism is developed for incorporating the effects of charge regulation on the ion-exchange adsorption of proteins under mass-overloaded conditions as described by the steric mass-action (SMA) isotherm. To accomplish this, the pH titration behavior of a protein and the associated adsorption equilibrium of the various charged forms of a protein are incorporated into a model which also accounts for the steric hindrance of salt counterions caused by protein adsorption. For the case where the protein is dilute, the new model reduces to the protein adsorption model described recently by the authors which accounts for charge regulation. Similarly, the new model reduces to the steric mass-action isotherm developed by Brooks and Cramer which applies to mass-overloaded conditions for the case where charge regulation is ignored so that the protein has a fixed charge. Calculations using the new model were found to agree with experimental data for the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on an anion-exchange column packing when using reasonable physical properties. The new model was also used to develop an improved theoretical criterion for determining the conditions required for an adsorbed species to displace a protein in displacement chromatography when the pH is near the protein pI.

  17. Adsorption behavior of activated carbon derived from pyrolusite-modified sewage sludge: equilibrium modeling, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Jiang, Li; Ji, Xiujuan

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon was developed from sewage sludge using pyrolusite as an additive. It was demonstrated that the removal efficiency of two synthetic dyes (Tracid orange GS and Direct fast turquoise blue GL) by the produced adsorbent was up to 97.6%. The activated carbon with pyrolusite addition had 38.2% higher surface area, 43.8% larger micropore and 54.4% larger mesopore production than ordinary sludge-based activated carbons. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on dyes adsorption tests. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption, and the results fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data have been analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equation. The experimental data fitted very well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Activation energies for the adsorption processes ranged between 8.7 and 19.1 kJ mol 1. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (deltaG0), standard enthalpy (deltaH0) and standard entropy (deltaS0) were evaluated. The adsorption of these two dyes on the activated carbon was found to be a spontaneous and endothermic process in nature.

  18. Adsorption behavior of activated carbon derived from pyrolusite-modified sewage sludge: equilibrium modeling, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Jiang, Li; Ji, Xiujuan

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon was developed from sewage sludge using pyrolusite as an additive. It was demonstrated that the removal efficiency of two synthetic dyes (Tracid orange GS and Direct fast turquoise blue GL) by the produced adsorbent was up to 97.6%. The activated carbon with pyrolusite addition had 38.2% higher surface area, 43.8% larger micropore and 54.4% larger mesopore production than ordinary sludge-based activated carbons. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on dyes adsorption tests. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption, and the results fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data have been analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equation. The experimental data fitted very well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Activation energies for the adsorption processes ranged between 8.7 and 19.1 kJ mol 1. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (deltaG0), standard enthalpy (deltaH0) and standard entropy (deltaS0) were evaluated. The adsorption of these two dyes on the activated carbon was found to be a spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. PMID:22097045

  19. Adsorption behavior of direct red 80 and congo red onto activated carbon/surfactant: Process optimization, kinetics and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengjun; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Xiao; Jiang, Xiaohui; Li, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Adsorptions of congo red and direct red 80 onto activated carbon/surfactant from aqueous solution were optimized. The Box-Behnken design (BBD) has been employed to analyze the effects of concentration of surfactant, temperature, pH, and initial concentration of the dye in the adsorption capacity. Their corresponding experimental data could be evaluated excellently by second order polynomial regression models and the two models were also examined based on the analysis of variance and t test statistics, respectively. The optimum conditions were obtained as follows: Cs = 34.10 μM, T = 50 °C, pH = 3.5, and CCR = 160 mg/L for the congo red system, and Cs = 34.10 μM, T = 50 °C, pH = 6.1, and CDR80 = 110 mg/L for the direct red 80 system. And in these conditions, the measured experimental maximum adsorption capacities for the congo red and direct red 80 removals were 769.48 mg/g and 519.90 mg/g, which were consistent with their corresponding predicted values, with small relative errors of -2.81% and -0.67%, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics for the two dye adsorptions onto AC/DDAC were also investigated. The experimental data were fitted by four isotherm models, and Langmuir model presented the best fit. The kinetic studies indicated that the kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order model.

  20. A Virtual Mixture Approach to the Study of Multistate Equilibrium: Application to Constant pH Simulation in Explicit Water

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium of multiple states is a fundamental phenomenon in biology systems and has been the focus of many experimental and computational studies. This work presents a simulation method to directly study the equilibrium of multiple states. This method constructs a virtual mixture of multiple states (VMMS) to sample the conformational space of all chemical states simultaneously. The VMMS system consists of multiple subsystems, one for each state. The subsystem contains a solute and a solvent environment. The solute molecules in all subsystems share the same conformation but have their own solvent environments. Transition between states is implicated by the change of their molar fractions. Simulation of a VMMS system allows efficient calculation of relative free energies of all states, which in turn determine their equilibrium molar fractions. For systems with a large number of state transition sites, an implicit site approximation is introduced to minimize the cost of simulation. A direct application of the VMMS method is for constant pH simulation to study protonation equilibrium. Applying the VMMS method to a heptapeptide of 3 ionizable residues, we calculated the pKas of those residues both with all explicit states and with implicit sites and obtained consistent results. For mouse epidermal growth factor of 9 ionizable groups, our VMMS simulations with implicit sites produced pKas of all 9 ionizable groups and the results agree qualitatively with NMR measurement. This example demonstrates the VMMS method can be applied to systems of a large number of ionizable groups and the computational cost scales linearly with the number of ionizable groups. For one of the most challenging systems in constant pH calculation, SNase Δ+PHS/V66K, our VMMS simulation shows that it is the state-dependent water penetration that causes the large deviation in lysine66’s pKa. PMID:26506245

  1. A Virtual Mixture Approach to the Study of Multistate Equilibrium: Application to Constant pH Simulation in Explicit Water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-10-01

    Chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium of multiple states is a fundamental phenomenon in biology systems and has been the focus of many experimental and computational studies. This work presents a simulation method to directly study the equilibrium of multiple states. This method constructs a virtual mixture of multiple states (VMMS) to sample the conformational space of all chemical states simultaneously. The VMMS system consists of multiple subsystems, one for each state. The subsystem contains a solute and a solvent environment. The solute molecules in all subsystems share the same conformation but have their own solvent environments. Transition between states is implicated by the change of their molar fractions. Simulation of a VMMS system allows efficient calculation of relative free energies of all states, which in turn determine their equilibrium molar fractions. For systems with a large number of state transition sites, an implicit site approximation is introduced to minimize the cost of simulation. A direct application of the VMMS method is for constant pH simulation to study protonation equilibrium. Applying the VMMS method to a heptapeptide of 3 ionizable residues, we calculated the pKas of those residues both with all explicit states and with implicit sites and obtained consistent results. For mouse epidermal growth factor of 9 ionizable groups, our VMMS simulations with implicit sites produced pKas of all 9 ionizable groups and the results agree qualitatively with NMR measurement. This example demonstrates the VMMS method can be applied to systems of a large number of ionizable groups and the computational cost scales linearly with the number of ionizable groups. For one of the most challenging systems in constant pH calculation, SNase Δ+PHS/V66K, our VMMS simulation shows that it is the state-dependent water penetration that causes the large deviation in lysine66's pKa.

  2. Dynamics of Equilibrium Folding and Unfolding Transitions of Titin Immunoglobulin Domain under Constant Forces

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hu; Yuan, Guohua; Winardhi, Ricksen S.; Yao, Mingxi; Popa, Ionel; Fernandez, Julio M.; Yan, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical stability of force-bearing proteins is crucial for their functions. However, slow transition rates of complex protein domains have made it challenging to investigate their equilibrium force-dependent structural transitions. Using ultra stable magnetic tweezers, we report the first equilibrium single-molecule force manipulation study of the classic titin I27 immunoglobulin domain. We found that individual I27 in a tandem repeat unfold/fold independently. We obtained the force-dependent free energy difference between unfolded and folded I27 and determined the critical force (∼5.4 pN) at which unfolding and folding have equal probability. We also determined the force-dependent free energy landscape of unfolding/folding transitions based on measurement of the free energy cost of unfolding. In addition to providing insights into the force-dependent structural transitions of titin I27, our results suggest that the conformations of titin immunoglobulin domains can be significantly altered during low force, long duration muscle stretching. PMID:25726700

  3. Dynamics of equilibrium folding and unfolding transitions of titin immunoglobulin domain under constant forces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hu; Yuan, Guohua; Winardhi, Ricksen S; Yao, Mingxi; Popa, Ionel; Fernandez, Julio M; Yan, Jie

    2015-03-18

    The mechanical stability of force-bearing proteins is crucial for their functions. However, slow transition rates of complex protein domains have made it challenging to investigate their equilibrium force-dependent structural transitions. Using ultra stable magnetic tweezers, we report the first equilibrium single-molecule force manipulation study of the classic titin I27 immunoglobulin domain. We found that individual I27 in a tandem repeat unfold/fold independently. We obtained the force-dependent free energy difference between unfolded and folded I27 and determined the critical force (∼5.4 pN) at which unfolding and folding have equal probability. We also determined the force-dependent free energy landscape of unfolding/folding transitions based on measurement of the free energy cost of unfolding. In addition to providing insights into the force-dependent structural transitions of titin I27, our results suggest that the conformations of titin immunoglobulin domains can be significantly altered during low force, long duration muscle stretching.

  4. Toward Improving Atmospheric Models and Ozone Projections: Laboratory UV Absorption Cross Sections and Equilibrium Constant of ClOOCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmouth, D. M.; Klobas, J. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Thirty years have now passed since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, and despite comprehensive international agreements being in place to phase out CFCs and halons, polar ozone losses generally remain severe. The relevant halogen compounds have very long atmospheric lifetimes, which ensures that seasonal polar ozone depletion will likely continue for decades to come. Changes in the climate system can further impact stratospheric ozone abundance through changes in the temperature and water vapor structure of the atmosphere and through the potential initiation of solar radiation management efforts. In many ways, the rate at which climate is changing must now be considered fast relative to the slow removal of halogens from the atmosphere. Photochemical models of Earth's atmosphere play a critical role in understanding and projecting ozone levels, but in order for these models to be accurate, they must be built on a foundation of accurate laboratory data. ClOOCl is the centerpiece of the catalytic cycle that accounts for more than 50% of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss in the Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere every spring, and so uncertainties in the ultraviolet cross sections of ClOOCl are particularly important. Additionally, the equilibrium constant of the dimerization reaction of ClO merits further study, as there are important discrepancies between in situ measurements and lab-based models, and the JPL-11 recommended equilibrium constant includes high error bars at atmospherically relevant temperatures (~75% at 200 K). Here we analyze available data for the ClOOCl ultraviolet cross sections and equilibrium constant and present new laboratory spectroscopic results.

  5. Computer codes for the evaluation of thermodynamic properties, transport properties, and equilibrium constants of an 11-species air model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Gupta, Roop N.

    1990-01-01

    The computer codes developed provide data to 30000 K for the thermodynamic and transport properties of individual species and reaction rates for the prominent reactions occurring in an 11-species nonequilibrium air model. These properties and the reaction-rate data are computed through the use of curve-fit relations which are functions of temperature (and number density for the equilibrium constant). The curve fits were made using the most accurate data believed available. A detailed review and discussion of the sources and accuracy of the curve-fitted data used herein are given in NASA RP 1232.

  6. Development, Construction, and Operation of a Multisample Volumetric Apparatus for the Study of Gas Adsorption Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Rui P. P. L.; Silva, Ricardo J. S.; Esteves, Isabel A. A. C.; Mota, Jose´ P. B.

    2015-01-01

    The construction of a simple volumetric adsorption apparatus is highlighted. The setup is inexpensive and provides a clear demonstration of gas phase adsorption concepts. The topic is suitable for undergraduate chemistry and chemical engineering students. Moreover, this unit can also provide quantitative data that can be used by young researchers…

  7. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Dissolution Theory for Multi-Component Solid/Liquid Surfaces Involving Surface Adsorption and Radiolysis Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R B

    2001-04-01

    A theoretical expression is developed for the dissolution rate response for multi-component radioactive materials that have surface adsorption kinetics and radiolysis kinetics when wetted by a multi-component aqueous solution. An application for this type of dissolution response is the performance evaluation of multi-component spent nuclear fuels (SNFs) for long term interim storage and for geological disposition. Typically, SNF compositions depend on initial composition, uranium oxide and metal alloys being most common, and on reactor burnup which results in a wide range of fission product and actinide concentrations that decay by alpha, beta, and gamma radiation. These compositional/burnup ranges of SNFs, whether placed in interim storage or emplaced in a geologic repository, will potentially be wetted by multi-component aqueous solutions, and these solutions may be further altered by radiolytic aqueous species due to three radiation fields. The solid states of the SNFs are not thermodynamically stable when wetted and will dissolve, with or without radiolysis. The following development of a dissolution theory is based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of energy reactions and energy transport across a solid-liquid phase change discontinuity that propagates at a quasi-steady, dissolution velocity. The integral form of the energy balance equation is used for this spatial surface discontinuity analysis. The integral formulation contains internal energy functional of classical thermodynamics for both the SNFs' solid state and surface adsorption species, and the adjacent liquid state, which includes radiolytic chemical species. The steady-state concentrations of radiolytic chemical species are expressed by an approximate analysis of the decay radiation transport equation. For purposes of illustration a modified Temkin adsorption isotherm was assumed for the surface adsorption kinetics on an arbitrary, finite area of the solid-liquid dissolution interface. For

  8. Equilibrium models and kinetic for the adsorption of methylene blue on Co-hectorites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Jia, Yong-Zhong; Jing, Yan; Sun, Jin-He; Yao, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Hua

    2010-03-15

    The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto the surface of cobalt doping hectorite (Co-hectorite) was systematically studied. The physical properties of Co-hectorites were investigated, where characterizations were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electron Diffraction Spectrum (EDS) techniques, and morphology was examined by nitrogen adsorption. The sample with a Co content 5% (m/m) had a higher specific surface area than other Co-hectorites. The pore diameters were distributed between 2.5 and 5.0 nm. The adsorption results revealed that Co-hectorite surfaces possessed effective interactions with MB and bases, and greatest adsorption capacity achieved with Co content 5%, where the best-fit isotherm model was the Langmuir adsorption model. Kinetic studies were fitted to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion was not the rate-limiting step for the whole reaction.

  9. Rate Constant in Far-from-Equilibrium States of a Replicating System with Mutually Catalyzing Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Yukawa, Satoshi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2006-02-01

    As a first step to study reaction dynamics in far-from-equilibrium open systems, we propose a stochastic protocell model in which two mutually catalyzing chemicals are replicating depending on the external flow of energy resources J. This model exhibits an Arrhenius type reaction; furthermore, it produces a non-Arrhenius reaction that exhibits a power-law reaction rate with regard to the activation energy. These dependences are explained using the dynamics of J; the asymmetric random walk of J results in the Arrhenius equation and conservation of J results in a power-law dependence. Further, we find that the discreteness of molecules results in the power change. Effects of cell divisions are also discussed in our model.

  10. Dynamic and equilibrium performance of sensors based on short peptide ligands for affinity adsorption of human IgG using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Islam, Nafisa; Shen, Fei; Gurgel, Patrick V; Rojas, Orlando J; Carbonell, Ruben G

    2014-08-15

    This paper characterizes the potential of novel hexameric peptide ligands for on-line IgG detection in bioprocesses. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) was used to study the binding of human IgG to the hexameric peptide ligand HWRGWV, which was covalently grafted to alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on gold surfaces. Peptide coupling on SAMs was verified, followed by covalent grafting of peptides with a removable Fmoc or acetylated N-termini via their C-termini to produce active peptide SPR sensors that were tested for IgG binding. The dynamics and extent of peptide-IgG binding were compared with results from a conventional system using protein A attached on a gold surface via disulfide monolayers. IgG binding to protein A on disulfide monolayers yielded equilibrium dissociation constants of 1.4×10(-7)M. The corresponding dissociation constant value for the acetylated version of the peptide (Ac-HWRGWV) supported on alkanethiol SAM was 5.8×10(-7)M and that for HWRGWV on the alkanethiol SAM (after de-protection of Fmoc-HWRGWVA) was 1.2×10(-6)M. Maximum IgG binding capacities, Qm of 6.7, 3.8, and 4.1mgm(-2) were determined for the protein A and the two forms of HWRGWV-based biosensors, respectively. Real-time data for the kinetics of adsorption were used to determine the apparent rate constants for adsorption and desorption. The results were analyzed to understand the mechanism of IgG binding to the protein and peptide ligands. It was found that the peptide-IgG binding was reaction controlled, however the protein A-IgG binding mechanism was partially mass transfer (diffusion) controlled. The adsorption rate constants, ka, for the protein A ligand increased with decreasing concentration of analyte and the peptide ligand ka values was constant at different IgG concentrations and flow rates.

  11. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium study of nitrogen species onto radiata pine (Pinus radiata) sawdust.

    PubMed

    Harmayani, Kadek D; Faisal Anwar, A H M

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen species (NH3-N, NO3-N, and NO2-N) are found as one of the major dissolved constituents in wastewater or stormwater runoff. In this research, laboratory experiments were conducted to remove these pollutants from the water environment using radiata pine (Pinus radiata) sawdust. A series of batch tests was conducted by varying initial concentration, dosage, particle size, pH, and contact time to check the removal performance. Test results confirmed the effectiveness of radiata pine sawdust for removing these contaminants from the aqueous phase (100% removal of NO3-N, and NO2-N; 55% removal of NH3-N). The adsorbent dosage and initial concentration showed a significantly greater effect on the removal process over pH or particle sizes. The optimum dosage for contaminant removal on a laboratory scale was found to be 12 g. Next, the adsorption kinetics were studied using intraparticle diffusion, liquid-film diffusion, and a pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order model. The adsorption of all species followed a pseudo-second order model but NO2-N adsorption followed both models. In addition, the kinetics of NO2-N adsorption showed two-step adsorption following intraparticle diffusion and liquid-film diffusion. The isotherm study showed that NO3-N and NO2-N adsorption fitted slightly better with the Freundlich model but that NH3-N adsorption followed both Freundlich and Langmuir models. PMID:27438245

  12. The polysiloxane cyclization equilibrium constant: a theoretical focus on small and intermediate size rings.

    PubMed

    Madeleine-Perdrillat, Claire; Delor-Jestin, Florence; de Sainte Claire, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear dependence of polysiloxane cyclization constants (log(K(x))) with ring size (log(x)) is explained by a thermodynamic model that treats specific torsional modes of the macromolecular chains with a classical coupled hindered rotor model. Several parameters such as the dependence of the internal rotation kinetic energy matrix with geometry, the effect of potential energy hindrance, anharmonicity, and the couplings between internal rotors were investigated. This behavior arises from the competing effects of local molecular entropy that is mainly driven by the intrinsic transformation of vibrations in small cycles into hindered rotations in larger cycles and configurational entropy.

  13. A benchmark study of molecular structure by experimental and theoretical methods: Equilibrium structure of thymine from microwave rotational constants and coupled-cluster computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Natalja; Demaison, Jean; Ksenafontov, Denis N.; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Accurate equilibrium, re, structures of thymine have been determined using two different, and to some extent complementary techniques. The composite ab initio Born-Oppenheimer, re(best ab initio), structural parameters are obtained from the all-electron CCSD(T) and MP2 geometry optimizations using Gaussian basis sets up to quadruple-zeta quality. The semi-experimental mixed estimation method, where internal coordinates are fitted concurrently to equilibrium rotational constants and geometry parameters obtained from a high level of electronic structure theory. The equilibrium rotational constants are derived from experimental effective ground-state rotational constants and rovibrational corrections based on a quantum-chemical cubic force field. Equilibrium molecular structures accurate to 0.002 Å and 0.2° have been determined. This work is one of a few accurate equilibrium structure determinations for large molecules. The poor behavior of Kraitchman's equations is discussed.

  14. Probing of Competitive Displacement Adsorption of Casein at Oil-in-Water Interface Using Equilibrium Force Distance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, V; Sangeetha, J; Philip, John

    2015-06-01

    The equilibrium force distance measurement is employed for the first time to probe the competitive and displacement adsorption of casein at an oil-water (O/W) emulsion interface that was initially adsorbed with either a diblock polymer or an anionic surfactant. A significant change in the force-distance profile was observed under the competitive displacement adsorption of casein, which is further confirmed from the hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential measurements. A decrease in the onset of repulsion and decay length are observed on competitive adsorption of smaller size casein molecules at O/W interface. With addition of casein in PVA-vac diblock polymer stabilized emulsion, the onset of repulsion decreases from 88 to 48 nm whereas the magnitude of force increases from 1 to 19 nN. The force decay length is reduced from 10.5 to 4.5 nm upon addition of casein. Our results suggest the complete replacement of adsorbed diblock polymers by casein molecules. The hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential measurements corroborate the casein mediated polymer displacement and the competitive adsorption of casein at the O/W interface. In the case of anionic surfactant covered O/W interfaces, casein molecules weakly associate at the interface without displacing the smaller size surfactant molecules where no significant changes in the onset repulsion and force profiles are observed. These results suggest that the casein molecules are effective displacers for replacement of adsorbed macromolecules from formulations, which has several important practical applications.

  15. Adsorption equilibrium of organic vapors on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Gravimetric techniques were employed to determine the adsorption capacities of commercially available purified electric arc and HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for organic compounds (toluene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), hexane and cyclohexane) at relative pressures, p/p0, ranging from 1 ?? 10-4 to 0.95 and at isothermal conditions of 25, 37 and 50 ??C. The isotherms displayed both type I and type II characteristics. Adsorption isotherm modeling showed that SWNTs are heterogeneous adsorbents, and the Freundlich equation best describes the interaction between organic molecules and SWNTs. The heats of adsorption were 1-4 times the heats of vaporization, which is typical for physical adsorption of organic vapors on porous carbons. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Theory for rates, equilibrium constants, and Brønsted slopes in F1-ATPase single molecule imaging experiments

    PubMed Central

    Volkán-Kacsó, Sándor; Marcus, Rudolph A.

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model of elastically coupled reactions is proposed for single molecule imaging and rotor manipulation experiments on F1-ATPase. Stalling experiments are considered in which rates of individual ligand binding, ligand release, and chemical reaction steps have an exponential dependence on rotor angle. These data are treated in terms of the effect of thermodynamic driving forces on reaction rates, and lead to equations relating rate constants and free energies to the stalling angle. These relations, in turn, are modeled using a formalism originally developed to treat electron and other transfer reactions. During stalling the free energy profile of the enzymatic steps is altered by a work term due to elastic structural twisting. Using biochemical and single molecule data, the dependence of the rate constant and equilibrium constant on the stall angle, as well as the Børnsted slope are predicted and compared with experiment. Reasonable agreement is found with stalling experiments for ATP and GTP binding. The model can be applied to other torque-generating steps of reversible ligand binding, such as ADP and Pi release, when sufficient data become available. PMID:26483483

  17. Theory for rates, equilibrium constants, and Brønsted slopes in F1-ATPase single molecule imaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Volkán-Kacsó, Sándor; Marcus, Rudolph A

    2015-11-17

    A theoretical model of elastically coupled reactions is proposed for single molecule imaging and rotor manipulation experiments on F1-ATPase. Stalling experiments are considered in which rates of individual ligand binding, ligand release, and chemical reaction steps have an exponential dependence on rotor angle. These data are treated in terms of the effect of thermodynamic driving forces on reaction rates, and lead to equations relating rate constants and free energies to the stalling angle. These relations, in turn, are modeled using a formalism originally developed to treat electron and other transfer reactions. During stalling the free energy profile of the enzymatic steps is altered by a work term due to elastic structural twisting. Using biochemical and single molecule data, the dependence of the rate constant and equilibrium constant on the stall angle, as well as the Børnsted slope are predicted and compared with experiment. Reasonable agreement is found with stalling experiments for ATP and GTP binding. The model can be applied to other torque-generating steps of reversible ligand binding, such as ADP and Pi release, when sufficient data become available.

  18. Mechanism of highly efficient adsorption of 2-chlorophenol onto ultrasonic graphene materials: Comparison and equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Tayyebeh; Lee, Byeong-Kyu

    2016-11-01

    The deficiencies of the recently reported improved Hummers method for the synthesis of graphene oxide (GO), such as high reaction temperature (60°C) and long reaction time (10h), were successfully solved using a low-intensity ultrasonic bath for 30min at 40°C. Furthermore, compared to its conventional synthesis counterpart, a facile and fast, one-step ultrasonic method that excluded hydrazine hydrate was developed to synthesize reduced GO (rGO) from graphite (10min, 50°C) in the presence of hydrazine hydrate (rGO-C, 12h, 90°C). The adsorption characteristics of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) from an aqueous solution were investigated using rGOs and GOs prepared by ultrasonic (rGO-Us/GO-Us) and conventional (rGO-C/GO-C) methods. Whereas 2-CP was completely removed with rGO-Us after 50min, only 40% of 2-CP was eliminated with rGO-C. The maximum adsorption capacity of 2-CP calculated by the Langmuir model onto rGO-Us (208.67mg/g) was much higher than that onto GO-Us (134.49mg/g). In addition, the ultrasonic graphene adsorption capacities were much higher than the corresponding values of rGO-C (49.9mg/g) and GO-C (32.06mg/g). The enhanced adsorption for rGO-Us and GO-Us is attributed to their greater surface areas, excellent oxygenated groups for GO-Us and superior π-electron-rich matrix for rGO-Us, compared to other adsorbents. The adsorption of 2-CP on the rGO materials increased with increasing solution pH to a maximum around its pKa (pKa=8.85), while the adsorption for the GO materials increased with decreasing solution pH. The adsorption mechanism proceeded via hydrogen bonding in neutral and acidic media, but via π-π electron donor-accepter (EDA) interactions between 2-CP and graphene materials in basic medium. The FTIR spectrum of GO-Us after adsorption indicates that the position and intensity of many peaks of GO-Us were affected due to the adsorption of different 2-CP groups at different pHs.

  19. Mechanism of highly efficient adsorption of 2-chlorophenol onto ultrasonic graphene materials: Comparison and equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Tayyebeh; Lee, Byeong-Kyu

    2016-11-01

    The deficiencies of the recently reported improved Hummers method for the synthesis of graphene oxide (GO), such as high reaction temperature (60°C) and long reaction time (10h), were successfully solved using a low-intensity ultrasonic bath for 30min at 40°C. Furthermore, compared to its conventional synthesis counterpart, a facile and fast, one-step ultrasonic method that excluded hydrazine hydrate was developed to synthesize reduced GO (rGO) from graphite (10min, 50°C) in the presence of hydrazine hydrate (rGO-C, 12h, 90°C). The adsorption characteristics of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) from an aqueous solution were investigated using rGOs and GOs prepared by ultrasonic (rGO-Us/GO-Us) and conventional (rGO-C/GO-C) methods. Whereas 2-CP was completely removed with rGO-Us after 50min, only 40% of 2-CP was eliminated with rGO-C. The maximum adsorption capacity of 2-CP calculated by the Langmuir model onto rGO-Us (208.67mg/g) was much higher than that onto GO-Us (134.49mg/g). In addition, the ultrasonic graphene adsorption capacities were much higher than the corresponding values of rGO-C (49.9mg/g) and GO-C (32.06mg/g). The enhanced adsorption for rGO-Us and GO-Us is attributed to their greater surface areas, excellent oxygenated groups for GO-Us and superior π-electron-rich matrix for rGO-Us, compared to other adsorbents. The adsorption of 2-CP on the rGO materials increased with increasing solution pH to a maximum around its pKa (pKa=8.85), while the adsorption for the GO materials increased with decreasing solution pH. The adsorption mechanism proceeded via hydrogen bonding in neutral and acidic media, but via π-π electron donor-accepter (EDA) interactions between 2-CP and graphene materials in basic medium. The FTIR spectrum of GO-Us after adsorption indicates that the position and intensity of many peaks of GO-Us were affected due to the adsorption of different 2-CP groups at different pHs. PMID:27474817

  20. Adsorption thermodynamics of Methylene Blue onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Hong, Song; Wen, Cheng; He, Jing; Gan, Fuxing; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2009-08-15

    The effect of temperature on the equilibrium adsorption of Methylene Blue dye from aqueous solution using bentonite was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using three widely applied isotherms: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson. A non-linear method was used for comparing the best fit of the isotherms. Best fit was found to be Redlich-Peterson isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees, and DeltaS degrees were calculated using adsorption equilibrium constant obtained from the Langmuir isotherm. Results suggested that the Methylene Blue adsorption on bentonite was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  1. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase ( PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each.

  2. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase (PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Equilibrium constant for the reaction ClO + ClO ↔ ClOOCl between 250 and 206 K.

    PubMed

    Hume, Kelly L; Bayes, Kyle D; Sander, Stanley P

    2015-05-14

    The chlorine peroxide molecule, ClOOCl, is an important participant in the chlorine-catalyzed destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Very few laboratory measurements have been made for the partitioning between monomer ClO and dimer ClOOCl at temperatures lower than 250 K. This paper reports absorption spectra for both ClO and ClOOCl when they are in equilibrium at 1 atm and temperatures down to 206 K. The very low ClO concentrations involved requires measuring and calibrating a differential cross section, ΔσClO, for the 10-0 band of ClO. A third law fit of the new results gives Keq = [(2.01 ± 0.17) 10–27 cm3 molecule–1] e(8554∓21)K/T, where the error limits reflect the uncertainty in the entropy change. The resulting equilibrium constants are slightly lower than currently recommended. The slope of the van’t Hoff plot yields a value for the enthalpy of formation of ClOOCl at 298 K, ΔHfo, of 129.8 ± 0.6 kJ mol–1. Uncertainties in the absolute ultraviolet cross sections of ClOOCl and ClO appear to be the limiting factors in these measurements. The new Keq parameters are consistent with the measurements of Santee et al.42 in the stratosphere. PMID:25560546

  4. Equilibrium constant for the reaction ClO + ClO ↔ ClOOCl between 250 and 206 K.

    PubMed

    Hume, Kelly L; Bayes, Kyle D; Sander, Stanley P

    2015-05-14

    The chlorine peroxide molecule, ClOOCl, is an important participant in the chlorine-catalyzed destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Very few laboratory measurements have been made for the partitioning between monomer ClO and dimer ClOOCl at temperatures lower than 250 K. This paper reports absorption spectra for both ClO and ClOOCl when they are in equilibrium at 1 atm and temperatures down to 206 K. The very low ClO concentrations involved requires measuring and calibrating a differential cross section, ΔσClO, for the 10-0 band of ClO. A third law fit of the new results gives Keq = [(2.01 ± 0.17) 10–27 cm3 molecule–1] e(8554∓21)K/T, where the error limits reflect the uncertainty in the entropy change. The resulting equilibrium constants are slightly lower than currently recommended. The slope of the van’t Hoff plot yields a value for the enthalpy of formation of ClOOCl at 298 K, ΔHfo, of 129.8 ± 0.6 kJ mol–1. Uncertainties in the absolute ultraviolet cross sections of ClOOCl and ClO appear to be the limiting factors in these measurements. The new Keq parameters are consistent with the measurements of Santee et al.42 in the stratosphere.

  5. Fundamental and overtone vibrational spectroscopy, enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation and equilibrium constant determination of the methanol-dimethylamine complex.

    PubMed

    Du, Lin; Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2013-07-01

    We have measured gas phase vibrational spectra of the bimolecular complex formed between methanol (MeOH) and dimethylamine (DMA) up to about 9800 cm(-1). In addition to the strong fundamental OH-stretching transition we have also detected the weak second overtone NH-stretching transition. The spectra of the complex are obtained by spectral subtraction of the monomer spectra from spectra recorded for the mixture. For comparison, we also measured the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the bimolecular complex between MeOH and trimethylamine (TMA). The enthalpies of hydrogen bond formation (ΔH) for the MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA complexes have been determined by measurements of the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the temperature range from 298 to 358 K. The enthalpy of formation is found to be -35.8 ± 3.9 and -38.2 ± 3.3 kJ mol(-1) for MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA, respectively, in the 298 to 358 K region. The equilibrium constant (Kp) for the formation of the MeOH-DMA complex has been determined from the measured and calculated transition intensities of the OH-stretching fundamental transition and the NH-stretching second overtone transition. The transition intensities were calculated using an anharmonic oscillator local mode model with dipole moment and potential energy curves calculated using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods. The equilibrium constant for formation of the MeOH-DMA complex was determined to be 0.2 ± 0.1 atm(-1), corresponding to a ΔG value of about 4.0 kJ mol(-1).

  6. Adsorption of methylene blue onto activated carbon produced from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-Jie; Qin, Ye-Bo; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Dong-Dong; Xu, Ping; Hochstetter, Danielle; Wang, Yue-Fei

    2013-07-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells, the main byproduct of the manufacture of tea seed oil, were used as precursors for the preparation of tea activated carbon (TAC) in the present study. A high yield (44.1%) of TAC was obtained from tea seed shells via a one-step chemical method using ZnCl2 as an agent. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the total pore volumes of the obtained TAC were found to be 1530.67 mg(2)/g and 0.7826 cm(3)/g, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption results were complied with Langmuir isotherm model and its maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 324.7 mg/g for methylene blue. Adsorption kinetics studies indicated that the pseudo-second-order model yielded the best fit for the kinetic data. An intraparticle diffusion model suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Thermodynamics studies revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process. These results indicate that tea seed shells could be utilized as a renewable resource to develop activated carbon which is a potential adsorbent for methylene blue.

  7. Adsorption of methylene blue onto activated carbon produced from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics studies*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-jie; Qin, Ye-bo; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Dong-dong; Xu, Ping; Hochstetter, Danielle; Wang, Yue-fei

    2013-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells, the main byproduct of the manufacture of tea seed oil, were used as precursors for the preparation of tea activated carbon (TAC) in the present study. A high yield (44.1%) of TAC was obtained from tea seed shells via a one-step chemical method using ZnCl2 as an agent. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the total pore volumes of the obtained TAC were found to be 1 530.67 mg2/g and 0.782 6 cm3/g, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption results were complied with Langmuir isotherm model and its maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 324.7 mg/g for methylene blue. Adsorption kinetics studies indicated that the pseudo-second-order model yielded the best fit for the kinetic data. An intraparticle diffusion model suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Thermodynamics studies revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process. These results indicate that tea seed shells could be utilized as a renewable resource to develop activated carbon which is a potential adsorbent for methylene blue. PMID:23825151

  8. Adsorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by native and activated bentonite: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Kul, Ali Riza; Koyuncu, Hülya

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of Pb(II) ions on native (NB) and acid activated (AAB) bentonites were examined. The specific surface areas, pore size and pore-size distributions of the samples were fully characterized. The adsorption efficiency of Pb(II) onto the NB and AAB was increased with increasing temperature. The kinetics of adsorption of Pb(II) ions was discussed using three kinetic models, the pseudo-first-order, the pseudo-second-order and the intra-particle diffusion model. The experimental data fitted very well the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The initial sorption rate and the activation energy were also calculated. The activation energy of the sorption was calculated as 16.51 and 13.66 kJ mol(-1) for NB and AAB, respectively. Experimental results were also analysed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Redushkevich (D-R) isotherm equations at different temperatures. R(L) separation factor for Langmuir and the n value for Freundlich isotherm show that Pb(II) ions are favorably adsorbed by NB and AAB. Thermodynamic quantities such as Gibbs free energy (DeltaG), the enthalpy (DeltaH) and the entropy change of sorption (DeltaS) were determined as about -5.06, 10.29 and 0.017 kJ mol(-1) K(-1), respectively for AAB. It was shown that the sorption processes were an endothermic reactions, controlled by physical mechanisms and spontaneously.

  9. Liquid Phase adsorption kinetics and equilibrium of toluene by novel modified-diatomite.

    PubMed

    Sheshdeh, Reza Khalighi; Abbasizadeh, Saeed; Nikou, Mohammad Reza Khosravi; Badii, Khashayar; Sharafi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption equilibria of toluene from aqueous solutions on natural and modified diatomite were examined at different operation parameters such as pH, contact time, initial toluene concentration was evaluated and optimum experimental conditions were identified. The surface area and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, BET, XRD, FTIR and EDX analysis. It was found that in order to obtain the highest possible removal of toluene, the experiments can be carried out at pH 6, temperature 25°C, an agitation speed of 200 rpm, an initial toluene concentration of 150 mg/L, a centrifugal rate of 4000 rpm, adsorbent dosage = 0.1 g and a process time of 90 min. The results of this work show that the maximum percentage removal of toluene from aqueous solution in the optimum conditions for NONMD was 96.91% (145.36 mg/g). Furthermore, under same conditions, the maximum adsorption of natural diatomite was 71.45% (107.18 mg/g). Both adsorption kinetic and isotherm experiments were carried out. The experimental data showed that the adsorption follows the Langmuir model and Freundlich model on natural and modified diatomite respectively. The kinetics results were found to conform well to pseudo-second order kinetics model with good correlation. Thus, this study demonstrated that the modified diatomite could be used as potential adsorbent for removal of toluene from aqueous solution.

  10. Determination of Equilibrium and Kinetic Parameters of the Adsorption of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from Aqueous Solutions to Agave Lechuguilla Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Romero-González, Jaime; Peralta-Videa, José R.; Rodríguez, Elena

    2005-01-01

    This investigation reveals the capability of Agave lechuguilla for trivalent and hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions. Experimentation included pH profile, time dependence, adsorption capacity (KF and QL), adsorption intensity (n and RL) and saturation capacity (q s) studies. Batch experiments were conducted at 22∘C to characterize and model the adsorption equilibrium as well as biomass adsorption rates. pH 4 was the optimum for Cr(III) binding, while Cr(VI) optimum binding was at pH 2. Time profile experiments indicated that the adsorption of Cr(VI) by lechuguilla biomass was time-dependent and that of Cr(III) was not. Kinetic models demonstrated that a pseudo-second order reaction model best described the kinetic data for Cr(VI). The adsorption isotherms showed that the binding pattern for Cr(VI) followed the Freundlich isotherm model, while that for Cr(III) followed the Langmuir isotherm. PMID:18365089

  11. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  12. Evaluation of equilibrium constants for the interaction of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes with reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Brinkworth, R I; Masters, C J; Winzor, D J

    1975-01-01

    Rabbit muscle lactate dehydrogenase was subjected to frontal affinity chromatography on Sepharose-oxamate in the presence of various concentrations of NADH and sodium phosphate buffer (0.05 M, pH 6.8) containing 0.5 M-NaCl. Quantitative interpretation of the results yields an intrinsic association constant of 9.0 x 10 (4)M-1 for the interaction of enzyme with NADH at 5 degrees C, a value that is confirmed by equilibrium-binding measurements. In a second series of experiments, zonal affinity chromatography of a mouse tissue extract under the same conditions was used to evaluate assoication constants of the order 2 x 10(5)M-1, 3 x 10(5)M-1, 4 x 10(5)M-1, 7 x 10(5)M-1 and 2 x 10(6)M-1 for the interaction of NADH with the M4, M3H, M2H2, MH3 and H4 isoenzymes respectively of lactate dehydrogenase. PMID:175784

  13. Effect-compartment equilibrium rate constant (keo) for propofol during induction of anesthesia with a target-controlled infusion device.

    PubMed

    Lim, Thiam Aun; Wong, Wai Hong; Lim, Kin Yuee

    2006-01-01

    The effect-compartment concentration (C(e)) of a drug at a specific pharmacodynamic endpoint should be independent of the rate of drug injection. We used this assumption to derive an effect-compartment equilibrium rate constant (k(eo)) for propofol during induction of anesthesia, using a target controlled infusion device (Diprifusor). Eighteen unpremedicated patients were induced with a target blood propofol concentration of 5 microg x ml(-1) (group 1), while another 18 were induced with a target concentration of 6 microg x ml(-1) (group 2). The time at loss of the eyelash reflex was recorded. Computer simulation was used to derive the rate constant (k(eo)) that resulted in the mean C(e) at loss of the eyelash reflex in group 1 being equal to that in group 2. Using this population technique, we found the k(eo) to be 0.57 min(-1). The mean (SD) effect compartment concentration at loss of the eyelash reflex was 2.39 (0.70) microg x ml(-1). This means that to achieve a desired C(e) within 3 min of induction, the initial target blood concentration should be set at 1.67 times that of the desired C(e) for 1 min, after which it should revert to the desired concentration.

  14. Adsorption of methylene blue onto jute fiber carbon: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaar, S; Varadarajan, P R; Porkodi, K; Subbhuraam, C V

    2005-04-01

    Jute fiber obtained from the stem of a plant was used to prepare activated carbon using phosphoric acid. Feasibility of employing this jute fiber activated carbon (JFC) for the removal of Methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution was investigated. The adsorption of MB on JFC has found to dependent on contact time, MB concentration and pH. Experimental result follows Langmuir isotherm model and the capacity was found to be 225.64 mg/g. The optimum pH for the MB removal was found to be 5-10. The kinetic data obtained at different concentrations have been analyzed using a pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order equation, intraparticle diffusion and Elovich equation. Among the kinetic models studied, the intraparticle diffusion was the best applicable model to describe the adsorption of MB onto JFC.

  15. Hydrous ferric oxide doped alginate beads for fluoride removal: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujana, M. G.; Mishra, A.; Acharya, B. C.

    2013-04-01

    A new biopolymer beads, composite of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and alginate were synthesised, characterised and studied for its fluoride efficiency from water. The beads were characterised by chemical analysis, BET surface area, pHPZC and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The optimum conditions for fluoride removal were determined by studying operational variables viz. pH, contact time, initial F- concentration, bead dose and temperature. Presence of other anions like SO42-, PO43-, NO3-, Cl- and HCO3- effect on fluoride removal efficiency of prepared beads was also tested. The beads were 0.8-0.9 mm in size and contain 32-33% Fe (III) and showed specific surface area of 25.80 m2 g-1 and pHPZC of 5.15. Modified beads demonstrated Langmuir F- adsorption capacity of 8.90 mg g-1 at pH 7.0. The adsorption kinetics were best described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model followed by intra-particle diffusion as the rate determining step. It was found that about 80% of the adsorbed fluoride could be desorbed by using 0.05 M HCl. The FTIR, Raman and SEM-EDAX analysis were used to study the fluoride adsorption mechanisms on beads. Studies were also conducted to test the potential application of beads for F- removal from drinking water and the treated water quality.

  16. Adsorptive potential of cationic Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) dye onto natural untreated clay (NUC) from aqueous phase: Mass transfer analysis, kinetic and equilibrium profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, A.; Malkoc, E.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, natural untreated clay (NUC) was studied for the removal of Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) from aqueous solution in batch system. The effects of initial BY2 concentration, contact time, solution temperature and solution pH on BY2 adsorption were investigated. Nitrogen sorption measurements were employed to investigate the variation in surface and pore properties after dye adsorption. The adsorbent was characterized by means of FTIR, PSD, TEM, XRD and BET analysis. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Scatchard isotherm models. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 833.33 mg/g at 25 °C (at room temperature). The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental datas compared with pseudo-first-order kinetic adsorption models. To explain mass transfer mechanism of BY2 adsorption, obtained experimental datas were applied Weber and Morris model, Body and Frusawa and Smith models. The results show that the adsorption process is controlled by film diffusion. The thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were determined. Adsorption of BY2 on NUC is exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The calculated activation energy of adsorption was found to be 5.24 kJ/mol for BY2. This value indicates that the adsorption process is a physisorption.

  17. Effect of Temperature on Acidity and Hydration Equilibrium Constants of Delphinidin-3-O- and Cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside Calculated from Uni- and Multiwavelength Spectroscopic Data.

    PubMed

    Vidot, Kévin; Achir, Nawel; Mertz, Christian; Sinela, André; Rawat, Nadirah; Prades, Alexia; Dangles, Olivier; Fulcrand, Hélène; Dornier, Manuel

    2016-05-25

    Delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside and cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside are the main anthocyanins of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces, traditionally used to make a bright red beverage by decoction in water. At natural pH, these anthocyanins are mainly in their flavylium form (red) in equilibrium with the quinonoid base (purple) and the hemiketal (colorless). For the first time, their acidity and hydration equilibrium constants were obtained from a pH-jump method followed by UV-vis spectroscopy as a function of temperature from 4 to 37 °C. Equilibrium constant determination was also performed by multivariate curve resolution (MCR). Acidity and hydration constants of cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside at 25 °C were 4.12 × 10(-5) and 7.74 × 10(-4), respectively, and were significantly higher for delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside (4.95 × 10(-5) and 1.21 × 10(-3), respectively). MCR enabled the obtaining of concentration and spectrum of each form but led to overestimated values for the equilibrium constants. However, both methods showed that formations of the quinonoid base and hemiketal were endothermic reactions. Equilibrium constants of anthocyanins in the hibiscus extract showed comparable values as for the isolated anthocyanins. PMID:27124576

  18. Effect of Temperature on Acidity and Hydration Equilibrium Constants of Delphinidin-3-O- and Cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside Calculated from Uni- and Multiwavelength Spectroscopic Data.

    PubMed

    Vidot, Kévin; Achir, Nawel; Mertz, Christian; Sinela, André; Rawat, Nadirah; Prades, Alexia; Dangles, Olivier; Fulcrand, Hélène; Dornier, Manuel

    2016-05-25

    Delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside and cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside are the main anthocyanins of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces, traditionally used to make a bright red beverage by decoction in water. At natural pH, these anthocyanins are mainly in their flavylium form (red) in equilibrium with the quinonoid base (purple) and the hemiketal (colorless). For the first time, their acidity and hydration equilibrium constants were obtained from a pH-jump method followed by UV-vis spectroscopy as a function of temperature from 4 to 37 °C. Equilibrium constant determination was also performed by multivariate curve resolution (MCR). Acidity and hydration constants of cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside at 25 °C were 4.12 × 10(-5) and 7.74 × 10(-4), respectively, and were significantly higher for delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside (4.95 × 10(-5) and 1.21 × 10(-3), respectively). MCR enabled the obtaining of concentration and spectrum of each form but led to overestimated values for the equilibrium constants. However, both methods showed that formations of the quinonoid base and hemiketal were endothermic reactions. Equilibrium constants of anthocyanins in the hibiscus extract showed comparable values as for the isolated anthocyanins.

