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Sample records for adsorption equilibrium constant

  1. A procedure to find thermodynamic equilibrium constants for CO2 and CH4 adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Trinh, T T; van Erp, T S; Bedeaux, D; Kjelstrup, S; Grande, C A

    2015-03-28

    Thermodynamic equilibrium for adsorption means that the chemical potential of gas and adsorbed phase are equal. A precise knowledge of the chemical potential is, however, often lacking, because the activity coefficient of the adsorbate is not known. Adsorption isotherms are therefore commonly fitted to ideal models such as the Langmuir, Sips or Henry models. We propose here a new procedure to find the activity coefficient and the equilibrium constant for adsorption which uses the thermodynamic factor. Instead of fitting the data to a model, we calculate the thermodynamic factor and use this to find first the activity coefficient. We show, using published molecular simulation data, how this procedure gives the thermodynamic equilibrium constant and enthalpies of adsorption for CO2(g) on graphite. We also use published experimental data to find similar thermodynamic properties of CO2(g) and of CH4(g) adsorbed on activated carbon. The procedure gives a higher accuracy in the determination of enthalpies of adsorption than ideal models do. PMID:25732332

  2. Calculation of the acid-base equilibrium constants at the alumina/electrolyte interface from the ph dependence of the adsorption of singly charged ions (Na+, Cl-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gololobova, E. G.; Gorichev, I. G.; Lainer, Yu. A.; Skvortsova, I. V.

    2011-05-01

    A procedure was proposed for the calculation of the acid-base equilibrium constants at an alumina/electrolyte interface from experimental data on the adsorption of singly charged ions (Na+, Cl-) at various pH values. The calculated constants (p K {1/0}= 4.1, p K {2/0}= 11.9, p K {3/0}= 8.3, and p K {4/0}= 7.7) are shown to agree with the values obtained from an experimental pH dependence of the electrokinetic potential and the results of potentiometric titration of Al2O3 suspensions.

  3. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  4. Equilibrium Constants You Can Smell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Michael; Buckley, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Presents a simple experiment involving the sense of smell that students can accomplish during a lecture. Illustrates the important concepts of equilibrium along with the acid/base properties of various ions. (JRH)

  5. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  6. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  7. Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for geochemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, D.C.; Parkhurst, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Theory is derived from the work of Urey (Urey H. C. [1947] The thermodynamic properties of isotopic substances. J. Chem. Soc. 562-581) to calculate equilibrium constants commonly used in geochemical equilibrium and reaction-transport models for reactions of individual isotopic species. Urey showed that equilibrium constants of isotope exchange reactions for molecules that contain two or more atoms of the same element in equivalent positions are related to isotope fractionation factors by ?? = (Kex)1/n, where n is the number of atoms exchanged. This relation is extended to include species containing multiple isotopes, for example 13C16O18O and 1H2H18O. The equilibrium constants of the isotope exchange reactions can be expressed as ratios of individual isotope equilibrium constants for geochemical reactions. Knowledge of the equilibrium constant for the dominant isotopic species can then be used to calculate the individual isotope equilibrium constants. Individual isotope equilibrium constants are calculated for the reaction CO2g = CO2aq for all species that can be formed from 12C, 13C, 16O, and 18O; for the reaction between 12C18 O2aq and 1H218Ol; and among the various 1H, 2H, 16O, and 18O species of H2O. This is a subset of a larger number of equilibrium constants calculated elsewhere (Thorstenson D. C. and Parkhurst D. L. [2002] Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for implementation in geochemical models. Water-Resources Investigation Report 02-4172. U.S. Geological Survey). Activity coefficients, activity-concentration conventions for the isotopic variants of H2O in the solvent 1H216Ol, and salt effects on isotope fractionation have been included in the derivations. The effects of nonideality are small because of the chemical similarity of different isotopic species of the same molecule or ion. The temperature dependence of the individual isotope equilibrium constants can be calculated from the temperature dependence of the fractionation

  8. A modified graphical method for determination of equilibrium constants

    PubMed Central

    Kilroe-Smith, T. A.

    1966-01-01

    A modification is described of the method of Dixon (1965) for determining equilibrium constants (K) of combinations of the type A+B⇌AB. The method obviates drawing of a tangent to the curve at the origin. PMID:5968534

  9. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  10. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation. PMID:26683820

  11. Equilibrium and kinetic data and process design for adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Emrah; Ozacar, Mahmut; Sengil, I Ayhan

    2008-06-15

    The adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite in a batch adsorber has been studied. Four kinetic models, the pseudo first- and second-order equations, the Elovich equation and the intraparticle diffusion equation, were selected to follow the adsorption process. Kinetic parameters; rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and correlation coefficients, for each kinetic equation were calculated and discussed. It was shown that the adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite could be described by the pseudo second-order equation. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin equations. Adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite followed the Langmuir isotherm. A single stage batch adsorber was designed for different adsorbent mass/treated effluent volume ratios using the Langmuir isotherm. PMID:18055111

  12. Constant Entropy Properties for an Approximate Model of Equilibrium Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick; Hodge, Marion E.

    1961-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions for properties of equilibrium air up to 15,000 K have been programmed for machine computation. Temperature, compressibility, enthalpy, specific heats, and speed of sound are tabulated as constant entropy functions of temperature. The reciprocal of acoustic impedance and its integral with respect to pressure are also given for the purpose of evaluating the Riemann constants for one-dimensional, isentropic flow.

  13. Microcomputer Calculation of Equilibrium Constants from Molecular Parameters of Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1989-01-01

    Lists a BASIC program which computes the equilibrium constant as a function of temperature. Suggests use by undergraduates taking a one-year calculus-based physical chemistry course. Notes the program provides for up to four species, typically two reactants and two products. (MVL)

  14. Adsorption of cellulase Aspergillus niger on a commercial activated carbon: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Fatima Boukraa-Oulad; Kaddour, Samia; Sadoun, Tahar

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics of cellulase Aspergillus niger on a commercial activated carbon has been performed using a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of various experimental parameters such as initial enzyme concentration, contact time and temperature were investigated. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data which shows that the adsorption of the enzyme followed the pseudo-second-order rate expression and the rate constants were evaluated. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms, and the isotherm constants were determined. It was found that Langmuir model was more suitable for our data. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated for the adsorption of enzyme onto activated carbon. It was found 11.37 kJ mol(-1). Thermodynamic parameters Delta G(0), Delta H(0) and DeltaS(0) were calculated, indicating that this process can be spontaneous and endothermic. The adsorption enthalpy and entropy were found 11.12 kJ mol(-1) and 0.084 kJ mol(-1)K(-1), respectively. At 30 degrees C and at pH 4.8, 1g activated carbon adsorbed about 1565 mg of cellulase, with a retention of 70% of the native enzyme activity up to five cycles of repeated batch enzyme reactions. PMID:19744839

  15. Experimental rovibrational constants and equilibrium structure of phosphorus trifluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najib, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    Thanks to recent high-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and pure rotational (RF/CM/MMW) measurements, several experimental values of the rotation-vibration parameters of the oblate molecule PF3 have been extracted, contributing thus to the knowledge of the molecular potential of phosphorus trifluoride. The data used are those of the fundamental, overtone and combination bands studied in the 300-1500 cm-1 range. The new values are in good agreement with ones determined at low resolution, but significantly more accurate. The agreement is excellent with the available values determined by ab initio HF-SCF calculations employing the TZP/TZ2P triple-zeta basis. From the recent experimental rovibrational interaction constants αC and αB, new accurate equilibrium rotational constants Ce and Be have been derived for the symmetric top molecule PF3, which were used to derive the equilibrium geometry of this molecule: re(F-P) = 1.560986 (43) Å; θe(FPF) = 97.566657 (64)°.

  16. Conjugate Acid-Base Pairs, Free Energy, and the Equilibrium Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Darrell H.

    1969-01-01

    Describes a method of calculating the equilibrium constant from free energy data. Values of the equilibrium constants of six Bronsted-Lowry reactions calculated by the author's method and by a conventional textbook method are compared. (LC)

  17. Equilibrium studies of copper ion adsorption onto palm kernel fibre.

    PubMed

    Ofomaja, Augustine E

    2010-07-01

    The equilibrium sorption of copper ions from aqueous solution using a new adsorbent, palm kernel fibre, has been studied. Palm kernel fibre is obtained in large amounts as a waste product of palm oil production. Batch equilibrium studies were carried out and system variables such as solution pH, sorbent dose, and sorption temperature were varied. The equilibrium sorption data was then analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Temkin isotherms. The fit of these isotherm models to the equilibrium sorption data was determined, using the linear coefficient of determination, r(2), and the non-linear Chi-square, chi(2) error analysis. The results revealed that sorption was pH dependent and increased with increasing solution pH above the pH(PZC) of the palm kernel fibre with an optimum dose of 10g/dm(3). The equilibrium data were found to fit the Langmuir isotherm model best, with a monolayer capacity of 3.17 x 10(-4)mol/g at 339K. The sorption equilibrium constant, K(a), increased with increasing temperature, indicating that bond strength between sorbate and sorbent increased with temperature and sorption was endothermic. This was confirmed by the increase in the values of the Temkin isotherm constant, B(1), with increasing temperature. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm parameter, free energy, E, was in the range of 15.7-16.7kJ/mol suggesting that the sorption mechanism was ion exchange. Desorption studies showed that a high percentage of the copper was desorbed from the adsorbent using acid solutions (HCl, HNO(3) and CH(3)COOH) and the desorption percentage increased with acid concentration. The thermodynamics of the copper ions/palm kernel fibre system indicate that the process is spontaneous and endothermic. PMID:20346574

  18. Equilibrium constants and protonation site for N-methylbenzenesulfonamides

    PubMed Central

    Rosa da Costa, Ana M; García-Río, Luis; Pessêgo, Márcia

    2011-01-01

    Summary The protonation equilibria of four substituted N-methylbenzenesulfonamides, X-MBS: X = 4-MeO (3a), 4-Me (3b), 4-Cl (3c) and 4-NO2 (3d), in aqueous sulfuric acid were studied at 25 °C by UV–vis spectroscopy. As expected, the values for the acidity constants are highly dependent on the electron-donor character of the substituent (the pK BH+ values are −3.5 ± 0.2, −4.2 ± 0.2, −5.2 ± 0.3 and −6.0 ± 0.3 for 3a, 3b, 3c and 3d, respectively). The solvation parameter m* is always higher than 0.5 and points to a decrease in the importance of solvation on the cation stabilization as the electron-donor character of the substituent increases. Hammett plots of the equilibrium constants showed a better correlation with the σ+ substituent parameter than with σ, which indicates that the initial protonation site is the oxygen atom of the sulfonyl group. PMID:22238552

  19. Interpretation of the temperature dependence of equilibrium and rate constants.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J; Jackson, Craig M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this review is to draw attention to potential pitfalls in attempts to glean mechanistic information from the magnitudes of standard enthalpies and entropies derived from the temperature dependence of equilibrium and rate constants for protein interactions. Problems arise because the minimalist model that suffices to describe the energy differences between initial and final states usually comprises a set of linked equilibria, each of which is characterized by its own energetics. For example, because the overall standard enthalpy is a composite of those individual values, a positive magnitude for DeltaH(o) can still arise despite all reactions within the subset being characterized by negative enthalpy changes: designation of the reaction as being entropy driven is thus equivocal. An experimenter must always bear in mind the fact that any mechanistic interpretation of the magnitudes of thermodynamic parameters refers to the reaction model rather than the experimental system. For the same reason there is little point in subjecting the temperature dependence of rate constants for protein interactions to transition-state analysis. If comparisons with reported values of standard enthalpy and entropy of activation are needed, they are readily calculated from the empirical Arrhenius parameters. PMID:16897812

  20. Adsorption Properties of Tetracycline onto Graphene Oxide: Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghadim, Ehsan Ezzatpour; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Soleimani, Gholamreza; Hosseini, Hadi; Kimiagar, Salimeh; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticle is a high potential effective absorbent. Tetracycline (TC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic produced, indicated for use against many bacterial infections. In the present research, a systematic study of the adsorption and release process of tetracycline on GO was performed by varying pH, sorption time and temperature. The results of our studies showed that tetracycline strongly loads on the GO surface via π–π interaction and cation–π bonding. Investigation of TC adsorption kinetics showed that the equilibrium was reached within 15 min following the pseudo-second-order model with observed rate constants of k2 = 0.2742–0.5362 g/mg min (at different temperatures). The sorption data has interpreted by the Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption of 323 mg/g (298 K). The mean energy of adsorption was determined 1.83 kJ/mol (298 K) based on the Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) adsorption isotherm. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° values for the adsorption were estimated which indicated the endothermic and spontaneous nature of the sorption process. The electrochemistry approved an ideal reaction for the adsorption under electrodic process. Simulation of GO and TC was done by LAMMPS. Force studies in z direction showed that tetracycline comes close to GO sheet by C8 direction. Then it goes far and turns and again comes close from amine group to the GO sheet. PMID:24302989

  1. Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for implementation in geochemical models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, Donald C.; Parkhurst, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Theory is derived from the work of Urey to calculate equilibrium constants commonly used in geochemical equilibrium and reaction-transport models for reactions of individual isotopic species. Urey showed that equilibrium constants of isotope exchange reactions for molecules that contain two or more atoms of the same element in equivalent positions are related to isotope fractionation factors by , where is n the number of atoms exchanged. This relation is extended to include species containing multiple isotopes, for example and , and to include the effects of nonideality. The equilibrium constants of the isotope exchange reactions provide a basis for calculating the individual isotope equilibrium constants for the geochemical modeling reactions. The temperature dependence of the individual isotope equilibrium constants can be calculated from the temperature dependence of the fractionation factors. Equilibrium constants are calculated for all species that can be formed from and selected species containing , in the molecules and the ion pairs with where the subscripts g, aq, l, and s refer to gas, aqueous, liquid, and solid, respectively. These equilibrium constants are used in the geochemical model PHREEQC to produce an equilibrium and reaction-transport model that includes these isotopic species. Methods are presented for calculation of the individual isotope equilibrium constants for the asymmetric bicarbonate ion. An example calculates the equilibrium of multiple isotopes among multiple species and phases.

  2. Physical Adsorption of Gases on Heterogeneous Solids and Equilibrium Studies of the Pressure Swing Adsorption Process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochun

    1990-01-01

    -parameter isotherm equation based on benzene adsorption isotherms. We extended further the TVFM to derive thermodynamic functions, such as the adsorption entropy, the adsorption enthalpy, and the adsorption energy distribution, and constructed these functions for various adsorption systems based on their adsorption isotherms. To explore the energetic heterogeneity of the adsorbent, we used two approaches. First, we used the overall integral isotherm equation to obtain the Langmuir -Freundlich isotherm; and second, we used the Gibb's relation to obtain an exponential isotherm equation. The adsorption energy-distribution function can be obtained from these isotherm equations. The pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process was studied based on Shandalman and Mitchell's equilibrium theory for a PSA system with a linear isotherm. This theory was extended to a PSA system with a non-linear isotherm. Relationships were established between the isotherms and process parameters, such as the enrichment factor, the critical recycle ratio, and the extent of the recovery.

  3. On the fractality of the Freundlich adsorption isotherm in equilibrium and non-equilibrium cases.

    PubMed

    Borys, Przemysław; Grzywna, Zbigniew J

    2016-07-27

    We investigate the relationship between the Freundlich adsorption exponent and the fractal dimension of the adsorption sites for quasi-monolayer adsorption, and of the adsorbed aggregate for a simple case of multilayer adsorption. We further check whether the Freundlich adsorption mechanism may contribute to anomalous diffusion in the transport through porous materials. PMID:27414951

  4. Quantifying differences in the impact of variable chemistry on equilibrium uranium(VI) adsorption properties of aquifer sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-09-16

    Uranium adsorption-desorption on sediment samples collected from the Hanford 300-Area, Richland, WA varied extensively over a range of field-relevant chemical conditions, complicating assessment of possible differences in equilibrium adsorption properties. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in 500-1000 hours although dissolved uranium concentrations increased over thousands of hours owing to changes in aqueous chemical composition driven by sediment-water reactions. A non-electrostatic surface complexation reaction, >SOH + UO22+ + 2CO32- = >SOUO2(CO3HCO3)2-, provided the best fit to experimental data for each sediment sample resulting in a range of conditional equilibrium constants (logKc) from 21.49 to 21.76. Potential differences in uranium adsorption properties could be assessed in plots based on the generalized mass-action expressions yielding linear trends displaced vertically by differences in logKc values. Using this approach, logKc values for seven sediment samples were not significantly different. However, a significant difference in adsorption properties between one sediment sample and the fines (<0.063 mm) of another could be demonstrated despite the fines requiring a different reaction stoichiometry. Estimates of logKc uncertainty were improved by capturing all data points within experimental errors. The mass-action expression plots demonstrate that applying models outside the range of conditions used in model calibration greatly increases potential errors.

  5. Quantifying differences in the impact of variable chemistry on equilibrium uranium(VI) adsorption properties of aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Uranium adsorption-desorption on sediment samples collected from the Hanford 300-Area, Richland, WA varied extensively over a range of field-relevant chemical conditions, complicating assessment of possible differences in equilibrium adsorption properties. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in 500-1000 h although dissolved uranium concentrations increased over thousands of hours owing to changes in aqueous chemical composition driven by sediment-water reactions. A nonelectrostatic surface complexation reaction, >SOH + UO22+ + 2CO32- = >SOUO2(CO3HCO3)2-, provided the best fit to experimental data for each sediment sample resulting in a range of conditional equilibrium constants (logKc) from 21.49 to 21.76. Potential differences in uranium adsorption properties could be assessed in plots based on the generalized mass-action expressions yielding linear trends displaced vertically by differences in logKc values. Using this approach, logKc values for seven sediment samples were not significantly different. However, a significant difference in adsorption properties between one sediment sample and the fines (Kc uncertainty were improved by capturing all data points within experimental errors. The mass-action expression plots demonstrate that applying models outside the range of conditions used in model calibration greatly increases potential errors.

  6. A Unified Kinetics and Equilibrium Experiment: Rate Law, Activation Energy, and Equilibrium Constant for the Dissociation of Ferroin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattar, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) is the basis of a suite of four experiments spanning 5 weeks. Students determine the rate law, activation energy, and equilibrium constant for the dissociation of the complex ion in acid solution and base dissociation constant for phenanthroline. The focus on one chemical system simplifies a daunting set of…

  7. Equilibrium-range constant in wind-generated wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resio, Donald T.; Long, Charles E.; Vincent, C. Linwood

    2004-01-01

    The equilibrium range in wind-driven wave spectra is characterized to have an f-4 form in deep water (k-5/2 shallow-water form). Absolute energy levels for six physically diverse sites are shown to be well fit by an expression involving the wind speed measured at a fraction of a wavelength above the sea surface in combination with the phase speed of the spectral peak. Observed energy levels suggest that nonlinear wave-wave interactions are capable of maintaining the observed energy-flux balance in the equilibrium range.

  8. The Rigorous Evaluation of Spectrophotometric Data to Obtain an Equilibrium Constant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, John R.; Drago, Russell S.

    1982-01-01

    Most students do not know how to determine the equilibrium constant and estimate the error in it from spectrophotometric data that contain experimental errors. This "dry-lab" experiment describes a method that may be used to determine the "best-fit" value of the 1:1 equilibrium constant to spectrophotometric data. (Author/JN)

  9. Predicting Selenite Adsorption by Soils Using Soil Chemical Parameters in the Constant Capacitance Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The constant capacitance model, a chemical surface complexation model, was applied to selenite, Se(IV), adsorption on 36 soils selected for variation in soil chemical properties. The constant capacitance model was able to fit Se(IV) adsorption by optimizing one monodentate Se(IV) surface complexati...

  10. Quantifying Differences in the Impact of Variable Chemistry on Equilibrium Uranium(VI) Adsorption Properties of Aquifer Sediments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Uranium adsorption–desorption on sediment samples collected from the Hanford 300-Area, Richland, WA varied extensively over a range of field-relevant chemical conditions, complicating assessment of possible differences in equilibrium adsorption properties. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in 500–1000 h although dissolved uranium concentrations increased over thousands of hours owing to changes in aqueous chemical composition driven by sediment-water reactions. A nonelectrostatic surface complexation reaction, >SOH + UO22+ + 2CO32- = >SOUO2(CO3HCO3)2–, provided the best fit to experimental data for each sediment sample resulting in a range of conditional equilibrium constants (logKc) from 21.49 to 21.76. Potential differences in uranium adsorption properties could be assessed in plots based on the generalized mass-action expressions yielding linear trends displaced vertically by differences in logKc values. Using this approach, logKc values for seven sediment samples were not significantly different. However, a significant difference in adsorption properties between one sediment sample and the fines (<0.063 mm) of another could be demonstrated despite the fines requiring a different reaction stoichiometry. Estimates of logKc uncertainty were improved by capturing all data points within experimental errors. The mass-action expression plots demonstrate that applying models outside the range of conditions used in model calibration greatly increases potential errors. PMID:21923109

  11. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-02-12

    Rates of contaminant U(VI) release from individual size fractions of a composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through batch reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. Variability in equilibrium adsorption among the various size fractions was determined in static batch reactors and analyzed using the surface complexation modeling approach. The estimated stoichiometric coefficients of U(VI) surface complexation reactions with respect to pH and carbonate concentrations varied with size fractions. This source of variability significantly increased the uncertainty in U(VI) conditional equilibrium constants over that estimated from experimental errors alone. A minimum difference between conditional equilibrium constants was established in order to evaluate statistically significant differences between sediment adsorption properties. A set of equilibrium and kinetic expressions for cation exchange, calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration, and silica dissolution were incorporated in a reaction-rate model to describe the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through batch experiments. Parameters in the reaction-rate model, calibrated using experimental data for select size fractions, predicted the changes in solute concentrations for the bulk, <2 mm, sediment sample. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multi-rate surface complexation model with an assumed lognormal distribution for the rate constants. The estimated mean and standard deviation were the same for all < 2mm size fractions, but differed in the 2-8mm size fraction. Micropore volumes in the varied size fractions were also similar as assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data. These findings provide further support for the link between microporosity and particle-scale mass transfer rates controlling kinetic U(VI) adsorption/desorption and for the utility of N2 desorption

  12. Galvanic Cells and the Determination of Equilibrium Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosmer, Jonathan L.; Peters, Dennis G.

    2012-01-01

    Readily assembled mini-galvanic cells can be employed to compare their observed voltages with those predicted from the Nernst equation and to determine solubility products for silver halides and overall formation constants for metal-ammonia complexes. Results obtained by students in both an honors-level first-year course in general chemistry and…

  13. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  14. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of phenol onto graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Liu, Tonghao; Sun, Jiankun; Jiao, Yuqin; Xia, Yanzhi; Xia, Linhua; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of temperature on phenol adsorbed by graphene shows that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of phenol increases with the increase in temperature from 285 to 333 K. Increasing adsorption capacities with temperature indicates that the adsorption of phenol is controlled by an endothermic reaction. Highlights: ► The graphene has high phenol adsorption capacity. ► The graphene has a high specific surface area of 305 m{sup 2}/g. ► The adsorption capacity is high at acidic pH range. ► The graphene has rapid phenol adsorption rate. ► Phenol adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. -- Abstract: Graphene, a new member of carbon family, has been prepared, characterized and used as adsorbent to remove phenol from aqueous solution. The effect parameters including pH, dosage, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption properties of phenol onto graphene were investigated. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity can reach 28.26 mg/g at the conditions of initial phenol concentration of 50 mg/L, pH 6.3 and 285 K. Adsorption data were well described by both Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene fit the pseudo second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene was endothermic and spontaneous.

  15. Determination of equilibrium constants of alkaline earth metal ion chelates with Dowex A-1 chelating resin.

    PubMed

    Harju, L; Krook, T

    1995-03-01

    A complexation chemistry model is applied to chelating ion-exchange systems and a method is presented for the determination of equilibrium constants for metal ion chelates with these resins. Protonation constants for the iminodiacetic based chelating resin Dowex A-1 were determined from potentiometric pH-data. Equilibrium constants were determined for 1:1 beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium chelates with the resin in a wide pH range by measuring the concentrations of respective metal ions in the aqueous phase with direct current plasma atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES). A batch technique was used for the equilibrium experiments. At pH below 7 protonated 1:1 species were also found to be formed with the resin. From the obtained equilibrium constants, theoretical distribution coefficients were calculated as function of pH for respective metal ion resin system. PMID:18966248

  16. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solution onto untreated coffee grounds: equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Azouaou, N; Sadaoui, Z; Djaafri, A; Mokaddem, H

    2010-12-15

    Adsorption can be used as a cost effective and efficient technique for the removal of toxic heavy metals from wastewater. Waste materials with no further treatment such as coffee grounds from cafeterias may act as adsorbents for the removal of cadmium. Batch kinetic and equilibrium experiments were conducted to study the effects of contact time, adsorbent dose, initial pH, particle size, initial concentration of cadmium and temperature. Three adsorption isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich were used to analyse the equilibrium data. The Langmuir isotherm which provided the best correlation for Cd(2+) adsorption onto coffee grounds, shows that the adsorption was favourable and the adsorption capacity found was equal to 15.65 mg g(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and the adsorption was exothermic. The equilibrium was achieved less than 120 min. The adsorption kinetic data was fitted with first and second order kinetic models. Finally it was concluded that the cadmium adsorption kinetic onto coffee grounds was well fitted by second order kinetic model rather than first order model. The results suggest that coffee grounds have high possibility to be used as effective and economical adsorbent for Cd(2+) removal. PMID:20817346

  17. Adsorption of leather dye onto activated carbon prepared from bottle gourd: equilibrium, kinetic and mechanism studies.

    PubMed

    Foletto, Edson Luiz; Weber, Caroline Trevisan; Paz, Diego Silva; Mazutti, Marcio Antonio; Meili, Lucas; Bassaco, Mariana Moro; Collazzo, Gabriela Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbon prepared from bottle gourd has been used as adsorbent for removal of leather dye (Direct Black 38) from aqueous solution. The activated carbon obtained showed a mesoporous texture, with surface area of 556.16 m(2) g(-1), and a surface free of organic functional groups. The initial dye concentration, contact time and pH significantly influenced the adsorption capacity. In the acid region (pH 2.5) the adsorption of dye was more favorable. The adsorption equilibrium was attained after 60 min. Equilibrium data were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Temkin isotherm models. The equilibrium data were best described by the Langmuir isotherm, with maximum adsorption capacity of 94.9 mg g(-1). Adsorption kinetic data were fitted using the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models. The adsorption kinetic was best described by the second-order kinetic equation. The adsorption process was controlled by both external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion. Activated carbon prepared from bottle gourd was shown to be a promising material for adsorption of Direct Black 38 from aqueous solution. PMID:23128640

  18. The Equilibrium Constant for Bromothymol Blue: A General Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Using Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klotz, Elsbeth; Doyle, Robert; Gross, Erin; Mattson, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly undergraduate laboratory experiment is described in which students use visible spectroscopy to determine a numerical value for an equilibrium constant, K[subscript c]. The experiment correlates well with the lecture topic of equilibrium even though the subject of the study is an acid-base…

  19. Adsorption of reactive dyes from aqueous solutions by fly ash: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Dizge, N; Aydiner, C; Demirbas, E; Kobya, M; Kara, S

    2008-02-11

    Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium studies of three reactive dyes namely, Remazol Brillant Blue (RB), Remazol Red 133 (RR) and Rifacion Yellow HED (RY) from aqueous solutions at various initial dye concentration (100-500 mg/l), pH (2-8), particle size (45-112.5 microm) and temperature (293-323 K) on fly ash (FA) were studied in a batch mode operation. The adsorbent was characterized with using several methods such as SEM, XRD and FTIR. Adsorption of RB reactive dye was found to be pH dependent but both RR and RY reactive dyes were not. The result showed that the amount adsorbed of the reactive dyes increased with increasing initial dye concentration and contact time. Batch kinetic data from experimental investigations on the removal of reactive dyes from aqueous solutions using FA have been well described by external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion models. It was found that external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion had rate limiting affects on the removal process. This was attributed to the relatively simple macropore structure of FA particles. The adsorption data fitted well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The optimum conditions for removal of the reactive dyes were 100mg/l initial dye concentration, 0.6g/100ml adsorbent dose, temperature of 293 K, 45 microm particle size, pH 6 and agitation speed of 250 rpm, respectively. The values of Langmuir and Freundlich constants were found to increase with increasing temperature in the range 135-180 and 15-34 mg/g for RB, 47-86 and 1.9-3.7 mg/g for RR and 37-61 and 3.0-3.6 mg/g for RY reactive dyes, respectively. Different thermodynamic parameters viz., changes in standard free energy, enthalpy and entropy were evaluated and it was found that the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. PMID:17574338

  20. Equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Bennett D.

    2016-07-01

    A theory is developed to describe the equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels. The adsorption theory is developed in classical density functional theory, with the adsorbed phase and fluid phase chemical potentials modeled using thermodynamic perturbation theory. Adsorption of nonpatchy colloids in microchannels is typically achieved through nonequilibrium routes such as spin coating and evaporation. These methods are required due to the entropic penalty of adsorption. In this work we propose that the introduction of patches on the colloids greatly enhances the temperature dependent and reversible adsorption of colloids in microchannels. It is shown how bulk fluid density, temperature, patch size, and channel diameter can be manipulated to achieve the adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels.

  1. Equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Bennett D

    2016-07-01

    A theory is developed to describe the equilibrium adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels. The adsorption theory is developed in classical density functional theory, with the adsorbed phase and fluid phase chemical potentials modeled using thermodynamic perturbation theory. Adsorption of nonpatchy colloids in microchannels is typically achieved through nonequilibrium routes such as spin coating and evaporation. These methods are required due to the entropic penalty of adsorption. In this work we propose that the introduction of patches on the colloids greatly enhances the temperature dependent and reversible adsorption of colloids in microchannels. It is shown how bulk fluid density, temperature, patch size, and channel diameter can be manipulated to achieve the adsorption and self-assembly of patchy colloids in microchannels. PMID:27575187

  2. Equilibrium study of single-solute adsorption of anionic surfactants with polymeric XAD resins

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Delgado, R.A.; Cotoruelo-Minguez, L.M.; Rodriguez, J.J. )

    1992-06-01

    Equilibrium data for the adsorption of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) from aqueous solutions by Amberlite XAD-4 and XAD-7 polymeric resins at temperatures in the 10-40C range have been obtained. The specific surface area of the resins plays a major role in adsorption, and thus the best results have been obtained with XAD-4 resin. A higher adsorption of SDBS over SLS was also observed. Several adsorption isotherm models have been used to fit the experimental data. The best results have been obtained with the Redlich-Peterson and Langmuir-Freundlich equations. Estimations of the isosteric heat of adsorption, free energy, and entropy of adsorption are also reported.

  3. Modeling selenium (IV and VI) adsorption envelopes in selected tropical soils using the constant capacitance model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption of selenium (Se) on soil is important due to the relevance of Se to environmental and health issues. The adsorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) was evaluated on soil samples from São Paulo state, Brazil, as a function of varying pH, and the experimental data were fitted to the constant capac...

  4. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  5. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 1. Equilibrium parameters.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2009-10-30

    This study was carried out to investigate the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of a pesticide of the uracil group on powdered activated carbon (PAC). The experiments were conducted at a wide range of initial pesticide concentrations (approximately 5 microg L(-1) to approximately 500 microg L(-1) at pH 7.8), corresponding to equilibrium concentrations of less than 0.1 microg L(-1) for the weakest, which is compatible with the tolerance limits of drinking water. Such a very broad range of initial solute concentrations resulting powdered activated carbon (PAC) concentrations (0.1-5 mg L(-1)) is the main particularity of our study. The application of several monosolute equilibrium models (two, three or more parameters) has generally shown that Bromacil adsorption is probably effective on two types of sites. High reactivity sites (K(L) approximately 10(3) Lmg(-1)) which are 10-20 less present in a carbon surface than lower reactivity sites (K(L) approximately 10 Lmg(-1)), according to the q(m) values calculated by two- or three-parameter models. The maximum capacity of the studied powdered activated carbon (PAC), corresponding to monolayer adsorption, compared to the Bromacil molecule surface, would be between 170 mg g(-1) and 190 mg g(-1). This theoretical value is very close to the experimental q(m) values obtained when using linearized forms of Langmuir, Tóth and Fritz-Schluender models. PMID:19539425

  6. Reanalysis of boron adsorption on soils and soil minerals using the constant capacitance model

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, S.

    1999-08-01

    Inclusion of microscopic information improved the ability of the constant capacitance model to provide a quantitative description of B adsorption on various Al and Fe oxides, clay minerals, and arid-zone soils as a function of solution pH. The same set of B surface complexation reactions was used for all adsorbing surfaces. This study tests the ability of the model to describe B adsorption using surface configurations that had been observed experimentally. In the present model application, both trigonal, B(OH){sub 3}, and tetrahedral, B(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}}, B surface complexes are postulated, consistent with experimental spectroscopic results. Boron surface complexation constants for Al and Fe oxides and kaolinites are not statistically significantly different from each other. Boron surface complexation constants for kaolinites are statistically significantly different from those for 2:1 clays and soils. Boron surface complexation constants for 2:1 clays and soils are not statistically significantly different from each other, reflecting the dominance of 2:1 clay minerals in B adsorption reactions in arid-zone soils. Average sets of B surface complexation constants provided adequate descriptions of B adsorption behavior on all adsorbents studied, indicating some predictive capability. The constant capacitance model was able to predict B adsorption behavior on additional arid-zone soils using the average set of B surface complexation constants.

  7. Adsorptive removal of heavy metals by magnetic nanoadsorbent: an equilibrium and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsath, D. S.; Shirivastava, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    An efficient and new magnetic nanoadsorbent photocatalyst was fabricated by co-precipitation technique. This research focuses on understanding metal removal process and developing a cost-effective technology for treatment of heavy metal-contaminated industrial wastewater. In this investigation, magnetic nanoadsorbent has been employed for the removal of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions by a batch adsorption technique. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted very well to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The thermodynamics of Zn(II) ions adsorption onto the magnetic nanoadsorbents indicated that the adsorption was spontaneous, endothermic and physical in nature. Surface morphology of magnetic nanoadsorbent by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and elemental analysis by EDX technique. The structural and photocatalytic properties of magnetic nanoadsorbent were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR techniques. Also, the magnetic properties of synthesized magnetic nanoadsorbent were determined by vibrating spinning magnetometer (VSM).

  8. Classical calculation of the equilibrium constants for true bound dimers using complete potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Buryak, Ilya; Vigasin, Andrey A.

    2015-12-21

    The present paper aims at deriving classical expressions which permit calculation of the equilibrium constant for weakly interacting molecular pairs using a complete multidimensional potential energy surface. The latter is often available nowadays as a result of the more and more sophisticated and accurate ab initio calculations. The water dimer formation is considered as an example. It is shown that even in case of a rather strongly bound dimer the suggested expression permits obtaining quite reliable estimate for the equilibrium constant. The reliability of our obtained water dimer equilibrium constant is briefly discussed by comparison with the available data based on experimental observations, quantum calculations, and the use of RRHO approximation, provided the latter is restricted to formation of true bound states only.

  9. Classical calculation of the equilibrium constants for true bound dimers using complete potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryak, Ilya; Vigasin, Andrey A.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper aims at deriving classical expressions which permit calculation of the equilibrium constant for weakly interacting molecular pairs using a complete multidimensional potential energy surface. The latter is often available nowadays as a result of the more and more sophisticated and accurate ab initio calculations. The water dimer formation is considered as an example. It is shown that even in case of a rather strongly bound dimer the suggested expression permits obtaining quite reliable estimate for the equilibrium constant. The reliability of our obtained water dimer equilibrium constant is briefly discussed by comparison with the available data based on experimental observations, quantum calculations, and the use of RRHO approximation, provided the latter is restricted to formation of true bound states only.

  10. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 2: Kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2009-10-30

    The application of several monosolute equilibrium models has previously shown that Bromacil adsorption on SA-UF (Norit) powdered activated carbon (PAC) is probably effective on two types of sites. High reactivity sites were found to be 10-20 less present in a carbon surface than lower reactivity sites, according to the q(m) values calculated by isotherm models. The aims of this work were trying, primarily, to identify the kinetic-determinant stage of the sorption of Bromacil at a wide range of initial pesticide concentrations (approximately 5 to approximately 500 microg L(-1) at pH 7.8), and secondly, to specify the rate constants and other useful design parameters for the application in water treatment. It was therefore not possible to specify a priori whether the diffusion or surface reaction is the key step. It shows that many of the tested models which describe the stage of distribution or the surface reaction are correctly applied. However, the diffusivity values (D and D(0)) were found to be constant only constants for some specific experimental concentrations. The HSDM model of surface diffusion in pores was also applied but the values of the diffusion coefficient of surface (D(s)) were widely scattered and reduce significantly with the initial concentration or the equilibrium concentration in Bromacil. The model of surface reaction of pseudo-second order fitted particularly well and led to constant values which are independent of the equilibrium concentration, except for the low concentrations where the constants become significantly more important. This last observation confirms perfectly the hypothesis based on two types of sites as concluded by the equilibrium data (part 1). PMID:19560269

  11. Equilibrium and Kinetic Adsorption of Bacteria on Alluvial Sand and Surface Thermodynamic Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gang; Rockhold, Mark L.; Strevett, Keith A.

    2003-05-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of Escherichia coli HB 101, E. coli JM 109, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas sp. on alluvial sand from the Canadian River alluvium (Norman, OK) was investigated through column experiments. Equilibrium adsorption of these five bacterial strains followed the Freundlich expression and was a function of zero energy points, an indication of the zero energy buffer zone. Among the microorganisms studied, P. putida had the greatest equilibrium adsorption (162.4 x 108 cell/g sediment with a microbial injectate concentration of 108 cell/mL), followed by Pseudomonas sp. (127.9 x 108 cell/g sediment), E. coli HB 101 (62.8 x 108 cell/g sediment), E. coli JM 109 (58.4 x 108 cell/g sediment), and P. fluorescens (42.6 x 108 cell/g sediment). The first-order kinetic adsorption rate coefficient was an exponential function of the total interaction free energy between bacteria and sediment evaluated at the primary minimum, (PM). E. coli HB 101 had the greatest kinetic adsorption rate coefficient on the sediment (5.10 h-1), followed by E. coli JM 109 (4.52 h-1), P. fluorescens (2.12 h-1), P. putida (2.04 h-1), and Pseudomonas sp. (1.34 h-1).

  12. Binary adsorption equilibrium of carbon dioxide and water vapor on activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xiao, Penny; Webley, Paul

    2009-09-15

    Adsorption equilibria of a CO2/H2O binary mixture on activated alumina F-200 were measured at several temperatures and over a wide range of concentrations from 4% to around 90% of the saturated water vapor pressure. In comparison with the single-component data, the loading of CO2 was not reduced in the presence of H2O, whereas at low relative humidity the adsorption of H2O was depressed. The binary system was described by a competitive/cooperative adsorption model where the readily adsorbed water layers acted as secondary sites for further CO2 adsorption via hydrogen bonding or hydration reaction. The combination of kinetic models, namely, a Langmuir isotherm for characterizing pure CO2 adsorption and a BET isotherm for H2O, was extended to derive a binary adsorption equilibrium model for the CO2/H2O mixture. Models based on the ideal adsorbed solution theory of Myers and Prausnitz failed to characterize the data over the whole composition range, and a large deviation of binary CO2/H2O equilibrium from ideal solution behavior was observed. The extended Langmuir-BET (LBET) isotherm, analogous to the extended Langmuir equation, drastically underestimated the CO2 loading. By incorporating the interactions between CO2 and H2O molecules on the adsorbent surface and taking into account the effect of nonideality, the realistic interactive LBET (R-LBET) model was found to be in very good agreement with the experimental data. The derived binary isosteric heat of adsorption showed that the heat was reduced by competitive adsorption but promoted by cooperative adsorption. PMID:19678623

  13. Effective computer simulation of equilibrium adsorption with limited solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedek, Lukáš; Šembera, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Radioactive waste repositories are discussed to be built in compact granite rock massif somewhere in the Czech Republic. To support the decision-making, various computer simulations are performed. These simulations help to evaluate risks connected with potential isolation failures, followed by transport of released radionuclides in the groundwater. Transport of radionuclides is affected by many natural processes. In this paper we focus on two important processes: adsorption and limited solubility (surface precipitation) of radionuclides in groundwater. Presented approach is based on interpolation instead of time demanding solution of nonlinear equations arising from mathematical description of the problem. The effectiveness of the proposed approach consists in creation of an interpolation table of points lying on an isotherm and transformed to mass balance maintaining system of coordinates. This kind of table is used to project data from transport part of simulation on the isotherm. The interpolation table points are computed using free derivative, nonlinear equation solver which avoids some of numerical solution difficulties. Results achieved with the use of our approach are comparable to Newton-Raphson method achieved solutions, but the simulation times are shorter.

  14. Does the Addition of Inert Gases at Constant Volume and Temperature Affect Chemical Equilibrium?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paiva, Joao C. M.; Goncalves, Jorge; Fonseca, Susana

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine three approaches, leading to different conclusions, for answering the question "Does the addition of inert gases at constant volume and temperature modify the state of equilibrium?" In the first approach, the answer is yes as a result of a common students' alternative conception; the second approach, valid only for ideal…

  15. Experimental values of the rotational and vibrational constants and equilibrium structure of nitrogen trifluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najib, Hamid

    2015-06-01

    Several accurate experimental values of the rovibrational interaction constants αC and αB, the harmonic wave-number parameters ωij, and the anharmonicity xij and gij constants have been extracted from the most recent high-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), centimeter-wave (CMW) and millimeter-wave (MMW) measurements in the spectra of the oblate symmetric top molecule 14NF3. The data used are those of the four fundamental, the overtone, the combination and the hot bands identified and analyzed in the range between 400 cm-1 and 2000 cm-1. Combining the recent experimental values of the constants αC and αB, with the accurate experimental ground state rotational constants C0 and B0, new equilibrium rotational constants have been evaluated: Ce = 0.1968006 (26) cm-1 and Be = 0.358981442 (43) cm-1 for the pyramidal molecule NF3, from which the following equilibrium structure is obtained: re(F-N) = 1.36757 (58) Å; θe(FNF) = 101.8513 (10)°. This experimental equilibrium geometry is in excellent agreement with the recent structure determined by ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory.

  16. Equilibrium adsorption of hexahistidine on pH-responsive hydrogel nanofilms.

    PubMed

    Longo, Gabriel S; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Szleifer, Igal

    2014-12-23

    We present a molecular theory to study the adsorption of different species within pH-sensitive hydrogel nanofilms. The theoretical framework allows for a molecular-level description of all the components of the system, and it explicitly accounts for the acid-base equilibrium. We concentrate on the adsorption of hexahistidine, one of the most widely used tags in bio-related systems, particularly in chromatography of proteins. The adsorption of hexahistidine within a grafted polyacid hydrogel film shows a nonmonotonic dependence on the solution pH. Depending on the salt concentration, the density of the polymer network, and the bulk concentration of peptide, substantial adsorption is predicted in the intermediate pH range where both the network and the amino acids are charged. To enhance the electrostatic attractions, the acid-base equilibrium of adsorbed hexahistidine is shifted significantly, increasing the degree of charge of the residues as compared to the bulk solution. Such a shift depends critically on the conditions of the environment at the nanoscale. At the same time, the degree of dissociation of the network becomes that of the isolated acid group in a dilute solution, which means that the network is considerably more charged than when there is no adsorbate molecules. This work provides fundamental information on the physical chemistry behind the adsorption behavior and the response of the hydrogel film. This information can be useful in designing new materials for the purification or separation/immobilization of histidine-tagged proteins. PMID:25434993

  17. Thermodynamic parameters for adsorption equilibrium of heavy metals and dyes from wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2014-05-01

    This meta-analysis evaluates adsorption studies that report thermodynamic parameters for heavy metals and dyes from wastewaters. The adsorbents were derived from agricultural waste, industrial wastes, inorganic particulates, or some natural products. The adsorption mechanisms, derivation of thermodynamic relationships, and possible flaws made in such evaluation are discussed. This analysis shows that conclusions from the examined standard enthalpy and entropy changes are highly contestable. The reason for this flaw may be the poor physical structure of adsorbents tested, such that pore transport controlled the solute flux, leaving a surface reaction process near equilibrium. PMID:24461254

  18. Equilibrium constants of several reactions involved in the fermentation of glutamate.

    PubMed

    Buckel, W; Miller, S L

    1987-05-01

    The equilibrium constants of the reactions catalysed by (S)-citramalate lyase and (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase were determined using the purified enzymes from Clostridium tetanomorphum and Acidaminococcus fermentans, respectively. The former constant had to be determined at high ionic strength (I). Therefore it was corrected to I = 0.1 M by applying single-ion activity coefficients estimated from literature data. The result (Kapp = 4.31 +/- 0.07 M-1; direction of citramalate formation) agreed very well with the constant of the (2R,3S)-2,3-dimethylmalate lyase equilibrium when all optical isomers were taken into account. From these and other data values for the free energies of formation (delta Gzerof) of (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate, mesaconate and (S)-citramalate were calculated. The constant of the (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase equilibrium [Kapp = (1.47 +/- 0.12)10(-12) M, direction of 2-oxoglutarate formation, I = 0.1 M] was shown to lie between those for malate and lactate dehydrogenases as expected. PMID:2883006

  19. Prediction of equilibrium parameters of adsorption of lead (II) ions onto diatomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Taylan; Ardalı, Yüksel; Gamze Turan, N.

    2013-04-01

    Heavy metals from industrial wastewaters are one of the most important environmental issues to be solved today. Due to their toxicity and nonbiodegradable nature, heavy metals cause environmental and public health problems. Various techniques have been developed to remove heavy metals from aqueous solutions. These include chemical precipitation, reverse osmosis, ion Exchange and adsorption. Among them, adsorption is considered to be a particularly competitive and effective process for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions. There is growing interest in using low cost, commercially available materials for the adsorption of heavy metals. Diatomite is a siliceous sedimentary rock having an amorphous form of silica (SiO2. nH2O) containing a small amount of microcrystalline material. It has unique combination of physical and chemical properties such as high porosity, high permeability, small particle size, large surface area, and low thermal conductivity. In addition, it is available in Turkey and in various locations around the world. Therefore, diatomite has been successfully used as adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals. The aim of the study is to investigate the adsorption properties of diatomite. The equilibrium adsorption data were applied to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevic (D-R) isotherm models. Adsorption experiments were performed under batch process, using Pb (II) initial concentration, pH of solution and contact time as variables. The results demonstrated that the adsorption of Pb (II) was strongly dependent on pH of solution. The effect of pH on adsorption of Pb(II) on diatomite was conducted by varying pH from 2 to 12 at 20 oC. In the pH range of 2.0-4.0, the adsorption percentage increases slightly as the pH increasing. At pH>4, the adsorption percentage decreases with increasing pH because hydrolysis product and the precipitation begin to play an important role in the sorption of Pb (II). At pH4, the maximum adsorption

  20. Chemical modeling of boron adsorption by humic materials using the constant capacitance model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The constant capacitance surface complexation model was used to describe B adsorption behavior on reference Aldrich humic acid, humic acids from various soil environments, and dissolved organic matter extracted from sewage effluents. The reactive surface functional groups on the humic materials wer...

  1. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of adsorptive removal of phenol onto eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Daraei, H; Mittal, A; Noorisepehr, M; Daraei, F

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present research is to develop economic, fast, and versatile method for the removal of toxic organic pollutant phenol from wastewater using eggshell. The batch experiments are conducted to evaluate the effect of pH, phenol concentration, dosage of adsorbent, and contact time on the removal of phenol. The paper includes in-depth kinetic studies of the ongoing adsorption process. Attempts have also been made to verify Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The morphology and characteristics of eggshell have also been studied using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray fluorescence analysis. At ambient temperature, the maximum adsorption of phenol onto eggshells has been achieved at pH 9 and the contact time, 90 min. The experimental data give best-fitted straight lines for pseudo-first-order as well as pseudo-second-order kinetic models. Furthermore, the adsorption process verifies Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and on the basis of mathematical expressions of these models, various necessary adsorption constants have been calculated. Using adsorption data, various thermodynamic parameters like change in enthalpy (∆H(0)), change in entropy (∆S(0)), and change in free energy ∆G(0) have also been evaluated. Results clearly reveal that the solid waste material eggshell acts as an effective adsorbent for the removal of phenol from aqueous solutions. PMID:23274804

  2. Equilibrium constant for carbamate formation from monoethanolamine and its relationship with temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Aroua, M.K.; Benamor, A.; Haji-Sulaiman, M.Z.

    1999-09-01

    Removal of acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S using aqueous solutions of alkanolamines is an industrially important process. The equilibrium constant for the formation of carbamate from monoethanolamine was evaluated at various temperatures of 298, 308, 318, and 328 K and ionic strengths up to 1.7 M. From the plot of log{sub 10} K versus I{sup 0.5}, the variation of the thermodynamical constant with temperature follows the relationship log{sub 10} K{sub 1} = {minus}0.934 + (0.671 {times} 10{sup 3})K/T.

  3. Intrinsic equilibrium constants of {beta}-silicon carbide obtained from surface charge data

    SciTech Connect

    Cerovic, L.S.; Milonjic, S.K.; Kostic-Gvozdenovic, L.

    1995-11-01

    The surface charge behavior of {beta}-SiC in KNO{sub 3} electrolyte solutions is reported as a function of pH and ionic strength. The surface charge densities were obtained by potentiometric titration, and the point of zero charge of {beta}-SiC was determined by the batch equilibration method. The intrinsic equilibrium constants, describing association-dissociation of surface groups, were calculated using the site-binding model.

  4. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of monomer-dimer monoclonal antibody mixtures on a cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jason M; Pabst, Timothy M; Hunter, Alan K; Wang, Xiangyang; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-07-10

    Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics are determined for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) monomer and dimer species, individually and in mixtures, on a macroporous cation exchange resin both under the dilute limit of salt gradient elution chromatography and at high protein loads and low salt based on batch adsorption equilibrium and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiments. In the dilute limit and weak binding conditions, the dimer/monomer selectivity in 10mM phosphate at pH 7 varies between 8.7 and 2.3 decreasing with salt concentration in the range of 170-230mM NaCl. At high protein loads and strong binding conditions (0-60mM NaCl), the selectivity in the same buffer is near unity with no NaCl added, but increases gradually with salt concentration reaching high values between 2 and 15 with 60mM added NaCl. For these conditions, the two-component adsorption kinetics is controlled by pore diffusion and is predicted approximately by a dual shrinking core model using parameters based on single component equilibrium and kinetics measurements. PMID:26028510

  5. Equilibrium and kinetics studies of arsenate adsorption by FePO(4).

    PubMed

    Hamayun, M; Mahmood, T; Naeem, A; Muska, M; Din, S U; Waseem, M

    2014-03-01

    The present work is focusing on removal of arsenate from aqueous solution using FePO4. The equilibrium study regarding the removal of arsenic by FePO4 was carried out at 298, 308, 318 and 328K. Langmuir parameters were found to increase with the increase in temperature indicating that the adsorption is favorable at high temperature. Kinetic study of arsenate adsorption on FePO4 was also carried out at different temperatures and at pH 6 and 8. Different kinetic models were used to the kinetic data amongst which pseudo second order model was best fitted. The mechanism of the adsorption kinetics was investigated by employing intraparticle diffusion and Richenberg models. The energy of activation (Ea) was found to be 30 and 35.52kJmol(-1) at pH 6 and pH 8, respectively, suggesting chemisorption nature of the adsorption process. The negative entropic values of activation signified the existence of entropy barrier while the positive ΔG(#) values indicated the existence of energy barrier to be crossed over for the occurrence of a chemical reaction. Both the spectroscopic studies and increase in equilibrium pH reveal the anion exchange removal of arsenate from aqueous solution to the solid surface. PMID:24280053

  6. Kinetics and equilibrium adsorption study of p-nitrophenol onto activated carbon derived from walnut peel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Fang; Bai, Song

    2015-01-01

    An original activated carbon prepared from walnut peel, which was activated by zinc chloride, was modified with ammonium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide in order to contrast the adsorption property of the three different activated carbons. The experiment used a static adsorption test for p-nitrophenol. The effects of parameters such as initial concentration, contact time and pH value on amount adsorbed and removal are discussed in depth. The thermodynamic data of adsorption were analyzed by Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic data of adsorption were measured by the pseudo-first-order kinetics and the pseudo-second-order kinetics models. The results indicated that the alkalized carbon samples derived from walnut peel had a better performance than the original activated carbon treated with zinc chloride. It was found that adsorption equilibrium time was 6 h. The maximum removal rate of activated carbon treated with zinc chloride for p-nitrophenol was 87.3% at pH 3,whereas the maximum removal rate of the two modified activated carbon materials was found to be 90.8% (alkalized with ammonium hydroxide) and 92.0% (alkalized with sodium hydroxide) at the same pH. The adsorption data of the zinc chloride activated carbon were fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model. The two alkalized activated carbon samples were fitted well to the Freundlich model. The pseudo-second-order dynamics equation provided better explanation of the adsorption dynamics data of the three activated carbons than the pseudo-first-order dynamics equation. PMID:26676011

  7. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 3: Competition with natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2010-10-15

    This study (part 3) was carried out to investigate the effect of the natural organic matter (NOM) concentration on Bromacil (pesticide) adsorption on powdered activated carbon (PAC) in the same experimental conditions as in our previous studies (parts 1 and 2). Our previous findings showed that Bromacil adsorption in buffered pure water (pH 7.8) occurred at two types of site. In the presence of NOM (three kinds), we noted a significant reduction in Bromacil adsorption capacities due to the competitive effects exerted by NOM. Highly reactive sites (or pores) in PAC appeared to be blocked by NOM adsorption, as demonstrated by the application of a pseudo-single solute isotherm and of the simplified ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST), regardless of the initial Bromacil and NOM concentrations. The competing effect of low-molecular weight NOM was found to be greater than the competing effect of high-molecular weight NOM. The pseudo-second order surface-reaction model fitted Bromacil adsorption particularly well, even in the presence of NOM. However, the adsorption-kinetic constant values were found to be independent of the aqueous equilibrium concentration of the target compound, contrary to that observed in pure water. The kinetic data thus confirmed that high reactivity PAC sites were blocked by NOM adsorption. A practical approach concluded this work. PMID:20619963

  8. Equilibrium study of selected divalent d-electron metals adsorption on A-type zeolite.

    PubMed

    Majdan, Marek; Pikus, Stanisław; Kowalska-Ternes, Monika; Głdysz-Płaska, Agnieszka; Staszczuk, Piotr; Fuks, Leon; Skrzypek, Henryk

    2003-06-15

    The objective of the presented study was to investigate the adsorption of Cu, Co, Mn, Zn, Cd and Mn on A-type zeolite. The isotherms for adsorption of metals from their nitrates were registered. The following adsorption constants K of metals were found: 162,890, 124,260, 69,025, 16,035, 10,254, and 151 [M(-1)] for Cu, Co, Mn, Zn, Cd, and Ni, respectively, for the concentration range 10(-4)-10(-3) M. On the other hand, the investigation of pH influence on the distribution constants of metals showed that the adsorption of metals proceeds essentially through an ion-exchange process, surface hydrolysis, and surface complexation. The supplementary results from DRIFT, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction methods confirmed the presumption about the possible connection between the electronic structure of divalent ions and their adsorption behavior, showing that ions with d5 and d10 configurations such as Mn2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, with much weaker hydrolytic properties than Cu2+ and Ni2+, strongly interact with the zeolite framework and therefore their affinity to the zeolite phase is much stronger when compared with that of the Ni2+ ion, but at the same time not as strong as the affinity of the Cu2+ ion, the latter forming a new phase during the interaction with zeolite framework. For Zn2+, during inspection of the correlation between the proton concentration H/Al and zinc concentration Zn/Al on the zeolite surface, the formation of the surface complex [triple bond]S-OZn(OH) was proposed. A correlation between the heterogeneity of proton concentrations H/Al on Me-zeolite surfaces and the hydrolysis constants pKh of Me2+ ions was found. PMID:16256612

  9. Anomalously slow cyanide binding to Glycera dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin component II: Implication for the equilibrium constant

    SciTech Connect

    Mintorovitch, J.; Satterlee, J.D. )

    1988-10-18

    In comparison to sperm whale metmyoglobin, metleghemoglobin {alpha}, methemoglobins, and heme peroxidases, the purified Glycera dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin component II exhibits anomalously slow cyanide ligation kinetics. For the component II monomer methemoglobin this reaction has been studied under pseudo-first-order conditions at pH 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0, employing 100-250-fold mole excesses of potassium cyanide at each pH. The analysis shows that the concentration-independent bimolecular rate constant is small in comparison to those of the other heme proteins. Furthermore, the results show that the dissociation rate is extremely slow. Separation of the bimolecular rate constant into contributions from k{sub CN{sup {minus}}} (the rate constant for CN{sup {minus}} binding) and from k{sub HCN} (the rate constant for HCN binding) shows that the former is approximately 90 times greater. These results indicate that cyanide ligation reactions are not instantaneous for this protein, which is important for those attempting to study the ligand-binding equilibria. From the results presented here the authors estimate that the actual equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub D}) for cyanide binding to this G. dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin has a numerical upper limit that is at least 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported before the kinetic results were known.