  19. Colorimetric Determination of the Iron(III)-Thiocyanate Reaction Equilibrium Constant with Calibration and Equilibrium Solutions Prepared in a Cuvette by Sequential Additions of One Reagent to the Other

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; Barlag, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The well-known colorimetric determination of the equilibrium constant of the iron(III-thiocyanate complex is simplified by preparing solutions in a cuvette. For the calibration plot, 0.10 mL increments of 0.00100 M KSCN are added to 4.00 mL of 0.200 M Fe(NO[subscript 3])[subscript 3], and for the equilibrium solutions, 0.50 mL increments of…

  20. Solubility of stibnite in hydrogen sulfide solutions, speciation, and equilibrium constants, from 25 to 350 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Krupp, R.E. )

    1988-12-01

    Solubility of stibnite (Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}) was measured in aqueous hydrogen sulfide solutions as a function of pH and total free sulfur (TFS) concentrations at 25, 90, 200, 275, and 350{degree}C and at saturated vapor pressures. At 25 and 90{degree}C and TFS {approx} 0.01 molal solubility is controlled by the thioantimonite complexes H{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}S{sup 0}{sub 4}, Hsb{sub 2}S{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, Sb{sub 2}S{sup 2{minus}}{sub 4}. At higher temperatures the hydroxothioantimonite complex Sb{sub 2}S{sub 2}(OH){sup 0}{sub 2} becomes dominant. Polymerization due to condensation reactions yields long chains made up of trigonal-pyramidal SbS{sub 3}-groups. Equilibrium constants were derived for the dimers. The transition from thioantimonites to the hydroxothioantimonite species at approximately 120{degree}C is endothermic and is entirely driven by a gain in entropy. Stibnite solubility calculated for some geothermal fluids indicate that these fluids are undersaturated in Sb if stibnite is the solid equilibrium phase. At high temperatures (> 100{degree}C) precipitation of stibnite from ore fluids can occur in response to conductive cooling, while at low temperatures, where thioantimonites dominate, acidification of the fluid is the more likely mechanism. Precipitation of stibnite from fluids containing hydroxothioantimonite consumes H{sub 2}S and may thus trigger precipitation of other metals carried as sulfide complexes, e.g. Au(HS){sup {minus}}{sub 2}.

  1. (SO2)-S-34-O-16: High-resolution analysis of the (030),(101), (111), (002) and (201) vibrational states; determination of equilibrium rotational constants for sulfur dioxide and anharmonic vibrational constants

    SciTech Connect

    Lafferty, Walter; Flaud, Jean-marie; Ngom, El Hadji A.; Sams, Robert L.

    2009-01-02

    High resolution Fourier transform spectra of a sample of sulfur dioxide, enriched in 34S (95.3%). were completely analyzed leading to a large set of assigned lines. The experimental levels derived from this set of transitions were fit to within their experimental uncertainties using Watson-type Hamiltonians. Precise band centers, rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined. The following band centers in cm-1 were obtained: ν0(3ν2)=1538.720198(11), ν0(ν1+ν3)=2475.828004(29), ν0(ν1+ν2+ν3)=2982.118600(20), ν0(2ν3)=2679.800919(35), and ν0(2ν1+ν3)=3598.773915(38). The rotational constants obtained in this work have been fit together with the rotational constants of lower lying vibrational states [ W.J. Lafferty, J.-M. Flaud, R.L. Sams and EL Hadjiabib, in press] to obtain equilibrium constants as well as vibration-rotation constants. These equilibrium constants have been fit together with those of 32S16O2 [J.-M. Flaud and W.J. Lafferty, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 16 (1993) 396-402] leading to an improved equilibrium structure. Finally the observed band centers have been fit to obtain anharmonic rotational constants.

  2. Arsenic (III) adsorption on iron acetate coated activated alumina: thermodynamic, kinetics and equilibrium approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption potential of iron acetate coated activated alumina (IACAA) for removal of arsenic [As (III)] as arsenite by batch sorption technique is described. IACAA was characterized by XRD, FTIR, EDAX and SEM instruments. Percentage adsorption on IACAA was determined as a function of pH, contact time and adsorbent dose. The study revealed that the removal of As (III) was best achieved at pH =7.4. The initial As (III) concentration (0.45 mg/L) came down to less than 0.01 mg/L at contact time 90 min with adsorbent dose of 1 g/100 mL. The sorption was reasonably explained with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and E a were calculated in order to understand the nature of sorption process. The sorption process was found to be controlled by pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. PMID:24359995

  3. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays to measure equilibrium dissociation constants: GAL4-p53 binding DNA as a model system.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Michael A; Walters, Ryan D; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D) ) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel; the DNA migrates more slowly when bound to a protein. To determine a K(D) the amount of unbound and protein-bound DNA in the gel is measured as the protein concentration increases. By performing this experiment, students will be introduced to making affinity measurements and gain experience in performing quantitative EMSAs. The experiment describes measuring the K(D) for the interaction between the chimeric protein GAL4-p53 and its DNA recognition site; however, the techniques are adaptable to other DNA binding proteins. In addition, the basic experiment described can be easily expanded to include additional inquiry-driven experimentation. © 2012 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Adsorption of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol onto powdered activated carbon at non-equilibrium conditions: influence of NOM and process modelling.

    PubMed

    Zoschke, Kristin; Engel, Christina; Börnick, Hilmar; Worch, Eckhard

    2011-10-01

    The adsorption of the taste and odour (T&O) compounds geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) has been studied under conditions which are typical for a drinking water treatment plant that uses reservoir water for drinking water production. The reservoir water as well as the pre-treated water (after flocculation) contains NOM that competes with the trace compounds for the adsorption sites on the carbon surface. Although the DOC concentrations in the reservoir water and in the pre-treated water were different, no differences in the competitive adsorption could be seen. By using two special characterisation methods for NOM (adsorption analysis, LC/OCD) it could be proved that flocculation removes only NOM fractions which are irrelevant for competitive adsorption. Different model approaches were applied to describe the competitive adsorption of the T&O compounds and NOM, the tracer model, the equivalent background compound model, and the simplified equivalent background compound model. All these models are equilibrium models but in practice the contact time in flow-through reactors is typically shorter than the time needed to establish the adsorption equilibrium. In this paper it is demonstrated that the established model approaches can be used to describe competitive adsorption of T&O compounds and NOM also under non-equilibrium conditions. The results of the model applications showed that in particular the simplified equivalent background compound model is a useful tool to determine the PAC dosage required to reduce the T&O compounds below the threshold concentration. PMID:21752419

  5. Mass transfer and adsorption equilibrium for low volatility alkanes in BPL activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Mahle, John J; Furtado, Amanda M B; Glover, T Grant; Buchanan, James H; Peterson, Gregory W; LeVan, M Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The structure of a molecule and its concentration can strongly influence diffusional properties for transport in nanoporous materials. We study mass transfer of alkanes in BPL activated carbon using the concentration-swing frequency response method, which can easily discriminate among mass transfer mechanisms. We measure concentration-dependent diffusion rates for n-hexane, n-octane, n-decane, 2,7-dimethyloctane, and cyclodecane, which have different carbon numbers and geometries: straight chain, branched chain, and cyclic. Micropore diffusion is determined to be the controlling mass transfer resistance except at low relative saturation for n-decane, where an external mass transfer resistance also becomes important, showing that the controlling mass transfer mechanism can change with system concentration. Micropore diffusion coefficients are found to be strongly concentration dependent. Adsorption isotherm slopes obtained from measured isotherms, the concentration-swing frequency response method, and a predictive method show reasonably good agreement.

  6. Adsorption of Pb(II) ions onto biomass from Trifolium resupinatum: equilibrium and kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, Makshoof; Farooq, Umar; Aslam, Muhammad; Salman, M.

    2013-09-01

    The present study provides information about the binding of Pb(II) ions on an eco-friendly and easily available biodegradable biomass Trifolium resupinatum. The powdered biomass was characterized by FTIR, potentiometric titration and surface area analyses. The FTIR spectrum showed the presence of hydroxyl, carbonyl and amino functional groups and Pb(II) ions bound with the oxygen- and nitrogen-containing sites (hydroxyl and amino groups). The acidic groups were also confirmed by titrations. Effects of various environmental parameters (time, pH and concentration) have been studied. The biosorption process achieved equilibrium in a very short period of time (25 min). Non-linear approach for Langmuir and Freundlich models was used to study equilibrium process and root mean-square error was used as an indicator to decide the fitness of the mathematical model. The biosorption process was found to follow pseudo-second-order kinetics and was very fast. Thus, the biomass can be cost-effectively used for the binding of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions.

  7. On the 2D-transition, hysteresis and thermodynamic equilibrium of Kr adsorption on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Diao, Rui; Fan, Chunyan; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2015-12-15

    The adsorption and desorption of Kr on graphite at temperatures in the range 60-88K, was systematically investigated using a combination of several simulation techniques including: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC), Canonical kinetic-Monte Carlo (C-kMC) and the Mid-Density Scheme (MDS). Particular emphasis was placed on the gas-solid, gas-liquid and liquid-solid 2D phase transitions. For temperatures below the bulk triple point, the transition from a 2D-liquid-like monolayer to a 2D-solid-like state is manifested as a sub-step in the isotherm. A further increase in the chemical potential leads to another rearrangement of the 2D-solid-like state from a disordered structure to an ordered structure that is signalled by (1) another sub-step in the monolayer region and (2) a spike in the plot of the isosteric heat versus density at loadings close to the dense monolayer coverage concentration. Whenever a 2D transition occurs in a grand canonical isotherm it is always associated with a hysteresis, a feature that is not widely recognised in the literature. We studied in details this hysteresis with the analysis of the canonical isotherm, obtained with C-kMC, which exhibits a van der Waals (vdW) type loop with a vertical segment in the middle. We complemented the hysteresis loop and the vdW curve with the analysis of the equilibrium transition obtained with the MDS, and found that the equilibrium transition coincides exactly with the vertical segment of the C-kMC isotherm, indicating the co-existence of two phases at equilibrium. We also analysed adsorption at higher layers and found that the 2D-coexistence is also observed, provided that the temperature is well below the triple point. Finally the 2D-critical temperatures were obtained for the first three layers and they are in good agreement with the experimental data in the literature.

  8. On the 2D-transition, hysteresis and thermodynamic equilibrium of Kr adsorption on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Diao, Rui; Fan, Chunyan; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2015-12-15

    The adsorption and desorption of Kr on graphite at temperatures in the range 60-88K, was systematically investigated using a combination of several simulation techniques including: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC), Canonical kinetic-Monte Carlo (C-kMC) and the Mid-Density Scheme (MDS). Particular emphasis was placed on the gas-solid, gas-liquid and liquid-solid 2D phase transitions. For temperatures below the bulk triple point, the transition from a 2D-liquid-like monolayer to a 2D-solid-like state is manifested as a sub-step in the isotherm. A further increase in the chemical potential leads to another rearrangement of the 2D-solid-like state from a disordered structure to an ordered structure that is signalled by (1) another sub-step in the monolayer region and (2) a spike in the plot of the isosteric heat versus density at loadings close to the dense monolayer coverage concentration. Whenever a 2D transition occurs in a grand canonical isotherm it is always associated with a hysteresis, a feature that is not widely recognised in the literature. We studied in details this hysteresis with the analysis of the canonical isotherm, obtained with C-kMC, which exhibits a van der Waals (vdW) type loop with a vertical segment in the middle. We complemented the hysteresis loop and the vdW curve with the analysis of the equilibrium transition obtained with the MDS, and found that the equilibrium transition coincides exactly with the vertical segment of the C-kMC isotherm, indicating the co-existence of two phases at equilibrium. We also analysed adsorption at higher layers and found that the 2D-coexistence is also observed, provided that the temperature is well below the triple point. Finally the 2D-critical temperatures were obtained for the first three layers and they are in good agreement with the experimental data in the literature. PMID:26364074

  9. Rate and Equilibrium Constants for an Enzyme Conformational Change during Catalysis by Orotidine 5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    from the complex between FOMP and the open enzyme, that the tyrosyl phenol group stabilizes the closed form of ScOMPDC by hydrogen bonding to the substrate phosphodianion, and that the phenyl group of Y217 and F217 facilitates formation of the transition state for the rate-limiting conformational change. An analysis of kinetic data for mutant enzyme-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP and FOMP provides estimates for the rate and equilibrium constants for the conformational change that traps FOMP at the enzyme active site. PMID:26135041

  10. Understanding Chemical Equilibrium Using Entropy Analysis: The Relationship between [delta]S[subscript tot](sys[superscript o]) and the Equilibrium Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Entropy analyses as a function of the extent of reaction are presented for a number of physicochemical processes, including vaporization of a liquid, dimerization of nitrogen dioxide, and the autoionization of water. Graphs of the total entropy change versus the extent of reaction give a visual representation of chemical equilibrium and the second…

  11. Physicochemical properties of MoO sub 3 -TiO sub 2 prepared by an equilibrium adsorption method

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Du Soung; Kurusu, Yasuhiko; Segawa, Kohichi ); Wachs, I.E.; Hardcastle, F.D. )

    1989-12-01

    The adsorption phenomena of molybdena species onto titania surfaces and the surface properties of the catalysts have been studied by using an equilibrium adsorption method. {sup 95}Mo NMR and UV spectroscopic studies show that the aqueous molybdena species vary as a function of the pH of the impregnating solution. For acidic pH values, polymeric species, Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{sup 6{minus}} ions, are present, while in the basic solutions it is the monomeric MoO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} ions that are present. The adsorbed amounts of molybdate anion are strongly dependent on the pH of the impregnating solution and increase as an inverse function of the pH. XRD, Raman, and XPS data of the calcined samples show that monolayer coverage of molybdenum oxide is established at pH 3.98 (6.6 wt%). The Raman studies reveal that the molybdenum oxide monolayer is composed of distorted octahedra. At more acidic pH regions, pH < 3.98, crystalline MoO{sub 3} is formed above monolayer coverage. The result of catalytic oxidation of methanol show that the catalysts up to monolayer coverage of surface molybdate species possess higher turnover numbers than the catalysts possessing more than monolayer coverage (presence of crystalline MoO{sub 3}). The primary methanol oxidation product is dimethoxymethane at low conversions; methyl formate is next in abundance. The selectivity for dimethyl ether, which occurred as a side reaction on the acidic sites of catalysts, increases as the Mo loading increases.

  12. The Freundlich adsorption isotherm constants and prediction of phosphorus bioavailability as affected by different phosphorus sources in two Kansas soils.

    PubMed

    Shafqat, Mustafa N; Pierzynski, Gary M

    2014-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) adsorption onto soil constituents influences P bioavailability from both agronomic and environmental perspectives. In this study, the P availability from different P sources along with utility of Freundlich adsorption coefficients on the predictability of various crop growth parameters were assessed. Two soils were amended with 150mgPkg(-1) each from six different P sources comprised of manures from two types of ruminants animals, three types of monogastric animals, and inorganic P fertilizer. Corn (Zea mays) was grown and harvested seven times under greenhouse conditions to remove P from the P amended treatments. The application of all P sources reduced the value of Freundlich K and increased the value of Freundlich 1/n and equilibrium P concentration (EPC0) in both soils compared to the un-amended control before cropping. The swine (Sus scrofa) manure (HM) resulted in significant smaller values of Freundlich K and larger values of 1/n in the P deficient Eram-Lebo soil compared to other P sources while, the opposite was true for the turkey (Meleagris gallopava) litter (TL) in the Ulysses soil. The corn biomass, tissue P concentration and P uptake were significantly influenced by all P sources during the first harvest and the total P uptake during seven harvests in both soils compared to the control treatment. Both Freundlich coefficients had strong relationships with the aforementioned corn parameters in the P deficient Eram-Lebo soil while, strength of the association was weak or missing in the Ulysses soil which had optimum levels of antecedent P. PMID:24238913

  13. The Freundlich adsorption isotherm constants and prediction of phosphorus bioavailability as affected by different phosphorus sources in two Kansas soils.

    PubMed

    Shafqat, Mustafa N; Pierzynski, Gary M

    2014-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) adsorption onto soil constituents influences P bioavailability from both agronomic and environmental perspectives. In this study, the P availability from different P sources along with utility of Freundlich adsorption coefficients on the predictability of various crop growth parameters were assessed. Two soils were amended with 150mgPkg(-1) each from six different P sources comprised of manures from two types of ruminants animals, three types of monogastric animals, and inorganic P fertilizer. Corn (Zea mays) was grown and harvested seven times under greenhouse conditions to remove P from the P amended treatments. The application of all P sources reduced the value of Freundlich K and increased the value of Freundlich 1/n and equilibrium P concentration (EPC0) in both soils compared to the un-amended control before cropping. The swine (Sus scrofa) manure (HM) resulted in significant smaller values of Freundlich K and larger values of 1/n in the P deficient Eram-Lebo soil compared to other P sources while, the opposite was true for the turkey (Meleagris gallopava) litter (TL) in the Ulysses soil. The corn biomass, tissue P concentration and P uptake were significantly influenced by all P sources during the first harvest and the total P uptake during seven harvests in both soils compared to the control treatment. Both Freundlich coefficients had strong relationships with the aforementioned corn parameters in the P deficient Eram-Lebo soil while, strength of the association was weak or missing in the Ulysses soil which had optimum levels of antecedent P.

  14. Lysozyme adsorption in pH-responsive hydrogel thin-films: the non-trivial role of acid-base equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Narambuena, Claudio F; Longo, Gabriel S; Szleifer, Igal

    2015-09-01

    We develop and apply a molecular theory to study the adsorption of lysozyme on weak polyacid hydrogel films. The theory explicitly accounts for the conformation of the network, the structure of the proteins, the size and shape of all the molecular species, their interactions as well as the chemical equilibrium of each titratable unit of both the protein and the polymer network. The driving forces for adsorption are the electrostatic attractions between the negatively charged network and the positively charged protein. The adsorption is a non-monotonic function of the solution pH, with a maximum in the region between pH 8 and 9 depending on the salt concentration of the solution. The non-monotonic adsorption is the result of increasing negative charge of the network with pH, while the positive charge of the protein decreases. At low pH the network is roughly electroneutral, while at sufficiently high pH the protein is negatively charged. Upon adsorption, the acid-base equilibrium of the different amino acids of the protein shifts in a nontrivial fashion that depends critically on the particular kind of residue and solution composition. Thus, the proteins regulate their charge and enhance adsorption under a wide range of conditions. In particular, adsorption is predicted above the protein isoelectric point where both the solution lysozyme and the polymer network are negatively charged. This behavior occurs because the pH in the interior of the gel is significantly lower than that in the bulk solution and it is also regulated by the adsorption of the protein in order to optimize protein-gel interactions. Under high pH conditions we predict that the protein changes its charge from negative in the solution to positive within the gel. The change occurs within a few nanometers at the interface of the hydrogel film. Our predictions show the non-trivial interplay between acid-base equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization under nanoconfined conditions

  15. Lysozyme adsorption in pH-responsive hydrogel thin-films: the non-trivial role of acid-base equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Narambuena, Claudio F; Longo, Gabriel S; Szleifer, Igal

    2015-09-01

    We develop and apply a molecular theory to study the adsorption of lysozyme on weak polyacid hydrogel films. The theory explicitly accounts for the conformation of the network, the structure of the proteins, the size and shape of all the molecular species, their interactions as well as the chemical equilibrium of each titratable unit of both the protein and the polymer network. The driving forces for adsorption are the electrostatic attractions between the negatively charged network and the positively charged protein. The adsorption is a non-monotonic function of the solution pH, with a maximum in the region between pH 8 and 9 depending on the salt concentration of the solution. The non-monotonic adsorption is the result of increasing negative charge of the network with pH, while the positive charge of the protein decreases. At low pH the network is roughly electroneutral, while at sufficiently high pH the protein is negatively charged. Upon adsorption, the acid-base equilibrium of the different amino acids of the protein shifts in a nontrivial fashion that depends critically on the particular kind of residue and solution composition. Thus, the proteins regulate their charge and enhance adsorption under a wide range of conditions. In particular, adsorption is predicted above the protein isoelectric point where both the solution lysozyme and the polymer network are negatively charged. This behavior occurs because the pH in the interior of the gel is significantly lower than that in the bulk solution and it is also regulated by the adsorption of the protein in order to optimize protein-gel interactions. Under high pH conditions we predict that the protein changes its charge from negative in the solution to positive within the gel. The change occurs within a few nanometers at the interface of the hydrogel film. Our predictions show the non-trivial interplay between acid-base equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization under nanoconfined conditions

  16. Determination of equilibrium and kinetic parameters of the adsorption of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions to Agave Lechuguilla biomass.

    PubMed

    Romero-González, Jaime; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L; Peralta-Videa, José R; Rodríguez, Elena

    2005-01-01

    This investigation reveals the capability of Agave lechuguilla for trivalent and hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions. Experimentation included pH profile, time dependence, adsorption capacity (K(F) and Q(L)), adsorption intensity (n and R(L)) and saturation capacity (q(s)) studies. Batch experiments were conducted at 22( composite function)C to characterize and model the adsorption equilibrium as well as biomass adsorption rates. pH 4 was the optimum for Cr(III) binding, while Cr(VI) optimum binding was at pH 2. Time profile experiments indicated that the adsorption of Cr(VI) by lechuguilla biomass was time-dependent and that of Cr(III) was not. Kinetic models demonstrated that a pseudo-second order reaction model best described the kinetic data for Cr(VI). The adsorption isotherms showed that the binding pattern for Cr(VI) followed the Freundlich isotherm model, while that for Cr(III) followed the Langmuir isotherm. PMID:18365089

  17. A novel polar-modified post-cross-linked resin and its enhanced adsorption to salicylic acid: Equilibrium, kinetics and breakthrough studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Guoqiang; Guo, Deping; Zhang, Yaling; Huang, Jianhan

    2016-05-15

    Improving the surface polarity is of significance for the post-cross-linked resins to enhance their adsorption to polar aromatic compounds. In the present study, we prepared a novel polar-modified post-cross-linked PDEpc_D by the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and the amination reaction, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume increased significantly after the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and the surface polarity improved greatly after the amination reaction. Batch adsorption showed that PDEpc_D possessed a much enhanced adsorption to salicylic acid as compared the precursors PDE and PDEpc as well as the non-polar post-cross-linked PDVBpc. The equilibrium data was characterized by the Freundlich model, π-π stacking, hydrogen bonding and static interaction were the possible driving forces. The adsorption was a fast process and the kinetic data obeyed the micropore diffusion model. Column adsorption-desorption experiments suggested that PDEpc_D was a potential candidate for adsorptive removal of salicylic acid from aqueous solution. PMID:26928058

  18. Kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of adsorption of 2-biphenylamine and dibenzylamine from aqueous solutions by Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasheghani F., B.; Rajabi, F. H.; Omidi, M. H.; Shabanian, S.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite is synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. Experimental data are modelled by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm model fitted the equilibrium data for the dibenzylamine (DBA) and 2-biphenylamine (BPA) respectively, compared to the other isotherm models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, Δ G°, Δ H°, and Δ S° showed that the DBA and BPA adsorption on bentonite nanocomposite is spontaneous and endothermic under examined conditions. Experimental data were also modeled using the adsorption kinetic models. The results show that the adsorption processes of DBA and BPA followed well the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Results indicated that Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite could be an alternative for more costly adsorbents used for organic toxicants removal.

  19. Adsorption properties of biologically active derivatives of quaternary ammonium surfactants and their mixtures at aqueous/air interface. I. Equilibrium surface tension, surfactant aggregation and wettability.

    PubMed

    Rojewska, Monika; Biadasz, Andrzej; Kotkowiak, Michał; Olejnik, Anna; Rychlik, Joanna; Dudkowiak, Alina; Prochaska, Krystyna

    2013-10-01

    The adsorption properties of surfactant mixtures containing two types of quaternary derivatives of lysosomotropic substances: alkyl N,N-dimethylalaninates methobromides and alkyl N,N-dimethylglycinates methobromides were studied. Quantitative and qualitative description of the adsorption process was carried out on the basis of experimentally obtained equilibrium surface tension isotherms. The results indicated that most of the systems studied revealed synergistic effect both in adsorption and wetting properties. In vitro studies on human cancer cells were undertaken and the data obtained showed that the mixtures suppressed the cancer cells' proliferation more effectively than individual components. Results of preliminary research on the interaction of catanionic mixtures with phospholipids suggested a possibility of a strong penetration of cell membranes by the mixtures investigated.

  20. Distinguishing between keto-enol and acid-base forms of firefly oxyluciferin through calculation of excited-state equilibrium constants.

    PubMed

    Falklöf, Olle; Durbeej, Bo

    2014-11-15

    Although recent years have seen much progress in the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the bioluminescence of fireflies, there is to date no consensus on the precise contributions to the light emission from the different possible forms of the chemiexcited oxyluciferin (OxyLH2) cofactor. Here, this problem is investigated by the calculation of excited-state equilibrium constants in aqueous solution for keto-enol and acid-base reactions connecting six neutral, monoanionic and dianionic forms of OxyLH2. Particularly, rather than relying on the standard Förster equation and the associated assumption that entropic effects are negligible, these equilibrium constants are for the first time calculated in terms of excited-state free energies of a Born-Haber cycle. Performing quantum chemical calculations with density functional theory methods and using a hybrid cluster-continuum approach to describe solvent effects, a suitable protocol for the modeling is first defined from benchmark calculations on phenol. Applying this protocol to the various OxyLH2 species and verifying that available experimental data (absorption shifts and ground-state equilibrium constants) are accurately reproduced, it is then found that the phenolate-keto-OxyLH(-) monoanion is intrinsically the preferred form of OxyLH2 in the excited state, which suggests a potential key role for this species in the bioluminescence of fireflies.

  1. Analysis of responsive characteristics of ionic-strength-sensitive hydrogel with consideration of effect of equilibrium constant by a chemo-electro-mechanical model.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Lai, Fukun; Luo, Rongmo

    2009-11-17

    A multiphysics model is presented in this paper for analysis of the influence of various equilibrium constants on the smart hydrogel responsive to the ionic strength of environmental solution, and termed the multieffect-coupling ionic-strength stimulus (MECis) model. The model is characterized by a set of partial differential governing equations by consideration of the mass and momentum conservations of the system and coupled chemical, electrical, and mechanical multienergy domains. The Nernst-Planck equations are derived by the mass conservation of the ionic species in both the interstitial fluid of the hydrogel and the surrounding solution. The binding reaction between the fixed charge groups of the hydrogel and the mobile ions in the solution is described by the fixed charge equation, which is based on the Langmuir monolayer theory. As an important effect for the binding reaction, the equilibrium constant is incorporated into the fixed charge equation. The kinetics of the hydrogel swelling/deswelling is illustrated by the mechanical equation, based on the law of momentum conservation for the solid polymeric networks matrix within the hydrogel. The MECis model is examined by comparison of the numerical simulations and experiments from open literature. The analysis of the influence of different equilibrium constants on the responsive characteristics of the ionic-strength-sensitive hydrogel is carried out with detailed discussion.

  2. On the use of dynamic fluorescence measurements to determine equilibrium and kinetic constants. The inclusion of pyrene in β-cyclodextrin cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Feyter, Steven; van Stam, Jan; Boens, Noël; De Schryver, Fans C.

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of the kinetic identifiability of two-state excited-state processes goves the conditions which have to be fulfilled to make it possible to estimate the ground-state equilibrium constant from dynamic fluorescence data. For the aqueous system β-cyclodextrin:pyrene it turns out that the only kinetic parameters which can be estimated are (i) the deactivation rate constant of pyrene dissolved in the aqeuous mbulk, (ii) the rate of formation of a β-cyclodextrin:pyrene inclusion complex in the excited-state, which is negligibly slow, and (iii) the sum of the rate constats for deactivation to the ground-state and for exclusion into the aqueous bulk of the excited pyrene participating in inclusion complex formation. This sum cannot be separated into its individual rate constant contributions, and it is impossible to determine the ground-state equilibrium constant for the formation of β-cyclodextrin:pyrene inclusion complexes solely from fluorescence decay data, a fact not taken into account in the literature.

  3. Automated Monitoring of the Establishment of the Adsorption Equilibrium: Adsorption of Polyethylene from 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene onto a Zeolite at Temperature 140°C

    PubMed Central

    Macko, Tibor; Brüll, Robert; Brinkmann, Christoph; Pasch, Harald

    2009-01-01

    The automated procedure for the monitoring of the adsorption process in the solute-sorbent-solvent system has been elaborated. It uses commercially available instrument CRYSTAF model 200. The application of CRYSTAF enabled monitoring of adsorption of linear polyethylene with weight average molar masses of 2, 14, and 53 kg/mol from 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene onto zeolite SH-300 at temperature as high as 140°C. It is the authors' understanding that this is the first demonstration of an adsorption isotherms for polyethylene. The measurement with the CRYSTAF instrument reduces manual manipulations with dangerous solvents at high temperature and enables automated long-time monitoring of the concentration of the solute in an adsorption system. PMID:19707534

  4. Plasma treatment of carbon fibers: Non-equilibrium dynamic adsorption and its effect on the mechanical properties of RTM fabricated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Keming; Wang, Baichen; Chen, Ping; Zhou, Xia

    2011-02-01

    The effect of oxygen plasma treatment on the non-equilibrium dynamic adsorption of the carbon fabric reinforcements in RTM process was studied. 5-Dimethylamino-1-naphthalene-sulfonylchloride (DNS-Cl) was attached to the curing agent to study the change of curing agent content in the epoxy resin matrix. Steady state fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) analysis was used to study this changes in the epoxy resin at the inlet and outlet of the RTM mould, and XPS was used to study the chemical changes on the carbon fiber surfaces introduced by plasma treatment. The interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and flexural strength were also measured to study the effects of this non-equilibrium dynamic adsorption progress on the mechanical properties of the end products. FS analysis shows that the curing agent adsorbed onto the fiber surface preferentially for untreated carbon fiber, the curing agent content in the resin matrix maintain unchanged after plasma treatment for 3 min and 5 min, but after oxygen plasma treatment for 7 min, the epoxy resin adsorbed onto the fiber surface preferentially. XPS analysis indicated that the oxygen plasma treatment successfully increased some polar functional groups concentration on the carbon fiber surfaces, this changes on the carbon fiber surfaces can change the adsorption ability of carbon fiber to the resin and curing agent. The mechanical properties of the composites were correlated to this results.

  5. Beyond transition state theory: accurate description of nuclear quantum effects on the rate and equilibrium constants of chemical reactions using Feynman path integrals.

    PubMed

    Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects have been shown to play a significant role in molecules as large as enzymes even at physiological temperatures. I discuss how these quantum phenomena can be accounted for rigorously using Feynman path integrals in calculations of the equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects as well as of the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Because these calculations are extremely computationally demanding, special attention is devoted to increasing the computational efficiency by orders of magnitude by employing efficient path integral estimators.

  6. Stability of equilibrium of a superconducting ring that levitates in the field of a fixed ring with constant current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishaev, A. M.; Bush, A. A.; Gavrikov, M. B.; Kamentsev, K. E.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Savel'ev, V. V.; Sigov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop a plasma trap with levitating superconducting magnetic coils, it is necessary to search for their stable levitating states. An analytical expression for the potential energy of a single superconducting ring that captures a fixed magnetic flux in the field of a fixed ring with constant current versus the coordinate of the free ring on the axis of the system, deviation angle of its axis from the axis of the system, and radial displacement of its plane is derived for uniform gravity field in the thin ring approximation. The calculated stable levitation states of the superconducting ring in the field of the ring with constant current are proven in experiments. The generalization of such an approach to the levitation of several rings makes it possible to search for stable levitation states of several coils that form a magnetic system of a multipole trap.

  7. Study on an effective industrial waste-based adsorbent for the adsorptive removal of phosphorus from wastewater: equilibrium and kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruzhen; Chen, Yao; Cheng, Ting; Lai, Yuguo; Jiang, Wenju; Yang, Zhishan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an effective adsorbent for removing phosphate from aqueous solution was developed from modifying industrial waste--lithium silica fume (LSF). The characterization of LSF before and after modification was investigated using an N2 adsorption-desorption technique (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Studies were conducted to investigate the effect of adsorbent dose, initial solution pH, contact time, phosphate concentration, and temperature on phosphate removal using this novel adsorbent. The specific surface area for modified LSF (LLSF) is 24.4024 m(2)/g, improved 69.8% compared with unmodified LSF. XRD result suggests that the lanthanum phosphate complex was formed on the surface of LLSF. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity was 24.096 mg P/g for LLSF, and phosphate removal was favored in the pH range of 3-8. The kinetic data fitted pseudo-second-order kinetic equation, intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate controlling step. The adsorption isotherm results illustrated that the Langmuir model provided the best fit for the equilibrium data. The change in free energy (△G(0)), enthalpy (△H(0)) and entropy (△S(0)) revealed that the adsorption of phosphate on LLSF was spontaneous and endothermic. It was concluded that by modifying with lanthanum, LSF can be turned to be a highly efficient adsorbent in phosphate removal.

  8. Study on an effective industrial waste-based adsorbent for the adsorptive removal of phosphorus from wastewater: equilibrium and kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruzhen; Chen, Yao; Cheng, Ting; Lai, Yuguo; Jiang, Wenju; Yang, Zhishan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an effective adsorbent for removing phosphate from aqueous solution was developed from modifying industrial waste--lithium silica fume (LSF). The characterization of LSF before and after modification was investigated using an N2 adsorption-desorption technique (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Studies were conducted to investigate the effect of adsorbent dose, initial solution pH, contact time, phosphate concentration, and temperature on phosphate removal using this novel adsorbent. The specific surface area for modified LSF (LLSF) is 24.4024 m(2)/g, improved 69.8% compared with unmodified LSF. XRD result suggests that the lanthanum phosphate complex was formed on the surface of LLSF. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity was 24.096 mg P/g for LLSF, and phosphate removal was favored in the pH range of 3-8. The kinetic data fitted pseudo-second-order kinetic equation, intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate controlling step. The adsorption isotherm results illustrated that the Langmuir model provided the best fit for the equilibrium data. The change in free energy (△G(0)), enthalpy (△H(0)) and entropy (△S(0)) revealed that the adsorption of phosphate on LLSF was spontaneous and endothermic. It was concluded that by modifying with lanthanum, LSF can be turned to be a highly efficient adsorbent in phosphate removal. PMID:27120644

  9. The determination of equilibrium constants, DeltaG, DeltaH and DeltaS for vapour interaction with a pharmaceutical drug, using gravimetric vapour sorption.

    PubMed

    Willson, Richard J; Beezer, Anthony E

    2003-06-01

    The application of gravimetric vapour sorption (GVS) to the characterisation of pharmaceutical drugs is often restricted to the study of gross behaviour such as a measure of hygroscopicity. Although useful in early development of a drug substance, for example, in salt selection screening exercises, such types of analysis may not contribute to a fundamental understanding of the properties of the material. This paper reports a new methodology for GVS experimentation that will allow specific sorption parameters to be calculated; equilibrium constant (K), van't Hoff enthalpy change (DeltaH(v)), Gibbs free energy for sorption (DeltaG) and the entropy change for sorption (DeltaS). Unlike other reports of such type of analysis that require the application of a specific model, this method is model free. The analysis does require that over the narrow temperature range of the study DeltaH(v) is constant and there is no change in interaction mechanism.

  10. The equilibrium constant for N2O5 = NO2 + NO3 - Absolute determination by direct measurement from 243 to 397 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, C. A.; Davidson, J. A.; Mcdaniel, A. H.; Shetter, R. E.; Calvert, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    Direct determinations of the equilibrium constant for the reaction N2O5 = NO2 + NO3 were carried out by measuring NO2, NO3, and N2O5 using long-path visible and infrared absorption spectroscopy as a function of temperature from 243 to 397 K. The first-order decay rate constant of N2O5 was experimentally measured as a function of temperature. These results are in turn used to derive a value for the rate coefficient for the NO-forming channel in the reaction of NO3 with NO2. The implications of the results for atmospheric chemistry, the thermodynamics of NO3, and for laboratory kinetics studies are discussed.

  11. Kinetic and equilibrium studies on the removal of acid dyes from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto activated carbon cloth.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Numan; Bayram, Edip; Ayranci, Erol

    2006-09-01

    Removal of acid dyes Acid Blue 45, Acid Blue 92, Acid Blue 120 and Acid Blue 129 from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto high area activated carbon cloth (ACC) was investigated. Kinetics of adsorption was followed by in situ UV-spectroscopy and the data were treated according to pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. It was found that the adsorption process of these dyes onto ACC follows the pseudo-second-order model. Adsorption isotherms were derived at 25 degrees C on the basis of batch analysis. Isotherm data were treated according to Langmuir and Freundlich models. The fits of experimental data to these equations were examined. PMID:16563617

  12. Generalized statistical model for multicomponent adsorption equilibria on zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Rota, R.; Gamba, G.; Paludetto, R.; Carra, S.; Morbidelli, M. )

    1988-05-01

    The statistical thermodynamic approach to multicomponent adsorption equilibria on zeolites has been extended to nonideal systems, through the correction of cross coefficients characterizing the interaction between unlike molecules. Estimation of the model parameters requires experimental binary equilibrium data. Comparisons with the classical model based on adsorbed solution theory are reported for three nonideal ternary systems. The two approaches provide comparable results in the simulation of binary and ternary adsorption equilibrium data at constant temperature and pressure.

  13. Enhancing adsorption capacity of toxic malachite green dye through chemically modified breadnut peel: equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Hei Ing; Lim, Linda B L; Priyantha, Namal

    2015-01-01

    Breadnut skin, in both its unmodified (KS) and base-modified (BM-KS) forms, was investigated for its potential use as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of toxic dye, malachite green (MG). Characterization of the adsorbents was carried out using scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Batch adsorption experiments, carried out under optimized conditions, for the adsorption of MG were fitted using five isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin and Sips) and six error functions to determine the best-fit model. The adsorption capacity was greatly enhanced when breadnut skin was chemically modified with NaOH, leading to an adsorption capacity of 353.0 mg g(-1), that was far superior to most reported adsorbents for the removal of MG. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of MG was spontaneous on KS and BM-KS, and the reactions were endothermic and exothermic, respectively. Kinetics studies showed that both followed the pseudo-second order. Regeneration experiments on BM-KS indicated that its adsorption capacity was still maintained at>90% even after five cycles. It can be concluded that NaOH-modified breadfruit skin has great potential to be utilized in real-life application as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of MG in wastewater treatment.

  14. Enhancing adsorption capacity of toxic malachite green dye through chemically modified breadnut peel: equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Hei Ing; Lim, Linda B L; Priyantha, Namal

    2015-01-01

    Breadnut skin, in both its unmodified (KS) and base-modified (BM-KS) forms, was investigated for its potential use as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of toxic dye, malachite green (MG). Characterization of the adsorbents was carried out using scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Batch adsorption experiments, carried out under optimized conditions, for the adsorption of MG were fitted using five isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin and Sips) and six error functions to determine the best-fit model. The adsorption capacity was greatly enhanced when breadnut skin was chemically modified with NaOH, leading to an adsorption capacity of 353.0 mg g(-1), that was far superior to most reported adsorbents for the removal of MG. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of MG was spontaneous on KS and BM-KS, and the reactions were endothermic and exothermic, respectively. Kinetics studies showed that both followed the pseudo-second order. Regeneration experiments on BM-KS indicated that its adsorption capacity was still maintained at>90% even after five cycles. It can be concluded that NaOH-modified breadfruit skin has great potential to be utilized in real-life application as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of MG in wastewater treatment. PMID:25409587

  15. Equilibrium and rate constants, and reaction mechanism of the HF dissociation in the HF(H2O)7 cluster by ab initio rare event simulations.

    PubMed

    Elena, Alin Marin; Meloni, Simone; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2013-12-12

    We perform restrained hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to compute the equilibrium constant of the dissociation reaction of HF in HF(H2O)7. We find that the HF is a stronger acid in the cluster than in the bulk, and its acidity is higher at lower T. The latter phenomenon has a vibrational entropic origin, resulting from a counterintuitive balance of intra- and intermolecular terms. We find also a temperature dependence of the reactions mechanism. At low T (≤225 K) the dissociation reaction follows a concerted path, with the H atoms belonging to the relevant hydrogen bond chain moving synchronously. At higher T (300 K), the first two hydrogen atoms move together, forming an intermediate metastable state having the structure of an eigen ion (H9O4(+)), and then the third hydrogen migrates completing the reaction. We also compute the dissociation rate constant, kRP. At very low T (≤75 K) kRP depends strongly on the temperature, whereas it gets almost constant at higher T’s. With respect to the bulk, the HF dissociation in the HF(H2O)7 is about 1 order of magnitude faster. This is due to a lower free energy barrier for the dissociation in the cluster.

  16. The enhanced adsorption of sulfur compounds onto mesoporous Ni-AlKIT-6 sorbent, equilibrium and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Subhan, Fazle; Yan, Zifeng; Peng, Peng; Ikram, Muhammad; Rehman, Sadia

    2014-04-15

    High performance nickel supported on mesoporous AlKIT-6 (Si/Al=15, 25, 50, 100) sorbents were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation (IWI) with ultrasonic aid for adsorptive desulfurization of commercial diesel and simulated fuels. The sorbents were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, NH3-TPD, Py-FT-IR, HRTEM, SEM and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques. The analysis results confirmed that Aluminum atoms entered the framework and 20%Ni-AlKIT-6(15) can still retain three dimensional structure of AlKIT-6(15) and Ni is highly dispersed in the support. The kinetic pseudo second-order model and Langmuir isotherm are shown to exhibits the best fits of experimental data for the adsorption of thiophene (T), benzothiophene (BT) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) over AlKIT-6 and 5-30%Ni-AlKIT-6. Intraparticle diffusion and steric hindrance were the rate controlling step of the adsorption of T and DBT over AlKIT-6(15) and 20%Ni-AlKIT-6(15) as verified through the intraparticle diffusion model. The characterization of regenerated 20%Ni-AlKIT-6(15) revealed that three-dimensional cubic Ia3d symmetric structure was maintained in the sorbent after 6 successive desulfurization-regeneration cycles.

  17. The enhanced adsorption of sulfur compounds onto mesoporous Ni-AlKIT-6 sorbent, equilibrium and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Subhan, Fazle; Yan, Zifeng; Peng, Peng; Ikram, Muhammad; Rehman, Sadia

    2014-04-15

    High performance nickel supported on mesoporous AlKIT-6 (Si/Al=15, 25, 50, 100) sorbents were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation (IWI) with ultrasonic aid for adsorptive desulfurization of commercial diesel and simulated fuels. The sorbents were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, NH3-TPD, Py-FT-IR, HRTEM, SEM and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques. The analysis results confirmed that Aluminum atoms entered the framework and 20%Ni-AlKIT-6(15) can still retain three dimensional structure of AlKIT-6(15) and Ni is highly dispersed in the support. The kinetic pseudo second-order model and Langmuir isotherm are shown to exhibits the best fits of experimental data for the adsorption of thiophene (T), benzothiophene (BT) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) over AlKIT-6 and 5-30%Ni-AlKIT-6. Intraparticle diffusion and steric hindrance were the rate controlling step of the adsorption of T and DBT over AlKIT-6(15) and 20%Ni-AlKIT-6(15) as verified through the intraparticle diffusion model. The characterization of regenerated 20%Ni-AlKIT-6(15) revealed that three-dimensional cubic Ia3d symmetric structure was maintained in the sorbent after 6 successive desulfurization-regeneration cycles. PMID:24556462

  18. Phosphate Adsorption using Modified Iron Oxide-based Sorbents in Lake Water: Kinetics, Equilibrium, and Column Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption behavior of Bayoxide ® E33 (E33) and three E33-modified sorbents for the removal of phosphate from lake water was investigated in this study. E33-modified sorbents were synthesized by coating with manganese (E33/Mn) and silver (E33/AgI and E33/AgII) nanoparticles. Adso...

  19. 2,4-D adsorption to biochars: effect of preparation conditions on equilibrium adsorption capacity and comparison with commercial activated carbon literature data.

    PubMed

    Kearns, J P; Wellborn, L S; Summers, R S; Knappe, D R U

    2014-10-01

    Batch isotherm experiments were conducted with chars to study adsorption of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Chars generated from corncobs, bamboo and wood chips in a laboratory pyrolyzer at 400-700 °C were compared with traditional kiln charcoals collected from villages in S/SE Asia and with activated carbons (ACs). 2,4-D uptake by laboratory chars obtained from bamboo and wood chips after 14 h of pyrolysis at 700 °C, from wood chips after 96 h of pyrolysis at 600 °C, and one of the field-collected chars (basudha) was comparable to ACs. H:C and O:C ratios declined with pyrolysis temperature and duration while surface area increased to >500 m(2)/g. Increasing pyrolysis intensity by increasing temperature and/or duration of heating was found to positively influence adsorption capacity yield (mg(2,4-D/g(feedstock))) over the range of conditions studied. Economic analysis showed that high temperature chars can be a cost-effective alternative to ACs for water treatment applications.

  20. 2,4-D adsorption to biochars: effect of preparation conditions on equilibrium adsorption capacity and comparison with commercial activated carbon literature data.

    PubMed

    Kearns, J P; Wellborn, L S; Summers, R S; Knappe, D R U

    2014-10-01

    Batch isotherm experiments were conducted with chars to study adsorption of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Chars generated from corncobs, bamboo and wood chips in a laboratory pyrolyzer at 400-700 °C were compared with traditional kiln charcoals collected from villages in S/SE Asia and with activated carbons (ACs). 2,4-D uptake by laboratory chars obtained from bamboo and wood chips after 14 h of pyrolysis at 700 °C, from wood chips after 96 h of pyrolysis at 600 °C, and one of the field-collected chars (basudha) was comparable to ACs. H:C and O:C ratios declined with pyrolysis temperature and duration while surface area increased to >500 m(2)/g. Increasing pyrolysis intensity by increasing temperature and/or duration of heating was found to positively influence adsorption capacity yield (mg(2,4-D/g(feedstock))) over the range of conditions studied. Economic analysis showed that high temperature chars can be a cost-effective alternative to ACs for water treatment applications. PMID:24934321

  1. Determination of the dissociation constant of valine from acetohydroxy acid synthase by equilibrium partition in an aqueous two-phase system.

    PubMed

    Engel, S; Vyazmensky, M; Barak, Z; Chipman, D M; Merchuk, J C

    2000-06-23

    An aqueous polyethylene glycol/salt two-phase system was used to estimate the dissociation constant, K(dis), of the Escherichia coli isoenzyme AHAS III regulatory subunit, ilvH protein, from the feedback inhibitor valine. The amounts of the bound and free radioactive valine in the system were determined. A Scatchard plot of the data revealed a 1:1 valine-protein binding ratio and K(dis) of 133+/-14 microM. The protein did not bind leucine, and the ilvH protein isolated from a valine resistant mutant showed no valine binding. This method is very simple, rapid and requires only a small amounts of protein compared to the presently used equilibrium dialysis method.

  2. Rate and equilibrium constant of the reaction of 1-methylvinoxy radicals with O2: CH3COCH2 + O2<--> CH3COCH2O2.

    PubMed

    Hassouna, Melynda; Delbos, Eric; Devolder, Pascal; Viskolcz, Bela; Fittschen, Christa

    2006-06-01

    The reaction of 1-methylvinoxy radicals, CH3COCH2, with molecular oxygen has been investigated by experimental and theoretical methods as a function of temperature (291-520 K) and pressure (0.042-10 bar He). Experiments have been performed by laser photolysis coupled to a detection of 1-methylvinoxy radicals by laser-induced fluorescence LIF. The potential energy surface calculations were performed using ab inito molecular orbital theory at the G3MP2B3 and CBSQB3 level of theory based on the density function theory optimized geometries. Derived molecular properties of the characteristic points of the potential energy surface were used to describe the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction under investigation. At 295 K, no pressure dependence of the rate constant for the association reaction has been observed: k(1,298K) = (1.18 +/- 0.04) x 10(-12) cm3 s(-1). Biexponential decays have been observed in the temperature range 459-520 K and have been interpreted as an equilibrium reaction. The temperature-dependent equilibrium constants have been extracted from these decays and a standard reaction enthalpy of deltaH(r,298K) = -105.0 +/- 2.0 kJ mol(-1) and entropy of deltaS(r,298K) = -143.0 +/- 4.0 J mol(-1) K(-1) were derived, in excellent agreement with the theoretical results. Consistent heats of formation for the vinoxy and the 1-methylvinoxy radical as well as their O2 adducts are recommended based on our complementary experimental and theoretical study deltaH(f,298K) = 13.0 +/- 2.0, -32. 9+/- 2.0, -85.9 +/- 4.0, and -142.1 +/- 4.0 kJ mol(-1) for CH2CHO, CH3COCH2 radicals, and their adducts, respectively.

  3. Basis for the equilibrium constant in the interconversion of l-lysine and l-beta-lysine by lysine 2,3-aminomutase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawei; Tanem, Justinn; Frey, Perry A

    2007-02-01

    l-beta-lysine and beta-glutamate are produced by the actions of lysine 2,3-aminomutase and glutamate 2,3-aminomutase, respectively. The pK(a) values have been titrimetrically measured and are for l-beta-lysine: pK(1)=3.25 (carboxyl), pK(2)=9.30 (beta-aminium), and pK(3)=10.5 (epsilon-aminium). For beta-glutamate the values are pK(1)=3.13 (carboxyl), pK(2)=3.73 (carboxyl), and pK(3)=10.1 (beta-aminium). The equilibrium constants for reactions of 2,3-aminomutases favor the beta-isomers. The pH and temperature dependencies of K(eq) have been measured for the reaction of lysine 2,3-aminomutase to determine the basis for preferential formation of beta-lysine. The value of K(eq) (8.5 at 37 degrees C) is independent of pH between pH 6 and pH 11; ruling out differences in pK-values as the basis for the equilibrium constant. The K(eq)-value is temperature-dependent and ranges from 10.9 at 4 degrees C to 6.8 at 65 degrees C. The linear van't Hoff plot shows the reaction to be enthalpy-driven, with DeltaH degrees =-1.4 kcal mol(-1) and DeltaS degrees =-0.25 cal deg(-1) mol(-1). Exothermicity is attributed to the greater strength of the bond C(beta)-N(beta) in l-beta-lysine than C(alpha)-N(alpha) in l-lysine, and this should hold for other amino acids.

  4. Removal of azo dye by a highly graphitized and heteroatom doped carbon derived from fish waste: Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengang; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Tingting; Peng, Nana; Gai, Chao

    2016-11-01

    A highly graphitized and heteroatom doped porous carbon was prepared from fish waste in the present study. The morphology and chemical composition of the resultant porous carbon were characterized by SEM-EDS, TEM, BET, XRD and Raman measurement. The prepared porous carbon was employed as an adsorbent for acid orange 7, a typical azo dye, removal from aqueous solution. The results showed that the porous carbon had ultrahigh surface area of 2146 m(2)/g, a high degree of graphitization structure and naturally doped with nitrogen and phosphorous. The maximum adsorption capacity of acid orange 7 reached 285.71 mg/g due to unique property of the prepared porous carbon. In addition, acid orange 7 adsorption onto the porous carbon well followed pseudo-second-order kinetics model and acid orange 7 diffusion in micropores was the potential rate controlling step. PMID:27526082

  5. Removal of azo dye by a highly graphitized and heteroatom doped carbon derived from fish waste: Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengang; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Tingting; Peng, Nana; Gai, Chao

    2016-11-01

    A highly graphitized and heteroatom doped porous carbon was prepared from fish waste in the present study. The morphology and chemical composition of the resultant porous carbon were characterized by SEM-EDS, TEM, BET, XRD and Raman measurement. The prepared porous carbon was employed as an adsorbent for acid orange 7, a typical azo dye, removal from aqueous solution. The results showed that the porous carbon had ultrahigh surface area of 2146 m(2)/g, a high degree of graphitization structure and naturally doped with nitrogen and phosphorous. The maximum adsorption capacity of acid orange 7 reached 285.71 mg/g due to unique property of the prepared porous carbon. In addition, acid orange 7 adsorption onto the porous carbon well followed pseudo-second-order kinetics model and acid orange 7 diffusion in micropores was the potential rate controlling step.

  6. Modeling, kinetic, and equilibrium characterization of paraquat adsorption onto polyurethane foam using the ion-pairing technique.

    PubMed

    Vinhal, Jonas O; Lage, Mateus R; Carneiro, José Walkimar M; Lima, Claudio F; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2015-06-01

    We studied the adsorption of paraquat onto polyurethane foam (PUF) when it was in a medium containing sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). The adsorption efficiency was dependent on the concentration of SDS in solution, because the formation of an ion-associate between the cationic paraquat and the dodecylsulfate anion was found to be a fundamental step in the process. A computational study was carried out to identify the possible structure of the ion-associate in aqueous medium. The obtained data demonstrated that the structure is probably formed from four units of dodecylsulfate bonded to one paraquat moiety. The results showed that 94% of the paraquat present in 45 mL of a solution containing 3.90 × 10(-5) mol L(-1) could be retained by 300 mg of PUF, resulting in the removal of 2.20 mg of paraquat. The experimental data were reasonably adjusted to the Freundlich isotherm and to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Also, the application of Morris-Weber and Reichenberg models indicated that both film-diffusion and intraparticle-diffusion processes were active during the control of the adsorption kinetics.

  7. Equilibrium binding constants for Tl+ with gramicidins A, B and C in a lysophosphatidylcholine environment determined by 205Tl nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, J F; Koeppe, R E; Shungu, D; Whaley, W L; Paczkowski, J A; Millett, F S

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) 205Tl spectroscopy has been used to monitor the binding of Tl+ to gramicidins A, B, and C packaged in aqueous dispersions of lysophosphatidylcholine. For 5 mM gramicidin dimer in the presence of 100 mM lysophosphatidylcholine, only approximately 50% or less of the gramicidin appears to be accessible to Tl+. Analysis of the 205Tl chemical shift as a function of Tl+ concentration over the 0.65-50 mM range indicates that only one Tl+ ion can be bound by gramicidin A, B, or C under these experimental conditions. In this system, the Tl+ equilibrium binding constant is 582 +/- 20 M-1 for gramicidin 1949 +/- 100 M-1 for gramicidin B, and 390 +/- 20 M-1 for gramicidin C. Gramicidin B not only binds Tl+ more strongly but it is also in a different conformational state than that of A and C, as shown by Circular Dichroism spectroscopy. The 205Tl NMR technique can now be extended to determinations of binding constants of other cations to gramicidin by competition studies using a 205Tl probe. PMID:2420383

  8. RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ADSORPTION OF CESIUM (Cs+) FROM HANFORD WASTE SOLUTIONS-PART I: BATCH EQUILIBRIUM STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    HASSAN, NEGUIBM

    2004-03-30

    Batch equilibrium measurements were conducted with a granular Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) resin to determine the distribution coefficients (Kds) for cesium. In the tests, Hanford Site actual waste sample containing radioactive cesium and a pretreated waste sample that was spiked with non-radioactive cesium were used. Initial concentrations of non-radioactive cesium in the waste sample were varied to generate an equilibrium isotherm for cesium. Two additional tests were conducted using a liquid to solid phase ratio of 10 and a contact time of 120 hours. The measured distribution coefficient (Kd) for radioactive cesium (137Cs) was 948 mL/g; the Kd for non-radioactive cesium (133Cs) was 1039 mL/g. The Kd for non-radioactive cesium decreased from 1039 to 691 mL/g as the initial cesium concentration increased. Very little change of the Kd was observed at initial cesium concentrations above 64 mg/mL. The maximum sorption capacity for cesium on granular RF resin was 1.17 mmole/g dry resin. T his value was calculated from the fit of the equilibrium isotherm data to the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation. Previously, a total capacity of 2.84 mmole/g was calculated by Bibler and Wallace for air-dried RF resin.

  9. Adsorption of methylene blue dye onto activated carbons based on agricultural by-products: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Z; Simitzis, J

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of novolac resin and olive stone biomass (20/80 and 40/60 w/w) were cured, pyrolyzed up to 1,000 °C and activated with CO2 under a continuous flow operation (named N20B-cCa and N40B-cCa respectively). Commercial activated charcoal was similarly re-activated with CO2 and used for comparison reasons (AC-a). The characterization of these materials was performed by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis and their specific surface area was determined according to DIN 66132. The materials were tested for their adsorption abilities at different temperatures (298, 333 K) and initial dye concentrations (0.01-0.35 g/L) using 1 L of methylene blue (MB) solution in 10 g of activated carbon. MB adsorption kinetic was also studied. The FTIR spectra of all activated carbons show absorption peaks which correspond to -OH, -CH, -C-O-C- groups and to aromatic ring. The presence of the absorption peak at about 1,400 cm(-1) for N20B-cCa, N40B-cCa indicates more acidic groups on them compared to the commercial AC-a. The specific surface area of N20B-cCa, N40B-cCa and AC-a has values equal to 352, 342 and 760 m(2)/g respectively. From the applied kinetic models, pseudo-second-order equation could best describe MB adsorption. Consequently, such adsorbents can be used as filters to adsorb dyes from wastewaters.

  10. Kinetic and equilibrium studies for the adsorption process of cadmium(II) and copper(II) onto Pseudomonas aeruginosa using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry method.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Tang, Biyu; Liu, Xiaoying; Zeng, Xiandong; Duan, Haiyan; Luo, Shenglian; Wei, Wanzhi

    2009-08-15

    A novel method for the simultaneous determination of cadmium(II) and copper(II) during the adsorption process onto Pseudomonas aeruginosa was developed. The concentration of the free metal ions was successfully detected by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) on the mercaptoethane sulfonate (MES) modified gold electrode, while the P. aeruginosa was efficiently avoided approaching to the electrode surface by the MES monolayer. And the anodic stripping peaks of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) appear at -0.13 and 0.34V respectively, at the concentration range of 5-50 microM, the peak currents of SWASV present linear relationships with the concentrations of cadmium and copper respectively. As the determination of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) was in real time and without pretreatment, the kinetic characteristics of the adsorption process were studied and all the corresponding regression parameters were obtained by fitting the electrochemical experimental data to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Moreover, Langmuir and Freundlich models well described the biosorption isotherms. And there were some differences in the amount of metal ion adsorbed at equilibrium (q(e)) and other kinetics parameters when the two ions coexisted were compared with the unaccompanied condition, which were also discussed in this paper. The proposed electrode system provides excellent platform for the simultaneous determination of trace metals in complex biosorption process.

  11. Oligomer formation of the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: reaction rates and equilibrium constants indicate a monomeric state at physiological concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Martin; Allan, Martin G; Zaehringer, Franziska; Schirmer, Tilman; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2012-01-18

    Cyclic diguanosine-monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial signaling molecule that triggers a switch from motile to sessile bacterial lifestyles. This mechanism is of considerable pharmaceutical interest, since it is related to bacterial virulence, biofilm formation, and persistence of infection. Previously, c-di-GMP has been reported to display a rich polymorphism of various oligomeric forms at millimolar concentrations, which differ in base stacking and G-quartet interactions. Here, we have analyzed the equilibrium and exchange kinetics between these various forms by NMR spectroscopy. We find that the association of the monomer into a dimeric form is in fast exchange (equilibrium constant of about 1 mM. At concentrations above 100 μM, higher oligomers are formed in the presence of cations. These are presumably tetramers and octamers, with octamers dominating above about 0.5 mM. Thus, at the low micromolar concentrations of the cellular environment and in the absence of additional compounds that stabilize oligomers, c-di-GMP should be predominantly monomeric. This finding has important implications for the understanding of c-di-GMP recognition by protein receptors. In contrast to the monomer/dimer exchange, formation and dissociation of higher oligomers occurs on a time scale of several hours to days. The time course can be described quantitatively by a simple kinetic model where tetramers are intermediates of octamer formation. The extremely slow oligomer dissociation may generate severe artifacts in biological experiments when c-di-GMP is diluted from concentrated stock solution. We present a simple method to quantify c-di-GMP monomers and oligomers from UV spectra and a procedure to dissolve the unwanted oligomers by an annealing step.

  12. Constraining the chlorine monoxide (ClO)/chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl) equilibrium constant from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements of nighttime ClO.

    PubMed

    Santee, Michelle L; Sander, Stanley P; Livesey, Nathaniel J; Froidevaux, Lucien

    2010-04-13

    The primary ozone loss process in the cold polar lower stratosphere hinges on chlorine monoxide (ClO) and one of its dimers, chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl). Recently, analyses of atmospheric observations have suggested that the equilibrium constant, K(eq), governing the balance between ClOOCl formation and thermal decomposition in darkness is lower than that in the current evaluation of kinetics data. Measurements of ClO at night, when ClOOCl is unaffected by photolysis, provide a useful means of testing quantitative understanding of the ClO/ClOOCl relationship. Here we analyze nighttime ClO measurements from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) to infer an expression for K(eq). Although the observed temperature dependence of the nighttime ClO is in line with the theoretical ClO/ClOOCl equilibrium relationship, none of the previously published expressions for K(eq) consistently produces ClO abundances that match the MLS observations well under all conditions. Employing a standard expression for K(eq), A x exp(B/T), we constrain the parameter A to currently recommended values and estimate B using a nonlinear weighted least squares analysis of nighttime MLS ClO data. ClO measurements at multiple pressure levels throughout the periods of peak chlorine activation in three Arctic and four Antarctic winters are used to estimate B. Our derived B leads to values of K(eq) that are approximately 1.4 times smaller at stratospherically relevant temperatures than currently recommended, consistent with earlier studies. Our results are in better agreement with the newly updated (2009) kinetics evaluation than with the previous (2006) recommendation.

  13. Adsorption kinetics of herbicide paraquat from aqueous solution onto activated bleaching earth.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W T; Lai, C W; Hsien, K J

    2004-05-01

    In the present study, the activated bleaching earth was used as adsorbent for the herbicide paraquat adsorption in a batch adsorber. The rate of adsorption has been investigated under the controlled process parameters like agitation speed, initial paraquat concentration, adsorbent dosage and temperature. A batch kinetic model, based on the assumption of a pseudo-second order mechanism, has been tested to predict the rate constant of adsorption, equilibrium adsorption capacity, time of half-adsorption, and equilibrium concentration by the fittings of the experimental data. The results of the kinetic studies show that the adsorption process can be well described with the pseudo-second order equation. Based on the isotherm data obtained from the fittings of the adsorption kinetics, Freundlich model appears to fit the adsorption better than Langmuir model. In addition, the effective diffusion coefficient has also been estimated based on the restrictive diffusion model.

  14. Application of surface complexation models to anion adsorption by natural materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various chemical models of ion adsorption will be presented and discussed. Chemical models, such as surface complexation models, provide a molecular description of anion adsorption reactions using an equilibrium approach. Two such models, the constant capacitance model and the triple layer model w...

  15. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  16. Theoretical calculations of homoconjugation equilibrium constants in systems modeling acid-base interactions in side chains of biomolecules using the potential of mean force.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Makowski, Mariusz; Liwo, Adam; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2005-02-01

    The potentials of mean force (PMFs) were determined for systems forming cationic and anionic homocomplexes composed of acetic acid, phenol, isopropylamine, n-butylamine, imidazole, and 4(5)-methylimidazole, and their conjugated bases or acids, respectively, in three solvents with different polarity and hydrogen-bonding propensity: acetonitrile (AN), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and water (H(2)O). For each pair and each solvent a series of umbrella-sampling molecular dynamics simulations with the AMBER force field, explicit solvent, and counterions added to maintain a zero net charge of a system were carried out and the PMF was calculated by using the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM). Subsequently, homoconjugation-equilibrium constants were calculated by numerical integration of the respective PMF profiles. In all cases but imidazole stable homocomplexes were found to form in solution, which was manifested as the presence of contact minima corresponding to hydrogen-bonded species in the PMF curves. The calculated homoconjugation constants were found to be greater for complexes with the OHO bridge (acetic acid and phenol) than with the NHN bridge and they were found to decrease with increasing polarity and hydrogen-bonding propensity of the solvent (i.e., in the series AN > DMSO > H(2)O), both facts being in agreement with the available experimental data. It was also found that interactions with counterions are manifested as the broadening of the contact minimum or appearance of additional minima in the PMF profiles of the acetic acid-acetate, phenol/phenolate system in acetonitrile, and the 4(5)-methylimidazole/4(5)-methylimidzole cation conjugated base system in dimethyl sulfoxide.

  17. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  18. Evaluating the Equilibrium Association Constant between ArtinM Lectin and Myeloid Leukemia Cells by Impedimetric and Piezoelectric Label Free Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Fernanda C.; Martins, Denise C.; Santos, Adriano; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Bueno, Paulo R.

    2014-01-01

    Label-free methods for evaluating lectin–cell binding have been developed to determine the lectin–carbohydrate interactions in the context of cell-surface oligosaccharides. In the present study, mass loading and electrochemical transducer signals were compared to characterize the interaction between lectin and cellular membranes by measuring the equilibrium association constant, Ka, between ArtinM lectin and the carbohydrate sites of NB4 leukemia cells. By functionalizing sensor interfaces with ArtinM, it was possible to determine Ka over a range of leukemia cell concentrations to construct analytical curves from impedimetric and/or mass-associated frequency shifts with analytical signals following a Langmuir pattern. Using the Langmuir isotherm-binding model, the Ka obtained were (8.9 ± 1.0) × 10−5 mL/cell and (1.05 ± 0.09) × 10−6 mL/cell with the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) methods, respectively. The observed differences were attributed to the intrinsic characteristic sensitivity of each method in following Langmuir isotherm premises. PMID:25587428

  19. Evaluating the Equilibrium Association Constant between ArtinM Lectin and Myeloid Leukemia Cells by Impedimetric and Piezoelectric Label Free Approaches.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fernanda C; Martins, Denise C; Santos, Adriano; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Bueno, Paulo R

    2014-12-01

    Label-free methods for evaluating lectin-cell binding have been developed to determine the lectin-carbohydrate interactions in the context of cell-surface oligosaccharides. In the present study, mass loading and electrochemical transducer signals were compared to characterize the interaction between lectin and cellular membranes by measuring the equilibrium association constant, Ka , between ArtinM lectin and the carbohydrate sites of NB4 leukemia cells. By functionalizing sensor interfaces with ArtinM, it was possible to determine Ka over a range of leukemia cell concentrations to construct analytical curves from impedimetric and/or mass-associated frequency shifts with analytical signals following a Langmuir pattern. Using the Langmuir isotherm-binding model, the Ka obtained were (8.9 ± 1.0) × 10(-5) mL/cell and (1.05 ± 0.09) × 10(-6) mL/cell with the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) methods, respectively. The observed differences were attributed to the intrinsic characteristic sensitivity of each method in following Langmuir isotherm premises.

  20. Determination of equilibrium constant of amino carbamate adduct formation in sisomicin by a high pH based high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wlasichuk, Kenneth B; Tan, Li; Guo, Yushen; Hildebrandt, Darin J; Zhang, Hao; Karr, Dane E; Schmidt, Donald E

    2015-01-01

    Amino carbamate adduct formation from the amino group of an aminoglycoside and carbon dioxide has been postulated as a mechanism for reducing nephrotoxicity in the aminoglycoside class compounds. In this study, sisomicin was used as a model compound for amino carbamate analysis. A high pH based reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method is used to separate the amino carbamate from sisomicin. The carbamate is stable as the breakdown is inhibited at high pH and any reactive carbon dioxide is removed as the carbonate. The amino carbamate was quantified and the molar fraction of amine as the carbamate of sisomicin was obtained from the HPLC peak areas. The equilibrium constant of carbamate formation, Kc, was determined to be 3.3 × 10(-6) and it was used to predict the fraction of carbamate over the pH range in a typical biological systems. Based on these results, the fraction of amino carbamate at physiological pH values is less than 13%, and the postulated mechanism for nephrotoxicity protection is not valid. The same methodology is applicable for other aminoglycosides.

  1. Estimating the plasma effect-site equilibrium rate constant (Ke₀) of propofol by fitting time of loss and recovery of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Sun, Baozhu; Wang, Shuqin; Zhao, Lianying; Qi, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The present paper proposes a new approach for fitting the plasma effect-site equilibrium rate constant (Ke0) of propofol to satisfy the condition that the effect-site concentration (Ce) is equal at the time of loss of consciousness (LOC) and recovery of consciousness (ROC). Forty patients receiving intravenous anesthesia were divided into 4 groups and injected propofol 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, or 2 mg/kg at 1,200 mL/h. Durations from the start of injection to LOC and to ROC were recorded. LOC and ROC were defined as an observer's assessment of alertness and sedation scale change from 3 to 2 and from 2 to 3, respectively. Software utilizing bisection method iteration algorithms was built. Then, Ke0 satisfying the CeLOC=CeROC condition was estimated. The accuracy of the Ke0 estimated by our method was compared with the Diprifusor TCI Pump built-in Ke0 (0.26 min(-1)), and the Orchestra Workstation built-in Ke0 (1.21 min(-1)) in another group of 21 patients who were injected propofol 1.4 to 2 mg/kg. Our results show that the population Ke0 of propofol was 0.53 ± 0.18 min(-1). The regression equation for adjustment by dose (mg/kg) and age was Ke0=1.42-0.30 × dose-0.0074 × age. Only Ke0 adjusted by dose and age achieved the level of accuracy required for clinical applications. We conclude that the Ke0 estimated based on clinical signs and the two-point fitting method significantly improved the ability of CeLOC to predict CeROC. However, only the Ke0 adjusted by dose and age and not a fixed Ke0 value can meet clinical requirements of accuracy.

  2. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  3. Adsorption of arsenate from aqueous solution by rice husk-based adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Taimur; Chaudhuri, Malay

    2013-06-01

    Rice husk-based adsorbent (RHBA) was prepared by burning rice husk in a muffle furnace at 400°C for 4 h and adsorption of arsenate by the RHBA from aqueous solution was examined. Batch adsorption test showed that extent of arsenate adsorption depended on contact time and pH. Equilibrium adsorption was attained in 60 min, with maximum adsorption occurring at pH 7. Equilibrium adsorption data were well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. Freundlich constants Kf and 1/n were 3.62 and 2, respectively. The RHBA is effective in the adsorption of arsenate from water and is a potentially suitable filter medium for removing arsenate from groundwater at wells or in households.

  4. The Langmuir isotherm: a commonly applied but misleading approach for the analysis of protein adsorption behavior.

    PubMed

    Latour, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    The Langmuir adsorption isotherm provides one of the simplest and most direct methods to quantify an adsorption process. Because isotherm data from protein adsorption studies often appear to be fit well by the Langmuir isotherm model, estimates of protein binding affinity have often been made from its use despite that fact that none of the conditions required for a Langmuir adsorption process may be satisfied for this type of application. The physical events that cause protein adsorption isotherms to often provide a Langmuir-shaped isotherm can be explained as being due to changes in adsorption-induced spreading, reorientation, clustering, and aggregation of the protein on a surface as a function of solution concentration in contrast to being due to a dynamic equilibrium adsorption process, which is required for Langmuir adsorption. Unless the requirements of the Langmuir adsorption process can be confirmed, fitting of the Langmuir model to protein adsorption isotherm data to obtain thermodynamic properties, such as the equilibrium constant for adsorption and adsorption free energy, may provide erroneous values that have little to do with the actual protein adsorption process, and should be avoided. In this article, a detailed analysis of the Langmuir isotherm model is presented along with a quantitative analysis of the level of error that can arise in derived parameters when the Langmuir isotherm is inappropriately applied to characterize a protein adsorption process.

  5. Dynamics and thermodynamics of toxic metals adsorption onto soil-extracted humic acid.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Medhat A; albishri, Hassan M

    2014-09-01

    Humic acids, HA represent a large portion of natural organic matter in soils, sediments and waters. They are environmentally important materials due to their extensive ubiquity and strong complexation ability, which can influence heavy metal removal and transportation in waters. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the adsorption of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) onto solid soil-derived HA have been investigated at optimum conditions of pH (5.5±0.1), metal concentration (10-100mmolL(-1)) and different temperatures (293-323K). The suitability of adsorption models such as Freundlich and Langmuir to equilibrium data was investigated. The adsorption was well described by Langmuir isotherm model in multi-detectable steps. Adsorption sites, i (i=A, B, C) with different capacities, νi are characterized. The stoichiometric site capacity is independent of temperature and equilibrium constant, Ki. Adsorption sites A and B are selectively occupied by Cr(VI) cations while sites A and C are selectively occupied by Cd(II) cations. The thermodynamic parameters of adsorption systems are correlated for each adsorption step. The adsorption is endothermic, spontaneous and favorable. Different kinetic models are applied and the adsorption of these heavy metals onto HA follows pseudo-second-order kinetics and equilibrium is achieved within 24h. The adsorption reaction is controlled by diffusion processes and the type of the adsorption is physical. PMID:24997970

  6. Three applications of path integrals: equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects, and the temperature dependence of the rate constant of the [1,5] sigmatropic hydrogen shift in (Z)-1,3-pentadiene.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Tomáš; Vaníček, Jiří

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments have confirmed the importance of nuclear quantum effects even in large biomolecules at physiological temperature. Here we describe how the path integral formalism can be used to describe rigorously the nuclear quantum effects on equilibrium and kinetic properties of molecules. Specifically, we explain how path integrals can be employed to evaluate the equilibrium (EIE) and kinetic (KIE) isotope effects, and the temperature dependence of the rate constant. The methodology is applied to the [1,5] sigmatropic hydrogen shift in pentadiene. Both the KIE and the temperature dependence of the rate constant confirm the importance of tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects as well as of the anharmonicity of the potential energy surface. Moreover, previous results on the KIE were improved by using a combination of a high level electronic structure calculation within the harmonic approximation with a path integral anharmonicity correction using a lower level method.

  7. Protein nanoparticle interaction: A spectrophotometric approach for adsorption kinetics and binding studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishanav, Sandeep K.; Chandraker, Kumudini; Korram, Jyoti; Nagwanshi, Rekha; Ghosh, Kallol K.; Satnami, Manmohan L.

    2016-08-01

    Investigating the protein nanoparticle interaction is crucial to understand how to control the biological interactions of nanoparticles. In this work, Model protein Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used to evaluate the process of protein adsorption to the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) surface. The binding of a model protein (BSA) to GNPs was investigated through fluorescence quenching measurements. The strong affinities of BSA for GNPs were confirmed by the high value of binding constant (Ks) which was calculated to be 2.2 × 1011 L/mol. In this consequence, we also investigated the adsorption behavior of BSA on GNPs surface via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effect of various operational parameters such as pH, contact time, initial BSA concentration, and temperature on adsorption of BSA was investigated using batch adsorption experiments. Kinetics of adsorption was found to follow the pseudo-second order rate equation. The suitability of Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models to the equilibrium data was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption was well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity for BSA adsorbed on GNPs was 58.71 mg/g and equilibrium constant was 0.0058 calculated by the Langmuir model at 298 K and pH = 11.0. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of BSA onto GNPs was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic.

  8. Analysis of fast and slow acid dissociation equilibria of 3',3″,5',5″-tetrabromophenolphthalein and determination of its equilibrium constants by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Acid dissociation constants of 3',3″,5',5″-tetrabrompohenolphthalein (TBPP) were determined in an aqueous solution by capillary zone electrophoresis at an ionic strength of 0.01 mol/L. Two steps of the fast acid-dissociation equilibria including precipitable species of H2TBPP were analyzed at a weakly acidic pH region by using the change in effective electrophoretic mobility of TBPP with the pH of the separation buffer. On the other hand, an acid-dissociation reaction of TBPP at an alkaline pH region was reversible, but very slow to reach its equilibrium; the two TBPP species concerned with the equilibrium were detected as distinct signals in the electropherograms. After reaching its equilibrium, the acid-dissociation constant was determined with the signal height corresponding to its dianion form. Thus, three steps of the acid dissociation constants of TBPP were determined in an aqueous solution as pKa1 = 5.29 ± 0.06, pKa2 = 6.35 ± 0.02, and pKa3 = 11.03 ± 0.04.

  9. Performance, kinetics, and equilibrium of methylene blue adsorption on biochar derived from eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Chen, Dongmei; Wan, Shungang; Yu, Zebin

    2015-12-01

    Biochar derived from eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids at low temperatures was utilized as adsorbent to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that the carboxyl group was introduced on the biochar surface. Adsorption experiment data indicated that eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric acid showed higher MB adsorption efficiency than that modified with tartaric and acetic acids. Pseudo-second-order kinetics was the most suitable model for describing MB adsorption on biochar compared with pseudo-first-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models. The calculated values of ΔG(0) and ΔH(0) indicated the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption process. MB adsorption on biochar followed the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacities for eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids were 178.57, 99.01, and 29.94 mg g(-1), respectively, at 35°C.

  10. Adsorption studies of methylene blue and gentian violet on sugarcane bagasse modified with EDTA dianhydride (EDTAD) in aqueous solutions: kinetic and equilibrium aspects.

    PubMed

    Gusmão, Karla Aparecida Guimarães; Gurgel, Leandro Vinícius Alves; Melo, Tânia Márcia Sacramento; Gil, Laurent Frédéric

    2013-03-30

    In this study the adsorption of cationic dyes by modified sugarcane bagasse with EDTA dianhydride (EB) was examined using methylene blue (MB) and gentian violet (GV) as model compounds in aqueous single solutions. The synthesized adsorbent (EB) was characterized by FTIR, elemental analysis, and BET. The capacity of EB to adsorb dyes was evaluated at different contact times, pH values, and initial dye concentrations. According to the obtained results, the adsorption processes could be described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption isotherms were well fitted by the Langmuir model. Maximum adsorption capacities for MB and GV on EB were found to be 202.43 and 327.83 mg/g, respectively. The free energy change during adsorption of MB and GV was found to be -22.50 and -24.21 kJ/mol, respectively, suggesting that chemisorption is the main mechanism controlling the adsorption process.

  11. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption applied to protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, E; Centres, P M; Ochoa, N A; Ramirez-Pastor, A J

    2013-01-15

    Experimental adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed on sulfonated microspheres were described by means of two analytical models: the first is the well-known Langmuir-Freundlich model (LF), and the second, called fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA), is a statistical thermodynamics model developed recently by Ramirez-Pastor et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 186101]. The experimental data, obtained by Hu et al. [Biochem. Eng. J. 23 (2005) 259] for different concentrations of sulfonate group on the surface of the microspheres, were correlated by using a fitting algorithm based on least-squares statistics. The combination of LF and FSTA models, along with the choice of an adequate fitting procedure, allowed us to obtain several conclusions: (i) as previously reported in the literature, the maximum amount adsorbed increases as the amount of sulfonate group increases; (ii) the equilibrium constant does not appear as a sensitive parameter to the amount of sulfonate group on the surface of the microspheres; and (iii) the values of the fitting parameters obtained from FSTA may be indicative of a mismatch between the equilibrium separation of the intermolecular interaction and the distance between the adsorption sites. The exhaustive study presented here has shown that FSTA model is a good one considering the complexity of the physical situation, which is intended to be described and could be more useful in interpreting experimental data of adsorption of molecules with different sizes and shapes. PMID:23084559

  12. Process development for removal and recovery of cadmium from wastewater by a low-cost adsorbent: Adsorption rates and equilibrium studies

    SciTech Connect

    Periasamy, K.; Namasivayam, C. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1994-02-01

    Activated carbon prepared from peanut hulls (PHC), an agricultural waste by-product, has been used for the adsorption of Cd(II) from synthetic wastewater. The adsorption data fit better with the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The applicability of the Lagergren kinetic model has also been investigated. An almost quantitative removal of 20 mg/L Cd(II) by 0.7 g of PHC/L of aqueous solution was observed in the pH range 3.5--9.5. A comparative study with a commercial granular activated carbon (CAC) showed that the adsorption capacity (K[sub f]) of PHC was 31 times larger than that of CAC.

  13. Experimental adsorption isotherms based on inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kalogirou, E; Bassiotis, I; Artemiadi, Th; Margariti, S; Siokos, V; Roubani-Kalantzopoulou, F

    2002-09-01

    A new chromatographic perturbation method is used for studying the adsorption-desorption equilibrium in various gas-solid heterogeneous systems. It is the reversed-flow method giving accurate and precise values of many physicochemical constants including the basic and necessary adsorption isotherm values. For four inorganic oxides, namely, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2 and PbO, and two aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene) these adsorption isotherms have been determined through a non-linear model. PMID:12385379

  14. 2, 4 dichlorophenol (2, 4-DCP) sorption from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon and polymeric adsorbents and studies on effect of temperature on activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ghatbandhe, A S; Yenkie, M K N

    2008-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), one of the most commonly used chlorophenol, onto bituminous coal based Filtrasorb-400 grade granular activated carbon, were studied in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to temperature. Uptake capacity of activated carbon found to increase with temperature. Langmuir isotherm models were applied to experimental equilibrium data of 2, 4-DCP adsorption and competitive studies with respect to XAD resin were carried out. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir equilibrium model. Adsorbent monolayer capacity 'Q0, Langmuir constant 'b' and adsorption rate constant 'k(a)' were evaluated at different temperatures for activated carbon adsorption. This data was then used to calculate the energy of activation of adsorption and also the thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy of adsorption, deltaG0, enthalpy of adsorption, deltaH0 and the entropy of adsorption deltaS0. The obtained results showed that the monolayer capacity increases with the increase in temperatures. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters showed that adsorption of 2,4 DCP is an endothermic process. Synthetic resin was not found efficient to adsorb 2,4 DCP compared to activated carbon. The order of adsorption efficiencies of three resins used in the study found as XAD7HP > XAD4 > XAD1180.

  15. Enhanced adsorptive removal of Safranine T from aqueous solutions by waste sea buckthorn branch powder modified with dopamine: Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Bai, Bo; Wang, Honglun; Suo, Yourui

    2015-12-01

    Polydopamine coated sea buckthorn branch powder (PDA@SBP) was facilely synthesized via a one-pot bio-inspired dip-coating approach. The as-synthesized PDA@SBP was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adsorption progresses of Safranine T on the surface of PDA@SBP adsorbent were systematically investigated. More specifically, the effects of solution pH, contact time, initial concentration and temperature were evaluated, respectively. The experimental results showed the adsorption capacity of PDA@SBP at 293.15 K could reach up to 54.0 mg/g; the adsorption increased by 201.7% compared to that of native SBP (17.9 mg/g). Besides, kinetics studies showed that pseudo-second-order kinetic model adequately described the adsorption behavior. The adsorption experimental data could be fitted well a Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic analyses showed that the ST adsorption was a physisorption endothermic process. Regeneration of the spent PDA@SBP adsorbent was conducted with 0.1 M HCl without significant reduction in adsorption capacity. On the basis of these investigations, it is believed that the PDA@SBP adsorbent could have potential applications in sewage disposal areas because of their considerable adsorption capacities, brilliant regeneration capability, and cost-effective and eco-friendly preparation and use.

  16. Petroleum resins adsorption onto quartz sand: near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Balabin, Roman M; Syunyaev, Rustem Z

    2008-02-15

    In this paper we have tried to evaluate adsorption parameters of petroleum resins. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is applied for resins bulk concentration evaluation during adsorption process. NIR experimental scheme and parameters are provided. NIR spectra range of 9000-13,000 cm(-1) is chosen. Quartz sand (0.2-0.8 mm fraction) is used as adsorbent; benzene is used as solvent. Different approaches of "NIR spectra-resins concentration" calibration model building are discussed. Partial least squares (PLS) regression method is used. Langmuir model is chosen for experimental data fitting. Combined usage of kinetic and isothermic data gives us ability to evaluate the maximal adsorbed mass density, the equilibrium constant of adsorption, and the rate constants of adsorption (and desorption). The rate constants of resins adsorption and desorption are found to be concentration independent.

  17. Adsorption of proteins at the aqueous solution/alkane interface: Co-adsorption of protein and alkane.

    PubMed

    Miller, R; Aksenenko, E V; Zinkovych, I I; Fainerman, V B

    2015-08-01

    The equations of state, adsorption isotherms and functions of the distribution of protein molecules in liquid interfacial layers with respect to molar area and the equations for their viscoelastic behavior are presented. This theory was used to determine the adsorption characteristics of β-casein and β-lactoglobulin at water/oil interfaces. The experimental results are shown to be describable quite adequately by the proposed theory with consistent model parameters. The data analysis demonstrated that the β-casein molecule adsorbed at equilibrium conditions is more unfolded as compared with dynamic conditions, and this fact causes the significant increase of the adsorption equilibrium constant. The theory assumes the adsorption of protein molecules from the aqueous solution and a competitive adsorption of alkane molecules from the alkane phase. The comparison of the experimental equilibrium interfacial tension isotherms for β-lactoglobulin at the solution/hexane interface with data calculated using the proposed theoretical model demonstrates that the assumption of a competitive adsorption is essential, and the influence of the hexane molecules on the shape of the adsorption isotherm does in fact exist.

  18. Calculation of equilibrium constants from multiwavelength spectroscopic data--II: SPECFIT: two user-friendly programs in basic and standard FORTRAN 77.

    PubMed

    Gampp, H; Maeder, M; Meyer, C J; Zuberbühler, A D

    1985-04-01

    A new program (SPECFIT), written in HP BASIC or FORTRAN 77, for the calculation of stability constants from spectroscopic data, is presented. Stability constants have been successfully calculated from multiwavelength spectrophotometric and EPR data, but the program can be equally well applied to the numerical treatment of other spectroscopic measurements. The special features included in SPECFIT to improve convergence, increase numerical reliability, and minimize memory as well as computing time requirements, include (i) elimination of the linear parameters (i.e., molar absorptivities), (ii) the use of analytical instead of numerical derivatives and (iii) factor analysis. Calculation of stability constants from spectroscopic data is then as straightforward as from potentiometric titration curves and gives results of analogous reproducibility. The spectroscopic method has proved, however, to be superior in discrimination between chemical models.

  19. Adsorption and excess fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of Xe and Kr on lunar soil 10084 was measured by a method that employs only very low fractions of monolayer coverage. Results are presented as parameters for calculation of the Henry constant for adsorption as a function of temperature. The adsorption potentials are about 3 kcal/mole for Kr and 5 kcal/mole for Xe; heating the sample in vacuum increased the Xe potential to nearly 7 kcal/mole. Henry constants at the characteristic lunar temperature are about 0.3 cu cm STP/g-atm. These data were applied to consider whether adsorption is important in producing the excess fission Xe effect characteristic of highland breccias. Sorption equilibrium with a transient lunar atmosphere vented fission Xe produces concentrations seven orders of magnitude lower than observed concentrations. Higher concentrations result because of the resistance of the regolith to upward diffusion of Xe. A diffusion coefficient of 0.26 sq cm/sec is estimated for this process.

  20. Metal adsorption on mosses: Toward a universal adsorption model.

    PubMed

    González, A G; Pokrovsky, O S

    2014-02-01

    This study quantifies the adsorption of heavy metals on 4 typical moss species used for environmental monitoring in the moss bag technique. The adsorption of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto Hypnum sp., Sphagnum sp., Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachytecium rutabulum has been investigated using a batch reactor in a wide range of pH (1.3-11.0) and metal concentrations in solution (1.6μM-3.8mM). A Linear Programming Model (LPM) was applied for the experimental data to derive equilibrium constants and the number of surface binding sites. The surface acid-base titration performed for 4 mosses at a pH range of 3-10 in 0.1M NaNO3 demonstrated that Sphagnum sp. is the most efficient adsorbent as it has the maximal number of proton-binding sites on the surface (0.65mmol g(-1)). The pKa computed for all the moss species suggested the presence of 5 major functional groups: phosphodiester, carboxyl, phosphoryl, amine and polyphenols. The results of pH-edge experiments demonstrated that B. rutabulum exhibits the highest percentage of metal adsorption and has the highest number of available sites for most of the metals studied. However, according to the results of the constant pH "Langmuirian" isotherm, Sphagnum sp. can be considered as the strongest adsorbent, although the relative difference from other mosses is within 20%. The LPM was found to satisfactorily fit the experimental data in the full range of the studied solution parameters. The results of this study demonstrate a rather similar pattern of five metal adsorptions on mosses, both as a function of pH and as a metal concentration, which is further corroborated by similar values of adsorption constants. Therefore, despite the species and geographic differences between the mosses, a universal adsorption edge and constant pH adsorption isotherm can be recommended for 4 studied mosses. The quantitative comparison of metal adsorption with other common natural organic and inorganic materials demonstrates

  1. Measurements of VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics of typical interior building materials

    SciTech Connect

    An, Y.; Zhang, J.S.; Shaw, C.Y.

    2000-07-01

    The adsorption/desorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on interior building material surfaces (i.e., the sink effect) can affect the VOC concentrations in a building, and thus need to be accounted for an indoor air quality (IAQ) prediction model. In this study, the VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics (sink effect) were measured for four typical interior building materials including carpet, vinyl floor tile, painted drywall, and ceiling tile. The VOCs tested were ethylbenzene, cyclohexanone, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, benzaldehyde, and dodecane. These five VOCs were selected because they are representative of hydrocarbons, aromatics, ketones, aldehydes, and chlorine substituted compounds. The first order reversible adsorption/desorption model was based on the Langmuir isotherm was used to analyze the data and to determine the equilibrium constant of each VOC-material combination. It was found that the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, which is a measure of the sink capacity, increased linearly with the inverse of the VOC vapor pressure. For each compound, the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, and the adsorption rate constant differed significantly among the four materials tested. A detailed characterization of the material structure in the micro-scale would improve the understanding and modeling of the sink effect in the future. The results of this study can be used to estimate the impact of sink effect on the VOC concentrations in buildings.

  2. Thermodynamic and microscopic equilibrium constants of molecular species formed from pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and 2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid in aqueous and D/sub 2/O solution

    SciTech Connect

    Szpoganicz, B.; Martell, A.E.