  10. Melanoidin Removal Mechanism in An Aqueous Adsorption System: An Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Study.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Diego L; Oliveira, Leandro S; Franca, Adriana S

    2015-01-01

    Melanoidins are colored products that can be found in food and drinks, formed by Maillard reactions. Sometimes these compounds are considered undesirable in certain food products, because they impart a brownish color and must be removed. An overview of recent patents related to melanoidin removal indicates that it can be performed by chemical/biological degradation or by adsorption processes. Therefore, in the present study, the adsorption mechanism for synthetic melanoidin removal from aqueous solutions was studied using different Raphanus sativus press-cake sorbents, with the precursor material being carbonized in a microwave oven, either with direct heating or after a chemical activation process with phosphoric acid, nitric acid or potassium hydroxide. Physical and chemical modifications were evaluated by FTIR, pHPZC, thermogravimetry and BET. The adsorption kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second order model for all activated carbons (ACs). Evaluation of the diffusion process showed dependence on the initial melanoidin concentration due to the wide range of sizes of the adsorbed molecules. The equilibrium data were best fitted by the Langmuir model for the acid-treated AC and by the Freundlich model for the base-treated and non-chemically treated ACs. Melanoidin adsorption was characterized as a spontaneous, favorable and endothermic process involving hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions between the adsorbents surfaces and the adsorbed molecules. PMID:26013772

  11. Dye removal from textile industrial effluents by adsorption on exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Carvallho, Marilda N; da Silva, Karolyne S; Sales, Deivson C S; Freire, Eleonora M P L; Sobrinho, Maurício A M; Ghislandi, Marcos G

    2016-01-01

    The concept of physical adsorption was applied for the removal of direct and reactive blue textile dyes from industrial effluents. Commercial graphite nanoplatelets were used as substrate, and the quality of the material was characterized by atomic force and transmission electron microscopies. Dye/graphite nanoplatelets water solutions were prepared varying their pH and initial dye concentration. Exceptionally high values (beyond 100 mg/L) for adsorptive capacity of graphite nanoplatelets could be achieved without complicated chemical modifications, and equilibrium and kinetic experiments were performed. Our findings were compared with the state of the art, and compared with theoretical models. Agreement between them was satisfactory, and allowed us to propose novel considerations describing the interactions of the dyes and the graphene planar structure. The work highlights the important role of these interactions, which can govern the mobility of the dye molecules and the amount of layers that can be stacked on the graphite nanoplatelets surface. PMID:27148721

  12. Temperature dependency of the equilibrium constant for the formation of carbamate from diethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Aroua, M.K.; Amor, A.B.; Haji-Sulaiman, M.Z.

    1997-07-01

    Aqueous alkanolamine solutions are frequently used to remove acidic components such as H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} from process gas streams. The equilibrium constant for the formation of diethanolamine carbamate was determined experimentally at (303, 313, 323, and 331) K for ionic strengths up to 1.8 mol/dm{sup 3}, the inert electrolyte being NaClO{sub 4}. A linear relationship was found to hole between log K and I{sup 0.5}. The thermodynamical constant has been determined and expressed by the equation log K{sub 1} = {minus}5.12 + 1.781 {times} 10{sup 3} K/T.

  13. Density functional theory of equilibrium random copolymers: application to surface adsorption of aggregating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiqiang; Forsman, Jan; Woodward, Clifford E.

    2016-06-01

    We generalize a recently developed polymer density functional theory (PDFT) for polydisperse polymer fluids to the case of equilibrium random copolymers. We show that the generalization of the PDFT to these systems allows us to obtain a remarkable simplification compared to the monodispersed polymers. The theory is used to treat a model for protein aggregation into linear filaments in the presence of surfaces. Here we show that, for attractive surfaces, there is evidence of significant enhancement of protein aggregation. This behaviour is a consequence of a surface phase transition, which has been shown to occur with ideal equilibrium polymers in the presence of sufficiently attractive surfaces. For excluding monomers, this transition is suppressed, though an echo of the underlying ideal transition is present in the sudden change in the excess adsorption.

  14. Density functional theory of equilibrium random copolymers: application to surface adsorption of aggregating peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiqiang; Forsman, Jan; Woodward, Clifford E

    2016-06-22

    We generalize a recently developed polymer density functional theory (PDFT) for polydisperse polymer fluids to the case of equilibrium random copolymers. We show that the generalization of the PDFT to these systems allows us to obtain a remarkable simplification compared to the monodispersed polymers. The theory is used to treat a model for protein aggregation into linear filaments in the presence of surfaces. Here we show that, for attractive surfaces, there is evidence of significant enhancement of protein aggregation. This behaviour is a consequence of a surface phase transition, which has been shown to occur with ideal equilibrium polymers in the presence of sufficiently attractive surfaces. For excluding monomers, this transition is suppressed, though an echo of the underlying ideal transition is present in the sudden change in the excess adsorption. PMID:27115518

  15. Determination of equilibrium constants for the reaction between acetone and HO2 using infrared kinetic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grieman, Fred J; Noell, Aaron C; Davis-Van Atta, Casey; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P

    2011-09-29

    The reaction between the hydroperoxy radical, HO(2), and acetone may play an important role in acetone removal and the budget of HO(x) radicals in the upper troposphere. We measured the equilibrium constants of this reaction over the temperature range of 215-272 K at an overall pressure of 100 Torr using a flow tube apparatus and laser flash photolysis to produce HO(2). The HO(2) concentration was monitored as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The resulting [HO(2)] decay curves in the presence of acetone are characterized by an immediate decrease in initial [HO(2)] followed by subsequent decay. These curves are interpreted as a rapid (<100 μs) equilibrium reaction between acetone and the HO(2) radical that occurs on time scales faster than the time resolution of the apparatus, followed by subsequent reactions. This separation of time scales between the initial equilibrium and ensuing reactions enabled the determination of the equilibrium constant with values ranging from 4.0 × 10(-16) to 7.7 × 10(-18) cm(3) molecule(-1) for T = 215-272 K. Thermodynamic parameters for the reaction determined from a second-law fit of our van't Hoff plot were Δ(r)H°(245) = -35.4 ± 2.0 kJ mol(-1) and Δ(r)S°(245) = -88.2 ± 8.5 J mol(-1) K(-1). Recent ab initio calculations predict that the reaction proceeds through a prereactive hydrogen-bonded molecular complex (HO(2)-acetone) with subsequent isomerization to a hydroxy-peroxy radical, 2-hydroxyisopropylperoxy (2-HIPP). The calculations differ greatly in the energetics of the complex and the peroxy radical, as well as the transition state for isomerization, leading to significant differences in their predictions of the extent of this reaction at tropospheric temperatures. The current results are consistent with equilibrium formation of the hydrogen-bonded molecular complex on a short time scale (100 μs). Formation of the hydrogen-bonded complex will have a negligible impact on the

  16. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of U(VI) release from individual dry-sieved size fractions of a field-aggregated, field-contaminated composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. The principal source of variability in equilibrium U(VI) adsorption properties of the various size fractions was the impact of variable chemistry on adsorption. This source of variability was represented using surface complexation models (SCMs) with different stoichiometric coefficients with respect to hydrogen ion and carbonate concentrations for the different size fractions. A reactive transport model incorporating equilibrium expressions for cation exchange and calcite dissolution, along with rate expressions for aerobic respiration and silica dissolution, described the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through reactor experiments. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multirate SCM with an assumed lognormal distribution for the mass-transfer rate coefficients. The estimated mean and standard deviation of the rate coefficients were the same for all <2 mm size fractions but differed for the 2–8 mm size fraction. Micropore volumes, assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data, were also the same for all dry-sieved <2 mm size fractions, indicating a link between micropore volumes and mass-transfer rate properties. Pore volumes for dry-sieved size fractions exceeded values for the corresponding wet-sieved fractions. We hypothesize that repeated field wetting and drying cycles lead to the formation of aggregates and/or coatings containing (micro)pore networks which provided an additional mass-transfer resistance over that associated with individual particles. The 2–8 mm fraction exhibited a larger average and standard deviation in the distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients, possibly caused by the abundance of

  17. Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption study of Basic Yellow 28 and Basic Red 46 by a boron industry waste.

    PubMed

    Olgun, Asim; Atar, Necip

    2009-01-15

    In this study, the adsorption characteristics of Basic Yellow 28 (BY 28) and Basic Red 46 (BR 46) onto boron waste (BW), a waste produced from boron processing plant were investigated. The equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed by using various adsorption isotherm models and the results have shown that adsorption behavior of two dyes could be described reasonably well by a generalized isotherm. Kinetic studies indicated that the kinetics of the adsorption of BY 28 and BR 46 onto BW follows a pseudo-second-order model. The result showed that the BW exhibited high-adsorption capacity for basic dyes and the capacity slightly decreased with increasing temperature. The maximum adsorption capacities of BY 28 and BR 46 are reported at 75.00 and 74.73mgg(-1), respectively. The dye adsorption depended on the initial pH of the solution with maximum uptake occurring at about pH 9 and electrokinetic behavior of BW. Activation energy of 15.23kJ/mol for BY 28 and 18.15kJ/mol for BR 46 were determined confirming the nature of the physisorption onto BW. These results indicate that BW could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of the textile dyes from effluents. PMID:18434000

  18. Adsorption of reactive blue BF-5G dye by soybean hulls: kinetics, equilibrium and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Honorio, Jacqueline Ferandin; Veit, Márcia Teresinha; Gonçalves, Gilberto da Cunha; de Campos, Élvio Antonio; Fagundes-Klen, Márcia Regina

    2016-01-01

    The textile industry is known for the high use of chemicals, such as dyes, and large volumes of effluent that contaminate waters, a fact that has encouraged research and improved treatment techniques. In this study, we used unprocessed soybean hulls for the removal of reactive blue BF-5G dye. The point of zero charge of soybean hulls was 6.76. Regarding the speed of agitation in the adsorption process, the resistance to mass transfer that occurs in the boundary layer was eliminated at 100 rpm. Kinetics showed an experimental amount of dye adsorbed at equilibrium of 57.473 mg g(-1) obtained under the following conditions: dye initial concentration = 400 mg L(-1); diameter of particle = 0.725 mm; dosage = 6 g L(-1); pH 2; 100 rpm; temperature = 30 °C; and duration of 24 hours. The pseudo-second order best showed the dye removal kinetics. The adsorption isotherms performed at different temperatures (20, 30, 40 and 50 °C) showed little variation in the concentration range assessed, being properly adjusted by the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum capacity of dye adsorption was 72.427 mg g(-1) at 30 °C. Since soybean hull is a low-cost industrial byproduct, it proved to be a potential adsorbent for the removal of the textile dye assessed. PMID:26942540

  19. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of adsorption of phosphate onto ZnCl2 activated coir pith carbon.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Sangeetha, D

    2004-12-15

    Phosphate removal from aqueous solution was investigated using ZnCl(2)-activated carbon developed from coir pith, an agricultural solid waste. Studies were conducted to delineate the effect of contact time, adsorbent dose, phosphate concentration, pH, and temperature. The adsorption equilibrium data followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Langmuir adsorption capacity was found to be 5.1 mg/g. Adsorption followed second-order kinetics. The removal was maximum in the pH range 3-10. pH effect and desorption studies showed that adsorption occurred by both ion exchange and chemisorption mechanisms. Adsorption was found to be spontaneous and endothermic. Effect of foreign ions on adsorption shows that perchlorate, sulfate, and selenite decreased the percent removal of phosphate. PMID:15533408

  20. Rough-to-smooth transition of an equilibrium neutral constant stress layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Fichtl, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    Purpose of research on rough-to-smooth transition of an equilibrium neutral constant stress layer is to develop a model for low-level atmospheric flow over terrains of abruptly changing roughness, such as those occurring near the windward end of a landing strip, and to use the model to derive functions which define the extent of the region affected by the roughness change and allow adequate prediction of wind and shear stress profiles at all points within the region. A model consisting of two bounding logarithmic layers and an intermediate velocity defect layer is assumed, and dimensionless velocity and stress distribution functions which meet all boundary and matching conditions are hypothesized. The functions are used in an asymptotic form of the equation of motion to derive a relation which governs the growth of the internal boundary layer. The growth relation is used to predict variation of surface shear stress.

  1. Use of laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LIPAS) to determine equilibrium constants of cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hannink, N.J.; Hoffman, D.C.; Silva, R.J.; Russo, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    Laser Induced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy (LIPAS) is a relatively new, photothermal technique to examine solutions. Studies in the past have shown it to be more sensitive than conventional absorption spectroscopy, while, yielding the same information thus allowing lower concentrations to be used. This study is using LIPAS to examine solutions to determine the equilibrium constants of cation-cation complexes. It has been found that actinyl(V) cations form cation-cation complexes with a variety of cations, including actinyl(VI) cations. The radioactive nature of the actinide elements requires special handling techniques and also require limits be placed on the amount of material that can be used. The sensitivity of some oxidation states of the actinides to oxygen also presents a problem. Preliminary results will be presented for actinyl(V)-actinyl(VI) cation-cation complexes that were studied using a remote LIPAS system incorporating fiber optics for transmission of laser signals.

  2. A Cyclic Voltammetry Experiment Illustrating Redox Potentials, Equilibrium Constants, and Substitution Reactions in Coordination Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Henrique E.; Araki, Koiti; Dovidauskas, Sergio

    2000-10-01

    We report a cyclic voltammetry experiment focusing on the [RuIII(EDTA)(H2O)]- complex and its equilibrium reaction with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in aqueous solution, yielding the [RuIII(EDTA)(kS-DMSO)]- complex. From the electrochemistry data, the formation constants for the [RuIII(EDTA)(kS-DMSO)]- and [RuII(EDTA)(kS-DMSO)]2- complexes were calculated as 2.0 mol-1 dm3 and 2.7 x 109 mol-1 dm3, respectively. The results illustrate the kinetic lability of the ruthenium(III)-EDTA complexes and the role of backbonding stabilization in ruthenium(II)-DMSO complexes. The experiment has been successfully performed in a Coordination Chemistry course, exploiting fundamental aspects of metal complexes and the applications of that important electrochemical technique.

  3. [Characterization of Cr (VI) removal and total Cr equilibrium adsorption by sulfate reducing granular sludge in stimulant wastewater].

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Pang, Zhi-Hua; Hu, Yong-You; Zhong, Hai-Tao; Chen, Jian-Yu; Lin, Fang-Min

    2010-11-01

    Sulfate reducing granular sludge (SRGS) cultivated in small scale EGSB reactor was used for Cr (VI) removing. Characterization of Cr (VI) removal and total Cr equilibrium adsorption was studied, and the adsorption isotherm was fitted. Results showed that removal of Cr (VI) was in connection with the structure and chemical composition of SRGS and several environmental factors. The Cr (VI) removal rate increased with the dosage of granular sludge; the increasing of oscillation speed and temperature could enhance Cr (VI) removal and total Cr adsorption, but while the oscillation speed reached 150 r x min(-1) or the temperature came to 40 degrees C, the physical structure of granular sludge would be affected and the granular sludge discrete, and total Cr equilibrium adsorption decreased; lower pH value caused higher Cr (VI) removal rate, however the sulfate on the surface of granular sludge was affected by lower pH value easily and would translate into H2S, then total Cr adsorption rate decreased. Cr (VI) removal would be influenced by physical, chemical and biological factors, and the process included reduction and adsorption mainly. The maximum adsorption of total Cr by granular sludge was 6.84 mg x g(-1), and the total Cr adsorbing process fitted in with Langmuir adsorption isotherm. PMID:21250453

  4. The Universal Statistical Distributions of the Affinity, Equilibrium Constants, Kinetics and Specificity in Biomolecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We uncovered the universal statistical laws for the biomolecular recognition/binding process. We quantified the statistical energy landscapes for binding, from which we can characterize the distributions of the binding free energy (affinity), the equilibrium constants, the kinetics and the specificity by exploring the different ligands binding with a particular receptor. The results of the analytical studies are confirmed by the microscopic flexible docking simulations. The distribution of binding affinity is Gaussian around the mean and becomes exponential near the tail. The equilibrium constants of the binding follow a log-normal distribution around the mean and a power law distribution in the tail. The intrinsic specificity for biomolecular recognition measures the degree of discrimination of native versus non-native binding and the optimization of which becomes the maximization of the ratio of the free energy gap between the native state and the average of non-native states versus the roughness measured by the variance of the free energy landscape around its mean. The intrinsic specificity obeys a Gaussian distribution near the mean and an exponential distribution near the tail. Furthermore, the kinetics of binding follows a log-normal distribution near the mean and a power law distribution at the tail. Our study provides new insights into the statistical nature of thermodynamics, kinetics and function from different ligands binding with a specific receptor or equivalently specific ligand binding with different receptors. The elucidation of distributions of the kinetics and free energy has guiding roles in studying biomolecular recognition and function through small-molecule evolution and chemical genetics. PMID:25885453

  5. The universal statistical distributions of the affinity, equilibrium constants, kinetics and specificity in biomolecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Jin

    2015-04-01

    We uncovered the universal statistical laws for the biomolecular recognition/binding process. We quantified the statistical energy landscapes for binding, from which we can characterize the distributions of the binding free energy (affinity), the equilibrium constants, the kinetics and the specificity by exploring the different ligands binding with a particular receptor. The results of the analytical studies are confirmed by the microscopic flexible docking simulations. The distribution of binding affinity is Gaussian around the mean and becomes exponential near the tail. The equilibrium constants of the binding follow a log-normal distribution around the mean and a power law distribution in the tail. The intrinsic specificity for biomolecular recognition measures the degree of discrimination of native versus non-native binding and the optimization of which becomes the maximization of the ratio of the free energy gap between the native state and the average of non-native states versus the roughness measured by the variance of the free energy landscape around its mean. The intrinsic specificity obeys a Gaussian distribution near the mean and an exponential distribution near the tail. Furthermore, the kinetics of binding follows a log-normal distribution near the mean and a power law distribution at the tail. Our study provides new insights into the statistical nature of thermodynamics, kinetics and function from different ligands binding with a specific receptor or equivalently specific ligand binding with different receptors. The elucidation of distributions of the kinetics and free energy has guiding roles in studying biomolecular recognition and function through small-molecule evolution and chemical genetics. PMID:25885453

  6. Low-pressure equilibrium binary argon-methane gas mixture adsorption on exfoliated graphite: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albesa, Alberto; Russell, Brice; Vicente, José Luis; Rafti, Matías

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium measurements of pure methane, pure argon, and binary mixtures over exfoliated graphite were carried for different initial compositions, temperatures, and total pressures in the range of 0.1-1.5 Torr using the volumetric static method. Diagrams for gas and adsorbed phase compositions were constructed for the conditions explored, and isosteric heats of adsorption were calculated. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained with Monte Carlo simulations and using the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST).

  7. Partition functions and equilibrium constants for diatomic molecules and atoms of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, P. S.; Collet, R.

    2016-04-01

    Partition functions and dissociation equilibrium constants are presented for 291 diatomic molecules for temperatures in the range from near absolute zero to 10 000 K, thus providing data for many diatomic molecules of astrophysical interest at low temperature. The calculations are based on molecular spectroscopic data from the book of Huber & Herzberg (1979, Constants of Diatomic Molecules) with significant improvements from the literature, especially updated data for ground states of many of the most important molecules by Irikura (2007, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, 36, 389). Dissociation energies are collated from compilations of experimental and theoretical values. Partition functions for 284 species of atoms for all elements from H to U are also presented based on data collected at NIST. The calculated data are expected to be useful for modelling a range of low density astrophysical environments, especially star-forming regions, protoplanetary disks, the interstellar medium, and planetary and cool stellar atmospheres. The input data, which will be made available electronically, also provides a possible foundation for future improvement by the community. Full Tables 1-8 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A96

  8. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qingling; Deng, Yali; Li, Huishu; Liu, Jie; Hu, Hongqing; Chen, Shouwen; Sa, Tongmin

    2009-02-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L -1. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy ( ΔGmθr) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy ( ΔHmθr) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  9. Equilibrium and kinetics study on the adsorption of perfluorooctanoic acid from aqueous solution onto powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yan; Zhang, Chaojie; Li, Fei; Bo, Xiaowen; Liu, Guangfu; Zhou, Qi

    2009-09-30

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) was applied to remove perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the aqueous PFOA solution in this study. Contact time, adsorbent dose and temperature were analyzed as the effect factors in the adsorption reaction. The contact time of maximum PFOA uptake was around 1h while the sorption removal efficiency increased with the PAC concentrations. And the process of adsorption increased from 303 K to 313 K and then decreased from 313 K to 323 K. Among four applied models, the experimental isotherm data were discovered to follow Langmuir isotherm model more closely. Thermodynamically, adsorption was endothermic because enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs constants were 198.5 kJ/mol, 0.709 kJ/mol/K and negative, respectively, which also indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and feasible. From kinetic analysis, the adsorption was suggested to be pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption of PFOA on the PAC was mainly controlled by particle diffusion. PMID:19395160

  10. Non-Condon equilibrium Fermi's golden rule electronic transition rate constants via the linearized semiclassical method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-06-28

    In this paper, we test the accuracy of the linearized semiclassical (LSC) expression for the equilibrium Fermi's golden rule rate constant for electronic transitions in the presence of non-Condon effects. We do so by performing a comparison with the exact quantum-mechanical result for a model where the donor and acceptor potential energy surfaces are parabolic and identical except for shifts in the equilibrium energy and geometry, and the coupling between them is linear in the nuclear coordinates. Since non-Condon effects may or may not give rise to conical intersections, both possibilities are examined by considering: (1) A modified Garg-Onuchic-Ambegaokar model for charge transfer in the condensed phase, where the donor-acceptor coupling is linear in the primary mode coordinate, and for which non-Condon effects do not give rise to a conical intersection; (2) the linear vibronic coupling model for electronic transitions in gas phase molecules, where non-Condon effects give rise to conical intersections. We also present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression and a progression of more approximate expressions. The comparison is performed over a wide range of frictions and temperatures for model (1) and over a wide range of temperatures for model (2). The linearized semiclassical method is found to reproduce the exact quantum-mechanical result remarkably well for both models over the entire range of parameters under consideration. In contrast, more approximate expressions are observed to deviate considerably from the exact result in some regions of parameter space. PMID:27369495

  11. SARS CoV Main Proteinase: The Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium Dissociation Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano,V.; McGrath, W.; Yang, L.; Mangel, W.

    2006-01-01

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, K{sub D}, have varied more than 650000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 {mu}M. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded K{sub D} values of 5.8 {+-} 0.8 {mu}M (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 {+-} 2.2 {mu}M (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 {+-} 1.5 {mu}M (obtained from the forward scattering). The K{sub D} from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 {+-} 1.1 {mu}M, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 {+-} 0.4 {mu}M. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar K{sub D} values.

  12. Non-Condon equilibrium Fermi's golden rule electronic transition rate constants via the linearized semiclassical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we test the accuracy of the linearized semiclassical (LSC) expression for the equilibrium Fermi's golden rule rate constant for electronic transitions in the presence of non-Condon effects. We do so by performing a comparison with the exact quantum-mechanical result for a model where the donor and acceptor potential energy surfaces are parabolic and identical except for shifts in the equilibrium energy and geometry, and the coupling between them is linear in the nuclear coordinates. Since non-Condon effects may or may not give rise to conical intersections, both possibilities are examined by considering: (1) A modified Garg-Onuchic-Ambegaokar model for charge transfer in the condensed phase, where the donor-acceptor coupling is linear in the primary mode coordinate, and for which non-Condon effects do not give rise to a conical intersection; (2) the linear vibronic coupling model for electronic transitions in gas phase molecules, where non-Condon effects give rise to conical intersections. We also present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression and a progression of more approximate expressions. The comparison is performed over a wide range of frictions and temperatures for model (1) and over a wide range of temperatures for model (2). The linearized semiclassical method is found to reproduce the exact quantum-mechanical result remarkably well for both models over the entire range of parameters under consideration. In contrast, more approximate expressions are observed to deviate considerably from the exact result in some regions of parameter space.

  13. Calculating henry adsorption constants of molecular hydrogen at 77 K on alumophosphate zeolites with different microchannel sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenev, I. V.; Gavrilov, V. Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption isotherms of molecular hydrogen are measured at 77 K in a series of AlPO alumophosphate zeolites with different microchannel sizes. The potential of the intermolecular interaction of H2 is calculated within the model of a cylindrical channel of variable size. Henry constants are calculated for this model for arbitrary orientations of the adsorbate molecules in microchannels. The experimental and calculated values of the Henry adsorption constant of H2 are compared at 77 K on AlPO zeolites. The constants of intermolecular interaction are determined for the H2-AlPO system.

  14. SPECIES - EVALUATING THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES & EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS OF AN 11-SPECIES AIR MODEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate numerical prediction of high-temperature, chemically reacting flowfields requires a knowledge of the physical properties and reaction kinetics for the species involved in the reacting gas mixture. Assuming an 11-species air model at temperatures below 30,000 degrees Kelvin, SPECIES (Computer Codes for the Evaluation of Thermodynamic Properties, Transport Properties, and Equilibrium Constants of an 11-Species Air Model) computes values for the species thermodynamic and transport properties, diffusion coefficients and collision cross sections for any combination of the eleven species, and reaction rates for the twenty reactions normally occurring. The species represented in the model are diatomic nitrogen, diatomic oxygen, atomic nitrogen, atomic oxygen, nitric oxide, ionized nitric oxide, the free electron, ionized atomic nitrogen, ionized atomic oxygen, ionized diatomic nitrogen, and ionized diatomic oxygen. Sixteen subroutines compute the following properties for both a single species, interaction pair, or reaction, and an array of all species, pairs, or reactions: species specific heat and static enthalpy, species viscosity, species frozen thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient, collision cross section (OMEGA 1,1), collision cross section (OMEGA 2,2), collision cross section ratio, and equilibrium constant. The program uses least squares polynomial curve-fits of the most accurate data believed available to provide the requested values more quickly than is possible with table look-up methods. The subroutines for computing transport coefficients and collision cross sections use additional code to correct for any electron pressure when working with ionic species. SPECIES was developed on a SUN 3/280 computer running the SunOS 3.5 operating system. It is written in standard FORTRAN 77 for use on any machine, and requires roughly 92K memory. The standard distribution medium for SPECIES is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the

  15. RECONCILE Airborne ClOx Measurements and the ClO/ClOOCl Equilibrium Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, Fred; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Heinecke, Florian; Suminska, Olga; von Hobe, Marc; Volk, Michael; Wegner, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    ClOx (denoting mainly ClO and its peroxide dimer ClOOCl) chemistry is driving the ClO dimer and ClO-BrO catalytic ozone destruction cycles leading to the ozone hole phenomena in southern and northern high latitudes. HALOX is an in-situ instrument to measure ClO and ClO dimer by the technique of thermal dissociation (of the dimer) followed by chemical conversion and resonance fluorescence (CCRF) detection of the halogen atoms. The instrument was installed onboard the high-flying research aircraft M55 Geophysica during the RECONCILE Arctic field campaign in early 2010. While results for the ClO dimer, ClOOCl, photolysis derived from the sunrise evolution of ClO during a self-match flight have been recently published by Suminska-Ebersoldt et al. (Atmosph. Chem. Phys. 12, 1353-1365, 2012) we now present ClO dimer data which could only be derived after thorough laboratory calibrations of the thermolysis efficiency of the HALOX inlet heater element. Details of the calibration setup and the procedure are presented and preliminary results for the ClO/ClOOCl equilibrium constant are derived and discussed.

  16. A rigorous multiple independent binding site model for determining cell-based equilibrium dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Drake, Andrew W; Klakamp, Scott L

    2007-01-10

    A new 4-parameter nonlinear equation based on the standard multiple independent binding site model (MIBS) is presented for fitting cell-based ligand titration data in order to calculate the ligand/cell receptor equilibrium dissociation constant and the number of receptors/cell. The most commonly used linear (Scatchard Plot) or nonlinear 2-parameter model (a single binding site model found in commercial programs like Prism(R)) used for analysis of ligand/receptor binding data assumes only the K(D) influences the shape of the titration curve. We demonstrate using simulated data sets that, depending upon the cell surface receptor expression level, the number of cells titrated, and the magnitude of the K(D) being measured, this assumption of always being under K(D)-controlled conditions can be erroneous and can lead to unreliable estimates for the binding parameters. We also compare and contrast the fitting of simulated data sets to the commonly used cell-based binding equation versus our more rigorous 4-parameter nonlinear MIBS model. It is shown through these simulations that the new 4-parameter MIBS model, when used for cell-based titrations under optimal conditions, yields highly accurate estimates of all binding parameters and hence should be the preferred model to fit cell-based experimental nonlinear titration data. PMID:17141800

  17. Constraining supernova equations of state with equilibrium constants from heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, Matthias; Hagel, Kris; Natowitz, Joseph; Röpke, Gerd; Typel, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Cluster formation is a fundamental aspect of the equation of state (EOS) of warm and dense nuclear matter such as can be found in supernovae (SNe). Similar matter can be studied in heavy-ion collisions (HICs). We use the experimental data of Qin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 172701 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.172701] to test calculations of cluster formation and the role of in-medium modifications of cluster properties in SN EOSs. For the comparison between theory and experiment we use chemical equilibrium constants as the main observables. This reduces some of the systematic uncertainties and allows deviations from ideal gas behavior to be identified clearly. In the analysis, we carefully account for the differences between matter in SNe and HICs. We find that, at the lowest densities, the experiment and all theoretical models are consistent with the ideal gas behavior. At higher densities ideal behavior is clearly ruled out and interaction effects have to be considered. The contributions of continuum correlations are of relevance in the virial expansion and remain a difficult problem to solve at higher densities. We conclude that at the densities and temperatures discussed mean-field interactions of nucleons, inclusion of all relevant light clusters, and a suppression mechanism of clusters at high densities have to be incorporated in the SN EOS.

  18. Adsorption/desorption of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) using chemically modified orange peel: Equilibrium and kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasheen, Mohamed R.; Ammar, Nabila S.; Ibrahim, Hanan S.

    2012-02-01

    Waste materials from industries such as food processing may act as cost effective and efficient biosorbents to remove toxic contaminants from wastewater. This study aimed to establish an optimized condition and closed loop application of processed orange peel for metals removal. A comparative study of the adsorption capacity of the chemically modified orange peel was performed against environmentally problematic metal ions, namely, Cd 2+, Cu 2+ and Pb 2+, from aqueous solutions. Chemically modified orange peel (MOP) showed a significantly higher metal uptake capacity compared to original orange peel (OP). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectra of peel showed that the carboxylic group peak shifted from 1637 to 1644 cm -1 after Pb (II) ions binding, indicated the involvement of carboxyl groups in Pb(II) ions binding. The metals uptake by MOP was rapid and the equilibrium time was 30 min at constant temperature and pH. Sorption kinetics followed a second-order model. The mechanism of metal sorption by MOP gave good fits for Freundlich and Langmuir models. Desorption of metals and regeneration of the biosorbent was attained simultaneously by acid elution. Even after four cycles of adsorption-elution, the adsorption capacity was regained completely and adsorption efficiency of metal was maintained at around 90%.

  19. Adsorption and desorption of arsenate on sandy sediments from contaminated and uncontaminated saturated zones: Kinetic and equilibrium modeling.

    PubMed

    Hafeznezami, Saeedreza; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G; Dunne, Aislinn; Tran, Tiffany; Yang, Chao; Lam, Jacquelyn R; Reynolds, Matthew D; Davis, James A; Jay, Jennifer A

    2016-08-01

    Application of empirical models to adsorption of contaminants on natural heterogeneous sorbents is often challenging due to the uncertainty associated with fitting experimental data and determining adjustable parameters. Sediment samples from contaminated and uncontaminated portions of a study site in Maine, USA were collected and investigated for adsorption of arsenate [As(V)]. Two kinetic models were used to describe the results of single solute batch adsorption experiments. Piecewise linear regression of data linearized to fit pseudo-first order kinetic model resulted in two distinct rates and a cutoff time point of 14-19 h delineating the biphasic behavior of solute adsorption. During the initial rapid adsorption stage, an average of 60-80% of the total adsorption took place. Pseudo-second order kinetic models provided the best fit to the experimental data (R(2) > 0.99) and were capable of describing the adsorption over the entire range of experiments. Both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms provided reasonable fits to the adsorption data at equilibrium. Langmuir-derived maximum adsorption capacity (St) of the studied sediments ranged between 29 and 97 mg/kg increasing from contaminated to uncontaminated sites. Solid phase As content of the sediments ranged from 3.8 to 10 mg/kg and the As/Fe ratios were highest in the amorphous phase. High-pH desorption experiments resulted in a greater percentage of solid phase As released into solution from experimentally-loaded sediments than from the unaltered samples suggesting that As(V) adsorption takes place on different reversible and irreversible surface sites. PMID:27218893

  20. Batch removal of malachite green from aqueous solutions by adsorption on oil palm trunk fibre: equilibrium isotherms and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Hameed, B H; El-Khaiary, M I

    2008-06-15

    Oil palm trunk fibre (OPTF)--an agricultural solid waste--was used as low-cost adsorbent to remove malachite green (MG) from aqueous solutions. The operating variables studied were contact time, initial dye concentration, and solution pH. Equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by three isotherms, namely the Freundlich isotherm, the Langmuir isotherm, and the multilayer adsorption isotherm. The best fit to the data was obtained with the multilayer adsorption. The monolayer adsorption capacity of OPTF was found to be 149.35 mg/g at 30 degrees C. Adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the Lagergren pseudo-first-order, Ho's pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. It was found that the Lagergren's model could be used for the prediction of the system's kinetics. The overall rate of dye uptake was found to be controlled by external mass transfer at the beginning of adsorption, then for initial MG concentrations of 25, 50, 100, 150, and 300 mg/L the rate-control changed to intraparticle diffusion at a later stage, but for initial MG concentrations 200 and 250 mg/L no evidence was found of intraparticle diffusion at any period of adsorption. It was found that with increasing the initial concentration of MG, the pore-diffusion coefficient increased while the film-diffusion coefficient decreased. PMID:18022316

  1. Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays to Measure Equilibrium Dissociation Constants: GAL4-p53 Binding DNA as a Model System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffler, Michael A.; Walters, Ryan D.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K[subscript D]) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel;…

  2. Adsorption equilibrium of binary methane/ethane mixtures in BPL activated carbon: isotherms and calorimetric heats of adsorption.

    PubMed

    He, Yufeng; Yun, Jeong-Ho; Seaton, Nigel A

    2004-08-01

    The adsorption of pure methane and ethane in BPL activated carbon has been measured at temperatures between 264 and 373 K and at pressures up to 3.3 MPa with a bench-scale high-pressure open-flow apparatus. The same apparatus was used to measure the adsorption of binary methane/ethane mixtures in BPL at 301.4 K and at pressures up to 2.6 MPa. Thermodynamic consistency tests demonstrate that the data are thermodynamically consistent. In contrast to two sets of data previously published, we found that the adsorption of binary methane/ethane in BPL behaves ideally (in the sense of obeying ideal adsorbed solution theory, IAST) throughout the pressure and gas-phase composition range studied. A Tian-Calvet type microcalorimeter was used to measure low-pressure isotherms, the isosteric heats of adsorption of pure methane and ethane in BPL activated carbon, and the individual heats of adsorption in binary mixtures, at 297 K and at pressures up to 100 kPa. The mixture heats of adsorption were consistent with IAST. PMID:15274571

  3. Rapid Adsorption of Copper(II) and Lead(II) by Rice Straw/Fe3O4 Nanocomposite: Optimization, Equilibrium Isotherms, and Adsorption Kinetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B.; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:25815470

  4. The effect of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of dissolved organic matter and atrazine on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd Schreiber; Viktor Schmalz; Thomas Brinkmann; Eckhard Worch

    2007-09-15

    The influence of water temperature on the adsorption of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) on activated carbon has not been investigated intensively yet. In this study, batch experiments with granular activated carbon (GAC) F300, from bituminous coal, have been carried out at three temperatures (5, 20, 35{sup o} C) using a humic acid model water and different types of surface water (lake, river, canal). Furthermore, the adsorption of an anthropogenic contaminant, atrazine, was quantified in the absence and presence of DOM. The results indicate a significant influence of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of DOM and atrazine. Contrary to expectations, DOM and atrazine adsorption in surface water tends to be increased with increasing water temperature, whereas the extent of this effect is dependent on the type and concentration of DOM. Furthermore, the temperature effect on atrazine adsorption is controlled by competition of DOM and atrazine on adsorption sites. Some assumptions are proposed and discussed for explaining the temperature effects observed in the batch studies. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics investigation on the adsorption of lead(II) by coal-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhengji; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Mijia; Chen, Huilun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using activated coal-based activated carbon (CBAC) to adsorb Pb(II) from aqueous solutions through batch tests. Effects of contact time, pH, temperature and initial Pb(II) concentration on the Pb(II) adsorption were examined. The Pb(II) adsorption is strongly dependent on pH, but insensitive to temperature. The best pH for Pb(II) removal is in the range of 5.0-5.5 with more than 90 % of Pb(II) removed. The equilibrium time was found to be 60 min and the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Isotherm data followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 162.33 mg/g. The adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis suggested that CBAC possessed a porous structure and was rich in carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on its surface, which might play a major role in Pb(II) adsorption. These findings indicated that CBAC has great potential as an alternative adsorbent for Pb(II) removal. PMID:27504258

  6. Adsorption of Zn2+ ions onto NaA and NaX zeolites: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Nibou, D; Mekatel, H; Amokrane, S; Barkat, M; Trari, M

    2010-01-15

    The adsorption of Zn(2+) onto NaA and NaX zeolites was investigated. The samples were synthesized according to a hydrothermal crystallization using aluminium isopropoxide (Al[OCH(CH(3))(2)](3)) as a new alumina source. The effects of pH, initial concentration, solid/liquid ratio and temperature were studied in batch experiments. The Freundlich and the Langmuir models were applied and the adsorption equilibrium followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The uptake distribution coefficient (K(d)) indicated that the Zn(2+) removal was the highest at minimum concentration. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The negative values of standard enthalpy of adsorption revealed the exothermic nature of the adsorption process whereas the negative activation entropies reflected that no significant change occurs in the internal structure of the zeolites solid matrix during the sorption of Zn(2+). The negative values of Gibbs free energy were indicative of the spontaneity of the adsorption process. Analysis of the kinetic and rate data revealed that the pseudo second-order sorption mechanism is predominant and the intra particle diffusion was the determining step for the sorption of zinc ions. The obtained optimal parameters have been applied to wastewater from the industrial zone (Algeria) in order to remove the contained zinc effluents. PMID:19773115

  7. An Equilibrium Model for the Combined Effect of Macromolecular Crowding and Surface Adsorption on the Formation of Linear Protein Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Travis; Minton, Allen P.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of linear protein fibrils has previously been shown to be enhanced by volume exclusion or crowding in the presence of a high concentration of chemically inert protein or polymer, and by adsorption to membrane surfaces. An equilibrium mesoscopic model for the combined effect of both crowding and adsorption upon the fibrillation of a dilute tracer protein is presented. The model exhibits behavior that differs qualitatively from that observed in the presence of crowding or adsorption alone. The model predicts that in a crowded solution, at critical values of the volume fraction of crowder or intrinsic energy of the tracer-wall interaction, the tracer protein will undergo an extremely cooperative transition—approaching a step function—from existence as a slightly self-associated species in solution to existence as a highly self-associated and completely adsorbed species. Criteria for a valid experimental test of these predictions are presented. PMID:25692600

  8. Adsorption of Rhodamine B on two novel polar-modified post-cross-linked resins: Equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiangfu; Huang, Jianhan

    2016-04-01

    We employed two polar monomers, triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) and butyl acrylate (BA), to copolymerize with divinylbenzene (DVB), and synthesized two starting copolymers labeled PDT and PDB. Then, the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction was performed for the two starting copolymers, and the residual pendent vinyl groups were consumed, and hence we obtained two novel polar-modified post-cross-linked resins PDTpc and PDBpc. The surface polarity greatly improved due to introduction of the polar monomers, and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume significantly increased after the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction. Compared with the starting copolymers, the non-polar post-cross-linked resin PDVBpc and some other adsorbents in the references, PDTpc and PDBpc possessed a much enhanced adsorption to Rhodamine B, and the equilibrium capacity reached 578.2mg/g and 328.7mg/g, respectively, at an equilibrium concentration of 100mg/L, and the Freundlich model characterized the equilibrium data very well. The adsorption was a fast process and the kinetic data obeyed the micropore diffusion model. These results confirmed that PDTpc and PDBpc had the potential superiority in adsorptive removal of Rhodamine B from aqueous solution. PMID:26803602

  9. Adsorption behaviour of direct yellow 50 onto cotton fiber: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic profile.

    PubMed

    Ismail, L F M; Sallam, H B; Abo Farha, S A; Gamal, A M; Mahmoud, G E A

    2014-10-15

    This study investigated the adsorption of direct yellow 50 onto cotton fiber from aqueous solution by using parameters, such as pH, temperature, contact time, initial dye concentration and the effect of sodium sulphate, tetrasodium edate and trisodium citrate. The extent of dye adsorption increased with increasing contact time, temperature and solution concentration. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. It was found that the Langmuir equation fit better than the Freundlich equation. The results show that the presence of SE and SC significantly enhance the dye adsorption onto cotton fiber. In addition, the adsorption data obtained at different temperatures of DY50 onto cotton fiber were applied to pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. The rates of adsorption were found to conform to pseudo second-order kinetics with good correlation. Also, free energy of adsorption (ΔG(#)), enthalpy (ΔH(#)), and entropy (ΔS(#)) changes were determined to predict the nature of adsorption. The positive value of the enthalpy change indicated that the adsorption is endothermic process. The activation energy, Ea, is ranged between 1.9 and 3.9kJmol(-1) indicated that the adsorption process is a physisorption. This low value of Ea generally indicates diffusion controlled process. PMID:24882703

  10. Adsorption behavior of activated carbon derived from pyrolusite-modified sewage sludge: equilibrium modeling, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Jiang, Li; Ji, Xiujuan

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon was developed from sewage sludge using pyrolusite as an additive. It was demonstrated that the removal efficiency of two synthetic dyes (Tracid orange GS and Direct fast turquoise blue GL) by the produced adsorbent was up to 97.6%. The activated carbon with pyrolusite addition had 38.2% higher surface area, 43.8% larger micropore and 54.4% larger mesopore production than ordinary sludge-based activated carbons. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on dyes adsorption tests. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption, and the results fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data have been analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equation. The experimental data fitted very well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Activation energies for the adsorption processes ranged between 8.7 and 19.1 kJ mol 1. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (deltaG0), standard enthalpy (deltaH0) and standard entropy (deltaS0) were evaluated. The adsorption of these two dyes on the activated carbon was found to be a spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. PMID:22097045

  11. Adsorption behavior of direct red 80 and congo red onto activated carbon/surfactant: Process optimization, kinetics and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengjun; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Xiao; Jiang, Xiaohui; Li, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Adsorptions of congo red and direct red 80 onto activated carbon/surfactant from aqueous solution were optimized. The Box-Behnken design (BBD) has been employed to analyze the effects of concentration of surfactant, temperature, pH, and initial concentration of the dye in the adsorption capacity. Their corresponding experimental data could be evaluated excellently by second order polynomial regression models and the two models were also examined based on the analysis of variance and t test statistics, respectively. The optimum conditions were obtained as follows: Cs = 34.10 μM, T = 50 °C, pH = 3.5, and CCR = 160 mg/L for the congo red system, and Cs = 34.10 μM, T = 50 °C, pH = 6.1, and CDR80 = 110 mg/L for the direct red 80 system. And in these conditions, the measured experimental maximum adsorption capacities for the congo red and direct red 80 removals were 769.48 mg/g and 519.90 mg/g, which were consistent with their corresponding predicted values, with small relative errors of -2.81% and -0.67%, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics for the two dye adsorptions onto AC/DDAC were also investigated. The experimental data were fitted by four isotherm models, and Langmuir model presented the best fit. The kinetic studies indicated that the kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order model.

  12. Development, Construction, and Operation of a Multisample Volumetric Apparatus for the Study of Gas Adsorption Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Rui P. P. L.; Silva, Ricardo J. S.; Esteves, Isabel A. A. C.; Mota, Jose´ P. B.

    2015-01-01

    The construction of a simple volumetric adsorption apparatus is highlighted. The setup is inexpensive and provides a clear demonstration of gas phase adsorption concepts. The topic is suitable for undergraduate chemistry and chemical engineering students. Moreover, this unit can also provide quantitative data that can be used by young researchers…

  13. A METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC TAUTOMERIC AND ZWITTERIONIC MICROSPECIES EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for the individual measurement of simultaneously occurring, unimolecular, site-specific "microequilibrium" constants as in, for example, prototropic tautomerism and zwitterionic equilibria. Our method represents an elaboration of that of Nygren et al. (Anal. ...

  14. METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC TAUTOMERIC AND ZWITTERIONIC MICROSPECIES EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for the individual measurement of simultaneously occurring, unimolecular, site-specific “microequilibrium” constants as in, for example, prototropic tautomerism and zwitterionic equilibria. Our method represents an elaboration of that of Nygren et al. (Anal. ...

  15. Adsorption removal of tetracycline from aqueous solution by anaerobic granular sludge: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Ji, Feng; Liu, Yuanlu; Tong, Zilin; Zhan, Xinmin; Hu, Zhenhu

    2013-01-01

    High concentration animal wastewater is often contaminated by tetracycline and an upflow anaerobic sludge bioreactor (UASB) with granular sludge is often used to treat the wastewater. The investigation of the adsorption process of tetracycline on anaerobic granular sludge during anaerobic digestion of animal wastewater will increase the understanding of antibiotics behavior in the UASB reactor. In this study, the effects of initial pH, humic acid concentration, and temperature on the removal of tetracycline by anaerobic granular sludge from aqueous solution were investigated using the batch adsorption technique in 100 mL flasks with 75 mL of work volume. The results show that the highest removal efficiency of 93.0% was achieved around pH 3.0 and the removal efficiency at the neutral pH range (pH 6.0-8.0) is about 91.5%. The thermodynamic analysis indicates that the adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order equation. The adsorption isotherms analysis indicates that the Langmuir model is better than the Freundlich model for the description of the adsorption process and confirms the result of thermodynamics analysis. The maximum adsorption capacities were 2.984, 4.108 and 4.618 mg/g at 25, 35 and 45 °C, respectively. These results provide useful information for understanding the fate and transformation of tetracycline in a UASB digestion system and improving the management of tetracycline contaminated animal wastewater. PMID:23552236

  16. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium study of nitrogen species onto radiata pine (Pinus radiata) sawdust.

    PubMed

    Harmayani, Kadek D; Faisal Anwar, A H M

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen species (NH3-N, NO3-N, and NO2-N) are found as one of the major dissolved constituents in wastewater or stormwater runoff. In this research, laboratory experiments were conducted to remove these pollutants from the water environment using radiata pine (Pinus radiata) sawdust. A series of batch tests was conducted by varying initial concentration, dosage, particle size, pH, and contact time to check the removal performance. Test results confirmed the effectiveness of radiata pine sawdust for removing these contaminants from the aqueous phase (100% removal of NO3-N, and NO2-N; 55% removal of NH3-N). The adsorbent dosage and initial concentration showed a significantly greater effect on the removal process over pH or particle sizes. The optimum dosage for contaminant removal on a laboratory scale was found to be 12 g. Next, the adsorption kinetics were studied using intraparticle diffusion, liquid-film diffusion, and a pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order model. The adsorption of all species followed a pseudo-second order model but NO2-N adsorption followed both models. In addition, the kinetics of NO2-N adsorption showed two-step adsorption following intraparticle diffusion and liquid-film diffusion. The isotherm study showed that NO3-N and NO2-N adsorption fitted slightly better with the Freundlich model but that NH3-N adsorption followed both Freundlich and Langmuir models. PMID:27438245

  17. Adsorption equilibrium of organic vapors on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Gravimetric techniques were employed to determine the adsorption capacities of commercially available purified electric arc and HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for organic compounds (toluene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), hexane and cyclohexane) at relative pressures, p/p0, ranging from 1 ?? 10-4 to 0.95 and at isothermal conditions of 25, 37 and 50 ??C. The isotherms displayed both type I and type II characteristics. Adsorption isotherm modeling showed that SWNTs are heterogeneous adsorbents, and the Freundlich equation best describes the interaction between organic molecules and SWNTs. The heats of adsorption were 1-4 times the heats of vaporization, which is typical for physical adsorption of organic vapors on porous carbons. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Virtual Mixture Approach to the Study of Multistate Equilibrium: Application to Constant pH Simulation in Explicit Water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-10-01

    Chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium of multiple states is a fundamental phenomenon in biology systems and has been the focus of many experimental and computational studies. This work presents a simulation method to directly study the equilibrium of multiple states. This method constructs a virtual mixture of multiple states (VMMS) to sample the conformational space of all chemical states simultaneously. The VMMS system consists of multiple subsystems, one for each state. The subsystem contains a solute and a solvent environment. The solute molecules in all subsystems share the same conformation but have their own solvent environments. Transition between states is implicated by the change of their molar fractions. Simulation of a VMMS system allows efficient calculation of relative free energies of all states, which in turn determine their equilibrium molar fractions. For systems with a large number of state transition sites, an implicit site approximation is introduced to minimize the cost of simulation. A direct application of the VMMS method is for constant pH simulation to study protonation equilibrium. Applying the VMMS method to a heptapeptide of 3 ionizable residues, we calculated the pKas of those residues both with all explicit states and with implicit sites and obtained consistent results. For mouse epidermal growth factor of 9 ionizable groups, our VMMS simulations with implicit sites produced pKas of all 9 ionizable groups and the results agree qualitatively with NMR measurement. This example demonstrates the VMMS method can be applied to systems of a large number of ionizable groups and the computational cost scales linearly with the number of ionizable groups. For one of the most challenging systems in constant pH calculation, SNase Δ+PHS/V66K, our VMMS simulation shows that it is the state-dependent water penetration that causes the large deviation in lysine66's pKa. PMID:26506245

  19. A Virtual Mixture Approach to the Study of Multistate Equilibrium: Application to Constant pH Simulation in Explicit Water

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium of multiple states is a fundamental phenomenon in biology systems and has been the focus of many experimental and computational studies. This work presents a simulation method to directly study the equilibrium of multiple states. This method constructs a virtual mixture of multiple states (VMMS) to sample the conformational space of all chemical states simultaneously. The VMMS system consists of multiple subsystems, one for each state. The subsystem contains a solute and a solvent environment. The solute molecules in all subsystems share the same conformation but have their own solvent environments. Transition between states is implicated by the change of their molar fractions. Simulation of a VMMS system allows efficient calculation of relative free energies of all states, which in turn determine their equilibrium molar fractions. For systems with a large number of state transition sites, an implicit site approximation is introduced to minimize the cost of simulation. A direct application of the VMMS method is for constant pH simulation to study protonation equilibrium. Applying the VMMS method to a heptapeptide of 3 ionizable residues, we calculated the pKas of those residues both with all explicit states and with implicit sites and obtained consistent results. For mouse epidermal growth factor of 9 ionizable groups, our VMMS simulations with implicit sites produced pKas of all 9 ionizable groups and the results agree qualitatively with NMR measurement. This example demonstrates the VMMS method can be applied to systems of a large number of ionizable groups and the computational cost scales linearly with the number of ionizable groups. For one of the most challenging systems in constant pH calculation, SNase Δ+PHS/V66K, our VMMS simulation shows that it is the state-dependent water penetration that causes the large deviation in lysine66’s pKa. PMID:26506245

  20. Toward Improving Atmospheric Models and Ozone Projections: Laboratory UV Absorption Cross Sections and Equilibrium Constant of ClOOCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmouth, D. M.; Klobas, J. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Thirty years have now passed since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, and despite comprehensive international agreements being in place to phase out CFCs and halons, polar ozone losses generally remain severe. The relevant halogen compounds have very long atmospheric lifetimes, which ensures that seasonal polar ozone depletion will likely continue for decades to come. Changes in the climate system can further impact stratospheric ozone abundance through changes in the temperature and water vapor structure of the atmosphere and through the potential initiation of solar radiation management efforts. In many ways, the rate at which climate is changing must now be considered fast relative to the slow removal of halogens from the atmosphere. Photochemical models of Earth's atmosphere play a critical role in understanding and projecting ozone levels, but in order for these models to be accurate, they must be built on a foundation of accurate laboratory data. ClOOCl is the centerpiece of the catalytic cycle that accounts for more than 50% of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss in the Arctic and Antarctic stratosphere every spring, and so uncertainties in the ultraviolet cross sections of ClOOCl are particularly important. Additionally, the equilibrium constant of the dimerization reaction of ClO merits further study, as there are important discrepancies between in situ measurements and lab-based models, and the JPL-11 recommended equilibrium constant includes high error bars at atmospherically relevant temperatures (~75% at 200 K). Here we analyze available data for the ClOOCl ultraviolet cross sections and equilibrium constant and present new laboratory spectroscopic results.