    1984-09-19

    Schiff base formation between pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and 2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (APP) has been investigated by measurement of the corresponding NMR and electronic absorption spectra. A value of 0.26 was found for the formation constant of the completely deprotonated Schiff base species, and is much smaller than the values reported for pyridoxal-..beta..-chloroalanine and pyridoxal-O-phosphoserine. The protonation constants for the aldehyde and hydrate forms of PLP were determined in D/sub 2/O by measurement of the variation of chemical shifts with pD (pH in D/sub 2/O). The hydration constants of PLP were determined in a pD range 2-12, and species distributions were calculated. The protonation constants of the APP-PLP Schiff base determined by NMR in D/sub 2/O were found to have the log values 12.54, 8.10, 6.70, and 5.95, and the species distributions were calculated for a range of pD values. Evidence is reported for hydrogen bonding involving the phosphate and phosphonate groups of the diprotonated Schiff base. The cis and trans forms of the Schiff bases were distinguished with the aid of the nuclear Overhauser effect. 43 references, 9 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Fast and considerable adsorption of methylene blue dye onto graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjie; Zhou, Chunjiao; Zhou, Weichang; Lei, Aihua; Zhang, Qinglin; Wan, Qiang; Zou, Bingsuo

    2011-07-01

    The quite efficient adsorption of methylene blue dye from an aqueous solution by graphene oxide was studied. The favorable electrostatic attraction is the main interaction between methylene blue and graphene oxide. As graphene oxide has the special nanostructural properties and negatively charged surface, the positively charged methylene blue molecules can be easily adsorbed on it. In the aqueous solution of methylene blue at 293 K, the adsorption data could be fitted by the Langmuir equation with a maximum adsorption amount of 1.939 mg/mg and a Langmuir adsorption equilibrium constant of 18.486 mL/mg. The adsorption amount increased with the increase of the solution pH (3-11), was not affected significantly by KCl under the examined condition and the adsorption process was exothermic in nature. The fast and considerable adsorption of graphene oxide could be regarded as a potential adsorbent for cationic dye removal in wastewater treatment process.

  4. Adsorption studies of methylene blue and gentian violet on sugarcane bagasse modified with EDTA dianhydride (EDTAD) in aqueous solutions: kinetic and equilibrium aspects.

    PubMed

    Gusmão, Karla Aparecida Guimarães; Gurgel, Leandro Vinícius Alves; Melo, Tânia Márcia Sacramento; Gil, Laurent Frédéric

    2013-03-30

    In this study the adsorption of cationic dyes by modified sugarcane bagasse with EDTA dianhydride (EB) was examined using methylene blue (MB) and gentian violet (GV) as model compounds in aqueous single solutions. The synthesized adsorbent (EB) was characterized by FTIR, elemental analysis, and BET. The capacity of EB to adsorb dyes was evaluated at different contact times, pH values, and initial dye concentrations. According to the obtained results, the adsorption processes could be described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption isotherms were well fitted by the Langmuir model. Maximum adsorption capacities for MB and GV on EB were found to be 202.43 and 327.83 mg/g, respectively. The free energy change during adsorption of MB and GV was found to be -22.50 and -24.21 kJ/mol, respectively, suggesting that chemisorption is the main mechanism controlling the adsorption process. PMID:23428463

  5. Adsorption of humic acids and trace metals in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies concerning the interactions between suspended hydrous iron oxide and dissolved humic acids and trace metals are reported. As a major component of dissolved organic matters and its readiness for adsorption at the solid/water interface, humic acids may play a very important role in the organometallic geochemistry of suspended sediments and in determining the fate and distribution of trace metals, pesticides and anions in natural water systems. Most of the solid phases in natural waters contain oxides and hydroxides. The most simple promising theory to describe the interactions of hydrous iron oxide interface is the surface complex formation model. In this model, the adsorptions of humic acids on hydrous iron oxide may be interpreted as complex formation of the organic bases (humic acid oxyanions) with surface Fe ions. Measurements on adsorptions were made in both fresh water and seawater. Attempts have been made to fit our data to Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption equilibrium constants were determined.

  6. Chlorodifluoromethane equilibrium on 13X molecular sieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlile, Donna L.; Mahle, John J.; Buettner, Leonard C.; Tevault, David E.; Friday, David K.

    1994-08-01

    Adsorption phase equilibrium data are required for evaluating any adsorption-based gas separation process. The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center is currently measuring adsorption phase equilibrium data for a variety of chemical warfare agents and their surrogates on adsorbent materials to correlate physical properties to filtration/separation efficiencies of each vapor on each adsorbent. This report details the adsorption phase equilibrium data measured for chlorodifluoromethane (R-22) on 13X Molecular Sieve. The 13X Molecular Sieve is a candidate adsorbent for future military air purification systems employing the pressure-swing adsorption separation process.

  7. Comparing the removal of perchlorate when using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon: adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie C; Hsu, Yung S; Hsu, Kai L; Chou, Ming S; Han, Jia Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to remove perchlorate using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon (GAC). Dynamic and equilibrium adsorption experiments were performed to evaluate the thermodynamic behavior of perchlorate on SWCNTs and GAC. Key parameters affecting the adsorption, such as pH, ionic strength, and temperature were studied. The experimental results showed that the dynamic adsorption experiment achieved equilibrium in approximately eight hours. The adsorption capacity increased as the concentration of perchlorate increased or as the ionic strength decreased. The selected adsorption models were the modified Freundlich, the pseudo-1st-order, and the pseudo-2nd-order equations. The results showed that the modified Freundlich equation best described the kinetic adsorption processes. The maximal adsorption capacities of GAC and SWCNTs were 33.87-28.21 mg/g and 13.64 - 10.03 mg/g, respectively, at a constant temperature between 5°C and 45°C. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the equilibrium constant (K0 ), the standard free energy changes (ΔG°), the standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and the standard entropy change (ΔS°), were obtained. The results of the isothermal equilibrium adsorption experiment showed that low pH levels, low ionic strength, and low-temperature conditions facilitated the perchlorate adsorption, indicating that GAC and SWCNTs are potential absorbents for water treatment. PMID:24410681

  8. Comparing the removal of perchlorate when using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon: adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie C; Hsu, Yung S; Hsu, Kai L; Chou, Ming S; Han, Jia Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to remove perchlorate using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon (GAC). Dynamic and equilibrium adsorption experiments were performed to evaluate the thermodynamic behavior of perchlorate on SWCNTs and GAC. Key parameters affecting the adsorption, such as pH, ionic strength, and temperature were studied. The experimental results showed that the dynamic adsorption experiment achieved equilibrium in approximately eight hours. The adsorption capacity increased as the concentration of perchlorate increased or as the ionic strength decreased. The selected adsorption models were the modified Freundlich, the pseudo-1st-order, and the pseudo-2nd-order equations. The results showed that the modified Freundlich equation best described the kinetic adsorption processes. The maximal adsorption capacities of GAC and SWCNTs were 33.87-28.21 mg/g and 13.64 - 10.03 mg/g, respectively, at a constant temperature between 5°C and 45°C. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the equilibrium constant (K0 ), the standard free energy changes (ΔG°), the standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and the standard entropy change (ΔS°), were obtained. The results of the isothermal equilibrium adsorption experiment showed that low pH levels, low ionic strength, and low-temperature conditions facilitated the perchlorate adsorption, indicating that GAC and SWCNTs are potential absorbents for water treatment.

  9. Adsorption and regenerative oxidation of trichlorophenol with synthetic zeolite: Ozone dosage and its influence on adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Prigent, Bastien; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2016-07-01

    Regeneration of loaded adsorbents is a key step for the sustainability of an adsorption process. In this study, ozone was applied to regenerate a synthetic zeolite for the adsorption of trichlorophenol (TCP) as an organic model pollutant. Three initial concentrations of TCP in water phase were used in adsorption tests. After the equilibrium, zeolite loaded different amounts of TCP was dried and then regenerated with ozone gas. It was found that the adsorption capacity of zeolite was increased through three regeneration cycles. However, the adsorption kinetics was compromised after the regeneration with slightly declined 2nd order reaction constants. The ozone demand for the regeneration was highly dependent on the TCP mass loaded onto the zeolite. It was estimated that the mass ratio of ozone to TCP was 1.2 ± 0.3 g O3/g TCP. PMID:27043379

  10. Adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 and Congo Red dye from aqueous solution by amino-functionalized Fe3O4 particles: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ting-guo; Wang, Li-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic adsorbent was synthesized by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modification of Fe(3)O(4) particles using a two-step process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and vibration sample magnetometry were used to characterize the obtained magnetic adsorbent. EDS and XPS showed that APTES polymer was successfully introduced onto the as-prepared Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particle surfaces. The saturation magnetization of the magnetic adsorbent was around 65 emu g(-1), which indicated that the dye can be removed fast and efficiently from aqueous solution with an external magnetic field. The maximum adsorption capacities of Fe(3)O(4)/APTES for C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) were 51.4 and 118.8 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) on Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particles corresponded well to the Langmuir model and the Freundlich model, respectively. The adsorption processes for RR 228 and CR followed the pseudo-second-order model. The Boyd's film-diffusion model showed that film diffusion also played a major role in the studied adsorption processes for both dyes. Thermodynamic study indicated that both of the adsorption processes of the two dyes are spontaneous exothermic. PMID:24552735

  11. A comparative adsorption study: 17β-estradiol onto aerobic granular sludge and activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-ying; He, Yu-jie; Chen, Wei; Wang, Ming-yang; Cao, Su-lan; Ni, Ming; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption plays a significant role in removing hydrophobic 17β-estradiol (E2) from wastewater. Batch experiments were conducted to compare the adsorption of E2 onto activated aerobic granular sludge (AGS) and activated sludge (AS), and features evaluated included the adsorption kinetics, thermodynamics, and influence of other environmental factors. By using a non-chemical wet-heat technique, both AGS and AS were treated to inactivated status. Then, after loading E2, the adsorption equilibrium capacity of the AGS was found to be greater than that of the AS at the same initial concentration of E2. Moreover, both the adsorption processes corresponded to a pseudo-second-order kinetic model; the adsorption rate constant of AGS was found to be higher and the half-adsorption time was shorter than that of AS. Next, evaluations of adsorption isotherms and thermodynamics indicated that the adsorption process was mainly a physical process. Lower temperatures facilitated a higher equilibrium adsorption capacity. However, the adsorption binding sites of AGS were distributed more uniformly at higher temperature, in contrast to the distribution found for AS. Finally, acidic conditions and an appropriate ionic strength (0.4 mol/L) were found to be particularly conducive to the adsorption process. Overall, the results showed that AGS has the potential to adsorb E2 with significant efficiency, thereby offering a new and more efficient means of treating E2 and trace oestrogens in wastewater.

  12. Formation and reactivity of a porphyrin iridium hydride in water: acid dissociation constants and equilibrium thermodynamics relevant to Ir-H, Ir-OH, and Ir-CH2- bond dissociation energetics.

    PubMed

    Bhagan, Salome; Wayland, Bradford B

    2011-11-01

    Aqueous solutions of group nine metal(III) (M = Co, Rh, Ir) complexes of tetra(3,5-disulfonatomesityl)porphyrin [(TMPS)M(III)] form an equilibrium distribution of aquo and hydroxo complexes ([(TMPS)M(III)(D(2)O)(2-n)(OD)(n)]((7+n)-)). Evaluation of acid dissociation constants for coordinated water show that the extent of proton dissociation from water increases regularly on moving down the group from cobalt to iridium, which is consistent with the expected order of increasing metal-ligand bond strengths. Aqueous (D(2)O) solutions of [(TMPS)Ir(III)(D(2)O)(2)](7-) react with dihydrogen to form an iridium hydride complex ([(TMPS)Ir-D(D(2)O)](8-)) with an acid dissociation constant of 1.8(0.5) × 10(-12) (298 K), which is much smaller than the Rh-D derivative (4.3 (0.4) × 10(-8)), reflecting a stronger Ir-D bond. The iridium hydride complex adds with ethene and acetaldehyde to form organometallic derivatives [(TMPS)Ir-CH(2)CH(2)D(D(2)O)](8-) and [(TMPS)Ir-CH(OD)CH(3)(D(2)O)](8-). Only a six-coordinate carbonyl complex [(TMPS)Ir-D(CO)](8-) is observed for reaction of the Ir-D with CO (P(CO) = 0.2-2.0 atm), which contrasts with the (TMPS)Rh-D analog which reacts with CO to produce an equilibrium with a rhodium formyl complex ([(TMPS)Rh-CDO(D(2)O)](8-)). Reactivity studies and equilibrium thermodynamic measurements were used to discuss the relative M-X bond energetics (M = Rh, Ir; X = H, OH, and CH(2)-) and the thermodynamically favorable oxidative addition of water with the (TMPS)Ir(II) derivatives.

  13. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2011-07-27

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  14. Production of ultra-low-sulfur gasoline: an equilibrium and kinetic analysis on adsorption of sulfur compounds over Ni/MMS sorbents.

    PubMed

    Subhan, Fazle; Liu, B S; Zhang, Q L; Wang, W S

    2012-11-15

    High performance nickel-based micro-mesoporous silica (Ni/MMS) sorbent was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation with ultrasonic aid (IWI-u) for adsorptive desulfurization (ADS) of commercial gasoline and simulated fuels. The sorbents were characterized with BET, XRD, TPR, SEM, HRTEM and TG/DTG. These results show that 20 wt%Ni/MMS (IWI-u) can still retain the framework of MMS and nickel particles were homogeneously distributed in the MMS channels without any aggregation, which improved significantly the ADS performance of the sorbents. The studies on the ADS kinetics indicate that the adsorption behavior of thiophene (T), benzothiophene (BT) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) over 20 wt%Ni/MMS (IWI-u) can be described appropriately by pseudo second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion model verified that the steric hindrance and intraparticle diffusion were the rate controlling step of the adsorption process of DBT molecules. Langmuir model can be used to describe the adsorption isotherms for T, BT and DBT due to low coverage. The regeneration sorbent maintains the sulfur removal efficiency of 85.9% for 6 cycles.

  15. Production of ultra-low-sulfur gasoline: an equilibrium and kinetic analysis on adsorption of sulfur compounds over Ni/MMS sorbents.

    PubMed

    Subhan, Fazle; Liu, B S; Zhang, Q L; Wang, W S

    2012-11-15

    High performance nickel-based micro-mesoporous silica (Ni/MMS) sorbent was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation with ultrasonic aid (IWI-u) for adsorptive desulfurization (ADS) of commercial gasoline and simulated fuels. The sorbents were characterized with BET, XRD, TPR, SEM, HRTEM and TG/DTG. These results show that 20 wt%Ni/MMS (IWI-u) can still retain the framework of MMS and nickel particles were homogeneously distributed in the MMS channels without any aggregation, which improved significantly the ADS performance of the sorbents. The studies on the ADS kinetics indicate that the adsorption behavior of thiophene (T), benzothiophene (BT) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) over 20 wt%Ni/MMS (IWI-u) can be described appropriately by pseudo second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion model verified that the steric hindrance and intraparticle diffusion were the rate controlling step of the adsorption process of DBT molecules. Langmuir model can be used to describe the adsorption isotherms for T, BT and DBT due to low coverage. The regeneration sorbent maintains the sulfur removal efficiency of 85.9% for 6 cycles. PMID:23022413

  16. Removal of mercury(II) ions in aqueous solution using the peel biomass of Pachira aquatica Aubl: kinetics and adsorption equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Santana, Andrea J; dos Santos, Walter N L; Silva, Laiana O B; das Virgens, Cesário F

    2016-05-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic substance that is a health hazard to humans. This study aims to investigate powders obtained from the peel of the fruit of Pachira aquatica Aubl, in its in natura and/or acidified form, as an adsorbent for the removal of mercury ions in aqueous solution. The materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The infrared spectra showed bands corresponding to the axial deformation of carbonyls from carboxylic acids, the most important functional group responsible for fixing the metal species to the adsorbent material. The thermograms displayed mass losses related to the decomposition of three major components, i.e., hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin. The adsorption process was evaluated using cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV AFS) and cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS). Three isotherm models were employed. The adsorption isotherm model, Langmuir-Freundlich, best represented the adsorption process, and the maximum adsorption capacity was predicted to be 0.71 and 0.58 mg g(-1) at 25 °C in nature and acidified, respectively. Adsorption efficiencies were further tested on real aqueous wastewater samples, and removal of Hg(II) was recorded as 69.6 % for biomass acidified and 76.3 % for biomass in nature. Results obtained from sorption experiments on real aqueous wastewater samples revealed that recovery of the target metal ions was very satisfactory. The pseudo-second-order model showed the best correlation to the experimental data. The current findings showed that the investigated materials are potential adsorbents for mercury(II) ion removal in aqueous solution, with acidified P. aquatica Aubl being the most efficient adsorbent.

  17. Chemical noise produced by equilibrium adsorption/desorption of surface pyridine at Au-Ag-Au bimetallic atom-scale junctions studied by fluctuation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tai-Wei; Branagan, Sean P; Bohn, Paul W

    2013-03-20

    The chemical noise contained in conductance fluctuations resulting from adsorption and desorption of pyridine at Au-Ag-Au bimetallic atom-scale junctions (ASJs) exhibiting ballistic electron transport is studied using fluctuation spectroscopy. ASJs are fabricated by electrochemical Ag deposition in a Au nanogap to produce a high-conductance Ag quantum wire, followed by electromigration-induced thinning in pyridine solution to create stable ASJs. The conductance behavior of the resulting ASJs is analyzed by sequential autocorrelation and Fourier transform of the current-time data to yield the power spectral density (PSD). In these experiments the PSDs from Ag ASJs in pyridine exhibit two main frequency regions: 1/f noise originating from resistance fluctuations of the junction itself at low frequencies, and a Lorentzian noise component arising from molecular adsorption/desorption fluctuations at higher frequencies. The characteristic cutoff frequency of the Lorentzian noise component determines the relaxation time of molecular fluctuations, which, in turn, is sensitive to the kinetics of the adsorption/desorption process. The kinetics are found to depend on concentration and on the adsorption binding energy. The junction size (<5G0), on the other hand, does not affect the kinetics, as the cutoff frequency remains unchanged. Concentration-dependent adsorption free energies are interpreted as arising from a distribution of binding energies, N(E(b)), on the Ag ASJ. Other observations, such as long lifetime ASJs and two-level fluctuations in conductance, provide additional evidence for the integral role of the adsorbate in determining ASJ reorganization dynamics.

  18. Removal of mercury(II) ions in aqueous solution using the peel biomass of Pachira aquatica Aubl: kinetics and adsorption equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Santana, Andrea J; dos Santos, Walter N L; Silva, Laiana O B; das Virgens, Cesário F

    2016-05-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic substance that is a health hazard to humans. This study aims to investigate powders obtained from the peel of the fruit of Pachira aquatica Aubl, in its in natura and/or acidified form, as an adsorbent for the removal of mercury ions in aqueous solution. The materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The infrared spectra showed bands corresponding to the axial deformation of carbonyls from carboxylic acids, the most important functional group responsible for fixing the metal species to the adsorbent material. The thermograms displayed mass losses related to the decomposition of three major components, i.e., hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin. The adsorption process was evaluated using cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV AFS) and cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS). Three isotherm models were employed. The adsorption isotherm model, Langmuir-Freundlich, best represented the adsorption process, and the maximum adsorption capacity was predicted to be 0.71 and 0.58 mg g(-1) at 25 °C in nature and acidified, respectively. Adsorption efficiencies were further tested on real aqueous wastewater samples, and removal of Hg(II) was recorded as 69.6 % for biomass acidified and 76.3 % for biomass in nature. Results obtained from sorption experiments on real aqueous wastewater samples revealed that recovery of the target metal ions was very satisfactory. The pseudo-second-order model showed the best correlation to the experimental data. The current findings showed that the investigated materials are potential adsorbents for mercury(II) ion removal in aqueous solution, with acidified P. aquatica Aubl being the most efficient adsorbent. PMID:27084802

  19. Automated method for determination of dissolved organic carbon-water distribution constants of structurally diverse pollutants using pre-equilibrium solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Ripszam, Matyas; Haglund, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays a key role in determining the environmental fate of semivolatile organic environmental contaminants. The goal of the present study was to develop a method using commercially available hardware to rapidly characterize the sorption properties of DOC in water samples. The resulting method uses negligible-depletion direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Its performance was evaluated using Nordic reference fulvic acid and 40 priority environmental contaminants that cover a wide range of physicochemical properties. Two SPME fibers had to be used to cope with the span of properties, 1 coated with polydimethylsiloxane and 1 coated with polystyrene divinylbenzene polydimethylsiloxane, for nonpolar and semipolar contaminants, respectively. The measured DOC-water distribution constants showed reasonably good reproducibility (standard deviation ≤ 0.32) and good correlation (R(2)  = 0.80) with log octanol-water partition coefficients for nonpolar persistent organic pollutants. The sample pretreatment is limited to filtration, and the method is easy to adjust to different DOC concentrations. These experiments also utilized the latest SPME automation that largely decreases total cycle time (to 20 min or shorter) and increases sample throughput, which is advantageous in cases when many samples of DOC must be characterized or when the determinations must be performed quickly, for example, to avoid precipitation, aggregation, and other changes of DOC structure and properties. The data generated by this method are valuable as a basis for transport and fate modeling studies.

  20. Application of surface complexation models to anion adsorption by natural materials.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    Various chemical models of ion adsorption are presented and discussed. Chemical models, such as surface complexation models, provide a molecular description of anion adsorption reactions using an equilibrium approach. Two such models, the constant capacitance model and the triple layer model, are described in the present study. Characteristics common to all the surface complexation models are equilibrium constant expressions, mass and charge balances, and surface activity coefficient electrostatic potential terms. Methods for determining parameter values for surface site density, capacitances, and surface complexation constants also are discussed. Spectroscopic experimental methods of establishing ion adsorption mechanisms include vibrational spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. Experimental determinations of point of zero charge shifts and ionic strength dependence of adsorption results and molecular modeling calculations also can be used to deduce adsorption mechanisms. Applications of the surface complexation models to heterogeneous natural materials, such as soils, using the component additivity and the generalized composite approaches are described. Emphasis is on the generalized composite approach for predicting anion adsorption by soils. Continuing research is needed to develop consistent and realistic protocols for describing ion adsorption reactions on soil minerals and soils. The availability of standardized model parameter databases for use in chemical speciation-transport models is critical. PMID:24619924

  1. Chemical Principles Revisited: Using the Equilibrium Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the concept of equilibrium in chemical systems, particularly in relation to predicting the position of equilibrium, predicting spontaneity of a reaction, quantitative applications of the equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, determination of the solubility product constant, common-ion effect, and dissolution of precipitates.…

  2. Biochars prepared from anaerobic digestion residue, palm bark, and eucalyptus for adsorption of cationic methylene blue dye: characterization, equilibrium, and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Wan, Shungang; Luo, Wensui

    2013-07-01

    Biochars prepared from anaerobic digestion residue (BC-R), palm bark (BC-PB) and eucalyptus (BC-E) were used as sorbents for removal of cationic methylene blue dye (MB). The FE-SEM images indicated that the biochars have a well-developed pore structure, and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas of BC-R, BC-PB, and BC-E were 7.60, 2.46, and 10.35 m(2)g(-1), respectively. The efficiencies of MB removal in the samples with initial concentrations of 5 mg L(-1) at pH 7.0 and 40°C by BC-R, BC-PB, and BC-E after 2h were 99.5%, 99.3%, and 86.1%, respectively. Pseudo-second-order kinetics was the most suitable model for describing the adsorption of MB onto the biochars. The experimental data were best described by the Langmuir isotherm model, with a maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 9.50 mg g(-1) at 40°C for BC-R. The biochars produced from the three types of solid waste showed considerable potential for adsorption.

  3. Carbonaceous materials for adsorptive refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, B.; Wolak, E.

    2012-06-01

    Carbon monoliths prepared from hard coal precursors were obtained. The porous structure of the monoliths was evaluated on the basis of nitrogen adsorption — desorption equilibrium data. The investigated monoliths have a well-developed microporous structure with significant specific surface area (S BET ). Equilibrium studies of methanol vapour adsorption were used to characterize the methanol adsorptive capacity that was determined using a volumetric method. The heat of wetting by methanol was determined in order to estimate the energetic effects of the adsorption process. The results of the investigations show that all monoliths exhibit high adsorption capacity and high heat of wetting with methanol.

  4. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  5. Adsorption behavior of methylene blue on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yunjin; Xu, Feifei; Chen, Ming; Xu, Zhongxiao; Zhu, Zhiwen

    2010-05-01

    The effect of temperature on the equilibrium adsorption of methylene blue dye from aqueous solution using carbon nanotubes was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using two widely applied isotherms: Langmuir and Freundlich. The results revealed that Langmuir isotherm fit the experimental results well. Kinetic analyses were conducted using pseudo-first and second-order models and the intraparticle diffusion model. The regression results showed that the adsorption kinetics were more accurately represented by pseudo-second-order model. The activation energy of system (Ea) was calculated as 18.54 kJ/mol. Standard free energy changes (DeltaG(0)), standard enthalpy change (DeltaH(0)), and standard entropy change (DeltaS(0)) were calculated using adsorption equilibrium constants obtained from the Langmuir isotherm at different temperatures. All DeltaG(0) values were negative; the DeltaH(0) values and DeltaS(0) values of CNTs were 7.29 kJ/mol and 64.6 J/mol K, respectively. Results suggested that the methylene blue adsorption on CNTs was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  6. Adsorption studies of azotetrazolate and 3,6-dihydrazinotetrazine on peat.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Rydelek, Paweł; Szala, Mateusz

    2013-01-01

    The objective of our studies was the evaluation of the adsorption process of two high-nitrogen compounds-dihydrazinotetrazine (DHTz) and azotetrazolate ion (AZ)-on a chosen peat. The experiments were performed using a static method at three different temperatures (283, 298, and 333 K). The adsorption process of DHTz and AZ on peat was characterized by isotherms according to the Freundlich and Langmuir models. The obtained correlations between adsorption and equilibrium concentration were in good accordance with the Freundlich and Langmuir models, as confirmed by high values of the correlation coefficients (0.97-0.99). Adsorption of AZ on peat was less efficient than that of DHTz, and this inference was experimentally proven. The maximum surface coverages of peat particles with adsorbate according to the Langmuir model were calculated as 0.02 and 0.17 mol kg(-1) (at 298 K) for AZ and DHTz, respectively. The determined adsorption equilibrium constants confirmed greater adsorption of DHTz on the investigated peat. It can be concluded that adsorption of AZ occurred to a much lesser extent compared to that of DHTz, pointing to a potentially greater threat of migration of soluble azotetrazolates in soil. Standard enthalpies of adsorption estimated for AZ and DHTz were -11.1 and -23.7 kJ mol(-1), respectively. Based on these adsorption enthalpy values, it can be stated that both investigated compounds are adsorbed on peat by a physisorption process.

  7. Robust design of binary countercurrent adsorption separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Storti, G. ); Mazzotti, M.; Morbidelli, M.; Carra, S. )

    1993-03-01

    The separation of a binary mixture, using a third component having intermediate adsorptivity as desorbent, in a four section countercurrent adsorption separation unit is considered. A procedure for the optimal and robust design of the unit is developed in the frame of Equilibrium Theory, using a model where the adsorption equilibria are described through the constant selectivity stoichiometric model, while mass-transfer resistances and axial mixing are neglected. By requiring that the unit achieves complete separation, it is possible to identify a set of implicity constraints on the operating parameters, that is, the flow rate ratios in the four sections of the unit. From these constraints explicit bounds on the operating parameters are obtained, thus yielding a region in the operating parameters space, which can be drawn a priori in terms of the adsorption equilibrium constants and the feed composition. This result provides a very convenient tool to determine both optimal and robust operating conditions. The latter issue is addressed by first analyzing the various possible sources of disturbances, as well as their effect on the separation performance. Next, the criteria for the robust design of the unit are discussed. Finally, these theoretical findings are compared with a set of experimental results obtained in a six port simulated moving bed adsorption separation unit operated in the vapor phase.

  8. Adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisaharu; Matsumoto, Michiaki

    1996-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose were examined. The pH dependency on the distribution ratio was found to be affected by the valency of the metal ion, and the apparent adsorption equilibrium constants of the metal ions were determined. The order of adsorption of the metal ions is Ga > In > Nd > Eu for the trivalent metal ions and Cu > Ni > Co for the divalent metal ions. It is believed that amino and hydroxyl groups in the chitosan act as a chelating ligand.

  9. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  10. Adsorption rate of phenol from aqueous solution onto organobentonite: surface diffusion and kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Perez, Raul; Leyva-Ramos, Roberto; Mendoza-Barron, Jovita; Guerrero-Coronado, Rosa M

    2011-12-01

    The concentration decay curves for the adsorption of phenol on organobentonite were obtained in an agitated tank batch adsorber. The experimental adsorption rate data were interpreted with diffusional models as well as first-order, second-order and Langmuir kinetic models. The surface diffusion model adjusted the data quite well, revealing that the overall rate of adsorption was controlled by surface diffusion. Furthermore, the surface diffusion coefficient increased raising the mass of phenol adsorbed at equilibrium and was independent of the particle diameter in the range 0.042-0.0126 cm. It was demonstrated that the overall rate of adsorption was essentially not affected by the external mass transfer. The second-order and the Langmuir kinetic models fitted the experimental data quite well; however, the kinetic constants of both models varied without any physical meaning while increasing the particle size and the mass of phenol adsorbed at equilibrium.

  11. Removal of phenol from aqueous solution using carbonized Terminalia chebula-activated carbon: process parametric optimization using conventional method and Taguchi's experimental design, adsorption kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Prateek; Kumar, Arvind

    2012-12-01

    In the present paper, the phenol removal from wastewater was investigated using agri-based adsorbent: Terminalia chebula-activated carbon (TCAC) produced by carbonization of Terminalia chebula (TC) in air-controlled atmosphere at 600 °C for 4 h. The surface area of TCAC was measured as 364 m2/g using BET method. The surface characteristic of TCAC was analyzed based on the value of point of zero charge. The effect of parameters such as TCAC dosage, pH, initial concentration of phenol, time of contact and temperature on the sorption of phenol by TCAC was investigated using conventional method and Taguchi experimental design. The total adsorption capacity of phenol was obtained as 36.77 mg/g using Langmuir model at the temperature of 30 °C at pH = 5.5. The maximum removal of phenol (294.86 mg/g) was obtained using Taguchi's method. The equilibrium study of phenol on TCAC showed that experimental data fitted well to R-P model. The results also showed that kinetic data were followed more closely the pseudo-first-order model. The results of thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption of phenol on TCAC was spontaneous and an exothermic in nature.

  12. Generalized adsorption isotherms for molecular and dissociative adsorption of a polar molecular species on two polar surface geometries: Perovskite (100) (Pm-3m) and fluorite (111) (Fm-3m)

    DOE PAGES

    Danielson, Thomas; Hin, Celine; Savara, Aditya

    2016-08-10

    Lattice based kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations have been used to determine a functional form for the second order adsorption isotherms on two commonly investigated crystal surfaces: the (111) fluorite surface and the (100) perovskite surface which has the same geometric symmetry as the NaCl (100) surface. The functional form is generalized to be applicable to all values of the equilibrium constant by a shift along the pressure axis. Functions have been determined for estimating the pressure at which a desired coverage would be achieved and for estimating the coverage at a certain pressure. The generalized form has been calculatedmore » by investigating the surface adsorbate coverage across a range of thermodynamic equilibrium constants that span the range 10-26 to 1013. Finally, the equations have been shown to be general for any value of the adsorption equilibrium constant.« less

  13. Generalized adsorption isotherms for molecular and dissociative adsorption of a polar molecular species on two polar surface geometries: Perovskite (100) (Pm-3m) and fluorite (111) (Fm-3m)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Thomas; Hin, Celine; Savara, Aditya

    2016-08-01

    Lattice based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used to determine a functional form for the second order adsorption isotherms on two commonly investigated crystal surfaces: the (111) fluorite surface and the (100) perovskite surface which has the same geometric symmetry as the NaCl (100) surface. The functional form is generalized to be applicable to all values of the equilibrium constant by a shift along the pressure axis. Functions have been determined for estimating the pressure at which a desired coverage would be achieved and, conversely, for estimating the coverage at a certain pressure. The generalized form has been calculated by investigating the surface adsorbate coverage across a range of thermodynamic equilibrium constants that span the range 10-26 to 1013. The equations have been shown to be general for any value of the adsorption equilibrium constant.

  14. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    is reflected in decreasing equilibrium constants for selenite with increasing adsorption density and both experimental observations and modeling results suggest that manganese dioxide has fewer sites of higher energy for selenite adsorption than amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. Modeling and interpreting the adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on the oxides are made difficult by the lack of constraint in choosing surface species and the fact that equally good fits can be obtained with different surface species. Finally, predictions of anion competition using the model results from single adsorbate systems are not very successful because the model does not account for surface site heterogeneity. Selenite adsorption data from a multi-adsorbate system could be fit if the equilibrium constant for selenite is decreased with increasing anion adsorption density. ?? 1990.

  15. Predicting heavy metals' adsorption edges and adsorption isotherms on MnO2 with the parameters determined from Langmuir kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinghai; Xiao, Zhongjin; Xiong, Xinmei; Zhou, Gongming; Guan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Although surface complexation models have been widely used to describe the adsorption of heavy metals, few studies have verified the feasibility of modeling the adsorption kinetics, edge, and isotherm data with one pH-independent parameter. A close inspection of the derivation process of Langmuir isotherm revealed that the equilibrium constant derived from the Langmuir kinetic model, KS-kinetic, is theoretically equivalent to the adsorption constant in Langmuir isotherm, KS-Langmuir. The modified Langmuir kinetic model (MLK model) and modified Langmuir isotherm model (MLI model) incorporating pH factor were developed. The MLK model was employed to simulate the adsorption kinetics of Cu(II), Co(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) on MnO2 at pH3.2 or 3.3 to get the values of KS-kinetic. The adsorption edges of heavy metals could be modeled with the modified metal partitioning model (MMP model), and the values of KS-Langmuir were obtained. The values of KS-kinetic and KS-Langmuir are very close to each other, validating that the constants obtained by these two methods are basically the same. The MMP model with KS-kinetic constants could predict the adsorption edges of heavy metals on MnO2 very well at different adsorbent/adsorbate concentrations. Moreover, the adsorption isotherms of heavy metals on MnO2 at various pH levels could be predicted reasonably well by the MLI model with the KS-kinetic constants.

  16. Removal of aluminium from aqueous solutions using PAN-based adsorbents: characterisation, kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Aly, Zaynab; Graulet, Adrien; Scales, Nicholas; Hanley, Tracey

    2014-03-01

    Economic adsorbents in bead form were fabricated and utilised for the adsorption of Al(3+) from aqueous solutions. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) beads, PAN powder and the thermally treated PAN beads (250 °C/48 h/Ar and 600 °C/48 h/Ar-H2) were characterised using different techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, specific surface analysis (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller), thermogravimetric analysis as well as scanning electron microscopy. Effects of pH, contact time, kinetics and adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were investigated in batch mode experiments. Aluminium kinetic data best fit the Lagergren pseudo-second-order adsorption model indicating a one-step, surface-only, adsorption process with chemisorption being the rate limiting step. Equilibrium adsorption data followed a Langmuir adsorption model with fairly low monolayer adsorption capacities suitable for freshwater clean-up only. Various constants including thermodynamic constants were evaluated from the experimental results obtained at 20, 40 and 60 °C. Positive values of ΔH° indicated that the adsorption of Al(3+) onto all three adsorbents was endothermic with less energy input required for PAN powder compared to PAN beads and low-temperature thermally treated PAN. Negative ΔG° values indicated that the aluminium adsorption process was spontaneous for all adsorbents examined.

  17. Adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solutions onto modified wheat residue: characteristics, kinetic and column studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Wenyi; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yu; Ni, Shouqing

    2009-04-01

    Kinetic and column adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solution using modified wheat residue (MWS) as an adsorbent were studied in a batch reactor. The respective characteristic rate constants and activation energy were presented after linear and non-linear fitting. In addition, the effects of influent concentration of phosphate and flow rates on the column adsorption were also investigated. The results showed that the adsorption process could reach equilibrium in 10-15 min, and the pseudo-second-order equation generated the best agreement with experimental data for adsorption systems. The activation energy was 3.39 kJ mol(-1) indicating that the synthesis process was a physical adsorption. In the column tests, the increase of influent concentration and flow rate both decreased the breakthrough time, and the MWS-packed column exhibited excellent phosphate removal from aqueous solution. These results provide strong evidence of the potential of MWS for the technological applications of phosphate removal from aqueous solutions.

  18. The Conceptual Change Approach to Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts (e.g. dynamic nature of equilibrium, definition of equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, qualitative interpreting of equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions). This…

  19. Temperature dependence of the NO3 absorption cross-section above 298 K and determination of the equilibrium constant for NO3 + NO2 <--> N2O5 at atmospherically relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Osthoff, Hans D; Pilling, Michael J; Ravishankara, A R; Brown, Steven S

    2007-11-21

    The reaction NO3 + NO2 <--> N2O5 was studied over the 278-323 K temperature range. Concentrations of NO3, N2O5, and NO2 were measured simultaneously in a 3-channel cavity ring-down spectrometer. Equilibrium constants were determined over atmospherically relevant concentration ranges of the three species in both synthetic samples in the laboratory and ambient air samples in the field. A fit to the laboratory data yielded Keq = (5.1 +/- 0.8) x 10(-27) x e((10871 +/- 46)/7) cm3 molecule(-1). The temperature dependence of the NO3 absorption cross-section at 662 nm was investigated over the 298-388 K temperature range. The line width was found to be independent of temperature, in agreement with previous results. New data for the peak cross section (662.2 nm, vacuum wavelength) were combined with previous measurements in the 200 K-298 K region. A least-squares fit to the combined data gave sigma = [(4.582 +/- 0.096) - (0.00796 +/- 0.00031) x T] x 10(-17) cm2 molecule(-1).

  20. Adsorption of Ba2+ by Ca-exchange clinoptilolite tuff and montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Chávez, M L; de Pablo, L; García, T A

    2010-03-15

    The adsorption of barium by Ca-exchanged clinoptilolite and montmorillonite is presented. The kinetics of adsorption of Ba(2+) were evaluated contacting 1g portion of each adsorber with 100mL 0.1N BaCl(2) for 200 h. Adsorption by Ca-clinoptilolite is defined by second-order kinetics of rate constant K(v) 8.232 x 10(-2) g mg(-1)h(-1) and maximum removal of 71.885 mg g(-1). It is a two-stage process initiated by a rapid uptake of Ba(2+) followed by more moderate kinetics. The adsorption isotherms were determined contacting 0.2g of each adsorber with 10 mL 0.1-0.005N BaCl(2)+CaCl(2) solution, Ba(2+)/Ca(2+) ratio 1, for periods of 7 days for the tuff and 2 days for the clay. The equilibrium adsorption is described by the Langmuir model, of equilibrium constant K 0.0151 L mg(-1) and maximum adsorption of 15.29 mg g(-1). The adsorption of Ba(2+) by Ca-exchanged montmorillonite also follows a second-order reaction of rate constant K(v) 3.179 x 10(-2) g mg(-1)h(-1), and calculated separation of 36.74 mg g(-1); the Langmuir isotherm is defined by the constant K 0.034 L mg(-1) and maximum adsorption of 15.29 mg g(-1). X-ray diffraction shows that the exchange of Ba(2+) modifies the d(001) of Ca-montmorillonite from 15.4 to 12.4A. PMID:19926210

  1. Predicting the adsorption capacity and isotherm curvature of organic compounds onto activated carbons in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Hung, H W; Lin, T F

    2006-03-01

    A simple approach to predict the adsorption capacity and isotherm curvature of organic compounds onto activated carbon in natural water was investigated. A combination of the well-known equivalent background compound (EBC), and the simplified competitive adsorption model (SCAM) was employed to delineate the equilibrium capacity. This SCAM-EBC approach may reduce the numerical and experimental effort to obtain the parameters required to predict the adsorption capacity for a specific adsorption system. Several sets of experimental data, including weakly adsorbing (MTBE), strongly adsorbing compounds (TCP, atrazine, and chloroform), and two taste and odor causing compounds (MIB and geosmin) onto different activated carbons in three natural waters and a synthetic groundwater, were tested to verify the SCAM-EBC approach. Based on the approach, a parameter, called relative adsorptivity, describing the adsorption preference of the adsorbent between EBC and the target compound was employed to simulate the isotherm curvature in natural water. The relative adsorptivity of the SCAM-EBC approach is constant and can be directly obtained from the SCAM-EBC parameters in a specific adsorption system. The potential and extent of isotherm curvature can be simulated by only changing the parameter of relative adsorptivity. The marked isotherm curvature was found while the relative adsorptivity is larger than 2.0 to 4.0 for all the systems tested.

  2. Radium, Thorium and Radioactive Lead Isotopes in Groundwaters: Application to the in Situ Determination of Adsorption-Desorption Rate Constants and Retardation Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswami, S.; Graustein, William C.; Turekian, Karl K.; Dowd, John F.

    1982-12-01

    Five groundwater samples taken from different Hydrogeologie settings in Connecticut were analyzed for major cation chemistry and the concentration of U and Th decay series nuclides 238U, 234Th, 226Ra, 222Rn, 210Pb, 210Po, 232Th, 228Ra, 228Th, and 224Ra. The concentration of 222Rn in the waters ranged between 103 and 104 dpm l-1 and was three to four orders of magnitude greater than that of the short-lived alpha daughters 224Ra, 228Ra, and 234Th, even though the rates of supply of these four nuclides to solution are expected to be similar. We infer that sorption removes radium and thorium from these groundwaters on a time scale of 3 minutes or less. The (224Ra/228Ra) and (234Th/228Th) activity ratios in these waters indicate that desorption of these nuclides occurs on a time scale of a week or less and that equilibrium between solution and surface phases is established. In situ retardation factors for radium, thorium, and lead may therefore be calculated directly from the isotopic data; values range from 4,500 to 200,000. Neither sorption time scales nor retardation factors are strongly dependent on the nuclide or on hydrogeology of the aquifer. Since our study includes nuclides with diverse chemical properties, we suggest that other uncomplexed heavy metals and transuranic elements will also behave in a manner similar to those measured here. The approach presented here should therefore find application in developing site-specific models of the transport of radioactive or stable elemental waste through water-saturated media.

  3. Adsorption of methylene blue from aqueous solution on pyrolyzed petrified sediment.

    PubMed

    Aroguz, Ayse Z; Gulen, J; Evers, R H

    2008-04-01

    The adsorption kinetics of methylene blue on pyrolyzed petrified sediment (PPS) has been performed using a batch-adsorption technique. The effects of various experimental parameters, such as initial dye concentration, contact time, and temperature were investigated. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data. The best correlation coefficient was obtained using the pseudo first-order kinetic model, which shows that the adsorption of methylene blue followed the pseudo-first-order rate expression and the rate constants were evaluated. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were determined. It was found that the data fitted well to Langmuir and Freundlich models. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated for the adsorption of methylene blue onto pyrolyzed sediment. It was found about 8.5 kJ mol(-1). Thermodynamics parameters DeltaG(o), DeltaH(o), DeltaS(o) were calculated, indicating that this process can be spontaneous and endothermic. The adsorption enthalpy and entropy were found as 14-18.5 kJ mol(-1) and 52.8-67 J mol(-1) K(-1), respectively. The results obtained from the adsorption process using PPS as adsorbent was subjected to student's t-test.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-03-03

    Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral alumino-silicate surfaces, namely the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbed as a bi-dentate innersphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption at the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol-1) was significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol-1), which was attributed to differences in surface functional groups and to the ability of the orthoclase surface to dissolve a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compared favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to 2 carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates in alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

  5. Adsorption of a non-enveloped mammalian virus to functionalized nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Mi, Xue; Heldt, Caryn L

    2014-09-01

    In the pursuit of finding superior methods to remove pathogens from drinking water, this study examines the adsorption of a non-enveloped, mammalian virus to highly charged nanofibers. N-[(2-Hydroxyl-3-trimethylammonium) propyl] chitosan (HTCC) nanofibers were synthesized by the addition of a quaternary amine to chitosan. HTCC was blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to produce nanofibers by electrospinning. The nanofibers were stabilized against water by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. When studied in the range of 100-200nm in diameter, larger fibers were able to adsorb about 90% more virus than smaller fibers. The kinetics of the adsorption was modeled with pseudo-first order kinetics and equilibrium was achieved in as little as 10min. Equilibrium adsorption was modeled with the Freundlich isotherm with a Freundlich constant of 1.4. When the Freundlich constant deviates from 1, this demonstrates that there is heterogeneity at the adsorption surface. The heterogeneity likely occurs at the nanofiber surface since a polymeric blend of two polymers was used to electrospin the nanofibers. The model mammalian virus, porcine parvovirus (PPV), has a fairly homogeneous, icosahedral protein capsid available for adsorption. The fast adsorption kinetics and high capacity of the nanofibers make HTCC/PVA a potential filter material for the removal of pathogens from drinking water.

  6. Humidity adsorption kinetics of a trypsin gel film.

    PubMed

    Okur, Salih; Ceylan, Cagatay; Culcular, Evren

    2012-02-15

    This study focuses on the humidity adsorption kinetics of an isopropanol-induced and pH-triggered bovine pancreatic trypsin gel (BPTG). The BPTG was adsorbed on a gold coated Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) substrate with a thickness of 376 nm. The morphology of the film was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). QCM was used to investigate the humidity sensing properties of the BPTG film. The response of the humidity sensor was explained using the Langmuir model. The average values of adsorption and desorption rates between 11% RH (relative humidity) and 97% RH were calculated as 2482.5 M(-1) s(-1) and 0.02 s(-1), respectively. The equilibrium constant and average Gibbs Free Energy of humidity adsorption and desorption cycles were obtained as 133,000 and -11.8 kJ/mol, respectively.