  1. Computer codes for the evaluation of thermodynamic properties, transport properties, and equilibrium constants of an 11-species air model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Gupta, Roop N.

    1990-01-01

    The computer codes developed provide data to 30000 K for the thermodynamic and transport properties of individual species and reaction rates for the prominent reactions occurring in an 11-species nonequilibrium air model. These properties and the reaction-rate data are computed through the use of curve-fit relations which are functions of temperature (and number density for the equilibrium constant). The curve fits were made using the most accurate data believed available. A detailed review and discussion of the sources and accuracy of the curve-fitted data used herein are given in NASA RP 1232.

  2. Rate Constant in Far-from-Equilibrium States of a Replicating System with Mutually Catalyzing Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Yukawa, Satoshi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2006-02-01

    As a first step to study reaction dynamics in far-from-equilibrium open systems, we propose a stochastic protocell model in which two mutually catalyzing chemicals are replicating depending on the external flow of energy resources J. This model exhibits an Arrhenius type reaction; furthermore, it produces a non-Arrhenius reaction that exhibits a power-law reaction rate with regard to the activation energy. These dependences are explained using the dynamics of J; the asymmetric random walk of J results in the Arrhenius equation and conservation of J results in a power-law dependence. Further, we find that the discreteness of molecules results in the power change. Effects of cell divisions are also discussed in our model.

  3. Kinetics and equilibrium studies of adsorption of chromium(VI) ion from industrial wastewater using Chrysophyllum albidum (Sapotaceae) seed shells.

    PubMed

    Amuda, O S; Adelowo, F E; Ologunde, M O

    2009-02-01

    A new biosorbent has been prepared by coating Chrysophyllum albidum (Sapotaceae) seed shells with chitosan and/or oxidizing agents such as sulfuric acid. This study investigated the technical feasibility of activated and modified activated C. albidum seed shells carbons for the adsorption of chromium(VI) from aqueous solution. The sorption process with respect to its equilibria and kinetics as well as the effects of pH, contact time, adsorbent mass, adsorbate concentration and particle size on adsorption was also studied. The most effective pH range was found to be between 4.5 and 5 for the sorption of the metal ion. The pseudo-first-order rate equation by Lagergren and pseudo-second-order rate equation were tested on the kinetic data, the adsorption process followed pseudo-second-order rate kinetics, also, isotherm data was analyzed for possible agreement with the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms, the Freundlich and Langmuir models for dynamics of metal ion uptake proposed in this work fitted the experimental data reasonably well. However, equilibrium sorption data were better represented by Langmuir model than Freundlich. The adsorption capacity calculated from Langmuir isotherm was 84.31, 76.23 and 59.63mgCr(VI)/g at initial pH of 3.0 at 30 degrees C for the particle size of 1.00-1.25mm with the use of 12.5, 16.5 and 2.1g/L of CACASC, CCASC and ACASC adsorbent mass, respectively. This readily available adsorbent is efficient in the uptake of Cr(VI) ion in aqueous solution, thus, it could be an excellent alternative for the removal of heavy metals and organic matter from water and wastewater. PMID:19022632

  4. Mechanism of highly efficient adsorption of 2-chlorophenol onto ultrasonic graphene materials: Comparison and equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Tayyebeh; Lee, Byeong-Kyu

    2016-11-01

    The deficiencies of the recently reported improved Hummers method for the synthesis of graphene oxide (GO), such as high reaction temperature (60°C) and long reaction time (10h), were successfully solved using a low-intensity ultrasonic bath for 30min at 40°C. Furthermore, compared to its conventional synthesis counterpart, a facile and fast, one-step ultrasonic method that excluded hydrazine hydrate was developed to synthesize reduced GO (rGO) from graphite (10min, 50°C) in the presence of hydrazine hydrate (rGO-C, 12h, 90°C). The adsorption characteristics of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) from an aqueous solution were investigated using rGOs and GOs prepared by ultrasonic (rGO-Us/GO-Us) and conventional (rGO-C/GO-C) methods. Whereas 2-CP was completely removed with rGO-Us after 50min, only 40% of 2-CP was eliminated with rGO-C. The maximum adsorption capacity of 2-CP calculated by the Langmuir model onto rGO-Us (208.67mg/g) was much higher than that onto GO-Us (134.49mg/g). In addition, the ultrasonic graphene adsorption capacities were much higher than the corresponding values of rGO-C (49.9mg/g) and GO-C (32.06mg/g). The enhanced adsorption for rGO-Us and GO-Us is attributed to their greater surface areas, excellent oxygenated groups for GO-Us and superior π-electron-rich matrix for rGO-Us, compared to other adsorbents. The adsorption of 2-CP on the rGO materials increased with increasing solution pH to a maximum around its pKa (pKa=8.85), while the adsorption for the GO materials increased with decreasing solution pH. The adsorption mechanism proceeded via hydrogen bonding in neutral and acidic media, but via π-π electron donor-accepter (EDA) interactions between 2-CP and graphene materials in basic medium. The FTIR spectrum of GO-Us after adsorption indicates that the position and intensity of many peaks of GO-Us were affected due to the adsorption of different 2-CP groups at different pHs. PMID:27474817

  5. Calculation of equilibrium constants from multiwavelength spectroscopic data-I Mathematical considerations.

    PubMed

    Gampp, H; Maeder, M; Meyer, C J; Zuberbühler, A D

    1985-02-01

    Multiwavelength spectrophotometric and spectroscopic data in general contain considerably more information about complexation equilibria than potentiometric data do. With the construction of a fully automatic titration set-up built into a high-precision spectrophotometer, the problems related to the wider use of this method have shifted from the quality of the primary data to the complexity of their numerical treatment. Matrix algebra is used to show how these problems can be overcome. An algorithm is described for calculation of stability constants and absorption spectra, together with the associated standard errors, at a reasonable expense of computer time. Problems in finding the minimum in a multidimensional parameter space are reduced by elimination of the molar absorptivities from the algorithm for the iterative refinement. Numerical safety and speed of calculation are improved by use of analytical instead of numerical derivatives. The number of data to be fitted is decreased by principal-component analysis. PMID:18963802

  6. Dynamic behaviour of Cd2+ adsorption in equilibrium batch studies by CaCO3(-)-rich Corbicula fluminea shell.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Farhah Amalya; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Latif, Puziah Abdul

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the structural and adsorption properties of the CaCO3(-)-rich Corbicula fluminea shell as a natural and economic adsorbent to remove Cd ions from aqueous solutions under batch studies. Experiments were conducted with different contact times, various initial concentrations, initial solution pH and serial biosorbent dosage to examine the dynamic characterization of the adsorption and its influence on Cd uptake capacity. The characterization of the C. fluminea shell using SEM/EDX revealed that the adsorbent surface is mostly impregnated by small particles of potentially calcium salts. The dominant Cd adsorption mechanism is strongly pH and concentration dependent. A maximum Cd removal efficiency of 96.20% was obtained at pH 7 while the optimum adsorbent dosage was observed as 5 g/L. The Langmuir isotherm was discovered to be more suitable to represent the experimental equilibrium isotherm results with higher correlation coefficients (R(2) > 0.98) than Freundlich (R(2) < 0.97).The correlation coefficient values (p < 0.01) indicated the superiority of the Langmuir isotherm over the Freundlich isotherm. PMID:23771443

  7. Adsorption of methylene blue onto activated carbon produced from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics studies*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-jie; Qin, Ye-bo; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Dong-dong; Xu, Ping; Hochstetter, Danielle; Wang, Yue-fei

    2013-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells, the main byproduct of the manufacture of tea seed oil, were used as precursors for the preparation of tea activated carbon (TAC) in the present study. A high yield (44.1%) of TAC was obtained from tea seed shells via a one-step chemical method using ZnCl2 as an agent. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the total pore volumes of the obtained TAC were found to be 1 530.67 mg2/g and 0.782 6 cm3/g, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption results were complied with Langmuir isotherm model and its maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 324.7 mg/g for methylene blue. Adsorption kinetics studies indicated that the pseudo-second-order model yielded the best fit for the kinetic data. An intraparticle diffusion model suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Thermodynamics studies revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process. These results indicate that tea seed shells could be utilized as a renewable resource to develop activated carbon which is a potential adsorbent for methylene blue. PMID:23825151

  8. Kinetic and equilibrium characterization of uranium(VI) adsorption onto carboxylate-functionalized poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)-grafted lignocellulosics.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Divya, L; Suchithra, P S

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a new adsorbent prepared from coconut coir pith, CP (a coir industry-based lignocellulosic residue), for the removal of uranium [U(VI)] from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent (PGCP-COOH) having a carboxylate functional group at the chain end was synthesized by grafting poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) onto CP using potassium peroxydisulphate-sodium thiosulphite as a redox initiator and in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as a crosslinking agent. IR spectroscopy results confirm the graft copolymer formation and carboxylate functionalization. XRD studies confirm the decrease of crystallinity in PGCP-COOH compared to CP, and it favors the protrusion of the functional group into the aqueous medium. The thermal stability of the samples was studied using thermogravimetry (TG). Surface charge density of the samples as a function of pH was determined using potentiometric titration. The ability of PGCP-COOH to remove U(VI) from aqueous solutions was assessed using a batch adsorption technique. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed at the pH range 4.0-6.0. Maximum removal of 99.2% was observed for an initial concentration of 25mg/L at pH 6.0 and an adsorbent dose of 2g/L. Equilibrium was achieved in approximately 3h. The experimental kinetic data were analyzed using a first-order kinetic model. The temperature dependence indicates an endothermic process. U(VI) adsorption was found to decrease with an increase in ionic strength due to the formation of outer-sphere surface complexes on PGCP-COOH. Equilibrium data were best modeled by the Langmuir isotherm. The thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG(0), DeltaH(0) and DeltaS(0) were derived to predict the nature of adsorption. Adsorption experiments were also conducted using a commercial cation exchanger, Ceralite IRC-50, with carboxylate functionality for comparison. Utility of the adsorbent was tested by removing U(VI) from simulated nuclear industry wastewater

  9. Adsorption of heavy metal cations by Na-clinoptilolite: equilibrium and selectivity studies.

    PubMed

    Mihaly-Cozmuta, L; Mihaly-Cozmuta, A; Peter, A; Nicula, C; Tutu, H; Silipas, Dan; Indrea, Emil

    2014-05-01

    This paper summarizes the conclusions of experiments conducted on the adsorption of Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto zeolite. The focus of the experiments was to establish the influence of the initial pH of the contact solution as well as the selectivity of zeolite on the efficiency of the adsorption process. To this end, experimental adsorption isotherms were established for the pH values ranging from 1 to 4 by using the Na-form of clinoptilolite (particle size range 0.5-1 mm) as an adsorbent. Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Raduschkevich isotherm models were used to validate the experimental data and the Gibbs free energy was calculated based on the distribution coefficient. From the Langmuir model, correlations between the maximum adsorption capacity and selected physical-chemical parameters of the cations studied were established. The results of the experiments suggest that the selectivity of zeolite is strongly influenced by the pH of the contact solution, dehydration energy of cations, diffusion coefficient and the pH at which the precipitation of hydroxides occurs. PMID:24603029

  10. Theory for rates, equilibrium constants, and Brønsted slopes in F1-ATPase single molecule imaging experiments

    PubMed Central

    Volkán-Kacsó, Sándor; Marcus, Rudolph A.

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model of elastically coupled reactions is proposed for single molecule imaging and rotor manipulation experiments on F1-ATPase. Stalling experiments are considered in which rates of individual ligand binding, ligand release, and chemical reaction steps have an exponential dependence on rotor angle. These data are treated in terms of the effect of thermodynamic driving forces on reaction rates, and lead to equations relating rate constants and free energies to the stalling angle. These relations, in turn, are modeled using a formalism originally developed to treat electron and other transfer reactions. During stalling the free energy profile of the enzymatic steps is altered by a work term due to elastic structural twisting. Using biochemical and single molecule data, the dependence of the rate constant and equilibrium constant on the stall angle, as well as the Børnsted slope are predicted and compared with experiment. Reasonable agreement is found with stalling experiments for ATP and GTP binding. The model can be applied to other torque-generating steps of reversible ligand binding, such as ADP and Pi release, when sufficient data become available. PMID:26483483

  11. Theory for rates, equilibrium constants, and Brønsted slopes in F1-ATPase single molecule imaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Volkán-Kacsó, Sándor; Marcus, Rudolph A

    2015-11-17

    A theoretical model of elastically coupled reactions is proposed for single molecule imaging and rotor manipulation experiments on F1-ATPase. Stalling experiments are considered in which rates of individual ligand binding, ligand release, and chemical reaction steps have an exponential dependence on rotor angle. These data are treated in terms of the effect of thermodynamic driving forces on reaction rates, and lead to equations relating rate constants and free energies to the stalling angle. These relations, in turn, are modeled using a formalism originally developed to treat electron and other transfer reactions. During stalling the free energy profile of the enzymatic steps is altered by a work term due to elastic structural twisting. Using biochemical and single molecule data, the dependence of the rate constant and equilibrium constant on the stall angle, as well as the Børnsted slope are predicted and compared with experiment. Reasonable agreement is found with stalling experiments for ATP and GTP binding. The model can be applied to other torque-generating steps of reversible ligand binding, such as ADP and Pi release, when sufficient data become available. PMID:26483483

  12. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  13. Adsorptive potential of cationic Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) dye onto natural untreated clay (NUC) from aqueous phase: Mass transfer analysis, kinetic and equilibrium profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, A.; Malkoc, E.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, natural untreated clay (NUC) was studied for the removal of Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) from aqueous solution in batch system. The effects of initial BY2 concentration, contact time, solution temperature and solution pH on BY2 adsorption were investigated. Nitrogen sorption measurements were employed to investigate the variation in surface and pore properties after dye adsorption. The adsorbent was characterized by means of FTIR, PSD, TEM, XRD and BET analysis. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Scatchard isotherm models. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 833.33 mg/g at 25 °C (at room temperature). The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental datas compared with pseudo-first-order kinetic adsorption models. To explain mass transfer mechanism of BY2 adsorption, obtained experimental datas were applied Weber and Morris model, Body and Frusawa and Smith models. The results show that the adsorption process is controlled by film diffusion. The thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were determined. Adsorption of BY2 on NUC is exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The calculated activation energy of adsorption was found to be 5.24 kJ/mol for BY2. This value indicates that the adsorption process is a physisorption.

  14. Protein loading into porous CaCO3 microspheres: adsorption equilibrium and bioactivity retention.

    PubMed

    Balabushevich, N G; Lopez de Guerenu, A V; Feoktistova, N A; Volodkin, D

    2015-01-28

    Formulation of proteins into particulate form is a principal strategy to achieve controlled and targeted delivery, as well as to protect fragile protein molecules. Control over size, mechanical properties, and surface area (porosity) of particulate proteins has been successfully achieved by hard templating under mild conditions using porous CaCO3 microspheres. A crucial step in this approach, which determines protein content, is the loading of proteins into the CaCO3 microspheres. In this study, the adsorption of different proteins into the microspheres has been investigated. Proteins differing in characteristics such as molecular weight and charge have been employed: catalase (Cat), insulin (Ins), aprotinin (Apr), and protamine (Pro). Thermodynamics of adsorption equilibria have been studied, together with quantitative and qualitative analysis of protein loading and distribution in the microspheres. Protein interaction with the CaCO3 microspheres is not limited by the diffusion of protein molecules (protein dimensions are significantly smaller than microsphere pores) but is determined by the protein affinity for the microsphere surface. Cat and Ins bind much more strongly to the microspheres than Apr and Pro, which can be explained by electrostatic attractive forces. Protein binding/release and protein biological activity have been investigated as a function of pH. It is shown that pH variation during the adsorption process plays a principal role and defines not only the amount of protein adsorbed/released but also protein biological activity. Protein adsorption and microsphere elimination (by EDTA) do not affect protein bioactivity. In addition to applications for protein particle/capsule formulations, the findings of this study might help in understanding protein interactions with carbonate minerals such as calcium carbonate, which is used as a natural material for multiple applications. PMID:25493351

  15. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies of cadmium (II) adsorption by modified agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Othman, Zeid A Al; Hashem, Ali; Habila, Mohamed A

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural wastes have great potential for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. The contamination of water by toxic heavy metals is a worldwide environmental problem. Unlike organic pollutants, the majority of which are susceptible to biological degradation, heavy metals do not degrade into harmless end products. Discharges containing cadmium, in particular, are strictly controlled because of the highly toxic nature of this element and its tendency to accumulate in the tissues of living organisms. This work aims to develop inexpensive, highly available, effective metal ion adsorbents from natural wastes as alternatives to existing commercial adsorbents. In particular, Tamrix articulata wastes were modified chemically by esterification with maleic acid to yield a carboxyl-rich adsorbent. The adsorption behavior of treated Tamrix articulata wastes toward cadmium ions in aqueous solutions in a batch system has been studied as a function of equilibration time, adsorbent dose, temperature and pH. Results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity was 195.5 mg/g in a pH 4 solution at 30 °C with a contact time of 120 min, an initial concentration of 400 mg/L and an adsorbent dose of 0.3 g/L. The kinetic data were analyzed using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. It was shown that the adsorption of cadmium could be described by a pseudo-second-order equation. The experimental data were also analyzed using the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° have been evaluated and it has been found that the sorption process was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. From all of our data, we conclude that the treated Tamrix articulata wastes investigated in this study showed good potential for cadmium removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:22173337

  16. Hydrous ferric oxide doped alginate beads for fluoride removal: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujana, M. G.; Mishra, A.; Acharya, B. C.

    2013-04-01

    A new biopolymer beads, composite of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and alginate were synthesised, characterised and studied for its fluoride efficiency from water. The beads were characterised by chemical analysis, BET surface area, pHPZC and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The optimum conditions for fluoride removal were determined by studying operational variables viz. pH, contact time, initial F- concentration, bead dose and temperature. Presence of other anions like SO42-, PO43-, NO3-, Cl- and HCO3- effect on fluoride removal efficiency of prepared beads was also tested. The beads were 0.8-0.9 mm in size and contain 32-33% Fe (III) and showed specific surface area of 25.80 m2 g-1 and pHPZC of 5.15. Modified beads demonstrated Langmuir F- adsorption capacity of 8.90 mg g-1 at pH 7.0. The adsorption kinetics were best described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model followed by intra-particle diffusion as the rate determining step. It was found that about 80% of the adsorbed fluoride could be desorbed by using 0.05 M HCl. The FTIR, Raman and SEM-EDAX analysis were used to study the fluoride adsorption mechanisms on beads. Studies were also conducted to test the potential application of beads for F- removal from drinking water and the treated water quality.

  17. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase ( PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each.

  18. Equilibrium constant for the reaction ClO + ClO ↔ ClOOCl between 250 and 206 K.

    PubMed

    Hume, Kelly L; Bayes, Kyle D; Sander, Stanley P

    2015-05-14

    The chlorine peroxide molecule, ClOOCl, is an important participant in the chlorine-catalyzed destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Very few laboratory measurements have been made for the partitioning between monomer ClO and dimer ClOOCl at temperatures lower than 250 K. This paper reports absorption spectra for both ClO and ClOOCl when they are in equilibrium at 1 atm and temperatures down to 206 K. The very low ClO concentrations involved requires measuring and calibrating a differential cross section, ΔσClO, for the 10-0 band of ClO. A third law fit of the new results gives Keq = [(2.01 ± 0.17) 10–27 cm3 molecule–1] e(8554∓21)K/T, where the error limits reflect the uncertainty in the entropy change. The resulting equilibrium constants are slightly lower than currently recommended. The slope of the van’t Hoff plot yields a value for the enthalpy of formation of ClOOCl at 298 K, ΔHfo, of 129.8 ± 0.6 kJ mol–1. Uncertainties in the absolute ultraviolet cross sections of ClOOCl and ClO appear to be the limiting factors in these measurements. The new Keq parameters are consistent with the measurements of Santee et al.42 in the stratosphere. PMID:25560546

  19. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase (PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27225419

  20. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2016-05-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase (PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each.

  1. Dynamic, equilibrium and human studies of adsorption of 201Tl by Prussian blue.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Nidhi; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Pathak, D P; Singh, A K

    2006-03-01

    Prussian blue is the recommended but infrequently required antidote for radiocesium and thallium chemical poisoning. Conceivably, its most frequent application will be the decontamination of radiothallium (thallous chloride) from human body following myocardial scintigraphy. Dosage schedule and physicochemical parameters of interaction with radiothallium, however, need to be defined, as the known data is inadequate on this account. The objective of the present study is to create physiologically relevant and mathematically rigorous data on interaction of Prussian blue with Tl, to estimate dosage schedule of Prussian blue suitable for myocardial scintigraphy, and to perform preliminary human studies to evaluate the efficacy of the antidote in reducing the considerable radiation burden imparted by this radiotracer. Adsorption efficacy of Prussian blue for radiothallium was found to be more than 95% at basic (intestinal) pH even at low concentrations and in presence of the physiological cations, potassium and sodium. Isotherm analysis and derivations using Langmuir, Bajpai, Lagergreen, and Freundlich equations suggest a favorable adsorption of Tl on Prussian blue with qmax being 5,000 MBq g. Based on these findings and clinical considerations, particularly preferential gall bladder excretion and enterohepatic recycling of radioactive thallous chloride, a dose of 100 mg Prussian blue with every major meal for 3 days was considered adequate for the purpose. Our experience with the first two patients (serving as their own self-controls) suggests that Prussian blue therapy is a safe and effective method to significantly reduce radiation burden imparted by thallium myocardial scintigraphy. PMID:16505622

  2. Arsenic (III) adsorption on iron acetate coated activated alumina: thermodynamic, kinetics and equilibrium approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption potential of iron acetate coated activated alumina (IACAA) for removal of arsenic [As (III)] as arsenite by batch sorption technique is described. IACAA was characterized by XRD, FTIR, EDAX and SEM instruments. Percentage adsorption on IACAA was determined as a function of pH, contact time and adsorbent dose. The study revealed that the removal of As (III) was best achieved at pH =7.4. The initial As (III) concentration (0.45 mg/L) came down to less than 0.01 mg/L at contact time 90 min with adsorbent dose of 1 g/100 mL. The sorption was reasonably explained with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and E a were calculated in order to understand the nature of sorption process. The sorption process was found to be controlled by pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. PMID:24359995

  3. Equilibrium and kinetic models on the adsorption of Reactive Black 5 from aqueous solution using Eichhornia crassipes/chitosan composite.

    PubMed

    El-Zawahry, Manal M; Abdelghaffar, Fatma; Abdelghaffar, Rehab A; Hassabo, Ahmed G

    2016-01-20

    New natural biopolymer composite was prepared using extracted cellulose from an environmentally problematic water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes (EC). The extracted cellulose was functionalized by chitosan and TiO2 nanoparticles to form EC/Chitosan (EC/Cs) composite network. Surface characterization of EC/Cs natural biopolymer composite was examined by spectrum analysis FT-IR, specific surface area, micropore volume, pore width and SEM. Furthermore, the sorption experiments were carried out as a function of pH, various initial dye concentration and contact time. Experiment results showed that the EC/Cs composite have high ability to remove C.I. Reactive Black 5 from its dye-bath effluent. The equilibrium sorption evaluation of RB5 conformed and fitted well to Langmuir adsorption isotherm models and the maximum sorption capacity was 0.606 mg/g. The kinetic adsorption models followed pseudo-second order model and the dye intra-particle diffusion may suggesting a chemical reaction mechanism. Further, it was obvious from the investigation that this composite could be applied as a promising low cost adsorbent for anionic dye removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:26572382

  4. Effect of Temperature on Acidity and Hydration Equilibrium Constants of Delphinidin-3-O- and Cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside Calculated from Uni- and Multiwavelength Spectroscopic Data.

    PubMed

    Vidot, Kévin; Achir, Nawel; Mertz, Christian; Sinela, André; Rawat, Nadirah; Prades, Alexia; Dangles, Olivier; Fulcrand, Hélène; Dornier, Manuel

    2016-05-25

    Delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside and cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside are the main anthocyanins of Hibiscus sabdariffa calyces, traditionally used to make a bright red beverage by decoction in water. At natural pH, these anthocyanins are mainly in their flavylium form (red) in equilibrium with the quinonoid base (purple) and the hemiketal (colorless). For the first time, their acidity and hydration equilibrium constants were obtained from a pH-jump method followed by UV-vis spectroscopy as a function of temperature from 4 to 37 °C. Equilibrium constant determination was also performed by multivariate curve resolution (MCR). Acidity and hydration constants of cyanidin-3-O-sambubioside at 25 °C were 4.12 × 10(-5) and 7.74 × 10(-4), respectively, and were significantly higher for delphinidin-3-O-sambubioside (4.95 × 10(-5) and 1.21 × 10(-3), respectively). MCR enabled the obtaining of concentration and spectrum of each form but led to overestimated values for the equilibrium constants. However, both methods showed that formations of the quinonoid base and hemiketal were endothermic reactions. Equilibrium constants of anthocyanins in the hibiscus extract showed comparable values as for the isolated anthocyanins. PMID:27124576

  5. Adsorption of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol onto powdered activated carbon at non-equilibrium conditions: influence of NOM and process modelling.

    PubMed

    Zoschke, Kristin; Engel, Christina; Börnick, Hilmar; Worch, Eckhard

    2011-10-01

    The adsorption of the taste and odour (T&O) compounds geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) has been studied under conditions which are typical for a drinking water treatment plant that uses reservoir water for drinking water production. The reservoir water as well as the pre-treated water (after flocculation) contains NOM that competes with the trace compounds for the adsorption sites on the carbon surface. Although the DOC concentrations in the reservoir water and in the pre-treated water were different, no differences in the competitive adsorption could be seen. By using two special characterisation methods for NOM (adsorption analysis, LC/OCD) it could be proved that flocculation removes only NOM fractions which are irrelevant for competitive adsorption. Different model approaches were applied to describe the competitive adsorption of the T&O compounds and NOM, the tracer model, the equivalent background compound model, and the simplified equivalent background compound model. All these models are equilibrium models but in practice the contact time in flow-through reactors is typically shorter than the time needed to establish the adsorption equilibrium. In this paper it is demonstrated that the established model approaches can be used to describe competitive adsorption of T&O compounds and NOM also under non-equilibrium conditions. The results of the model applications showed that in particular the simplified equivalent background compound model is a useful tool to determine the PAC dosage required to reduce the T&O compounds below the threshold concentration. PMID:21752419

  6. Size dependent adsorption on nanocrystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. M.; Wen, Z.; Jiang, Q.

    2005-03-01

    A quantitative thermodynamic correlation method to describe the size dependent Langmuir adsorption isotherm is developed. According to the model, the equilibrium adsorption constant increases as material size decreases, which is in agreement with the literature data of acetic acid, valeric acid, oxalic acid, and adipic acid on anatase nanoparticles.

  7. Adsorption of Pb(II) ions onto biomass from Trifolium resupinatum: equilibrium and kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, Makshoof; Farooq, Umar; Aslam, Muhammad; Salman, M.

    2013-09-01

    The present study provides information about the binding of Pb(II) ions on an eco-friendly and easily available biodegradable biomass Trifolium resupinatum. The powdered biomass was characterized by FTIR, potentiometric titration and surface area analyses. The FTIR spectrum showed the presence of hydroxyl, carbonyl and amino functional groups and Pb(II) ions bound with the oxygen- and nitrogen-containing sites (hydroxyl and amino groups). The acidic groups were also confirmed by titrations. Effects of various environmental parameters (time, pH and concentration) have been studied. The biosorption process achieved equilibrium in a very short period of time (25 min). Non-linear approach for Langmuir and Freundlich models was used to study equilibrium process and root mean-square error was used as an indicator to decide the fitness of the mathematical model. The biosorption process was found to follow pseudo-second-order kinetics and was very fast. Thus, the biomass can be cost-effectively used for the binding of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions.

  8. On the 2D-transition, hysteresis and thermodynamic equilibrium of Kr adsorption on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Diao, Rui; Fan, Chunyan; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2015-12-15

    The adsorption and desorption of Kr on graphite at temperatures in the range 60-88K, was systematically investigated using a combination of several simulation techniques including: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC), Canonical kinetic-Monte Carlo (C-kMC) and the Mid-Density Scheme (MDS). Particular emphasis was placed on the gas-solid, gas-liquid and liquid-solid 2D phase transitions. For temperatures below the bulk triple point, the transition from a 2D-liquid-like monolayer to a 2D-solid-like state is manifested as a sub-step in the isotherm. A further increase in the chemical potential leads to another rearrangement of the 2D-solid-like state from a disordered structure to an ordered structure that is signalled by (1) another sub-step in the monolayer region and (2) a spike in the plot of the isosteric heat versus density at loadings close to the dense monolayer coverage concentration. Whenever a 2D transition occurs in a grand canonical isotherm it is always associated with a hysteresis, a feature that is not widely recognised in the literature. We studied in details this hysteresis with the analysis of the canonical isotherm, obtained with C-kMC, which exhibits a van der Waals (vdW) type loop with a vertical segment in the middle. We complemented the hysteresis loop and the vdW curve with the analysis of the equilibrium transition obtained with the MDS, and found that the equilibrium transition coincides exactly with the vertical segment of the C-kMC isotherm, indicating the co-existence of two phases at equilibrium. We also analysed adsorption at higher layers and found that the 2D-coexistence is also observed, provided that the temperature is well below the triple point. Finally the 2D-critical temperatures were obtained for the first three layers and they are in good agreement with the experimental data in the literature. PMID:26364074

  9. Simulating adsorption of U(VI) under transient groundwater flow and hydrochemistry – Physical versus non-equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Greskowiak, Janek; Hay, Michael B.; Prommer, Henning; Liu, Chongxuan; Post, Vincent; Ma, Rui; Davis, James A.; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zachara, John M.

    2011-08-03

    Coupled intra-grain diffusional mass-transfer and non-linear surface complexation processes play an important role for the transport behaviour of U(VI) in contaminated aquifers. Two alternative model approaches for simulating these coupled processes have been analysed and compared: (i) the physical non-equilibrium approach that explicitly accounts for aqueous speciation and instantaneous surface complexation reactions in the intra-grain regions and approximates the diffusive mass exchange between the immobile intra-grain pore water and the advective pore water as multi-rate 1st-order mass transfer and (ii) the chemical non-equilibrium approach that approximates the diffusion-limited intra-grain surface complexation reactions by a set of multiple 1st-order surface complexation reaction kinetics, thereby eliminating the explicit treatment of aqueous speciation in the intra grain pore water. Model comparison has been carried out for column and field scale scenarios, representing the highly transient hydrological and geochemical conditions in the U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford 300A site, Washington, USA. It was found that the response of apparent U(VI) adsorption/desorption kinetic behaviour to hydrogeochemically induced changes in U(VI) sorption strength is more pronounced in the physical than in the chemical non-equilibrium model. The magnitude of the differences in model behaviour depends particularly on the degree of disequilibrium between the advective and immobile phase U(VI) concentrations. While a clear difference in U(VI) transport behaviour between the two models was noticeable for the column-scale scenarios, only minor differences were found for the Hanford 300A field scale scenarios, where the model-generated disequilibrium conditions were less pronounced as a result of high frequent groundwater flow reversals.

  10. Colorimetric Determination of the Iron(III)-Thiocyanate Reaction Equilibrium Constant with Calibration and Equilibrium Solutions Prepared in a Cuvette by Sequential Additions of One Reagent to the Other

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; Barlag, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The well-known colorimetric determination of the equilibrium constant of the iron(III-thiocyanate complex is simplified by preparing solutions in a cuvette. For the calibration plot, 0.10 mL increments of 0.00100 M KSCN are added to 4.00 mL of 0.200 M Fe(NO[subscript 3])[subscript 3], and for the equilibrium solutions, 0.50 mL increments of…

  11. Solubility of stibnite in hydrogen sulfide solutions, speciation, and equilibrium constants, from 25 to 350 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Krupp, R.E. )

    1988-12-01

    Solubility of stibnite (Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}) was measured in aqueous hydrogen sulfide solutions as a function of pH and total free sulfur (TFS) concentrations at 25, 90, 200, 275, and 350{degree}C and at saturated vapor pressures. At 25 and 90{degree}C and TFS {approx} 0.01 molal solubility is controlled by the thioantimonite complexes H{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}S{sup 0}{sub 4}, Hsb{sub 2}S{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, Sb{sub 2}S{sup 2{minus}}{sub 4}. At higher temperatures the hydroxothioantimonite complex Sb{sub 2}S{sub 2}(OH){sup 0}{sub 2} becomes dominant. Polymerization due to condensation reactions yields long chains made up of trigonal-pyramidal SbS{sub 3}-groups. Equilibrium constants were derived for the dimers. The transition from thioantimonites to the hydroxothioantimonite species at approximately 120{degree}C is endothermic and is entirely driven by a gain in entropy. Stibnite solubility calculated for some geothermal fluids indicate that these fluids are undersaturated in Sb if stibnite is the solid equilibrium phase. At high temperatures (> 100{degree}C) precipitation of stibnite from ore fluids can occur in response to conductive cooling, while at low temperatures, where thioantimonites dominate, acidification of the fluid is the more likely mechanism. Precipitation of stibnite from fluids containing hydroxothioantimonite consumes H{sub 2}S and may thus trigger precipitation of other metals carried as sulfide complexes, e.g. Au(HS){sup {minus}}{sub 2}.

  12. (SO2)-S-34-O-16: High-resolution analysis of the (030),(101), (111), (002) and (201) vibrational states; determination of equilibrium rotational constants for sulfur dioxide and anharmonic vibrational constants

    SciTech Connect

    Lafferty, Walter; Flaud, Jean-marie; Ngom, El Hadji A.; Sams, Robert L.

    2009-01-02

    High resolution Fourier transform spectra of a sample of sulfur dioxide, enriched in 34S (95.3%). were completely analyzed leading to a large set of assigned lines. The experimental levels derived from this set of transitions were fit to within their experimental uncertainties using Watson-type Hamiltonians. Precise band centers, rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined. The following band centers in cm-1 were obtained: ν0(3ν2)=1538.720198(11), ν0(ν1+ν3)=2475.828004(29), ν0(ν1+ν2+ν3)=2982.118600(20), ν0(2ν3)=2679.800919(35), and ν0(2ν1+ν3)=3598.773915(38). The rotational constants obtained in this work have been fit together with the rotational constants of lower lying vibrational states [ W.J. Lafferty, J.-M. Flaud, R.L. Sams and EL Hadjiabib, in press] to obtain equilibrium constants as well as vibration-rotation constants. These equilibrium constants have been fit together with those of 32S16O2 [J.-M. Flaud and W.J. Lafferty, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 16 (1993) 396-402] leading to an improved equilibrium structure. Finally the observed band centers have been fit to obtain anharmonic rotational constants.

  13. Calculation of acid-base equilibrium constants at the oxide-electrolyte interface from the dependence of oxide surface charge on pH of the electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Gorichev, I.G.; Dorofeev, M.V.; Batrakov, V.V.

    1994-09-01

    The dependences of the catalytic activity of oxides and acid-base properties on ph of solution are similar. A procedure is developed for calculating acid-base equilibrium constants from the dependence of the oxide surface charge q on pH. The values q can be determined by potentiometric titration of aqueous suspensions of oxides. The acid-base equilibrium constants for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and CuO were calculated in accordance with the proposed procedure.

  14. Structural requirements of tetracycline-Tet repressor interaction: determination of equilibrium binding constants for tetracycline analogs with the Tet repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Degenkolb, J; Takahashi, M; Ellestad, G A; Hillen, W

    1991-01-01

    We used the Tn10-encoded Tet repressor, which has a highly specific binding capacity for tetracycline, to probe contacts between the drug and protein by chemical interference studies of the antibiotic. For that purpose, the equilibrium association constants of modified tetracyclines with the Tet repressor and Mg2+ cations were determined quantitatively. The results confirm the previous notion that Mg2+ probably binds with the oxygens at positions 11 and 12 and is absolutely required for protein-drug recognition. Modifications were introduced at positions seven, six, five, and four of the drug, and anhydrotetracycline was also studied. Substitutions or eliminations of functions at these positions influenced binding to the Tet repressor up to 35-fold. The introduction of an azido function at position seven in 7-azidotetracycline and epimerization of the substituents at position four in 4-epitetracycline lead to a 2- or 25-fold reduction, respectively, of Tet repressor affinity in those compounds. Anhydrotetracycline bound about 35-fold more strongly than tetracycline did, indicating that the oxygen at position 11 may be involved in Tet repressor recognition. This increased binding is in contrast to the lower antibiotic activity of anhydrotetracycline and indicates that the Tet repressor and ribosomes recognize the drug differently. PMID:1929330

  15. The Freundlich adsorption isotherm constants and prediction of phosphorus bioavailability as affected by different phosphorus sources in two Kansas soils.

    PubMed

    Shafqat, Mustafa N; Pierzynski, Gary M

    2014-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) adsorption onto soil constituents influences P bioavailability from both agronomic and environmental perspectives. In this study, the P availability from different P sources along with utility of Freundlich adsorption coefficients on the predictability of various crop growth parameters were assessed. Two soils were amended with 150mgPkg(-1) each from six different P sources comprised of manures from two types of ruminants animals, three types of monogastric animals, and inorganic P fertilizer. Corn (Zea mays) was grown and harvested seven times under greenhouse conditions to remove P from the P amended treatments. The application of all P sources reduced the value of Freundlich K and increased the value of Freundlich 1/n and equilibrium P concentration (EPC0) in both soils compared to the un-amended control before cropping. The swine (Sus scrofa) manure (HM) resulted in significant smaller values of Freundlich K and larger values of 1/n in the P deficient Eram-Lebo soil compared to other P sources while, the opposite was true for the turkey (Meleagris gallopava) litter (TL) in the Ulysses soil. The corn biomass, tissue P concentration and P uptake were significantly influenced by all P sources during the first harvest and the total P uptake during seven harvests in both soils compared to the control treatment. Both Freundlich coefficients had strong relationships with the aforementioned corn parameters in the P deficient Eram-Lebo soil while, strength of the association was weak or missing in the Ulysses soil which had optimum levels of antecedent P. PMID:24238913

  16. Rate and Equilibrium Constants for an Enzyme Conformational Change during Catalysis by Orotidine 5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    from the complex between FOMP and the open enzyme, that the tyrosyl phenol group stabilizes the closed form of ScOMPDC by hydrogen bonding to the substrate phosphodianion, and that the phenyl group of Y217 and F217 facilitates formation of the transition state for the rate-limiting conformational change. An analysis of kinetic data for mutant enzyme-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP and FOMP provides estimates for the rate and equilibrium constants for the conformational change that traps FOMP at the enzyme active site. PMID:26135041

  17. Understanding Chemical Equilibrium Using Entropy Analysis: The Relationship between [delta]S[subscript tot](sys[superscript o]) and the Equilibrium Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Entropy analyses as a function of the extent of reaction are presented for a number of physicochemical processes, including vaporization of a liquid, dimerization of nitrogen dioxide, and the autoionization of water. Graphs of the total entropy change versus the extent of reaction give a visual representation of chemical equilibrium and the second…

  18. Lysozyme adsorption in pH-responsive hydrogel thin-films: the non-trivial role of acid-base equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Narambuena, Claudio F; Longo, Gabriel S; Szleifer, Igal

    2015-09-01

    We develop and apply a molecular theory to study the adsorption of lysozyme on weak polyacid hydrogel films. The theory explicitly accounts for the conformation of the network, the structure of the proteins, the size and shape of all the molecular species, their interactions as well as the chemical equilibrium of each titratable unit of both the protein and the polymer network. The driving forces for adsorption are the electrostatic attractions between the negatively charged network and the positively charged protein. The adsorption is a non-monotonic function of the solution pH, with a maximum in the region between pH 8 and 9 depending on the salt concentration of the solution. The non-monotonic adsorption is the result of increasing negative charge of the network with pH, while the positive charge of the protein decreases. At low pH the network is roughly electroneutral, while at sufficiently high pH the protein is negatively charged. Upon adsorption, the acid-base equilibrium of the different amino acids of the protein shifts in a nontrivial fashion that depends critically on the particular kind of residue and solution composition. Thus, the proteins regulate their charge and enhance adsorption under a wide range of conditions. In particular, adsorption is predicted above the protein isoelectric point where both the solution lysozyme and the polymer network are negatively charged. This behavior occurs because the pH in the interior of the gel is significantly lower than that in the bulk solution and it is also regulated by the adsorption of the protein in order to optimize protein-gel interactions. Under high pH conditions we predict that the protein changes its charge from negative in the solution to positive within the gel. The change occurs within a few nanometers at the interface of the hydrogel film. Our predictions show the non-trivial interplay between acid-base equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization under nanoconfined conditions

  19. A novel polar-modified post-cross-linked resin and its enhanced adsorption to salicylic acid: Equilibrium, kinetics and breakthrough studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Guoqiang; Guo, Deping; Zhang, Yaling; Huang, Jianhan

    2016-05-15

    Improving the surface polarity is of significance for the post-cross-linked resins to enhance their adsorption to polar aromatic compounds. In the present study, we prepared a novel polar-modified post-cross-linked PDEpc_D by the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and the amination reaction, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume increased significantly after the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and the surface polarity improved greatly after the amination reaction. Batch adsorption showed that PDEpc_D possessed a much enhanced adsorption to salicylic acid as compared the precursors PDE and PDEpc as well as the non-polar post-cross-linked PDVBpc. The equilibrium data was characterized by the Freundlich model, π-π stacking, hydrogen bonding and static interaction were the possible driving forces. The adsorption was a fast process and the kinetic data obeyed the micropore diffusion model. Column adsorption-desorption experiments suggested that PDEpc_D was a potential candidate for adsorptive removal of salicylic acid from aqueous solution. PMID:26928058

  20. Kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of adsorption of 2-biphenylamine and dibenzylamine from aqueous solutions by Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasheghani F., B.; Rajabi, F. H.; Omidi, M. H.; Shabanian, S.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite is synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. Experimental data are modelled by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm model fitted the equilibrium data for the dibenzylamine (DBA) and 2-biphenylamine (BPA) respectively, compared to the other isotherm models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, Δ G°, Δ H°, and Δ S° showed that the DBA and BPA adsorption on bentonite nanocomposite is spontaneous and endothermic under examined conditions. Experimental data were also modeled using the adsorption kinetic models. The results show that the adsorption processes of DBA and BPA followed well the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Results indicated that Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite could be an alternative for more costly adsorbents used for organic toxicants removal.

  1. A simple simulation of adsorption equilibrium of Pb(II) on Andosols in the presence of dissolved humic substances for monitoring soil contamination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuyu; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yukari; Kameya, Takashi; Urano, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption equilibrium of Pb(II) on Andosols was investigated and described quantitatively in order to develop a simple method for the rapid monitoring of heavy metals in soils. The effect of solution pH on adsorption isotherms was investigated experimentally and in simulations. At pH 7, the considerable desorption of Pb(II) due to the extensive dissolution of humic substances (HS) from soils into aqueous phases is known to be an obstacle to carrying out simulations. In batch experiments, the total organic carbon (TOC) of the aqueous phases was shown to be enhanced by the addition of pre-extracted HS to soil suspensions. By combining the ion-exchange and Freundlich models, the adsorption equilibriums of free Pb(2+) ions and Pb(2+)-HS were simulated and were shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. By estimating the concentrations and adsorption amounts of Pb(2+) and Pb(2+)-HS from measured CPb and TOC, it is possible to accurately simulate the soil contamination status even in in the presence of dissolved HS in the water in the solid-liquid extraction samples. PMID:23947708

  2. Constraints for the photolysis rate and the equilibrium constant of ClO-dimer from airborne and balloon-borne measurements of chlorine compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinböhl, Armin; Khosravi, Maryam; Urban, Joachim; Canty, Timothy; Salawitch, Ross J.; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Küllmann, Harry; Notholt, Justus

    2014-06-01

    We analyze measurements of ClO across the terminator taken by the Airborne Submillimeter Radiometer (ASUR) in the activated vortices of the Arctic winters of 1995/1996, 1996/1997, and 1999/2000 to evaluate the plausibility of various determinations of the ClO-dimer photolysis cross section and the rate constant controlling the thermal equilibrium between ClO-dimer and ClO. We use measured ClO during sunlit conditions to estimate total active chlorine (ClOx). As the measurements suggest nearly full chlorine activation in winter 1999/2000, we compare ClOx estimates based on various photolysis frequencies of ClO-dimer with total available inorganic chlorine (Cly), estimated from an N2O-Cly correlation established by a balloon-borne MkIV interferometer measurement. Only ClO-dimer cross sections leading to the fastest photolysis frequencies in the literature (including the latest evaluation by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) give ClOx mixing ratios that overlap with the estimated range of available Cly. Slower photolysis rates lead to ClOx values that are higher than available Cly. We use the ClOx calculated from sunlit ClO measurements to estimate ClO in darkness based on different equilibrium constants, and compare it with ASUR ClO measurements before sunrise at high solar zenith angles. Calculations with equilibrium constants published in recent evaluations of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory give good agreement with observed ClO mixing ratios. Equilibrium constants leading to a higher ClO/ClOx ratio in darkness yield ClO values that tend to exceed observed abundances. Perturbing the rates for the ClO + BrO reaction in a manner that increases OClO formation and decreases BrCl formation leads to lower ClO values calculated for twilight conditions after sunset, resulting in better agreement with ASUR measurements.

  3. Analysis of responsive characteristics of ionic-strength-sensitive hydrogel with consideration of effect of equilibrium constant by a chemo-electro-mechanical model.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Lai, Fukun; Luo, Rongmo

    2009-11-17

    A multiphysics model is presented in this paper for analysis of the influence of various equilibrium constants on the smart hydrogel responsive to the ionic strength of environmental solution, and termed the multieffect-coupling ionic-strength stimulus (MECis) model. The model is characterized by a set of partial differential governing equations by consideration of the mass and momentum conservations of the system and coupled chemical, electrical, and mechanical multienergy domains. The Nernst-Planck equations are derived by the mass conservation of the ionic species in both the interstitial fluid of the hydrogel and the surrounding solution. The binding reaction between the fixed charge groups of the hydrogel and the mobile ions in the solution is described by the fixed charge equation, which is based on the Langmuir monolayer theory. As an important effect for the binding reaction, the equilibrium constant is incorporated into the fixed charge equation. The kinetics of the hydrogel swelling/deswelling is illustrated by the mechanical equation, based on the law of momentum conservation for the solid polymeric networks matrix within the hydrogel. The MECis model is examined by comparison of the numerical simulations and experiments from open literature. The analysis of the influence of different equilibrium constants on the responsive characteristics of the ionic-strength-sensitive hydrogel is carried out with detailed discussion. PMID:19678621

  4. Polar modified post-cross-linked resin and its adsorption toward salicylic acid from aqueous solution: Equilibrium, kinetics and breakthrough studies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhenyu; He, Chunlian; Huang, Jianhan; Liu, You-Nian

    2015-08-01

    A novel polar modified post-cross-linked resin PDMPA was synthesized, characterized and evaluated for adsorption of salicylic acid from aqueous solution. PDMPA was prepared by a suspension polymerization of methyl acrylate (MA) and divinylbenzene (DVB), a Friedel-Crafts reaction and an amination reaction. After characterization of the chemical and pore structure of PDMPA, the adsorption behaviors of salicylic acid on PDMPA were determined in comparison with the precursor resins. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of salicylic acid on PDMPA was much larger than the precursor resins and the equilibrium data were correlated by both of the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The pseudo-second-order rate equation fitted the kinetic data better than the pseudo-first-order rate equation, and the micropore diffusion model could characterize the kinetic data very well. The dynamic experimental results showed that the breakthrough point and saturated point of salicylic acid on PDMPA were 40.3 and 92.4BV (1BV=10mL) at a feed concentration of 995.8mg/L and a flow rate of 1.4mL/min, and the resin column could be regenerated by 16.0BV of a mixture desorption solvent containing 0.01mol/L of NaOH (w/v) and 50% of ethanol (v/v). PMID:25863446

  5. Equilibrium adsorption isotherm studies of Cu (II) and Co (II) in high concentration aqueous solutions on Ag-TiO2-modified kaolinite ceramic adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajenifuja, E.; Ajao, J. A.; Ajayi, E. O. B.

    2016-03-01

    Photocatalytic ceramic adsorbents were prepared from locally sourced kaolinite clay minerals for the removal of copper and cobalt ions from high concentration aqueous solutions. The minerals were treated with mild acid before modification using silver nanoparticles sources and titanium-oxide nanoparticles. Batch adsorption experiment was carried out on the targeted ions and the results were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich equation at different concentrations (100-1000 mg/l). As-received raw materials do not exhibit any adsorption capacity. However, the adsorption isotherms for modified kaolinite clay ceramic adsorbents could be fitted well by the Langmuir model for Cu2+ and Co2+ with correlation coefficient (R) of up to 0.99705. The highest and lowest monolayer coverage (q max) were 93.023 and 30.497 mg/g for Cu2+ and Co2+, respectively. The separation factor (R L ) was less than one (<1), indicating that the adsorption of metal ions on modified ceramic adsorbent is favorable. The highest adsorbent adsorption capacity (K f ) and intensity (n) constants obtained from Freundlich model are 14.401 (Cu2+ on KLN-T) and 6.057 (Co2+ on KLN-T).

  6. Study on an effective industrial waste-based adsorbent for the adsorptive removal of phosphorus from wastewater: equilibrium and kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruzhen; Chen, Yao; Cheng, Ting; Lai, Yuguo; Jiang, Wenju; Yang, Zhishan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an effective adsorbent for removing phosphate from aqueous solution was developed from modifying industrial waste--lithium silica fume (LSF). The characterization of LSF before and after modification was investigated using an N2 adsorption-desorption technique (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Studies were conducted to investigate the effect of adsorbent dose, initial solution pH, contact time, phosphate concentration, and temperature on phosphate removal using this novel adsorbent. The specific surface area for modified LSF (LLSF) is 24.4024 m(2)/g, improved 69.8% compared with unmodified LSF. XRD result suggests that the lanthanum phosphate complex was formed on the surface of LLSF. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity was 24.096 mg P/g for LLSF, and phosphate removal was favored in the pH range of 3-8. The kinetic data fitted pseudo-second-order kinetic equation, intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate controlling step. The adsorption isotherm results illustrated that the Langmuir model provided the best fit for the equilibrium data. The change in free energy (△G(0)), enthalpy (△H(0)) and entropy (△S(0)) revealed that the adsorption of phosphate on LLSF was spontaneous and endothermic. It was concluded that by modifying with lanthanum, LSF can be turned to be a highly efficient adsorbent in phosphate removal. PMID:27120644

  7. Label-Free Kinetics: Exploiting Functional Hemi-Equilibrium to Derive Rate Constants for Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Riddy, Darren M; Valant, Celine; Rueda, Patricia; Charman, William N; Sexton, Patrick M; Summers, Roger J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Langmead, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Drug receptor kinetics is as a key component in drug discovery, development, and efficacy; however, determining kinetic parameters has historically required direct radiolabeling or competition with a labeled tracer. Here we present a simple approach to determining the kinetics of competitive antagonists of G protein-coupled receptors by exploiting the phenomenon of hemi-equilibrium, the state of partial re-equilibration of agonist, antagonist, and receptor in some functional assays. Using functional [Ca(2+)]i-flux and extracellular kinases 1 and 2 phosphorylation assays that have short incubation times and therefore are prone to hemi-equilibrium "behaviors," we investigated a wide range of structurally and physicochemically distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists. Using a combined operational and hemi-equilibrium model of antagonism to both simulate and analyze data, we derived estimates of association and dissociation rates for the test set of antagonists, identifying both rapidly dissociating (4-DAMP, himbacine) and slowly dissociating (tiotropium, glycopyrrolate) ligands. The results demonstrate the importance of assay incubation time and the degree of receptor reserve in applying the analytical model. There was an excellent correlation between estimates of antagonist pK(B), k(on), and k(off) from functional assays and those determined by competition kinetics using whole-cell [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine binding, validating this approach as a rapid and simple method to functionally profile receptor kinetics of competitive antagonists in the absence of a labeled tracer. PMID:26243731

  8. Enhancing adsorption capacity of toxic malachite green dye through chemically modified breadnut peel: equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Hei Ing; Lim, Linda B L; Priyantha, Namal

    2015-01-01

    Breadnut skin, in both its unmodified (KS) and base-modified (BM-KS) forms, was investigated for its potential use as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of toxic dye, malachite green (MG). Characterization of the adsorbents was carried out using scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Batch adsorption experiments, carried out under optimized conditions, for the adsorption of MG were fitted using five isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin and Sips) and six error functions to determine the best-fit model. The adsorption capacity was greatly enhanced when breadnut skin was chemically modified with NaOH, leading to an adsorption capacity of 353.0 mg g(-1), that was far superior to most reported adsorbents for the removal of MG. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of MG was spontaneous on KS and BM-KS, and the reactions were endothermic and exothermic, respectively. Kinetics studies showed that both followed the pseudo-second order. Regeneration experiments on BM-KS indicated that its adsorption capacity was still maintained at>90% even after five cycles. It can be concluded that NaOH-modified breadfruit skin has great potential to be utilized in real-life application as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of MG in wastewater treatment. PMID:25409587

  9. Stability of equilibrium of a superconducting ring that levitates in the field of a fixed ring with constant current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishaev, A. M.; Bush, A. A.; Gavrikov, M. B.; Kamentsev, K. E.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Savel'ev, V. V.; Sigov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop a plasma trap with levitating superconducting magnetic coils, it is necessary to search for their stable levitating states. An analytical expression for the potential energy of a single superconducting ring that captures a fixed magnetic flux in the field of a fixed ring with constant current versus the coordinate of the free ring on the axis of the system, deviation angle of its axis from the axis of the system, and radial displacement of its plane is derived for uniform gravity field in the thin ring approximation. The calculated stable levitation states of the superconducting ring in the field of the ring with constant current are proven in experiments. The generalization of such an approach to the levitation of several rings makes it possible to search for stable levitation states of several coils that form a magnetic system of a multipole trap.

  10. pH-responsive diblock copolymer micelles at the silica/aqueous solution interface: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Smith, Emelyn G; Webber, Grant B; Schatz, Christophe; Wanless, Erica J; Bütün, Vural; Armes, Steven P; Biggs, Simon

    2006-08-01

    The adsorption behavior of two examples of a weakly basic diblock copolymer, poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMA-PDEA), at the silica/aqueous solution interface has been investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and an optical reflectometer. Dynamic and static light scattering measurements have also been carried out to assess aqueous solution properties of such pH-responsive copolymers. In alkaline solution, core-shell micelles are formed above the critical micelle concentration (cmc) by both copolymers, whereas the chains are molecularly dissolved (as unimers) at all concentrations in acidic solution. As a result, the adsorption behavior of PDMA-PDEA diblock copolymers on silica is strongly dependent on both the copolymer concentration and the solution pH. Below the cmc at pH 9, the cationic PDMA-PDEA copolymers adsorb as unimers and the conformation of the adsorbed polymer is essentially flat. At concentrations just above the cmc, the initial adsorption of copolymer onto the silica is dominated by the unimers due to their faster diffusion compared to the much larger micelles. Rearrangement of the adsorbed unimers and/or their subsequent displacement by micelles from solution is then observed during an equilibration period, and the final adsorbed mass is greater than that observed below the cmc. At concentrations well above the cmc, the much higher proportion of micelles in solution facilitates more effective competition for the surface at all stages of the adsorption process and no replacement of initially adsorbed unimers by micelles is evident. However, the adsorbed layer undergoes gradual rearrangement after initial adsorption. This relaxation is believed to result from a combination of further copolymer adsorption and swelling of the adsorbed layer. PMID:16869582

  11. The equilibrium constant for N2O5 = NO2 + NO3 - Absolute determination by direct measurement from 243 to 397 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, C. A.; Davidson, J. A.; Mcdaniel, A. H.; Shetter, R. E.; Calvert, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    Direct determinations of the equilibrium constant for the reaction N2O5 = NO2 + NO3 were carried out by measuring NO2, NO3, and N2O5 using long-path visible and infrared absorption spectroscopy as a function of temperature from 243 to 397 K. The first-order decay rate constant of N2O5 was experimentally measured as a function of temperature. These results are in turn used to derive a value for the rate coefficient for the NO-forming channel in the reaction of NO3 with NO2. The implications of the results for atmospheric chemistry, the thermodynamics of NO3, and for laboratory kinetics studies are discussed.

  12. Phosphate Adsorption using Modified Iron Oxide-based Sorbents in Lake Water: Kinetics, Equilibrium, and Column Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption behavior of Bayoxide ® E33 (E33) and three E33-modified sorbents for the removal of phosphate from lake water was investigated in this study. E33-modified sorbents were synthesized by coating with manganese (E33/Mn) and silver (E33/AgI and E33/AgII) nanoparticles. Adso...

  13. 2,4-D adsorption to biochars: effect of preparation conditions on equilibrium adsorption capacity and comparison with commercial activated carbon literature data.

    PubMed

    Kearns, J P; Wellborn, L S; Summers, R S; Knappe, D R U

    2014-10-01

    Batch isotherm experiments were conducted with chars to study adsorption of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Chars generated from corncobs, bamboo and wood chips in a laboratory pyrolyzer at 400-700 °C were compared with traditional kiln charcoals collected from villages in S/SE Asia and with activated carbons (ACs). 2,4-D uptake by laboratory chars obtained from bamboo and wood chips after 14 h of pyrolysis at 700 °C, from wood chips after 96 h of pyrolysis at 600 °C, and one of the field-collected chars (basudha) was comparable to ACs. H:C and O:C ratios declined with pyrolysis temperature and duration while surface area increased to >500 m(2)/g. Increasing pyrolysis intensity by increasing temperature and/or duration of heating was found to positively influence adsorption capacity yield (mg(2,4-D/g(feedstock))) over the range of conditions studied. Economic analysis showed that high temperature chars can be a cost-effective alternative to ACs for water treatment applications. PMID:24934321

  14. Prediction of iodide adsorption on oxides by surface complexation modeling with spectroscopic confirmation.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Takahiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2009-04-15

    A deficiency in environmental iodine can cause a number of health problems. Understanding how iodine is sequestered by materials is helpful for evaluating and developing methods for minimizing human health effects related to iodine. In addition, (129)I is considered to be strategically important for safety assessment of underground radioactive waste disposal. To assess the long-term stability of disposed radioactive waste, an understanding of (129)I adsorption on geologic materials is essential. Therefore, the adsorption of I(-) on naturally occurring oxides is of environmental concern. The surface charges of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) in NaI electrolyte solutions were measured by potentiometric acid-base titration. The surface charge data were analyzed by means of an extended triple-layer model (ETLM) for surface complexation modeling to obtain the I(-) adsorption reaction and its equilibrium constant. The adsorption of I(-) was determined to be an outer-sphere process from ETLM analysis, which was consistent with independent X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) observation of I(-) adsorbed on HFO. The adsorption equilibrium constants for I(-) on beta-TiO(2) and gamma-Al(2)O(3) were also evaluated by analyzing the surface charge data of these oxides in NaI solution as reported in the literature. Comparison of these adsorption equilibrium constants for HFO, beta-TiO(2), and gamma-Al(2)O(3) based on site-occupancy standard states permitted prediction of I(-) adsorption equilibrium constants for all oxides by means of the Born solvation theory. The batch adsorption data for I(-) on HFO and amorphous aluminum oxide were reasonably reproduced by ETLM with the predicted equilibrium constants, confirming the validity of the present approach. Using the predicted adsorption equilibrium constants, we calculated distribution coefficient (K(d)) values for I(-) adsorption on common soil minerals as a function of pH and ionic strength. PMID:19176225

  15. Removal of azo dye by a highly graphitized and heteroatom doped carbon derived from fish waste: Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengang; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Tingting; Peng, Nana; Gai, Chao

    2016-11-01

    A highly graphitized and heteroatom doped porous carbon was prepared from fish waste in the present study. The morphology and chemical composition of the resultant porous carbon were characterized by SEM-EDS, TEM, BET, XRD and Raman measurement. The prepared porous carbon was employed as an adsorbent for acid orange 7, a typical azo dye, removal from aqueous solution. The results showed that the porous carbon had ultrahigh surface area of 2146 m(2)/g, a high degree of graphitization structure and naturally doped with nitrogen and phosphorous. The maximum adsorption capacity of acid orange 7 reached 285.71 mg/g due to unique property of the prepared porous carbon. In addition, acid orange 7 adsorption onto the porous carbon well followed pseudo-second-order kinetics model and acid orange 7 diffusion in micropores was the potential rate controlling step. PMID:27526082

  16. RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ADSORPTION OF CESIUM (Cs+) FROM HANFORD WASTE SOLUTIONS-PART I: BATCH EQUILIBRIUM STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    HASSAN, NEGUIBM

    2004-03-30

    Batch equilibrium measurements were conducted with a granular Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) resin to determine the distribution coefficients (Kds) for cesium. In the tests, Hanford Site actual waste sample containing radioactive cesium and a pretreated waste sample that was spiked with non-radioactive cesium were used. Initial concentrations of non-radioactive cesium in the waste sample were varied to generate an equilibrium isotherm for cesium. Two additional tests were conducted using a liquid to solid phase ratio of 10 and a contact time of 120 hours. The measured distribution coefficient (Kd) for radioactive cesium (137Cs) was 948 mL/g; the Kd for non-radioactive cesium (133Cs) was 1039 mL/g. The Kd for non-radioactive cesium decreased from 1039 to 691 mL/g as the initial cesium concentration increased. Very little change of the Kd was observed at initial cesium concentrations above 64 mg/mL. The maximum sorption capacity for cesium on granular RF resin was 1.17 mmole/g dry resin. T his value was calculated from the fit of the equilibrium isotherm data to the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation. Previously, a total capacity of 2.84 mmole/g was calculated by Bibler and Wallace for air-dried RF resin.

  17. Application of surface complexation models to anion adsorption by natural materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various chemical models of ion adsorption will be presented and discussed. Chemical models, such as surface complexation models, provide a molecular description of anion adsorption reactions using an equilibrium approach. Two such models, the constant capacitance model and the triple layer model w...

  18. Equilibrium binding constants for Tl+ with gramicidins A, B and C in a lysophosphatidylcholine environment determined by 205Tl nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, J F; Koeppe, R E; Shungu, D; Whaley, W L; Paczkowski, J A; Millett, F S

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) 205Tl spectroscopy has been used to monitor the binding of Tl+ to gramicidins A, B, and C packaged in aqueous dispersions of lysophosphatidylcholine. For 5 mM gramicidin dimer in the presence of 100 mM lysophosphatidylcholine, only approximately 50% or less of the gramicidin appears to be accessible to Tl+. Analysis of the 205Tl chemical shift as a function of Tl+ concentration over the 0.65-50 mM range indicates that only one Tl+ ion can be bound by gramicidin A, B, or C under these experimental conditions. In this system, the Tl+ equilibrium binding constant is 582 +/- 20 M-1 for gramicidin 1949 +/- 100 M-1 for gramicidin B, and 390 +/- 20 M-1 for gramicidin C. Gramicidin B not only binds Tl+ more strongly but it is also in a different conformational state than that of A and C, as shown by Circular Dichroism spectroscopy. The 205Tl NMR technique can now be extended to determinations of binding constants of other cations to gramicidin by competition studies using a 205Tl probe. PMID:2420383

  19. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  20. Investigation of equilibrium and kinetics of Cr(VI) adsorption by dried Bacillus cereus using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) based on three-variable-five-level central composite rotatable design was used to analyze the effects of combined and individual operating parameters (biomass dose, initial concentration of Cr(VI) and pH) on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of dried Bacillus cereus. A quadratic polynomial equation was obtained to predict the adsorbed Cr(VI) amount. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of biomass dose was the key factor in the removal of Cr(VI). The maximum adsorbed Cr(VI) amount (30.93 mg g(-1)) was found at 165.30 mg L(-1), 2.96, and 3.01 g L(-1) for initial Cr(VI) concentration, pH, and biosorbent dosage, respectively. The surface chemical functional groups and microstructure of unloaded and Cr(VI)-loaded dried Bacillus cereus were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Besides, the results gained from these studies indicated that Langmuir isotherm and the second-order rate expression were suitable for the removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater. The results revealed RSM was an effective method for optimizing biosorption process, and dried Bacillus cereus had a remarkable performance on the removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater. PMID:26877045

  1. Constraining the chlorine monoxide (ClO)/chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl) equilibrium constant from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements of nighttime ClO

    PubMed Central

    Santee, Michelle L.; Sander, Stanley P.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Froidevaux, Lucien

    2010-01-01

    The primary ozone loss process in the cold polar lower stratosphere hinges on chlorine monoxide (ClO) and one of its dimers, chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl). Recently, analyses of atmospheric observations have suggested that the equilibrium constant, Keq, governing the balance between ClOOCl formation and thermal decomposition in darkness is lower than that in the current evaluation of kinetics data. Measurements of ClO at night, when ClOOCl is unaffected by photolysis, provide a useful means of testing quantitative understanding of the ClO/ClOOCl relationship. Here we analyze nighttime ClO measurements from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) to infer an expression for Keq. Although the observed temperature dependence of the nighttime ClO is in line with the theoretical ClO/ClOOCl equilibrium relationship, none of the previously published expressions for Keq consistently produces ClO abundances that match the MLS observations well under all conditions. Employing a standard expression for Keq, A × exp(B/T), we constrain the parameter A to currently recommended values and estimate B using a nonlinear weighted least squares analysis of nighttime MLS ClO data. ClO measurements at multiple pressure levels throughout the periods of peak chlorine activation in three Arctic and four Antarctic winters are used to estimate B. Our derived B leads to values of Keq that are ∼1.4 times smaller at stratospherically relevant temperatures than currently recommended, consistent with earlier studies. Our results are in better agreement with the newly updated (2009) kinetics evaluation than with the previous (2006) recommendation. PMID:20388911

  2. Constraining the chlorine monoxide (ClO)/chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl) equilibrium constant from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements of nighttime ClO.

    PubMed

    Santee, Michelle L; Sander, Stanley P; Livesey, Nathaniel J; Froidevaux, Lucien

    2010-04-13

    The primary ozone loss process in the cold polar lower stratosphere hinges on chlorine monoxide (ClO) and one of its dimers, chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl). Recently, analyses of atmospheric observations have suggested that the equilibrium constant, K(eq), governing the balance between ClOOCl formation and thermal decomposition in darkness is lower than that in the current evaluation of kinetics data. Measurements of ClO at night, when ClOOCl is unaffected by photolysis, provide a useful means of testing quantitative understanding of the ClO/ClOOCl relationship. Here we analyze nighttime ClO measurements from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) to infer an expression for K(eq). Although the observed temperature dependence of the nighttime ClO is in line with the theoretical ClO/ClOOCl equilibrium relationship, none of the previously published expressions for K(eq) consistently produces ClO abundances that match the MLS observations well under all conditions. Employing a standard expression for K(eq), A x exp(B/T), we constrain the parameter A to currently recommended values and estimate B using a nonlinear weighted least squares analysis of nighttime MLS ClO data. ClO measurements at multiple pressure levels throughout the periods of peak chlorine activation in three Arctic and four Antarctic winters are used to estimate B. Our derived B leads to values of K(eq) that are approximately 1.4 times smaller at stratospherically relevant temperatures than currently recommended, consistent with earlier studies. Our results are in better agreement with the newly updated (2009) kinetics evaluation than with the previous (2006) recommendation. PMID:20388911

  3. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  4. Adsorption of arsenate from aqueous solution by rice husk-based adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Taimur; Chaudhuri, Malay

    2013-06-01

    Rice husk-based adsorbent (RHBA) was prepared by burning rice husk in a muffle furnace at 400°C for 4 h and adsorption of arsenate by the RHBA from aqueous solution was examined. Batch adsorption test showed that extent of arsenate adsorption depended on contact time and pH. Equilibrium adsorption was attained in 60 min, with maximum adsorption occurring at pH 7. Equilibrium adsorption data were well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. Freundlich constants Kf and 1/n were 3.62 and 2, respectively. The RHBA is effective in the adsorption of arsenate from water and is a potentially suitable filter medium for removing arsenate from groundwater at wells or in households.

  5. Evaluating the Equilibrium Association Constant between ArtinM Lectin and Myeloid Leukemia Cells by Impedimetric and Piezoelectric Label Free Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Fernanda C.; Martins, Denise C.; Santos, Adriano; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina; Bueno, Paulo R.

    2014-01-01

    Label-free methods for evaluating lectin–cell binding have been developed to determine the lectin–carbohydrate interactions in the context of cell-surface oligosaccharides. In the present study, mass loading and electrochemical transducer signals were compared to characterize the interaction between lectin and cellular membranes by measuring the equilibrium association constant, Ka, between ArtinM lectin and the carbohydrate sites of NB4 leukemia cells. By functionalizing sensor interfaces with ArtinM, it was possible to determine Ka over a range of leukemia cell concentrations to construct analytical curves from impedimetric and/or mass-associated frequency shifts with analytical signals following a Langmuir pattern. Using the Langmuir isotherm-binding model, the Ka obtained were (8.9 ± 1.0) × 10−5 mL/cell and (1.05 ± 0.09) × 10−6 mL/cell with the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) methods, respectively. The observed differences were attributed to the intrinsic characteristic sensitivity of each method in following Langmuir isotherm premises. PMID:25587428

  6. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  7. Adsorption behaviour of bulgur.

    PubMed

    Erbaş, Mustafa; Aykın, Elif; Arslan, Sultan; Durak, Atike N

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this research was to determine the adsorption behaviour of bulgur. Three different particle sizes (2equilibrium levels of relative humidity (8.2-97.3%) at 20, 30 and 40 °C. The data obtained were evaluated using BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) and GAB (Guggenheim, Anderson and deBoer) sorption equations. The equilibrium moisture content of bulgur increased both with decreasing temperature and bulgur size. The constants m0 and C of BET and GAB equations were determined to be between 2.54 and 5.03 g water per 100 g of dry matter and 4.96-16.57, respectively. Constant k was between 0.85 and 0.93, and GAB equation was determined to fit very well for bulgur adsorption, because of %E values lower than 10%. Bulgur must be stored below 70% relative humidity and with less than 10 g water per 100 g of dry mater. PMID:26575716

  8. Effect of grain size on uranium(VI) surface complexation kinetics and adsorption additivity.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M

    2011-07-15

    The contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption was studied using a sediment from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.053-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (<0.053 mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch and flow-cell experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms and kinetic uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. One important implication of this study is that grain-size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location. PMID:21648458

  9. Protein nanoparticle interaction: A spectrophotometric approach for adsorption kinetics and binding studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishanav, Sandeep K.; Chandraker, Kumudini; Korram, Jyoti; Nagwanshi, Rekha; Ghosh, Kallol K.; Satnami, Manmohan L.

    2016-08-01

    Investigating the protein nanoparticle interaction is crucial to understand how to control the biological interactions of nanoparticles. In this work, Model protein Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used to evaluate the process of protein adsorption to the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) surface. The binding of a model protein (BSA) to GNPs was investigated through fluorescence quenching measurements. The strong affinities of BSA for GNPs were confirmed by the high value of binding constant (Ks) which was calculated to be 2.2 × 1011 L/mol. In this consequence, we also investigated the adsorption behavior of BSA on GNPs surface via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effect of various operational parameters such as pH, contact time, initial BSA concentration, and temperature on adsorption of BSA was investigated using batch adsorption experiments. Kinetics of adsorption was found to follow the pseudo-second order rate equation. The suitability of Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models to the equilibrium data was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption was well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity for BSA adsorbed on GNPs was 58.71 mg/g and equilibrium constant was 0.0058 calculated by the Langmuir model at 298 K and pH = 11.0. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of BSA onto GNPs was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic.

  10. Adsorption of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Studies were undertaken of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols from aqueous solution on granular activated carbon (Filtrasorb-400, 30 x 40 mesh). Single-component equilibrium adsorption data on the eight compounds in two concentration ranges at pH 7.0 fit the Langmuir equation better than the Freundlich equation. The adsorptive capacities at pH 7.0 increase from pentachlorophenol to trichlorophenols and are fairly constant from trichlorophenols to monochlorophenols. The adsorption process was found to be exothermic for pentachlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and endothermic for 2,4-dichlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol. Equilibrium measurements were also conducted for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 4-chlorophenol over a wide pH range. A surface complexation model was proposed to describe the effect of pH on adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on activated carbon. The simulations of the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Batch kinetics studies were conducted of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols on granular activated carbon. The results show that the surface reaction model best describes both the short-term and long-term kinetics, while the external film diffusion model describes the short-term kinetics data very well and the linear-driving-force approximation improved its performance for the long-term kinetics. Multicomponent adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon was investigated in the micromolar equilibrium concentration range. The Langmuir competitive and Ideal Adsorbed Solution (IAS) models were tested for their performance on the three binary systems of pentachlorophenol/2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and the tertiary system of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and found to fail to predict the two-component adsorption equilibria of the former two binary systems and the tertiary system.

  11. Process development for removal and recovery of cadmium from wastewater by a low-cost adsorbent: Adsorption rates and equilibrium studies

    SciTech Connect

    Periasamy, K.; Namasivayam, C. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1994-02-01

    Activated carbon prepared from peanut hulls (PHC), an agricultural waste by-product, has been used for the adsorption of Cd(II) from synthetic wastewater. The adsorption data fit better with the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The applicability of the Lagergren kinetic model has also been investigated. An almost quantitative removal of 20 mg/L Cd(II) by 0.7 g of PHC/L of aqueous solution was observed in the pH range 3.5--9.5. A comparative study with a commercial granular activated carbon (CAC) showed that the adsorption capacity (K[sub f]) of PHC was 31 times larger than that of CAC.

  12. 2, 4 dichlorophenol (2, 4-DCP) sorption from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon and polymeric adsorbents and studies on effect of temperature on activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ghatbandhe, A S; Yenkie, M K N

    2008-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), one of the most commonly used chlorophenol, onto bituminous coal based Filtrasorb-400 grade granular activated carbon, were studied in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to temperature. Uptake capacity of activated carbon found to increase with temperature. Langmuir isotherm models were applied to experimental equilibrium data of 2, 4-DCP adsorption and competitive studies with respect to XAD resin were carried out. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir equilibrium model. Adsorbent monolayer capacity 'Q0, Langmuir constant 'b' and adsorption rate constant 'k(a)' were evaluated at different temperatures for activated carbon adsorption. This data was then used to calculate the energy of activation of adsorption and also the thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy of adsorption, deltaG0, enthalpy of adsorption, deltaH0 and the entropy of adsorption deltaS0. The obtained results showed that the monolayer capacity increases with the increase in temperatures. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters showed that adsorption of 2,4 DCP is an endothermic process. Synthetic resin was not found efficient to adsorb 2,4 DCP compared to activated carbon. The order of adsorption efficiencies of three resins used in the study found as XAD7HP > XAD4 > XAD1180. PMID:19295102

  13. Adsorption and excess fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of Xe and Kr on lunar soil 10084 was measured by a method that employs only very low fractions of monolayer coverage. Results are presented as parameters for calculation of the Henry constant for adsorption as a function of temperature. The adsorption potentials are about 3 kcal/mole for Kr and 5 kcal/mole for Xe; heating the sample in vacuum increased the Xe potential to nearly 7 kcal/mole. Henry constants at the characteristic lunar temperature are about 0.3 cu cm STP/g-atm. These data were applied to consider whether adsorption is important in producing the excess fission Xe effect characteristic of highland breccias. Sorption equilibrium with a transient lunar atmosphere vented fission Xe produces concentrations seven orders of magnitude lower than observed concentrations. Higher concentrations result because of the resistance of the regolith to upward diffusion of Xe. A diffusion coefficient of 0.26 sq cm/sec is estimated for this process.

  14. Enhanced adsorptive removal of Safranine T from aqueous solutions by waste sea buckthorn branch powder modified with dopamine: Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Bai, Bo; Wang, Honglun; Suo, Yourui

    2015-12-01

    Polydopamine coated sea buckthorn branch powder (PDA@SBP) was facilely synthesized via a one-pot bio-inspired dip-coating approach. The as-synthesized PDA@SBP was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adsorption progresses of Safranine T on the surface of PDA@SBP adsorbent were systematically investigated. More specifically, the effects of solution pH, contact time, initial concentration and temperature were evaluated, respectively. The experimental results showed the adsorption capacity of PDA@SBP at 293.15 K could reach up to 54.0 mg/g; the adsorption increased by 201.7% compared to that of native SBP (17.9 mg/g). Besides, kinetics studies showed that pseudo-second-order kinetic model adequately described the adsorption behavior. The adsorption experimental data could be fitted well a Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic analyses showed that the ST adsorption was a physisorption endothermic process. Regeneration of the spent PDA@SBP adsorbent was conducted with 0.1 M HCl without significant reduction in adsorption capacity. On the basis of these investigations, it is believed that the PDA@SBP adsorbent could have potential applications in sewage disposal areas because of their considerable adsorption capacities, brilliant regeneration capability, and cost-effective and eco-friendly preparation and use.

  15. Adsorption and isothermal models of atrazine by zeolite prepared from Egyptian kaolin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Tarek S.; Gad-Allah, Tarek A.; Ibrahim, Hanan S.; Saleh, Tamer S.

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of Atrazine on zeolites, prepared from Egyptian kaolin, has been studied in order to consider the application of these types of zeolites in water purification. The batch mode has been employed, using atrazine solution of concentration ranging from 2 to 10 mg /l. The adsorption capacity and distribution coefficients ( Kd) were determined for the adsorption system as a function of sorbate concentration. It was found that, under the studies concentrations, the percent of adsorbed atrazine on both zeolites match to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The constants of each model were calculated to assess the adsorption behavior of atrazine on each type of zeolite. According to the equilibrium studies, adsorption of atrazine on zeolite X at lower concentrations is much better than that on zeolite A. The application of Dublin-Kaganer-Radushkevich model revealed physisorption endothermic adsorption process for both zeolites. These results show that natural zeolites hold great potential to remove hazardous materials such as atrazine from water.

  16. [Application of classical isothermal adsorption models in heavy metal ions/ diatomite system and related problems].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Wu, Qing-Ding; Wang, Ping; Li, Ke-Lin; Lei, Ming-Jing; Zhang, Wei-Li

    2013-11-01

    In order to fully understand adsorption nature of Cu2+, Zn2+, Pb2+, Cd2+, Mn2+, Fe3+ onto natural diatomite, and to find problems of classical isothermal adsorption models' application in liquid/solid system, a series of isothermal adsorption tests were conducted. As results indicate, the most suitable isotherm models for describing adsorption of Pb2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Fe3+ onto natural diatomite are Tenkin, Tenkin, Langmuir, Tenkin, Freundlich and Freundlich, respectively, the adsorption of each ion onto natural diatomite is mainly a physical process, and the adsorption reaction is favorable. It also can be found that, when using classical isothermal adsorption models to fit the experimental data in liquid/solid system, the equilibrium adsorption amount q(e) is not a single function of ion equilibrium concentration c(e), while is a function of two variables, namely c(e) and the adsorbent concentration W0, q(e) only depends on c(e)/W(0). Results also show that the classical isothermal adsorption models have a significant adsorbent effect, and their parameter values are unstable, the simulation values of parameter differ greatly from the measured values, which is unhelpful for practical use. The tests prove that four-adsorption-components model can be used for describing adsorption behavior of single ion in nature diatomite-liquid system, its parameters k and q(m) have constant values, which is favorable for practical quantitative calculation in a given system. PMID:24455943

  17. Adsorption of humic acids and trace metals in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies concerning the interactions between suspended hydrous iron oxide and dissolved humic acids and trace metals are reported. As a major component of dissolved organic matters and its readiness for adsorption at the solid/water interface, humic acids may play a very important role in the organometallic geochemistry of suspended sediments and in determining the fate and distribution of trace metals, pesticides and anions in natural water systems. Most of the solid phases in natural waters contain oxides and hydroxides. The most simple promising theory to describe the interactions of hydrous iron oxide interface is the surface complex formation model. In this model, the adsorptions of humic acids on hydrous iron oxide may be interpreted as complex formation of the organic bases (humic acid oxyanions) with surface Fe ions. Measurements on adsorptions were made in both fresh water and seawater. Attempts have been made to fit our data to Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption equilibrium constants were determined.

  18. Adsorption and regenerative oxidation of trichlorophenol with synthetic zeolite: Ozone dosage and its influence on adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Prigent, Bastien; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2016-07-01

    Regeneration of loaded adsorbents is a key step for the sustainability of an adsorption process. In this study, ozone was applied to regenerate a synthetic zeolite for the adsorption of trichlorophenol (TCP) as an organic model pollutant. Three initial concentrations of TCP in water phase were used in adsorption tests. After the equilibrium, zeolite loaded different amounts of TCP was dried and then regenerated with ozone gas. It was found that the adsorption capacity of zeolite was increased through three regeneration cycles. However, the adsorption kinetics was compromised after the regeneration with slightly declined 2nd order reaction constants. The ozone demand for the regeneration was highly dependent on the TCP mass loaded onto the zeolite. It was estimated that the mass ratio of ozone to TCP was 1.2 ± 0.3 g O3/g TCP. PMID:27043379

  19. Adsorption of toxic metal ion Cr(VI) from aqueous state by TiO2-MCM-41: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Parida, Kulamani; Mishra, Krushna Gopal; Dash, Suresh Kumar

    2012-11-30

    This paper deals with the immobilization of various weight percentage of TiO(2) on mesoporous MCM-41, characterization of the materials by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and evaluation of the adsorption capacity toward Cr(VI) removal. It is found that the MCM-41 structure retained after loading of TiO(2) but the surface area and pore diameter decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous state was investigated on TiO(2)-MCM-41 by changing various parameters such as pH, metal ion concentration, and the temperature. When TiO(2) loading was more than 20 wt.%, the adsorption activity (25)TiO(2)-MCM-41 reduced significantly due to considerable decrease in the surface area. It is also observed that TiO(2) and neat MCM-41 exhibits very less Cr(VI) adsorption compared to TiO(2)-MCM-41. The adsorption of Cr(VI) onto (20)TiO(2)-MCM-41 at pH~5.5 and temperature 323 K was 91% at 100mg/L Cr(VI) metal ion concentration in 80 min. The experimental data fitted well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on TiO(2)-MCM-41 followed a second order kinetics with higher values of intra-particle diffusion rate. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption process is endothermic in nature and desorption studies indicated a chemisorption mode. PMID:23092612

  20. Adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen on an ultramicroporous copper metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaofei; Yuan, Bin; Bao, Zongbi; Deng, Shuguang

    2014-09-15

    An ultramicroporous copper metal-organic framework (Cu-MOF), Cu(hfipbb)(H2hfipbb)0.5 [H2hfipbb=4,4'-(hexafluoro-isopropylidene) bis(benzoic acid)] was successfully synthesized by a microwave-assisted method (1) with a shorter reaction time and higher MOFs yield. The obtained Cu-MOF sample was characterized with scanning electron microscopy for crystal structure, powder X-ray diffraction for phase structure, and carbon dioxide adsorption at 273 K for pore textural properties. Single-component adsorption (adsorption equilibrium and kinetics) of CO2, CH4, and N2 on 1 was measured using a Micromeritics ASAP 2020 adsorption porosimeter at 278, 298 and 318 K, and pressures up to 1 bar. Isosteric heats of adsorption, Henry's constants, and diffusion time constants were calculated and carefully analyzed. Adsorption equilibrium selectivity (α), adsorbent selection parameter for pressure swing adsorption processes (S), kinetic selectivity and combined separation selectivity (β) for CO2/CH4, CO2/N2 and CH4/N2 binary mixtures were estimated based on the single-component adsorption data. The relative high values of the adsorption selectivities suggest that Cu-MOF is a promising adsorbent for separating CO2/CH4, CO2/N2 and CH4/N2 gas pairs. PMID:24998057

  1. Comparing the removal of perchlorate when using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon: adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie C; Hsu, Yung S; Hsu, Kai L; Chou, Ming S; Han, Jia Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to remove perchlorate using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon (GAC). Dynamic and equilibrium adsorption experiments were performed to evaluate the thermodynamic behavior of perchlorate on SWCNTs and GAC. Key parameters affecting the adsorption, such as pH, ionic strength, and temperature were studied. The experimental results showed that the dynamic adsorption experiment achieved equilibrium in approximately eight hours. The adsorption capacity increased as the concentration of perchlorate increased or as the ionic strength decreased. The selected adsorption models were the modified Freundlich, the pseudo-1st-order, and the pseudo-2nd-order equations. The results showed that the modified Freundlich equation best described the kinetic adsorption processes. The maximal adsorption capacities of GAC and SWCNTs were 33.87-28.21 mg/g and 13.64 - 10.03 mg/g, respectively, at a constant temperature between 5°C and 45°C. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the equilibrium constant (K0 ), the standard free energy changes (ΔG°), the standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and the standard entropy change (ΔS°), were obtained. The results of the isothermal equilibrium adsorption experiment showed that low pH levels, low ionic strength, and low-temperature conditions facilitated the perchlorate adsorption, indicating that GAC and SWCNTs are potential absorbents for water treatment. PMID:24410681

  2. A comparative adsorption study: 17β-estradiol onto aerobic granular sludge and activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-ying; He, Yu-jie; Chen, Wei; Wang, Ming-yang; Cao, Su-lan; Ni, Ming; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption plays a significant role in removing hydrophobic 17β-estradiol (E2) from wastewater. Batch experiments were conducted to compare the adsorption of E2 onto activated aerobic granular sludge (AGS) and activated sludge (AS), and features evaluated included the adsorption kinetics, thermodynamics, and influence of other environmental factors. By using a non-chemical wet-heat technique, both AGS and AS were treated to inactivated status. Then, after loading E2, the adsorption equilibrium capacity of the AGS was found to be greater than that of the AS at the same initial concentration of E2. Moreover, both the adsorption processes corresponded to a pseudo-second-order kinetic model; the adsorption rate constant of AGS was found to be higher and the half-adsorption time was shorter than that of AS. Next, evaluations of adsorption isotherms and thermodynamics indicated that the adsorption process was mainly a physical process. Lower temperatures facilitated a higher equilibrium adsorption capacity. However, the adsorption binding sites of AGS were distributed more uniformly at higher temperature, in contrast to the distribution found for AS. Finally, acidic conditions and an appropriate ionic strength (0.4 mol/L) were found to be particularly conducive to the adsorption process. Overall, the results showed that AGS has the potential to adsorb E2 with significant efficiency, thereby offering a new and more efficient means of treating E2 and trace oestrogens in wastewater. PMID:26209151

  3. Calculation of equilibrium constants from multiwavelength spectroscopic data--II: SPECFIT: two user-friendly programs in basic and standard FORTRAN 77.

    PubMed

    Gampp, H; Maeder, M; Meyer, C J; Zuberbühler, A D

    1985-04-01

    A new program (SPECFIT), written in HP BASIC or FORTRAN 77, for the calculation of stability constants from spectroscopic data, is presented. Stability constants have been successfully calculated from multiwavelength spectrophotometric and EPR data, but the program can be equally well applied to the numerical treatment of other spectroscopic measurements. The special features included in SPECFIT to improve convergence, increase numerical reliability, and minimize memory as well as computing time requirements, include (i) elimination of the linear parameters (i.e., molar absorptivities), (ii) the use of analytical instead of numerical derivatives and (iii) factor analysis. Calculation of stability constants from spectroscopic data is then as straightforward as from potentiometric titration curves and gives results of analogous reproducibility. The spectroscopic method has proved, however, to be superior in discrimination between chemical models. PMID:18963840

  4. Adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 and Congo Red dye from aqueous solution by amino-functionalized Fe3O4 particles: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ting-guo; Wang, Li-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic adsorbent was synthesized by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modification of Fe(3)O(4) particles using a two-step process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and vibration sample magnetometry were used to characterize the obtained magnetic adsorbent. EDS and XPS showed that APTES polymer was successfully introduced onto the as-prepared Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particle surfaces. The saturation magnetization of the magnetic adsorbent was around 65 emu g(-1), which indicated that the dye can be removed fast and efficiently from aqueous solution with an external magnetic field. The maximum adsorption capacities of Fe(3)O(4)/APTES for C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) were 51.4 and 118.8 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) on Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particles corresponded well to the Langmuir model and the Freundlich model, respectively. The adsorption processes for RR 228 and CR followed the pseudo-second-order model. The Boyd's film-diffusion model showed that film diffusion also played a major role in the studied adsorption processes for both dyes. Thermodynamic study indicated that both of the adsorption processes of the two dyes are spontaneous exothermic. PMID:24552735

  5. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2011-07-27

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  6. Determination of Equilibrium Constants of Some Novel Antioxidant Compounds and Study on their Complexes with Some Divalent Metal ions in Ethanol-water Mixed.

    PubMed

    Atabey, Hasan; Findik, Esra; Sari, Hayati; Ceylan, Mustafa

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the nature and type of complexes formed in solution, between novel antioxidant compounds [P1(4-(1-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)propyl)benzene-1,2-diol) and P2(4-(1-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)propyl)benzene-1,3-diol)] and the ions Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+ and Co2+. Potentiometric titration technique was used to follow the formation of complexes during the course of coordination. The stability of the complexes formed was controlled through the determination of stability constants in aqueous ethanol solution at 25 ± 0.1 C° and ionic strength of 0.1 M NaCl. Basicity of the ligand was also assessed by the determination of the dissociation constants of the ligand. All the constants were computed by computer refinement of pH-volume data using the SUPERQUAD program. The species distribution diagram of each type of complex has been obtained after computer calculation process. PMID:24061367

  7. Removal of mercury(II) ions in aqueous solution using the peel biomass of Pachira aquatica Aubl: kinetics and adsorption equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Santana, Andrea J; Dos Santos, Walter N L; Silva, Laiana O B; das Virgens, Cesário F

    2016-05-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic substance that is a health hazard to humans. This study aims to investigate powders obtained from the peel of the fruit of Pachira aquatica Aubl, in its in natura and/or acidified form, as an adsorbent for the removal of mercury ions in aqueous solution. The materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The infrared spectra showed bands corresponding to the axial deformation of carbonyls from carboxylic acids, the most important functional group responsible for fixing the metal species to the adsorbent material. The thermograms displayed mass losses related to the decomposition of three major components, i.e., hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin. The adsorption process was evaluated using cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV AFS) and cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS). Three isotherm models were employed. The adsorption isotherm model, Langmuir-Freundlich, best represented the adsorption process, and the maximum adsorption capacity was predicted to be 0.71 and 0.58 mg g(-1) at 25 °C in nature and acidified, respectively. Adsorption efficiencies were further tested on real aqueous wastewater samples, and removal of Hg(II) was recorded as 69.6 % for biomass acidified and 76.3 % for biomass in nature. Results obtained from sorption experiments on real aqueous wastewater samples revealed that recovery of the target metal ions was very satisfactory. The pseudo-second-order model showed the best correlation to the experimental data. The current findings showed that the investigated materials are potential adsorbents for mercury(II) ion removal in aqueous solution, with acidified P. aquatica Aubl being the most efficient adsorbent. PMID:27084802

  8. Application of surface complexation models to anion adsorption by natural materials.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    Various chemical models of ion adsorption are presented and discussed. Chemical models, such as surface complexation models, provide a molecular description of anion adsorption reactions using an equilibrium approach. Two such models, the constant capacitance model and the triple layer model, are described in the present study. Characteristics common to all the surface complexation models are equilibrium constant expressions, mass and charge balances, and surface activity coefficient electrostatic potential terms. Methods for determining parameter values for surface site density, capacitances, and surface complexation constants also are discussed. Spectroscopic experimental methods of establishing ion adsorption mechanisms include vibrational spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. Experimental determinations of point of zero charge shifts and ionic strength dependence of adsorption results and molecular modeling calculations also can be used to deduce adsorption mechanisms. Applications of the surface complexation models to heterogeneous natural materials, such as soils, using the component additivity and the generalized composite approaches are described. Emphasis is on the generalized composite approach for predicting anion adsorption by soils. Continuing research is needed to develop consistent and realistic protocols for describing ion adsorption reactions on soil minerals and soils. The availability of standardized model parameter databases for use in chemical speciation-transport models is critical. PMID:24619924

  9. Investigating the thermodynamic stability of Bacillus subtilis spore-uranium(VI) adsorption though surface complexation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Z.; Hertel, M.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolved uranium speciation, mobility, and remediation are increasingly important topics given continued and potential uranium (U) release from mining operations and nuclear waste. Vegetative bacterial cell surfaces are known to adsorb uranium and may influence uranium speciation in the environment. Previous investigations regarding U(VI) adsorption to bacterial spores, a differentiated and dormant cell type with a tough proteinaceous coat, include U adsorption affinity and XAFS data. We investigated the thermodynamic stability of aerobic, pH dependent uranium adsorption to bacterial spore surfaces using purified Bacillus subtilis spores in solution with 5ppm uranium. Adsorption reversibility and kinetic experiments indicate that uranium does not precipitate over the duration of the experiments and equilibrium is reached within 20 minutes. Uranium-spore adsorption edges exhibited adsorption at all pH measured between 2 and 10. Maximum adsorption was achieved around pH 7 and decreased as pH increased above 7. We used surface complexation modeling (SCM) to quantify uranium adsorption based on balanced chemical equations and derive thermodynamic stability constants for discrete uranium-spore adsorption reactions. Site specific thermodynamic stability constants provide insight on interactions occurring between aqueous uranium species and spore surface ligands. The uranium adsorption data and SCM parameters described herein, also provide a basis for predicting the influence of bacterial spores on uranium speciation in natural systems and investigating their potential as biosorption agents in engineered systems.

  10. KEMOD: A mixed chemical kinetic and equilibrium model of aqueous and solid phase geochemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Iskra, G.A.; Szecsody, J.E.; Zachara, J.M.; Streile, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the development of a mixed chemical Kinetic and Equilibrium MODel in which every chemical species can be treated either as a equilibrium-controlled or as a kinetically controlled reaction. The reaction processes include aqueous complexation, adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, precipitation/dissolution, oxidation/reduction, and acid/base reactions. Further development and modification of KEMOD can be made in: (1) inclusion of species switching solution algorithms, (2) incorporation of the effect of temperature and pressure on equilibrium and rate constants, and (3) extension to high ionic strength.

  11. The Effect of the N-Terminus on Heme Cavity Structure, Ligand Equilibrium and Rate Constants and Reduction Potentials of Nitrophorin 2 from Rhodnius prolixus†

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Robert E.; Shokhireva, Tatiana Kh.; Filippov, Igor; Shokhirev, Maxim N.; Zhang, Hongjun; Walker, F. Ann

    2008-01-01

    The D1A mutant of recombinant NP2 has been prepared and shown to have the expression-initiation methionine-0 cleaved during expression in E. coli, as is the case for recombinant NP4, where Ala is the first amino acid for the recombinant protein, as well as for the mature native protein. The heme substituent 1H NMR chemical shifts of NP2-D1A and those of its imidazole, N-methylimidazole and cyanide complexes are rather different from those of NP2-M0D1. This difference is likely due to the much smaller size of the N-terminal amino acid (A) of NP2-D1A, which allows formation of the closed loop form of this protein, as it does for NP4 (Weichsel, A.; Andersen, J. F.; Roberts, S. A.; Montfort, W. R Nature Struct. Biol. 2000, 7, 551-554). The ratio of the two hemin rotational isomers A and B is different for the two proteins, and the rate at which the A:B ratio reaches equilibrium is strikingly different (NP2-M0D1 t1/2 for heme rotation ∼2 h, NP2-D1A t1/2 ∼43 h). This difference is consistent with a high stability of the closed loop form of the NP2-D1A protein, and infrequent opening of the loops that could allow heme to at least partially exit the binding pocket in order to rotate about its α,γ-meso axis. Consistent with this, the rates of histamine binding and release to/from NP2-D1A are significantly slower than for NP2-M0D1 at pH 7.5. This work suggests that care must be taken in interpreting data obtained from proteins that carry the expression-initiation M0. PMID:17506528

  12. Adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisaharu; Matsumoto, Michiaki

    1996-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose were examined. The pH dependency on the distribution ratio was found to be affected by the valency of the metal ion, and the apparent adsorption equilibrium constants of the metal ions were determined. The order of adsorption of the metal ions is Ga > In > Nd > Eu for the trivalent metal ions and Cu > Ni > Co for the divalent metal ions. It is believed that amino and hydroxyl groups in the chitosan act as a chelating ligand.

  13. Automated method for determination of dissolved organic carbon-water distribution constants of structurally diverse pollutants using pre-equilibrium solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Ripszam, Matyas; Haglund, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays a key role in determining the environmental fate of semivolatile organic environmental contaminants. The goal of the present study was to develop a method using commercially available hardware to rapidly characterize the sorption properties of DOC in water samples. The resulting method uses negligible-depletion direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Its performance was evaluated using Nordic reference fulvic acid and 40 priority environmental contaminants that cover a wide range of physicochemical properties. Two SPME fibers had to be used to cope with the span of properties, 1 coated with polydimethylsiloxane and 1 coated with polystyrene divinylbenzene polydimethylsiloxane, for nonpolar and semipolar contaminants, respectively. The measured DOC-water distribution constants showed reasonably good reproducibility (standard deviation ≤ 0.32) and good correlation (R(2)  = 0.80) with log octanol-water partition coefficients for nonpolar persistent organic pollutants. The sample pretreatment is limited to filtration, and the method is easy to adjust to different DOC concentrations. These experiments also utilized the latest SPME automation that largely decreases total cycle time (to 20 min or shorter) and increases sample throughput, which is advantageous in cases when many samples of DOC must be characterized or when the determinations must be performed quickly, for example, to avoid precipitation, aggregation, and other changes of DOC structure and properties. The data generated by this method are valuable as a basis for transport and fate modeling studies. PMID:25393710

  14. Comparison of adsorption equilibrium models for the study of CL-, NO3- and SO4(2-) removal from aqueous solutions by an anion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Dron, Julien; Dodi, Alain

    2011-06-15

    The removal of chloride, nitrate and sulfate ions from aqueous solutions by a macroporous resin is studied through the ion exchange systems OH(-)/Cl(-), OH(-)/NO(3)(-), OH(-)/SO(4)(2-), and HCO(3)(-)/Cl(-), Cl(-)/NO(3)(-), Cl(-)/SO(4)(2-). They are investigated by means of Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevitch (D-R) and Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A) single-component adsorption isotherms. The sorption parameters and the fitting of the models are determined by nonlinear regression and discussed. The Langmuir model provides a fair estimation of the sorption capacity whatever the system under study, on the contrary to Freundlich and D-R models. The adsorption energies deduced from Dubinin and Langmuir isotherms are in good agreement, and the surface parameter of the D-A isotherm appears consistent. All models agree on the order of affinity OH(-)adsorption isotherms. The nonlinear regression results are also compared with linear regressions. While the parameter values are not affected, the evaluation of the best fitting model is biased by linearization. PMID:21497015

  15. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    is reflected in decreasing equilibrium constants for selenite with increasing adsorption density and both experimental observations and modeling results suggest that manganese dioxide has fewer sites of higher energy for selenite adsorption than amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. Modeling and interpreting the adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on the oxides are made difficult by the lack of constraint in choosing surface species and the fact that equally good fits can be obtained with different surface species. Finally, predictions of anion competition using the model results from single adsorbate systems are not very successful because the model does not account for surface site heterogeneity. Selenite adsorption data from a multi-adsorbate system could be fit if the equilibrium constant for selenite is decreased with increasing anion adsorption density. ?? 1990.

  16. Chemical Principles Revisited: Using the Equilibrium Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the concept of equilibrium in chemical systems, particularly in relation to predicting the position of equilibrium, predicting spontaneity of a reaction, quantitative applications of the equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, determination of the solubility product constant, common-ion effect, and dissolution of precipitates.…

  17. Generalized adsorption isotherms for molecular and dissociative adsorption of a polar molecular species on two polar surface geometries: Perovskite (100) (Pm-3m) and fluorite (111) (Fm-3m)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Danielson, Thomas; Hin, Celine; Savara, Aditya

    2016-08-10

    Lattice based kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations have been used to determine a functional form for the second order adsorption isotherms on two commonly investigated crystal surfaces: the (111) fluorite surface and the (100) perovskite surface which has the same geometric symmetry as the NaCl (100) surface. The functional form is generalized to be applicable to all values of the equilibrium constant by a shift along the pressure axis. Functions have been determined for estimating the pressure at which a desired coverage would be achieved and for estimating the coverage at a certain pressure. The generalized form has been calculatedmore » by investigating the surface adsorbate coverage across a range of thermodynamic equilibrium constants that span the range 10-26 to 1013. Finally, the equations have been shown to be general for any value of the adsorption equilibrium constant.« less

  18. Generalized adsorption isotherms for molecular and dissociative adsorption of a polar molecular species on two polar surface geometries: Perovskite (100) (Pm-3m) and fluorite (111) (Fm-3m)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Thomas; Hin, Celine; Savara, Aditya

    2016-08-01

    Lattice based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used to determine a functional form for the second order adsorption isotherms on two commonly investigated crystal surfaces: the (111) fluorite surface and the (100) perovskite surface which has the same geometric symmetry as the NaCl (100) surface. The functional form is generalized to be applicable to all values of the equilibrium constant by a shift along the pressure axis. Functions have been determined for estimating the pressure at which a desired coverage would be achieved and, conversely, for estimating the coverage at a certain pressure. The generalized form has been calculated by investigating the surface adsorbate coverage across a range of thermodynamic equilibrium constants that span the range 10-26 to 1013. The equations have been shown to be general for any value of the adsorption equilibrium constant.