  7. Adsorption of herbicide paraquat by clay mineral regenerated from spent bleaching earth.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Lai, Chi-Wei

    2006-06-30

    The adsorption of herbicide paraquat (as model adsorbate) in aqueous solution onto regenerated clay mineral from bleaching earth waste has been studied in a batch reaction system. The adsorption rate has been investigated under the controlled process parameters including initial pH, salinity and temperature. Based on the high affinity between cationic paraquat and clay mineral, a pseudo-second order model has been developed using experimental data to predict the rate constant of adsorption, and equilibrium adsorption capacity. The results showed that the adsorption process could be satisfactorily described with the reaction model and were reasonably explained by assuming a competitive adsorption mechanism in the ion exchange process. Further, the fitted adsorption capacity at equilibrium decreased with increasing temperature. It implied that the strong interaction might play an important role in the paraquat-clay system. Overall, the results from this study demonstrated that the clay resource regenerated from bleaching earth waste could be used as a low-cost mineral adsorbent for the removal of environmental cationic organic pollutants from the aqueous solution.

  8. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  9. Arsenic(III, V) adsorption on a goethite-based adsorbent in the presence of major co-existing ions: Modeling competitive adsorption consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M.; Fukushi, Keisuke; Green, Peter G.; Darby, Jeannie L.

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption of the two oxyanions, arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)), on a common goethite-based granular porous adsorbent is studied in the presence of major co-existing ions in groundwater (i.e., phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, carbonate, magnesium, and calcium) and predicted using the extended triple layer model (ETLM), a dipole modified single-site triple layer surface complexation model consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence. Surface species of all ions were selected according to the previous ETLM studies and published experimental spectroscopic/theoretical molecular information. The adsorption equilibrium constants for all ions were determined using adsorption data obtained in single-solute systems. The adsorption equilibrium constants referenced to the site-occupancy standard state (indicated by Kθ) were compared with those for goethite in the literature if available. The values of these constants for the goethite-based adsorbent are found to be close to the values for goethite previously studied. These "constrained" adsorption equilibrium constants determined in single-solute systems were used in the ETLM to predict the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with the co-existing ions in binary-solute systems. The ETLM is capable of predicting As(III, V) adsorption in the presence of oxyanions (phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, and carbonate). This study presents the first successful and systematic prediction of the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with these oxyanions using the ETLM. The ETLM prediction of surface (and aqueous) speciation also provides insights into the distinct adsorption behavior of As(III, V) in the presence of the oxyanions. Magnesium and calcium significantly enhanced As(V) adsorption at higher pH values, while they had little effect on As(III) adsorption. The enhanced adsorption of As(V), however, could not be predicted by the ETLM using the surface species proposed in previous ETLM studies. Further studies

  10. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  11. Adsorption of dyes onto activated carbon prepared from olive stones.

    PubMed

    Najar-Souissi, Souad; Ouederni, Abdelmottaleb; Ratel, Abdelhamid

    2005-01-01

    Activated carbon was produced from olive stones(OSAC) by a physical process in two steps. The adsorption character of this activated carbon was tested on three colour dyes molecules in aqueous solution: Methylene blue (MB), Rhodamine B (RB) and Congo Red(CR). The adsorption equilibrium was studied through isotherms construction at 30 degrees C, which were well described by Langmuir model. The adsorption capacity on the OSAC was estimated to be 303 mg/g, 217 mg/g and 167 mg/g respectively for MB, RB and CR. This activated carbon has a similar adsorption properties to that of commercial ones and show the same adsorption performances. The adsorption kinetics of the MB molecule in aqueous solution at different initial concentrations by OSAC was also studied. Kinetic experiments were well fitted by a simple intra-particle diffusion model. The measured kinetics constant was influenced by the initial concentration and we found the following correlation: Kid = 1.55 C0(0.51). PMID:16465895

  12. Study of adsorption of Neon on open Carbon nanohorns aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Carl Andrew

    Adsorption isotherms can be used to determine surface area of a substrate and the heat released when adsorption occurs. Our measurements are done determining the equilibrium pressures corresponding to a given amount of gas adsorbed on a substrate at constant temperature. The adsorption studies were done on aggregates of open dahlia-like carbon nanohorns. The nanohorns were oxidized for 9 hours at 550 °C to open them up and render their interior space accessible for adsorption. Volumetric adsorption measurements of Ne were performed at twelve different temperatures between 19 K and 48 K. The isotherms showed two substeps. The first substep corresponds to adsorption on the high energy binding sites in the interior of the nanohorns, near the tip. The second substep corresponds to low energy binding sites both on the outside of the nanotubes and inside the nanotube away from the tip. The isosteric heat measurements obtained from the isotherm data also shows these two distinct substeps. The effective surface area of the open nanotubes was determined from the isotherms using the point-B method. The isosteric heat and surface area data for neon on open nanohorns were compared to two similar experiments of neon adsorbed on aggregates of closed nanohorns.

  13. Carbon dioxide adsorption in Brazilian coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Luciano Soares; Andre L.B. Oberziner; Humberto J. Jose; Alirio E. Rodrigues; Regina F.P.M. Moreira

    2007-01-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is one of the most important greenhouse gases. In the period between 1980 and 1998, CO{sub 2} emissions increased more than 21% and projections suggest that the emissions will continue to increase globally by 2.2% between 2000 and 2020 and 3.3% in the developed countries. The sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep unminable coal beds is one of the more promising of several methods of geological sequestration that are currently being investigated. CO{sub 2} can adsorb onto coal, and there are several studies demonstrating that CO{sub 2} dissolves in coals and swells them. At very low pressures (P {lt} 1 bar), CO{sub 2} dissolution does not seem to be a problem; however, high pressures are necessary for CO{sub 2} sequestration (P {gt} 50 bar). In this study, we evaluated the kinetics and equilibrium of sorption of CO{sub 2} on Brazilian coals at low pressures. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm at room temperature (30{sup o}C) was measured through the static method. The results showed that the Freundlich model or the Langmuir model is suitable to describe the equilibrium experimental results. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of Brazilian coals are in the range of 0.089-0.186 mmol CO{sub 2}/g, which are typical values for coals with high ash content. The dynamics of adsorption in a fixed-bed column that contains granular coal (particle sizes of 0.8, 2.4, and 4.8 mm) showed that the adsorption rate is fast and a mathematical model was developed to describe the CO{sub 2} dynamics of the adsorption in a fixed-bed column. The linear driving force (LDF) was used to describe the rate of adsorption and the mass-transfer constants of the LDF model (K{sub s}) are in the range of 1.0-2.0 min{sup -1}. 29 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Alcohol adsorption on softwood lignin from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Ladisch, M R; Ladisch, C M

    1990-02-01

    Lignin prepared by acid and enzyme hydrolysis of a softwood mixture adsorbs acetone, butanol, and other alcohols while showing only a slight uptake of glucose. Adsorption of butanol is independent of temperature in the range of 30-65 degrees C. The Polanyi theory fits adsorption for the linear alcohols methanol through hexanol with values of DeltaS and Delta(mu) ranging from 2.6 to 26 J mol(-1) K(-1)and -0.8 to -8 kJ/mol. The adsorption capacity is given by Q (g alcohol/g lignin) = KC(*). Where C(*) is the equilibrium alcohol concentration (g/mL), K = epsilon(W)exp (Delta/R), and epsilon(w) is the porosity of the lignin (0.23-0.42 mL/g). The value of the adsorption capacity constant K for n-butanol ranges from 1.3 to 2.7 mL/g on sorbent containing 26-72% lignin, while ethanol is 0.5-0.73, acetone is 0.62-1.0, and glucose is 0.35. Adsorption is shown to occur through combined hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions of the alkyl and hydroxyl groups, respectively, of the adsorbate with the lignin. Consequently, for the alcohols methanol to hexanol, we present the capacity constant K[=K(R) + K(OH)] as a sum of an alky! adsorption constant (0.1-9.5 mL/g) and a hydrophilic (0.40-0.50 mL/g) contribution. This approach may be applicable to organic acids. Lignin's sorbent properties have potential to moderate product inhibition in the anaerobic acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. PMID:18592519

  15. Partition and water/oil adsorption of some surfactants.

    PubMed

    Tadmouri, Rawad; Zedde, Chantal; Routaboul, Corinne; Micheau, Jean-Claude; Pimienta, Véronique

    2008-10-01

    Adsorption isotherms have been determined at the water/oil interface for five biphasic systems involving surfactants (non-ionic and ionic) present in both phases at partition equilibrium. The systems studied were polyoxyethylene(23)lauryl ether (Brij35) in water/hexane and four ionic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and a series of three tetraalkylammonium dodecylsulfate (TEADS, TPADS, and TBADS) in water/CH 2Cl 2. Interfacial tension measurements performed at the water/air and water/oil interfaces provided all the necessary information for the determination of the adsorption parameters by taking partition into account. These measurements also allowed the comparison of the adsorption properties at both interfaces which showed an increase of the adsorption equilibrium constant and a decrease of the maximum surface concentration at the water/oil interface compared to water/air. The values of the critical aggregation concentration showed, in all cases, that only the surfactant dissolved in the aqueous phase contribute to the decrease of the water/oil interfacial tension. In the case of the four ionic surfactants, the critical aggregation concentration obtained in biphasic conditions were lowered because of the formation of mixed surfactant-CH 2Cl 2 aggregates.

  16. Miscible viscous fingering with linear adsorption on the porous matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M.; Martin, M.; De Wit, A.

    2007-07-01

    Viscous fingering between miscible fluids of different viscosities can affect the dispersion of finite samples in porous media. In some applications, as typically in chromatographic separations or pollutant dispersion in underground aquifers, adsorption onto the porous matrix of solutes (the concentration of which rules the viscosity of the solution) can affect the fingering dynamics. Here, we investigate theoretically the influence of such an adsorption on the stability and nonlinear properties of viscous samples displaced in a two-dimensional system by a less viscous and miscible carrying fluid. The model is based on Darcy's law for the evolution of the fluid velocity coupled to a diffusion-convection equation for the concentration of a solute in the mobile phase inside the porous medium. The adsorption-desorption dynamics of the solute onto the stationary phase is assumed to be at equilibrium, to follow a linear isotherm and is characterized by a retention parameter κ' equal to the adsorption-desorption equilibrium constant K multiplied by the phase ratio F. In practice, retention on the porous matrix renormalizes the log-mobility ratio by a factor (1+κ'). Correspondingly, a linear stability analysis and nonlinear simulations of the model show that an increase of κ' leads to a stabilization of viscous fingering with fingers appearing on a dimensional time scale multiplied by (1+κ')3 and with a dimensional wavelength multiplied by (1+κ').

  17. In vitro study on fluoxetine adsorption onto charcoal using potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Atta-Politou, J; Skopelitis, I; Apatsidis, I; Koupparis, M

    2001-01-01

    This in vitro investigation was performed to study the adsorption rate constant as well as the adsorption characteristics of fluoxetine (F) to activated charcoal and its commercial formulation Carbomix powder in simulated gastric (pH 1.2) fluid environment. Ion-selective electrode (ISE) potentiometry, based on the selective, direct and continuous monitoring of F with an F-ISE constructed in our laboratory was used. The method used in the kinetic experiments consists of the rapid addition of a slurry containing the charcoal into the drug solution under stirring and continuous recording of the F-ISE potential until the establishment of equilibrium. The free ionized drug concentration at appropriate time intervals was calculated from the recorded adsorption curve and the apparent adsorption rate constant was estimated assuming pseudo first order kinetics. Within run R.S.D. of the estimates ranged from 0.24 to 11.5%, while between run R.S.D. (n=3-4) ranged from 0.90 to 13.8%. A linear relationship was found between the apparent adsorption rate constants and the amount of charcoal used with slopes (+/-S.D.) for activated charcoal and Carbomix equal to 1.14(+/-0.21) and 0.146(+/-0.009) s(-1)g(-1), respectively. Successive additions of microvolumes of F solution were made into a charcoal slurry with measurement of the F-ISE potential at equilibrium. The maximum adsorption capacity values (+/-S.D.) of activated charcoal and Carbomix were 254.8+/-1.8 and 405+/-41 mg/g, respectively while the affinity constant values (+/-S.D.) were 45.6+/-2.2 and 55.5+/-2.9 l/g, respectively. The adsorption of F to charcoals was rapid and for amounts of charcoal 10 times greater than the amount of the drug, 95% of F was adsorbed within the first 5 min. Relative to the toxic and lethal doses in cases of F intoxications, both types of charcoals tested adsorbed effectively F at gastric pH. Carbomix can be considered as appropriate charcoal formulation for medical treatment in cases of F

  18. Entropically favored adsorption of cellulosic molecules onto carbon materials through hydrophobic functionalities.

    PubMed

    Yabushita, Mizuho; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Hasegawa, Jun-Ya; Hara, Kenji; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-based materials have attracted interest as high-performance catalysts for the aqueous-phase conversion of cellulose. The adsorption of β-glucans plays a crucial role in the catalytic performance of carbons, although the primary driving force and details of the adsorption process remain unclear. This study demonstrates that adsorption occurs at hydrophobic sites on the carbon surface and that hydrophilic groups are not involved. Analysis of adsorption temperature dependence also reveals that the entropy change associated with adsorption is positive. Our results indicate that adsorption occurs by entropically driven hydrophobic interactions in addition to CH-π hydrogen bonding. These same CH-π hydrogen bonds are also confirmed by DFT calculations. The adsorption of β-glucans on carbons is significantly stronger than the affinity between β-glucans. The adsorption equilibrium constants of β-glucans on carbons increase exponentially with increasing degrees of polymerization, which supports the theory of strong interactions between the carbon and the long β-glucans found in cellulose. PMID:24644071

  19. Entropically favored adsorption of cellulosic molecules onto carbon materials through hydrophobic functionalities.

    PubMed

    Yabushita, Mizuho; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Hasegawa, Jun-Ya; Hara, Kenji; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-based materials have attracted interest as high-performance catalysts for the aqueous-phase conversion of cellulose. The adsorption of β-glucans plays a crucial role in the catalytic performance of carbons, although the primary driving force and details of the adsorption process remain unclear. This study demonstrates that adsorption occurs at hydrophobic sites on the carbon surface and that hydrophilic groups are not involved. Analysis of adsorption temperature dependence also reveals that the entropy change associated with adsorption is positive. Our results indicate that adsorption occurs by entropically driven hydrophobic interactions in addition to CH-π hydrogen bonding. These same CH-π hydrogen bonds are also confirmed by DFT calculations. The adsorption of β-glucans on carbons is significantly stronger than the affinity between β-glucans. The adsorption equilibrium constants of β-glucans on carbons increase exponentially with increasing degrees of polymerization, which supports the theory of strong interactions between the carbon and the long β-glucans found in cellulose.

  20. The adsorption of plutonium IV and V on goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Arthur L.; Murray, James W.; Sibley, Thomas H.

    1985-11-01

    The adsorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) on goethite (αFeOOH) from NaNO 3 solution shows distinct differences related to the different hydrolytic character of these two oxidation states. Under similar solution conditions, the adsorption edge of the more strongly hydrolyzable Pu(IV) occurs in the pH range 3 to 5 while that for Pu(V) is at pH 5 to 7. The adsorption edge for Pu(V) shifts with time to lower pH values and this appears to be due to the reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) in the presence of the goethite surface. These results suggest that redox transformations may be an important aspect of Pu adsorption chemistry and the resulting scavenging of Pu from natural waters. Increasing ionic strength (from 0.1 M to 3 M NaCl or NaNO 3 and 0.03 M to 0.3 M Na 2SO 4) did not influence Pu(IV) or Pu(V) adsorption. In the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Pu(V) reduction to Pu(IV) occurred in solution. Pu(IV) adsorption on goethite decreased by 30% in the presence of 240 ppm natural DOC found in Soap Lake, Washington waters. Increasing concentrations of carbonate ligands decreased Pu(IV) and Pu(V) adsorption on goethite, with an alkalinity of 1000 meq/l totally inhibiting adsorption. The Pu-goethite adsorption system provides the data base for developing a thermodynamic model of Pu interaction with an oxide surface and with dissolved ligands, using the MINEQL computer program. From the model calculations we determined equilibrium constants for the adsorption of Pu(IV) hydrolysis species. The model was then applied to Pu adsorption in carbonate media to see how the presence of CO 3-2 could influence the mobility of Pu. The decrease in adsorption appears to be due to formation of a Pu-CO 3 complex. Model calculations were used to predict what the adsorption curves would look like if Pu-CO 3 complexes formed.

  1. Kinetic study for copper adsorption onto soil minerals in the absence and presence of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Komy, Zanaty R; Shaker, Ali M; Heggy, Said E M; El-Sayed, Mohamed E A

    2014-03-01

    Equilibrium and kinetics of Cu(2+) adsorption onto soil minerals (kaolinite and hematite) in the absence and presence of humic acid have been investigated under various conditions. The influences of ionic strength, pH and solution cations on the rate of the adsorption have been studied. The rate and the amount of adsorbed Cu(2+) onto soil minerals in the absence or the presence of humic acid increased with decreasing ionic strength, increasing pH and in the presence of the background electrolyte K(+) rather than Ca(2+). Humic acid enhanced the rate and the amount of adsorbed Cu(2+) onto soil minerals. The adsorption equilibrium data showed that adsorption behavior of Cu(2+) could be described more reasonably by Langmiur adsorption isotherm than Freundlich isotherm in the absence or presence of humic acid. Pseudo first and pseudo second order models were used to evaluate the kinetic data and the rate constants. The results indicated that the adsorption of Cu(2+) onto hematite and kaolinite in the absence and presence of humic acid is more conforming to pseudo second order kinetics.

  2. Biosorption studies on waste cotton seed for cationic dyes sequestration: equilibrium and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivarajasekar, N.; Baskar, R.; Ragu, T.; Sarika, K.; Preethi, N.; Radhika, T.

    2016-01-01

    The immature Gossypium hirsutum seeds—an agricultural waste was converted into a novel adsorbent and its effectiveness for cationic dyes removal was discussed in this study. Characterization revealed that sulfuric acid activated waste Gossypium hirsutum seed (WGSAB) contains surface area 496 m2 g-1. The ability of WGSAB to adsorb basic red 2 (BR2) and basic violet 3 (BV3) from aqueous solutions has been studied. Batch adsorption studies were carried out at different initial dye concentrations (100-300 mg l-1), contact time (1-5 h), pH (2-12) and temperature (293-323 K) to understand the adsorption mechanism. Adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich and Toth adsorption isotherms. Equilibrium data of the adsorption process fitted very well to the Toth model for both dyes. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity was 66.69 mg g-1 for BV3 and 50.11 mg g-1 for BR2 at optimum conditions. The near unity value of Toth isotherm constant (BR2: 0.999 and BV3: 1.0) indicates that WGSAB surface is heterogeneous in nature. The maximum adsorption capacity predicted by Toth isotherm of BV3 (66.699 mg g-1) is higher than BR2 (50.310 mg g-1). The kinetic investigation revealed that the BR2 and BV3 were chemisorbed on WGSAB surface following Avrami fractional order kinetics. Further, the fractional order and rate constant values are almost similar for every concentration in both the dyes. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH 0, ΔS 0 and ΔG 0 were evaluated. The dye adsorption process was found to be spontaneous and endothermic for the two dyes. Regeneration of WGSAB exhausted by the two dyes could be possible via acetic acid as elutant.

  3. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of sulforaphane adsorption on macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Wu; Lei, Zhang; Jianwei, Mao; Shiwang, Liu; Jun, Huang; Yuru, You; Lehe, Mei

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of sulforaphane (SF) adsorption onto macroporous resin in aqueous phase were studied. The SP850 resin was screened as the appropriate resin for SF purification. From the equilibrium studies, the Redlich-Peterson model was found to be the best for description of the adsorption behavior of SF onto SP850 resin, followed by the Freundlich model and the Langmuir model. Batch equilibrium experiments demonstrated that, in the examined temperature range, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of SP850 resin decreased with increasing adsorption temperature. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of SF was a physical, exothermic, and spontaneous process. The adsorption kinetics revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was suitable to characterize the kinetics of adsorption of SF onto SP850. Finally, the intra-particle diffusion model demonstrated that SF diffused quickly into macropores, and that diffusion slowed down in the meso- and micropores. PMID:27391585

  4. A fundamental study of the impact of pressure on the adsorption mechanism in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2016-07-29

    A fundamental investigation of the pressure effect on individual adsorption sites was undertaken based on adsorption energy distribution and adsorption isotherm measurements. For this purpose, we measured adsorption equilibrium data at pressures ranging from 100 to 1000bar at constant flow and over a wide concentration range for three low-molecular-weight solutes, antipyrine, sodium 2-naphthalenesulfonate, and benzyltriethylammonium chloride, on an Eternity C18 stationary phase. The adsorption energy distribution was bimodal for all solutes, remaining clearly so at all pressures. The bi-Langmuir model best described the adsorption in these systems and two types of adsorption sites were identified, one with a low and another with a high energy of interaction. Evidence exists that the low-energy interactions occur at the interface between the mobile and stationary phases and that the high-energy interactions occur nearer the silica surface, deeper in the C18 layer. The contribution of each type of adsorption site to the retention factor was calculated and the change in solute molar volume from the mobile to stationary phase during the adsorption process was estimated for each type of site. The change in solute molar volume was 2-4 times larger at the high-energy site, likely because of the greater loss of solute solvation layer when penetrating deeper into the C18 layer. The association equilibrium constant increased with increasing pressure while the saturation capacity of the low-energy site remained almost unchanged. The observed increase in saturation capacity for the high-energy site did not affect the column loading capacity, which was almost identical at 50- and 950-bar pressure drops over the column.

  5. Liquid Phase Adsorption of α-Tocopherol by Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Ming, Chu Chi; Sundang, Murni

    α-Tocopherol or commonly called vitamin E can be found in major commercial vegetable oils such as soya oil and palm oil. However the existence in these oil is in low concentration. The recovery of low concentration of α-tocopherol from palm oils is increasingly popular. Adsorption technique for the recovery of α-tocopherol from palm oil is believed to be much lower in cost and more effective. As a case study in this work, activated carbon is chosen as the adsorbent and ethanol as the solvent. The adsorption equilibria of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was conducted in batch and the concentration of α-tocopherol was identified by LCMS. Langmuirian monolayer adsorption theory was used for the analysis of the isotherm equilibria. The adsorptivity of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was identified. The adsorption equilibria at low concentration found to be linear. The breakthrough curve was then generated using model assuming isothermal, single transition trace component with intraparticle diffusion. Sensitivity test on the curve indicated that the system is very sensitive to changes in diffusitivity and passive to changes on the equilibrium constant.

  6. Immobilization of Acetobacter aceti on cellulose ion exchangers: adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    The adsorptive behavior of cells of Acetobacter aceti, ATCC 23746, on DEAE-, TEAE-, and DEHPAE-cellulose ion exchangers in a modified Hoyer's medium at 30 degrees Centigrade was investigated. The maximum observed adsorption capacities varied from 46 to 64 mg dry wt/g resin. The Langmuir isotherm form was used to fit the data, since the cells formed a monolayer on the resin and exhibited saturation. The equilibrium constant in the Langmuir expression was qualitatively correlated with the surface charge density of the resin. The adsorption was also ''normalized'' by considering the ionic capacities of the resins. The exceptionally high normalized adsorption capacity of ECTEOLA-cellulose, 261 mg dry/meq, may be explained by an interaction between the cell wall and the polyglyceryl chains of the exchanging groups in addition to the electrostatic effects. The effect of pH on the bacterial adsorption capacity of ECTEOLA-, TEAE-, and phosphate-cellulose resins was studied and the pH of the bacteria was estimated to be 3.0. 17 references.

  7. Molecular structure-adsorption study on current textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Örücü, E; Tugcu, G; Saçan, M T

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the adsorption of a diverse set of textile dyes onto granulated activated carbon (GAC). The adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch system. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to experimental data and the isotherm constants were calculated for 33 anthraquinone and azo dyes. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted more adequately to the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model. Added to a qualitative analysis of experimental results, multiple linear regression (MLR), support vector regression (SVR) and back propagation neural network (BPNN) methods were used to develop quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models with the novel adsorption data. The data were divided randomly into training and test sets. The predictive ability of all models was evaluated using the test set. Descriptors were selected with a genetic algorithm (GA) using QSARINS software. Results related to QSPR models on the adsorption capacity of GAC showed that molecular structure of dyes was represented by ionization potential based on two-dimensional topological distances, chromophoric features and a property filter index. Comparison of the performance of the models demonstrated the superiority of the BPNN over GA-MLR and SVR models. PMID:25529487

  8. Kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of adsorption of arsenic onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kashi; Amy, Gary L; Prevost, Michele; Nour, Shokoufeh; Jekel, Martin; Gallagher, Paul M; Blumenschein, Charles D

    2008-07-01

    Relatively limited information is available regarding the impacts of temperature on the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium capacities of granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) for arsenic (V) and arsenic (III) in an aqueous solution. In general, very little information is available on the kinetics and thermodynamic aspects of adsorption of arsenic compounds onto other iron oxide-based adsorbents as well. In order to gain an understanding of the adsorption process kinetics, a detailed study was conducted in a controlled batch system. The effects of temperature and pH on the adsorption rates of arsenic (V) and arsenic (III) were investigated. Reaction rate constants were calculated at pH levels of 6.5 and 7.5. Rate data are best described by a pseudo first-order kinetic model at each temperature and pH condition studied. At lower pH values, arsenic (V) exhibits greater removal rates than arsenic (III). An increase in temperature increases the overall adsorption reaction rate constant values for both arsenic (V) and arsenic (III). An examination of thermodynamic parameters shows that the adsorption of arsenic (V) as well as arsenic (III) by GFH is an endothermic process and is spontaneous at the specific temperatures investigated.

  9. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  10. Interpretation of dynamic frontal analysis data in solid/supercritical fluid adsorption systems. I: theory.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Tarafder, Abhijit; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-05-17

    A theory is proposed to relate the elution times of the adsorption front shocks of breakthrough curves recorded during classical dynamic frontal analysis (FA) experiments with selected compounds and their adsorption isotherms in solid/supercritical fluid adsorption systems. The actual density and viscosity of binary mixtures of CO2 and methanol were obtained from the NIST REPPROP software. Diluted solutions of S-naproxen were considered (<2% in mass) but the possible effects of the analyte concentration on the viscosity and the density of the eluent percolating through the column were neglected. This allows the determination of the excess adsorption isotherm (or Gibbs excess isotherm) of the adsorbed analyte in the whole column at constant mass and volumetric flow rate of pure CO2 and of the modifier solution. A local Langmuir adsorption isotherm and a constant saturation capacity were assumed in the calculations. The variation of the adsorption-desorption constant with the eluent density was taken from the experimental variation of the retention factor of S-naproxen on a chiral column packed with Whelk-O1 particles. The results show that the isotherm parameters obtained from the best adjustment of the Langmuir model to the SFC excess adsorption data deviates by less than 7% from the assumed saturation capacity and from the average of the equilibrium constant along the chromatographic column. In practice, this conclusion holds true provided that the precision of the measurement of elution times of front shocks of breakthrough curves is better than 1% and that the maximum surface coverage qexp,max/qS is at least equal to 20%.

  11. Are Fundamental Constants Really Constant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Dirac's classical conclusions, that the values of e2, M and m are constants and the quantity of G decreases with time. Evoked considerable interest among researchers and traces historical development by which further experimental evidence points out that both e and G are constant values. (PS)

  12. Equilibrium analysis for heavy metal cation removal using cement kiln dust.

    PubMed

    El Zayat, Mohamed; Elagroudy, Sherien; El Haggar, Salah

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and chemical precipitation have been investigated extensively for heavy metal uptake. However, they are deemed too expensive to meet stringent effluent characteristics. In this study, cement kiln dust (CKD) was examined for the removal of target heavy metals. Adsorption studies in completely mixed batch reactors were used to generate equilibrium pH adsorption edges. Studies showed the ability of CKD to remove the target heavy metals in a pH range below that of precipitation after an equilibrium reaction time of 24 h. A surface titration experiment indicated negative surface charge of the CKD at pH below 10, meaning that electrostatic attraction of the divalent metals can occur below the pH required for precipitation. However, surface complexation was also important due to the substantive metal removal. Accordingly, a surface complexation model approach that utilizes an electrostatic term in the double-layer description was used to estimate equilibrium constants for the protolysis interactions of the CKD surface as well as equilibria between background ions and the sorbent surface. It was concluded that the removal strength of adsorption is in the order: Pb > Cu > Cd. The experiments were also supported by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  13. Equilibrium analysis for heavy metal cation removal using cement kiln dust.

    PubMed

    El Zayat, Mohamed; Elagroudy, Sherien; El Haggar, Salah

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and chemical precipitation have been investigated extensively for heavy metal uptake. However, they are deemed too expensive to meet stringent effluent characteristics. In this study, cement kiln dust (CKD) was examined for the removal of target heavy metals. Adsorption studies in completely mixed batch reactors were used to generate equilibrium pH adsorption edges. Studies showed the ability of CKD to remove the target heavy metals in a pH range below that of precipitation after an equilibrium reaction time of 24 h. A surface titration experiment indicated negative surface charge of the CKD at pH below 10, meaning that electrostatic attraction of the divalent metals can occur below the pH required for precipitation. However, surface complexation was also important due to the substantive metal removal. Accordingly, a surface complexation model approach that utilizes an electrostatic term in the double-layer description was used to estimate equilibrium constants for the protolysis interactions of the CKD surface as well as equilibria between background ions and the sorbent surface. It was concluded that the removal strength of adsorption is in the order: Pb > Cu > Cd. The experiments were also supported by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). PMID:25259489

  14. Adsorption and desorption of atrazine and deethylatrazine by low organic carbon geologic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.

    1994-05-01

    The adsorption and desorption of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6- isopropylamino-s-triazine) and a primary metabolite, deethylatrazine (2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine; DEA), by low organic C ({le} 3.3 g kg{sup -1}) materials were measured by batch-equilibrium techniques. The adsorbents were samples of glacial outwash sand, till, and stream sediments. The adsorption of both atrazine and DEA conformed to linear isotherms. The adsorption of atrazine by most of the absorbents yielded apparent K, values that were in excess of those based on surface agricultural soils. Adsorption correlated with only the pH of the sand-water suspensions. The desorption of atrazine was hysteretic under the conditions of the measurement. DEA had a lower affinity for the same adsorbents; the mean ratio of Kd values of DEA to those of atrazine was 0.37 {+-} 0.20. DEA adsorption did not correlate with organic C, surface area, clay content of the adsorbents, or with the pH of the suspensions. DEA adsorption, unlike atrazine, tended to be reversible. There was a linear relationship between the adsorption constants of atrazine and those of DEA. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Adsorption of Acid Red 57 from aqueous solutions onto polyacrylonitrile/activated carbon composite.

    PubMed

    El-Bindary, Ashraf A; Diab, Mostafa A; Hussien, Mostafa A; El-Sonbati, Adel Z; Eessa, Ahmed M

    2014-04-24

    The adsorption of Acid Red 57 (AR57) onto Polyacrylonitrile/activated carbon (PAN/AC) composite was investigated in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to contact time, pH and temperature. Physical characteristics of (PAN/AC) composite such as fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were obtained. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were determined. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated for the adsorption of AR57 onto (PAN/AC) composite. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data. The dynamic data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model well. The activation energy, change of free energy, enthalpy and entropy of adsorption were also evaluated for the adsorption of AR57 onto (PAN/AC) composite. The thermodynamics of the adsorption indicated spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. The results indicate that (PAN/AC) composite could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of acid dyes from textile effluents. PMID:24463242

  16. Adsorption and desorption of atrazine and deethylatrazine by low organic carbon geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6- isopropylamino-s-triazine) and a primary metabolite, deethylatrazine (2- amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine; DEA), by low organic C (??? 3.3 g kg-1) materials were measured by batch-equilibrium techniques. The adsorbents were samples of glacial outwash sand, till, and stream sediments. The adsorption of both atrazine and DEA conformed to linear isotherms. The adsorption of atrazine by most of the adsorbents yielded apparent K(oc) values that were in excess of those based on surface agricultural soils. Adsorption correlated with only the pH of the sand-water suspensions. The desorption of atrazine was hysteretic under the conditions of the measurement. DEA had a lower affinity for the same adsorbents; the mean ratio of K(d) values of DEA to those of atrazine was 0.37 ?? 0.20. DEA adsorption did not correlate with organic C, surface area, clay content of the adsorbents, or with the pH of the suspensions. DEA adsorption, unlike atrazine, tended to be reversible. There was a linear relationship between the adsorption constants of atrazine and those of DEA.

  17. Equilibrium and Absorption Kinetics of Carbon Dioxide by solid Supported Amine Sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Monazam, Esmail R.; Shadle, Lawrence J.; Siriwardane, Ranjani

    2011-11-01

    The equilibrium and conversion-time data on the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with amine-based solid sorbent were analyzed over the range of 303–373 K. Data on CO{sub 2} loading on amine based solid sorbent at these temperatures and CO{sub 2} partial pressure between 10 and 760 mm Hg obtained from volumetric adsorption apparatus were fitted to a simple equilibrium model to generate the different parameters (including equilibrium constant) in the model. Using these constants, a correlation was obtained to define equilibrium constant and maximum CO{sub 2} loading as a function of temperature. In this study, a shrinking core model (SCM) was applied to elucidate the relative importance of pore diffusion and surface chemical reaction in controlling the rate of reaction. Application of SCM to the data suggested a surface reaction-controlled mechanism for the temperature of up to 40°C and pore-diffusion mechanism at higher temperature.

  18. Equilibrium and kinetics analysis of carbon dioxide capture using immobilized amine on a mesoporous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Monazam, E., Shadle, L., Pennline, H., Miller, D., Fauth, D., Hoffman, J., Gray, M.

    2012-01-01

    The equilibrium and conversion-time data on the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with amine-based solid sorbent were analyzed over the range of 303–373 K. Data on CO{sub 2} loading on amine based solid sorbent at these temperatures and CO{sub 2} partial pressure between 10 and 760 mm Hg obtained from volumetric adsorption apparatus were fitted to a simple equilibrium model to generate the different parameters (including equilibrium constant) in the model. Using these constants, a correlation was obtained to define equilibrium constant and maximum CO{sub 2} loading as a function of temperature. In this study, a shrinking core model (SCM) was applied to elucidate the relative importance of pore diffusion and surface chemical reaction in controlling the rate of reaction. Application of SCM to the data suggested a surface reaction-controlled mechanism for the temperature of up to 40°C and pore-diffusion mechanism at higher temperature.

  19. Hexavalent chromium removal performance of anionic functionalized monolithic polymers: column adsorption, regeneration and modelling.

    PubMed

    Barlik, Necla; Keskinler, Bülent; Kocakerim, M Muhtar

    2016-01-01

    Anionic functionalized monolithic macro-porous polymers were used for the removal of hexavalent chromium(VI) anions from aqueous solution in column experiments. At a flux of 1.0 cm min and 30 mg Cr(VI) L(-1) feed concentration, breakthrough capacity and apparent capacity were 0.066 g Cr(VI) g(-1) anionic monolith and 0.144 g Cr(VI) g(-1) anionic monolith, respectively. The degree of column utilization was found to lie in the range 41-46%. Two kinetic models, theoretical and Thomas models, were applied to experimental data to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column useful for process design. The simulation of the whole breakthrough curve was effective with the models. At a flux of 1.0 cm min and 30 mg Cr(VI) L(-1) feed concentration, the dispersion coefficient and adsorption equilibrium constant (K) were 3.14 × 10(-7) m s(-1) and 3,840, respectively. Also, Thomas model parameters k1 (rate constant of adsorption) and qm (equilibrium solid-phase concentration of sorbed solute) were 1.08 × 10(-3) L mg(-1) min(-1) and 0.124 g g(-1), respectively. After reaching equilibrium adsorption capacity, the monoliths were regenerated using 1 N HCl and were subsequently re-tested. It was found that the regeneration efficiency reduced from 98% after second usage to 97% after the third usage. PMID:27003067

  20. Quantitation of enantiospecific adsorption on chiral nanoparticles from optical rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Nisha; Ondeck, Nathaniel; Gellman, Andrew J.

    2014-11-01

    Au nanoparticles modified with enantiomerically pure D- or L-cysteine have been shown to serve as enantioselective adsorbents of R- and S-propylene oxide. A simple adsorption model and accompanying experimental protocol have been developed to enable optical rotation measurements to be analyzed for quantitative determination of the ratios of the enantiospecific adsorption equilibrium constants of chiral species on the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles, KLS/KDS = KDR/KLR. This analysis is robust in the sense that it obviates the need to measure the absolute surface area of the absorbent nanoparticles, a quantity that is somewhat difficult to obtain accurately. This analysis has been applied to optical rotation data obtained from solutions of R- and S-propylene oxide, in varying concentration ratios, with D- and L-cysteine coated Au nanoparticles, in varying concentration ratios.

  1. Cd adsorption onto bacterial surfaces: A universal adsorption edge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Nathan; Fein, Jeremy

    2001-07-01

    In this study, we measure the thermodynamic stability constants for proton and Cd binding onto the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus megaturium, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Sporosarcina ureae, and Bacillus cereus. Potentiometric titrations and Cd-bacteria adsorption experiments yield average values for the carboxyl site pK a, site concentration, and log stability constant for the bacterial surface Cd-carboxyl complex of 5.0, 2.0 × 10 -3 mol/g and 4.0 respectively. Our results indicate that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit nearly identical Cd adsorption behavior as a function of pH. We propose that metal-bacteria adsorption is not dependent on the bacterial species involved, and we develop a generalized adsorption model which may greatly simplify the task of quantifying the effects of bacterial adsorption on dissolved mass transport in realistic geologic systems.

  2. Estimation of medium effects on equilibrium constants in moderate and high ionic strength solutions at elevated temperatures by using specific interaction theory (SIT): interaction coefficients involving Cl, OH- and Ac- up to 200 degrees C and 400 bars.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2006-01-01

    In this study, a series of interaction coefficients of the Brønsted-Guggenheim-Scatchard specific interaction theory (SIT) have been estimated up to 200 degrees C and 400 bars. The interaction coefficients involving Cl- estimated include epsilon(H+, Cl-), epsilon(Na+, Cl-), epsilon(Ag+, Cl-), epsilon(Na+, AgCl2 -), epsilon(Mg2+, Cl-), epsilon(Ca2+, Cl-), epsilon(Sr2+, Cl-), epsilon(Ba2+, Cl-), epsilon(Sm3+, Cl-), epsilon(Eu3+, Cl-), epsilon(Gd3+, Cl-), and epsilon(GdAc2+, Cl-). The interaction coefficients involving OH- estimated include epsilon(Li+, OH-), epsilon(K+, OH-), epsilon(Na+, OH-), epsilon(Cs+, OH-), epsilon(Sr2+, OH-), and epsilon(Ba2+, OH-). In addition, the interaction coefficients of epsilon(Na+, Ac-) and epsilon(Ca2+, Ac-) have also been estimated. The bulk of interaction coefficients presented in this study has been evaluated from the mean activity coefficients. A few of them have been estimated from the potentiometric and solubility studies. The above interaction coefficients are tested against both experimental mean activity coefficients and equilibrium quotients. Predicted mean activity coefficients are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Predicted equilibrium quotients are in very good agreement with experimental values. Based upon its relatively rapid attainment of equilibrium and the ease of determining magnesium concentrations, this study also proposes that the solubility of brucite can be used as a pH (pcH) buffer/sensor for experimental systems in NaCl solutions up to 200 degrees C by employing the predicted solubility quotients of brucite in conjunction with the dissociation quotients of water and the first hydrolysis quotients of Mg2+, all in NaCl solutions.

  3. Enhanced adsorption of atrazine from aqueous solution by molecularly imprinted TiO2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunjing; Yan, Jinlong; Zhang, Chunxiao; Yang, Zhengpeng

    2012-07-01

    TiO2 film imprinted by atrazine molecule at the surface of quartz crystal was prepared using molecular imprinting and surface sol-gel process. The molecularly imprinted TiO2 film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry, and the atrazine adsorption was investigated by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique. In comparison with non-imprinted TiO2 film, the molecularly imprinted TiO2 film exhibits high selectivity for atrazine, better reversibility and a much higher adsorption capacity for the target molecule, the adsorption equilibrium constant estimated from the in situ frequency measurement is about 6.7 × 104 M-1, which is thirteen times higher than that obtained on non-imprinted TiO2 film.

  4. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  5. Chlorodifluoromethane equilibrium on 13X molecular sieve. Final report, September 1992-March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Carlile, D.L.; Mahle, J.J.; Buettner, L.C.; Tevault, D.E.; Friday, D.K.

    1994-08-01

    Adsorption phase equilibrium data are required for evaluating any adsorption-based gas separation process. The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center is currently measuring adsorption phase equilibrium data for a variety of chemical warfare agents and their surrogates on adsorbent materials to correlate physical properties to filtration/separation efficiencies of each vapor on each adsorbent. This report details the adsorption phase equilibrium data measured for chlorodifluoromethane (R-22) on 13X Molecular Sieve. The 13X Molecular Sieve is a candidate adsorbent for future military air purification systems employing the pressure-swing adsorption separation process.

  6. Sulfate adsorption on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-10-15

    Recent spectroscopic work has suggested that only one surface species of sulfate is dominant on hematite. Sulfate is therefore a very suitable anion to test and develop adsorption models for variable charge minerals. The authors have studied sulfate adsorption on goethite covering a large range of sulfate concentrations, surface coverages, pH values, and electrolyte concentrations. Four different techniques were used to cover the entire range of conditions. For characterization at low sulfate concentrations, below the detection limit of sulfate with ICP-AES, the authors used proton-sulfate titrations at constant pH. Adsorption isotherms were studied for the intermediate sulfate concentration range. Acid-base titrations in sodium sulfate and electromobility were used for high sulfate concentrations. All the data can be modeled with one adsorbed species if it is assumed that the charge of adsorbed sulfate is spatially distributed in the interface. The charge distribution of sulfate follows directly from modeling the proton-sulfate adsorption stoichoimemtry sine this stoichiometry is independent of the intrinsic affinity constant of sulfate. The charge distribution can be related to the structure of the surface complex by use of the Pauling bond valence concept and is in accordance with the microscopic structure found by spectroscopy. The intrinsic affinity constant follows from the other measurements. Modeling of the proton-ion stoichoimetry with the commonly used 2-pK models, where adsorbed ions are treated as point charges, is possible only if at least two surface species for sulfate are used.

  7. Ab initio prediction of adsorption isotherms for small molecules in metal-organic frameworks: the effect of lateral interactions for methane/CPO-27-Mg.

    PubMed

    Sillar, Kaido; Sauer, Joachim

    2012-11-01

    A hybrid method that combines density functional theory for periodic structures with wave function-based electron correlation methods for finite-size models of adsorption sites is employed to calculate energies for adsorption of CH(4) onto different sites in the metal-organic framework (MOF) CPO-27-Mg (Mg-MOF-74) with chemical accuracy. The adsorption energies for the Mg(2+), linker, second layer sites are -27.8, -18.3, and -15.1 kJ/mol. Adsorbate-adsorbate interactions increase the average CH(4) adsorption energy by about 10% (2.4 kJ/mol). The free rotor-harmonic oscillator-ideal gas model is applied to calculate free energies/equilibrium constants for adsorption on the individual sites. This information is used in a multisite Langmuir model, augmented with a Bragg-Williams model for lateral interactions, to calculate adsorption isotherms. This ab initio approach yields the contributions of the individual sites to the final isotherms and also of the lateral interactions that contribute about 15% to the maximum excess adsorption capacity. Isotherms are calculated for both absolute amounts, for calculation of isosteric heats of adsorption as function of coverage, and excess amounts, for comparison with measured isotherms. Agreement with observed excess isotherms is reached if the experimentally determined limited accessibility of adsorption sites (78%) is taken into account.

  8. Quantification of the effects of organic and carbonate buffers on arsenate and phosphate adsorption on a goethite-based granular porous adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M; Fukushi, Keisuke; Sverjensky, Dimitri A; Green, Peter G; Darby, Jeannie L

    2011-01-15

    Interest in the development of oxide-based materials for arsenate removal has led to a variety of experimental methods and conditions for determining arsenate adsorption isotherms, which hinders comparative evaluation of their adsorptive capacities. Here, we systematically investigate the effects of buffer (HEPES or carbonate), adsorbent dose, and solution pH on arsenate and phosphate adsorption isotherms for a previously well characterized goethite-based adsorbent (Bayoxide E33 (E33)). All adsorption isotherms obtained at different adsorbate/adsorbent concentrations were identical when 1 mM of HEPES (96 mg C/L) was used as a buffer. At low aqueous arsenate and phosphate concentration (∼1.3 μM), however, adsorption isotherms obtained using 10 mM of NaHCO(3) buffer, which is a reasonable carbonate concentration in groundwater, are significantly different from those obtained without buffer or with HEPES. The carbonate competitive effects were analyzed using the extended triple layer model (ETLM) with the adsorption equilibrium constant of carbonate calibrated using independent published carbonate adsorption data for pure goethite taking into consideration the different surface properties. The successful ETLM calculations of arsenate adsorption isotherms for E33 under various conditions allowed quantitative comparison of the arsenate adsorption capacity between E33 and other major adsorbents initially tested under varied experimental conditions in the literature.