  19. Adsorption of phenanthrene on natural snow.

    PubMed

    Domine, Florent; Cincinelli, Alessandra; Bonnaud, Elodie; Martellini, Tania; Picaud, Sylvain

    2007-09-01

    The snowpack is a reservoir for semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and, in particular, for persistent organic pollutants (POPs), which are sequestered in winter and released to the atmosphere or hydrosphere in the spring. Modeling these processes usually assumes that SVOCs are incorporated into the snowpack by adsorption to snow surfaces, but this has never been proven because the specific surface area (SSA) of snow has never been measured together with snow composition. Here we expose natural snow to phenanthrene vapors (one of the more volatile POPs) and measure for the first time both the SSA and the chemical composition of the snow. The results are consistent with an adsorption equilibrium. The measured Henry's law constant is H(Phen)(T) = 2.88 x 10(22) exp(-10660/7) Pa m2 mol(-1), with Tin Kelvin. The adsorption enthalpy is delta H(ads) = -89 +/- 18 kJ mol(-1). We also perform molecular dynamics calculations of phenanthrene adsorption to ice and obtain AHads = -85 +/- 8 kJ mol(-1), close to the experimental value. Results are applied to the adsorption of phenanthrene to the Arctic and subarctic snowpacks. The subarctic snowpack, with a low snow area index (SAI = 1000), is a negligible reservoir of phenanthrene, butthe colder Arctic snowpack, with SAI = 2500, sequesters most of the phenanthrene present in the (snow + boundary layer) system. PMID:17937278

  20. Removal of aluminium from aqueous solutions using PAN-based adsorbents: characterisation, kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Aly, Zaynab; Graulet, Adrien; Scales, Nicholas; Hanley, Tracey

    2014-03-01

    Economic adsorbents in bead form were fabricated and utilised for the adsorption of Al(3+) from aqueous solutions. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) beads, PAN powder and the thermally treated PAN beads (250 °C/48 h/Ar and 600 °C/48 h/Ar-H2) were characterised using different techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, specific surface analysis (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller), thermogravimetric analysis as well as scanning electron microscopy. Effects of pH, contact time, kinetics and adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were investigated in batch mode experiments. Aluminium kinetic data best fit the Lagergren pseudo-second-order adsorption model indicating a one-step, surface-only, adsorption process with chemisorption being the rate limiting step. Equilibrium adsorption data followed a Langmuir adsorption model with fairly low monolayer adsorption capacities suitable for freshwater clean-up only. Various constants including thermodynamic constants were evaluated from the experimental results obtained at 20, 40 and 60 °C. Positive values of ΔH° indicated that the adsorption of Al(3+) onto all three adsorbents was endothermic with less energy input required for PAN powder compared to PAN beads and low-temperature thermally treated PAN. Negative ΔG° values indicated that the aluminium adsorption process was spontaneous for all adsorbents examined. PMID:24297464

  1. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  2. Adsorption of divalent copper, zinc, cadmium and lead ions from aqueous solution by waste tea and coffee adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Djati Utomo, H; Hunter, K A

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of the divalent cations of Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb by tea leaves and coffee grounds from aqueous solutions is described. Both adsorbents exhibited strong affinity for these ions which could be described by a simple single-site equilibrium model. For coffee, the order of increasing adsorption equilibrium constant K was Cu < Pb < Zn < Cd, while for tea the opposite order was observed indicating that the adsorption sites on each adsorbent have a different chemical nature. Adsorption decreased at low pH < 4 through competition with H+ for adsorption sites, and for all metals except Cu, at high pH > 10, probably because of anion formation in the case of Zn2+ and also increased leaching of metal-binding soluble materials. The effect of metal ion concentration on the adsorptive equilibria indicated a threshold concentration above which overall adsorption became limited by saturation of the adsorption sites. Competition between two metal ions for the same sites was not observed with Cu(II) and Pb(II), however Zn(II) reacted competitively with Cd(II) binding sites on both tea and coffee. If fresh coffee or tea adsorbents were used, the fraction of metal ion taken up by the adsorbent was diminished by the competitive effects of soluble metal-binding ligands released by the tea or coffee. Experiments with coffee showed that roasting temperature controls the formation of metal ion adsorption sites for this adsorbent. PMID:16457172

  3. Predicting Adsorption Affinities of Small Molecules on Carbon Nanotubes Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Comer, Jeffrey; Chen, Ran; Poblete, Horacio; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Riviere, Jim E

    2015-12-22

    Computational techniques have the potential to accelerate the design and optimization of nanomaterials for applications such as drug delivery and contaminant removal; however, the success of such techniques requires reliable models of nanomaterial surfaces as well as accurate descriptions of their interactions with relevant solutes. In the present work, we evaluate the ability of selected models of naked and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes to predict adsorption equilibrium constants for about 30 small aromatic compounds with a variety of functional groups. The equilibrium constants determined using molecular dynamics coupled with free-energy calculation techniques are directly compared to those derived from experimental measurements. The calculations are highly predictive of the relative adsorption affinities of the compounds, with excellent correlation (r ≥ 0.9) between calculated and measured values of the logarithm of the adsorption equilibrium constant. Moreover, the agreement in absolute terms is also reasonable, with average errors of less than one decade. We also explore possible effects of surface loading, although we demonstrate that they are negligible for the experimental conditions considered. Given the degree of reliability demonstrated, we move on to employing the in silico techniques in the design of nanomaterials, using the optimization of adsorption affinity for the herbacide atrazine as an example. Our simulations suggest that, compared to other modifications of graphenic carbon, polyvinylpyrrolidone conjugation gives the highest affinity for atrazine-substantially greater than that of graphenic carbon alone-and may be useful as a nanomaterial for delivery or sequestration of atrazine. PMID:26506132

  4. Adsorption of a non-enveloped mammalian virus to functionalized nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Mi, Xue; Heldt, Caryn L

    2014-09-01

    In the pursuit of finding superior methods to remove pathogens from drinking water, this study examines the adsorption of a non-enveloped, mammalian virus to highly charged nanofibers. N-[(2-Hydroxyl-3-trimethylammonium) propyl] chitosan (HTCC) nanofibers were synthesized by the addition of a quaternary amine to chitosan. HTCC was blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to produce nanofibers by electrospinning. The nanofibers were stabilized against water by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. When studied in the range of 100-200nm in diameter, larger fibers were able to adsorb about 90% more virus than smaller fibers. The kinetics of the adsorption was modeled with pseudo-first order kinetics and equilibrium was achieved in as little as 10min. Equilibrium adsorption was modeled with the Freundlich isotherm with a Freundlich constant of 1.4. When the Freundlich constant deviates from 1, this demonstrates that there is heterogeneity at the adsorption surface. The heterogeneity likely occurs at the nanofiber surface since a polymeric blend of two polymers was used to electrospin the nanofibers. The model mammalian virus, porcine parvovirus (PPV), has a fairly homogeneous, icosahedral protein capsid available for adsorption. The fast adsorption kinetics and high capacity of the nanofibers make HTCC/PVA a potential filter material for the removal of pathogens from drinking water. PMID:24985761

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-03-03

    Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral alumino-silicate surfaces, namely the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbed as a bi-dentate innersphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption at the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol-1) was significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol-1), which was attributed to differences in surface functional groups and to the ability of the orthoclase surface to dissolve a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compared favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to 2 carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates in alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

  6. Removal of phenol and chlorophenols from water by coir pith carbon: equilibrium and rate studies.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Kavitha, D

    2004-07-01

    Batch mode studies were conducted to study the removal of phenol, 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol (TCP) and Pentachlorophenol (PCP) from aqueous solution on coir pith carbon by adsorption process under varying experimental conditions such as agitation time, adsorbent dose, pH and temperature. Kinetics of adsorption obeyed second order rate equation and the rate constant was found to be in the range 0.0098-0.0672, 0.0949-0.8801 and 0.172-0.305 g/mg/min for phenol, TCP and PCP respectively. Equilibrium adsorption data follow Langmuir isotherm for phenol and PCP and the adsorption capacities were found to be 48.3 mg and 3.7 mg/g, respectively. For TCP, adsorption followed Freundlich isotherm only. Acidic pH was favorable for the adsorption of all the chlorophenols. Studies on pH effect and desorption show that chemisorption seems to play a major rule in the adsorption process. The positive values of H0 24.99, 18.69, and 8.907 kJ/mol for phenol, TCP and PCP respectively, confirm the endothermic nature of adsorption. PMID:16669312

  7. Solvothermal synthesis of different phase N-TiO2 and their kinetics, isotherm and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of methyl orange.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jimin; Zhao, Zhihuan; Liu, Wenhui; Xue, Yongqiang; Yin, Shu

    2016-05-15

    The different crystal forms of nitrogen doped-titanium oxide (N-TiO2) with different particle sizes were produced by precipitation-solvothermal method and their adsorption mechanism were also investigated. The adsorption kinetics showed that rutile N-TiO2 displayed higher adsorption capacity than anatase for methyl orange (MO) and its adsorption behavior followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The equilibrium adsorption rate of N-TiO2 for MO was well fitted by the Langmuir isotherm model and the adsorption process was monolayer adsorption. The adsorption capacity decreased with increasing temperature. The average correlation coefficient was beyond 97%. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔaGm(ө), ΔaHm(ө), and ΔaSm(ө)) were calculated. It was found that anatase and rutile N-TiO2 had different adsorption enthalpy and entropy. The smaller the particle size, the greater the surface area and surface energy was, then ΔaGm(ө) decreased and the standard equilibrium constant increased at the same time. The adsorption process onto different crystalline phase N-TiO2 was exothermic and non-spontaneous. PMID:26945716

  8. Temperature dependence of the NO3 absorption cross-section above 298 K and determination of the equilibrium constant for NO3 + NO2 <--> N2O5 at atmospherically relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Osthoff, Hans D; Pilling, Michael J; Ravishankara, A R; Brown, Steven S

    2007-11-21

    The reaction NO3 + NO2 <--> N2O5 was studied over the 278-323 K temperature range. Concentrations of NO3, N2O5, and NO2 were measured simultaneously in a 3-channel cavity ring-down spectrometer. Equilibrium constants were determined over atmospherically relevant concentration ranges of the three species in both synthetic samples in the laboratory and ambient air samples in the field. A fit to the laboratory data yielded Keq = (5.1 +/- 0.8) x 10(-27) x e((10871 +/- 46)/7) cm3 molecule(-1). The temperature dependence of the NO3 absorption cross-section at 662 nm was investigated over the 298-388 K temperature range. The line width was found to be independent of temperature, in agreement with previous results. New data for the peak cross section (662.2 nm, vacuum wavelength) were combined with previous measurements in the 200 K-298 K region. A least-squares fit to the combined data gave sigma = [(4.582 +/- 0.096) - (0.00796 +/- 0.00031) x T] x 10(-17) cm2 molecule(-1). PMID:19462574

  9. Glyphosate and AMPA adsorption in soils: laboratory experiments and pedotransfer rules.

    PubMed

    Sidoli, Pauline; Baran, Nicole; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of the herbicide glyphosate and its main metabolite AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid) was investigated on 17 different agricultural soils. Batch equilibration adsorption data are shown by Freundlich adsorption isotherms. Glyphosate adsorption is clearly affected by equilibration concentrations, but the nonlinear AMPA adsorption isotherms indicate saturation of the adsorption sites with increasing equilibrium concentrations. pHCaCl2 (i.e. experimental pH) is the major parameter governing glyphosate and AMPA adsorption in soils. However, considering pHCaCl2 values, available phosphate amount, and amorphous iron and aluminium oxide contents by using a nonlinear multiple regression equation, obtains the most accurate and powerful pedotransfer rule for predicting the adsorption constants for these two molecules. As amorphous iron and aluminium oxide contents in soil are not systematically determined, we also propose a pedotransfer rule with two variables-pHCaCl2 values and available phosphate amount-that remains acceptable for both molecules. Moreover, the use of the commonly measured pHwater or pHKCl values gives less accurate results compared to pHCaCl2 measurements. To our knowledge, this study is the first AMPA adsorption characterization for a significant number of temperate climate soils. PMID:26581693

  10. The Conceptual Change Approach to Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac; Pinarbasi, Tacettin; Bayrakceken, Samih; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a conceptual change approach over traditional instruction on students' understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts (e.g. dynamic nature of equilibrium, definition of equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, qualitative interpreting of equilibrium constant, changing the reaction conditions). This…

  11. Chemical modeling of arsenic(III, V) and selenium(IV, VI) adsorption by soils surrounding ash disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, S.; Hyun, S.; Lee, L.S.

    2008-11-15

    Leachate derived from coal ash disposal facilities is a potential anthropogenic source of As and Se to the environment. To establish a practical framework for predicting attenuation and transport of As and Se in ash leachates, the adsorption of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) had been characterized in prior studies for 18 soils obtained downgradient from ash landfill sites and representing a wide range of soil properties. The constant capacitance model was applied for the first time to describe As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) adsorption on soils as a function of equilibrium solution As(III), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI) concentrations. Prior applications of the model had been restricted to describing Se(IV) and As(V) adsorption by soils as a function of solution pH. The constant capacitance model was applied for the first time to describe As(III) and Se(VI) adsorption by soils. The model was able to describe adsorption of these ions on all soils as a function of solution ion concentration by optimizing only one adjustable parameter, the anion surface complexation constant. This chemical model represents an advancement over adsorption isotherm equation approaches that contain two empirical adjustable parameters. Incorporation of these anion surface complexation constants obtained with the constant capacitance model into chemical speciation transport models will allow simulation of soil solution anion concentrations under diverse environmental and agricultural conditions.

  12. Competitive adsorption of furfural and phenolic compounds onto activated carbon in fixed bed column.

    PubMed

    Sulaymon, Abbas H; Ahmed, Kawther W

    2008-01-15

    For a multicomponent competitive adsorption of furfural and phenolic compounds, a mathematical model was builtto describe the mass transfer kinetics in a fixed bed column with activated carbon. The effects of competitive adsorption equilibrium constant, axial dispersion, external mass transfer, and intraparticle diffusion resistance on the breakthrough curve were studied for weakly adsorbed compound (furfural) and strongly adsorbed compounds (parachlorophenol and phenol). Experiments were carried out to remove the furfural and phenolic compound from aqueous solution. The equilibrium data and intraparticle diffusion coefficients obtained from separate experiments in a batch adsorber, by fitting the experimental data with theoretical model. The results show that the mathematical model includes external mass transfer and pore diffusion using nonlinear isotherms and provides a good description of the adsorption process for furfural and phenolic compounds in a fixed bed adsorber. PMID:18284136

  13. Arsenic(III, V) adsorption on a goethite-based adsorbent in the presence of major co-existing ions: Modeling competitive adsorption consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M.; Fukushi, Keisuke; Green, Peter G.; Darby, Jeannie L.

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption of the two oxyanions, arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)), on a common goethite-based granular porous adsorbent is studied in the presence of major co-existing ions in groundwater (i.e., phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, carbonate, magnesium, and calcium) and predicted using the extended triple layer model (ETLM), a dipole modified single-site triple layer surface complexation model consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence. Surface species of all ions were selected according to the previous ETLM studies and published experimental spectroscopic/theoretical molecular information. The adsorption equilibrium constants for all ions were determined using adsorption data obtained in single-solute systems. The adsorption equilibrium constants referenced to the site-occupancy standard state (indicated by Kθ) were compared with those for goethite in the literature if available. The values of these constants for the goethite-based adsorbent are found to be close to the values for goethite previously studied. These "constrained" adsorption equilibrium constants determined in single-solute systems were used in the ETLM to predict the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with the co-existing ions in binary-solute systems. The ETLM is capable of predicting As(III, V) adsorption in the presence of oxyanions (phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, and carbonate). This study presents the first successful and systematic prediction of the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with these oxyanions using the ETLM. The ETLM prediction of surface (and aqueous) speciation also provides insights into the distinct adsorption behavior of As(III, V) in the presence of the oxyanions. Magnesium and calcium significantly enhanced As(V) adsorption at higher pH values, while they had little effect on As(III) adsorption. The enhanced adsorption of As(V), however, could not be predicted by the ETLM using the surface species proposed in previous ETLM studies. Further studies

  14. Carbon dioxide adsorption in Brazilian coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Luciano Soares; Andre L.B. Oberziner; Humberto J. Jose; Alirio E. Rodrigues; Regina F.P.M. Moreira

    2007-01-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is one of the most important greenhouse gases. In the period between 1980 and 1998, CO{sub 2} emissions increased more than 21% and projections suggest that the emissions will continue to increase globally by 2.2% between 2000 and 2020 and 3.3% in the developed countries. The sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep unminable coal beds is one of the more promising of several methods of geological sequestration that are currently being investigated. CO{sub 2} can adsorb onto coal, and there are several studies demonstrating that CO{sub 2} dissolves in coals and swells them. At very low pressures (P {lt} 1 bar), CO{sub 2} dissolution does not seem to be a problem; however, high pressures are necessary for CO{sub 2} sequestration (P {gt} 50 bar). In this study, we evaluated the kinetics and equilibrium of sorption of CO{sub 2} on Brazilian coals at low pressures. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm at room temperature (30{sup o}C) was measured through the static method. The results showed that the Freundlich model or the Langmuir model is suitable to describe the equilibrium experimental results. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of Brazilian coals are in the range of 0.089-0.186 mmol CO{sub 2}/g, which are typical values for coals with high ash content. The dynamics of adsorption in a fixed-bed column that contains granular coal (particle sizes of 0.8, 2.4, and 4.8 mm) showed that the adsorption rate is fast and a mathematical model was developed to describe the CO{sub 2} dynamics of the adsorption in a fixed-bed column. The linear driving force (LDF) was used to describe the rate of adsorption and the mass-transfer constants of the LDF model (K{sub s}) are in the range of 1.0-2.0 min{sup -1}. 29 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. UV-induced photocatalytic degradation of aqueous acetaminophen: the role of adsorption and reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Basha, Shaik; Keane, David; Nolan, Kieran; Oelgemöller, Michael; Lawler, Jenny; Tobin, John M; Morrissey, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructured titania supported on activated carbon (AC), termed as integrated photocatalytic adsorbents (IPCAs), were prepared by ultrasonication and investigated for the photocatalytic degradation of acetaminophen (AMP), a common analgesic and antipyretic drug. The IPCAs showed high affinity towards AMP (in dark adsorption studies), with the amount adsorbed proportional to the TiO2 content; the highest adsorption was at 10 wt% TiO2. Equilibrium isotherm studies showed that the adsorption followed the Langmuir model, indicating the dependence of the reaction on an initial adsorption step, with maximum adsorption capacity of 28.4 mg/g for 10 % TiO2 IPCA. The effects of initial pH, catalyst amount and initial AMP concentration on the photocatalytic degradation rates were studied. Generally, the AMP photodegradation activity of the IPCAs was better than that of bare TiO2. Kinetic studies on the photocatalytic degradation of AMP under UV suggest that the degradation followed Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) kinetics, with an adsorption rate constant (K) that was considerably higher than the photocatalytic rate constant (k r), indicating that the photocatalysis of AMP is the rate-determining step during the adsorption/photocatalysis process. PMID:25173973

  16. Adsorption of metal ions onto Moroccan stevensite: kinetic and isotherm studies.

    PubMed

    Benhammou, A; Yaacoubi, A; Nibou, L; Tanouti, B

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this paper is to study the adsorption of the heavy metals (Cd(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II)) from aqueous solutions by a natural Moroccan stevensite called locally rhassoul. We carried out, first, a mineralogical and physicochemical characterization of stevensite. The surface area is 134 m2/g and the cation exchange capacity (CEC) is 76.5 meq/100 g. The chemical formula of stevensite is Si3.78Al0.22Mg2.92Fe0.09Na0.08K0.08O10(OH)2.4H2O. Adsorption tests of Cd(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) in batch reactors were carried out at ambient temperature and at constant pH. Two simplified models including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second- order were used to test the adsorption kinetics. The equilibrium time and adsorption rate of adsorption were determined. The increasing order of the adsorption rates follows the sequence Mn(II) > Pb(II) > Zn(II) > Cu(II) > Cd(II). The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R), Langmuir, and Redlich-Peterson (R-P) models were adopted to describe the adsorption isotherms. The maximal adsorption capacities at pH 4.0 determined from the D-R and Langmuir models vary in the following order: Cu(II) > Mn(II) > Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Pb(II). The equilibrium data fitted well with the three-parameter Redlich-Peterson model. The values of mean energy of adsorption show mainly an ion-exchange mechanism. Also, the influence of solution pH on the adsorption onto stevensite was studied in the pH range 1.5-7.0. PMID:15589536

  17. Description of multicomponent adsorption and absorption phenomena from a single viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Tvardovski, A; Tondeur, D; Favre, E

    2003-09-15

    On the basis of phenomenological thermodynamics, an equation has been derived that represents one of the interphase equilibrium equations and provides a description of both multicomponent adsorption and absorption phenomena from a single point of view. The approach is based on a free-volume state equation for the adsorbed phase. It is shown that the well-known Henry, Langmuir, Fowler-Guggenheim, Temkin, and BET adsorption equations (generalized for gas mixtures) follow directly from the equation proposed with constants having a clear physical meaning. PMID:12962656

  18. The influence of the degree of cross-linking on the adsorption properties of chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Osifo, Peter O; Webster, Athena; van der Merwe, Hein; Neomagus, Hein W J P; van der Gun, Marius A; Grant, David M

    2008-10-01

    The influence of the degree of cross-linking (DCL) on chitosan beads was studied. Chitosan was prepared from the exoskeleton of Cape rock-lobsters, collected from the surroundings of Cape Town, South Africa. The chitosan beads were characterized; the beads water contents and pKa varied in the range of 90-96% and 4.3-6.0, respectively, and were found to decrease with increasing DCL (0.0-34.0%). A pH-model, which described the reversibility of the metal adsorbed onto the beads, was used to predict the equilibrium properties of copper adsorption onto the cross-linked beads. The model accounts for the effect of pH and the important model parameters, the equilibrium adsorption constant (Kads) and to a lesser extent the adsorbent adsorption capacity (qmax) showed to decrease with the DCL. The adsorbent capacity and the adsorption constant were determined as 3.8-5.0mmol/g chitosan and (9-90)x10(-4), respectively. The adsorption kinetics could be described using a shrinking core model and the effective diffusion coefficient (Deff) was determined as (8.0-25.8)x10(-11)m2/s. It was found that Deff decreases with the DCL mainly due to the decreased in water content of the beads at high DCL. PMID:18342504

  19. The adsorption of plutonium IV and V on goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Arthur L.; Murray, James W.; Sibley, Thomas H.

    1985-11-01

    The adsorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) on goethite (αFeOOH) from NaNO 3 solution shows distinct differences related to the different hydrolytic character of these two oxidation states. Under similar solution conditions, the adsorption edge of the more strongly hydrolyzable Pu(IV) occurs in the pH range 3 to 5 while that for Pu(V) is at pH 5 to 7. The adsorption edge for Pu(V) shifts with time to lower pH values and this appears to be due to the reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) in the presence of the goethite surface. These results suggest that redox transformations may be an important aspect of Pu adsorption chemistry and the resulting scavenging of Pu from natural waters. Increasing ionic strength (from 0.1 M to 3 M NaCl or NaNO 3 and 0.03 M to 0.3 M Na 2SO 4) did not influence Pu(IV) or Pu(V) adsorption. In the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Pu(V) reduction to Pu(IV) occurred in solution. Pu(IV) adsorption on goethite decreased by 30% in the presence of 240 ppm natural DOC found in Soap Lake, Washington waters. Increasing concentrations of carbonate ligands decreased Pu(IV) and Pu(V) adsorption on goethite, with an alkalinity of 1000 meq/l totally inhibiting adsorption. The Pu-goethite adsorption system provides the data base for developing a thermodynamic model of Pu interaction with an oxide surface and with dissolved ligands, using the MINEQL computer program. From the model calculations we determined equilibrium constants for the adsorption of Pu(IV) hydrolysis species. The model was then applied to Pu adsorption in carbonate media to see how the presence of CO 3-2 could influence the mobility of Pu. The decrease in adsorption appears to be due to formation of a Pu-CO 3 complex. Model calculations were used to predict what the adsorption curves would look like if Pu-CO 3 complexes formed.

  20. Entropically favored adsorption of cellulosic molecules onto carbon materials through hydrophobic functionalities.

    PubMed

    Yabushita, Mizuho; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Hasegawa, Jun-Ya; Hara, Kenji; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-based materials have attracted interest as high-performance catalysts for the aqueous-phase conversion of cellulose. The adsorption of β-glucans plays a crucial role in the catalytic performance of carbons, although the primary driving force and details of the adsorption process remain unclear. This study demonstrates that adsorption occurs at hydrophobic sites on the carbon surface and that hydrophilic groups are not involved. Analysis of adsorption temperature dependence also reveals that the entropy change associated with adsorption is positive. Our results indicate that adsorption occurs by entropically driven hydrophobic interactions in addition to CH-π hydrogen bonding. These same CH-π hydrogen bonds are also confirmed by DFT calculations. The adsorption of β-glucans on carbons is significantly stronger than the affinity between β-glucans. The adsorption equilibrium constants of β-glucans on carbons increase exponentially with increasing degrees of polymerization, which supports the theory of strong interactions between the carbon and the long β-glucans found in cellulose. PMID:24644071

  1. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  2. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  3. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of sulforaphane adsorption on macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Wu; Lei, Zhang; Jianwei, Mao; Shiwang, Liu; Jun, Huang; Yuru, You; Lehe, Mei

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of sulforaphane (SF) adsorption onto macroporous resin in aqueous phase were studied. The SP850 resin was screened as the appropriate resin for SF purification. From the equilibrium studies, the Redlich-Peterson model was found to be the best for description of the adsorption behavior of SF onto SP850 resin, followed by the Freundlich model and the Langmuir model. Batch equilibrium experiments demonstrated that, in the examined temperature range, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of SP850 resin decreased with increasing adsorption temperature. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of SF was a physical, exothermic, and spontaneous process. The adsorption kinetics revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was suitable to characterize the kinetics of adsorption of SF onto SP850. Finally, the intra-particle diffusion model demonstrated that SF diffused quickly into macropores, and that diffusion slowed down in the meso- and micropores. PMID:27391585

  4. Heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and xylene over spent and chemically regenerated platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Kim, Sang Chai

    2010-06-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption and catalytic oxidation of benzene, toluene and o-xylene (BTX) over the spent platinum catalyst supported on activated carbon (Pt/AC) as well as the chemically treated spent catalysts were studied to understand their catalytic and adsorption activities. Sulfuric aqueous acid solution (0.1N, H 2SO 4) was used to regenerate the spent Pt/AC catalyst. The physico-chemical properties of the catalysts in the spent and chemically treated states were analyzed by using nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm and elemental analysis (EDX). The gravimetric adsorption and the light-off curve analysis were employed to study the BTX adsorption and oxidation on the spent catalyst and its modified Pt/AC catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the spent Pt/AC catalyst treated with the H 2SO 4 aqueous solution has a higher toluene adsorption and conversion ability than that of the spent Pt/AC catalyst. A further studies of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst on their catalytic and heterogeneous adsorption behaviours for BTX revealed that the activity of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC catalyst follows the sequence of benzene > toluene > o-xylene. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms of BTX on the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC were measured at different temperatures ranging from 120 to 180 °C. To correlate the equilibrium data and evaluate their adsorption affinity for BTX, the two sites localized Langmuir (L2m) isotherm model was employed. The heterogeneous surface feature of the H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC was described in detail with the information obtained from the results of isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distributions. Furthermore, the activity of H 2SO 4 treated Pt/AC about BTX was found to be directly related to the Henry's constant, isosteric enthalpy of adsorption and adsorption energy distribution functions.

  5. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  6. Helical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-08-01

    A straight, helical plasma equilibrium equation is solved numerically for a plasma with a helical magnetic axis. As is expected, by a suitable choice of the plasma boundary, the vacuum configuration is made line ..integral.. dl/B stable. As the plasma pressure increases, the line ..integral.. dl/B criterion will improve (again as expected). There is apparently no limit on the plasma ..beta.. from the equilibrium consideration. Thus helical-axis stellarator ..beta.. will presumably be limited by MHD stability ..beta.., and not by equilibrium ..beta...

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo investigations of adsorption energetics on graphene.

    PubMed

    Hsing, C R; Wei, C M; Chou, M Y

    2012-10-01

    We have performed calculations of adsorption energetics on the graphene surface using the state-of-the-art diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method. Two types of configurations are considered in this work: the adsorption of a single O, F, or H atom on the graphene surface and the H-saturated graphene system (graphane). The adsorption energies are compared with those obtained from density functional theory with various exchange-correlation functionals. The results indicate that the approximate exchange-correlation functionals significantly overestimate the binding of O and F atoms on graphene, although the preferred adsorption sites are consistent. The energy errors are much less for atomic hydrogen adsorbed on the surface. We also find that a single O or H atom on graphene has a higher energy than in the molecular state, while the adsorption of a single F atom is preferred over the gas phase. In addition, the energetics of graphane is reported. The calculated equilibrium lattice constant turns out to be larger than that of graphene, at variance with a recent experimental suggestion. PMID:22909778

  8. Immobilization of Acetobacter aceti on cellulose ion exchangers: adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    The adsorptive behavior of cells of Acetobacter aceti, ATCC 23746, on DEAE-, TEAE-, and DEHPAE-cellulose ion exchangers in a modified Hoyer's medium at 30 degrees Centigrade was investigated. The maximum observed adsorption capacities varied from 46 to 64 mg dry wt/g resin. The Langmuir isotherm form was used to fit the data, since the cells formed a monolayer on the resin and exhibited saturation. The equilibrium constant in the Langmuir expression was qualitatively correlated with the surface charge density of the resin. The adsorption was also ''normalized'' by considering the ionic capacities of the resins. The exceptionally high normalized adsorption capacity of ECTEOLA-cellulose, 261 mg dry/meq, may be explained by an interaction between the cell wall and the polyglyceryl chains of the exchanging groups in addition to the electrostatic effects. The effect of pH on the bacterial adsorption capacity of ECTEOLA-, TEAE-, and phosphate-cellulose resins was studied and the pH of the bacteria was estimated to be 3.0. 17 references.

  9. Liquid Phase Adsorption of α-Tocopherol by Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Awang; Ming, Chu Chi; Sundang, Murni

    α-Tocopherol or commonly called vitamin E can be found in major commercial vegetable oils such as soya oil and palm oil. However the existence in these oil is in low concentration. The recovery of low concentration of α-tocopherol from palm oils is increasingly popular. Adsorption technique for the recovery of α-tocopherol from palm oil is believed to be much lower in cost and more effective. As a case study in this work, activated carbon is chosen as the adsorbent and ethanol as the solvent. The adsorption equilibria of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was conducted in batch and the concentration of α-tocopherol was identified by LCMS. Langmuirian monolayer adsorption theory was used for the analysis of the isotherm equilibria. The adsorptivity of α-tocopherol onto activated carbon was identified. The adsorption equilibria at low concentration found to be linear. The breakthrough curve was then generated using model assuming isothermal, single transition trace component with intraparticle diffusion. Sensitivity test on the curve indicated that the system is very sensitive to changes in diffusitivity and passive to changes on the equilibrium constant.

  10. The mechanism of Zn sup 2+ adsorption on calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M. ); Kittrick, J.A.; Harsh, J.B. )

    1988-09-01

    The adsorption of Zn{sup 2+} on calcite (CaCO{sub 3(s)}) was investigated from aqueous solutions in equilibrium with CaCO{sub 3(s)} and undersaturated with respect to Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 6}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2(s)}. Zinc adsorption occurred via exchange with Ca{sub 2+} in a surface-adsorbed layer on calcite. The validity of this exchange reaction was supported by adsorption isotherm and constant concentration experiments, where Ca{sup 2+}{sub aq} was varied by systematically changing the pH and CO{sub 2(g)}. Greater adsorption of Zn{sup 2+} occurred at higher pH and Co{sub 2(g)} levels, where Ca{sup 2+} activities were lowest. Sites available for Zn{sup 2+} sorption were less than 10% of Ca{sup 2+} sites on the calcite surface. Surface exchange of Zn{sup 2+} did not affect the solubility of calcite. Zinc sorption was apparently independent of surface charge, which suggested that the surface complex had covalent character. Desorption and isotopic exchange experiments indicated that the surface complex remained hydrated and labile as Zn{sup 2+} was rapidly exchangeable with Ca{sup 2+}. Careful analysis of the adsorption data showed that Zn{sup 2+} and ZnOH{sup +} were the sorbing species.

  11. Molecular structure-adsorption study on current textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Örücü, E; Tugcu, G; Saçan, M T

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the adsorption of a diverse set of textile dyes onto granulated activated carbon (GAC). The adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch system. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to experimental data and the isotherm constants were calculated for 33 anthraquinone and azo dyes. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted more adequately to the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model. Added to a qualitative analysis of experimental results, multiple linear regression (MLR), support vector regression (SVR) and back propagation neural network (BPNN) methods were used to develop quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models with the novel adsorption data. The data were divided randomly into training and test sets. The predictive ability of all models was evaluated using the test set. Descriptors were selected with a genetic algorithm (GA) using QSARINS software. Results related to QSPR models on the adsorption capacity of GAC showed that molecular structure of dyes was represented by ionization potential based on two-dimensional topological distances, chromophoric features and a property filter index. Comparison of the performance of the models demonstrated the superiority of the BPNN over GA-MLR and SVR models. PMID:25529487

  12. A fundamental study of the impact of pressure on the adsorption mechanism in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2016-07-29

    A fundamental investigation of the pressure effect on individual adsorption sites was undertaken based on adsorption energy distribution and adsorption isotherm measurements. For this purpose, we measured adsorption equilibrium data at pressures ranging from 100 to 1000bar at constant flow and over a wide concentration range for three low-molecular-weight solutes, antipyrine, sodium 2-naphthalenesulfonate, and benzyltriethylammonium chloride, on an Eternity C18 stationary phase. The adsorption energy distribution was bimodal for all solutes, remaining clearly so at all pressures. The bi-Langmuir model best described the adsorption in these systems and two types of adsorption sites were identified, one with a low and another with a high energy of interaction. Evidence exists that the low-energy interactions occur at the interface between the mobile and stationary phases and that the high-energy interactions occur nearer the silica surface, deeper in the C18 layer. The contribution of each type of adsorption site to the retention factor was calculated and the change in solute molar volume from the mobile to stationary phase during the adsorption process was estimated for each type of site. The change in solute molar volume was 2-4 times larger at the high-energy site, likely because of the greater loss of solute solvation layer when penetrating deeper into the C18 layer. The association equilibrium constant increased with increasing pressure while the saturation capacity of the low-energy site remained almost unchanged. The observed increase in saturation capacity for the high-energy site did not affect the column loading capacity, which was almost identical at 50- and 950-bar pressure drops over the column. PMID:27357740

  13. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  14. Biosorption studies on waste cotton seed for cationic dyes sequestration: equilibrium and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivarajasekar, N.; Baskar, R.; Ragu, T.; Sarika, K.; Preethi, N.; Radhika, T.

    2016-01-01

    The immature Gossypium hirsutum seeds—an agricultural waste was converted into a novel adsorbent and its effectiveness for cationic dyes removal was discussed in this study. Characterization revealed that sulfuric acid activated waste Gossypium hirsutum seed (WGSAB) contains surface area 496 m2 g-1. The ability of WGSAB to adsorb basic red 2 (BR2) and basic violet 3 (BV3) from aqueous solutions has been studied. Batch adsorption studies were carried out at different initial dye concentrations (100-300 mg l-1), contact time (1-5 h), pH (2-12) and temperature (293-323 K) to understand the adsorption mechanism. Adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich and Toth adsorption isotherms. Equilibrium data of the adsorption process fitted very well to the Toth model for both dyes. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity was 66.69 mg g-1 for BV3 and 50.11 mg g-1 for BR2 at optimum conditions. The near unity value of Toth isotherm constant (BR2: 0.999 and BV3: 1.0) indicates that WGSAB surface is heterogeneous in nature. The maximum adsorption capacity predicted by Toth isotherm of BV3 (66.699 mg g-1) is higher than BR2 (50.310 mg g-1). The kinetic investigation revealed that the BR2 and BV3 were chemisorbed on WGSAB surface following Avrami fractional order kinetics. Further, the fractional order and rate constant values are almost similar for every concentration in both the dyes. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH 0, ΔS 0 and ΔG 0 were evaluated. The dye adsorption process was found to be spontaneous and endothermic for the two dyes. Regeneration of WGSAB exhausted by the two dyes could be possible via acetic acid as elutant.

  15. CO 2 adsorption on porous NiO as a cathode material for molten carbonate fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkan, Göksel; Özçelik, Emre

    Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are the systems suitable for large-scale energy production. The cathode material used in these cells is NiO. In this study the NiO cathode was synthesized by tape-casting method and the adsorption of CO 2, one of the cathode feeding gases, was investigated on it. The adsorption studies were carried out by the use of packed column and the adsorption analysis were performed using pulse response technique. There were two 1/4 in. diameter and 5 and 10 cm length columns prepared for the experiments and they were packed with 3 mm average particle sized NiO. The experiments were carried out with gas chromatography using He as a carrier gas. The response curves were taken after pulsing the columns with CO 2. The equilibrium constants and heat of adsorption of CO 2 on NiO were determined by the use of the first absolute moment equations corresponding to retention times. It was observed that the adsorption was physical in nature. From the adsorption constants determined at different temperatures and the heat of adsorption, Δ H0, was found as -1299 cal mol -1.

  16. Adsorption-desorption and leaching behavior of kresoxim-methyl in different soils of India: kinetics and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Sabale, Rupali P; Shabeer T P, Ahammed; Dasgupta, Soma; Utture, Sagar C; Banerjee, Kaushik; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Adsule, Pandurang G; Deshmukh, Madhukar B

    2015-07-01

    The sorption and leaching behavior of kresoxim-methyl was explored in four different soils, viz., clay, sandy loam, loamy sand, and sandy loam (saline), representing vegetables and fruits growing regions of India. Adsorption of kresoxim-methyl in all the soils reached equilibrium within 48 h. The rate constants for adsorption and desorption at two different temperatures were obtained from the Lindstrom model, which simultaneously evaluated adsorption and desorption kinetics. The data for rate constants, activation energies, enthalpy of activation, entropy of activation, and free energy indicated physical adsorption of kresoxim-methyl on soil. The relative adsorptivity of the test soils could be attributed to different organic matter and clay contents of the soils. A good fit to the linear and Freundlich isotherms was observed for both adsorption as well as desorption. The groundwater ubiquity score (GUS) for different soils varied between 0 and 2.26. The GUS and leaching study indicated moderately low leaching potential of kresoxim-methyl. The adsorption on four soil types largely depended on the soil physicochemical properties such as organic carbon content, cation-exchange capacity, and texture of the soil. PMID:26082423

  17. Adsorptive behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-conversion wastewaters. Six months progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.W.; Luthy, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    A coupled column system was designed and assembled for use in solubility and adsorption testing. This system consists of a saturated solution generation column and an adsorption column. The generation column has been employed successfully to determine the solubility behavior of naphthalene; for nine determinations at 25 /sup 0/C the aqueous solubility is 32.9 +- 1.2 milligrams per liter. However, adsorption isotherm data obtained from the coupled column system involved techniques which are limited by time constraints and accuracy. Batch adsorption shake testing using the generation column to prepare solutions offers an acceptable alternative to this sytem. This procedure has been employed to obtain adsorption isotherm data for naphthalene. Thirty-one data points were obtained for equilibrium concentrations from 0.00689 to 18.8 milligrams per liter. These data can be fitted to the Freundlich equation with constant values of 263 for the coefficient and 0.39 for the exponent. Adsorption and adsorption isotherm models which are more appropriate than the Freundlich equation for purposes of detailed modelling are reviewed.

  18. Adsorption and desorption of atrazine and deethylatrazine by low organic carbon geologic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.

    1994-05-01

    The adsorption and desorption of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6- isopropylamino-s-triazine) and a primary metabolite, deethylatrazine (2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine; DEA), by low organic C ({le} 3.3 g kg{sup -1}) materials were measured by batch-equilibrium techniques. The adsorbents were samples of glacial outwash sand, till, and stream sediments. The adsorption of both atrazine and DEA conformed to linear isotherms. The adsorption of atrazine by most of the absorbents yielded apparent K, values that were in excess of those based on surface agricultural soils. Adsorption correlated with only the pH of the sand-water suspensions. The desorption of atrazine was hysteretic under the conditions of the measurement. DEA had a lower affinity for the same adsorbents; the mean ratio of Kd values of DEA to those of atrazine was 0.37 {+-} 0.20. DEA adsorption did not correlate with organic C, surface area, clay content of the adsorbents, or with the pH of the suspensions. DEA adsorption, unlike atrazine, tended to be reversible. There was a linear relationship between the adsorption constants of atrazine and those of DEA. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Adsorption and desorption of atrazine and deethylatrazine by low organic carbon geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6- isopropylamino-s-triazine) and a primary metabolite, deethylatrazine (2- amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine; DEA), by low organic C (??? 3.3 g kg-1) materials were measured by batch-equilibrium techniques. The adsorbents were samples of glacial outwash sand, till, and stream sediments. The adsorption of both atrazine and DEA conformed to linear isotherms. The adsorption of atrazine by most of the adsorbents yielded apparent K(oc) values that were in excess of those based on surface agricultural soils. Adsorption correlated with only the pH of the sand-water suspensions. The desorption of atrazine was hysteretic under the conditions of the measurement. DEA had a lower affinity for the same adsorbents; the mean ratio of K(d) values of DEA to those of atrazine was 0.37 ?? 0.20. DEA adsorption did not correlate with organic C, surface area, clay content of the adsorbents, or with the pH of the suspensions. DEA adsorption, unlike atrazine, tended to be reversible. There was a linear relationship between the adsorption constants of atrazine and those of DEA.

  20. Quantitation of enantiospecific adsorption on chiral nanoparticles from optical rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Nisha; Ondeck, Nathaniel; Gellman, Andrew J.

    2014-11-01

    Au nanoparticles modified with enantiomerically pure D- or L-cysteine have been shown to serve as enantioselective adsorbents of R- and S-propylene oxide. A simple adsorption model and accompanying experimental protocol have been developed to enable optical rotation measurements to be analyzed for quantitative determination of the ratios of the enantiospecific adsorption equilibrium constants of chiral species on the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles, KLS/KDS = KDR/KLR. This analysis is robust in the sense that it obviates the need to measure the absolute surface area of the absorbent nanoparticles, a quantity that is somewhat difficult to obtain accurately. This analysis has been applied to optical rotation data obtained from solutions of R- and S-propylene oxide, in varying concentration ratios, with D- and L-cysteine coated Au nanoparticles, in varying concentration ratios.

  1. Hexavalent chromium removal performance of anionic functionalized monolithic polymers: column adsorption, regeneration and modelling.

    PubMed

    Barlik, Necla; Keskinler, Bülent; Kocakerim, M Muhtar

    2016-01-01

    Anionic functionalized monolithic macro-porous polymers were used for the removal of hexavalent chromium(VI) anions from aqueous solution in column experiments. At a flux of 1.0 cm min and 30 mg Cr(VI) L(-1) feed concentration, breakthrough capacity and apparent capacity were 0.066 g Cr(VI) g(-1) anionic monolith and 0.144 g Cr(VI) g(-1) anionic monolith, respectively. The degree of column utilization was found to lie in the range 41-46%. Two kinetic models, theoretical and Thomas models, were applied to experimental data to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column useful for process design. The simulation of the whole breakthrough curve was effective with the models. At a flux of 1.0 cm min and 30 mg Cr(VI) L(-1) feed concentration, the dispersion coefficient and adsorption equilibrium constant (K) were 3.14 × 10(-7) m s(-1) and 3,840, respectively. Also, Thomas model parameters k1 (rate constant of adsorption) and qm (equilibrium solid-phase concentration of sorbed solute) were 1.08 × 10(-3) L mg(-1) min(-1) and 0.124 g g(-1), respectively. After reaching equilibrium adsorption capacity, the monoliths were regenerated using 1 N HCl and were subsequently re-tested. It was found that the regeneration efficiency reduced from 98% after second usage to 97% after the third usage. PMID:27003067

  2. EVALUATING MULTICOMPONENT COMPETITIVE ADSORPTION IN FIXED BEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An equilibrium column model (ECM) was developed to evaluate multicomponent competition in fixed-bed adsorption columns. The model ignores mass transfer resistances and uses ideal adsorbed solution theory to predict the competitive effects in multicomponent mixtures. The bed capac...

  3. A comparative study and evaluation of sulfamethoxazole adsorption onto organo-montmorillonites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Laifu; Gao, Manglai; Gu, Zheng; Yang, Senfeng; Liu, Yuening

    2014-12-01

    Three organo-montmorillonites were prepared using surfactants, and their adsorption behaviors toward sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were investigated. The surfactants used were cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTMAB), 3-(N,N-dimethylhexadecylammonio) propane sulfonate (HDAPS) and 1,3-bis(hexadecyldimethylammonio)-propane dibromide (BHDAP). The properties of the organo-montmorillonites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements. Results showed that the interlayer spacing of montmorillonite was increased and the surface area as well as the morphology were changed. Batch adsorption experiments showed that the surfactant loading amount had a great effect on the adsorption of SMX. The adsorption process was pH dependent and the maximum adsorption capacity was obtained at pH3 for HDAPS-Mt, while CTMAB-Mt and BHDAP-Mt showed a high removal efficiency at 3-11. The adsorption capacity increased with the initial SMX concentration and contact time but decreased with increasing solution ionic strength. Kinetic data were best described by the pseudo second-order model. Equilibrium data were best represented by the Langmuir model, and the Freundlich constant (n) indicated a favorable adsorption process. The maximum adsorption capacity of SMX was 235.29 mg/g for CTMAB-Mt, 155.28 mg/g for HDAPS-Mt and 242.72 mg/g for BHDAP-Mt. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated to evaluate the spontaneity and endothermic or exothermic nature. The adsorption mechanism was found to be dominated by electrostatic interaction, while hydrophobic interaction played a secondary role. PMID:25499502

  4. On the thermodynamics of refrigerant + heterogeneous solid surfaces adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Azhar Bin; Li, Ang; Thu, Kyaw; Ng, K C; Chun, Wongee

    2013-11-26

    This Article presents a theoretical framework for the understanding of pressurized adsorption systems using the statistical rate methodology. Utilizing results from the statistical rate theory, basic thermodynamic variables including enthalpy (h(a)), entropy (s(a)), and the specific heat capacity (c(p,a)) of the adsorbed phase are derived using the thermodynamic requirements of chemical equilibrium, Gibbs law, as well as Maxwell relations. A built-in constant (K) describes the adsorbed molecular partition function (q(s)), and it captures the heterogeneous properties of the adsorbent + adsorbate pair at equilibrium states. Improved adsorbed-phase volume considerations were incorporated in the formulations of these variables where they could be utilized with relative ease for analyzing the energetic performances of any practical adsorption system. In this Article, we have demonstrated how derived thermodynamic quantities can bridge the information gap with respect to the states of adsorbed phase, as well as resolved some theoretical inconsistencies that were found in previously derived quantities. Experimentally, the adsorption isotherms of propane (refrigerant) on activated carbon powder (Maxsorb III) for temperatures from 5 to 75 °C and pressures up to 8 bar are presented, and they are used to illustrate the behaviors of the adsorbed-phase during uptakes, temperatures, and pressure excursions or changes. PMID:24191669

  5. Equilibrium analysis for heavy metal cation removal using cement kiln dust.

    PubMed

    El Zayat, Mohamed; Elagroudy, Sherien; El Haggar, Salah

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and chemical precipitation have been investigated extensively for heavy metal uptake. However, they are deemed too expensive to meet stringent effluent characteristics. In this study, cement kiln dust (CKD) was examined for the removal of target heavy metals. Adsorption studies in completely mixed batch reactors were used to generate equilibrium pH adsorption edges. Studies showed the ability of CKD to remove the target heavy metals in a pH range below that of precipitation after an equilibrium reaction time of 24 h. A surface titration experiment indicated negative surface charge of the CKD at pH below 10, meaning that electrostatic attraction of the divalent metals can occur below the pH required for precipitation. However, surface complexation was also important due to the substantive metal removal. Accordingly, a surface complexation model approach that utilizes an electrostatic term in the double-layer description was used to estimate equilibrium constants for the protolysis interactions of the CKD surface as well as equilibria between background ions and the sorbent surface. It was concluded that the removal strength of adsorption is in the order: Pb > Cu > Cd. The experiments were also supported by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). PMID:25259489

  6. A generalized model for simulating adsorption on porous media and checking for reversibility by desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, Fragiskos; Bountri, Athanasia; Sidiras, Dimitris

    2012-12-01

    Most adsorption kinetic models are of integer order (mainly of first and to a lesser extent of second order) with two parameters (rate constant and equilibrium parameter) and without an intercept, when used in their analytic form. In this work, we derive a four-parameter nth-order (n being not an integer, in general) model, simulating adsorption on porous media. We proved that this model implied best fitting to experimental data of dye adsorption on fir sawdust. Subsequently, a criterion of competitiveness is presented to find out which simplified form of a pre-set order is the second best, in order to obtain parameter values comparable to results already stored in corresponding Data Bases. Partial reversibility was also confirmed by desorption, from saturated-with-dye biomass to aquatic solution, using a Friendlichtype desorption isotherm.

  7. Enhanced adsorption of atrazine from aqueous solution by molecularly imprinted TiO2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunjing; Yan, Jinlong; Zhang, Chunxiao; Yang, Zhengpeng

    2012-07-01

    TiO2 film imprinted by atrazine molecule at the surface of quartz crystal was prepared using molecular imprinting and surface sol-gel process. The molecularly imprinted TiO2 film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry, and the atrazine adsorption was investigated by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique. In comparison with non-imprinted TiO2 film, the molecularly imprinted TiO2 film exhibits high selectivity for atrazine, better reversibility and a much higher adsorption capacity for the target molecule, the adsorption equilibrium constant estimated from the in situ frequency measurement is about 6.7 × 104 M-1, which is thirteen times higher than that obtained on non-imprinted TiO2 film.

  8. Kafirin adsorption on ion-exchange resins: isotherm and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Lau, Pei Wen; Kale, Sandeep; Johnson, Stuart; Pareek, Vishnu; Utikar, Ranjeet; Lali, Arvind

    2014-08-22

    Kafirin is a natural, hydrophobic and celiac safe prolamin protein obtained from sorghum seeds. Today kafirin is found to be useful in designing delayed delivery systems and coatings of pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals where its purity is important and this can be obtained by adsorptive chromatography. This study is the first scientific insight into the isotherm and kinetic studies of kafirin adsorption on anion- and cation-exchange resins for practical applications in preparative scale chromatography. Adsorption isotherms of kafirin were determined for five anion- and two cation-exchange resins in batch systems. Isotherm parameters such as maximum binding capacity and dissociation constant were determined from Langmuir isotherm, and adsorptive capacity and affinity constant from Freundlich isotherm. Langmuir isotherm was found to fit the adsorption equilibrium data well. Batch uptake kinetics for kafirin adsorption on these resins was also carried out and critical parameters including the diffusion coefficient, film mass transfer coefficient, and Biot number for film-pore diffusion model were calculated. Both the isotherm and the kinetic parameters were considered for selection of appropriate resin for kafirin purification. UNOsphere Q (78.26 mg/ml) and Toyopearl SP-650M (57.4 mg/ml) were found to offer better kafirin binding capacities and interaction strength with excellent uptake kinetics under moderate operating conditions. With these adsorbents, film diffusion resistance was found to be major governing factor for adsorption (Bi<10 and δ<1). Based on designer objective function, UNOsphere Q was found be best adsorbent for binding of kafirin. The data presented is valuable for designing large scale preparative adsorptive chromatographic kafirin purification systems. PMID:25022481

  9. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Xochilt; Schiavi, Federica; Keppler, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the interaction between volcanic gases and ash is important to derive gas compositions from ash leachates and to constrain the environmental impact of eruptions. Volcanic HCl could potentially damage the ozone layer, but it is unclear what fraction of HCl actually reaches the stratosphere. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash was therefore studied from -76 to +150 °C to simulate the behavior of HCl in the dilute parts of a volcanic plume. Finely ground synthetic glasses of andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic composition as well as a natural obsidian from Vulcano (Italy) served as proxies for fresh natural ash. HCl adsorption is an irreversible process and appears to increase with the total alkali content of the glass. Adsorption kinetics follow a first order law with rate constants of 2.13 ṡ10-6 s-1 to 1.80 ṡ10-4 s-1 in the temperature range investigated. For dacitic composition, the temperature and pressure dependence of adsorption can be described by the equation ln ⁡ c = 1.26 + 0.27 ln ⁡ p - 715.3 / T, where c is the surface concentration of adsorbed HCl in mg/m2, T is temperature in Kelvin, and p is the partial pressure of HCl in mbar. A comparison of this model with a large data set for the composition of volcanic ash suggests that adsorption of HCl from the gas phase at relatively low temperatures can quantitatively account for the majority of the observed Cl concentrations. The model implies that adsorption of HCl on ash increases with temperature, probably because of the increasing number of accessible adsorption sites. This temperature dependence is opposite to that observed for SO2, so that HCl and SO2 are fractionated by the adsorption process and the fractionation factor changes by four orders of magnitude over a temperature range of 250 K. The assumption of equal adsorption of different species is therefore not appropriate for deriving volcanic gas compositions from analyses of adsorbates on ash. However, with the experimental

  10. Equilibrium and kinetics analysis of carbon dioxide capture using immobilized amine on a mesoporous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Monazam, E., Shadle, L., Pennline, H., Miller, D., Fauth, D., Hoffman, J., Gray, M.

    2012-01-01

    The equilibrium and conversion-time data on the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with amine-based solid sorbent were analyzed over the range of 303–373 K. Data on CO{sub 2} loading on amine based solid sorbent at these temperatures and CO{sub 2} partial pressure between 10 and 760 mm Hg obtained from volumetric adsorption apparatus were fitted to a simple equilibrium model to generate the different parameters (including equilibrium constant) in the model. Using these constants, a correlation was obtained to define equilibrium constant and maximum CO{sub 2} loading as a function of temperature. In this study, a shrinking core model (SCM) was applied to elucidate the relative importance of pore diffusion and surface chemical reaction in controlling the rate of reaction. Application of SCM to the data suggested a surface reaction-controlled mechanism for the temperature of up to 40°C and pore-diffusion mechanism at higher temperature.

  11. Equilibrium and Absorption Kinetics of Carbon Dioxide by solid Supported Amine Sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Monazam, Esmail R.; Shadle, Lawrence J.; Siriwardane, Ranjani

    2011-11-01

    The equilibrium and conversion-time data on the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with amine-based solid sorbent were analyzed over the range of 303–373 K. Data on CO{sub 2} loading on amine based solid sorbent at these temperatures and CO{sub 2} partial pressure between 10 and 760 mm Hg obtained from volumetric adsorption apparatus were fitted to a simple equilibrium model to generate the different parameters (including equilibrium constant) in the model. Using these constants, a correlation was obtained to define equilibrium constant and maximum CO{sub 2} loading as a function of temperature. In this study, a shrinking core model (SCM) was applied to elucidate the relative importance of pore diffusion and surface chemical reaction in controlling the rate of reaction. Application of SCM to the data suggested a surface reaction-controlled mechanism for the temperature of up to 40°C and pore-diffusion mechanism at higher temperature.