  9. Surface complexation modeling calculation of Pb(II) adsorption onto the calcined diatomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Removal of noxious heavy metal ions (e.g. Pb(II)) by surface adsorption of minerals (e.g. diatomite) is an important means in the environmental aqueous pollution control. Thus, it is very essential to understand the surface adsorptive behavior and mechanism. In this work, the Pb(II) apparent surface complexation reaction equilibrium constants on the calcined diatomite and distributions of Pb(II) surface species were investigated through modeling calculations of Pb(II) based on diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites. Batch experiments were used to study the adsorption of Pb(II) onto the calcined diatomite as a function of pH (3.0-7.0) and different ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl) under ambient atmosphere. Adsorption of Pb(II) can be well described by Freundlich isotherm models. The apparent surface complexation equilibrium constants (log K) were obtained by fitting the batch experimental data using the PEST 13.0 together with PHREEQC 3.1.2 codes and there is good agreement between measured and predicted data. Distribution of Pb(II) surface species on the diatomite calculated by PHREEQC 3.1.2 program indicates that the impurity cations (e.g. Al3+, Fe3+, etc.) in the diatomite play a leading role in the Pb(II) adsorption and dominant formation of complexes and additional electrostatic interaction are the main adsorption mechanism of Pb(II) on the diatomite under weak acidic conditions.

  10. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Xochilt; Schiavi, Federica; Keppler, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the interaction between volcanic gases and ash is important to derive gas compositions from ash leachates and to constrain the environmental impact of eruptions. Volcanic HCl could potentially damage the ozone layer, but it is unclear what fraction of HCl actually reaches the stratosphere. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash was therefore studied from -76 to +150 °C to simulate the behavior of HCl in the dilute parts of a volcanic plume. Finely ground synthetic glasses of andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic composition as well as a natural obsidian from Vulcano (Italy) served as proxies for fresh natural ash. HCl adsorption is an irreversible process and appears to increase with the total alkali content of the glass. Adsorption kinetics follow a first order law with rate constants of 2.13 ṡ10-6 s-1 to 1.80 ṡ10-4 s-1 in the temperature range investigated. For dacitic composition, the temperature and pressure dependence of adsorption can be described by the equation ln ⁡ c = 1.26 + 0.27 ln ⁡ p - 715.3 / T, where c is the surface concentration of adsorbed HCl in mg/m2, T is temperature in Kelvin, and p is the partial pressure of HCl in mbar. A comparison of this model with a large data set for the composition of volcanic ash suggests that adsorption of HCl from the gas phase at relatively low temperatures can quantitatively account for the majority of the observed Cl concentrations. The model implies that adsorption of HCl on ash increases with temperature, probably because of the increasing number of accessible adsorption sites. This temperature dependence is opposite to that observed for SO2, so that HCl and SO2 are fractionated by the adsorption process and the fractionation factor changes by four orders of magnitude over a temperature range of 250 K. The assumption of equal adsorption of different species is therefore not appropriate for deriving volcanic gas compositions from analyses of adsorbates on ash. However, with the experimental

  11. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Chemical Equilibrium in Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory of thermodynamics of the equilibrium in solution and dissociation-dimerization kinetics. Describes experimental procedure including determination of molar absorptivity and equilibrium constant, reaction enthalpy, and kinetics of the dissociation-dimerization reaction. (JM)

  12. On the Equilibrium States of Interconnected Bubbles or Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinhaus, F.; Barker, W.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the equilibrium states of a system composed of two interconnected, air-filled spherical membranes of different sizes. The equilibrium configurations are determined by the method of minimization of the availability of the system at constant temperature. (GA)

  13. Influence of Soil Solution Salinity on Molybdenum Adsorption by Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molybdenum (Mo) adsorption on five arid-zone soils from California was investigated as a function of equilibrium solution Mo concentration (0-30 mg L-1), solution pH (4-8), and electrical conductivity (EC = 0.3 or 8 dS m-1). Molybdenum adsorption decreased with increasing pH. An adsorption maximum...

  14. How to determine the adsorption energy of the surfactant's hydrophilic head? How to estimate easily the surface activity of every simple surfactant?

    PubMed

    Karakashev, Stoyan I

    2014-10-15

    A definite way to determine the adsorption energy of the surfactant's hydrophilic head on the air water interface is presented. For this purpose, the Davies adsorption theory and the most advanced version of Helfand-Frish-Lebowitz adsorption theory were applied to the surface tension isotherms of homologous series of sodium alkyl sulfate (CnH2n+1SO4Na, n=7-12), thus deriving the equilibrium adsorption constant, the cross-sectional area of the surfactant molecule, the interaction coefficient and the cohesion constant versus the number of the carbon atoms into the alkyl sulfate molecule. Thus, the total adsorption energy of each particular homolog was calculated in line with the latest development of the adsorption theory, thus calculating the dimensionless adsorption energy of the hydrophilic head Ehead/kBT. In our particular case (SO4(-)) we calculated Ehead/kBT=-2.79, which indicates the strong propensity of the SO4(-) to be surrounded by water molecules. The procedure for calculation Ehead/kBT does not depend on the charge of the hydrophilic head. Similarly, we calculated Ehead/kBT of another six well known in the literature hydrophilic heads (COOH, OH, DMPO, DEPO, N(CH3)3(+), and NH3(+)), indicating that the adsorption energy of the CH2 group depends slightly on the type of the hydrophilic head, but it affects substantially the adsorption energy of the whole surfactant molecule. Finally, we defined and validated a parameter called adsorption capacity of surfactants with simple molecular structure, for easy estimation of their surface activity. Linear dependence between the CMC of ionic surfactants and their adsorption capacity was established.

  15. Human serum albumin adsorption study on 62-MHz miniaturized quartz gravimetric sensors.

    PubMed

    Kao, Ping; Patwardhan, Ashish; Allara, David; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2008-08-01

    We have designed and fabricated 25-microm-thick quartz resonators operating at a fundamental resonance frequency of approximately 62 MHz. The results show a substantial increase in the mass sensitivity compared to single monolithic commercial resonators operating at lower frequencies in the approximately 5-10-MHz range. The overall performance of the micromachined resonators is demonstrated for the example of human serum albumin protein adsorption from aqueous buffer solutions onto gold electrodes functionalized with self-assembled monolayers. The results show a saturation adsorption frequency change of 6.8 kHz as opposed to 40 Hz for a commercial approximately 5-MHz sensor under identical loading conditions. From the analysis of the adsorption isotherm, the equilibrium adsorption constant of the adsorption of the protein layer was found to be K = 8.03 x 10(6) M(-1), which is in agreement with the values reported in the literature. The high sensitivity of the miniaturized QCM devices can be a significant advantage in both vapor and solution adsorption analyses.

  16. Selective Adsorption on Fluorinated Plastic Enables the Optical Detection of Molecular Pollutants in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanfranco, R.; Giavazzi, F.; Salina, M.; Tagliabue, G.; Di Nicolò, E.; Bellini, T.; Buscaglia, M.

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous fluorinated plastic can be produced with a refractive index similar to that of water, a condition that makes it essentially invisible when immersed in aqueous solutions. Because of this property, even a small amount of adsorbed molecules on the plastic-water interface provides a detectable optical signal. We investigate two distinct substrates made of this material, characterized by different interface areas: a prism and a microporous membrane. We demonstrate that both substrates enable the label-free detection of molecular compounds in water even without any surface functionalization. The adsorption of molecules on the planar surface of the prism provides an increase of optical reflectivity, whereas the adsorption on the internal surface of the microporous membrane yields an increase of scattered light. Despite the different mechanisms, we find a similar optical response upon adsorption. We confirm this result by a theoretical model accounting for both reflection and scattering. We investigate the spontaneous adsorption process for different kinds of molecules: surfactants with different charges, a protein (lysozyme), and a constituent of gasoline (hexane). The measured equilibrium and kinetic constants for adsorption differ by orders of magnitudes among the different classes of molecules. By suitable analytical models, accounting for the effects of mass limitation and transport, we find a simple and general scaling of the adsorption parameters with the molecular size.

  17. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm of anionic dyes onto organo-bentonite from single and multisolute systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dazhong; Fan, Jianxin; Zhou, Weizhi; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Kang, Qi

    2009-12-15

    The performances of polydiallydimethylammonium modified bentonite (PDADMA-bentonite) as an adsorbent to remove anionic dyes, namely Acid Scarlet GR (AS-GR), Acid Turquoise Blue 2G (ATB-2G) and Indigo Carmine (IC), were investigated in single, binary and ternary dye systems. In adsorption from single dye solutions with initial concentration of 100 micromol/L, the dosage of PDADMA-bentonite needed to remove 95% dye was 0.42, 0.68 and 0.75 g/L for AS-GR, ATB-2G and IC, respectively. The adsorption isotherms of the three dyes obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model with the equilibrium constants of 0.372, 0.629 and 4.31 L/micromol, the saturation adsorption amount of 176.3, 149.2 and 228.7 micromol/g for ATB-2G, IC and AS-GR, respectively. In adsorption from mixed dye solutions, the isotherm of each individual dye followed an expanded Langmuir isotherm model and the relationship between the total amount of dyes adsorbed and the total equilibrium dye concentration was interpreted well by Langmuir isotherm model. In the region of insufficient dosage of PDADMA-bentonite, the dye with a larger affinity was preferentially removed by adsorption. Desorption was observed in the kinetic curve of the dye with lower affinity on PDADMA-bentonite surface by the competitive adsorption. The kinetics in single dye solution and the total adsorption of dyes in binary and ternary dye systems nicely followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  18. Sub-Grid Reactive Diffusion and Apparent Uranyl Adsorption/Desorption Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Kerisit, S.; Ma, R.; Zheng, C.; Zachara, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adsorption/desorption is an important process affecting contaminant fate and transport in subsurface sediments. This presentation will discuss the importance of sub-grid reactive diffusion in both intragranular and inter-grain domains that affect the apparent rates of uranyl adsorption/desorption at the macroscopic scale. Uranyl[U(VI)]-contaminated site at Hanford 300A where U(VI) resides in intragranular domains as surface-complexed species is used as an example in this presentation. Molecular dynamics calculations revealed that uranyl surface complexation reactions are a fast process with a first-order rate constant of 100 per second. Consequently U(VI) adsorption/desorption is treated as an equilibrium process. An equilibrium, Kd-based model, however, significantly over-predicted the historical migration of the uranyl plume at the site. Sub-grain pore-scale simulations and stirred-flow cell experiments indicated that the coupling of intragranular diffusion with surface complexation reactions decreased the apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption over 4 order of magnitude. The apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption decreased further over 1 order of magnitude due to the sub-grid pore-scale coupling of diffusive mass transfer and grain-scale U(VI) adsorption/desorption as revealed by column experiments and pore-scale simulations. Field-scale reactive transport models that incorporate the complexity of sub-grid reactive diffusion in the apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption were consistent with the slow migration of the U(VI) plume at the site.

  19. Acid base reactions, phosphate and arsenate complexation, and their competitive adsorption at the surface of goethite in 0.7 M NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Mucci, Alfonso

    2001-07-01

    Potentiometric titrations of the goethite-water interface were carried out at 25°C in 0.1, 0.3 and 0.7 M NaCl solutions. The acid/base properties of goethite at pH > 4 in a 0.7 M NaCl solution can be reproduced successfully using either the Constant Capacitance (CCM), the Basic Stern (BSM) or the Triple Layer models (TLM) when two surface acidity constants are considered. Phosphate and arsenate complexation at the surface of goethite was studied in batch adsorption experiments. The experiments were conducted in 0.7 mol/L NaCl solutions at 25°C in the pH range of 3.0 to 10.0. Phosphate shows a strong affinity for the goethite surface and the amount of phosphate adsorbed decreases with increasing pH. Phosphate complexation is described using a model consisting of three monodentate surface complexes. Arsenate shows a similar adsorption pattern on goethite but a higher affinity than phosphate. A model including three surface complexation constants describes the arsenate adsorption at [AsO 4] init = 23 and 34 μmol/L. The model prediction, however, overestimates arsenate adsorption at [AsO 4] init = 8.8 μmol/L. The goethite surface acidity constants as well as the preceding phosphate and arsenate surface complexation constants were evaluated by the CCM and BSM with the aid of the computer program FITEQL, version 2.0. The experimental investigation of phosphate and arsenate competitive adsorption in 0.7 mol/L NaCl was performed at [PO 4]/[AsO 4] ratios of 1:1, 2.5:1 and 5:1 with [AsO 4] init = 9.0 μmol/L and at a [PO 4]/[AsO 4] ratio of 1:1 with [AsO 4] init = 22 μmol/L. The surface complexation of arsenate decreases significantly in competitive adsorption experiments and the decrease is proportional to the amount of phosphate present. Phosphate adsorption is also reduced but less drastically in competitive adsorption and is not affected significantly by incremental additions of arsenate at pH > 7. The equilibrium model derived by combining the single oxyanion

  20. Adsorption of Cu2+ ions using chitosan-modified magnetic Mn ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yuying; Chen, Deyang; Sun, Yitao; Jiao, Dongling; Zeng, Dechang; Liu, Zhongwu

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-modified Mn ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a one-step microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. These Mn ferrite magnetic composite nanoparticles were employed to absorb Cu2+ ions in water. XRD verified the spinel structure of the MnFe2O4 nanoparticles. Chitosan modification does not result in any phase change of MnFe2O4. FTIR and zeta potentials curves for all samples suggest that chitosan can be successfully coated on the Mn ferrites. TEM characterization showed that the modified MnFe2O4 nanoparticles have a cubic shape with a mean diameter of ∼100 nm. For adsorption behavior, the effects of experiment parameters such as solution pH value, contact time and initial Cu2+ ions concentration on the adsorption efficiency were systematically investigated. The results showed that increasing solution pH value and extending contact time are favorable for improving adsorption efficiency. Especially, adsorption efficiency can reach up to 100% and 96.7% after 500 min adsorption at pH 6.5 for the solutions with initial Cu2+ ions concentration of 50 mg/L and 100 mg/L. Adsorption data fits well with the Langmuir isotherm models with a maximum adsorption capacity (qm) and a Langmuir adsorption equilibrium constant (K) of 65.1 mg/g and 0.090 L/mg, respectively. The adsorption kinetic agrees well with pseudo second order model with the pseudo second rate constants (K2) of 0.0468 and 0.00189 g/mg/min for solutions with initial Cu2+ ions of 50 and 100 mg/L, respectively.

  1. Predictive model for Pb(II) adsorption on soil minerals (oxides and low-crystalline aluminum silicate) consistent with spectroscopic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usiyama, Tomoki; Fukushi, Keisuke

    2016-10-01

    Mobility of Pb(II) in surface condition is governed by adsorption processes on soil minerals such as iron oxides and low-crystalline aluminum silicates. The adsorption effectiveness and the surface complex structures of Pb(II) vary sensitively with solution conditions such as pH, ionic strength, Pb(II) loading, and electrolyte anion type. This study was undertaken to construct a quantitative model for Pb(II) on soil minerals. It can predict the adsorption effectiveness and surface complex structures under any solution conditions using the extended triple layer model (ETLM). The Pb(II) adsorption data for goethite, hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), quartz, and low-crystalline aluminum silicate (LCAS) were analyzed with ETLM to retrieve the surface complexation reactions and these equilibrium constants. The adsorption data on goethite, HFO and quartz were referred from reports of earlier studies. Those data for LCAS were measured under a wide range of pH, ionic strength and Pb(II) loadings in NaNO3 and NaCl solutions. All adsorption data can be reasonably regressed using ETLM with the assumptions of inner sphere bidentate complexation and inner sphere monodentate ternary complexation with electrolyte anions, which are consistent with previously reported spectroscopic evidence. Predictions of surface speciation under widely various solution conditions using ETLM revealed that the inner sphere bidentate complex is the predominant species at neutral to high pH conditions. The inner sphere monodentate ternary complex becomes important at low pH, high surface Pb(II) coverage, and high electrolyte concentrations, of which the behavior is consistent with the spectroscopic observation. Comparisons of the obtained adsorption constants on goethite, HFO and quartz exhibited good linear relations between the reciprocals of dielectric constants of solids and adsorption constants. Those linear relations support predictions of the adsorption constants of all oxides based on Born

  2. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of chloramphenicols, sulfonamides, and non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals on multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Heng; Liu, Xue; Cao, Zhen; Zhan, Yi; Shi, Xiaodong; Yang, Yi; Zhou, Junliang; Xu, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption behavior of different emerging contaminants (3 chloramphenicols, 7 sulfonamides, and 3 non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals) on five types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and the underlying factors were studied. Adsorption equilibriums were reached within 12h for all compounds, and well fitted by the Freundlich isotherm model. The adsorption affinity of pharmaceuticals was positively related to the specific surface area of MWCNTs. The solution pH was an important parameter of pharmaceutical adsorption on MWCNTs, due to its impacts on the chemical speciation of pharmaceuticals and the surface electrical property of MWCNTs. The adsorption of ionizable pharmaceuticals decreased in varying degrees with the increased ionic strength. MWCNT-10 was found to be the strongest adsorbent in this study, and the Freundlich constant (KF) values were 353-2814mmol(1-n)L(n)/kg, 571-618mmol(1-n)L(n)/kg, and 317-1522mmol(1-n)L(n)/kg for sulfonamides, chloramphenicols, and non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals, respectively. The different adsorption affinity of sulfonamides might contribute to the different hydrophobic of heterocyclic substituents, while chloramphenicols adsorption was affected by the charge distribution in aromatic rings via substituent effects.

  3. Adsorptive removal of patulin from apple juice using Ca-alginate-activated carbon beads.

    PubMed

    Yue, Tianli; Guo, Caixia; Yuan, Yahong; Wang, Zhouli; Luo, Ying; Wang, Ling

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the adsorption of patulin from apple juice by Ca-alginate-activated carbon (Ca-alginate-AC) beads. The capacity of patulin was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that Ca-alginate-AC beads have significant ability to reduce patulin from contaminated apple juice. Furthermore, the adsorption process did not affect the quality of apple juice. The effects of contact time, initial patulin concentration, adsorbent dose, and temperature were assessed. The removal percentage of patulin increased with contact time, adsorbent dose, and temperature. A reduction was also noted to bind patulin at increased levels of contamination. The equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherm models and the isotherm constants were calculated at different temperatures. The adsorption equilibrium was best described by the Freundlich isotherm (R(2) > 0.990). The pseudo 1st-order model was found to describe the kinetic data satisfactorily. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard Gibbs free energy (ΔG◦◦), standard enthalpy (ΔH◦), and standard entropy (ΔS◦) were evaluated. The results showed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic nature.

  4. Adsorption of lanthanum to goethite in the presence of gluconate

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Laurence C.; Sarah Pepper; Sue Clark

    2005-05-01

    Adsorption of Lanthanum to Goethite in the Presence of Gluconic Acid L. C. HULL,1 S. E. PEPPER2 AND S. B. CLARK2 1Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (hulllc@inel.gov) 2Washington State University, Pullman, WA (spepper@wsu.edu), (s_clark@wsu.edu) Lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elements in radioactive waste can pose risks to humans and ecological systems for many years. Organic complexing agents, from natural organic matter or the degradation of waste package components, can alter the mobility of these elements. We studied the effect of gluconic acid, as an analogue for cellulose degradation products, on the adsorption of lanthanum, representing lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elments, to goethite, representing natural iron minearals and degradation products of waste packages. Batch pH adsorption edge experiments were conducted with lanthanum alone, and with lanthanum and gluconate at a 1:1 mole ratio. Lanthanum concentrations studied were 0.1, 1, and 10 mM, covering a range from 10% to 1000% of the calculated available adsorption sites on goethite. In the absence of gluconate, lanthanum was primarily present in solution as free lanthanum ion. With gluconate present, free lanthanum concentration in solution decreased with increasing pH as step-wise deprotonation of the gluconate molecule increased the fraction lanthanum complexed with gluconate. Adsorption to the goethite surface was represented with the diffuse double-layer model. The number of adsorption sites and the intrinsic binding constants for the surface complexes were estimated from the pH adsorption edge data using the computer code FITEQL 4.0. Two surface reactions were used to fit the adsorption data in the absence of gluconate. A strong binding site with no proton release and a much higher concentration of weak binding sites with release of two protons per lanthanum adsorbed. The adsorption of lanthanum was not measurably affected by the presence of gluconate

  5. Adsorption of methabenzthiazuron on six allophanic and nonallophanic soils: effect of organic matter amendment.

    PubMed

    Báez, M E; Rodríguez, M; Vilches, P; Romero, E

    2001-01-01

    This article reports on methabenzthiazuron [1-(1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl)-1,3-dimethylurea] (MBT) adsorption process on six agricultural allophanic and nonallophanic soils. The effect of amendment with exogenous organic matter was also studied. Adsorption kinetic fits an hyperbolic model. MBT adsorption reached an apparent equilibrium within 2 h and followed a second-order reaction. The maximum adsorbed amounts for natural soils ranged from 32 to 145 microg g(-1). Rate constants were considered relatively low (0.27-1.5 x 10(-4) [microg g(-1)](1-n) s-1); the slow process was attributed to a combined effect of difussion and adsorption. MBT adsorption fits the Freundlich model with r values > or =0.998 at P < or = 0.001 significance levels. Kf and Freundlich exponents (l/n) ranged from 5.3 to 82.1 cm3 g(-1) and from 0.66 to 0.73, respectively. Kf values for soils with a low organic matter content were lower than that obtained from the only typical allophanic soil derived from volcanic ash under study. Lineal regression analysis between Kf and organic matter content of nonallophanic soils gave a correlation coefficient of 0.980 (P = 0.02). Dispersion of Kd values together with close values of K(OM) indicate that organic matter (OM) was the principal component responsible for MBT adsorption in unamended soils. Addition of peat decreased soil pH and increased adsorption capacity for allophanic and nonallophanic soils. Kinetic experiments showed enhancements of Xmax values and lower rate constants.

  6. Adsorption of crude oil from aqueous solution by hydrogel of chitosan based polyacrylamide prepared by radiation induced graft polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sokker, H H; El-Sawy, Naeem M; Hassan, M A; El-Anadouli, Bahgat E

    2011-06-15

    The adsorption of crude oil (initial concentration 0.5-30 g/L) from aqueous solution using hydrogel of chitosan based polyacrylamide (PAM) prepared by radiation induced graft polymerization has been investigated. The prepared hydrogel was characterized by FTIR and SEM micrographs. The experiments were carried out as a function of different initial concentrations of oil residue, acrylamide concentration, contact time and pH to determine the optimum condition for the adsorption of residue oil from aqueous solution and sea water. The results obtained showed that the hydrogel prepared at concentration of 40% acrylamide (AAm) and at a radiation dose of 5 kGy has high removal efficiency of crude oil 2.3g/g at pH 3. Equilibrium studies have been carried out to determine the capacity of the hydrogel for adsorption of crude oil, Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the experimental isotherms and isotherms constants. Equilibrium data were found to fit very well with both Freundlich and Langmuir models. Also the adsorption of oil onto the hydrogel behaves as a pseudo-second-order kinetic models rather than the pseudo-first-order kinetic model.

  7. Soil adsorption studies of a rice herbicide, cyhalofop-butyl, in two texturally different soils of India.

    PubMed

    Sondhia, Shobha; Khare, Rishi Raj

    2014-10-01

    The ability of herbicides to be adsorbed by the soil and sediment and their tendency to be desorbed are some of the most important factors affecting soil and water contamination. Therefore, a sorption study was conducted to evaluate the adsorption of cyhalofop-butyl, butyl (2R)-2-[4-(4-cyano-2-fluorophenoxy) phenoxy] propanoate, in the sandy clay loam and clayey soils using a batch equilibrium method. The adsorption of cyhalofop-butyl was found positively related with the clay and organic carbon content. Freundlich constants (Kf) of cyhalofop-butyl in the clayey and sandy clay loam were found to be 13.39 and 2.21, respectively. Sorption coefficients (Koc) and distribution coefficients (Kd) were found to be 265.38 and 2,092.79, and 1.38 and 11.48, for sandy clay loam and clayey soils, respectively. The adsorption isotherm suggested a relatively higher affinity of cyhalofop-butyl to the adsorption sites at low equilibrium concentrations. The low value of the soil organic carbon partition coefficient (Koc) of cyhalofop-butyl in the sandy loam soil suggested its weaker adsorption in soil and thus increased its risk of mobility into water sources; hence, it should be used judiciously to prevent groundwater contamination.

  8. Soil adsorption studies of a rice herbicide, cyhalofop-butyl, in two texturally different soils of India.

    PubMed

    Sondhia, Shobha; Khare, Rishi Raj

    2014-10-01

    The ability of herbicides to be adsorbed by the soil and sediment and their tendency to be desorbed are some of the most important factors affecting soil and water contamination. Therefore, a sorption study was conducted to evaluate the adsorption of cyhalofop-butyl, butyl (2R)-2-[4-(4-cyano-2-fluorophenoxy) phenoxy] propanoate, in the sandy clay loam and clayey soils using a batch equilibrium method. The adsorption of cyhalofop-butyl was found positively related with the clay and organic carbon content. Freundlich constants (Kf) of cyhalofop-butyl in the clayey and sandy clay loam were found to be 13.39 and 2.21, respectively. Sorption coefficients (Koc) and distribution coefficients (Kd) were found to be 265.38 and 2,092.79, and 1.38 and 11.48, for sandy clay loam and clayey soils, respectively. The adsorption isotherm suggested a relatively higher affinity of cyhalofop-butyl to the adsorption sites at low equilibrium concentrations. The low value of the soil organic carbon partition coefficient (Koc) of cyhalofop-butyl in the sandy loam soil suggested its weaker adsorption in soil and thus increased its risk of mobility into water sources; hence, it should be used judiciously to prevent groundwater contamination. PMID:24875347

  9. Effect of cation type, alkyl chain length, adsorbate size on adsorption kinetics and isotherms of bromide ionic liquids from aqueous solutions onto microporous fabric and granulated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Safia; Duclaux, Laurent; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; Reinert, Laurence; Farooq, Amjad; Yasin, Tariq

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption from aqueous solution of imidazolium, pyrrolidinium and pyridinium based bromide ionic liquids (ILs) having different alkyl chain lengths was investigated on two types of microporous activated carbons: a fabric and a granulated one, well characterized in terms of surface chemistry by "Boehm" titrations and pH of point of zero charge measurements and of porosity by N2 adsorption at 77 K and CO2 adsorption at 273 K. The influence of cation type, alkyl chain length and adsorbate size on the adsorption properties was analyzed by studying kinetics and isotherms of eight different ILs using conductivity measurements. Equilibrium studies were carried out at different temperatures in the range [25-55 °C]. The incorporation of ILs on the AC porosity was studied by N2 adsorption-desorption measurements at 77 K. The experimental adsorption isotherms data showed a good correlation with the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of ILs onto activated carbons was an exothermic process, and that the removal efficiency increased with increase in alkyl chain length, due to the increase in hydrophobicity of long chain ILs cations determined with the evolution of the calculated octanol-water constant (Kow). The negative values of free energies indicated that adsorption of ILs with long chain lengths having hydrophobic cations was more spontaneous at the investigated temperatures.

  10. Adsorption of drinking water fluoride on a micron-sized magnetic Fe3O4@Fe-Ti composite adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chang; Li, Yingzhen; Wang, Ting-Jie; Jiang, Yanping; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-02-01

    A micron-sized magnetic adsorbent (MMA) for fluoride removal from drinking water was prepared by spray drying and subsequent calcination of a magnetic Fe3O4@Fe-Ti core-shell nanoparticle slurry. The MMA granules had high mechanical strength and stability against water scouring, can be easily separated from the water by a magnet, and had a high selectivity for fluoride versus common co-existing ions and high fluoride removal efficiency in a wide range of initial pH of 3-11. Abundant hydroxyl groups on the MMA surface acted as the active sites for fluoride adsorption, which resulted in a high affinity of the MMA for fluoride. The pH in the adsorption process affected the adsorption significantly. At neutral initial pH, the adsorption isotherm was well fitted with the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacity reached a high value of 41.8 mg/g. At a constant pH of 3, multilayer adsorption of fluoride occurred due to the abundant positive surface charges on the MMA, and the adsorption isotherm was well fitted with the Freundlich model. The MMA had a fast adsorption rate, and adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 2 min. The adsorption kinetics followed a quasi-second order model. The regeneration of the MMA was easy and fast, and can be completed within 2 min. After 10 recycles, the fluoride removal efficiency of the MMA still remained high. These properties showed that the MMA is a promising adsorbent for fluoride removal.

  11. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium with Poker Chips: A General Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on laboratory exercise at the general chemistry level introduces students to chemical equilibrium through a simulation that uses poker chips and rate equations. More specifically, the exercise allows students to explore reaction tables, dynamic chemical equilibrium, equilibrium constant expressions, and the equilibrium constant based on…

  12. The role of particle-size soil fractions in the adsorption of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandzhieva, Saglara; Minkina, Tatiana; Pinsky, David; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Kalinitchenko, Valeriy; Sushkova, Svetlana; Chaplygin, Viktor; Dikaev, Zaurbek; Startsev, Viktor; Bakoev, Serojdin

    2014-05-01

    the process - the adsorption equilibrium constant (k).The ratio between the content of exchangeable cations displaced from the soil adsorbing complex (SAC) into the solution and the content of adsorbed HMs decreased with the increasing concentration of adsorbed HMs. These values could be higher (for Cu2+ and Pb2+), equal, or lower than 1 (for Zn2+) and depend on the properties of HMs. At the first case, this was due to the dissolution of readily soluble salts at low HM concentrations in the SAC. In the latter case, this was related to the adsorption of associated forms HMs and the formation of new phases localized on the surface of soil particles at high HM concentrations in the SAC. Soil solution equilibrium (SSE) accords to the soil fine fraction composition. SSE thermodynamics causes the ratio of free and associated forms of ions and ion's activity in soil solution influencing composition, concentration and adsorption of HMs salts by SAC. This study was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project no. 12-05-33078,14-05-00586_a, grant of President of MK-6448.2014.4

  13. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies towards understanding the interaction between cross-linked alginate-guar gum matrix and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Woitovich Valetti, Nadia; Picó, Guillermo

    2016-02-15

    The adsorption kinetics of chymotrypsin, a pancreatic serine protease, onto an alginate-gum guar matrix cross-linked with epichlorohydrin has been performed using a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of various experimental parameters such as pH, salt presence, contact time and temperature were investigated. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data which shows that the adsorption of the enzyme followed the pseudo-second-order rate expression. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Hill adsorption isotherm models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms, and the isotherm constants were determined. It was found that Hill model was more suitable for our data because the isotherm data showed a sigmoidal behavior with the free enzyme concentration increasing in equilibrium. At 8°C and at pH 5.0, 1g hydrate matrix adsorbed about 7mg of chymotrypsin. In the desorption process 80% of the biological activity of chymotrypsin was recovered under the condition of 50mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.00-500mM NaCl. When successive cycles of adsorption/washing/desorption were performed, it was observed that the matrix remained functional until the fourth cycle of repeated batch enzyme adsorption. These results are important in terms of diminishing of cost and waste generation. PMID:26849187

  14. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies towards understanding the interaction between cross-linked alginate-guar gum matrix and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Woitovich Valetti, Nadia; Picó, Guillermo

    2016-02-15

    The adsorption kinetics of chymotrypsin, a pancreatic serine protease, onto an alginate-gum guar matrix cross-linked with epichlorohydrin has been performed using a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of various experimental parameters such as pH, salt presence, contact time and temperature were investigated. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data which shows that the adsorption of the enzyme followed the pseudo-second-order rate expression. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Hill adsorption isotherm models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms, and the isotherm constants were determined. It was found that Hill model was more suitable for our data because the isotherm data showed a sigmoidal behavior with the free enzyme concentration increasing in equilibrium. At 8°C and at pH 5.0, 1g hydrate matrix adsorbed about 7mg of chymotrypsin. In the desorption process 80% of the biological activity of chymotrypsin was recovered under the condition of 50mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.00-500mM NaCl. When successive cycles of adsorption/washing/desorption were performed, it was observed that the matrix remained functional until the fourth cycle of repeated batch enzyme adsorption. These results are important in terms of diminishing of cost and waste generation.

  15. Recyclable Mg-Al layered double hydroxides for fluoride removal: Kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohito; Oba, Jumpei; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2015-12-30

    Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) intercalated with NO3(-) (NO3 · Mg-Al LDH) and Cl(-) (Cl · Mg-Al LDH) were found to adsorb fluoride from aqueous solutions. Fluoride is removed by anion exchange in solution with NO3(-) and Cl(-) intercalated in the LDH interlayer. In both cases, the residual F concentration is lower than the effluent standards for F in Japan (8 mg/L). The rate-determining step in the removal of F using NO3 · Mg-Al and Cl · Mg-Al LDH is chemical adsorption involving F(-) anion exchange with intercalated NO3(-) and Cl(-) ions. The removal of F is described by pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics, with Langmuir-type adsorption. The values obtained for the maximum adsorption and the equilibrium adsorption constant are respectively 3.3 mmol g(-1) and 2.8 with NO3 · Mg-Al LDH, and 3.2 mmol g(-1) and 1.5 with Cl · Mg-Al LDH. The F in the F · Mg-Al LDH produced in these reactions was found to exchange with NO3(-) and Cl(-) ions in solution. The regenerated NO3 · Mg-Al and Cl · Mg-Al LDHs thus obtained can be used once more to capture aqueous F. This suggests that NO3 · Mg-Al and Cl · Mg-Al LDHs can be recycled and used repeatedly for F removal.

  16. Recovery of oil from oil-in-water emulsion using biopolymers by adsorptive method.

    PubMed

    Elanchezhiyan, S Sd; Sivasurian, N; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, it is aimed to identify, a low cost sorbent for the recovery of oil from oil-in-water emulsion using biopolymers such as chitin and chitosan. Chitin has the greater adsorption capacity than chitosan due to its hydrophobic nature. The characterizations of chitin and chitosan were done using FTIR, SEM, EDAX, XRD, TGA and DSC techniques. Under batch equilibrium mode, a systematic study was performed to optimize the various equilibrium parameters viz., contact time, pH, dosage, initial concentration of oil, and temperature. The adsorption process reached equilibrium at 40 min of contact time and the percentage removal of oil was found to be higher (90%) in the acidic medium. The Freundlich and Langmuir models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were calculated. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were calculated to find out the nature of the sorption mechanism. The kinetic studies were investigated with reaction-based and diffusion-based models. The suitable mechanism for the removal of oil has been established.

  17. Equilibrium bond lengths, force constants and vibrational frequencies of MnF 2, FeF 2, CoF 2, NiF 2, and ZnF 2 from least-squares analysis of gas-phase electron diffraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Natalja

    2001-08-01

    The least-squares analysis of the electron diffraction data for MnF 2, FeF 2, CoF 2, NiF 2 and ZnF 2 was carried out in terms of a cubic potential function. The obtained equilibrium bond lengths (in Å) are re(Mn-F)=1.797(6), re(Fe-F)=1.755(6), re(Co-F)=1.738(6), re(Ni-F)=1.715(7), and re(Zn-F)=1.729(7). The determined force constants and the corresponding vibrational frequencies are listed. The bond length re(Cu-F)=1.700(14) Å for CuF 2 was estimated and the variations of bond lengths for the first-row transition metal difluorides were discussed in light of their electronic structure.

  18. A Constant Pressure Bomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1924-01-01

    This report describes a new optical method of unusual simplicity and of good accuracy suitable to study the kinetics of gaseous reactions. The device is the complement of the spherical bomb of constant volume, and extends the applicability of the relationship, pv=rt for gaseous equilibrium conditions, to the use of both factors p and v. The method substitutes for the mechanical complications of a manometer placed at some distance from the seat of reaction the possibility of allowing the radiant effects of reaction to record themselves directly upon a sensitive film. It is possible the device may be of use in the study of the photoelectric effects of radiation. The method makes possible a greater precision in the measurement of normal flame velocities than was previously possible. An approximate analysis shows that the increase of pressure and density ahead of the flame is negligible until the velocity of the flame approaches that of sound.

  19. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  20. Adsorption of Acid Red 57 from aqueous solutions onto surfactant-modified sepiolite.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Adnan; Ozcan, A Safa

    2005-10-17

    The adsorption of Acid Red 57 (AR57) onto surfactant-modified sepiolite was investigated in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to contact time, pH and temperature. The surface modification of surfactant-modified sepiolite was controlled using the FTIR technique. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetic models and the intraparticle diffusion model were used to describe the kinetic data and the rate constants were evaluated. The experimental data fitted very well the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and also followed the intraparticle diffusion model up to 90 min, whereas diffusion is not only the rate controlling step. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were also determined. The Freundlich model agrees with experimental data well. The activation energy, change of free energy, enthalpy and entropy of adsorption were also evaluated for the adsorption of AR57 onto surfactant-modified sepiolite. The results indicate that surfactant-modified sepiolite could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of textile dyes from effluents. PMID:16019142

  1. Removal of mixed pesticides from aqueous solutions using organoclays: evaluation of equilibrium and kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ajoy; Ahammed Shabeer Tp; Gajbhiye, V T; Gupta, Suman; Kumar, Rajesh

    2013-07-01

    Removal of mixed pesticides, namely alachlor, metolachlor, chlorpyriphos, fipronil, α-endosulfan, β-endosulfan, p,p'-DDT and two metabolites p,p'-DDE and endosulfan sulphate from aqueous solution by batch adsorption onto three commercial organo-modified montmorillonite clays [modified with octadecylamine (ODA-M), modified with dimethyl- dialkylamine (DMDA-M) and modified with octadecylamine and aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ODAAPS-M)] were investigated. Effect of process variables, mainly contact time and initial concentration of mixed pesticides, on adsorption phenomenon were evaluated. To understand the adsorption kinetic pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models were tested. The pseudo-second-order model provided the best fit for explaining adsorption kinetics, on the basis of high correlation coefficient (r) and normalized percent deviation values. The adsorption equilibrium was explained by the Freundlich isotherm (r = 0.951-0.992). High values (0.17-0.52 mg g⁻¹) of Freundlich constant (K(f)) indicated higher affinity of pesticides towards all three organoclays, as a result of hydrophobic interaction between the adsorbent/adsorbate systems. Pesticides with high octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) and low water solubility showed faster adsorption with higher K(f) values as compared to the pesticides with low K(ow) and high water solubility. The order of organoclays for removal efficiency of mixed pesticide was ODAAPS-M > DMDA-M > ODA-M. These findings may find application to decontaminate or treat mixed pesticide contaminated industrial/agricultural waste waters. PMID:23728289

  2. Removal of mixed pesticides from aqueous solutions using organoclays: evaluation of equilibrium and kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ajoy; Ahammed Shabeer Tp; Gajbhiye, V T; Gupta, Suman; Kumar, Rajesh

    2013-07-01

    Removal of mixed pesticides, namely alachlor, metolachlor, chlorpyriphos, fipronil, α-endosulfan, β-endosulfan, p,p'-DDT and two metabolites p,p'-DDE and endosulfan sulphate from aqueous solution by batch adsorption onto three commercial organo-modified montmorillonite clays [modified with octadecylamine (ODA-M), modified with dimethyl- dialkylamine (DMDA-M) and modified with octadecylamine and aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ODAAPS-M)] were investigated. Effect of process variables, mainly contact time and initial concentration of mixed pesticides, on adsorption phenomenon were evaluated. To understand the adsorption kinetic pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models were tested. The pseudo-second-order model provided the best fit for explaining adsorption kinetics, on the basis of high correlation coefficient (r) and normalized percent deviation values. The adsorption equilibrium was explained by the Freundlich isotherm (r = 0.951-0.992). High values (0.17-0.52 mg g⁻¹) of Freundlich constant (K(f)) indicated higher affinity of pesticides towards all three organoclays, as a result of hydrophobic interaction between the adsorbent/adsorbate systems. Pesticides with high octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) and low water solubility showed faster adsorption with higher K(f) values as compared to the pesticides with low K(ow) and high water solubility. The order of organoclays for removal efficiency of mixed pesticide was ODAAPS-M > DMDA-M > ODA-M. These findings may find application to decontaminate or treat mixed pesticide contaminated industrial/agricultural waste waters.

  3. Methylene blue adsorption from aqueous solution by activated carbon: effect of acidic and alkaline solution treatments.

    PubMed

    Ijagbemi, Christianah O; Chun, Ji I; Han, Da H; Cho, Hye Y; O, Se J; Kim, Dong S

    2010-01-01

    The removal of Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solution using activated carbon (AC) has been investigated. Adsorption experiments were conducted and the maximum adsorption capacity was determined. The effect of experimental parameters such as pH, dye concentration and temperature were studied on the adsorption process. Equilibrium data were mathematically modeled using the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models to describe the equilibrium isotherms at different dye concentrations and temperature. Parameters of best-fit model were calculated and discussed. To understand the mechanism of adsorption, kinetic models were employed to follow the adsorption processes; the pseudo-first-order best described the adsorption of MB onto AC. It was found that pH plays a major role in the adsorption process; adsorption capacity was influenced by the physical and surface chemical properties of carbon and the pH of the solution. 99.0% MB removal was achieved at equilibrium.

  4. Ice-surface adsorption enhanced colligative effect of antifreeze proteins in ice growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yougang; Ba, Yong

    2006-09-01

    This Communication describes a mechanism to explain antifreeze protein's function to inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We propose that the adsorption of antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules on an ice surface induces a dense AFP-water layer, which can significantly decrease the mole fraction of the interfacial water and, thus, lower the temperature for a seed ice crystal to grow in a super-cooled AFP solution. This mechanism can also explain the nearly unchanged melting point for the ice crystal due to the AFP's ice-surface adsorption. A mathematical model combining the Langmuir theory of adsorption and the colligative effect of thermodynamics has been proposed to find the equilibrium constants of the ice-surface adsorptions, and the interfacial concentrations of AFPs through fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental thermal hysteresis data. This model has been demonstrated by using the experimental data of serial size-mutated beetle Tenebrio molitor (Tm) AFPs. It was found that the AFP's ice-surface adsorptions could increase the interfacial AFP's concentrations by 3 to 4 orders compared with those in the bulk AFP solutions.

  5. Ice-surface adsorption enhanced colligative effect of antifreeze proteins in ice growth inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yougang; Ba, Yong

    2006-09-01

    This Communication describes a mechanism to explain antifreeze protein's function to inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We propose that the adsorption of antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules on an ice surface induces a dense AFP-water layer, which can significantly decrease the mole fraction of the interfacial water and, thus, lower the temperature for a seed ice crystal to grow in a super-cooled AFP solution. This mechanism can also explain the nearly unchanged melting point for the ice crystal due to the AFP's ice-surface adsorption. A mathematical model combining the Langmuir theory of adsorption and the colligative effect of thermodynamics has been proposed to find the equilibrium constants of the ice-surface adsorptions, and the interfacial concentrations of AFPs through fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental thermal hysteresis data. This model has been demonstrated by using the experimental data of serial size-mutated beetle Tenebrio molitor (Tm) AFPs. It was found that the AFP's ice-surface adsorptions could increase the interfacial AFP's concentrations by 3 to 4 orders compared with those in the bulk AFP solutions.

  6. Adsorption of p-chlorophenol from aqueous solutions on bentonite and perlite.

    PubMed

    Koumanova, Bogdana; Peeva-Antova, P

    2002-03-29

    The adsorption of p-chlorophenol (p-CP) from aqueous solutions on bentonite and perlite was studied. These materials are available in large quantities in Bulgaria. Model solutions of various concentrations (1-50 mgdm(-3)) were shaken with certain amounts of adsorbent to determine the adsorption capacity of p-CP on bentonite and perlite as well. The influence of several individual variables (initial adsorbate concentration, adsorbent mass) on the rate of uptake of the studied compound on the adsorbent was determined by carrying out experiments at different contact times using the batch adsorber vessel designed according to the standard tank configuration. Rapid adsorption was observed 20-30 min after the beginning for every experiment. After that, the concentration of p-CP in the liquid phase remained constant. The adsorption equilibrium of p-CP on bentonite and perlite was described by the Langmuir and the Freundlich models. A higher adsorption capacity was observed for bentonite (10.63 mgg(-1)) compared to that for perlite (5.84 mgg(-1)).

  7. Probing Adsorption / Desorption Processes at the Liquid / Solid Interface: Thiols and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles; Jung, Linda S.; Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer; Nelsen, K. E.; Stayton, P. S.; Gelb, M. H.; Aebersold, R.