  12. Surface complexation modeling calculation of Pb(II) adsorption onto the calcined diatomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Removal of noxious heavy metal ions (e.g. Pb(II)) by surface adsorption of minerals (e.g. diatomite) is an important means in the environmental aqueous pollution control. Thus, it is very essential to understand the surface adsorptive behavior and mechanism. In this work, the Pb(II) apparent surface complexation reaction equilibrium constants on the calcined diatomite and distributions of Pb(II) surface species were investigated through modeling calculations of Pb(II) based on diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites. Batch experiments were used to study the adsorption of Pb(II) onto the calcined diatomite as a function of pH (3.0-7.0) and different ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl) under ambient atmosphere. Adsorption of Pb(II) can be well described by Freundlich isotherm models. The apparent surface complexation equilibrium constants (log K) were obtained by fitting the batch experimental data using the PEST 13.0 together with PHREEQC 3.1.2 codes and there is good agreement between measured and predicted data. Distribution of Pb(II) surface species on the diatomite calculated by PHREEQC 3.1.2 program indicates that the impurity cations (e.g. Al3+, Fe3+, etc.) in the diatomite play a leading role in the Pb(II) adsorption and dominant formation of complexes and additional electrostatic interaction are the main adsorption mechanism of Pb(II) on the diatomite under weak acidic conditions.

  13. Influence of Soil Solution Salinity on Molybdenum Adsorption by Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molybdenum (Mo) adsorption on five arid-zone soils from California was investigated as a function of equilibrium solution Mo concentration (0-30 mg L-1), solution pH (4-8), and electrical conductivity (EC = 0.3 or 8 dS m-1). Molybdenum adsorption decreased with increasing pH. An adsorption maximum...

  14. Removal of phenol from aqueous solutions by adsorption.

    PubMed

    Roostaei, Nadia; Tezel, F Handan

    2004-02-01

    Experiments have been conducted to examine the liquid-phase adsorption of phenol from water by silica gel, HiSiv 3000, activated alumina, activated carbon, Filtrasorb-400, and HiSiv 1000. Experiments were carried out for the analysis of adsorption equilibrium capacities and kinetics. The adsorption isotherm model of the Langmuir-Freundlich type was the best to describe adsorption equilibrium data for phenol for the adsorbents studied. Results of kinetic experiments indicated that HiSiv 1000 had the highest rate of adsorption among the adsorbents studied and therefore more detailed studies were carried out with this adsorbent. The influence of particle size, temperature, and thermal regeneration on adsorption of phenol by HiSiv 1000 was evaluated. From particle size experiments it appeared that adsorption capacity of HiSiv 1000 did not change by changing the particle size, but the rate of adsorption decreased considerably by increasing the particle size. The effect of temperature on adsorption was studied by determining equilibrium isotherms for HiSiv 1000 at 25, 40, and 55 degrees C. The results showed that adsorption capacity decreased with increasing temperature. Thermal regeneration of HiSiv 1000 was performed at 360 degrees C. It was observed that adsorption capacity of HiSiv 1000 did not change after 14 regeneration cycles. Equilibrium experiments showed that the adsorption capacities of activated carbon and Filtrasorb-400 were several times higher than that of HiSiv 1000. PMID:15160741

  15. Adsorption of lead at variable pH onto a natural porous medium: Modeling of batch and column experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Papini, M.P.; Kahie, Y.D.; Troia, B.; Majone, M.

    1999-12-15

    The surface complexation approach has been applied to describe the adsorption of lead and proton onto a heterogeneous natural porous medium at constant ionic strength. Acid-base titration experiments were used to determine the minimum number of sites needed to describe the surface heterogeneity. Lead adsorption tests at several pH and total lead concentration were used to complete the model structure, whose adjustable parameters (site concentration and apparent formation constants) were determined by nonlinear multivariate regression of titration and adsorption data. The final model represents the acid-base properties of the surface by the presence of two amphoteric sites, SOH and TOH, and a monoprotic one, MOH; whereas lead adsorption is considered only onto SOH and MOH sites. The model allows a good representation of the experimental behavior in the whole experimental range. Theoretical surface speciation shows that lead adsorption occurs mostly onto site MOH at low pH level and on both SOH and MOH sites at higher values. The model was independently validated by simulating Pb and pH breakthrough experiments performed in small chromatographic columns. Experimental breakthroughs are well predicted by an advection-dispersion transport model coupled with the chemical equilibrium routine (IMPACT), without any parameter adjustment. A large spreading of Pb and pH breakthroughs was calculated and experimentally observed, even in the absence of any kinetic effect. That spreading is explained in terms of the concomitant presence of competitive adsorption and surface heterogeneity.

  16. Selective Adsorption on Fluorinated Plastic Enables the Optical Detection of Molecular Pollutants in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanfranco, R.; Giavazzi, F.; Salina, M.; Tagliabue, G.; Di Nicolò, E.; Bellini, T.; Buscaglia, M.

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous fluorinated plastic can be produced with a refractive index similar to that of water, a condition that makes it essentially invisible when immersed in aqueous solutions. Because of this property, even a small amount of adsorbed molecules on the plastic-water interface provides a detectable optical signal. We investigate two distinct substrates made of this material, characterized by different interface areas: a prism and a microporous membrane. We demonstrate that both substrates enable the label-free detection of molecular compounds in water even without any surface functionalization. The adsorption of molecules on the planar surface of the prism provides an increase of optical reflectivity, whereas the adsorption on the internal surface of the microporous membrane yields an increase of scattered light. Despite the different mechanisms, we find a similar optical response upon adsorption. We confirm this result by a theoretical model accounting for both reflection and scattering. We investigate the spontaneous adsorption process for different kinds of molecules: surfactants with different charges, a protein (lysozyme), and a constituent of gasoline (hexane). The measured equilibrium and kinetic constants for adsorption differ by orders of magnitudes among the different classes of molecules. By suitable analytical models, accounting for the effects of mass limitation and transport, we find a simple and general scaling of the adsorption parameters with the molecular size.

  17. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm of anionic dyes onto organo-bentonite from single and multisolute systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dazhong; Fan, Jianxin; Zhou, Weizhi; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Kang, Qi

    2009-12-15

    The performances of polydiallydimethylammonium modified bentonite (PDADMA-bentonite) as an adsorbent to remove anionic dyes, namely Acid Scarlet GR (AS-GR), Acid Turquoise Blue 2G (ATB-2G) and Indigo Carmine (IC), were investigated in single, binary and ternary dye systems. In adsorption from single dye solutions with initial concentration of 100 micromol/L, the dosage of PDADMA-bentonite needed to remove 95% dye was 0.42, 0.68 and 0.75 g/L for AS-GR, ATB-2G and IC, respectively. The adsorption isotherms of the three dyes obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model with the equilibrium constants of 0.372, 0.629 and 4.31 L/micromol, the saturation adsorption amount of 176.3, 149.2 and 228.7 micromol/g for ATB-2G, IC and AS-GR, respectively. In adsorption from mixed dye solutions, the isotherm of each individual dye followed an expanded Langmuir isotherm model and the relationship between the total amount of dyes adsorbed and the total equilibrium dye concentration was interpreted well by Langmuir isotherm model. In the region of insufficient dosage of PDADMA-bentonite, the dye with a larger affinity was preferentially removed by adsorption. Desorption was observed in the kinetic curve of the dye with lower affinity on PDADMA-bentonite surface by the competitive adsorption. The kinetics in single dye solution and the total adsorption of dyes in binary and ternary dye systems nicely followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. PMID:19631461

  18. Application of a new bifunctionalized chitosan derivative with zwitterionic characteristics for the adsorption of Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and oxyanions of Cr(6+) from aqueous solutions: Kinetic and equilibrium aspects.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Francine Tatiane Rezende; Ferreira, Bruno Christiano Silva; Moreira, Ana Luísa da Silva Lage; de Freitas, Rossimiriam Pereira; Gil, Laurent Frédéric; Gurgel, Leandro Vinícius Alves

    2016-03-15

    This study describes the synthesis of a new chitosan derivative (C2) with zwitterionic characteristics and its use for the removal of cationic species Cu(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) and anionic species of Cr(6+) in a single aqueous solution. The new adsorbent was synthesized by quaternization of the amine group of chitosan and esterification of hydroxyl groups with EDTA dianhydride. These combined reactions gave both cationic and anionic characteristics to C2 with the release of quaternary ammonium groups and carboxylic groups. The capacity of C2 to adsorb Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and oxyanions of Cr(6+) was evaluated in a batch process with different contact times, pH values, and initial concentrations. Adsorption isotherms were best fitted to the Langmuir and Sips models. The maximum adsorption capacities (Q(max)) of C2 for adsorption of Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cr(6+) were 0.698, 1.125, 0.725, and 1.910 mmol/g, respectively. The Δ(ads)G° values were in the range from -20 to -28 kJ/mol. These values suggest a mixed mechanism controlling adsorption. Desorption studies using an aqueous solution consisting of 0.1 mol/L HNO3 were carried out. The reusability of the recovered C2 adsorbent after desorption was also evaluated. PMID:26748062

  19. Adsorption of Cu2+ ions using chitosan-modified magnetic Mn ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yuying; Chen, Deyang; Sun, Yitao; Jiao, Dongling; Zeng, Dechang; Liu, Zhongwu

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-modified Mn ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a one-step microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. These Mn ferrite magnetic composite nanoparticles were employed to absorb Cu2+ ions in water. XRD verified the spinel structure of the MnFe2O4 nanoparticles. Chitosan modification does not result in any phase change of MnFe2O4. FTIR and zeta potentials curves for all samples suggest that chitosan can be successfully coated on the Mn ferrites. TEM characterization showed that the modified MnFe2O4 nanoparticles have a cubic shape with a mean diameter of ∼100 nm. For adsorption behavior, the effects of experiment parameters such as solution pH value, contact time and initial Cu2+ ions concentration on the adsorption efficiency were systematically investigated. The results showed that increasing solution pH value and extending contact time are favorable for improving adsorption efficiency. Especially, adsorption efficiency can reach up to 100% and 96.7% after 500 min adsorption at pH 6.5 for the solutions with initial Cu2+ ions concentration of 50 mg/L and 100 mg/L. Adsorption data fits well with the Langmuir isotherm models with a maximum adsorption capacity (qm) and a Langmuir adsorption equilibrium constant (K) of 65.1 mg/g and 0.090 L/mg, respectively. The adsorption kinetic agrees well with pseudo second order model with the pseudo second rate constants (K2) of 0.0468 and 0.00189 g/mg/min for solutions with initial Cu2+ ions of 50 and 100 mg/L, respectively.

  20. On the adsorption/photodegradation of amoxicillin in aqueous solutions by an integrated photocatalytic adsorbent (IPCA): experimental studies and kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Basha, Shaik; Barr, Colin; Keane, David; Nolan, Kieran; Morrissey, Anne; Oelgemöller, Michael; Tobin, John M

    2011-06-01

    Activated carbon-supported TiO(2) nanoparticles, termed integrated photocatalytic adsorbents (IPCAs), were prepared using an ultrasonic impregnation technique and investigated for the photocatalytic degradation of amoxicillin (AMO), a β-lactam antibiotic. The IPCAs had high adsorption affinity for AMO with the amount adsorbed proportional to the TiO(2) loading and the highest adsorption was at 10 wt% TiO(2) loading. A pseudo-second-order model was found to fit the experimental data and consistently predicted the amount of AMO adsorbed over the adsorption period. Equilibrium isotherm studies showed that the adsorption followed the Redlich-Peterson model with maximum adsorption capacity of 441.3 mg g(-1) for 10% IPCA, 23% higher than the pure activated carbon (AC). Kinetic studies on the photocatalytic degradation of AMO using non-linear regression analysis suggest that the degradation followed Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) kinetics. The adsorption rate constant (K(ad)) was considerably higher than the photocatalytic rate constant (k(L-H)), indicating that the photocatalysis of AMO is the rate-determining step during the adsorption/photocatalysis process. The 10% IPCA exhibited excellent stability and reusability over four photodegradation cycles. PMID:21380442

  1. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of chloramphenicols, sulfonamides, and non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals on multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Heng; Liu, Xue; Cao, Zhen; Zhan, Yi; Shi, Xiaodong; Yang, Yi; Zhou, Junliang; Xu, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption behavior of different emerging contaminants (3 chloramphenicols, 7 sulfonamides, and 3 non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals) on five types of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and the underlying factors were studied. Adsorption equilibriums were reached within 12h for all compounds, and well fitted by the Freundlich isotherm model. The adsorption affinity of pharmaceuticals was positively related to the specific surface area of MWCNTs. The solution pH was an important parameter of pharmaceutical adsorption on MWCNTs, due to its impacts on the chemical speciation of pharmaceuticals and the surface electrical property of MWCNTs. The adsorption of ionizable pharmaceuticals decreased in varying degrees with the increased ionic strength. MWCNT-10 was found to be the strongest adsorbent in this study, and the Freundlich constant (KF) values were 353-2814mmol(1-n)L(n)/kg, 571-618mmol(1-n)L(n)/kg, and 317-1522mmol(1-n)L(n)/kg for sulfonamides, chloramphenicols, and non-antibiotic pharmaceuticals, respectively. The different adsorption affinity of sulfonamides might contribute to the different hydrophobic of heterocyclic substituents, while chloramphenicols adsorption was affected by the charge distribution in aromatic rings via substituent effects. PMID:26937870

  2. Adsorption of lanthanum to goethite in the presence of gluconate

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Laurence C.; Sarah Pepper; Sue Clark

    2005-05-01

    Adsorption of Lanthanum to Goethite in the Presence of Gluconic Acid L. C. HULL,1 S. E. PEPPER2 AND S. B. CLARK2 1Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (hulllc@inel.gov) 2Washington State University, Pullman, WA (spepper@wsu.edu), (s_clark@wsu.edu) Lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elements in radioactive waste can pose risks to humans and ecological systems for many years. Organic complexing agents, from natural organic matter or the degradation of waste package components, can alter the mobility of these elements. We studied the effect of gluconic acid, as an analogue for cellulose degradation products, on the adsorption of lanthanum, representing lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elments, to goethite, representing natural iron minearals and degradation products of waste packages. Batch pH adsorption edge experiments were conducted with lanthanum alone, and with lanthanum and gluconate at a 1:1 mole ratio. Lanthanum concentrations studied were 0.1, 1, and 10 mM, covering a range from 10% to 1000% of the calculated available adsorption sites on goethite. In the absence of gluconate, lanthanum was primarily present in solution as free lanthanum ion. With gluconate present, free lanthanum concentration in solution decreased with increasing pH as step-wise deprotonation of the gluconate molecule increased the fraction lanthanum complexed with gluconate. Adsorption to the goethite surface was represented with the diffuse double-layer model. The number of adsorption sites and the intrinsic binding constants for the surface complexes were estimated from the pH adsorption edge data using the computer code FITEQL 4.0. Two surface reactions were used to fit the adsorption data in the absence of gluconate. A strong binding site with no proton release and a much higher concentration of weak binding sites with release of two protons per lanthanum adsorbed. The adsorption of lanthanum was not measurably affected by the presence of gluconate

  3. Adsorption and solid catalysed reaction between activated carbon impregnated with SnO 2 and CO at ordinary temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyuke, Sunny E.; Ahmadun, Fakhru'l.-Razi

    2002-02-01

    We have used pressure swing adsorption (PSA) measurements to study the reaction of CO adsorbed from H 2/CO (75/25 vol.%) onto an activated carbon-tin(IV) oxide (AC-SnO 2) catalyst to form gaseous CO 2. Unimpregnated pure activated carbon was used for comparison. Our data fit well to Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with a rate constant of 0.022 s -1 and an equilibrium constant of 1.04, indicating first-order kinetics. We conclude that chemisorption takes place preferentially on the adsorbed O - sites produced during the thermal pre-treatment of the catalyst.

  4. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  5. A study of the thermodynamic properties of surfactant mixtures: Mixed micelle formation and mixed surfactant adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Lopata, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    The volumetric mixing in anionic/nonionic, cationic/nonionic, and anionic/cationic mixed micelles was determined by examining the total surfactant apparent molar volumes at total surfactant concentrations much greater than the mixture critical micelle concentration. The mixed surfactant systems investigated were: sodium dodecyl sulfate and a polyethoxylated nonylphenol, at 0.15 M NaCl and with no added NaCl; cetyl pyridinium chloride and polyethoxylated nonylphenol, at 0.03 M NaCl; and sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride, at 0.15 M NaCl. The results of this study suggest that the electrostatic interactions in the mixed micelles do no significantly effect the molar volume of the mixed micelle. Therefore, the micelle hydrophobic core dominates the volumetric mixing in mixed micelles. The adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate and a polyethoxylated nonylphenol and well defined mixtures thereof was measured on gamma alumina. A pseudo-phase separation model to describe mixed anionic/nonionic admicelle (adsorbed surfactant aggregate) formation was developed. In this model, regular solution theory was used to describe the anionic/nonionic surfactant interactions in the mixed admicelle and a patch-wise adsorption model was used to describe surfactant adsorption on a heterogeneous surface. Regular solution theory was tested on specific homogeneous surface patches by examining constant total surfactant adsorption levels. For the adsorption of binary surfactant mixtures adsorbing at total equilibrium concentrations above the mixture critical micelle concentration, simultaneous solution of the pseudo-phase separation models for mixed admicelle and mixed micelle formation predicts that the surfactant compositions in the monomer, micelle, and admicelle pseudo-phases are constant at a constant total adsorption level.

  6. Adsorption of polymeric brushes: Bridging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johner, Albert; Joanny, Jean-François

    1992-04-01

    We study the adsorption of grafted polymer layers on a planar surface parallel to the grafting surface. The layer consists of two types of chains: nonadsorbed chains with a free end and adsorbed chains forming bridges between the two plates. In the limit of strong adsorption a dead zone exists in the vicinity of the adsorbing plate; its size increases with the adsorption strength. Two adsorption mechanisms are possible: adsorption of the last monomer only and adsorption of all the monomers. In both cases the adsorption regimes at equilibrium (when no external force acts on the plates) are discussed within the framework of the self-consistent mean-field theory. We also give scaling laws taking into account excluded volume correlations. Finally, we consider situations where a finite external force, either tangential or normal to the plates, is applied on the adsorbing plate. Pulling and tangential forces both reduce the fraction of bridges and eventually lead to rupture, whereas compressional forces favor bridging. For normal forces, force vs distance profiles between planes and crossed cylinders are given.

  7. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of (60)Co and (137)Cs in fresh water rivers.

    PubMed

    Fiengo Pérez, Fabricio; Sweeck, Lieve; Bauwens, Willy; Van Hees, May; Elskens, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Radionuclides released in water systems--as well as heavy metals and organic toxicants--sorb to both the suspended solid particles and the bed sediments. Sorption is usually represented mathematically by the distribution coefficient. This approach implies equilibrium between phases and instantaneous fixation (release) of the pollutant onto (from) the surface of the soil particle. However, empirical evidence suggests that for some radionuclides the fixation is not achieved instantaneously and that the reversibility of the process can be slow. Here the adsorption/desorption kinetics of (60)Co and (137)Cs in fresh water environments were simulated experimentally and later on modelled mathematically, while the influence of the most relevant factors affecting the sorption were taken into account. The experimental results suggest that for adsorption and the desorption more than 24 h are needed to reach equilibrium, moreover, It was observed that the desorption rate constants for (60)Co and (137)Cs lie within ranges which are of two to three orders of magnitude lower than the adsorption rate constants. PMID:26218323

  8. Adsorption of drinking water fluoride on a micron-sized magnetic Fe3O4@Fe-Ti composite adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chang; Li, Yingzhen; Wang, Ting-Jie; Jiang, Yanping; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-02-01

    A micron-sized magnetic adsorbent (MMA) for fluoride removal from drinking water was prepared by spray drying and subsequent calcination of a magnetic Fe3O4@Fe-Ti core-shell nanoparticle slurry. The MMA granules had high mechanical strength and stability against water scouring, can be easily separated from the water by a magnet, and had a high selectivity for fluoride versus common co-existing ions and high fluoride removal efficiency in a wide range of initial pH of 3-11. Abundant hydroxyl groups on the MMA surface acted as the active sites for fluoride adsorption, which resulted in a high affinity of the MMA for fluoride. The pH in the adsorption process affected the adsorption significantly. At neutral initial pH, the adsorption isotherm was well fitted with the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacity reached a high value of 41.8 mg/g. At a constant pH of 3, multilayer adsorption of fluoride occurred due to the abundant positive surface charges on the MMA, and the adsorption isotherm was well fitted with the Freundlich model. The MMA had a fast adsorption rate, and adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 2 min. The adsorption kinetics followed a quasi-second order model. The regeneration of the MMA was easy and fast, and can be completed within 2 min. After 10 recycles, the fluoride removal efficiency of the MMA still remained high. These properties showed that the MMA is a promising adsorbent for fluoride removal.

  9. Effect of cation type, alkyl chain length, adsorbate size on adsorption kinetics and isotherms of bromide ionic liquids from aqueous solutions onto microporous fabric and granulated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Safia; Duclaux, Laurent; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; Reinert, Laurence; Farooq, Amjad; Yasin, Tariq

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption from aqueous solution of imidazolium, pyrrolidinium and pyridinium based bromide ionic liquids (ILs) having different alkyl chain lengths was investigated on two types of microporous activated carbons: a fabric and a granulated one, well characterized in terms of surface chemistry by "Boehm" titrations and pH of point of zero charge measurements and of porosity by N2 adsorption at 77 K and CO2 adsorption at 273 K. The influence of cation type, alkyl chain length and adsorbate size on the adsorption properties was analyzed by studying kinetics and isotherms of eight different ILs using conductivity measurements. Equilibrium studies were carried out at different temperatures in the range [25-55 °C]. The incorporation of ILs on the AC porosity was studied by N2 adsorption-desorption measurements at 77 K. The experimental adsorption isotherms data showed a good correlation with the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of ILs onto activated carbons was an exothermic process, and that the removal efficiency increased with increase in alkyl chain length, due to the increase in hydrophobicity of long chain ILs cations determined with the evolution of the calculated octanol-water constant (Kow). The negative values of free energies indicated that adsorption of ILs with long chain lengths having hydrophobic cations was more spontaneous at the investigated temperatures. PMID:24929502

  10. The role of particle-size soil fractions in the adsorption of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandzhieva, Saglara; Minkina, Tatiana; Pinsky, David; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Kalinitchenko, Valeriy; Sushkova, Svetlana; Chaplygin, Viktor; Dikaev, Zaurbek; Startsev, Viktor; Bakoev, Serojdin

    2014-05-01

    the process - the adsorption equilibrium constant (k).The ratio between the content of exchangeable cations displaced from the soil adsorbing complex (SAC) into the solution and the content of adsorbed HMs decreased with the increasing concentration of adsorbed HMs. These values could be higher (for Cu2+ and Pb2+), equal, or lower than 1 (for Zn2+) and depend on the properties of HMs. At the first case, this was due to the dissolution of readily soluble salts at low HM concentrations in the SAC. In the latter case, this was related to the adsorption of associated forms HMs and the formation of new phases localized on the surface of soil particles at high HM concentrations in the SAC. Soil solution equilibrium (SSE) accords to the soil fine fraction composition. SSE thermodynamics causes the ratio of free and associated forms of ions and ion's activity in soil solution influencing composition, concentration and adsorption of HMs salts by SAC. This study was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project no. 12-05-33078,14-05-00586_a, grant of President of MK-6448.2014.4

  11. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Chemical Equilibrium in Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory of thermodynamics of the equilibrium in solution and dissociation-dimerization kinetics. Describes experimental procedure including determination of molar absorptivity and equilibrium constant, reaction enthalpy, and kinetics of the dissociation-dimerization reaction. (JM)

  12. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies towards understanding the interaction between cross-linked alginate-guar gum matrix and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Woitovich Valetti, Nadia; Picó, Guillermo

    2016-02-15

    The adsorption kinetics of chymotrypsin, a pancreatic serine protease, onto an alginate-gum guar matrix cross-linked with epichlorohydrin has been performed using a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of various experimental parameters such as pH, salt presence, contact time and temperature were investigated. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data which shows that the adsorption of the enzyme followed the pseudo-second-order rate expression. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Hill adsorption isotherm models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms, and the isotherm constants were determined. It was found that Hill model was more suitable for our data because the isotherm data showed a sigmoidal behavior with the free enzyme concentration increasing in equilibrium. At 8°C and at pH 5.0, 1g hydrate matrix adsorbed about 7mg of chymotrypsin. In the desorption process 80% of the biological activity of chymotrypsin was recovered under the condition of 50mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.00-500mM NaCl. When successive cycles of adsorption/washing/desorption were performed, it was observed that the matrix remained functional until the fourth cycle of repeated batch enzyme adsorption. These results are important in terms of diminishing of cost and waste generation. PMID:26849187

  13. Adsorption of lipase on polypropylene powder.

    PubMed

    Gitlesen, T; Bauer, M; Adlercreutz, P

    1997-04-01

    Adsorption of different lipases by EP-100 polypropylene powder from crude and pure lipase preparations was studied. Langmuir isotherms described the adsorption equilibria well both for protein and lipase activity adsorption. Adsorption isotherms for five different proteins all gave a similar saturation level of 220 mg protein per g carrier. Twelve commercial lipase preparations were tested for selectivity in the adsorption of lipase. For all preparations the selectivity factor was larger than one. In a crude lipase preparation from Pseudomonas fluorescence, the specific activity in solution decreased by two orders of magnitude after adsorption. The adsorption was not significantly influenced by pH changes in the adsorption buffer, indicating that hydrophobic and not electrostatic interactions are the dominating adsorption forces. Adsorption of a crude lipase from Candida rugosa (Sigma) was fast and equilibrium was reached in 30 and 100 min for protein and lipase activity adsorption respectively. Desorption in aqueous solution was negligible. Investigations with seven different lipases showed no correlation between the specific lipolytic activity of dissolved enzyme in aqueous solution and the specific activity of adsorbed enzyme in an esterification reaction in organic solvent. PMID:9106498

  14. Kinetic study of aluminum adsorption by aluminosilicate clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, W.J.; Cronan, C.S.; Patterson, H.H.

    1988-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics of Al/sup 3 +/ by montmorillonite, kaolinite, and vermiculite were investigated as a function of the initial Al concentration, the surface area of the clay, and H/sup +/ concentration, at 25/sup 0/, 18/sup 0/, and 10/sup 0/C. In order to minimize complicated side reactions the pH range was kept between 3.0 and 4.1. Results showed that the adsorption rate was first order with respect to both the initial Al concentration and the clay surface area. Changes in pH within this narrow range had virtually no effect on adsorption rate. This zero order reaction dependence suggested that the H/sup +/, compared to Al, has a weak affinity for the surface. The rates of adsorption decreased in the order of montmorillonite > kaolinite > vermiculite when compared on the basis of equal surface areas, but changed to kaolinite > montmorillonite > vermiculite when the clays were compared on an equal exchange capacity basis. The calculated apparent activation energies were < 32 kJ mol/sup -1/, indicating that over the temperature range of the study the adsorption process is only marginally temperature sensitive. The mechanism is governed by a simple electrostatic cation exchange involving outer sphere complexes between adsorbed Al and the clay surface. Vermiculite, may have a second reaction step governed by both electrostatic attraction and internal ion diffusion. Equilibrium constants for the formation of an adsorbed Al clay complex were also estimated and are 10/sup 5.34/, 10/sup 5.18/, and 10/sup 4.94/ for kaolinite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite, respectively, suggesting that these clays could play a significant role in controlling soil solutions Al concentrations.

  15. The impact of particle size on the adsorption of citrate to hematite.

    PubMed

    Noerpel, Matthew R; Lenhart, John J

    2015-12-15

    We investigated the adsorption of citric acid on the surface of two different sized hematite nanoparticles using batch adsorption experiments, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, surface complexation modeling and computational molecular modeling. Citrate adsorption reached a maximum between pH approximately 2.5 and 5.5 and declined as the pH was increased or decreased from that range. At high surface loading conditions, the dominant adsorbed citrate structure was outer-sphere in nature with a protonation state that varied with pH. At low pH, there was also evidence of an inner-sphere complex consistent with a binuclear, bidentate structure where the hydroxyl group was deprotonated and played an active role in the adsorption. An inner-sphere complex was also detected at low citrate surface loading conditions. Surface-area normalized surface coverages were similar for both sizes of hematite, however, the inner sphere complex appeared to be slightly more prevalent on the smaller hematite. Based on these structures, a triple layer surface complexation model comprised of two outer-sphere complexes and one inner-sphere complex was used to describe the adsorption data for both hematite sizes across a range of solution conditions with a single set of surface area dependent equilibrium constants. PMID:26313711

  16. Effect of surface acidity and basicity of aluminas on asphaltene adsorption and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Nashaat N; Hassan, Azfar; Pereira-Almao, Pedro

    2011-08-01

    This study investigates the effect of surface acidity and basicity of aluminas on asphaltene adsorption followed by air oxidation. Equilibrium batch adsorption experiments were conducted at 25°C with solutions of asphaltenes in toluene at concentrations ranging from 100 to 3000 g/L using three conventional alumina adsorbents with different surface acidity. Data were found to better fit to the Freundlich isotherm model showing a multilayer adsorption. Results showed that asphaltene adsorption is strongly affected by the surface acidity, and the adsorption capacities of asphaltenes onto the three aluminas followed the order acidic>basic and neutral. Asphaltenes adsorbed over aluminas were subjected to oxidation in air up to 600°C in a thermogravimetric analyzer to study the catalytic effect of aluminas with different surface acidity. A correlation was found between Freundlich affinity constant (1/n) and the catalytic activity. Basic alumina that has the lowest 1/n value, depicting strongest interactions, has the highest catalytic activity, followed by neutral and acidic aluminas, respectively. PMID:21571295

  17. Adsorption and degradation of model volatile organic compounds by a combined titania-montmorillonite-silica photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangyao; Li, Guiying; He, Zhigui; An, Taicheng

    2011-06-15

    A series of adsorptive photocatalysts, combined titania-montmorillonite-silica were synthesized. The resultant photocatalysts consisted of more and more spherically agglomerated TiO(2) particles with increasing of TiO(2) content, and anatase was the only crystalline phase with nano-scale TiO(2) particles. With increasing of the cation exchange capacity to TiO(2) molar ratio, specific surface area and pore volume increased very slightly. In a fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor by choosing toluene, ethyl acetate and ethanethiol as model pollutants, all catalysts had relatively high adsorption capacities and preferred to adsorb higher polarity pollutants. Langmuir isotherm model better described equilibrium data compared to Freundlich model. Competitive adsorptions were observed for the mixed pollutants on the catalysts, leading to decrease adsorption capacity for each pollutant. The combined titania-montmorillonite-silica photocatalyst exhibited excellent photocatalytic removal ability to model pollutants of various components. Almost 100% of degradation efficiency was achieved within 120 min for each pollutant with about 500 ppb initial concentration, though the efficiencies of multi-component compounds slightly decreased. All photocatalytic reactions followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Degradation rate constants of multi-component systems were lower than those for single systems, following the order of tolueneadsorption capacities for different pollutants of various components. PMID:21501924

  18. Organoclays in water cause expansion that facilitates caffeine adsorption.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomohiko; Oguchi, Junpei; Yamamoto, Ken-ichiro; Shiono, Takashi; Fujita, Masahiko; Iiyama, Taku

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the adsorption of caffeine in water on organically modified clays (a natural montmorillonite and synthetic saponite, which are smectite group of layered clay minerals). The organoclays were prepared by cation-exchange reactions of benzylammonium and neostigmine with interlayer exchangeable cations in the clay minerals. Although less caffeine was uptaken on neostigmine-modified clays than on raw clay minerals, uptake was increased by adding benzylammonium to the clays. The adsorption equilibrium constant was considerably higher on benzylammonium-modified saponite (containing small quantities of intercalated benzylammonium) than on its montmorillonite counterpart. These observations suggest that decreasing the size and number of intercalated cations enlarges the siloxane surface area available for caffeine adsorption. When the benzylammonium-smectite powders were immersed in water, the intercalated water molecules expanded the interlayer space. Addition of caffeine to the aqueous dispersion further expanded the benzylammonium-montmorillonite system but showed no effect on benzylammonium-saponite. We assume that intercalated water molecules were exchanged with caffeine molecules. By intercalating benzylammonium into smectites, we have potentially created an adaptable two-dimensional nanospace that sequesters caffeine from aqueous media. PMID:25522121

  19. The effect of mixed HCl-KCl competitive adsorbate on Pt adsorption and catalytic properties of Pt-Sn/Al2O3 catalysts in propane dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangeneh, Farnaz Tahriri; Taeb, Abbas; Gholivand, Khodayar; Sahebdelfar, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The effect of competitive adsorbate concentration and combination on the adsorption of H2PtCl6 onto γ-Al2O3 in the preparation and performance of PtSnK/γ-Al2O3 catalyst for propane dehydrogenation was investigated. The catalysts were prepared by sequential impregnation of Sn and Pt precursors. The effect of competitor concentration on Pt adsorption was studied by using hydrochloric acid (0.1-0.3 M) and the effect of pH was studied by using KCl/HCl mixtures at constant (0.1 M) total chloride ion concentration. The catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption/desorption, XRD, XRF, SEM and CO chemisorption. The catalytic performance tests were carried out in a fixed-bed quartz reactor under kinetic controlled condition for proper catalyst screening. It was found that the corrosive competitor HCl could be partially substituted with KCl without appreciable impact on catalyst performance with the advantage of lower acid attack on the support and reduced leaching of the deposited tin. A model based on initial concentration and uptake of the adsorbates was developed to obtain the adsorption parameters. Values of 890 μmol/g and 600 lit/mol were obtained for adsorption site concentration of the tin-impregnated support and equilibrium constant for Pt adsorption, respectively, for HCl concentration range of 0.1-0.3 M.

  20. The effects of acid and alkali modification on the adsorption performance of fuller's earth for basic dye.

    PubMed

    Hisarli, G

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work was to prepare modified adsorbents from fuller's earth (FE) by acid and alkali treatment for enhancement cationic dye adsorption. Toluidine blue (TB) was selected as adsorbate for evaluating the adsorption performance of fuller's earth samples, which was affected significantly by acid and alkali modification. The adsorption of TB was studied by visible spectra. The absorption band of the monomer at low loading of TB in FE suspension with respect to its maximum in aqueous solution is red-shifted, which is related to accessibility of dye interlamellar space in the presence of positively charged surface sites. Since all surfaces are negatively charged under experimental conditions, this effect has not been observed in acid- and alkali-treated FE suspensions. It was seen that the adsorption capacity of alkali-treated surface (FEAl) for TB was higher than these of acid-treated adsorbent (FEAc) and FE. Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) spectra were applied to analyze the structure of the raw and modified FE samples. Absence of any identifiable amount of a crystalline compound in the solid reaction products after acid treatment was confirmed by XRD and SEM, whereas the crystalline form of FEAl was preserved. Experimental data for high-concentration regions were well described by Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption equations. The thermodynamic parameters were estimated for FE, FEAc, and FEAl by using temperature dependence of adsorption equilibrium constants. PMID:15567375

  1. Influence of particle size and salinity on adsorption of basic dyes by agricultural waste: dried seagrape (Caulerpa lentillifera).

    PubMed

    Punjongharn, Pimol; Meevasana, Khanidtha; Pavasant, Prasert

    2008-01-01

    Green macroalga Caulerpa lentillifera was found to have reasonable adsorption capacity for basic dyes, Astrazon Blue FGRL (AB), Astrazon Red GTLN (AR), and Astrazon Golden Yellow GL-E (AY). The initial dye concentration was in the range of 100-1,800 mg/L. The dried algal sorbent was ground and sieved into 3 sizes: S (0.1-0.84 mm), M (0.84-2.0 mm), and L sizes (larger than 2.0 mm). For all conditions examined in this work (at 25 degrees C in batch systems), the adsorption reached equilibrium within the first hour. The kinetic data corresponded well with the pseudo second order kinetic model where the rate constant, k2, decreased as the sorbent size increased for all dyes. The adsorption isotherms followed both Langmuir and Freundlich models. Among three sorbent sizes, S size gave the highest adsorption capacity followed by M and L sizes. A reduction of sorbent size increased the specific surface area for mass transfer, and also increased the total pore volume, thus providing more active sites for adsorption. The adsorption of AB was adversely influenced by the protonation of algal surface at low pH. On the other hand, the adsorption of AR and AY could be due to weak electrostatic interaction, which was not significantly affected by pH. Increasing salinity of the system caused a decrease in adsorption capacity possibly due to the competition between Na+ and the dye cations for the binding sites on algal surface. Moreover, an increase in salinity generated a compressed electrical double layer on the algal surface which exerted repulsive force, retarding the adsorption of positive charged molecules such as the basic dyes. PMID:18763573

  2. Adsorption of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles within layer-by-layer films: a kinetic study carried out using quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Gustavo B; Paterno, Leonardo G; Afonso, André S; Faria, Ronaldo C; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A; Morais, Paulo C; Soler, Maria A G

    2011-12-28

    The paper reports on the successful use of the quartz crystal microbalance technique to assess accurate kinetics and equilibrium parameters regarding the investigation of in situ adsorption of nanosized cobalt ferrite particles (CoFe(2)O(4)--10.5 nm-diameter) onto two different surfaces. Firstly, a single layer of nanoparticles was deposited onto the surface provided by the gold-coated quartz resonator functionalized with sodium 3-mercapto propanesulfonate (3-MPS). Secondly, the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique was used to build multilayers in which the CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle-based layer alternates with the sodium sulfonated polystyrene (PSS) layer. The adsorption experiments were conducted by modulating the number of adsorbed CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS bilayers (n) and/or by changing the CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle concentration while suspended as a stable colloidal dispersion. Adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles onto the 3-MPS-functionalized surface follows perfectly a first order kinetic process in a wide range (two orders of magnitude) of nanoparticle concentrations. These data were used to assess the equilibrium constant and the adsorption free energy. Alternatively, the Langmuir adsorption constant was obtained while analyzing the isotherm data at the equilibrium. Adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles while growing multilayers of CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS was conducted using colloidal suspensions with CoFe(2)O(4) concentration in the range of 10(-8) to 10(-6) (moles of cobalt ferrite per litre) and for different numbers of cycles n = 1, 3, 5, and 10. We found the adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles within the CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS bilayers perfectly following a first order kinetic process, with the characteristic rate constant growing with the increase of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle concentration and decreasing with the rise of the number of LbL cycles (n). Additionally, atomic force microscopy was employed for assessing the LbL film roughness and thickness. We found the film

  3. Adsorptive removal of 2-chlorophenol by low-cost coir pith carbon.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Kavitha, D

    2003-03-17

    Adsorption of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) by coir pith carbon was carried out by varying the parameters such as agitation time, 2-CP concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and temperature. Adsorption equilibrium reached at 40, 60, 80 and 100 min for 2-CP concentration of 10, 20, 30 and 40 mg/l, respectively. Adsorption followed second-order kinetics. The adsorption equilibrium data obeyed Freundlich isotherm. Acidic pH was favorable for the adsorption of 2-CP. Desorption studies showed that chemisorption plays a major role in the adsorption process. PMID:12628792

  4. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium with Poker Chips: A General Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on laboratory exercise at the general chemistry level introduces students to chemical equilibrium through a simulation that uses poker chips and rate equations. More specifically, the exercise allows students to explore reaction tables, dynamic chemical equilibrium, equilibrium constant expressions, and the equilibrium constant based on…

  5. A Constant Pressure Bomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1924-01-01

    This report describes a new optical method of unusual simplicity and of good accuracy suitable to study the kinetics of gaseous reactions. The device is the complement of the spherical bomb of constant volume, and extends the applicability of the relationship, pv=rt for gaseous equilibrium conditions, to the use of both factors p and v. The method substitutes for the mechanical complications of a manometer placed at some distance from the seat of reaction the possibility of allowing the radiant effects of reaction to record themselves directly upon a sensitive film. It is possible the device may be of use in the study of the photoelectric effects of radiation. The method makes possible a greater precision in the measurement of normal flame velocities than was previously possible. An approximate analysis shows that the increase of pressure and density ahead of the flame is negligible until the velocity of the flame approaches that of sound.

  6. Adsorption of phenol on wood surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of phenol on aspen and pine wood is investigated. It is shown that adsorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. The woods' specific surface areas and adsorption interaction constants are determined. It is found that the sorption of phenol on surfaces of aspen and pine is due to Van der Waals interactions ( S sp = 45 m2/godw for aspen and 85 m2/godw for pine). The difference between the adsorption characteristics is explained by properties of the wood samples' microstructures.

  7. Adsorption interactions of humic acids with biocides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'Tseva, E. V.; Ivanov, A. A.; Yudina, N. V.

    2009-11-01

    The chemical composition of humic acids from brown coal (Aldrich) was determined by element analysis, 13C NMR spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration. The adsorption ability of humic acids with different biocides (cyproconasol, propiconasol, tebuconasol, irgarol 1051, and DCOIT) was studied. The adsorption ability of a mixture of biocides in aqueous solutions was higher than that of the individual components. The limiting concentration of humic acids at which adsorption of biocides was maximum was determined. Adsorption constants were calculated by the Freundlich equation for each biocide in aqueous solution.

  8. Optical luminescence studies of the ethyl xanthate adsorption layer on the surface of sphalerite minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, R.; Todoran, D.; Szakács, Zs.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose optical luminescence measurements as a method to evaluate the kinetics of adsorption processes. Measurement of the intensity of the integral optical radiation obtained from the mineral-xanthate interface layer, stimulated with a monochromatic pulsating optical signal, as a function of time were made. The luminescence radiation was obtained from the thin interface layer formed at the separation surface between the sphalerite natural mineral and potassium ethyl xanthate solution, for different solution concentrations and pH-es at the constant industry standard temperature. This method enabled us to determine the time to achieve dynamic equilibrium in the formation of the interface layer of approximately 20 min, gaining information on the adsorption kinetics in the case of xanthate on mineral surface and leading to the optimization of the industrial froth flotation process.

  9. Application of physical adsorption thermodynamics to heterogeneous chemistry on polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Scott; Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory isotherms for the binding of several nonheterogeneously active atmospheric gases and for HCl to water ice are translated into adsorptive equilibrium constants and surface enthalpies. Extrapolation to polar conditions through the Clausius Clapeyron relation yields coverage estimates below the percent level for N2, Ar, CO2, and CO, suggesting that the crystal faces of type II stratospheric cloud particles may be regarded as clean with respect to these species. For HCl, and perhaps HF and HNO3, estimates rise to several percent, and the adsorbed layer may offer acid or proton sources alternate to the bulk solid for heterogeneous reactions with stratospheric nitrates. Measurements are lacking for many key atmospheric molecules on water ice, and almost entirely for nitric acid trihydrate as substrate. Adsorptive equilibria enter into gas to particle mass flux descriptions, and the binding energy determines rates for desorption of, and encounter between, potential surface reactants.

  10. Optical luminescence studies of the ethyl xanthate adsorption layer on the surface of sphalerite minerals.

    PubMed

    Todoran, R; Todoran, D; Szakács, Zs

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose optical luminescence measurements as a method to evaluate the kinetics of adsorption processes. Measurement of the intensity of the integral optical radiation obtained from the mineral-xanthate interface layer, stimulated with a monochromatic pulsating optical signal, as a function of time were made. The luminescence radiation was obtained from the thin interface layer formed at the separation surface between the sphalerite natural mineral and potassium ethyl xanthate solution, for different solution concentrations and pH-es at the constant industry standard temperature. This method enabled us to determine the time to achieve dynamic equilibrium in the formation of the interface layer of approximately 20min, gaining information on the adsorption kinetics in the case of xanthate on mineral surface and leading to the optimization of the industrial froth flotation process. PMID:25619858

  11. Isotherm study of reactive Blue 19 adsorption by an alum sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khim, Ong Keat; Nor, Mohd Asri Md; Mohamad, Syuriya; Nasaruddin, Nas Aulia Ahmad; Jamari, Nor Laili-Azua; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 using dewatered alum sludge. The dewatered alum sludge was a sludge produced from drinking water treatment plant. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism of the dye adsorption. The adsorption was rapid at its initial stage but the rate decreased as it approached equilibrium. The adsorption data were evaluated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models but was best described by the Langmuir isotherm model as it gave the highest correlation.

  12. Passive equilibrium studies on ZT-P

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Reass, W.A.

    1987-12-01

    The poloidal field system of ZT-P was modified by the addition of a transformer, which coupled the magnetizing and equilibrium circuits. ZT-P is a small, air core, Reversed Field Pinch, operated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is used as test bed for the much larger ZT-H, RFP experiment, now under construction at LANL. Planned experiments include size scaling measurements and determining the effect of low time constant measurements and determining the effect of low time constant shell operation. ZT-P has had an entirely passive equilibrium system, which did not provide a well centered equilibrium, although a tolerable equilibrium was realized by removing half of the equilibrium coil set. The transformer was added to the poloidal field system to adjust the equilibrium current for a centered plasma, while using the entire coil set. It also had the effect of reducing the dependence of the equilibrium on the plasma resistance. Stable, well centered discharges were achieved over a broad range of plasma currents. The improved equilibrium also lowered the loop voltage and extended the discharge lifetime. These experiments also investigated the unique problems of equilibrium systems on air core RFP devices. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Optical luminescence studies of diffusion times at the potassium ethyl xanthate adsorption layer on the surface of sphalerite minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, R.; Todoran, D.; Anitas, E. M.; Szakács, Zs

    2016-08-01

    We propose reflectance measurements as a method for the evaluation of the kinetics of adsorption processes, to compute the diffusion times of the adsorption products at the thin layers formed at the sphalerite natural mineral-potassium ethyl xanthate solution interface. The method is based on the intensity measurement of the reflected monochromatic radiation obtained from the mineral-xanthate thin layer as a function of time. These determinations were made at the thin layer formed between the sphalerite or activated sphalerite natural minerals with potassium ethyl xanthate, for different solutions concentrations and pH values at constant temperature. Diffusion times of desorbed molecular species into the liquid bring important information about the global kinetics of the ions in this phase during adsorption processes at interfaces. Analysing the time dependence of this parameter one concluded on the diffusion properties of the xanthate molecule in the solution depending on its concentration and pH, knowing that at the initial time these molecules had a uniform spread. This method enabled us to determine that, in time interval of approximately 35 minutes to achieve dynamic equilibrium in the formation of the interface layer, one had three different kinetic behaviours of our systems. In the first 5-8 min one had highly adsorbent character, the state of equilibrium is followed by low adsorbent properties. Gaining information on the adsorption kinetics in the case of xanthate on mineral surface leads to the optimization of the industrial froth flotation process.

  14. Effect of previous fertilization on phosphorus adsorption. Measurement of surface phosphorus by isotopic exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, S.C.; Barbaro, N.O.; De Tramontini, S.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Adsorption properties of a soil with previous additions of different phosphate fertilizers were characterized by means of the Langmuir isotherm. The best correlation with the Langmuir isotherm was obtained for low added-phosphorus concentration and for conditions of different amounts of initial soil phosphorus treatment. The phosphorus initially present in each soil sample was evaluated by isotopic exchange. (The use of different isotopic methodologies is discussed.) Carrier-free {sup 32}P was added to a soil-solution system in adsorption equilibrium after soil agitation with increasing phosphorus concentration solutions for 5 days; this allowed measurement of the adsorbed phosphorus that remained exchangeable phosphorus and equilibrium phosphorus concentration was found. The surface exchangeable phosphorus concentration at 0.3 ppm was used to estimate initial surface soil phosphorus. Taking these corrections into account, the authors found adsorption maximum and the bonding energy constant were similar in spite of the amount and kind of previous fertilizer addition. However, the behavior of superphosphate seemed to be modified in the presence of rock phosphate, especially in relation to exchange ability.

  15. Moisture adsorption and volume change of partially saturated bentonite buffer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Takeshi; Wakamatsu, Hisao

    1993-12-31

    Water vapor adsorption characteristics of buffer materials to be used for the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste have been investigated. Highly compacted blocks of Japanese Na bentonite were used as the buffer material. Initial dry density of the blocks was 1.8 g/cm{sup 3}. Volume changes and water contents of the blocks in equilibrium with surrounding moist air were measured. The humidity of the surrounding air was kept constant, and the suction of the block at equilibrium has been determined by the humidity. The temperature of the surrounding air was varied between 20{degrees}C and 60{degrees}C. The volumetric strain was observed to vary approximately between -3% and 13% depending on the humidity of 0.6% to 95%. Some analytical expressions derived from these experiments on moisture adsorption are presented in this paper. Water vapor adsorption isotherm of the bentonite blocks was also obtained. The swelling pressures calculated from the analytical expressions are compared with literature data for this bentonite.

  16. Adsorption studies of methylene blue dye on tunisian activated lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, A.; Hamdi, N.; Srasra, E.

    2011-02-01

    Activated carbon prepared from natural lignin, providing from a geological deposit, was used as the adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) dye from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to evaluate various experimental parameters like pH and contact time for the removal of this dye. Effective pH for MB removal was 11. Kinetic study showed that the adsorption of dye was gradual process. Quasi equilibrium reached in 4 h. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order were used to fit the experimental data. Pseudo-second-order rate equation was able to provide realistic description of adsorption kinetics. The experimental isotherms data were also modelled by the Langmuir and Freundlich equation of adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 147 mg/g. Activated lignin was shown to be a promising material for adsorption of MB from aqueous solutions.

  17. Adsorption mechanism of acids and bases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography in weak buffered mobile phases designed for liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    The overloaded band profiles of five acido-basic compounds were measured, using weakly buffered mobile phases. Low buffer concentrations were selected to provide a better understanding of the band profiles recorded in LC/MS analyses, which are often carried out at low buffer concentrations. In this work, 10 {micro}L samples of a 50 mM probe solution were injected into C{sub 18}-bonded columns using a series of five buffered mobile phases at {sub W}{sup S}pH between 2 and 12. The retention times and the shapes of the bands were analyzed based on thermodynamic arguments. A new adsorption model that takes into account the simultaneous adsorption of the acidic and the basic species onto the endcapped adsorbent, predicts accurately the complex experimental profiles recorded. The adsorption mechanism of acido-basic compounds onto RPLC phases seems to be consistent with the following microscopic model. No matter whether the acid or the base is the neutral or the basic species, the neutral species adsorbs onto a large number of weak adsorption sites (their saturation capacity is several tens g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of 0.1 L/g). In contrast, the ionic species adsorbs strongly onto fewer active sites (their saturation capacity is about 1 g/L and their equilibrium constant of the order of a few L/g). From a microscopic point of view and in agreement with the adsorption isotherm of the compound measured by frontal analysis (FA) and with the results of Monte-Carlo calculations performed by Schure et al., the first type of adsorption sites are most likely located in between C{sub 18}-bonded chains and the second type of adsorption sites are located deeper in contact with the silica surface. The injected concentration (50 mM) was too low to probe the weakest adsorption sites (saturation capacity of a few hundreds g/L with an equilibrium constant of one hundredth of L/g) that are located at the very interface between the C{sub 18}-bonded layer and the bulk

  18. Thermodynamic Considerations in Solid Adsorption of Bound Solutes for Patient Support in Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Patzer, John F.

    2008-01-01

    New detoxification modes of treatment for liver failure that use solid adsorbents to remove toxins bound to albumin in the patient bloodstream are entering clinical evaluations, frequently in head-to-head competition. While generally effective in reducing toxin concentration beyond that obtainable by conventional dialysis procedures, the solid adsorbent processes are largely the result of heuristic development. Understanding the principles and limitations inherent in competitive toxin binding, albumin versus solid adsorbent, will enhance the design process and, possibly, improve detoxification performance. An equilibrium thermodynamic analysis is presented for both the Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) and Fractionated Plasma Separation, Adsorption, and Dialysis System (Prometheus), two advanced systems with distinctly different operating modes but with similar equilibrium limitations. The Prometheus analysis also applies to two newer approaches: sorbent suspension reactor (SSR) and microspheres-based detoxification system (MDS). Primary results from the thermodynamic analysis are that: (1) the solute-albumin binding constant is of minor importance to equilibrium once it exceeds about 105 L mol−1; (2) the Prometheus approach requires larger solid adsorbent columns than calculated by adsorbent solute capacity alone; and (3) the albumin-containing recycle stream in the MARS approach is a major reservoir of removed toxin. A survey of published results indicates that MARS is operating under mass transfer control dictated by solute-albumin equilibrium in the recycle stream and Prometheus is approaching equilibrium limits under current clinical protocols. PMID:18638303

  19. Influence of soil solution salinity on boron adsorption by soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron adsorption on two arid-zone soils from the San Joaquin Valley of California was investigated as a function of equilibrium solution B concentration (0-250 mg L-1), solution pH (3-12), and electrical conductivity (EC = 0.3 or 7.8 dS m-1). Boron adsorption on both soils increased with increasing...