    2001-03-01

    The adsorption of molecules from liquid solutions onto solid surfaces can be monitored with high sensitivity and fast time response by following changes in the angle or wavelength at which the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a thin metal film is optically excited. Simple methods convert these measured changes into adsorbate concentrations. We report here the adsorption and desorption kinetics and equilibrium coverages of a variety of species on well-characterized surfaces as determined by SPR techniques. When the diffusion constant of the adsorbing species is known in the liquid phase, the intrinsic rate constants can be determined from the kinetic results. The sticking probability, defined as the rate of adsorption per molecular collision with the surface, directly expresses the difficulty encountered by a molecule in scaling the barrier to adsorption. Its prior use has been restricted to adsorption of gases. A method extending this concept to adsorption from liquid solutions is applied to transient measurements of alkylthiol adsorption onto gold from ethanol solutions. The initial sticking probability increases from 10-8 to 10-6 with alkyl chain length, implying a stabilization of the transition state by 0.65 kJ/mol per CH_2. Since their sticking probabilities in gas phase are 1.0, the solvent increases the activation free energy by 40 kJ/mol. Applications of gold-thin-film SPR sensors in quantifying biological interactions will be described also. A gold surface containing a few biotin headgroups in a self assembled alkylthiolate monolayer of mainly oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) headgroups selectively adsorbs the protein streptavidin with a structure that depends on the biotin / OEG ratio. The free biotin sites in the resulting streptavidin monolayer have been used as strong linker sites for further attachment of intact, biotinylated lipid vesicles and biotinylated, double-stranded oligonucleotides to the surface. These complex biological films then provide a

  8. Organoclays in water cause expansion that facilitates caffeine adsorption.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomohiko; Oguchi, Junpei; Yamamoto, Ken-ichiro; Shiono, Takashi; Fujita, Masahiko; Iiyama, Taku

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the adsorption of caffeine in water on organically modified clays (a natural montmorillonite and synthetic saponite, which are smectite group of layered clay minerals). The organoclays were prepared by cation-exchange reactions of benzylammonium and neostigmine with interlayer exchangeable cations in the clay minerals. Although less caffeine was uptaken on neostigmine-modified clays than on raw clay minerals, uptake was increased by adding benzylammonium to the clays. The adsorption equilibrium constant was considerably higher on benzylammonium-modified saponite (containing small quantities of intercalated benzylammonium) than on its montmorillonite counterpart. These observations suggest that decreasing the size and number of intercalated cations enlarges the siloxane surface area available for caffeine adsorption. When the benzylammonium-smectite powders were immersed in water, the intercalated water molecules expanded the interlayer space. Addition of caffeine to the aqueous dispersion further expanded the benzylammonium-montmorillonite system but showed no effect on benzylammonium-saponite. We assume that intercalated water molecules were exchanged with caffeine molecules. By intercalating benzylammonium into smectites, we have potentially created an adaptable two-dimensional nanospace that sequesters caffeine from aqueous media. PMID:25522121

  9. The effect of mixed HCl-KCl competitive adsorbate on Pt adsorption and catalytic properties of Pt-Sn/Al2O3 catalysts in propane dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangeneh, Farnaz Tahriri; Taeb, Abbas; Gholivand, Khodayar; Sahebdelfar, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The effect of competitive adsorbate concentration and combination on the adsorption of H2PtCl6 onto γ-Al2O3 in the preparation and performance of PtSnK/γ-Al2O3 catalyst for propane dehydrogenation was investigated. The catalysts were prepared by sequential impregnation of Sn and Pt precursors. The effect of competitor concentration on Pt adsorption was studied by using hydrochloric acid (0.1-0.3 M) and the effect of pH was studied by using KCl/HCl mixtures at constant (0.1 M) total chloride ion concentration. The catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption/desorption, XRD, XRF, SEM and CO chemisorption. The catalytic performance tests were carried out in a fixed-bed quartz reactor under kinetic controlled condition for proper catalyst screening. It was found that the corrosive competitor HCl could be partially substituted with KCl without appreciable impact on catalyst performance with the advantage of lower acid attack on the support and reduced leaching of the deposited tin. A model based on initial concentration and uptake of the adsorbates was developed to obtain the adsorption parameters. Values of 890 μmol/g and 600 lit/mol were obtained for adsorption site concentration of the tin-impregnated support and equilibrium constant for Pt adsorption, respectively, for HCl concentration range of 0.1-0.3 M.

  10. Adsorption of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles within layer-by-layer films: a kinetic study carried out using quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Gustavo B; Paterno, Leonardo G; Afonso, André S; Faria, Ronaldo C; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A; Morais, Paulo C; Soler, Maria A G

    2011-12-28

    The paper reports on the successful use of the quartz crystal microbalance technique to assess accurate kinetics and equilibrium parameters regarding the investigation of in situ adsorption of nanosized cobalt ferrite particles (CoFe(2)O(4)--10.5 nm-diameter) onto two different surfaces. Firstly, a single layer of nanoparticles was deposited onto the surface provided by the gold-coated quartz resonator functionalized with sodium 3-mercapto propanesulfonate (3-MPS). Secondly, the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique was used to build multilayers in which the CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle-based layer alternates with the sodium sulfonated polystyrene (PSS) layer. The adsorption experiments were conducted by modulating the number of adsorbed CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS bilayers (n) and/or by changing the CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle concentration while suspended as a stable colloidal dispersion. Adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles onto the 3-MPS-functionalized surface follows perfectly a first order kinetic process in a wide range (two orders of magnitude) of nanoparticle concentrations. These data were used to assess the equilibrium constant and the adsorption free energy. Alternatively, the Langmuir adsorption constant was obtained while analyzing the isotherm data at the equilibrium. Adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles while growing multilayers of CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS was conducted using colloidal suspensions with CoFe(2)O(4) concentration in the range of 10(-8) to 10(-6) (moles of cobalt ferrite per litre) and for different numbers of cycles n = 1, 3, 5, and 10. We found the adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles within the CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS bilayers perfectly following a first order kinetic process, with the characteristic rate constant growing with the increase of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle concentration and decreasing with the rise of the number of LbL cycles (n). Additionally, atomic force microscopy was employed for assessing the LbL film roughness and thickness. We found the film

  11. Kinetics and thermodynamics studies on the BMP-2 adsorption onto hydroxyapatite surface with different multi-morphological features.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhiwei; Huangfu, Changxin; Wang, Yanying; Ge, Hongwei; Yao, Yao; Zou, Ping; Wang, Guangtu; He, Hua; Rao, Hanbing

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the surface topography on protein adsorption process is of great significance for designing hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic material surfaces. In this work, three different topographies of HA materials HA-sheet, HA-rod, and HA-whisker were synthesized and testified by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and a field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). We have systematically investigated the adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2) on the three different topography surfaces of HA, respectively. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacities of HA-sheet, HA-rod and HA-whisker were (219.96 ± 10.18), (247.13 ± 12.35), and (354.67 ± 17.73) μg · g(-1), respectively. Kinetic parameters, rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and related correlation coefficients, for each kinetic model were calculated as well as discussed. It demonstrated that the adsorption of BMP-2 onto HA could be described by the pseudo second-order equation. Adsorption of BMP-2 onto HA followed the Langmuir isotherm. It confirmed that compared with other samples HA-whisker had more adsorption sites for its high specific surface area which could provide more opportunities for protein molecules. The adsorption processes were endothermic (ΔH > 0), spontaneous (ΔG < 0) and entropy increasing (ΔS > 0). A possible adsorption mechanism has been proposed. In addition, the BMP-2 could be adsorbed to the surface which existed slight conformational changes by FT-IR. PMID:25953565

  12. The Perils of Carbonic Acid and Equilibrium Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jencks, William P.; Altura, Rachel A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the effects caused by small amounts of carbon dioxide usually present in water and acid-base equilibria of dilute solutions. Notes that dilute solutions of most weak acids and bases undergo significant dissociation or protonation. (MVL)

  13. Adsorption and transport of gas-phase naphthalene on micron-size fog droplets in air.

    PubMed

    Raja, Suresh; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2004-02-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbon vapors adsorb to the air/water interface and are transported by wet deposition processes via fog, mist, and rain. A falling droplet apparatus was used to study the adsorption and uptake of naphthalene vapor on water droplets with diameters ranging from 14 to 200 microm. Uptake of naphthalene vapor greater than that predicted by bulk (air-water) phase equilibrium was noted for diameters less than 50 microm and was attributed to surface adsorption. The experimental values of the droplet-vapor partition constants were used to obtain the mass accommodation coefficient for naphthalene at the interface. The effect of temperature on the mass accommodation coefficientwas measured. The effects of a synthetic surfactant and a natural organic carbon surrogate (Suwanee Fulvic acid) on the uptake of naphthalene vapors on water droplets were also examined. Small droplet diameter, decreased temperature, and the presence of dissolved surface-active material in water enhanced the uptake of naphthalene into fog droplets.

  14. Application of physical adsorption thermodynamics to heterogeneous chemistry on polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Scott; Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory isotherms for the binding of several nonheterogeneously active atmospheric gases and for HCl to water ice are translated into adsorptive equilibrium constants and surface enthalpies. Extrapolation to polar conditions through the Clausius Clapeyron relation yields coverage estimates below the percent level for N2, Ar, CO2, and CO, suggesting that the crystal faces of type II stratospheric cloud particles may be regarded as clean with respect to these species. For HCl, and perhaps HF and HNO3, estimates rise to several percent, and the adsorbed layer may offer acid or proton sources alternate to the bulk solid for heterogeneous reactions with stratospheric nitrates. Measurements are lacking for many key atmospheric molecules on water ice, and almost entirely for nitric acid trihydrate as substrate. Adsorptive equilibria enter into gas to particle mass flux descriptions, and the binding energy determines rates for desorption of, and encounter between, potential surface reactants.

  15. Optical luminescence studies of diffusion times at the potassium ethyl xanthate adsorption layer on the surface of sphalerite minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, R.; Todoran, D.; Anitas, E. M.; Szakács, Zs

    2016-08-01

    We propose reflectance measurements as a method for the evaluation of the kinetics of adsorption processes, to compute the diffusion times of the adsorption products at the thin layers formed at the sphalerite natural mineral-potassium ethyl xanthate solution interface. The method is based on the intensity measurement of the reflected monochromatic radiation obtained from the mineral-xanthate thin layer as a function of time. These determinations were made at the thin layer formed between the sphalerite or activated sphalerite natural minerals with potassium ethyl xanthate, for different solutions concentrations and pH values at constant temperature. Diffusion times of desorbed molecular species into the liquid bring important information about the global kinetics of the ions in this phase during adsorption processes at interfaces. Analysing the time dependence of this parameter one concluded on the diffusion properties of the xanthate molecule in the solution depending on its concentration and pH, knowing that at the initial time these molecules had a uniform spread. This method enabled us to determine that, in time interval of approximately 35 minutes to achieve dynamic equilibrium in the formation of the interface layer, one had three different kinetic behaviours of our systems. In the first 5-8 min one had highly adsorbent character, the state of equilibrium is followed by low adsorbent properties. Gaining information on the adsorption kinetics in the case of xanthate on mineral surface leads to the optimization of the industrial froth flotation process.

  16. Isotherm study of reactive Blue 19 adsorption by an alum sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khim, Ong Keat; Nor, Mohd Asri Md; Mohamad, Syuriya; Nasaruddin, Nas Aulia Ahmad; Jamari, Nor Laili-Azua; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 using dewatered alum sludge. The dewatered alum sludge was a sludge produced from drinking water treatment plant. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism of the dye adsorption. The adsorption was rapid at its initial stage but the rate decreased as it approached equilibrium. The adsorption data were evaluated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models but was best described by the Langmuir isotherm model as it gave the highest correlation.

  17. Adsorption of phenol on wood surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of phenol on aspen and pine wood is investigated. It is shown that adsorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. The woods' specific surface areas and adsorption interaction constants are determined. It is found that the sorption of phenol on surfaces of aspen and pine is due to Van der Waals interactions ( S sp = 45 m2/godw for aspen and 85 m2/godw for pine). The difference between the adsorption characteristics is explained by properties of the wood samples' microstructures.

  18. Adsorption of paraquat on soil organic matter: effect of exchangeable cations and dissolved organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Gondar, Dora; López, Rocío; Antelo, Juan; Fiol, Sarah; Arce, Florencio

    2012-10-15

    Herbicides that interact with soil organic matter do so with both the solid and the dissolved fractions, so that the distribution of herbicide between the soil solution and solid phases is determined by competitive effects. In the present study, adsorption experiments were carried out with the cationic herbicide paraquat and untreated and acid-washed samples of a peat soil, at different values of pH and ionic strength. Less herbicide was adsorbed onto the untreated peat than onto the acid-washed peat; the difference was due to the presence of exchangeable cations, as demonstrated in experiments carried out by adding Ca(2+) to suspensions of acid-washed peat. The results were interpreted by an electrostatic model and the fitting parameters indicated that the adsorption constants were the same for both samples of peat, although the number of binding sites available was different. Simultaneous resolution of the adsorption equilibrium of paraquat for the soil organic matter (SOM) and of the binding equilibrium between paraquat and dissolved organic matter (DOM) enabled the distribution of paraquat between the solid and solution phases to be determined. The increased solubility of the SOM with increasing pH led to a decrease in the fraction of paraquat retained on the peat surface above pH 5.5, which favors the mobility of the herbicide in the soil.

  19. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium with the Jigsaw Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooperative learning (jigsaw) versus individual learning methods on students’ understanding of chemical equilibrium in a first-year general chemistry course. This study was carried out in two different classes in the department of primary science education during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was randomly assigned as the non-jigsaw group (control) and other as the jigsaw group (cooperative). Students participating in the jigsaw group were divided into four “home groups” since the topic chemical equilibrium is divided into four subtopics (Modules A, B, C and D). Each of these home groups contained four students. The groups were as follows: (1) Home Group A (HGA), representin g the equilibrium state and quantitative aspects of equilibrium (Module A), (2) Home Group B (HGB), representing the equilibrium constant and relationships involving equilibrium constants (Module B), (3) Home Group C (HGC), representing Altering Equilibrium Conditions: Le Chatelier’s principle (Module C), and (4) Home Group D (HGD), representing calculations with equilibrium constants (Module D). The home groups then broke apart, like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, and the students moved into jigsaw groups consisting of members from the other home groups who were assigned the same portion of the material. The jigsaw groups were then in charge of teaching their specific subtopic to the rest of the students in their learning group. The main data collection tool was a Chemical Equilibrium Achievement Test (CEAT), which was applied to both the jigsaw and non-jigsaw groups The results indicated that the jigsaw group was more successful than the non-jigsaw group (individual learning method).

  20. Adsorption mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography in weak buffered mobile phases designed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-03-01

    The overloaded band profiles of five acido-basic compounds were measured, using weakly buffered mobile phases. Low buffer concentrations were selected to provide a better understanding of the band profiles recorded in LC/MS analyses, which are often carried out at low buffer concentrations. In this work, 10 microL samples of a 50 mM probe solution were injected into C(18)-bonded columns using a series of five buffered mobile phases at (SW)pH between 2 and 12. The retention times and the shapes of the bands were analyzed based on thermodynamic arguments. A new adsorption model that takes into account the simultaneous adsorption of the acidic and the basic species onto the endcapped adsorbent, predicts accurately the complex experimental profiles recorded. The adsorption mechanism of acido-basic compounds onto RPLC phases seems to be consistent with the following microscopic model. No matter whether the acid or the base is the neutral or the basic species, the neutral species adsorbs onto a large number of weak adsorption sites (their saturation capacity is several tens g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of 0.1 L/g). In contrast, the ionic species adsorbs strongly onto fewer active sites (their saturation capacity is about 1g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of a few L/g). From a microscopic point of view and in agreement with the adsorption isotherm of the compound measured by frontal analysis (FA) and with the results of Monte-Carlo calculations performed by Schure et al., the first type of adsorption sites are most likely located in between C(18)-bonded chains and the second type of adsorption sites are located deeper in contact with the silica surface. The injected concentration (50 mM) was too low to probe the weakest adsorption sites (saturation capacity of a few hundreds g/L with an equilibrium constant of one hundredth of L/g) that are located at the very interface between the C(18)-bonded layer and the bulk phase. PMID:18976999

  1. Adsorption mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography in weak buffered mobile phases designed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2009-03-01

    The overloaded band profiles of five acido-basic compounds were measured, using weakly buffered mobile phases. Low buffer concentrations were selected to provide a better understanding of the band profiles recorded in LC/MS analyses, which are often carried out at low buffer concentrations. In this work, 10 microL samples of a 50 mM probe solution were injected into C(18)-bonded columns using a series of five buffered mobile phases at (SW)pH between 2 and 12. The retention times and the shapes of the bands were analyzed based on thermodynamic arguments. A new adsorption model that takes into account the simultaneous adsorption of the acidic and the basic species onto the endcapped adsorbent, predicts accurately the complex experimental profiles recorded. The adsorption mechanism of acido-basic compounds onto RPLC phases seems to be consistent with the following microscopic model. No matter whether the acid or the base is the neutral or the basic species, the neutral species adsorbs onto a large number of weak adsorption sites (their saturation capacity is several tens g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of 0.1 L/g). In contrast, the ionic species adsorbs strongly onto fewer active sites (their saturation capacity is about 1g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of a few L/g). From a microscopic point of view and in agreement with the adsorption isotherm of the compound measured by frontal analysis (FA) and with the results of Monte-Carlo calculations performed by Schure et al., the first type of adsorption sites are most likely located in between C(18)-bonded chains and the second type of adsorption sites are located deeper in contact with the silica surface. The injected concentration (50 mM) was too low to probe the weakest adsorption sites (saturation capacity of a few hundreds g/L with an equilibrium constant of one hundredth of L/g) that are located at the very interface between the C(18)-bonded layer and the bulk phase.

  2. Adsorption mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography in weak buffered mobile phases designed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    The overloaded band profiles of five acido-basic compounds were measured, using weakly buffered mobile phases. Low buffer concentrations were selected to provide a better understanding of the band profiles recorded in LC/MS analyses, which are often carried out at low buffer concentrations. In this work, 10 {micro}L samples of a 50 mM probe solution were injected into C{sub 18}-bonded columns using a series of five buffered mobile phases at {sub W}{sup S}pH between 2 and 12. The retention times and the shapes of the bands were analyzed based on thermodynamic arguments. A new adsorption model that takes into account the simultaneous adsorption of the acidic and the basic species onto the endcapped adsorbent, predicts accurately the complex experimental profiles recorded. The adsorption mechanism of acido-basic compounds onto RPLC phases seems to be consistent with the following microscopic model. No matter whether the acid or the base is the neutral or the basic species, the neutral species adsorbs onto a large number of weak adsorption sites (their saturation capacity is several tens g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of 0.1 L/g). In contrast, the ionic species adsorbs strongly onto fewer active sites (their saturation capacity is about 1 g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of a few L/g). From a microscopic point of view and in agreement with the adsorption isotherm of the compound measured by frontal analysis (FA) and with the results of Monte-Carlo calculations performed by Schure et al., the first type of adsorption sites are most likely located in between C{sub 18}-bonded chains and the second type of adsorption sites are located deeper in contact with the silica surface. The injected concentration (50 mM) was too low to probe the weakest adsorption sites (saturation capacity of a few hundreds g/L with an equilibrium constant of one hundredth of L/g) that are located at the very interface between the C{sub 18}-bonded layer and the bulk

  3. Influence of clay on the adsorption of heavy metals like copper and cadmium on chitosan.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Nagan; Latha, Srinivasan; Sudha, Persu N; Renganathan, N Gopalan

    2013-02-01

    The influence of clay on the adsorption of heavy metals like copper and cadmium on chitosan from simulated industrial wastewater is evaluated. Chitosan-clay blend with ratio of (1:1), (1:2), and (2:1) have been prepared, and these were used as membranes to remove copper and cadmium ions from synthetic industrial wastewater. The chemical parameters for quantities of adsorption of heavy metal contamination have been done, and the kinetics of adsorption has also been carried out. Clay provides enough absorbable sites to overcome mass transfer limitations. The number of absorbable sites for cadmium is more compared to copper, and thus the rate of recovery of cadmium is faster than copper, and the percentage removal of cadmium is more than copper at all times on clay over nylon 6. This difference indicates the influence of clay in the adsorption of heavy metals in comparison to synthetic polymer nylon 6. Rate constant for first-order kinetics of adsorption, k (1), for copper and cadmium is less than that of clay, which clearly indicates that clay, which is a natural polymer, is more kinetically favored compared to synthetic polymer. The difference in the intraparticle diffusion in both the natural and synthetic polymer is not much, and it suggests that the particle diffusion mechanism is the same in both cases. Copper and cadmium recovery is parallel at all times. The percentage of removal of copper increased with an increase in pH from 3 to 5. In the case of cadmium containing wastewater, the maximum removal of metal occurred at pH 5. The uptake amount of Cu(2+) ions on chitosan increased rapidly with increasing the contact time from 0 to 360 min and then reaches equilibrium after 360 min, and the equilibrium constant for copper and cadmium ions are more or less the same for the adsorption reaction. There are more adsorption sites for cadmium in the presence of clay and mass transfer limitation is avoided without resorting to rotation, which is the highlight of the

  4. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  5. Linear two-step gradient counter-current chromatography analysis based on a recursive solution of an equilibrium stage model.

    PubMed

    Beltscheva, Daria; Hugo, Peter; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2003-03-01

    The implementation of gradients in continuously operated chromatographic counter-current processes has recently attracted considerable interest as a method to improve the performance of this effective separation method. If liquid mobile phases are applied it is advantageous to set the solvent strength in the desorbent stream higher than that in the feed stream. As a consequence. the components to be separated are more retained in the adsorption zones and more easily eluted in the desorption zones. Due to the additional degrees of freedom the design and the optimization of such a two-step gradient counter-current process is difficult. In this paper a steady state equilibrium stage model is used to simulate the process under linear conditions. A simple solution of the underlying model equations is presented capable to describe efficiently the unit for large stage numbers typically encountered in chromatographic columns. Due to the rapidity of the algorithm developed a broad range of operating conditions can be evaluated systematically for different types of gradients. The impact of (a) the functional dependence of the adsorption equilibrium constants on the solvent composition, (b) the number of equilibrium stages and (c) the specification of purity requirements is illustrated and discussed based on results of parametric calculations. The results achieved emphasize the potential of two-step gradient counter-current chromatography. PMID:12641280

  6. Unexpected coupling between flow and adsorption in porous media.

    PubMed

    Vanson, Jean-Mathieu; Coudert, François-Xavier; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Levesque, Maximilien; Tardivat, Caroline; Klotz, Michaela; Boutin, Anne

    2015-08-14

    We study the interplay between transport and adsorption in porous systems under a fluid flow, based on a lattice Boltzmann scheme extended to account for adsorption. We performed simulations on well-controlled geometries with slit and grooved pores, investigating the influence of adsorption and flow on dispersion coefficient and adsorbed density. In particular, we present a counterintuitive effect where fluid flow induces heterogeneity in the adsorbate, displacing the adsorption equilibrium towards downstream adsorption sites in grooves. We also present an improvement of the adsorption-extended lattice Boltzmann scheme by introducing the possibility for saturating Langmuir-like adsorption, while earlier work focused on linear adsorption phenomena. We then highlight the impact of this change in situations of high concentration of adsorbate. PMID:26139013

  7. Isodynamic axisymmetric equilibrium near the magnetic axis

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V. V.

    2013-08-15

    Plasma equilibrium near the magnetic axis of an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic confinement system is described in orthogonal flux coordinates. For the case of a constant current density in the vicinity of the axis and magnetic surfaces with nearly circular cross sections, expressions for the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components are obtained in these coordinates by using expansion in the reciprocal of the aspect ratio. These expressions allow one to easily derive relationships between quantities in an isodynamic equilibrium, in which the absolute value of the magnetic field is constant along the magnetic surface (Palumbo’s configuration)

  8. Equilibrium Potentials of Membrane Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jui H.; Copeland, Eva

    1973-01-01

    A simple thermodynamic theory of the equilibrium potentials of membrane electrodes is formulated and applied to the glass electrode for measurement of pH. The new formulation assumes the selective adsorption or binding of specific ions on the surface of the membrane which may or may not be permeable to the ion, and includes the conventional derivation based on reversible ion transport across membranes as a special case. To test the theory, a platinum wire was coated with a mixture of stearic acid and methyl-tri-n-octyl-ammonium stearate. When this coated electrode was immersed in aqueous phosphate solution, its potential was found to be a linear function of pH from pH 2 to 12 with a slope equal to the theoretical value of 59.0 mV per pH unit at 24°. PMID:4516194

  9. Extended triple layer modeling of arsenate and phosphate adsorption on a goethite-based granular porous adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M; Fukushi, Keisuke; Green, Peter G; Darby, Jeannie L

    2010-05-01

    The extended triple layer model (ETLM), which is consistent with spectroscopic and theoretical molecular evidence, is first systematically tested for its capability to model adsorption of arsenate and phosphate, a strong competitor, on a common goethite-based granular porous adsorptive media (Bayoxide E33 (E33)) in water treatment systems under a wide range of solution conditions. Deprotonated bidentate-binuclear, protonated bidentate-binuclear, and deprotonated monodentate complexes are chosen as surface species for both arsenate and phosphate. The estimated values of the ETLM parameters of arsenate for the adsorbent are close to those for pure goethite minerals previously determined by others. The ETLM predictions for arsenate and phosphate adsorption basically agree with experimental results over a wide range of pH, surface coverage, and solid concentrations. High background electrolyte concentration (i.e., I = 0.1 M), however, was found to strongly impact arsenate and phosphate adsorption on E33 probably because of the porous structure of the adsorbent, which cannot be observed for pure goethite minerals and could not be completely modeled by the ETLM. Prediction of phosphate adsorption isotherms at higher pH were relatively poor, and this may suggest searching for alternative surface species for phosphate. Since adsorption equilibrium constants of major coexisting ions encountered in water treatment systems for goethite minerals have been estimated by others, the application of ETLM theory to this common goethite-based adsorptive media will enable us to understand how those coexisting ions macroscopically and thermodynamically interact with arsenate and phosphate in the environment of adsorptive water treatment system in a way consistent with molecular and spectroscopic evidence.

  10. Equilibrium binding studies of mono, di and triisocyanide ligands on Au powder surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ontko, A.

    1997-10-08

    The author`s group has previously shown that isocyanides are readily adsorbed from solutions to Au powder and bind to the Au surface in an end-on fashion through the terminal carbon. Later work demonstrated that the equilibrium constants for the reversible adsorption of electronically inequivalent isocyanides could be obtained using the Langmuir isotherm technique. This dissertation describes two projects completed which complement the initial findings of this group. Initially, several alkylisocyanides were synthesized to examine the effect of tail length on Au powder adsorption. It was observed that the length of the alkyl chain affected not only the Au surface binding affinity, but also the rate of surface saturation and saturation coverage values. Direct competition studies were also studied using a {sup 13}C-labeled isocyanide. These studies demonstrated the stabilization afforded by substrate-substrate packing forces in SAM`s formed by the longer chain isocyanides. In a second study, di and triisocyanides were synthesized to determine the effect that the length of the connecting link and the number of isocyanide groups (as points of attachment) have on Au adsorption stability. The work in this area describes the binding modes, relative binding affinities and surface coverage values for a series of flexible alkyl and xylyldiisocyanides on Au powder surfaces. This report contains only the introductory material, and general summary. Two chapters have been processed separately. 56 refs.

  11. PDMS compound adsorption in context.

    PubMed

    Li, Nianzhen; Schwartz, Michael; Ionescu-Zanetti, Cristian

    2009-02-01

    Soft lithography of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), an elastomeric polymer, has enabled rapid and inexpensive fabrication of microfluidic devices for various biotechnology applications. However, concerns remain about adsorption of compounds on PDMS surfaces because of its porosity and hydrophobicity. Here, the adsorption of 2 small fluorescent dyes of different hydrophobicity (calcein and 5- (and 6-)carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMR)) on PDMS surface has been systematically characterized, and PDMS adsorption has been compared with 2 traditional substrates: glass and polystyrene. To characterize adsorption in a regimen that is more relevant to microfluidic applications, the adsorption and desorption of the 2 compounds in PDMS microfluidic channels under flow conditions were also studied. Results showed that there was minimal adsorption of the hydrophilic compound calcein on PDMS, whereas the more hydrophobic TMR adsorbed on PDMS up to 4 times of that on glass or polystyrene. Under flow conditions, the desorption profiles and times needed to drop desorbed compound concentrations to negligible levels (desorption time constant, 10-42 s) were characterized. In the worst case scenario, after a 4-min exposure to TMR, 4 min of continuous wash resulted in compound concentrations in the microchannels to drop to values below 2 x 10(- 5) of the initial concentration.

  12. Adsorption-desorption behavior of thiram onto humic acid.

    PubMed

    Filipe, O M S; Vidal, M M; Duarte, A C; Santos, E B H

    2009-06-10

    The adsorption/desorption behavior of pure thiram (Thi-P) and formulated thiram (Thi-F) onto commercial humic acids (HA) was studied using a batch equilibration procedure. Results of adsorption kinetic experiments showed that thiram adsorption is a fast process since 85% of the equilibrium concentration is reached within two hours. Experimental K(D) values between 0.110 to 0.210 L g(-1) were obtained for the adsorption of both Thi-P and Thi-F onto HA, suggesting that thiram is strongly sorbed by humic acids. In general, for both Thi-P and Thi-F, the lower the initial thiram concentration, the stronger is its adsorption (higher K(D) and percentage adsorption values). The adsorption isotherms were found to match the BET model. The results show that thiram adsorption onto condensed humic acids cannot be explained only in terms of specific interactions, such as those identified in studies of adsorption of thiram with humic acids in solution. The comparison of sorption and desorption results allowed the observation of hysteresis phenomena. Desorption K(D) values were consistently higher than those for adsorption at the same equilibrium concentration. Hysteresis was lower for the formulated thiram suggesting that adsorption is more reversible in the presence of the formulation components turning the pesticide more susceptible to be leached.

  13. [Study on phosphorus adsorption characteristic of sediments in an ecological ditch].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Nan; Jia, Zhao-Yue; Xiao, Run-Lin; Yang, Feng-Fei; Yu, Hong-Bing; Liu, Feng; Wu, Jin-Shui

    2013-03-01

    Sediments properties and phosphorus (P) adsorption capacities were compared among the samples of 0-5 cm and 5-15 cm layers from the ecological ditch vegetated with Cenetlla asiatica, Sparganium stoloniferum and a natural agricultural ditch with weeds. The results showed the 0-5 cm sediment vegetated with Cenetlla asiatica had higher concentrations of oxalate extracted Fe, Al and P than those vegetated with Sparganium stoloniferum or weeds. The parameters calculated from the Freudlich and Langmiur isotherms showed the equilibrium phosphate concentration (EPC0) ranged from 0.009 to 0.031 mg x L(-1). Cenetlla asiatica in the 0-5 cm layer had the maximum values of 352.2 L x kg(-1) and 562.7 mg x kg(-1) for Freundlich adsorption constant (K(f)) and Langmuir sorption maximum (S(max)), respectively, which proved it had the highest P adsorption capacity. The regression analysis showed P sorption parameters had significant relationship to oxalate-extracted Fe, clay content and DPS (P < 0.05). It was thus clear that aquatic plants influenced sediment properties and P adsorption capacity, and the practice of growing proper plants in ecological ditch could reduce the risk of P loss in non-point source pollution.

  14. Investigation into adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene in an annular fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor.

    PubMed

    Geng, Qijin; Tang, Shankang; Wang, Lintong; Zhang, Yunchen

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene were investigated considering the operating variables and kinetic mechanism using nano-titania agglomerates in an annular fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor (AFBPR) designed. The special adsorption equilibrium constant, adsorption active sites, and apparent reaction rate coefficient of benzene were determined by linear regression analysis at various gas velocities and relative humidities (RH). Based on a series of photocatalytic degradation kinetic equations, the influences of operating variables on degradation efficiency, apparent reaction rate coefficient and half-life were explored. The findings indicated that the operating variables have obviously influenced the adsorption/photocatalytic degradation and corresponding kinetic parameters. In the photocatalytic degradation process, the relationship between photocatalytic degradation efficiency and RH indicated that water molecules have a dual-function which was related to the structure characteristics of benzene. The optimal operating conditions for photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene in AFBPR were determined as the fluidization number at 1.9 and RH required related to benzene concentration. This investigation highlights the importance of controlling RH and benzene concentration in order to obtain the desired synergy effect in photocatalytic degradation processes.

  15. Design of a hybrid advective-diffusive microfluidic system with ellipsometric detection for studying adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Cunlu; Wijnperlé, Daniel; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-05-01

    Establishing and maintaining concentration gradients that are stable in space and time is critical for applications that require screening the adsorption behavior of organic or inorganic species onto solid surfaces for wide ranges of fluid compositions. In this work, we present a design of a simple and compact microfluidic device based on steady-state diffusion of the analyte, between two control channels where liquid is pumped through. The device generates a near-linear distribution of concentrations. We demonstrate this via experiments with dye solutions and comparison to finite-element numerical simulations. In a subsequent step, the device is combined with total internal reflection ellipsometry to study the adsorption of (cat)ions on silica surfaces from CsCl solutions at variable pH. Such a combined setup permits a fast determination of an adsorption isotherm. The measured optical thickness is compared to calculations from a triple layer model for the ion distribution, where surface complexation reactions of the silica are taken into account. Our results show a clear enhancement of the ion adsorption with increasing pH, which can be well described with reasonable values for the equilibrium constants of the surface reactions. PMID:27375818

  16. Adsorption of small biological molecules on silica from diluted aqueous solutions: Quantitative characterization and implications to the Bernal's hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Gromovoy, Taras Yu.; Khil'Chevskaya, Elena G.

    1995-08-01

    To describe quantitatively the adsorption of prebiotically important compounds of low molecular weight (amino acids, short linear peptides, cyclic dipeptides, the Krebs's cycle and other carboxylic acids, nucleosides and related phosphates) on silica surface from diluted neutral aqueous solutions, equilibrium constants (K) and free energies (-ΔG) of adsorption were determined from the retention values measured by means of high-performance liquid chromatography on a silica gel column and from the isotherms measured under static conditions. For most carboxylic acids (including amino acids and linear peptides) -ΔG values were negative and K<1, thus showing very weak adsorption. Cyclic dipeptides (2,5-piperazinediones) exhibited higher adsorbability; -ΔG>0 and K>1 were found for most of them. Influence of the structure of α-substituent on the adsorbability is analyzed. A linear dependence of -ΔG on the number of aliphatic carbon atoms in a sorbate molecule was found for the series of aliphatic bifunctional amino acids, related dipeptides and 2,5-piperazinediones, as well as for the row from glycine to triglycyl glycine. The adsorption of nucleosides and their phosphates is characterized by much higherK and -ΔG values (of the order of 102 and 104, respectively). The adsorption data available from our work and literature are summarized and discussed with implications to the Bernal's hypothesis on the roles of solid surfaces in the prebiotic formation of biopolymers from monomeric ‘building blocks’.

  17. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters. PMID:26657085

  18. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters.

  19. Empirical prediction of heats of vaporization and heats of adsorption of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Goss, K.U.; Schwarzenbach, R.P.

    1999-10-01

    Partitioning between the gas phase and ambient condensed phases is an important process in determining the transport and fate of organic chemicals in the atmosphere as well as in other environmental compartments exhibiting a vadose zone (e.g., soils). In general, partition processes including the gas phase are strongly temperature dependent and the respective enthalpies of transfer need to be known. Unfortunately, such data are often not available. In this paper, the authors evaluate the possibilities of estimating both the enthalpies of vaporization from the pure liquid and the enthalpies of gas/surface adsorption of organic compounds from either their (subcooled) liquid vapor pressure or their equilibrium adsorption constant at a particular temperature. Such an approach becomes possible when linear relationships between the enthalpy and entropy, and hence between the enthalpy and the logarithm of the partition constant, exist. Using literature data reported for almost 200 compounds covering a wide range of compound classes the authors have derived an empirical relationship that can be used to estimate the enthalpy of vaporization, {Delta}{sub vap}H{sub i}, of a given compound i from its saturated liquid vapor pressure, {rho}{sub iL}, at 25 C: {Delta}{sub vap}H{sub i} (kJ/mol) = {minus}3.82({+-}0.03) In {rho}{sub iL}* (Pa, 25 C) + 70.0({+-}0.2); n = 195, r{sup 2} = 0.99. An analogous equation is given for the estimation of the enthalpy of adsorption of organic vapors to mineral surfaces. The application of this equation to other surfaces including liquid and solid organic phases as well as the liquid water surface is discussed. The equations presented are useful practical tools for approximating the temperature dependence of liquid vapor pressure and of vapor/surface adsorption constants of organic chemicals in the ambient temperature range.

  20. Removal of hazardous azopyrazole dye from an aqueous solution using rice straw as a waste adsorbent: Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bindary, Ashraf A.; El-Sonbati, Adel Z.; Al-Sarawy, Ahmad A.; Mohamed, Khaled S.; Farid, Mansour A.

    2015-02-01

    In this research, activated carbonmade from rice straw (ACRS) was synthesized simply by a low cost and nontoxic procedure and used for the adsorption of hazardous azopyrazole dye. The effect of different variables in the batch method as a function of solution pH, contact time, concentration of adsorbate, adsorbent dosage and temperature were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertaine. Surface modification of ACRS using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was obtained. More than 75% removal efficiency was obtained within 75 min at adsorbent dose of 0.5 g for initial dye concentration of 30-100 mg L-1 at pH 3. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by the isotherm models namely, Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption and the isotherm constants were determined. The kinetic data obtained with different initial concentration and temperature were analyzed using a pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated and found to be +13.25 kJ mol-1 indicating that the adsorption is physisorption. The thermodynamics of the adsorption indicated spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. The results indicate that ACRS could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of acid dyes from aqueous solution.

  1. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that the GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.

  2. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that themore » GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.« less

  3. Comparative studies on adsorptive removal of heavy metal ions by biosorbent, bio-char and activated carbon obtained from low cost agro-residue.

    PubMed

    Kırbıyık, Çisem; Pütün, Ayşe Eren; Pütün, Ersan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Fe(III) and Cr(III) metal ion adsorption processes were carried out with three adsorbents in batch experiments and their adsorption performance was compared. These adsorbents were sesame stalk without pretreatment, bio-char derived from thermal decomposition of biomass, and activated carbon which was obtained from chemical activation of biomass. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared techniques were used for characterization of adsorbents. The optimum conditions for the adsorption process were obtained by observing the influences of solution pH, adsorbent dosage, initial solution concentration, contact time and temperature. The optimum adsorption efficiencies were determined at pH 2.8 and pH 4.0 for Fe(III) and Cr(III) metal ion solutions, respectively. The experimental data were modelled by different isotherm models and the equilibriums were well described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetic, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich models were applied to analyze the kinetic data and to evaluate rate constants. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model gave a better fit than the others. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy change ΔG°, standard enthalpy change ΔH° and standard entropy change ΔS° were evaluated. The thermodynamic study showed the adsorption was a spontaneous endothermic process. PMID:26819399

  4. Effects of dissolved carbonate on arsenate adsorption and surface speciation at the hematite--water interface.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yuji; Sparks, D L; Davis, J A

    2004-02-01

    Effects of dissolved carbonate on arsenate [As(V)] reactivity and surface speciation at the hematite-water interface were studied as a function of pH and two different partial pressures of carbon dioxide gas [P(CO2) = 10(-3.5) atm and approximately 0; CO2-free argon (Ar)] using adsorption kinetics, pseudo-equilibrium adsorption/titration experiments, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic (EXAFS) analyses, and surface complexation modeling. Different adsorbed carbonate concentrations, due to the two different atmospheric systems, resulted in an enhanced and/or suppressed extent of As(V) adsorption. As(V) adsorption kinetics [4 g L(-1), [As(V)]0 = 1.5 mM and I = 0.01 M NaCl] showed carbonate-enhanced As(V) uptake in the air-equilibrated systems at pH 4 and 6 and at pH 8 after 3 h of reaction. Suppressed As(V) adsorption was observed in the air-equilibrated system in the early stages of the reaction at pH 8. In the pseudo-equilibrium adsorption experiments [1 g L(-1), [As(V)]0 = 0.5 mM and I = 0.01 M NaCI], in which each pH value was held constant by a pH-stat apparatus, effects of dissolved carbonate on As(V) uptake were almost negligible at equilibrium, but titrant (0.1 M HCl) consumption was greater in the air-equilibrated systems (P(CO2) = 10(-3.5) atm) than in the CO2-free argon system at pH 4-7.75. The EXAFS analyses indicated that As(V) tetrahedral molecules were coordinated on iron octahedral via bidentate mononuclear ( 2.8 A) and bidentate binuclear (approximately equal to 3.3 A) bonding at pH 4.5-8 and loading levels of 0.46-3.10 microM m(-2). Using the results of the pseudo-equilibrium adsorption data and the XAS analyses, the pH-dependent As(V) adsorption under the P(CO2) = 10(-3.5) atm and the CO2-free argon system was modeled using surface complexation modeling, and the results are consistent with the formation of nonprotonated bidentate surface species at the hematite surfaces. The results also suggest that the acid titrant consumption

  5. Effect of thermal pretreatment on equilibrium moisture content of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Acharjee, Tapas C; Coronella, Charles J; Vasquez, Victor R

    2011-04-01

    The equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of raw lignocellulosic biomass, along with four samples subjected to thermal pretreatment, was measured at relative humidities ranging from 11% to 97% at a constant temperature of 30 °C. Three samples were prepared by treatment in hot compressed water by a process known as wet torrefaction, at temperatures of 200, 230, and 260 °C. An additional sample was prepared by dry torrefaction at 300 °C. Pretreated biomass shows EMC below that of raw biomass. This indicates that pretreated biomass, both dry and wet torrefied, is more hydrophobic than raw biomass. The EMC results were correlated with a recent model that takes into account additional non-adsorption interactions of water, such as mixing and swelling. The model offers physical insight into the water activity in lignocellulosic biomass.

  6. Sound speeds in suspensions in thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temkin, S.

    1992-11-01

    This work considers sound propagation in suspensions of particles of constant mass in fluids, in both relaxed and frozen thermodynamic equilibrium. Treating suspensions as relaxing media, thermodynamic arguments are used to obtain their sound speeds in equilibrium conditions. The results for relaxed equilibrium, which is applicable in the limit of low frequencies, agree with existing theories for aerosols, but disagree with Wood's equation. It is shown that the latter is thermodynamically correct only in the exceptional case when the specific heat ratios of the fluid and of the particles are equal to unity. In all other cases discrepancies occur. These may be significant when one of the two phases in the suspension is a gas, as is the case in aerosols and in bubbly liquids. The paper also includes a brief discussion of the sound speed in frozen equilibrium.

  7. Radiative-dynamical equilibrium states for Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L. M.; Stone, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    In order to obtain accurate estimates of the radiative heating that drives motions in Jupiter's atmosphere, previous radiative equilibrium calculations are improved by including the NH3 opacities and updated results for the pressure-induced opacities. These additions increase the radiative lapse rate near the top of the statically unstable region and lead to a fairly constant radiative lapse rate below the tropopause. The radiative-convective equilibrium temperature structure consistent with these changes is calculated, but it differs only slightly from earlier calculations. The radiative equilibrium calculations are used to calculate whether equilibrium states can occur on Jupiter which are similar to the baroclinic instability regimes on the earth and Mars. The results show that Jupiter's dynamical regime cannot be of this kind, except possibly at very high latitudes, and that its regime must be a basically less stable one than this kind.

  8. Applications and limits of theoretical adsorption models for predicting the adsorption properties of adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Ju; Nguyen, Duc Canh; Na, Choon-Ki; Kim, Chung-il

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the applicability of adsorption models for predicting the properties of adsorbents. The kinetics of the adsorption of NO3- ions on a PP-g-AA-Am non-woven fabric have been investigated under equilibrium conditions in both batch and fixed bed column processes. The adsorption equilibrium experiments in the batch process were carried out under different adsorbate concentration and adsorbent dosage conditions and the results were analyzed using adsorption isotherm models, energy models, and kinetic models. The results of the analysis indicate that the adsorption occurring at a fixed adsorbate concentration with a varying adsorbent dosage occur more easily compared to those under a fixed adsorbent dosage with a varying adsorbate concentration. In the second part of the study, the experimental data obtained using fixed bed columns were fit to Bed Depth Service Time, Bohart-Adams, Clark, and Wolborska models, to predict the breakthrough curves and determine the column kinetic parameters. The adsorption properties of the NO3- ions on the PP-g-AA-Am non-woven fabric were differently described by different models for both the batch and fixed bed column process. Therefore, it appears reasonable to assume that the adsorption properties were dominated by multiple mechanisms, depending on the experimental conditions.

  9. Equilibrium structure of gas phase o-benzyne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groner, Peter; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2006-01-01

    An equilibrium structure has been derived for o-benzyne from experimental rotational constants of seven isotopomers and vibration-rotation constants calculated from MP2 (full)/6-31G(d) quadratic and cubic force fields. In the case of benzene, this method yields results that are in excellent agreement with those obtained from high quality ab initio force fields. The ab initio-calculated vibrational averaging corrections were applied to the measured A0, B0 and C0 rotational constants and the resulting experimental, near-equilibrium, rotational constants were used in a least squares fit to determine the approximate equilibrium structural parameters. The C-C bond lengths for this equilibrium structure of o-benzyne are, beginning with the formal triple bond (C 1-C 2): 1.255, 1.383, 1.403 and 1.405 Å. The bond angles obtained are in good agreement with most of the recent ab initio predictions.

  10. Getting Freshman in Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various aspects of chemical equilibrium were discussed in six papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). These include student problems in understanding hydrolysis, helping students discover/uncover topics, equilibrium demonstrations, instructional strategies, and flaws to kinetic…

  11. Removal of Cr(III) from chrome tanning wastewater by adsorption using two natural carbonaceous materials: Eggshell and powdered marble.

    PubMed

    Elabbas, Saliha; Mandi, Laila; Berrekhis, Fatima; Pons, Marie Noelle; Leclerc, Jean Pierre; Ouazzani, Naaila

    2016-01-15

    In the present paper, eggshell and powdered marble, two carbonaceous materials, were used to remove Cr(III) ions from a real chrome tanning wastewater. The effects of initial effluent pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were studied. The maximum uptake of chromium ions was obtained at pH 5.0 with the dose 20 g L(-1) and 12 g L(-1) for eggshell and powdered marble respectively. Adsorption equilibrium was reached after 14 h contact time for eggshell and only after 30 min for powdered marble. Under these conditions, almost 99% Cr(III) was removed from chrome tanning wastewater having an initial concentration of chromium of 3.21 g L(-1). Kinetic data were satisfactorily described by a pseudo-second order chemical sorption model. The equilibrium rate constant was notably greater for powdered marble than for eggshell with 1.142·10(-3) (g mg(-1) min(-1)) and 0.041·10(-3) (g mg(-1) min(-1)) respectively. The adsorption isotherm were well described by a Langmuir model and showed that the interaction of chromium with the two adsorbents surface is a localized monolayer adsorption with a smaller energy constant for the powdered marble than for eggshell (0.020 (L mg(-1)) and 0.083 (L mg(-1)) respectively). The powdered marble was able to adsorb faster a large amount of Cr (III) in comparison to eggshell. The use of a standardized lettuce seed bioassay allowed evaluating a better effectiveness of the Cr adsorption on the powdered marble, removing up to 40% of the treated effluent toxicity than by eggshell 25%. The powdered marble could be considered as an effective, low cost carbonaceous material to be used for chromium removal from tanning wastewater.

  12. Removal of Cr(III) from chrome tanning wastewater by adsorption using two natural carbonaceous materials: Eggshell and powdered marble.

    PubMed

    Elabbas, Saliha; Mandi, Laila; Berrekhis, Fatima; Pons, Marie Noelle; Leclerc, Jean Pierre; Ouazzani, Naaila

    2016-01-15

    In the present paper, eggshell and powdered marble, two carbonaceous materials, were used to remove Cr(III) ions from a real chrome tanning wastewater. The effects of initial effluent pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were studied. The maximum uptake of chromium ions was obtained at pH 5.0 with the dose 20 g L(-1) and 12 g L(-1) for eggshell and powdered marble respectively. Adsorption equilibrium was reached after 14 h contact time for eggshell and only after 30 min for powdered marble. Under these conditions, almost 99% Cr(III) was removed from chrome tanning wastewater having an initial concentration of chromium of 3.21 g L(-1). Kinetic data were satisfactorily described by a pseudo-second order chemical sorption model. The equilibrium rate constant was notably greater for powdered marble than for eggshell with 1.142·10(-3) (g mg(-1) min(-1)) and 0.041·10(-3) (g mg(-1) min(-1)) respectively. The adsorption isotherm were well described by a Langmuir model and showed that the interaction of chromium with the two adsorbents surface is a localized monolayer adsorption with a smaller energy constant for the powdered marble than for eggshell (0.020 (L mg(-1)) and 0.083 (L mg(-1)) respectively). The powdered marble was able to adsorb faster a large amount of Cr (III) in comparison to eggshell. The use of a standardized lettuce seed bioassay allowed evaluating a better effectiveness of the Cr adsorption on the powdered marble, removing up to 40% of the treated effluent toxicity than by eggshell 25%. The powdered marble could be considered as an effective, low cost carbonaceous material to be used for chromium removal from tanning wastewater. PMID:26598282

  13. Stoichiometry and Formation Constant Determination by Linear Sweep Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Franklin A.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper an experiment is described in which the equilibrium constants necessary for determining the composition and distribution of lead (II)-oxalate species may be measured by linear sweep voltammetry. (Author/BB)

  14. A Better Way of Dealing with Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tykodi, Ralph J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses how to address the concept of chemical equilibrium through the use of thermodynamic activities. Describes the advantages of setting up an equilibrium constant in terms of activities and demonstrates how to approximate those activities by practical measures such as partial pressures, mole fractions, and molar concentrations. (TW)

  15. Formation of nitric acid hydrates - A chemical equilibrium approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roland H.

    1990-01-01

    Published data are used to calculate equilibrium constants for reactions of the formation of nitric acid hydrates over the temperature range 190 to 205 K. Standard enthalpies of formation and standard entropies are calculated for the tri- and mono-hydrates. These are shown to be in reasonable agreement with earlier calorimetric measurements. The formation of nitric acid trihydrate in the polar stratosphere is discussed in terms of these equilibrium constants.

  16. [Ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium in natural clinoptilolite].

    PubMed

    He, Yun-Hua; Li, Hang; Liu, Xin-Min; Xiong, Hai-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Zeolites have been widely applied in soil improvement and environment protection. The study on ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium is of important significance for better use of zeolites. The maximum adsorption capacities of alkali ions during ion exchange equilibrium in the clinoptilolite showed obvious specificity. For alkali metal ions with equivalent valence, the differences in adsorption capacity increased with the decrease of ionic concentration. These results cannot be well explained by the classical theories including coulomb force, ionic size, hydration, dispersion force, classic induction force and surface complexation. We found that the coupling of polarization effects resulted from the quantum fluctuation of diverse alkali metal ions and electric field near the zeolite surface should be the primary reason for specific ion effect during ion exchange in zeolite. The result of this coupling effect was that the difference in the ion dipole moment increased with the increase of surface potential, which further expanded the difference in the adsorption ability between zeolite surface and ions, resulting in different ion exchange adsorption ability at the solid/liquid interface. Due to the high surface charge density of zeolite, ionic size also played an important role in the distribution of ions in the double diffuse layer, which led to an interesting result that distinct differences in exchange adsorption ability of various alkali metal ions were only detected at high surface potential (the absolute value was greater than 0.2 V), which was different from the ion exchange equilibrium result on the surface with low charge density.

  17. Study of the kinetics and the adsorption isotherm of cadmium(II) from aqueous solution using green algae (Ulva lactuca) biomass.

    PubMed

    Asnaoui, H; Laaziri, A; Khalis, M

    2015-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption of hazardous cadmium onto low-cost algae biomass in aqueous solution with respect to concentration of adsorbate, adsorbent dosage, contact time, solution pH and temperature. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were determined. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated for the adsorption of cadmium onto Ulva lactuca biomass. Experimental data were tested in terms of biosorption kinetics using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The results showed that the biosorption processes of Cd(II) followed well pseudo-second-order kinetics. Langmuir and Freundlich models were applied to describe the biosorption isotherm of the metal ions by Ulva lactuca biomass. Langmuir model fitted the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm. The biosorption capacity of Ulva lactuca biomass for cadmium was found to be 3.02 mg/g at pH 5.60 min equilibrium time and 20 °C. The mean free energy which was calculated was 6.24 kJ/mol for Cd(II) biosorption, which shows that the adsorption is physical. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0) showed that the biosorption of Cd(II) onto Ulva lactuca biomass was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under examined conditions. The results indicate that algae Ulva lactuca could be employed as a low-cost material for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solution. PMID:26524441

  18. A New Application for Radioimmunoassay: Measurement of Thermodynamic Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angstadt, Carol N.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which an equilibrium radioimmunoassay (RIA) is used to estimate thermodynamic parameters such as equilibrium constants. The experiment is simple and inexpensive, and it introduces a technique that is important in the clinical chemistry and research laboratory. Background information, procedures, and results are…

  19. Chemical Equilibrium, Unit 3: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Cynthia J.

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student materials for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student manual for this unit on chemical equilibrium calculations includes objectives, prerequisites, a discussion of the equilibrium constant (K), and ten…

  20. Adsorption of selenite and selenate by nanocrystalline aluminum oxide, neat and impregnated in chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Yamani, Jamila S; Lounsbury, Amanda W; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2014-03-01

    Nanocrystalline metal oxide impregnated chitosan beads (MICB) were successfully developed with nanocrystalline aluminum oxide (n-Al2O3) to form n-Al2O3 impregnated chitosan beads (AICB). AICB were able to simultaneously adsorb inorganic aqueous selenite and selenate more effectively than n-Al2O3 or chitosan alone. For completeness, adsorption performance was also compared to n-TiO2, a widely studied adsorbent for selenium, and n-TiO2 impregnated chitosan beads (TICB). For the selenite system, n-Al2O3 was the primary active adsorbent responsible for removal as chitosan has a low affinity for selenite. For selenate, however, chitosan was the primary active adsorbent. The association constants for the adsorbent/adsorbate complexes and the relative amounts in which they are present supported this hypothesis. The association constants for selenate binding on n-Al2O3 and chitosan were 1.215 × 10(-2) and 3.048 × 10(-3), respectively, and the association constants for selenite binding on n-Al2O3 and chitosan were 1.349 × 10(-2) and 1.990 × 10(-4), respectively. For systems with coexisting selenite and selenate, AICB is potentially the most robust option as it maintained the most consistent performance regardless of fractionation of the selenium species. Kinetic studies and equilibrium isotherms were completed and effectively modeled using pseudo-second order kinetics and Langmuir adsorption theory, making it the first comprehensive systematic study of neat n-Al2O3 and AICB for selenium adsorption. pH significantly impacted adsorption due to changes in the adsorbent surface charge; increasing pH corresponded with decreasing adsorbent performance, beginning at approximately pH 6.5-7 for AICB. The trend in performance due to the effect of pH indicated that selenate binds to the amine group in chitosan, as suggested by other studies. In addition, increasing background sulfate concentration was found to negatively impact adsorption efficacy for both selenite, and

  1. Effects of Dissolved Carbonate on Arsenate Adsorption and Surface Speciation at the Hematite-Water Interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; Sparks, D.L.; Davis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of dissolved carbonate on arsenate [As(V)] reactivity and surface speciation at the hematite-water interface were studied as a function of pH and two different partial pressures of carbon dioxide gas [PCO2 = 10 -3.5 atm and ???0; CO2-free argon (Ar)] using adsorption kinetics, pseudo-equilibrium adsorption/titration experiments, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic (EXAFS) analyses, and surface complexation modeling. Different adsorbed carbonate concentrations, due to the two different atmospheric systems, resulted in an enhanced and/or suppressed extent of As(V) adsorption. As(V) adsorption kinetics [4 g L -1, [As(V)]0 = 1.5 mM and / = 0.01 M NaCl] showed carbonate-enhanced As(V) uptake in the air-equilibrated systems at pH 4 and 6 and at pH 8 after 3 h of reaction. Suppressed As(V) adsorption was observed in the air-equilibrated system in the early stages of the reaction at pH 8. In the pseudo-equilibrium adsorption experiments [1 g L-1, [As(V)] 0 = 0.5 mM and / = 0.01 M NaCl], in which each pH value was held constant by a pH-stat apparatus, effects of dissolved carbonate on As(V) uptake were almost negligible at equilibrium, but titrant (0.1 M HCl) consumption was greater in the air-equilibrated systems (PCO2 = 10-3.5 atm)than in the CO2-free argon system at pH 4-7.75. The EXAFS analyses indicated that As(V) tetrahedral molecules were coordinated on iron octahedral via bidentate mononuclear (???2.8 A??) and bidentate binuclear (???3.3 A??) bonding at pH 4.5-8 and loading levels of 0.46-3.10 ??M m-2. Using the results of the pseudoequilibrium adsorption data and the XAS analyses, the pH-dependent As(V) adsorption under the PCO2 = 10-3.5 atm and the CO2-free argon system was modeled using surface complexation modeling, and the results are consistent with the formation of nonprotonated bidentate surface species at the hematite surfaces. The results also suggest that the acid titrant consumption was strongly affected by changes to

  2. Adsorption mechanism in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Effect of the surface coverage of a monomeric C18-silica stationary phase

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-04-01

    The effect of the bonding density of the octadecyl chains onto the same silica on the adsorption and retention properties of low molecular weight compounds (phenol, caffeine, and sodium 2-naphthalene sulfonate) was investigated. The same mobile phase (methanol:water, 20:80, v/v) and temperature (T = 298 K) were applied and two duplicate columns (A and B) from each batch of packing material (neat silica, simply endcapped or C{sub 1} phase, 0.42, 1.01, 2.03, and 3.15 {micro}mol/m{sup 2} of C{sub 18} alkyl chains) were tested. Adsorption data of the three compounds were acquired by frontal analysis (FA) and the adsorption energy distributions (AEDs) were calculated using the expectation-maximization method. Results confirmed earlier findings in linear chromatography of a retention maximum at an intermediate bonding density. From a general point of view, the saturation capacity of the adsorbent tends to decrease with increasing bonding density, due to the vanishing space intercalated between the C{sub 18} bonded chains and to the decrease of the specific surface area of the stationary phase. The equilibrium constants are maximum for an intermediary bonding density ({approx}2 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}). An enthalpy-entropy compensation was found for the thermodynamic parameters of the isotherm data. Weak equilibrium constants (small {Delta}H) and high saturation capacities (large {Delta}S) were observed at low bonding densities, higher equilibrium constants and lower saturation capacities at high bonding densities, the combinations leading to similar apparent retention in RPLC. The use of a low surface coverage column is recommended for preparative purposes.

  3. Microwave spectrum and equilibrium structure of o-xylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Natalja; Demaison, Jean; Geiger, Werner; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2013-06-01

    Ground state rotational constants were determined for 14 isotopologues of o-xylene. These rotational constants have been corrected with the rovibrational constants calculated from a quantum chemical force field. It was found that the derived semiexperimental equilibrium rotational constants of the deuterated isotopologues are not fully compatible with those of the non-deuterated ones. To mitigate the consequences of this incompatibility, the semiexperimental equilibrium rotational constants of the non-deuterated isotopologues have been supplemented by structural parameters, in particular those for hydrogen atoms, from high level ab initio calculations. The combined data have been used in a weighted least-squares fit to determine an accurate equilibrium structure. It was shown, at least in the present case, that the empirical structures are not sufficiently accurate and are, therefore, hardly appropriate for large molecules with many hydrogen atoms.

  4. Far-from-equilibrium kinetic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubí, J. Miguel; Pérez-Madrid, Agustin

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the kinetics of activated processes that take place under far-from-equilibrium conditions, when the system is subjected to external driving forces or gradients or at high values of affinities. We use mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics to show that when a force is applied, the reaction rate depends on the force. In the case of a chemical reaction at high affinity values, the reaction rate is no longer constant but depends on affinity, which implies that the law of mass action is no longer valid. This result is in good agreement with the kinetic theory of reacting gases, which uses a Chapman-Enskog expansion of the probability distribution.

  5. Adsorption of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane by various adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Lin, R.C.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate gas-phase adsorption characteristics of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) by activated carbon fiber, extruded activated carbon, granular activated carbon, activated alumina, and molecular sieve. HGC-134a is currently regarded as an excellent replacement for chlorofluorocarbon-12, a refrigerating and cooling agent extensively used previously in all automobiles and many cooling systems. Performances of HFC-134a adsorption were characterized by the equilibrium adsorption capacity, time to reach equilibrium, and desorption efficiency of exhausted adsorbent. A simple thermal treatment process with proper operating temperature and treatment duration was found to be effective for the regeneration of exhausted absorbents. Adsorption isotherms of the empirical Freundlich and Hossens types were observed to adequately represent the equilibrium adsorption data. A mass transfer model based on the pseudo steady state squared driving force was adopted to describe the mass transfer process of HFC-134a adsorption.

  6. Application of an equilibrium-based model for diffusion barrier charcoal canisters in a small volume non-steady state radon chamber.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, A L; Thompson, K H; Kearfott, K J

    2011-02-01

    Radon in indoor air is often measured using activated charcoal in canisters. These are generally calibrated using large, humidity- and temperature-controlled radon chambers capable of maintaining a constant radon concentration over several days. Reliable and reproducible chambers are expensive and may be difficult to create and maintain. This study characterizes a small radon chamber in which Rn gas is allowed to build up over a period of several days for use in charcoal canister calibration and educational demonstrations, as well as various radon experiments using charcoal canisters. Predictive models have been developed that accurately describe radon gas kinetics in the charcoal canisters. Three models are available for kinetics in the small chamber with and without radon-adsorbing charcoal canisters. Presented here are both theoretical and semi-empirical applications of this equilibrium-based model of radon adsorption as applied to canisters in the small chamber. Several charcoal canister experiments in the small chamber with an equilibrium-based model of radon adsorption applied are reported. Results show that it is necessary to include a continuous radon monitor in the chamber during canister exposures, as the radon removal rate is highly variable. Furthermore, the presence of the canisters significantly decreases the amount of radon in the small chamber, especially when several canisters are present. It was found that canister response in the small chamber is largely consistent with the equilibrium-based model for both applications, with average errors of 1% for the theoretical application and -4% for the semi-empirical approach.

  7. Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes during adsorption onto amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide: Experimental mixing of acid rock drainage and ambient river water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Borrok, D.M.; Wanty, R.B.; Ridley, W.I.

    2008-01-01

    Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes during adsorption onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide is examined in experimental mixtures of metal-rich acid rock drainage and relatively pure river water and during batch adsorption experiments using synthetic ferrihydrite. A diverse set of Cu- and Zn-bearing solutions was examined, including natural waters, complex synthetic acid rock drainage, and simple NaNO3 electrolyte. Metal adsorption data are combined with isotopic measurements of dissolved Cu (65Cu/63Cu) and Zn (66Zn/64Zn) in each of the experiments. Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes occurs during adsorption of the metal onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide. The adsorption data are modeled successfully using the diffuse double layer model in PHREEQC. The isotopic data are best described by a closed system, equilibrium exchange model. The fractionation factors (??soln-solid) are 0.99927 ?? 0.00008 for Cu and 0.99948 ?? 0.00004 for Zn or, alternately, the separation factors (??soln-solid) are -0.73 ?? 0.08??? for Cu and -0.52 ?? 0.04??? for Zn. These factors indicate that the heavier isotope preferentially adsorbs onto the oxyhydroxide surface, which is consistent with shorter metal-oxygen bonds and lower coordination number for the metal at the surface relative to the aqueous ion. Fractionation of Cu isotopes also is greater than that for Zn isotopes. Limited isotopic data for adsorption of Cu, Fe(II), and Zn onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide suggest that isotopic fractionation is related to the intrinsic equilibrium constants that define aqueous metal interactions with oxyhydroxide surface sites. Greater isotopic fractionation occurs with stronger metal binding by the oxyhydroxide with Cu > Zn > Fe(II).

  8. Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.; Ghosh, T.K.; Hines, A.L.; Loyalka, S.K.

    1995-02-01

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherms are reported for radon and water vapor on two commercial activated carbons: coconut shell Type PCB and hardwood Type BD. The isotherms of the water vapor were measured gravimetrically at 298 K. The isotherms of radon from dry nitrogen were obtained at 293, 298, and 308 K while the data for the mixture of radon and water vapor were measured at 298 K. The concentrations of radon in the gas and solid phases were measured simultaneously, once the adsorption equilibrium and the radioactive equilibrium between the radon and its daughter products were established. The shape of the isotherms was of Type III for the radon and Type V for the water vapor, according to Brunauer`s classification. The adsorption mechanism was similar for both the radon and the water vapor, being physical adsorption on the macropore surface area in the low pressure region and micropore filling near saturation pressure. The uptake capacity of radon decreased both with increasing temperature and relative humidity. The heat of adsorption data indicated that the PCB- and the BD-activated carbons provided a heterogeneous surface for radon adsorption. The equilibrium data for radon were correlated with a modified Freundlich equation.

  9. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle. PMID:16722770

  10. Approaches to the Treatment of Equilibrium Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2003-10-01

    Perturbations from equilibrium are treated in the textbooks by a combination of Le Châtelier's principle, the comparison of the equilibrium constant K with the reaction quotient Q,and the kinetic approach. Each of these methods is briefly reviewed. This is followed by derivations of the variation of the equilibrium value of the extent of reaction, ξeq, with various parameters on which it depends. Near equilibrium this relationship can be represented by a straight line. The equilibrium system can be regarded as moving on this line as the parameter is varied. The slope of the line depends on quantities like enthalpy of reaction, volume of reaction and so forth. The derivation shows that these quantities pertain to the equilibrium system, not the standard state. Also, the derivation makes clear what kind of assumptions underlie our conclusions. The derivation of these relations involves knowledge of thermodynamics that is well within the grasp of junior level physical chemistry students. The conclusions that follow from the derived relations are given as subsidiary rules in the form of the slope of ξeq, with T, p, et cetera. The rules are used to develop a visual way of predicting the direction of shift of a perturbed system. This method can be used to supplement one of the other methods even at the introductory level.

  11. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  12. [Adsorption kinetics of reactive dyes on activated carbon fiber].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yue, Qin-Yan; Gao, Bao-Yu; Yang, Jing; Zheng, Yan

    2007-11-01

    The adsorption capability of activated carbon fiber (ACF) to four reactive dyes (reactive brilliant red K-2BP, reactive turquoise blue KN-G, reactive golden yellow K-3RP, reactive black KN-B) in aqueous solution was studied, and adsorption mechanism was focused on from kinetics point of view. The results show that the equilibrium adsorbing capacity (q(e)) of each dye increases with the addition of initial concentration or temperature. On the same condition, the order of q(e) is: reactive brilliant red > reactive golden yellow > reactive black > reactive turquoise blue. The adsorption processes follow a pseudo second-order kinetic rate equation, and the steric structure, size and polarity of dyes are important influence factors to initial adsorption rate. The adsorption activation energy of each dye is low (16.42, 3.56, 5.21, 26.38 kJ x mol(-1) respectively), which indicates that it belongs to physics adsorption.

  13. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solutions by perlite.

    PubMed

    Mathialagan, T; Viraraghavan, T

    2002-10-14

    The present study examined the use of perlite for the removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions. The effects of pH and contact time on the adsorption process were examined. The optimum pH for adsorption was found to be 6.0. Residual cadmium concentration reached equilibrium in 6h and the rate of cadmium adsorption by perlite was rapid in the first hour of the reaction time. Ho's pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of the reaction. Batch adsorption experiments conducted at room temperature (22+/-1 degrees C) showed that the adsorption pattern followed the Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum removal of cadmium obtained from batch studies was 55%. Thomas model was used to describe the adsorption data from column studies. The results generally showed that perlite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for cadmium removal from aqueous solutions.

  14. [Adsorption characteristics of the antibiotic sulfanilamide onto rice husk ash].

    PubMed

    Ji, Ying-Xue; Wang, Feng-He; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Gu, Zhong-Zhu

    2013-10-01

    Under different conditions of initial rice husk ash (RHA) dosage, oscillating temperature, oscillating frequency and solution pH, the adsorption characteristics of sulfanilamide on RHA with the change of time and its adsorption kinetics were investigated. RHA was characterized by SEM and FTIR before and after sulfanilamide adsorption. The results indicated that the adsorption characteristics of sulfanilamide on RHA was influenced by RHA dosage, oscillating temperature, oscillating frequency and solution pH. Within the RHA dosing range (0. 1-2.0 g.L-1) in this experiment, the optimal temperature for the adsorption was 25C , and with the increase of RHA dosage, the removal efficiency of sulfanilamide increased, the time required to reach adsorption equilibrium was shortened and the adsorptive quantity of sulfanilamide by per unit mass of RHA decreased. A high oscillating frequency was used to ensure the adsorption effect when the RHA concentration was high. Strong acidic and strong alkaline conditions were conducive to the adsorption of sulfanilamide. The analysis of adsorption dynamics showed that for the adsorption process with high RHA dosage ( >or= 1.0 g.L-1), the pseudo-second-order model fitted the adsorption behavior well, and the process was controlled by physical and chemical adsorption. Intraparticle diffusion model showed that the adsorption process was controlled by both membrane diffusion and internal diffusion, and the influence of the former became more obvious with the increase of the adsorbent concentration. Both the SEM and FTIR spectra proved the effective adsorption of sulfanilamide by RHA. PMID:24364310

  15. Characteristics of lead(II) adsorption onto "Natural Red Earth" in simulated environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahatantila, K.; Vithanage, M. S.; Seike, Y.; Okumura, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lead is considered as a non-biodegradable and potentially toxic heavy metal and it is found as a common environmental pollutant. Adsorption characteristics of Pb(II) onto natural iron and aluminum coated sand, which is called Natural Red Earth (NRE), have been studied to ascertain the effect of pH, ionic strength, initial sorbate concentrations, temperature and time. Lead(II) adsorption achieved its maximum adsorption of nearly 100% at neutral to slightly acidic conditions. The optimum pH was nearly 5.5 and 6.5 for 2.41 and 24.1 μmol/L initial Pb(II) concentrations, respectively. Lead(II) adsorption was independent of 100 fold variation of ionic strength (0.001 - 0.1), indirectly evidencing dominance of an inner-sphere surface complexation mechanism for 10 fold variation of initial Pb(II) concentrations (2.41 and 24.1 μmol/L). Adsorption edges were quantified with a 2pK generalized diffuse double layer model considering two site types, >FeOH and >AlOH, for Pb(II) binding. The modeling results better fit with the mixture of monodentate and bidentated binding of Pb(II) onto >FeOH site and bidentate binding of Pb(II) onto >AlOH site. The intrinsic constants obtained were log KFeOPb=13.93, log K(FeO)2Pb=11.88 and log K(AlO)2Pb=13.21. Time required to reach the equilibrium was also increase from 15 min to 1hr with increasing Pb(II) concentrations from 2.41 to 24.1 μmol/L. Kinetic data fitted better to pseudo second order kinetic model. Lead(II) adsorption onto NRE was better explained by Two-site Langmuir isotherm with sorption maximum of 1.39x10-2 and 2.30x10-3 mol/kg for two sites with different affinities. Negative Gibbs free energy values indicated spontaneity of Pb(II) adsorption onto NRE, and entropy and enthalpy of adsorption were 124.04 J/K mol and 17.71 KJ/mol, respectively. These results suggested that the NRE could be effectively used as a low cost candidate for removal of Pb(II) from environmental water, since use of low cost materials to treat

  16. Kinetic and thermodynamic investigation of rhodamine B adsorption at solid/solvent interfaces by use of evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Shiang; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Lin, King-Chuen

    2010-02-01

    Evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy is applied to investigate the adsorption behavior of rhodamine B at three different interfaces. The adsorption equilibrium constant (K(ads)) and adsorption free energy of rhodamine B at the silica/methanol interface are determined to be (1.5 +/- 0.2) x 10(4) M(-1) and -23.8 +/- 0.4 kJ/mol by use of a Langmuir isotherm model. A Langmuir-based kinetic model is also developed to determine the corresponding adsorption and desorption rate constants of (1.02 +/- 0.03) x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1) and (7.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-3) s(-1), from which K(ads) is obtained to be (1.45 +/- 0.09) x 10(4) M(-1), in agreement with the value determined under equilibrium conditions. Similarly, when rhodamine B is at the chlorotrimethylsilane-immobilized silica/methanol interface, the adsorption and desorption rate constants are determined to be (1.7 +/- 0.2) x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1) and (5.0 +/- 1.0) x 10(-3) s(-1). The subsequent K(ads) is (3.6 +/- 0.4) x 10(4) M(-1), which is larger than that at the silica/methanol interface. The former adsorption is dominated by hydrophobic interaction, while the latter is subject to electrostatic attraction. When rhodamine B is at the silica/water interface, there exist three chemical forms, including zwitterion (R(+)B(-)), cation (RBH(+)), and lactone (RBL). A combination of double-layer and Langmuir competitive models is used to fit the adsorption isotherm as a function of solution pH, yielding K(ads) of (2.5 +/- 0.2) x 10(4) M(-1) and (1.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(5) M(-1) for R(+)B(-) and RBH(+), respectively. RBL is considered to have the same K(ads) value as R(+)B(-).

  17. Physical adsorption and charge transfer of molecular Br2 on graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheyuan; Darancet, Pierre; Wang, Lei; Crowther, Andrew C; Gao, Yuanda; Dean, Cory R; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Marianetti, Chris A; Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-25

    We present a detailed study of gaseous Br2 adsorption and charge transfer on graphene, combining in situ Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). When graphene is encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layers on both sides, in a h-BN/graphene/h-BN sandwich structure, it is protected from doping by strongly oxidizing Br2. Graphene supported on only one side by h-BN shows strong hole doping by adsorbed Br2. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determine the graphene charge density as a function of pressure. DFT calculations reveal the variation in charge transfer per adsorbed molecule as a function of coverage. The molecular adsorption isotherm (coverage versus pressure) is obtained by combining Raman spectra with DFT calculations. The Fowler-Guggenheim isotherm fits better than the Langmuir isotherm. The fitting yields the adsorption equilibrium constant (∼0.31 Torr(-1)) and repulsive lateral interaction (∼20 meV) between adsorbed Br2 molecules. The Br2 molecule binding energy is ∼0.35 eV. We estimate that at monolayer coverage each Br2 molecule accepts 0.09 e- from single-layer graphene. If graphene is supported on SiO2 instead of h-BN, a threshold pressure is observed for diffusion of Br2 along the (somewhat rough) SiO2/graphene interface. At high pressure, graphene supported on SiO2 is doped by adsorbed Br2 on both sides. PMID:24528378

  18. Experimental determination of thermodynamic equilibrium in biocatalytic transamination.

    PubMed

    Tufvesson, Pär; Jensen, Jacob S; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Woodley, John M

    2012-08-01

    The equilibrium constant is a critical parameter for making rational design choices in biocatalytic transamination for the synthesis of chiral amines. However, very few reports are available in the scientific literature determining the equilibrium constant (K) for the transamination of ketones. Various methods for determining (or estimating) equilibrium have previously been suggested, both experimental as well as computational (based on group contribution methods). However, none of these were found suitable for determining the equilibrium constant for the transamination of ketones. Therefore, in this communication we suggest a simple experimental methodology which we hope will stimulate more accurate determination of thermodynamic equilibria when reporting the results of transaminase-catalyzed reactions in order to increase understanding of the relationship between substrate and product molecular structure on reaction thermodynamics.

  19. Utilization of waste product (tamarind seeds) for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions: equilibrium, kinetics, and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Suresh; Babu, B V

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, an adsorbent was prepared from tamarind seeds and used after activation for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The tamarind seeds were activated by treating them with concentrated sulfuric acid (98% w/w) at a temperature of 150 degrees C. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was found to be maximum at low values of initial pH in the range of 1-3. The adsorption process of Cr(VI) was tested with Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Koble-Corrigan, Tempkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Generalized isotherm models. Application of the Langmuir isotherm to the system yielded a maximum adsorption capacity of 29.7 mg/g at an equilibrium pH value ranging from 1.12 to 1.46. The adsorption process followed second-order kinetics and the corresponding rate constants obtained were 2.605 x 10(-3), 0.818 x 10(-3), 0.557 x 10(-3) and 0.811 x 10(-3) g/mg min(-1) for 50, 200, 300 and 400 mg/L of initial Cr(VI) concentration, respectively. The regenerated activated tamarind seeds showed more than 95% Cr(VI) removal of that obtained using the fresh activated tamarind seeds. A feasible solution is proposed for the disposal of the contaminants (acid and base solutions) containing high concentrations of Cr(VI) obtained during the regeneration (desorption) process.

  20. Adsorptive separation in bioprocess engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.W.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The invention and development of an energy-efficient separation technique for recovery of desired chemicals from biomass conversion would greatly enhance the economic viability of this bioprocess. Adsorptive separation of several chemicals from aqueous solution was studied in this thesis. The desired species were recovered from the dilute aqueous solution by using crosslinked polyvinylpyridine resin to effect selective sorption. The sorbed chemicals were then removed from the resin by either thermal regeneration or elution with some appropriate desorbents. The effects of temperature, pH value, and solute concentration on resin swelling were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms, resin capacities and resin selectivities of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, isopropanol, glycerol, acetone, 1-butanol, tert-butanol, and 2,3-butanediol were determined to study the homologies. Furthermore, acetic acid, butyric acid, hydrochloric acid, lactic acid, and sulfuric acid were recovered from very dilute aqueous solutions. The concentration of the sorbed chemical in the stationary phase can be many times higher than in the mobile phase for some acids. Finally, different types of equilibrium isotherms were used to fit the experimental data. A mathematical model was developed by using the theory of interference to predict the breakthrough curves and the process efficiency to provide information for large-scale process design and development.

  1. A comparison of three adsorption equations and sensitivity study of parameter uncertainty effects on adsorption refrigeration thermal performance estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongling; Hu, Eric; Blazewicz, Antoni

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents isosteric-based adsorption equilibrium tests of three activated carbon samples with methanol as an adsorbate. Experimental data was fitted into Langmuir equation, Freundlich equation and Dubinin-Astakov (D-A) equation, respectively. The fitted adsorption equations were compared in terms of agreement with experimental data. Moreover, equation format's impacts on calculation of the coefficient of performance (COP) and refrigeration capacity of an adsorption refrigeration system was analyzed. In addition, the sensitivity of each parameter in each adsorption equation format to the estimation of cycle's COP and refrigeration capacity was investigated. It was found that the D-A equation is the best form for presenting the adsorptive property of a carbon-methanol working pair. The D-A equation is recommended for estimating thermal performance of an adsorption refrigeration system because simulation results obtained using the D-A equation are less sensitive to errors of experimentally determined D-A equation's parameters.

  2. Process development for the batch and bulk removal and recovery of a hazardous, water-soluble azo dye (Metanil Yellow) by adsorption over waste materials (Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya).

    PubMed

    Mittal, Alok; Gupta, V K; Malviya, Arti; Mittal, Jyoti

    2008-03-01

    Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya have been used as adsorbents for the removal of a hazardous azo dye-Metanil Yellow from its aqueous solutions. Adsorption of Metanil Yellow on these adsorbents has been studied as function of time, temperature, concentration and pH. Batch adsorption studies, kinetic studies and column operations enabled extraction of lethal dye from wastewaters. Adsorption equilibrium data confirms both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and monolayer coverage of dye over adsorbents. Kinetic data have been employed to calculate specific rate constants, indicating thereby involvement of first order kinetics in the on-going adsorption and activation energy was determined as 0.813 and 1.060 kJ mol(-1) for Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya, respectively. For both adsorbents, the adsorption process has been found governing by film diffusion, over the entire concentration range. Column operations have also been performed for the bulk removal of the dye and also to examine the practical utilization of fixed bed adsorption technique in elimination of dangerous effluent. Saturation factors for Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya columns have been calculated as 99.15 and 99.38%, respectively. Attempts have also been made to regenerate the dye from the exhausted columns using aqueous sodium hydroxide as eluent. PMID:17659833

  3. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  4. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively.

  5. Quantitative determination of competitive molecular adsorption on gold nanoparticles using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, De-Hao; Davila-Morris, Melissa; DelRio, Frank W; Guha, Suvajyoti; Zachariah, Michael R; Hackley, Vincent A

    2011-08-01

    Surface-sensitive quantitative studies of competitive molecular adsorption on nanoparticles were conducted using a modified attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy method. Adsorption isotherms for thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) (SH-PEG) on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a function of molecular mass (1, 5, and 20 kDa) were characterized. We find that surface density of SH-PEG on AuNPs is inversely proportional to the molecular mass (M(m)). Equilibrium binding constants for SH-PEG, obtained using the Langmuir adsorption model, show the binding affinity for SH-PEG is proportional to M(m). Simultaneous competitive adsorption between mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and 5 kDa SH-PEG (SH-PEG5K) was investigated, and we find that MPA concentration is the dominant factor influencing the surface density of both SH-PEG5K and MPA, whereas the concentration of SH-PEG5K affects only SH-PEG5K surface density. Electrospray differential mobility analysis (ES-DMA) was employed as an orthogonal characterization technique. ES-DMA results are consistent with the results obtained by ATR-FTIR, confirming our conclusions about the adsorption process in this system. Ligand displacement competitive adsorption, where the displacing molecular species is added after completion of the ligand surface binding, was also interrogated by ATR-FTIR. Results indicate that for SH-PEG increasing M(m) yields greater stability on AuNPs when measured against displacement by bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model serum protein. In addition, the binding affinity of BSA to AuNPs is inhibited for SH-PEG conjugated AuNPs, an effect that is enhanced at higher SH-PEG M(m) values.

  6. CO2 and humidity removal system for extended Shuttle missions - CO2, H2O, and trace contaminant equilibrium testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.; Kissinger, L. D.

    1977-01-01

    The equilibrium relationships for the co-adsorption of CO2 and H2O on an amine coated acrylic ester are presented. The equilibrium data collection and reduction techniques are discussed. Based on the equilibrium relationship, other modes of operation of systems containing HS-C are discussed and specific space applications for HS-C are presented. Equilibrium data for 10 compounds which are found as trace contaminants in closed environments are also presented.

  7. Equilibrium games in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Angsheng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pan, Yicheng; Peng, Pan

    2014-12-01

    It seems a universal phenomenon of networks that the attacks on a small number of nodes by an adversary player Alice may generate a global cascading failure of the networks. It has been shown (Li et al., 2013) that classic scale-free networks (Barabási and Albert, 1999, Barabási, 2009) are insecure against attacks of as small as O(logn) many nodes. This poses a natural and fundamental question: Can we introduce a second player Bob to prevent Alice from global cascading failure of the networks? We proposed a game in networks. We say that a network has an equilibrium game if the second player Bob has a strategy to balance the cascading influence of attacks by the adversary player Alice. It was shown that networks of the preferential attachment model (Barabási and Albert, 1999) fail to have equilibrium games, that random graphs of the Erdös-Rényi model (Erdös and Rényi, 1959, Erdös and Rényi, 1960) have, for which randomness is the mechanism, and that homophyly networks (Li et al., 2013) have equilibrium games, for which homophyly and preferential attachment are the underlying mechanisms. We found that some real networks have equilibrium games, but most real networks fail to have. We anticipate that our results lead to an interesting new direction of network theory, that is, equilibrium games in networks.

  8. Adsorption features of flavonoids on macroporous adsorption resins functionalized with ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Lou, Song; Di, Duolong

    2012-10-01

    A series of macroporous adsorption resins (MARs) with novel structures is synthesized via Friedel-Crafts catalyzed reaction. The adsorption kinetics of the synthetic resins with respect to the purification effect is systematically investigated by means of the response surface methodology (RSM). The kinetic data cannot be fitted to the classical model because it does not take multicompartments and desorption rates into consideration. A new multicompartment louver-tide theory is thus developed considering that adsorption is an indefinite dynamic equilibrium process, which can be divided into innumerable ingredients with different desorption rates. This theory produces much better fits to the experimental data and provides a quantitative explanation with multicompartments and adsorption/desorption rates. PMID:22811393

  9. Multifractal characteristics of Nitrogen adsorption isotherms from tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    One of the primary methods used to characterize a wide range of porous materials, including soils, are gas adsorption isotherms. An adsorption isotherm is a function relating the amount of adsorbed gas or vapour to the respective equilibrium pressure, during pressure increase at constant temperature. Adsorption data allow easily estimates of specific surface area and also can provide a characterization of pore surface heterogeneity. Most of the properties and the reactivity of soil colloids are influenced by their specific surface area and by parameters describing the surface heterogeneity. For a restricted scale range, linearity between applied pressure and volume of adsorbate holds, which is the basis for current estimations of specific surface area. However, adsorption isotherms contain also non-linear segments of pressure versus volume so that evidence of multifractal scale has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to analyze the multifractal behaviour of nitrogen adsorption isotherms from a set of tropical soils. Samples were collected form 54 horizons belonging to 19 soil profiles in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The most frequent soil type was Oxisol, according to the Soil Survey Staff, equivalent to Latossolo in the Brazilian soil classification system. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms at standard 77 K were measured using a Thermo Finnigan Sorptomatic 1990 gas sorption analyzer (Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA). From the raw data a distributions of mass along a support was obtained to perform multifractal analysis. The probability distribution was constructed by dividing the values of the measure in a given segment by the sum of the measure in the whole scale range. The box-counting method was employed to perform multifractal analysis. All the analyzed N2 adsorption isotherms behave like a multifractal system. The singularity spectra, f(α), showed asymmetric concave down parabolic shapes, with a greater tendency toward the left side, where moments

  10. Kinetics of salicylic acid adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Polakovic, Milan; Gorner, Tatiana; Villiéras, Frédéric; de Donato, Philippe; Bersillon, Jean Luc

    2005-03-29

    The adsorption and desorption of salicylic acid from water solutions was investigated in HPLC microcolumns packed with activated carbon. The adsorption isotherm was obtained by the step-up frontal analysis method in a concentration range of 0-400 mg/L and was well fitted with the Langmuir equation. The investigation of rate aspects of salicylic acid adsorption was based on adsorption/desorption column experiments where different inlet concentrations of salicylic acid were applied in the adsorption phase and desorption was conducted with pure water. The concentration profiles of individual adsorption/desorption cycles data were fitted using several single-parameter models of the fixed-bed adsorption to assess the influence of different phenomena on the column behavior. It was found that the effects of axial dispersion and extraparticle mass transfer were negligible. A rate-determining factor of fixed-bed column dynamics was the kinetics of pore surface adsorption. A bimodal kinetic model reflecting the heterogeneous character of adsorbent pores was verified by a simultaneous fit of the column outlet concentration in four adsorption/desorption cycles. The fitted parameters were the fraction of mesopores and the adsorption rate constants in micropores and mesopores, respectively. It was shown that the former rate constant was an intrinsic one whereas the latter one was an apparent value due to the effects of pore blocking and diffusional hindrances in the micropores. PMID:15779975

  11. Adsorption of Pyrene onto the Agricultural By-Product: Corncob.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Tong, Dongli; Allinson, Graeme; Jia, Chunyun; Gong, Zongqing; Liu, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of pyrene on corncob was studied to provide a theoretical basis for the possible use of this material as an immobilized carrier for improving the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil. The results were as follows. Kinetic experiments showed that the adsorption processes obeyed a pseudo-second-order model. The intraparticle diffusion of Weber-Morris model fitting showed that the film and intraparticle diffusions were the key rate-limiting processes, and the adsorption process mainly consisted of three steps: boundary layer diffusion and two intra-particle diffusions. Experimental adsorption data for pyrene were successfully described by the adsorption-partition equilibrium model. The maximum adsorption capacity at 25°C was 214.8 μg g(-1). The adsorption contribution decreased significantly when the Ce/Sw (the equilibrium concentration/solubility in water) was higher than 1. Adsorption decreased with increased temperature. Based on the above results, the corncob particles could be helpful in the bioremediation of pyrene-contaminated soil.

  12. Adsorption of Pyrene onto the Agricultural By-Product: Corncob.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Tong, Dongli; Allinson, Graeme; Jia, Chunyun; Gong, Zongqing; Liu, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of pyrene on corncob was studied to provide a theoretical basis for the possible use of this material as an immobilized carrier for improving the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil. The results were as follows. Kinetic experiments showed that the adsorption processes obeyed a pseudo-second-order model. The intraparticle diffusion of Weber-Morris model fitting showed that the film and intraparticle diffusions were the key rate-limiting processes, and the adsorption process mainly consisted of three steps: boundary layer diffusion and two intra-particle diffusions. Experimental adsorption data for pyrene were successfully described by the adsorption-partition equilibrium model. The maximum adsorption capacity at 25°C was 214.8 μg g(-1). The adsorption contribution decreased significantly when the Ce/Sw (the equilibrium concentration/solubility in water) was higher than 1. Adsorption decreased with increased temperature. Based on the above results, the corncob particles could be helpful in the bioremediation of pyrene-contaminated soil. PMID:26573838

  13. [Adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto modified activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Tong, Xi-Zhen; Shi, Bao-You; Xie, Yue; Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-09-01

    Modified coal and coconut shell based powdered activated carbons (PACs) were prepared by FeCl3 and medium power microwave treatment, respectively. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the characteristics of adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto original and modified PACs. Based on pore structure and surface functional groups characterization, the adsorption behaviors of modified and original PACs were compared. The competitive adsorption of humic acid (HA) and PFOS on original and modified coconut shell PACs were also investigated. Results showed that both Fe3+ and medium power microwave treatments changed the pore structure and surface functional groups of coal and coconut shell PACs, but the changing effects were different. The adsorption of PFOS on two modified coconut shell-based PACs was significantly improved. While the adsorption of modified coal-based activated carbons declined. The adsorption kinetics of PFOS onto original and modified coconut shell-based activated carbons were the same, and the time of reaching adsorption equilibrium was about 6 hours. In the presence of HA, the adsorption of PFOS by modified PAC was reduced but still higher than that of the original. PMID:23243870

  14. Removal of hazardous pharmaceutical dyes by adsorption onto papaya seeds.

    PubMed

    Weber, Caroline Trevisan; Collazzo, Gabriela Carvalho; Mazutti, Marcio Antonio; Foletto, Edson Luiz; Dotto, Guilherme Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya L.) seeds were used as adsorbent to remove toxic pharmaceutical dyes (tartrazine and amaranth) from aqueous solutions, in order to extend application range. The effects of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and temperature were investigated. The kinetic data were evaluated by the pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order and Elovich models. The equilibrium was evaluated by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. It was found that adsorption favored a pH of 2.5, temperature of 298 K and equilibrium was attained at 180-200 min. The adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo second-order model, and the equilibrium was well represented by the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacities were 51.0 and 37.4 mg g(-1) for tartrazine and amaranth, respectively. These results revealed that papaya seeds can be used as an alternative adsorbent to remove pharmaceutical dyes from aqueous solutions.

  15. Moisture adsorption isotherms and glass transition temperature of pectin.

    PubMed

    Basu, Santanu; Shivhare, U S; Muley, S

    2013-06-01

    The moisture adsorption isotherms of low methoxyl pectin were determined at 30-70°C and water activity ranging from 0.11 to 0.94. The moisture adsorption isotherms revealed that the equilibrium moisture content increased with water activity. Increase in temperature, in general, resulted in decreased equilibrium moisture content. However in some cases, equilibrium moisture content values increased with temperature at higher water activities. Selected sorption models (GAB, Halsey, Henderson, Oswin, modified Oswin) were tested for describing the adsorption isotherms. Parameters of each sorption models were determined by nonlinear regression analysis. Oswin model gave the best fit for pectin sorption behaviour. Isosteric heat of sorption decreased with increase in moisture content and varied between 14.607 and 0.552 kJ/mol. Glass transition temperature decreased with increase in moisture content of pectin. PMID:24425957

  16. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partialmore » pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.« less

  17. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.

  18. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Newberg, John T; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-09-28

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10(-5) to 2 × 10(-3) Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 10(3) Torr(-1). The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors. PMID:26299301