  20. The Perils of Carbonic Acid and Equilibrium Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jencks, William P.; Altura, Rachel A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the effects caused by small amounts of carbon dioxide usually present in water and acid-base equilibria of dilute solutions. Notes that dilute solutions of most weak acids and bases undergo significant dissociation or protonation. (MVL)

  1. Adsorption of four perfluorinated acids on non ion exchange polymer sorbents.

    PubMed

    Senevirathna, S T M L D; Tanaka, S; Fujii, S; Kunacheva, C; Harada, H; Shivakoti, B R; Dinh, H; Ariyadasa, T

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have attracted global concern due to their ubiquitous distribution and properties of persistence, bio accumulation and toxicity. The process of adsorption has been identified as an effective technique to remove PFCs in water. Different non ion-exchange polymeric adsorbents were tested with regard to their sorption kinetics and isotherms at low PFCs concentrations. Selected PFCs were perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) and the tested polymers were three types of Dowex optopores (V-493, V503, and L493), Amberlite XAD-4, and Filtrasorb 400 (Granular Activated Carbon-GAC). We observed the selective adsorption of PFCs on synthetic polymers. For PFDA, Amberlite XAD-4 gave the Freundlich adsorption constant of 2,965 (microg PFCs/g sorbent)(microg PFCs/L)(-n), which was higher than that of GAC (121.89 (microg PFCs/g sorbent) (microg PFCS/L)(-n)). In the case of PFBA, GAC showed better performance (13.36) (microg PFCs/g sorbent) microg PFCS/L)(-n) than synthetic polymers (0.62-5.23) (microg PFCs/g sorbent) (microg PFCS/L)(-n). Adsorption kinetics of all adsorbents were well described (R2 = 0.85-1) by pseudo-second order kinetic model. Sorption capacity was influenced by initial PFCs concentration for all adsorbents. GAC reached the equilibrium concentration within 4 hours, Amberlite XAD 4 reached it within 10 hours and other polymers took more than 70 hours. PMID:21977627

  2. Design of a hybrid advective-diffusive microfluidic system with ellipsometric detection for studying adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Cunlu; Wijnperlé, Daniel; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-05-01

    Establishing and maintaining concentration gradients that are stable in space and time is critical for applications that require screening the adsorption behavior of organic or inorganic species onto solid surfaces for wide ranges of fluid compositions. In this work, we present a design of a simple and compact microfluidic device based on steady-state diffusion of the analyte, between two control channels where liquid is pumped through. The device generates a near-linear distribution of concentrations. We demonstrate this via experiments with dye solutions and comparison to finite-element numerical simulations. In a subsequent step, the device is combined with total internal reflection ellipsometry to study the adsorption of (cat)ions on silica surfaces from CsCl solutions at variable pH. Such a combined setup permits a fast determination of an adsorption isotherm. The measured optical thickness is compared to calculations from a triple layer model for the ion distribution, where surface complexation reactions of the silica are taken into account. Our results show a clear enhancement of the ion adsorption with increasing pH, which can be well described with reasonable values for the equilibrium constants of the surface reactions. PMID:27375818

  3. Degradation and adsorption of selected pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Wu, Laosheng; Chang, Andrew C

    2009-11-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are emerging contaminants in the environment, which have drawn popular concerns recently. Most studies on the environmental fate of PPCPs have focused on their behaviors during wastewater treatment processes, in aquatic environments, and in the sludge, however, little is known about their behavior in agricultural soils. In this study, adsorption and degradation of six selected PPCPs, including clofibric acid, ibuprofen, naproxen, triclosan, diclofenac and bisphenol A have been investigated in the laboratory using four US agricultural soils associated with reclaimed wastewater reuse. Adsorption test using a batch equilibrium method demonstrated that adsorption of all tested chemicals in soils could be well described with Freundlich equation, and their adsorption affinity on soil followed the order of triclosan>bisphenol A>clofibric acid>naproxen>diclofenac>ibuprofen. Retardation factor (R(F)) suggested that ibuprofen had potential to move downward with percolating water, while triclosan and bisphenol A were readily retarded in soils. Degradation of selected PPCPs in soils generally followed first-order exponential decay kinetics, with half-lives ranging from 0.81 to 20.44 d. Degradation of PPCPs in soils appeared to be influenced by the soil organic matter and clay contents. Sterilization generally decreased the degradation rates, indicating microbial activity played a significant role in the degradation in soils. The degradation rate constant decreased with increasing initial chemical concentrations in soil, implying that the microbial activity was inhibited with high chemical loading levels. PMID:19853275

  4. Adsorption of Cd(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution by carbonate hydroxylapatite derived from eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiao-ming; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guang-ming; Shen, Xiang-xin; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Jing-jin

    2007-08-17

    Carbonate hydroxylapatite (CHAP) synthesized by using eggshell waste as raw material has been investigated as metal adsorption for Cd(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. The effect of various parameters on adsorption process such as contact time, solution pH, amount of CHAP and initial concentration of metal ions was studied at room temperature to optimize the conditions for maximum adsorption. The results showed that the removal efficiency of Cd(II) and Cu(II) by CHAP could reach 94 and 93.17%, respectively, when the initial Cd(II) concentration 80 mg/L and Cu(II) 60 mg/L and the liquid/solid ratio was 2.5 g/L. The equilibrium sorption data for single metal systems at room temperature could be described by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The highest value of Langmuir maximum uptake, (b), was found for cadmium (111.1mg/g) and copper (142.86 mg/g). Similar Freundlich empirical constants, K, were obtained for cadmium (2.224) and copper (7.925). Ion exchange and surface adsorption might be involved in the adsorption process of cadmium and copper. Desorption experiments showed that CaCl2, NaCl, acetic acid and ultrasonic were not efficient enough to desorb substantial amount of metal ions from the CHAP. The results obtained show that CHAP has a high affinity to cadmium and copper. PMID:17368932

  5. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters. PMID:26657085

  6. Adsorption of small biological molecules on silica from diluted aqueous solutions: Quantitative characterization and implications to the Bernal's hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Gromovoy, Taras Yu.; Khil'Chevskaya, Elena G.

    1995-08-01

    To describe quantitatively the adsorption of prebiotically important compounds of low molecular weight (amino acids, short linear peptides, cyclic dipeptides, the Krebs's cycle and other carboxylic acids, nucleosides and related phosphates) on silica surface from diluted neutral aqueous solutions, equilibrium constants (K) and free energies (-ΔG) of adsorption were determined from the retention values measured by means of high-performance liquid chromatography on a silica gel column and from the isotherms measured under static conditions. For most carboxylic acids (including amino acids and linear peptides) -ΔG values were negative and K<1, thus showing very weak adsorption. Cyclic dipeptides (2,5-piperazinediones) exhibited higher adsorbability; -ΔG>0 and K>1 were found for most of them. Influence of the structure of α-substituent on the adsorbability is analyzed. A linear dependence of -ΔG on the number of aliphatic carbon atoms in a sorbate molecule was found for the series of aliphatic bifunctional amino acids, related dipeptides and 2,5-piperazinediones, as well as for the row from glycine to triglycyl glycine. The adsorption of nucleosides and their phosphates is characterized by much higherK and -ΔG values (of the order of 102 and 104, respectively). The adsorption data available from our work and literature are summarized and discussed with implications to the Bernal's hypothesis on the roles of solid surfaces in the prebiotic formation of biopolymers from monomeric ‘building blocks’.

  7. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that themore » GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.« less

  8. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that the GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.

  9. Comparative studies on adsorptive removal of heavy metal ions by biosorbent, bio-char and activated carbon obtained from low cost agro-residue.

    PubMed

    Kırbıyık, Çisem; Pütün, Ayşe Eren; Pütün, Ersan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Fe(III) and Cr(III) metal ion adsorption processes were carried out with three adsorbents in batch experiments and their adsorption performance was compared. These adsorbents were sesame stalk without pretreatment, bio-char derived from thermal decomposition of biomass, and activated carbon which was obtained from chemical activation of biomass. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared techniques were used for characterization of adsorbents. The optimum conditions for the adsorption process were obtained by observing the influences of solution pH, adsorbent dosage, initial solution concentration, contact time and temperature. The optimum adsorption efficiencies were determined at pH 2.8 and pH 4.0 for Fe(III) and Cr(III) metal ion solutions, respectively. The experimental data were modelled by different isotherm models and the equilibriums were well described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetic, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich models were applied to analyze the kinetic data and to evaluate rate constants. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model gave a better fit than the others. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy change ΔG°, standard enthalpy change ΔH° and standard entropy change ΔS° were evaluated. The thermodynamic study showed the adsorption was a spontaneous endothermic process. PMID:26819399

  10. Impact of carbon nanotube morphology on phenanthrene adsorption.

    PubMed

    Apul, Onur Guven; Shao, Ting; Zhang, Shujuan; Karanfil, Tanju

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the roles of the specific surface area (SSA), diameter, and length of carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the adsorption of phenanthrene (PNT) by analyzing the adsorption isotherms obtained with several single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). At low equilibrium concentrations (e.g., 1 ppb), MWNTs with larger outer diameters exhibited higher PNT adsorption capacity on an SSA basis than those with smaller diameters. With increasing equilibrium concentration, adsorption on an SSA basis became independent of MWNT diameter, and the total surface area controlled maximum adsorption capacity. A similar analysis for the adsorption of naphthalene, a planar molecule with one less benzene ring but 20 times higher solubility than PNT, showed no correlation with respect to MWNT outer diameter. The results indicated that the surface curvature of MWNT was more important on the adsorption of PNT than on the adsorption of naphthalene. Specific surface area normalized isotherms did not show a correlation between PNT adsorption and lengths of SWNTs and MWNTs. Characterization results indicated that the morphology of CNTs plays an important role on the SSA and pore volume. Data from the manufacturer may not always represent the characteristics of CNTs in a particular batch. Therefore, accurate characterization of CNTs is critical to systematically examine the behavior of CNTs, such as adsorption and transport, in environmental systems. PMID:22002628

  11. Equilibrium binding studies of mono, di and triisocyanide ligands on Au powder surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ontko, A.

    1997-10-08

    The author`s group has previously shown that isocyanides are readily adsorbed from solutions to Au powder and bind to the Au surface in an end-on fashion through the terminal carbon. Later work demonstrated that the equilibrium constants for the reversible adsorption of electronically inequivalent isocyanides could be obtained using the Langmuir isotherm technique. This dissertation describes two projects completed which complement the initial findings of this group. Initially, several alkylisocyanides were synthesized to examine the effect of tail length on Au powder adsorption. It was observed that the length of the alkyl chain affected not only the Au surface binding affinity, but also the rate of surface saturation and saturation coverage values. Direct competition studies were also studied using a {sup 13}C-labeled isocyanide. These studies demonstrated the stabilization afforded by substrate-substrate packing forces in SAM`s formed by the longer chain isocyanides. In a second study, di and triisocyanides were synthesized to determine the effect that the length of the connecting link and the number of isocyanide groups (as points of attachment) have on Au adsorption stability. The work in this area describes the binding modes, relative binding affinities and surface coverage values for a series of flexible alkyl and xylyldiisocyanides on Au powder surfaces. This report contains only the introductory material, and general summary. Two chapters have been processed separately. 56 refs.

  12. The Adsorption of Polyatomic Molecules on Carbon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burde, Jared T.

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit the structure and chemical properties that make them apt substrates for many adsorption applications. Of particular interest are carbon nanotube bundles, whose unique geometry is conducive to the formation of pseudo-one-dimensional phases of matter, and graphite, whose simple planar structure allows ordered phases to form in the absence of surface effects. Although both of these structures have been the focus of many research studies, knowledge gaps still remain. Much of the work with carbon nanotubes has used simple adsorbates1-43, and there is little kinetic data available. On the other hand, there are many studies of complex molecules adsorbing on graphite; however, there is almost no kinetic data reported for this substrate. We seek to close these knowledge gaps by performing a kinetic study of linear molecules of increasing length adsorbing on carbon nanotube bundles and on graphite. We elucidated the process of adsorption of complex admolecules on carbon nanotube bundles, while at the same time producing some of the first equilibrium results of the films formed by large adsorbates on these structures. We also extended the current knowledge of adsorption on graphite to include the kinetics of adsorption. The kinetic data that we have produced enables a more complete understanding of the process of adsorption of large admolecules on carbon nanotube bundles and graphite. We studied the adsorption of particles on carbon nanotube bundles and graphite using analytical and computational techniques. By employing these methods separately but in parallel, we were able to constantly compare and verify our results. We calculated and simulated the behavior of a given system throughout its evolution and then analyzed our results to determine which system parameters have the greatest effect on the kinetics of adsorption. Our analytical and computational results show good agreement with each other and with the experimental isotherm data provided by

  13. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  14. Equilibrium Potentials of Membrane Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jui H.; Copeland, Eva

    1973-01-01

    A simple thermodynamic theory of the equilibrium potentials of membrane electrodes is formulated and applied to the glass electrode for measurement of pH. The new formulation assumes the selective adsorption or binding of specific ions on the surface of the membrane which may or may not be permeable to the ion, and includes the conventional derivation based on reversible ion transport across membranes as a special case. To test the theory, a platinum wire was coated with a mixture of stearic acid and methyl-tri-n-octyl-ammonium stearate. When this coated electrode was immersed in aqueous phosphate solution, its potential was found to be a linear function of pH from pH 2 to 12 with a slope equal to the theoretical value of 59.0 mV per pH unit at 24°. PMID:4516194

  15. Isodynamic axisymmetric equilibrium near the magnetic axis

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V. V.

    2013-08-15

    Plasma equilibrium near the magnetic axis of an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic confinement system is described in orthogonal flux coordinates. For the case of a constant current density in the vicinity of the axis and magnetic surfaces with nearly circular cross sections, expressions for the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components are obtained in these coordinates by using expansion in the reciprocal of the aspect ratio. These expressions allow one to easily derive relationships between quantities in an isodynamic equilibrium, in which the absolute value of the magnetic field is constant along the magnetic surface (Palumbo’s configuration)

  16. Isodynamic axisymmetric equilibrium near the magnetic axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    Plasma equilibrium near the magnetic axis of an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic confinement system is described in orthogonal flux coordinates. For the case of a constant current density in the vicinity of the axis and magnetic surfaces with nearly circular cross sections, expressions for the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components are obtained in these coordinates by using expansion in the reciprocal of the aspect ratio. These expressions allow one to easily derive relationships between quantities in an isodynamic equilibrium, in which the absolute value of the magnetic field is constant along the magnetic surface (Palumbo's configuration).

  17. Application of activated carbon derived from scrap tires for adsorption of Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Shuangxi; Zhu, Tan

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon derived from solid hazardous waste scrap tires was evaluated as a potential adsorbent for cationic dye removal. The adsorption process with respect to operating parameters was investigated to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of the activated pyrolytic tire char (APTC) for Rhodamine B (RhB). Systematic research including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic studies was performed. The results showed that APTC was a potential adsorbent for RhB with a higher adsorption capacity than most adsorbents. Solution pH and temperature exert significant influence while ionic strength showed little effect on the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data obey Langmuir isotherm and the kinetic data were well described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process followed intra-particle diffusion model with more than one process affecting the adsorption process. Thermodynamic study confirmed that the adsorption was a physisorption process with spontaneous, endothermic and random characteristics. PMID:21179969

  18. Removal of Cr(III) from chrome tanning wastewater by adsorption using two natural carbonaceous materials: Eggshell and powdered marble.

    PubMed

    Elabbas, Saliha; Mandi, Laila; Berrekhis, Fatima; Pons, Marie Noelle; Leclerc, Jean Pierre; Ouazzani, Naaila

    2016-01-15

    In the present paper, eggshell and powdered marble, two carbonaceous materials, were used to remove Cr(III) ions from a real chrome tanning wastewater. The effects of initial effluent pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were studied. The maximum uptake of chromium ions was obtained at pH 5.0 with the dose 20 g L(-1) and 12 g L(-1) for eggshell and powdered marble respectively. Adsorption equilibrium was reached after 14 h contact time for eggshell and only after 30 min for powdered marble. Under these conditions, almost 99% Cr(III) was removed from chrome tanning wastewater having an initial concentration of chromium of 3.21 g L(-1). Kinetic data were satisfactorily described by a pseudo-second order chemical sorption model. The equilibrium rate constant was notably greater for powdered marble than for eggshell with 1.142·10(-3) (g mg(-1) min(-1)) and 0.041·10(-3) (g mg(-1) min(-1)) respectively. The adsorption isotherm were well described by a Langmuir model and showed that the interaction of chromium with the two adsorbents surface is a localized monolayer adsorption with a smaller energy constant for the powdered marble than for eggshell (0.020 (L mg(-1)) and 0.083 (L mg(-1)) respectively). The powdered marble was able to adsorb faster a large amount of Cr (III) in comparison to eggshell. The use of a standardized lettuce seed bioassay allowed evaluating a better effectiveness of the Cr adsorption on the powdered marble, removing up to 40% of the treated effluent toxicity than by eggshell 25%. The powdered marble could be considered as an effective, low cost carbonaceous material to be used for chromium removal from tanning wastewater. PMID:26598282

  19. Proton and Cd adsorption onto natural bacterial consortia: Testing universal adsorption behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrok, David; Fein, Jeremy B.; Kulpa, Charles F.

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial surface adsorption can control metal distributions in some natural systems, yet it is unclear whether natural bacterial consortia differ in their adsorption behaviors. In this study, we conduct potentiometric titration and metal adsorption experiments to measure proton and Cd adsorption onto a range of bacterial consortia. We model the experimental data using a surface complexation approach to determine thermodynamic stability constants. Our results indicate that these consortia adsorb similar extents of protons and Cd and that the adsorption onto all of the consortia can be modeled using a single set of stability constants. Consortia of bacteria cultured from natural environments also adsorb metals to lesser extents than individual strains of laboratory-cultivated species. This study suggests that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit similar adsorption behaviors, potentially simplifying the task of modeling the distribution and speciation of metals in bacteria-bearing natural systems. Current models for bacteria-metal adsorption that rely on pure strains of laboratory-cultivated species likely overpredict the amount of bacteria-metal adsorption in natural systems.

  20. Morphodynamic equilibrium of alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambroni, Nicoletta; Bolla Pittaluga, Michele; Canestrelli, Alberto; Lanzoni, Stefano; Seminara, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of the longitudinal bed profile of an estuary, with given plan-form configuration, subject to given tidal forcing at the mouth and prescribed values of water and sediment supply from the river is investigated numerically. Our main goal is to ascertain whether, starting from some initial condition, the bed evolution tends to reach a unique equilibrium configuration asymptotically in time. Also, we investigate the morphological response of an alluvial estuary to changes in the tidal range and hydrologic forcing (flow and sediment supply). Finally, the solution helps characterizing the transition between the fluvially dominated region and the tidally dominated region of the estuary. All these issues play an important role also in interpreting how the facies changes along the estuary, thus helping to make correct paleo-environmental and sequence-stratigraphic interpretations of sedimentary successions (Dalrymple and Choi, 2007). Results show that the model is able to describe a wide class of settings ranging from tidally dominated estuaries to fluvially dominated estuaries. In the latter case, the solution is found to compare satisfactory with the analytical asymptotic solution recently derived by Seminara et al. (2012), under the hypothesis of fairly 'small' tidal oscillations. Simulations indicate that the system always moves toward an equilibrium configuration in which the net sediment flux in a tidal cycle is constant throughout the estuary and equal to the constant sediment flux discharged from the river. For constant width, the bed equilibrium profile of the estuarine channel is characterized by two distinct regions: a steeper reach seaward, dominated by the tide, and a less steep upstream reach, dominated by the river and characterized by the undisturbed bed slope. Although the latter reach, at equilibrium, is not directly affected by the tidal wave, however starting from an initial uniform stream with the constant 'fluvial' slope, the final

  1. Study of the kinetics and the adsorption isotherm of cadmium(II) from aqueous solution using green algae (Ulva lactuca) biomass.

    PubMed

    Asnaoui, H; Laaziri, A; Khalis, M

    2015-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption of hazardous cadmium onto low-cost algae biomass in aqueous solution with respect to concentration of adsorbate, adsorbent dosage, contact time, solution pH and temperature. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were determined. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated for the adsorption of cadmium onto Ulva lactuca biomass. Experimental data were tested in terms of biosorption kinetics using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The results showed that the biosorption processes of Cd(II) followed well pseudo-second-order kinetics. Langmuir and Freundlich models were applied to describe the biosorption isotherm of the metal ions by Ulva lactuca biomass. Langmuir model fitted the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm. The biosorption capacity of Ulva lactuca biomass for cadmium was found to be 3.02 mg/g at pH 5.60 min equilibrium time and 20 °C. The mean free energy which was calculated was 6.24 kJ/mol for Cd(II) biosorption, which shows that the adsorption is physical. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0) showed that the biosorption of Cd(II) onto Ulva lactuca biomass was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under examined conditions. The results indicate that algae Ulva lactuca could be employed as a low-cost material for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solution. PMID:26524441

  2. Effect of thermal pretreatment on equilibrium moisture content of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Acharjee, Tapas C; Coronella, Charles J; Vasquez, Victor R

    2011-04-01

    The equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of raw lignocellulosic biomass, along with four samples subjected to thermal pretreatment, was measured at relative humidities ranging from 11% to 97% at a constant temperature of 30 °C. Three samples were prepared by treatment in hot compressed water by a process known as wet torrefaction, at temperatures of 200, 230, and 260 °C. An additional sample was prepared by dry torrefaction at 300 °C. Pretreated biomass shows EMC below that of raw biomass. This indicates that pretreated biomass, both dry and wet torrefied, is more hydrophobic than raw biomass. The EMC results were correlated with a recent model that takes into account additional non-adsorption interactions of water, such as mixing and swelling. The model offers physical insight into the water activity in lignocellulosic biomass. PMID:21310606

  3. Effects of Dissolved Carbonate on Arsenate Adsorption and Surface Speciation at the Hematite-Water Interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; Sparks, D.L.; Davis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of dissolved carbonate on arsenate [As(V)] reactivity and surface speciation at the hematite-water interface were studied as a function of pH and two different partial pressures of carbon dioxide gas [PCO2 = 10 -3.5 atm and ???0; CO2-free argon (Ar)] using adsorption kinetics, pseudo-equilibrium adsorption/titration experiments, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic (EXAFS) analyses, and surface complexation modeling. Different adsorbed carbonate concentrations, due to the two different atmospheric systems, resulted in an enhanced and/or suppressed extent of As(V) adsorption. As(V) adsorption kinetics [4 g L -1, [As(V)]0 = 1.5 mM and / = 0.01 M NaCl] showed carbonate-enhanced As(V) uptake in the air-equilibrated systems at pH 4 and 6 and at pH 8 after 3 h of reaction. Suppressed As(V) adsorption was observed in the air-equilibrated system in the early stages of the reaction at pH 8. In the pseudo-equilibrium adsorption experiments [1 g L-1, [As(V)] 0 = 0.5 mM and / = 0.01 M NaCl], in which each pH value was held constant by a pH-stat apparatus, effects of dissolved carbonate on As(V) uptake were almost negligible at equilibrium, but titrant (0.1 M HCl) consumption was greater in the air-equilibrated systems (PCO2 = 10-3.5 atm)than in the CO2-free argon system at pH 4-7.75. The EXAFS analyses indicated that As(V) tetrahedral molecules were coordinated on iron octahedral via bidentate mononuclear (???2.8 A??) and bidentate binuclear (???3.3 A??) bonding at pH 4.5-8 and loading levels of 0.46-3.10 ??M m-2. Using the results of the pseudoequilibrium adsorption data and the XAS analyses, the pH-dependent As(V) adsorption under the PCO2 = 10-3.5 atm and the CO2-free argon system was modeled using surface complexation modeling, and the results are consistent with the formation of nonprotonated bidentate surface species at the hematite surfaces. The results also suggest that the acid titrant consumption was strongly affected by changes to

  4. THE EQUILIBRIUM FLUORIDE CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED ALUMINA. DETERMINATION OF THE EFFECTS OF PH AND COMPETING IONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes research on the determination of the equilibrium fluoride adsorption capacity of small columns of acid pretreated activated alumina (Alcoa F-1 grade). The experimental observations verified the expectation that fluoride is very favorably adsorbed in preferen...

  5. FATE, THE ENVIRONMENTAL FATE CONSTANTS INFORMATION DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An online database, FATE, has been developed for the interactive retrieval of kinetic and equilibrium constants that are needed for assessing the fate of chemicals in the environment. he database contains values for up to 12 parameters for each chemical. s of December 1991, FATE ...

  6. Adsorption of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane by various adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Lin, R.C.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate gas-phase adsorption characteristics of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) by activated carbon fiber, extruded activated carbon, granular activated carbon, activated alumina, and molecular sieve. HGC-134a is currently regarded as an excellent replacement for chlorofluorocarbon-12, a refrigerating and cooling agent extensively used previously in all automobiles and many cooling systems. Performances of HFC-134a adsorption were characterized by the equilibrium adsorption capacity, time to reach equilibrium, and desorption efficiency of exhausted adsorbent. A simple thermal treatment process with proper operating temperature and treatment duration was found to be effective for the regeneration of exhausted absorbents. Adsorption isotherms of the empirical Freundlich and Hossens types were observed to adequately represent the equilibrium adsorption data. A mass transfer model based on the pseudo steady state squared driving force was adopted to describe the mass transfer process of HFC-134a adsorption.

  7. Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.; Ghosh, T.K.; Hines, A.L.; Loyalka, S.K.

    1995-02-01

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherms are reported for radon and water vapor on two commercial activated carbons: coconut shell Type PCB and hardwood Type BD. The isotherms of the water vapor were measured gravimetrically at 298 K. The isotherms of radon from dry nitrogen were obtained at 293, 298, and 308 K while the data for the mixture of radon and water vapor were measured at 298 K. The concentrations of radon in the gas and solid phases were measured simultaneously, once the adsorption equilibrium and the radioactive equilibrium between the radon and its daughter products were established. The shape of the isotherms was of Type III for the radon and Type V for the water vapor, according to Brunauer`s classification. The adsorption mechanism was similar for both the radon and the water vapor, being physical adsorption on the macropore surface area in the low pressure region and micropore filling near saturation pressure. The uptake capacity of radon decreased both with increasing temperature and relative humidity. The heat of adsorption data indicated that the PCB- and the BD-activated carbons provided a heterogeneous surface for radon adsorption. The equilibrium data for radon were correlated with a modified Freundlich equation.

  8. [Adsorption characteristics of the antibiotic sulfanilamide onto rice husk ash].

    PubMed

    Ji, Ying-Xue; Wang, Feng-He; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Gu, Zhong-Zhu

    2013-10-01

    Under different conditions of initial rice husk ash (RHA) dosage, oscillating temperature, oscillating frequency and solution pH, the adsorption characteristics of sulfanilamide on RHA with the change of time and its adsorption kinetics were investigated. RHA was characterized by SEM and FTIR before and after sulfanilamide adsorption. The results indicated that the adsorption characteristics of sulfanilamide on RHA was influenced by RHA dosage, oscillating temperature, oscillating frequency and solution pH. Within the RHA dosing range (0. 1-2.0 g.L-1) in this experiment, the optimal temperature for the adsorption was 25C , and with the increase of RHA dosage, the removal efficiency of sulfanilamide increased, the time required to reach adsorption equilibrium was shortened and the adsorptive quantity of sulfanilamide by per unit mass of RHA decreased. A high oscillating frequency was used to ensure the adsorption effect when the RHA concentration was high. Strong acidic and strong alkaline conditions were conducive to the adsorption of sulfanilamide. The analysis of adsorption dynamics showed that for the adsorption process with high RHA dosage ( >or= 1.0 g.L-1), the pseudo-second-order model fitted the adsorption behavior well, and the process was controlled by physical and chemical adsorption. Intraparticle diffusion model showed that the adsorption process was controlled by both membrane diffusion and internal diffusion, and the influence of the former became more obvious with the increase of the adsorbent concentration. Both the SEM and FTIR spectra proved the effective adsorption of sulfanilamide by RHA. PMID:24364310

  9. Adsorption mechanism in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Effect of the surface coverage of a monomeric C18-silica stationary phase

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-04-01

    The effect of the bonding density of the octadecyl chains onto the same silica on the adsorption and retention properties of low molecular weight compounds (phenol, caffeine, and sodium 2-naphthalene sulfonate) was investigated. The same mobile phase (methanol:water, 20:80, v/v) and temperature (T = 298 K) were applied and two duplicate columns (A and B) from each batch of packing material (neat silica, simply endcapped or C{sub 1} phase, 0.42, 1.01, 2.03, and 3.15 {micro}mol/m{sup 2} of C{sub 18} alkyl chains) were tested. Adsorption data of the three compounds were acquired by frontal analysis (FA) and the adsorption energy distributions (AEDs) were calculated using the expectation-maximization method. Results confirmed earlier findings in linear chromatography of a retention maximum at an intermediate bonding density. From a general point of view, the saturation capacity of the adsorbent tends to decrease with increasing bonding density, due to the vanishing space intercalated between the C{sub 18} bonded chains and to the decrease of the specific surface area of the stationary phase. The equilibrium constants are maximum for an intermediary bonding density ({approx}2 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}). An enthalpy-entropy compensation was found for the thermodynamic parameters of the isotherm data. Weak equilibrium constants (small {Delta}H) and high saturation capacities (large {Delta}S) were observed at low bonding densities, higher equilibrium constants and lower saturation capacities at high bonding densities, the combinations leading to similar apparent retention in RPLC. The use of a low surface coverage column is recommended for preparative purposes.

  10. Protein adsorption on polyanion/polycation layer-by-layer assembled polyelectrolyte films.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen Ming; Tsai, Rong-Ze; Hsu, Chih-Chin

    2016-06-01

    As layer-by-layer self-assembly deposition (LbL) is a versatile technique for surface modification, protein adsorption on the LbL modified glass is evaluated in this study. At the beginning, glass slides was silanized by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Sodium alginate (Alg), poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PGA) and poly(aspartic acid) (PAsp) were selected as polyanion electrolytes and chitosan (CS) was used as the polycation electrolyte. Both polyanion and polycation electrolytes alternately deposited on the silanized glass slide surface by the LbL technique to get three different polyanion/chitosan series of LbL films ([Alg/CS], [PGA/CS], and [PAsp/CS]). Three kinds of kinetic model including pseudo-first-order, second-order kinetic and intraparticle diffusion model were used to evaluate the adsorption of albumin on the three different polyanion/chitosan series of LbL films. It is found that the adsorption of albumin on the polyanion/chitosan series of LbL films can be described well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic mechanism. To make sure if the pseudo-second-order kinetic mechanism of protein adsorbed on the other polyanion/polycation LbL films is also suitable, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(L-lysine) (PLL) are used as two other polycations. The [polyanion/PAH] and [polyanion/PLL] series of LbL films were prepared with the same LbL technique for albumin, fibrinogen, and fibronectin adsorption. From the results, it is found that albumin, fibrinogen, and fibronectin adsorption on the various polyanion/polycation LbL films can be described well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic mechanism. The protein adsorbed at equilibrium and rate constant of protein adsorbed on the various LbL films can be determined. PMID:26938325

  11. Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes during adsorption onto amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide: Experimental mixing of acid rock drainage and ambient river water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Borrok, David M.; Wanty, Richard B.; Ridley, W. Ian

    2008-01-01

    Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes during adsorption onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide is examined in experimental mixtures of metal-rich acid rock drainage and relatively pure river water and during batch adsorption experiments using synthetic ferrihydrite. A diverse set of Cu- and Zn-bearing solutions was examined, including natural waters, complex synthetic acid rock drainage, and simple NaNO3 electrolyte. Metal adsorption data are combined with isotopic measurements of dissolved Cu (65Cu/63Cu) and Zn (66Zn/64Zn) in each of the experiments. Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes occurs during adsorption of the metal onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide. The adsorption data are modeled successfully using the diffuse double layer model in PHREEQC. The isotopic data are best described by a closed system, equilibrium exchange model. The fractionation factors (αsoln-solid) are 0.99927 ± 0.00008 for Cu and 0.99948 ± 0.00004 for Zn or, alternately, the separation factors (Δsoln-solid) are -0.73 ± 0.08‰ for Cu and -0.52 ± 0.04‰ for Zn. These factors indicate that the heavier isotope preferentially adsorbs onto the oxyhydroxide surface, which is consistent with shorter metal-oxygen bonds and lower coordination number for the metal at the surface relative to the aqueous ion. Fractionation of Cu isotopes also is greater than that for Zn isotopes. Limited isotopic data for adsorption of Cu, Fe(II), and Zn onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide suggest that isotopic fractionation is related to the intrinsic equilibrium constants that define aqueous metal interactions with oxyhydroxide surface sites. Greater isotopic fractionation occurs with stronger metal binding by the oxyhydroxide with Cu > Zn > Fe(II).

  12. Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes during adsorption onto amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide: Experimental mixing of acid rock drainage and ambient river water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Borrok, D.M.; Wanty, R.B.; Ridley, W.I.

    2008-01-01

    Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes during adsorption onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide is examined in experimental mixtures of metal-rich acid rock drainage and relatively pure river water and during batch adsorption experiments using synthetic ferrihydrite. A diverse set of Cu- and Zn-bearing solutions was examined, including natural waters, complex synthetic acid rock drainage, and simple NaNO3 electrolyte. Metal adsorption data are combined with isotopic measurements of dissolved Cu (65Cu/63Cu) and Zn (66Zn/64Zn) in each of the experiments. Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes occurs during adsorption of the metal onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide. The adsorption data are modeled successfully using the diffuse double layer model in PHREEQC. The isotopic data are best described by a closed system, equilibrium exchange model. The fractionation factors (??soln-solid) are 0.99927 ?? 0.00008 for Cu and 0.99948 ?? 0.00004 for Zn or, alternately, the separation factors (??soln-solid) are -0.73 ?? 0.08??? for Cu and -0.52 ?? 0.04??? for Zn. These factors indicate that the heavier isotope preferentially adsorbs onto the oxyhydroxide surface, which is consistent with shorter metal-oxygen bonds and lower coordination number for the metal at the surface relative to the aqueous ion. Fractionation of Cu isotopes also is greater than that for Zn isotopes. Limited isotopic data for adsorption of Cu, Fe(II), and Zn onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide suggest that isotopic fractionation is related to the intrinsic equilibrium constants that define aqueous metal interactions with oxyhydroxide surface sites. Greater isotopic fractionation occurs with stronger metal binding by the oxyhydroxide with Cu > Zn > Fe(II).

  13. Recyclable Mg-Al layered double hydroxides for fluoride removal: Kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohito; Oba, Jumpei; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2015-12-30

    Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) intercalated with NO3(-) (NO3 · Mg-Al LDH) and Cl(-) (Cl · Mg-Al LDH) were found to adsorb fluoride from aqueous solutions. Fluoride is removed by anion exchange in solution with NO3(-) and Cl(-) intercalated in the LDH interlayer. In both cases, the residual F concentration is lower than the effluent standards for F in Japan (8 mg/L). The rate-determining step in the removal of F using NO3 · Mg-Al and Cl · Mg-Al LDH is chemical adsorption involving F(-) anion exchange with intercalated NO3(-) and Cl(-) ions. The removal of F is described by pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics, with Langmuir-type adsorption. The values obtained for the maximum adsorption and the equilibrium adsorption constant are respectively 3.3 mmol g(-1) and 2.8 with NO3 · Mg-Al LDH, and 3.2 mmol g(-1) and 1.5 with Cl · Mg-Al LDH. The F in the F · Mg-Al LDH produced in these reactions was found to exchange with NO3(-) and Cl(-) ions in solution. The regenerated NO3 · Mg-Al and Cl · Mg-Al LDHs thus obtained can be used once more to capture aqueous F. This suggests that NO3 · Mg-Al and Cl · Mg-Al LDHs can be recycled and used repeatedly for F removal. PMID:26223022

  14. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  15. [Ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium in natural clinoptilolite].

    PubMed

    He, Yun-Hua; Li, Hang; Liu, Xin-Min; Xiong, Hai-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Zeolites have been widely applied in soil improvement and environment protection. The study on ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium is of important significance for better use of zeolites. The maximum adsorption capacities of alkali ions during ion exchange equilibrium in the clinoptilolite showed obvious specificity. For alkali metal ions with equivalent valence, the differences in adsorption capacity increased with the decrease of ionic concentration. These results cannot be well explained by the classical theories including coulomb force, ionic size, hydration, dispersion force, classic induction force and surface complexation. We found that the coupling of polarization effects resulted from the quantum fluctuation of diverse alkali metal ions and electric field near the zeolite surface should be the primary reason for specific ion effect during ion exchange in zeolite. The result of this coupling effect was that the difference in the ion dipole moment increased with the increase of surface potential, which further expanded the difference in the adsorption ability between zeolite surface and ions, resulting in different ion exchange adsorption ability at the solid/liquid interface. Due to the high surface charge density of zeolite, ionic size also played an important role in the distribution of ions in the double diffuse layer, which led to an interesting result that distinct differences in exchange adsorption ability of various alkali metal ions were only detected at high surface potential (the absolute value was greater than 0.2 V), which was different from the ion exchange equilibrium result on the surface with low charge density. PMID:25929073

  16. Synergy between surface adsorption and photocatalysis during degradation of humic acid on TiO2/activated carbon composites.

    PubMed

    Xue, Gang; Liu, Huanhuan; Chen, Quanyuan; Hills, Colin; Tyrer, Mark; Innocent, Francis

    2011-02-15

    A photocatalyst comprising nano-sized TiO(2) particles on granular activated carbon (GAC) was prepared by a sol-dipping-gel process. The TiO(2)/GAC composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractiometry (XRD) and nitrogen sorptometry, and its photocatalytic activity was studied through the degradation of humic acid (HA) in a quartz glass reactor. The factors influencing photocatalysis were investigated and the GAC was found to be an ideal substrate for nano-sized TiO(2) immobilization. A 99.5% removal efficiency for HA from solution was achieved at an initial concentration of 15 mg/L in a period of 3h. It was found that degradation of HA on the TiO(2)/GAC composite was facilitated by the synergistic relationship between surface adsorption characteristics and photocatalytic potential. The fitting of experimental results with the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) model showed that the reaction rate constant and the adsorption constant values were 0.1124 mg/(L min) and 0.3402 L/mg. The latter is 1.7 times of the calculated value by fitting the adsorption equilibrium data into the Langmuir equation. PMID:21163573

  17. Stoichiometry and Formation Constant Determination by Linear Sweep Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Franklin A.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper an experiment is described in which the equilibrium constants necessary for determining the composition and distribution of lead (II)-oxalate species may be measured by linear sweep voltammetry. (Author/BB)

  18. Monitoring N3 dye adsorption and desorption on TiO2 surfaces: a combined QCM-D and XPS study.

    PubMed

    Wayment-Steele, Hannah K; Johnson, Lewis E; Tian, Fangyuan; Dixon, Matthew C; Benz, Lauren; Johal, Malkiat S

    2014-06-25

    Understanding the kinetics of dye adsorption and desorption on semiconductors is crucial for optimizing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) measures adsorbed mass in real time, allowing determination of binding kinetics. In this work, we characterize adsorption of the common RuBipy dye N3 to the native oxide layer of a planar, sputter-coated titanium surface, simulating the TiO2 substrate of a DSSC. We report adsorption equilibrium constants consistent with prior optical measurements of N3 adsorption. Dye binding and surface integrity were also verified by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We further study desorption of the dye from the native oxide layer on the QCM sensors using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH), a commonly used industrial desorbant. We find that using TBAOH as a desorbant does not fully regenerate the surface, though little ruthenium or nitrogen is observed by XPS after desorption, suggesting that carboxyl moieties of N3 remain bound. We demonstrate the native oxide layer of a titanium sensor as a valid and readily available planar TiO2 morphology to study dye adsorption and desorption and begin to investigate the mechanism of dye desorption in DSSCs, a system that requires further study. PMID:24848580

  19. Efficient adsorption of phenanthrene by simply synthesized hydrophobic MCM-41 molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yun; He, Yinyun; Wang, Xiaowen; Wei, Chaohai

    2014-08-01

    Hydrophobic molecular sieve MCM-41 including surfactant template was synthesized by a simple method. The adsorption properties of this material toward phenanthrene were studied. The effects of adsorbent dose and pH value on the adsorption process as well as the adsorption mechanism and reuse performance were investigated. The template-containing MCM-41 showed a significant adsorption for phenanthrene, due to its hydrophobicity created by the surfactant template in MCM-41. The solution pH had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The adsorption kinetic could be fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption equilibrium was fitted well by the linear model, and the adsorption process followed the liquid/solid phase distribution mechanism. The thermodynamic results indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process.

  20. Physical adsorption and charge transfer of molecular Br2 on graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheyuan; Darancet, Pierre; Wang, Lei; Crowther, Andrew C; Gao, Yuanda; Dean, Cory R; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Marianetti, Chris A; Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-25

    We present a detailed study of gaseous Br2 adsorption and charge transfer on graphene, combining in situ Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). When graphene is encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layers on both sides, in a h-BN/graphene/h-BN sandwich structure, it is protected from doping by strongly oxidizing Br2. Graphene supported on only one side by h-BN shows strong hole doping by adsorbed Br2. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determine the graphene charge density as a function of pressure. DFT calculations reveal the variation in charge transfer per adsorbed molecule as a function of coverage. The molecular adsorption isotherm (coverage versus pressure) is obtained by combining Raman spectra with DFT calculations. The Fowler-Guggenheim isotherm fits better than the Langmuir isotherm. The fitting yields the adsorption equilibrium constant (∼0.31 Torr(-1)) and repulsive lateral interaction (∼20 meV) between adsorbed Br2 molecules. The Br2 molecule binding energy is ∼0.35 eV. We estimate that at monolayer coverage each Br2 molecule accepts 0.09 e- from single-layer graphene. If graphene is supported on SiO2 instead of h-BN, a threshold pressure is observed for diffusion of Br2 along the (somewhat rough) SiO2/graphene interface. At high pressure, graphene supported on SiO2 is doped by adsorbed Br2 on both sides. PMID:24528378

  1. Effect of calcination temperature of alumina on the adsorption/impregnation of Pd(II) compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraj, C.; Contescu, C.; Schwarz, J.A. )

    1991-12-01

    A series of alumina supports derived from a common source material was subjected to a range of calcination temperatures and the results of this treatment on the adsorption of Pd(II) compounds were studied. Increasing calcination temperature lead to a decrease in BET surface area and produced a series of alumina samples carrying different inventories of hydroxyl groups. The surface chemistry of these hydroxyl groups was studied using mass and potentiometric titration techniques and form these data the protonation/deprotonation equilibrium constants for the surface hydroxyl groups were obtained. This allowed construction of the pH-dependent surface charge distribution for each alumina sample. Cationic and anionic Pd(II) complexes were used to titrate the negative and positive surface charge sites. The authors find that the adsorption mechanism is primarily controlled by electrostatic effects in that saturation capacities of adsorbed complex showed a correlation with the surface charge density evaluated at the pH used for the adsorption/impregnation experiments.

  2. A relation between diffusion, temperature and the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Z.

    2016-07-01

    We show that the temperature of a diffusing fluid with the diffusion constant κ2 in an expanding universe approaches a constant limit T∞ = κ2 H in its final de Sitter stage characterized by the horizon 1 H determined by the Hubble constant. If de Sitter surface temperature in the final equilibrium state coincides with the fluid temperature, then the cosmological constant Λ = 3H2 = 6πκ2.

  3. A New Application for Radioimmunoassay: Measurement of Thermodynamic Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angstadt, Carol N.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which an equilibrium radioimmunoassay (RIA) is used to estimate thermodynamic parameters such as equilibrium constants. The experiment is simple and inexpensive, and it introduces a technique that is important in the clinical chemistry and research laboratory. Background information, procedures, and results are…

  4. Getting Freshman in Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various aspects of chemical equilibrium were discussed in six papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). These include student problems in understanding hydrolysis, helping students discover/uncover topics, equilibrium demonstrations, instructional strategies, and flaws to kinetic…

  5. Multifractal characteristics of Nitrogen adsorption isotherms from tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    One of the primary methods used to characterize a wide range of porous materials, including soils, are gas adsorption isotherms. An adsorption isotherm is a function relating the amount of adsorbed gas or vapour to the respective equilibrium pressure, during pressure increase at constant temperature. Adsorption data allow easily estimates of specific surface area and also can provide a characterization of pore surface heterogeneity. Most of the properties and the reactivity of soil colloids are influenced by their specific surface area and by parameters describing the surface heterogeneity. For a restricted scale range, linearity between applied pressure and volume of adsorbate holds, which is the basis for current estimations of specific surface area. However, adsorption isotherms contain also non-linear segments of pressure versus volume so that evidence of multifractal scale has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to analyze the multifractal behaviour of nitrogen adsorption isotherms from a set of tropical soils. Samples were collected form 54 horizons belonging to 19 soil profiles in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The most frequent soil type was Oxisol, according to the Soil Survey Staff, equivalent to Latossolo in the Brazilian soil classification system. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms at standard 77 K were measured using a Thermo Finnigan Sorptomatic 1990 gas sorption analyzer (Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA). From the raw data a distributions of mass along a support was obtained to perform multifractal analysis. The probability distribution was constructed by dividing the values of the measure in a given segment by the sum of the measure in the whole scale range. The box-counting method was employed to perform multifractal analysis. All the analyzed N2 adsorption isotherms behave like a multifractal system. The singularity spectra, f(α), showed asymmetric concave down parabolic shapes, with a greater tendency toward the left side, where moments

  6. Structure of Non-Equilibrium Adsorbed Polymer Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Ben; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2004-03-01

    Equilibrium polymer adsorption has been widely studied theoretically. Many experiments however implicate strong non-equilibrium effects for monomer sticking energies somewhat larger than kT, the most common case. The structure and slow dynamics in these layers is not understood. We analyze theoretically non-equilibrium layers from dilute solutions in the limit of irreversible monomer adsorption. We find the density profile ˜ z-4/3 and loop distribution ˜ s-11/5 of the resulting layer are no different to equilibrium. However, single chain statistics are radically different: the layer consists of a flat inner portion of fully collapsed chains plus an outer part whose chains make only fN surface contacts where N is chain length. The contact fractions f follow a broad distribution, P(f) ˜ f-4/5, consistent with experiment [H. M. Schneider et al, Langmuir 12, 994 (1996)], and the lateral size R of adsorbed chains is of order the bulk coil size, R ˜ N^3/5. For equilibrium layers, by contrast, P has a unique peak at a value of f of order unity, while R ˜ N^1/2 is significantly less. The relaxation of a non-equilibrium layer towards equilibrium thus entails chain shrinkage and tighter binding. We speculate that the observed decrease of bulk-layer chain exchange rates with increasing aging reflects these internal layer dynamics.

  7. [Adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto modified activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Tong, Xi-Zhen; Shi, Bao-You; Xie, Yue; Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-09-01

    Modified coal and coconut shell based powdered activated carbons (PACs) were prepared by FeCl3 and medium power microwave treatment, respectively. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the characteristics of adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto original and modified PACs. Based on pore structure and surface functional groups characterization, the adsorption behaviors of modified and original PACs were compared. The competitive adsorption of humic acid (HA) and PFOS on original and modified coconut shell PACs were also investigated. Results showed that both Fe3+ and medium power microwave treatments changed the pore structure and surface functional groups of coal and coconut shell PACs, but the changing effects were different. The adsorption of PFOS on two modified coconut shell-based PACs was significantly improved. While the adsorption of modified coal-based activated carbons declined. The adsorption kinetics of PFOS onto original and modified coconut shell-based activated carbons were the same, and the time of reaching adsorption equilibrium was about 6 hours. In the presence of HA, the adsorption of PFOS by modified PAC was reduced but still higher than that of the original. PMID:23243870

  8. Adsorption of Pyrene onto the Agricultural By-Product: Corncob.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Tong, Dongli; Allinson, Graeme; Jia, Chunyun; Gong, Zongqing; Liu, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of pyrene on corncob was studied to provide a theoretical basis for the possible use of this material as an immobilized carrier for improving the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil. The results were as follows. Kinetic experiments showed that the adsorption processes obeyed a pseudo-second-order model. The intraparticle diffusion of Weber-Morris model fitting showed that the film and intraparticle diffusions were the key rate-limiting processes, and the adsorption process mainly consisted of three steps: boundary layer diffusion and two intra-particle diffusions. Experimental adsorption data for pyrene were successfully described by the adsorption-partition equilibrium model. The maximum adsorption capacity at 25°C was 214.8 μg g(-1). The adsorption contribution decreased significantly when the Ce/Sw (the equilibrium concentration/solubility in water) was higher than 1. Adsorption decreased with increased temperature. Based on the above results, the corncob particles could be helpful in the bioremediation of pyrene-contaminated soil. PMID:26573838

  9. A Better Way of Dealing with Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tykodi, Ralph J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses how to address the concept of chemical equilibrium through the use of thermodynamic activities. Describes the advantages of setting up an equilibrium constant in terms of activities and demonstrates how to approximate those activities by practical measures such as partial pressures, mole fractions, and molar concentrations. (TW)

  10. Adsorption behavior of copper and zinc in soils: Influence of pH on adsorption characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Msaky, J.J. ); Calvet, R. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors studied adsorption of copper and zinc on three different soils: a brown silty soil, an Oxisol, and a Podzol. They determined the amounts adsorbed and the shapes of adsorption isotherms as a function of the pH of the adsorbing medium at a constant ionic strength. The adsorbed amount-pH relationship depended strongly on the natures of the metallic cation and of the soil. The pH greatly influenced the characteristics of adsorption isotherms. They based interpretation on the variations with the pH of both adsorbent affinity for the metal in relation to the surface electric charge and chemical speciation in solution. The adsorption mechanism in the Oxisol probably involves monohydroxylated cations but is more determined by bivalent cations in the brown silty soil and the Podzol. From a general point of view, adsorption of copper and zinc cannot be represented with a single adsorption constant, but should be described by adsorption isotherms obtained at various pH values.

  11. Process development for the batch and bulk removal and recovery of a hazardous, water-soluble azo dye (Metanil Yellow) by adsorption over waste materials (Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya).

    PubMed

    Mittal, Alok; Gupta, V K; Malviya, Arti; Mittal, Jyoti

    2008-03-01

    Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya have been used as adsorbents for the removal of a hazardous azo dye-Metanil Yellow from its aqueous solutions. Adsorption of Metanil Yellow on these adsorbents has been studied as function of time, temperature, concentration and pH. Batch adsorption studies, kinetic studies and column operations enabled extraction of lethal dye from wastewaters. Adsorption equilibrium data confirms both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and monolayer coverage of dye over adsorbents. Kinetic data have been employed to calculate specific rate constants, indicating thereby involvement of first order kinetics in the on-going adsorption and activation energy was determined as 0.813 and 1.060 kJ mol(-1) for Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya, respectively. For both adsorbents, the adsorption process has been found governing by film diffusion, over the entire concentration range. Column operations have also been performed for the bulk removal of the dye and also to examine the practical utilization of fixed bed adsorption technique in elimination of dangerous effluent. Saturation factors for Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya columns have been calculated as 99.15 and 99.38%, respectively. Attempts have also been made to regenerate the dye from the exhausted columns using aqueous sodium hydroxide as eluent. PMID:17659833

  12. Formation of nitric acid hydrates - A chemical equilibrium approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roland H.

    1990-01-01

    Published data are used to calculate equilibrium constants for reactions of the formation of nitric acid hydrates over the temperature range 190 to 205 K. Standard enthalpies of formation and standard entropies are calculated for the tri- and mono-hydrates. These are shown to be in reasonable agreement with earlier calorimetric measurements. The formation of nitric acid trihydrate in the polar stratosphere is discussed in terms of these equilibrium constants.

  13. Vibration-rotation spectra of deuterated hypochlorous acid and the determination of the equilibrium structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeley, C. M.

    1987-04-01

    Vibration-rotation spectra of the three fundamental vibrations of D 16O 35Cl have been measured at a resolution of 0.01 cm -1 to determine vibration-rotation constants. From these results values for the equilibrium rotational constants have been established and used, in conjunction with the equilibrium rotational constants for H 16O 35Cl (C. M. Deeley and I. M. Mills, J. Mol. Spectrosc.114, 368-376 (1985)), to determine the equilibrium structure of hypochlorous acid.

  14. Moisture adsorption isotherms and glass transition temperature of pectin.

    PubMed

    Basu, Santanu; Shivhare, U S; Muley, S

    2013-06-01

    The moisture adsorption isotherms of low methoxyl pectin were determined at 30-70°C and water activity ranging from 0.11 to 0.94. The moisture adsorption isotherms revealed that the equilibrium moisture content increased with water activity. Increase in temperature, in general, resulted in decreased equilibrium moisture content. However in some cases, equilibrium moisture content values increased with temperature at higher water activities. Selected sorption models (GAB, Halsey, Henderson, Oswin, modified Oswin) were tested for describing the adsorption isotherms. Parameters of each sorption models were determined by nonlinear regression analysis. Oswin model gave the best fit for pectin sorption behaviour. Isosteric heat of sorption decreased with increase in moisture content and varied between 14.607 and 0.552 kJ/mol. Glass transition temperature decreased with increase in moisture content of pectin. PMID:24425957

  15. Adsorptive Removal and Adsorption Kinetics of Fluoroquinolone by Nano-Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yajun; Lan, Tao; Duan, Lunchao; Wang, Fenghe; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Shengtian; Wei, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Various kinds of antibiotics, especially fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) have been widely used for the therapy of infectious diseases in human and livestock. For their poorly absorbed by living organisms, large-scale misuse or abuse of FQs will foster drug resistance among pathogenic bacteria, as well as a variety of environmental problems when they were released in the environment. In this work, the adsorption properties of two FQs, namely norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP), by nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HAP) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption curves of FQs by n-HAP were simulated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The results shown that NOR and CIP can be adsorbed effectively by the adsorbent of n-HAP, and the adsorption capacity of FQs increase with increasing dosage of n-HAP. The optimum dosage of n-HAP for FQs removal was 20 g·L-1, in which the removal efficiencies is 51.6% and 47.3%, and an adsorption equilibrium time is 20 min. The maximum removal efficiency occurred when pH is 6 for both FQs. The adsorption isotherm of FQs fits well for both Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The adsorption of both FQs by n-HAP follows second-order kinetics. PMID:26698573

  16. Chemical Equilibrium, Unit 3: Chemical Equilibrium Calculations. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jameson, Cynthia J.

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student materials for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student manual for this unit on chemical equilibrium calculations includes objectives, prerequisites, a discussion of the equilibrium constant (K), and ten…

  17. Dimer adsorption on a (100) nanotube of arbitrary diameter, with first- and second-neighbor interactions.

    PubMed

    Phares, Alain J; Grumbine, David W

    2014-06-17

    Dimer adsorption on an infinitely long (100) or square lattice nanotube of fixed lattice constant and arbitrary number M of sites in its normal cross section is considered with first- and second-neighbor interaction energies, V and W, respectively. An increase in M keeping the lattice constant fixed corresponds to a nanotube with increasing diameter. The system is at thermodynamic equilibrium and relatively low temperature in order to determine all of the possible crystallization patterns or phases that may exist. Under these conditions, the energy phase space diagram is two-dimensional, and the dimensionless parameters are u = W/|V| and v = μ/|V|, where μ is the sum of the chemical potential energy, μ', of a dimer and the dimer-substrate interaction energy V0. The low temperature energy phase diagram is numerically generated using a transfer matrix method adapted to the present problem. For both attractive and repulsive first-neighbors, it is M-independent for M even, and its M-dependence when M is odd is established. As a consistency check, the infinite odd-M limit matches exactly the M-independent phase diagram for even M. The knowledge of the boundaries of the regions in the phase diagram where these phases occur and the knowledge of their respective occupational configurations are particularly useful information when experimental data on dimer adsorption on square nanotubes become available. PMID:24897920

  18. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.

  19. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partialmore » pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.« less

  20. IONIZATION EQUILIBRIUM TIMESCALES IN COLLISIONAL PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Randall K.; Hughes, John P. E-mail: jph@physics.rutgers.ed

    2010-07-20

    Astrophysical shocks or bursts from a photoionizing source can disturb the typical collisional plasma found in galactic interstellar media or the intergalactic medium. The spectrum emitted by this plasma contains diagnostics that have been used to determine the time since the disturbing event, although this determination becomes uncertain as the elements in the plasma return to ionization equilibrium. A general solution for the equilibrium timescale for each element arises from the elegant eigenvector method of solution to the problem of a non-equilibrium plasma described by Masai and Hughes and Helfand. In general, the ionization evolution of an element Z in a constant electron temperature plasma is given by a coupled set of Z + 1 first-order differential equations. However, they can be recast as Z uncoupled first-order differential equations using an eigenvector basis for the system. The solution is then Z separate exponential functions, with the time constants given by the eigenvalues of the rate matrix. The smallest of these eigenvalues gives the scale of the slowest return to equilibrium independent of the initial conditions, while conversely the largest eigenvalue is the scale of the fastest change in the ion population. These results hold for an ionizing plasma, a recombining plasma, or even a plasma with random initial conditions, and will allow users of these diagnostics to determine directly if their best-fit result significantly limits the timescale since a disturbance or is so close to equilibrium as to include an arbitrarily long time.

  1. Adsorption of tetrahydrothiophene (THT) onto soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juriga, Martin; Kubinec, Róbert; Rajzinger, Ján; Jelemenský, Karol; Gužela, Štefan

    2014-08-01

    Adsorption is one of the major industrial separation technique nowadays. Although adsorption is most commonly used as a separation method, in some cases cause harmful and undesirable effects such as capture odorant from natural gas onto soil. In the event of an accident, the gas can leak from pipes in two ways - either directly into the surrounding air, or the soil where the odorant can be mostly absorbed depending of type of soil, water content and temperature. Design of experimental apparatus for measurement of breakthrough curves is studied in detail. Alternative arrangement of experimental apparatus, calibration of measuring devices, method of measurement and processing the data are narrowly discussed. Moreover, experimental measurements of breakthrough curves are presented. The actual measurement was made to identify the equilibrium adsorption capacity of THT (tetrahydrothiophene) onto soils. Experimental data were evaluated using Linear, Freundlich, Langmuir and Koble-Corrigan model.

  2. [Thermodynamics adsorption and its influencing factors of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on the bentonite and humus].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Chi; Zai, De-Xin; Zhao, Rong

    2010-11-01

    The adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite and humus was investigated by using the equilibrium oscillometry. The adsorption capacity of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on humus was great higher than bentonite at the same concentration. Equilibrium data of Langmuir, Freundlich isotherms showed significant relationship to the adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on humus (chlorpyrifos: R2 0.996 4, 0.996 3; triazophos: R2 0.998 9, 0.992 4). Langmuir isotherm was the best for chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite (chlorpyrifos: R2 = 0.995 7, triazophos: R2 = 0.998 9). The pH value, adsorption equilibrium time and temperature were the main factors affecting adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite and humus. The adsorption equilibrium time on mixed adsorbent was 12h for chlorpyrifos and 6h for triazophos respectively. The mass ratio of humus and bentonite was 12% and 14% respectively, the adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos was the stronglest and tended to saturation. At different temperatures by calculating the thermodynamic parameters deltaG, deltaH and deltaS, confirmed that the adsorption reaction was a spontaneous exothermic process theoretically. The adsorption was the best when the pH value was 6.0 and the temperature was 15 degrees C. PMID:21250454

  3. Adsorption and Separation Modeling of Porous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanoski, Anthony; van Swol, Frank

    2001-03-01

    With the advent of self-assembly techniques has come the potential to tailor materials for adsorption and separation applications. For example, using surfactants as templating agents it is now feasible to finely control both the three-dimensional (3D) porosity as well as the surface chemistry. With an eye on assisting the emerging materials design we have embarked on a program that focuses on modeling adsorption/desorption, reactions and permeation phenomena in such structures. What makes the modeling particularly challenging is the coupling of length scales. The role of the atomic length scale features such as surface reactions and surface structure must be captured as well as the role of the network connectivity and other larger length scales. The latter include the pore shape and length, and the presence of external surfaces. This paper reports on how we employ refineable lattice models to tackle the modeling problems. We use both equilibrium and non-equilibrium Monte Carlo (MC) and 3D density functional theory (DFT) techniques to study the equilibrium and transport behavior in nanostructured porous materials. We will present 1) results of both adsorption/desorption hysteresis in large regular and random networks and 2) the results of using reactive sites in separation membranes, and compare these with experiments.

  4. Gas separation by adsorption in carbon nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekhai, Anton; Gatica, Silvina

    Gas separation by adsorption can be accomplished by three basic physical mechanisms: equilibria, kinetics, and steric effects. Equilibrium mechanisms rely on the strength of attraction between gas molecules and their substrate. For example, CO2 possesses the strongest, attractive interactions with its substrate. As a result, the equilibrium mechanism presents the most plausible strategy to separate carbon dioxide from mixtures. The specification of a sound adsorbent is the key for separation by adsorption. In this paper we investigate carbon nanohrons for selectivity of carbon dioxide over methane. Carbon Nanohorns resemble short, wide, highly defected single-wall nanotubes that end in conical tips (``horns''). In contrast to regular nanotubes that assemble into parallel bundles, nanohorns form spherical aggregates with the nanohorns arranged along radial directions. Using the simulation technique Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) we obtained the adsorption isotherms of CH4 and CO2 in a 2D array of carbon nanohorns. We estimated the selectivity based on the IAST approximation. We also study the adsorption of argon and neon and compare with experimental results. We acknowledge support from the Partnership for Reduced Dimension Materials (PRDM), NSF Grant No. DMR1205608.

  5. Far-from-equilibrium kinetic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubí, J. Miguel; Pérez-Madrid, Agustin

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the kinetics of activated processes that take place under far-from-equilibrium conditions, when the system is subjected to external driving forces or gradients or at high values of affinities. We use mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics to show that when a force is applied, the reaction rate depends on the force. In the case of a chemical reaction at high affinity values, the reaction rate is no longer constant but depends on affinity, which implies that the law of mass action is no longer valid. This result is in good agreement with the kinetic theory of reacting gases, which uses a Chapman-Enskog expansion of the probability distribution.

  6. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  7. Kinetic aspects of the adsorption of xyloglucan onto cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Dammak, Abir; Capron, Isabelle; Cathala, Bernard

    2015-08-28

    In this work, the adsorption of a neutral flexible polysaccharide, xyloglucan (XG), onto thin cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) surfaces has been investigated to get more insight into the CNC-XG association. Gold-coated quartz crystals were spin-coated with one layer of CNC, and XG adsorption was monitored in situ using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The adsorption of XG under flow at different concentrations did not result in the same surface concentration, which evidenced a kinetically controlled process. In an attempt to describe the binding of XG to CNCs, adsorption data were fitted to a kinetic model comprising a contribution from XG adsorption onto uncovered CNC surfaces and a contribution from XG adsorption after rearrangement. Kinetic studies evidenced the presence of two adsorption regimes as a function of XG concentration. For low XG concentrations, the kinetic constant for chain rearrangement is comparable to the kinetic constant for adsorption. This fact implies a rearrangement and alignment of XG molecules on CNCs. Differently, for higher XG concentrations, the kinetic constant related to the conformational rearrangement decreases, indicating that XG molecules have no time to laterally rearrange before new XG molecules adsorb. PMID:26179417

  8. ESTIMATION METHODS FOR PROCESS CONSTANTS AND PROPERTIES USED IN FATE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical property data, rate constants, and equilibrium constants are required for assessments of the fate of chemicals in the environment. Structure-activity relationship (SARs), property correlations, and reactivity correlations arex sources of such data that are increasingly r...

  9. Adsorption kinetics of Rhodamine-B on used black tea leaves

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rhodamine B (Rh-B) is one of the most common pollutants in the effluents of textile industries effluents in developing countries. This study was carried out to evaluate the applicability of used black tea leaves (UBTL) for the adsorptive removal of Rh-B from aqueous system by investigating the adsorption kinetics in batch process. The effects of concentration and temperature on adsorption kinetics were examined. First-, second- and pseudo-second order kinetic equations were used to investigate the adsorption mechanism. The adsorption of Rh-B on UBTL followed pseudo-second order kinetics. The equilibrium amount adsorbed and the equilibrium concentration were calculated from pseudo-second-order kinetic plots for different initial concentrations of Rh-B to construct the adsorption isotherm. The adsorption isotherm was well expressed by Langmuir equation. The maximum adsorption capacity of UBTL to Rh-B was found to be 53.2 mg/g at pH = 2.0. The equilibrium amount adsorbed, calculated from pseudo-second-order kinetic plots, increased with temperature increase. The positive value of enthalpy of adsorption, ΔHads = 31.22 kJ/mol, suggested that the adsorption of Rh-B on UBTL at pH = 2.0 is an endothermic process. PMID:23369452

  10. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  11. Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon preadsorbed with naphtalene.

    PubMed

    Zimny, T; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2005-05-01

    The adsorption of water vapor on a microporous activated carbon derived from the carbonization of coconut shell has been studied. Preadsorption of naphthalene was used as a tool to determine the location and the influence of the primary adsorbing centers within the porous structure of active carbon. The adsorption was studied in the pressure range p/p0=0-0.95 in a static water vapor system, allowing the investigation of both kinetic and equilibrium experimental data. Modeling of the isotherms using the modified equation of Do and Do was applied to determine the effect of preadsorption on the mechanism of adsorption. PMID:15797395

  12. Effective interactions in multisite cells for adsorption in microporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demontis, Pierfranco; Pazzona, Federico G.; Suffritti, Giuseppe B.

    2009-04-01

    Local, discrete models of self-interacting multisite adsorption cells have been shown to be able to provide a coarse-grained representation of equilibrium properties of small molecules adsorbed in nanoporous materials at the mesoscopic scale. In the present work we show how the essential statistical properties of a host cell of structured sites with multiple adsorption energies and particle-particle interactions (that is the partition function, the average energy, and the average number of guests close to the windows connecting the cell to its surroundings) can be reproduced by a less-structured cell with two occupancy-dependent adsorption energy levels.

  13. Adsorption mechanisms and effect of temperature in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. meaning of the classical Van't Hoff plot in chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2006-07-01

    The effect of temperature on the adsorption and retention behaviors of a low molecular weight compound (phenol) on a C18-bonded silica column (C18-Sunfire, Waters) from aqueous solutions of methanol (20%) or acetonitrile (15%) was investigated. The results of the measurements were interpreted successively on the basis of the linear (i.e., overall retention factors) and the nonlinear (i.e., adsorption isotherms, surface heterogeneity, saturation capacities, and equilibrium constants) chromatographic methods. The confrontation of these two approaches confirmed the impossibility of a sound physical interpretation of the conventional Van't Hoff plot. The classical linear chromatography theory assumes that retention is determined by the equilibrium thermodynamics of analytes between a homogeneous stationary phase and a homogeneous mobile phase (although there may be two or several types of interactions). From values of the experimental retention factors in a temperature interval and estimates of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution in the same temperature interval provided by the UNIFAC group contribution method, evidence is provided that such a retention model cannot hold. The classical Van't Hoff plot appears meaningless and its linear behavior a mere accident. Results from nonlinear chromatography confirm these conclusions and provide explanations. The retention factors seem to fulfill the Van't Hoff equation, not the Henry constants corresponding to the different types of adsorption sites. The saturation capacities and the adsorption energies are clearly temperature dependent. The temperature dependence of these characteristics of the different assorption sites are different in aqueous methanol and acetonitrile solutions. PMID:16808477

  14. CO2 and humidity removal system for extended Shuttle missions - CO2, H2O, and trace contaminant equilibrium testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.; Kissinger, L. D.

    1977-01-01

    The equilibrium relationships for the co-adsorption of CO2 and H2O on an amine coated acrylic ester are presented. The equilibrium data collection and reduction techniques are discussed. Based on the equilibrium relationship, other modes of operation of systems containing HS-C are discussed and specific space applications for HS-C are presented. Equilibrium data for 10 compounds which are found as trace contaminants in closed environments are also presented.

  15. Adsorption behavior of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) on boehmite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Chengshuai; Shih, Kaimin

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the interaction of perfluorochemicals, persistent pollutants with known human health effects, with mineral compounds in surface water and groundwater environments is essential to determining their fate and transport. Kinetic experiments showed that adsorption equilibrium can be achieved within 48 h and the boehmite (AlOOH) surface is receptive to perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorption. The adsorption isotherms estimated the maximum adsorption capacities of PFOS and PFOA on boehmite as 0.877 μg m(-2) and 0.633 μg m(-2), respectively. Compared to the adsorption capacity on γ-alumina, the abundant hydroxyl groups on boehmite surfaces resulted in the 2-3 times higher adsorption of PFOS and PFOA. Increasing solution pH led to a moderate decrease in PFOS and PFOA adsorption, owing to an increase in ligand exchange reactions and the decrease of electrostatic interactions. The presence of NaCl and CaCl(2) in solution demonstrated negative effects for PFOS and PFOA adsorption on boehmite surfaces, with potential mechanisms being electrical double layer compression, competitive adsorption of chloride, and the Ca(2+) bridging effect between perfluorochemicals. PMID:22897837

  16. Neon and CO2 adsorption on open carbon nanohorns.

    PubMed

    Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Ziegler, Carl A; Banjara, Shree R; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, S; Migone, Aldo D

    2013-07-30

    We present the results of a thermodynamics and kinetics study of the adsorption of neon and carbon dioxide on aggregates of chemically opened carbon nanohorns. Both the equilibrium adsorption characteristics, as well as the dependence of the kinetic behavior on sorbent loading, are different for these two adsorbates. For neon the adsorption isotherms display two steps before reaching the saturated vapor pressure, corresponding to adsorption on strong and on weak binding sites; the isosteric heat of adsorption is a decreasing function of sorbent loading (this quantity varies by about a factor of 2 on the range of loadings studied), and the speed of the adsorption kinetics increases with increasing loading. By contrast, for carbon dioxide there are no substeps in the adsorption isotherms; the isosteric heat is a nonmonotonic function of loading, the value of the isosteric heat never differs from the bulk heat of sublimation by more than 15%, and the kinetic behavior is opposite to that of neon, with equilibration times increasing for higher sorbent loadings. We explain the difference in the equilibrium properties observed for neon and carbon dioxide in terms of differences in the relative strengths of adsorbate-adsorbate to adsorbate-sorbent interaction for these species. PMID:23802764

  17. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin on nanosized magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Peng, Z G; Hidajat, K; Uddin, M S

    2004-03-15

    Adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on nanosized magnetic particles (Fe(3)O(4)) was carried out in the presence of carbodiimide. The equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption process were studied. Nanosized magnetic particles (Fe(3)O(4)) were prepared by the chemical precipitation method using Fe2+, Fe3+ salts, and ammonium hydroxide under a nitrogen atmosphere. Characterizations of magnetic particles were carried out using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm the attachment of BSA on magnetic particles. Effects of pH and salt concentrations were investigated on the adsorption process. The experimental results show that the adsorption of BSA on magnetic particles was affected greatly by the pH, while the effect of salt concentrations was insignificant at a low concentration range. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm was fitted well by the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption of BSA on magnetic particles occurred at the isoelectric point of BSA. Adsorption kinetics was analyzed by a linear driving force mass-transfer model. BSA was desorbed from magnetic particles under alkaline conditions, which was confirmed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and FTIR results. PMID:14972603

  18. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z. )

    1992-02-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibria with anisotropic pressure are obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distributions or particle distributions measured along a satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibria including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator owing to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has a significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling the dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the taillike flux surface.

  19. On the Khinchin Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We prove known identities for the Khinchin constant and develop new identities for the more general Hoelder mean limits of continued fractions. Any of these constants can be developed as a rapidly converging series involving values of the Riemann zeta function and rational coefficients. Such identities allow for efficient numerical evaluation of the relevant constants. We present free-parameter, optimizable versions of the identities, and report numerical results.

  20. Solar constant secular changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.; Orosz, Jerome A.

    1990-01-01

    A recent model for solar constant secular changes is used to calculate a 'proxy' solar constant for: (1) the past four centuries, based upon the sunspot record, (2) the past nine centuries, based upon C-14 observations and their relation to solar activity, and (3) the next decade, based upon a dynamo theory model for the solar cycle. The proxy solar constant data is tabulated as it may be useful for climate modelers studying global climate changes.

  1. Kinetic Interpretation of Water Vapor Adsorption-Desorption Behavior of a Desiccant Rotor Showing S-shaped Adsorption Isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kumiko; Oshima, Kazunori; Takewaki, Takahiko; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor containing an iron aluminophosphate type zeolite FAM-Z01 (Functional Adsorbent Material Zeolite 01) was experimentally investigated for humidity swing. This rotor exhibited an S-shaped adsorption isotherm with its temperature dependence. Humidity swing, using a small piece of the rotor, could be usefully applied to interpret adsorption / desorption mechanisms by observing their rates. The most significant finding was that the adsorption / desorption rates in humidity swing could be described by the amount of adsorption, temperature and amplitude of the humidity swing, not by cycle time. Also, using the liner driving force (LDF) model, the overall mass transfer coefficient changed with the elapse of time or with the amount of adsorbed water. This implied that the LDF model, considering constant value of the overall mass transfer coefficient, was probably unable to explain the water adsorption / desorption behavior of FAM-Z01 desiccant rotor.

  2. Adsorption of atrazine on soils: model study.

    PubMed

    Kovaios, Ilias D; Paraskeva, Christakis A; Koutsoukos, Petros G; Payatakes, Alkiviades Ch

    2006-07-01

    The adsorption of the widely used herbicide atrazine onto three model inorganic soil components (silica gel, gamma-alumina, and calcite (CaCO(3)) was investigated in a series of batch experiments in which the aqueous phase equilibrated with the solid, under different solution conditions. Atrazine did not show discernible adsorption on gamma-alumina (theta=25 degrees C, 3.8adsorption from solutions was found for silica gel suspensions. The adsorption isotherms obtained for atrazine uptake on silica gel particles were best fitted with the Freundlich model. An increase of the ionic strength of the electrolytic solution induced an increase of the surface concentration of atrazine on silica gel, indicating significant electrostatic interactions between atrazine and silica gel particles, possibly through interaction with the surface silanol groups of the solid substrate. Increase of the pH value of the electrolyte solution from 6 to 9 considerably decreased the amount of atrazine adsorbed on the silica gel substrate. Decrease of the solution pH from 6 to 3 had only a slight effect on the surface concentration of the adsorbed atrazine. The adsorption of atrazine on silica gel increased when the temperature was decreased from 40 to 25 degrees C, an indication that the adsorption is exothermic. The calculated enthalpy of adsorption ( approximately 10 kJ/mol) indicates that the uptake at the solid-liquid equilibrium pH (6.1) was largely due to physisorption. PMID:16556447

  3. Poliovirus Adsorption by 34 Minerals and Soils

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Rebecca S.; Taylor, Dene H.; Sturman, Lawrence S.; Reddy, Michael M.; Fuhs, G. Wolfgang

    1981-01-01

    The adsorption of radiolabeled infectious poliovirus type 2 by 34 well-defined soils and mineral substrates was analyzed in a synthetic freshwater medium containing 1 mM CaCl2 and 1.25 mM NaHCO3 at pH 7. In a model system, adsorption of poliovirus by Ottawa sand was rapid and reached equilibrium within 1 h at 4°C. Near saturation, the adsorption could be described by the Langmuir equation; the apparent surface saturation was 2.5 × 106 plaque-forming units of poliovirus per mg of Ottawa sand. At low surface coverage, adsorption was described by the Freundlich equation. The soils and minerals used ranged from acidic to basic and from high in organic content to organic free. The available negative surface charge on each substrate was measured by the adsorption of a cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. Most of the substrates adsorbed more than 95% of the virus. In general, soils, in comparison with minerals, were weak adsorbents. Among the soils, muck and Genesee silt loam were the poorest adsorbents; among the minerals, montmorillonite, glauconite, and bituminous shale were the least effective. The most effective adsorbents were magnetite sand and hematite, which are predominantly oxides of iron. Correlation coefficients for substrate properties and virus adsorption revealed that the elemental composition of the adsorbents had little effect on poliovirus uptake. Substrate surface area and pH, by themselves, were not significantly correlated with poliovirus uptake. A strong negative correlation was found between poliovirus adsorption and both the contents of organic matter and the available negative surface charge on the substrates as determined by their capacities for adsorbing the cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. PMID:6274259

  4. The role of metal ion-ligand interactions during divalent metal ion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Daniel S; Crawford, Russell J; Harding, Ian H

    2015-09-15

    A suite of seven different divalent metal ions (Ca(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Mg(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II)) was adsorbed from solution onto two Fe2O3 samples, quartz SiO2 and three different amphoteric polystyrene latices (containing amine and carboxyl functional groups). For the metal oxides, a high correlation was observed between the pH at which 50% of the metal was removed from solution (pH50) and the first hydrolysis constant for the metal ion (pK1). For the polystyrene latices, a much higher correlation was observed between the pH50 and pKc (equilibrium constant describing metal-carboxyl affinity) as opposed to pK1. These observations provide evidence of a strong relationship that exists between a metal's affinity for a particular ligand in solution and for that metal ion's affinity for the same ligand present as part of an adsorbing surface. The isoelectric point of the amphoteric latex surface can be increased by decreasing the carboxyl content of the latex surface. For all 7 metal ions, this resulted in a substantial decrease, for any given pH, in adsorption. We suggest that this may be partly due to the decreased carboxyl content, but is dominantly attributable to the presence of less favorable electrostatic conditions. This, in turn, demonstrates that electrostatics play a controlling role in metal ion adsorption onto amphoteric latex surfaces and, in addition to the nature of the metal ion, also controls the pH at which adsorption takes place. PMID:26001134

  5. Novel sandwich structure adsorptive membranes for removal of 4-nitrotoluene from water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuexin; Jia, Zhiqian

    2016-11-01

    Novel sandwich PES-SPES/PS-PDVB/PTFE adsorptive membranes were prepared by a filtration/immersion precipitation method and employed for the removal of 4-nitrotoluene from water. The static adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics, dynamic adsorption/desorption and membrane reusability were investigated. The results showed that the Freundlich model describes the adsorption isotherm satisfactorily. With increased PS-PDVB content, the maximum static adsorption capacity, partition coefficient, apparent adsorption rate constant, and dynamic adsorption capacity all significantly increased. The sandwich membranes showed much higher removal efficiency and adsorption capacity than those of mixed matrix membranes. With respect to dynamics adsorption/desorption, the sandwich membranes exhibited excellent reusability, with a removal efficiency greater than 95% even after five recycles. PMID:27322899

  6. Equilibrium games in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Angsheng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pan, Yicheng; Peng, Pan

    2014-12-01

    It seems a universal phenomenon of networks that the attacks on a small number of nodes by an adversary player Alice may generate a global cascading failure of the networks. It has been shown (Li et al., 2013) that classic scale-free networks (Barabási and Albert, 1999, Barabási, 2009) are insecure against attacks of as small as O(logn) many nodes. This poses a natural and fundamental question: Can we introduce a second player Bob to prevent Alice from global cascading failure of the networks? We proposed a game in networks. We say that a network has an equilibrium game if the second player Bob has a strategy to balance the cascading influence of attacks by the adversary player Alice. It was shown that networks of the preferential attachment model (Barabási and Albert, 1999) fail to have equilibrium games, that random graphs of the Erdös-Rényi model (Erdös and Rényi, 1959, Erdös and Rényi, 1960) have, for which randomness is the mechanism, and that homophyly networks (Li et al., 2013) have equilibrium games, for which homophyly and preferential attachment are the underlying mechanisms. We found that some real networks have equilibrium games, but most real networks fail to have. We anticipate that our results lead to an interesting new direction of network theory, that is, equilibrium games in networks.

  7. Adsorption Behavior of Metasilicate on N-Methyl d-Glucamine Functional Groups and Associated Silicon Isotope Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wei, Hai-Zhen; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Eastoe, Christopher J; Guo, Qi; Lin, Yi-Bo

    2016-09-01

    Significant isotope fractionation of silicon provides a powerful geochemical tracer for biological and physicochemical processes in terrestrial and marine environments. The exact mechanism involved in silicon uptake as part of the biological process is not well known. The silicon uptake in biological processes is investigated using silicate adsorption onto the N-methylglucamine functional group (sugarlike structure, abbreviated as L) of Amberlite IRA-743 resin as an analogue of the formation of silicate-sugar complexes in plants. This study provides new evidence that certain sugars can react readily with basic silicic acid to form sugar-silicate chelating complexes, and the equilibrium adsorption behavior of silicate can be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with a Gibbs free energy (ΔG) of -11.94 ± 0.21 kJ·mol(-1) at 293 K. The adsorption kinetics corresponds well to a first-order kinetic model in which the adsorption rate constant ka of 1.25 × 10(-4) s(-1) and the desorption rate constant kd of 4.00 × 10(-6) s(-1) are obtained at 293 K. Both ka and kd increase with increasing temperature. The bonding configurations of silicate-sugar complexes imply the principal coordination complex of hexacoordinated silicon (silicon/L = 1:3) in the liquid phase and the dominant tetracoordinated silicon in the solid phase. Similar to those of many natural processes, the biological uptake via the sugar-silicate chelating complexes favors the preferential enrichment of light Si isotopes into solids, and the Rayleigh model controls the dynamic isotope fractionation with an estimated silicon isotope fractionation factor (i.e., αsolid-solution = [Formula: see text]) of 0.9971. This study advanced the fundamental understanding of the dynamic isotope fractionation of silicon during silicon cycling from the lithosphere to the biosphere and hydrosphere in surficial processes. PMID:27499230

  8. Competitive adsorption of molybdenum in the presence of phosphorus or sulfur on gibbsite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anion adsorption on the aluminum oxide, gibbsite was investigated as a function of solution pH (3-11) and equilibrium solution Mo (3.13, 31.3, or 313 µM), P (96.9 µM), or S (156 µM)concentration. Adsorption of all three anions decreased with increasing pH. Electrophoretic mobility measurements indi...

  9. BORONATE AFFINITY ADSORPTION OF RNA: POSSIBLE ROLE OF CONFORMATIONAL CHANGES. (R825354)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Batch equilibrium adsorption isotherm determination is used to characterize the adsorption of mixed yeast RNA on agarose-immobilized m-aminophenylboronic acid. It is shown that the affinity-enhancing influence of divalent cations depends strongly on the precise nature of t...

  10. Removal of water and iodine by solid sorbents: adsorption isotherms and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    2013-07-01

    Tritium and iodine-129 are two major radioactive elements that are present in off-gases from spent fuel reprocessing plants. Adsorption by solid sorbents is the state-of-the-art technique for removal of these species from off-gases. Modeling and simulating adsorption processes require accurate adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data to permit reasonable estimates of process parameters. We have developed a continuous flow single-pellet adsorption system to gather accurate adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data for adsorption of water by molecular sieve 3A and for adsorption of iodine by silver exchanged mordenite. In this paper, the design of the water and iodine adsorption experimental systems are briefly described and results of water adsorption experiments are presented and discussed. Water uptake curves are fitted with the linear-driving force (LDF) model and the shrinking-core model to determine kinetic parameters. It is shown that the kinetics of water adsorption on zeolite 3A under current experimental conditions is controlled by both the external film resistance and the macro-pore diffusion and can be predicted by both the LDF model and the shrinking-core model with the former one performing slightly better. Preliminary results from iodine adsorption experiments will be presented in the conference.

  11. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  12. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  13. Biosorption of Cu(II) by immobilized microalgae using silica: kinetic, equilibrium, and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongkyun; Shim, Eunjung; Yun, Hyun-Shik; Park, Young-Tae; Kim, Dohyeong; Ji, Min-Kyu; Kim, Chi-Kyung; Shin, Won-Sik; Choi, Jaeyoung

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized microalgae using silica (IMS) from Micractinium reisseri KGE33 was synthesized through a sol-gel reaction. Green algal waste biomass, the residue of M. reisseri KGE33 after oil extraction, was used as the biomaterial. The adsorption of Cu(II) on IMS was tested in batch experiments with varying algal doses, pH, contact times, initial Cu(II) concentrations, and temperatures. Three types of IMSs (IMS 14, 70, and 100) were synthesized according to different algal doses. The removal efficiency of Cu(II) in the aqueous phase was in the following order: IMS 14 (77.0%) < IMS 70 (83.3%) < IMS 100 (87.1%) at pH 5. The point of zero charge (PZC) value of IMS100 was 4.5, and the optimum pH for Cu(II) adsorption was 5. Equilibrium data were described using a Langmuir isotherm model. The Langmuir model maximum Cu(II) adsorption capacity (q m) increased with the algal dose in the following order: IMS 100 (1.710 mg g(-1)) > IMS 70 (1.548 mg g(-1)) > IMS 14 (1.282 mg g(-1)). The pseudo-second-order equation fitted the kinetics data well, and the value of the second-order rate constant increased with increasing algal dose. Gibbs free energies (ΔG°) were negative within the temperature range studied, which indicates that the adsorption process was spontaneous. The negative value of enthalpy (ΔH°) again indicates the exothermic nature of the adsorption process. In addition, SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of the IMS surface reveal that the algal biomass on IMS is the main site for Cu(II) binding. This study shows that immobilized microalgae using silica, a synthesized biosorbent, can be used as a cost-effective sorbent for Cu(II) removal from the aqueous phase. PMID:25953610

  14. Study of polyethyleneimine- and amidoxime-functionalized hybrid biomass of Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis for adsorption of uranium (VI) ion.

    PubMed

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Akbulut, Aydin; Arica, M Yakup

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the potential application of the polyethyleneimine- (PEI) and amidoxime-modified Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis biomasses for the removal of uranium ion in batch mode using the native biomass as a control system. The uranium ion adsorption was also characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra, zeta potential analysis, and surface area measurement studies. The effects of pH, biomass amount, contact time, initial uranium ion concentration, and ionic strength were evaluated by using native and modified algal biomass preparations. The uranium ion removal was rapid, with more than 70% of total adsorption taking place in 40 min, and equilibrium was established within 60 min. From the experimental data, it was found that the amount of adsorption uranium ion on the algal preparations decreased in the following series: amidoxime-modified algal biomass > PEI-modified algal biomass > native algal biomass. Maximum adsorption capacities of amidoxime- and PEI-modified, and native algal biomasses were found to be 366.8, 279.5, and 194.6 mg/g, respectively, in batchwise studies. The adsorption rate of U(VI) ion by amidoxime-modified algal biomass was higher than those of the native and PEI-modified counterparts. The adsorption processes on all the algal biomass preparations followed by the Dubinin-Radushkevitch (D-R) and Temkin isotherms and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The thermodynamic parameters were determined at four different temperatures (i.e., 15, 25, 35, and 45 °C) using the thermodynamics constant of the Temkin isotherm model. The ΔH° and ΔG° values of U(VI) ion adsorption on algal preparations show endothermic heat of adsorption; higher temperatures favor the process. The native and modified algal biomass preparations were regenerated using 10 mM HNO3. These results show that amidoxime-modified algal biomass can be a potential candidate for effective removal of U(VI) ion from

  15. Iron(III) Thiocyanate Revisited: A Physical Chemistry Equilibrium Lab Incorporating Ionic Strength Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Cathy L.; Love, G. A.

    1998-01-01

    A physical chemistry laboratory exercise is presented in which the thermodynamic equilibrium constant for Fe3+ + SCN- <--> Fe(SCN)2+ in 0.5 M acid is calculated from the experimentally observed equilibrium constant and activity coefficients generated by the Davies extension of the Debye-Hückel theory.

  16. Removal of uranium(VI) from aqueous solutions by manganese oxide coated zeolite: discussion of adsorption isotherms and pH effect.

    PubMed

    Han, Runping; Zou, Weihua; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Lu

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the adsorption properties for uranium(VI) by manganese oxide coated zeolite (MOCZ). The removal of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution by adsorption onto MOCZ in a single-component system with various contact times, pH, competitive ions, temperatures and initial concentrations of uranium(VI) was investigated. The experimental results were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and the three-parameter Redlich-Peterson model isotherms to obtain the characteristic parameters of each model. Both the Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherms were found to best represent the measured adsorption data. According to the evaluation using the Langmuir equation, the maximum adsorption capacity of uranium(VI) ions onto MOCZ was 15.1 mg g(-1) at 293K and pH 4.0. Using the thermodynamic equilibrium constants obtained at different temperatures, various thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG(0), DeltaH(0) and DeltaS(0), have been calculated. The thermodynamics of uranium(VI) ion/MOCZ system indicates the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. It was noted that an increase in temperature resulted in a higher uranium loading per unit weight of the adsorbent. PMID:17258360

  17. Determination of the Vibrational Constants of Some Diatomic Molecules: A Combined Infrared Spectroscopic and Quantum Chemical Third Year Chemistry Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    In one option for this project, the rotation-vibration infrared spectra of a number of gaseous diatomic molecules were recorded, from which the fundamental vibrational wavenumber, the force constant, the rotation-vibration interaction constant, the equilibrium rotational constant, and the equilibrium internuclear distance were determined.…

  18. Adsorption of Phosphate on Goethite: An Undergraduate Research Laboratory Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tribe, Lorena; Barja, Beatriz C.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory experiment on the adsorption of phosphate on goethite is presented, which also includes discussion on surface properties, interfaces, acid-base equilibrium, molecular structure and solid state chemistry. It was seen that many students were able to produce qualitatively correct results for a complex system of real interest and they…

  19. [Adsorption characteristics of f2 bacteriophages by four substrates in constructed wetland].

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Zheng, Xiang; Wei, Yuan-Song; Yang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Performance of f2 phages adsorption by four substrates including anthracite coal, steel slag, zeolite and forsterite was investigated through batch and dynamic experiments. Results of batch experiments showed that the removal efficiency of f2 phages by these four substrates was in the order of anthracite > steel slag > forsterite approximately zeolite. The adsorption of f2 phages by anthracite experienced fast, medium and slow stages, and the removal efficiency of f2 phages increased gradually with the increase of anthracite dosage, e. g. the optimized dosage of anthracite was 8.0 g at a solid/liquid ratio of 1:12.5 (m/V). The isothermal adsorption of all four substrates was described with Freundlich and Langmuir isothermal adsorption equation very well, and the adsorption of f2 phages by both anthracite and steel slag fitted pseudo-second order adsorption kinetics at their theoretical adsorption capacities of 3. 35 x 10(8) PFU.g-1 and 2.56 x 10(8) PFU.g-1, respectively, nearly the same as the equilibrium adsorption capacities obtained under the experiment conditions. And the liquid diffusion process was a rate-limiting step of the adsorption of f2 phage by both anthracite and steel slag, but not the only one. The results of dynamic adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption process of f2 phages in the three adsorption columns including anthracite, steel slag and zeolite experienced four stages of adaption, adsorption, pulse adsorption and adsorption equilibrium, and the total removal rates of f2 phages were more than 2. 55 Ig. PMID:24364309

  20. The Adsorption of Polyelectrolytes on Hydroxyapatite Crystals.

    PubMed

    Tsortos; Nancollas

    1999-01-01

    The adsorption of two polyelectrolytes, poly-L-Glutamate and poly-L-Aspartate, on hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Langmuir adsorption isotherms were obtained for both these molecules, with binding constants K = 6 x 10(6) and 3 x 10(6) M-1, respectively, at 37.0 degreesC, pH 7.4, and 0.15 M ionic strength. A theoretical analysis of the data, based on a model proposed by Hesselink, suggested a "train-loop" type of adsorption with non-electrostatic energy terms 3.51 and 4.76 (kT) for poly-L-Glu and poly-L-Asp, respectively. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:9878142

  1. Adsorption Analysis of Lactoferrin to Titanium, Stainless Steel, Zirconia, and Polymethyl Methacrylate Using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance Method

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Eiji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    It is postulated that biofilm formation in the oral cavity causes some oral diseases. Lactoferrin is an antibacterial protein in saliva and an important defense factor against biofilm development. We analyzed the adsorbed amount of lactoferrin and the dissociation constant (Kd) of lactoferrin to the surface of different dental materials using an equilibrium analysis technique in a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurement. Four different materials, titanium (Ti), stainless steel (SUS), zirconia (ZrO2) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), were evaluated. These materials were coated onto QCM sensors and the surfaces characterized by atomic force microscopic observation, measurements of surface roughness, contact angles of water, and zeta potential. QCM measurements revealed that Ti and SUS showed a greater amount of lactoferrin adsorption than ZrO2 and PMMA. Surface roughness and zeta potential influenced the lactoferrin adsorption. On the contrary, the Kd value analysis indicated that the adsorbed lactoferrin bound less tightly to the Ti and SUS surfaces than to the ZrO2 and PMMA surfaces. The hydrophobic interaction between lactoferrin and ZrO2 and PMMA is presumed to participate in better binding of lactoferrin to ZrO2 and PMMA surfaces. It was revealed that lactoferrin adsorption behavior was influenced by the characteristics of the material surface. PMID:26998486

  2. pi-Selective stationary phases: (II) Adsorption behavior of substituted aromatic compounds on n-alkyl-phenyl stationary phases

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A; Mayfield, Kirsty; Dennis, Gary; Shalliker, R. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The frontal analysis method was used to measure the adsorption isotherms of phenol, 4-chlorophenol, p-cresol, 4-methoxyphenol and caffeine on a series of columns packed with home-made alkyl-phenyl bonded silica particles. These ligands consist of a phenyl ring tethered to the silica support via a carbon chain of length ranging from 0 to 4 atoms. The adsorption isotherm models that fit best to the data account for solute-solute interactions that are likely caused by p-p interactions occurring between aromatic compounds and the phenyl group of the ligand. These interactions are the dominant factor responsible for the separation of low molecular weight aromatic compounds on these phenyl-type stationary phases. The saturation capacities depend on whether the spacer of the ligands have an even or an odd number of carbon atoms, with the even alkyl chain lengths having a greater saturation capacity than the odd alkyl chain lengths. The trends in the adsorption equilibrium constant are also significantly different for the even and the odd chain length ligands.

  3. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are…

  4. A thermodynamic model for gas adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Riazi, M.R.; Khan, A.R.

    1999-02-15

    In this paper based on the principle of solution thermodynamics for gas-solid equilibrium, a relation is developed to express gas adsorption isotherms. An activity coefficient model based on weight fraction of sorbate in the solid phase has been derived that well describes the behavior of various gases on different types of adsorbents. The proposed model has been evaluated and compared with four other models commonly used for gas adsorption isotherms in the literature. For 12 different systems at various isotherms for the temperature range {minus}128 to 100 C and the pressure range 0.02 to 1219 kPa for 689 data points, the proposed model predicts equilibrium pressure with an average deviation of 5.3%, which is about half of the error obtained from other methods. The proposed model clearly outperforms other available methods such as the vacancy solution theory, the ideal adsorption solution model, and other various modified forms of the Langmuir isotherm. Unique features of the proposed model are its simplicity, generality, and accuracy over the entire pressure and temperature ranges.

  5. [Adsorption of Congo red from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yan-Hui; Lin, Jian-Wei

    2013-08-01

    The adsorption of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite was investigated using batch experiments. The hydroxyapatite was effective for CR removal from aqueous solution. The adsorption kinetics of CR on hydroxyapatite well followed a pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium adsorption data of CR on hydroxyapatite could be described by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and showed that the adsorption of CR on hydroxyapatite was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The CR adsorption capacity for hydroxyapatite decreased significantly with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Thermal regeneration showed that hydroxyapatite could be used for six desorption-adsorption cycles with high removal efficiency for CR in each cycle. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value below the pH at point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) include electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value above its pH(PZC) include hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. Results of this work indicate that hydroxyapatite is a promising adsorbent for CR removal from aqueous solution. PMID:24191561

  6. Mechanism of amitriptyline adsorption on Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2).

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Hsiang; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Li, Zhaohui; Kuo, Chung-Yih; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Chen, Wan-Ru; Lv, Guocheng

    2014-07-30

    The uptake of amitriptyline (AMI) from aqueous environment by Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2) was studied in a batch system under different physicochemical conditions. The adsorbent was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. The AMI adsorption on SAz-2 obeyed the Langmuir isotherm with a capacity of 330mg/g (1.05mmol/g) at pH 6-7. The adsorption kinetics was fast, almost reaching equilibrium in 2h, and followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Desorption of exchangeable cations correlated with the AMI adsorption well, indicating that cation exchange was the major mechanism. X-ray diffraction patterns showing significant expansions of the d001 spacing and characteristic FTIR band shifts toward higher frequencies after AMI adsorption onto SAz-2 indicated that the adsorbed AMI molecules were intercalated into the interlayers of the mineral. Thermodynamic parameters based on partitioning coefficients suggested that the AMI adsorption was an endothermic physisorption at high adsorption levels. At low and higher AMI adsorption levels, the intercalated AMI molecules take a horizontal monolayer and bilayer conformation, respectively. The higher adsorption capacity suggested that SAz-2 could be a good candidate to remove AMI from wastewater and would be an important environmental sink for the fate and transport of AMI in soils and groundwater. PMID:24373983

  7. ARSENIC TREATMENT BY ADSORPTIVE TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the removal of arsenic from drinking water using the adsorptive media treatment process. Fundamental information is provided on the design and operation of adsorptive media technology including the selection of the adsorptive media. The information cites...

  8. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  9. The cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs.

  10. Space Shuttle astrodynamical constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, B. F.; Williamson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Basic space shuttle astrodynamic constants are reported for use in mission planning and construction of ground and onboard software input loads. The data included here are provided to facilitate the use of consistent numerical values throughout the project.

  11. Constant potential pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of constant potential pulse polarography, In which all pulses are to be the same potential, is presented theoretically and evaluated experimentally. The response obtained is in the form of a faradaic current wave superimposed on a constant capacitative component. Results obtained with a computer-controlled system exhibit a capillary response current similar to that observed In normal pulse polarography. Calibration curves for Pb obtained using a modified commercial pulse polarographic instrument are in good accord with theoretical predictions.

  12. Adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics of acid Bordeaux B from aqueous solution by graphene oxide/PAMAMs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; He, Shengfu; Zhang, Chen; Peng, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide/polyamidoamines dendrimers (GO/PAMAMs) composites were synthesized via modifying GO with 2.0 G PAMAM. The adsorption behavior of the GO/PAMAMs for acid Bordeaux B (ABB) was studied and the effects of media pH, adsorption time and initial ABB concentration on adsorption capacity of the adsorbent were investigated. The optimum pH value of the adsorption of ABB onto GO/PAMAMs was 2.5. The maximum adsorption capacity increased from 325.78 to 520.83 mg/g with the increase in temperature from 298 to 328 K. The equilibrium data followed the Langmuir isotherm model better than the Freundlich model. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of ABB onto GO/PAMAMs fit the pseudo-second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process was physisorption, and also an endothermic and spontaneous process. PMID:26398038

  13. Enhanced adsorptive removal of toxic dyes using SiO2 nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batool, S. S.; Imran, Z.; Hassan, Safia; Rasool, Kamran; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Rafiq, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Electrospinning method was used to synthesize porous SiO2 nanofibers. The adsorption of Methyl Orange and Safranin O by porous SiO2 nanofibers was carried out by varying the parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, dye concentration, and temperature. Equilibrium adsorption data followed Langmuir isotherms. Kinetic adsorption followed second-order rate kinetics model. The maximum adsorption capacity for Methyl Orange and Safranin O was found to be 730.9 mg/g and 960.4 mg/g, respectively. Acidic pH was favorable for the adsorption of Methyl Orange while basic pH was favorable for the adsorptions of Safranin O. Modeling study suggested the major mode of adsorption, while thermodynamic study showed the endothermic reactions. This effort has pronounced impact on environmental applications of SiO2 nanofibers as auspicious adsorbent nanofibers for organic material from aqueous solution.

  14. Adsorption of coliphages T1 and T7 to clay minerals.

    PubMed Central

    Schiffenbauer, M; Stotzky, G

    1982-01-01

    Coliphages T1 and T7 of Escherichia coli were absorbed by kaolinite (K) and montmorillonite (M). Maximum adsorption of T7 (96%) to M was greater than that of T1 (84%), but the adsorption of both coliphages to K was the same (99%). Positively charged sites (i.e., anion exchange sites) on the clays appeared to be primarily responsible for the adsorption of T1 to K but only partially responsible for the adsorption of T1 to M; equilibrium adsorption isotherms of T1 to K and M did not show a correlation between adsorption and the cation exchange capacity of the clays, and the reduction in adsorption caused by sodium metaphosphate (a polyanion that interacts with positively charged sites on clay) was more pronounced with K than with M. The equilibrium adsorption isotherms of T7 to K and M suggested a correlation between adsorption and the cation exchange capacity of the clays. However, studies with sodium metaphosphate indicated that T7 also adsorbed to positively charged sites on the clays, especially on K. Adsorption of the coliphages to positively charged sites was greater with K than with M, probably because the ratio of positively charged sites to negatively charged sites was greater on K than on M. PMID:7041821

  15. Optimization of salt adsorption rate in membrane capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R; Satpradit, O; Rijnaarts, H H M; Biesheuvel, P M; van der Wal, A

    2013-04-01

    Membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI) is a water desalination technique based on applying a cell voltage between two oppositely placed porous electrodes sandwiching a spacer channel that transports the water to be desalinated. In MCDI, ion-exchange membranes are positioned in front of each porous electrode to prevent co-ions from leaving the electrode region during ion adsorption, thereby enhancing the salt adsorption capacity. MCDI can be operated at constant cell voltage (CV), or at a constant electrical current (CC). In this paper, we present both experimental and theoretical results for desalination capacity and rate in MCDI (both in the CV- and the CC-mode) as function of adsorption/desorption time, salt feed concentration, electrical current, and cell voltage. We demonstrate how by varying each parameter individually, it is possible to systematically optimize the parameter settings of a given system to achieve the highest average salt adsorption rate and water recovery. PMID:23395310

  16. Adsorption of Ions at Uncharged Insoluble Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Peshkova, Tatyana V; Minkov, Ivan L; Tsekov, Roumen; Slavchov, Radomir I

    2016-09-01

    A method is proposed for the experimental determination of the adsorption of inorganic electrolytes at a surface covered with insoluble surfactant monolayer. This task is complicated by the fact that the change of the salt concentration alters both chemical potentials of the electrolyte and the surfactant. Our method resolves the question by combining data for the surface pressure versus area of the monolayer at several salt concentrations with data for the equilibrium spreading pressure of crystals of the surfactant (used to fix a standard state). We applied the method to alcohols spread at the surface of concentrated halide solutions. The measured salt adsorption is positive and has nonmonotonic dependence on the area per surfactant molecule. For the liquid expanded film, depending on the concentration, there is one couple of ions adsorbed per each 3-30 surfactant molecules. We analyzed which ion, the positive or the negative, stands closer to the surface, by measuring the effect of NaCl on the Volta potential of the monolayer. The potentiometric data suggest that Na(+) is specifically adsorbed, while Cl(-) remains in the diffuse layer, i.e., the surface is positively charged. The observed reverse Hofmeister series of the adsorptions of NaF, NaCl, and NaBr suggests the same conclusion holds for all these salts. The force that causes the adsorption of Na(+) seems to be the interaction of the ion with the dipole moment of the monolayer. PMID:27529571

  17. Adsorption of aqueous copper on peanut hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kanika Octavia

    A method was established for measuring the adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution to unmodified and modified peanut hulls at constant temperature and pH. Modification of the hulls was performed by oxidation with alkaline hydrogen peroxide. During the modification process, the hydrogen peroxide solubilizes the lignin component, making the surface more porous which increases the availability of binding sites, while simultaneously oxidizing the cellulose. The oxidation of alcohol groups creates more binding sites by creating functional groups such as COO-, which increases chelation to metal ions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms delignification of the peanut hulls by the disappearance of carboxyl peaks of the modified hulls, which were originally produced from the lignin content. Although, oxidation is not fully confirmed, it is not ruled out because the expected carboxylate peak (1680 cm-1) maybe overshadowed by a broad peak due to OH bending of water adsorbed to the hulls. Hulls adsorbed copper from solutions in the concentration range of 50-1000 ppm of CuCl2. Concentrations of pre- and post-adsorption solutions were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms were fit to known two and three-parameter models, evaluated and the binding mechanism was inferred. Maximum surface coverage was 3.5 +/- 0.6 mg Cu2+ /g hull for unmodified hulls and 11 +/- 1 mg Cu2+/g hull for modified hulls. The adsorption for the hulls is best described by the Langmuir model, suggesting monolayer, homogeneous adsorption. With a free energy of adsorption of 10.5 +/- 0.9 kJ/mol for unmodified hulls and 14.5 +/-0.4 kJ/mol for modified hulls, the process is categorized as chemisorption for both types of hulls. The adsorption for both hulls is also described by the Redlich-Peterson model, giving beta nearer to 1 than 0, which further suggests homogeneous adsorption described by the Langmuir model. After rinsing the hulls

  18. Interaction of bisphenol A with dissolved organic matter in extractive and adsorptive removal processes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fei-Die; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Lee, Byunghwan

    2012-05-01

    The fate of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in natural and engineered systems is complicated due to their interactions with various water constituents. This study investigated the interaction of bisphenol A (BPA) with dissolved organic matter (DOM) and colloids present in surface water and secondary effluent as well as its adsorptive removal by powdered activated carbons. The solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) method followed by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was utilized for determining the distribution of BPA molecules in water. The BPA removal by SPME decreased with the increased DOM content, where the formation of BPA-DOM complexes in an aqueous matrix was responsible for the reduced extraction of BPA. Colloidal particles in water samples sorbed BPA leading to the marked reduction of liquid phase BPA. BPA-DOM complexes had a negative impact on the adsorptive removal of BPA by powered activated carbons. The complex formation was characterized based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, along with the calculation of molecular interactions between BPA and functional groups in DOM. It was found that the hydrogen bonding between DOM and BPA would be preferred over aromatic interactions. A pseudo-equilibrium molecular coordination model for the complexation between a BPA molecule and a hydroxyl group of the DOM was developed, which enabled estimation of the maximum sorption site and complex formation constant as well as prediction of organic complexes at various DOM levels. PMID:22330311

  19. Ion-selective Marangoni instability coupled with the nonlinear adsorption/desorption rate.

    PubMed

    Hosohama, Tsugihiko; Megumi, Keitaro; Terakawa, Syuji; Nishimura, Junya; Iida, Youhei; Ban, Takahiko; Shioi, Akihisa

    2011-12-01

    An oil/water interface containing bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate and Ca(2+) or Fe(3+) exhibits spontaneous Marangoni instability associated with the fluctuation in interfacial tension. This instability rarely appears for oil/water systems with Mg(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Cu(2+), or Co(2+). The same ion selectivity is observed for n-heptane and nitrobenzene despite their significant differences in density, viscosity, and the dielectric constant of oil. We studied this instability under acidic pH conditions to avoid the neutralization reaction effects. The result of the equilibrium interfacial tension and the extraction ratio of cations indicates that a large number of oil-soluble complexes form at the interfaces of Ca(2+)-containing systems and probably for Fe(3+)-containing systems. The results obtained by oscillating drop tensiometry and Brewster angle microscopy indicate that desorption, rather than adsorption, is more significant to the onset of instability and that the resulting complex tends to form aggregates in the interface. This aggregation gives the nonlinear desorption rate of the oil-soluble complex. Then, exfoliation of the aggregating matter occurs, which triggers the Marangoni instability. The induced convection removes the oil-soluble complex accumulated at the interface, creating a renewed interface, which is necessary for the successive occurrence of the Marangoni instability. For the other cations, the oil-soluble compounds are insignificant, and they rarely form aggregates. In such cases, adsorption/desorption proceeds without instability. PMID:22017536

  20. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-08-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are applied. Equilibrium can be approached from different distributions of balls in the container under different conditions. The Le Châtelier principle can be demonstrated. Kinetic concepts can be demonstrated by changing the nature of the barrier, either changing the height or by having various sized holes in the barrier. Thermodynamic concepts can be demonstrated by taping over some or all of the openings and restricting air flow into container on either side of the barrier.

  1. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  2. The equilibrium dayside magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavriyev, Anton; Hasegawa, Akira

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented of computing the dayside global earth magnetic field which is in equilibrium with the plasma pressure, based on satellite observations at a local region of the magnetosphere. The method, which utilizes a perturbation around a dipole magnetic field, involves computation of the global plasma pressure profile based on the equatorial (anisotropic) pressure data, derivation of the current profile which satisfies the equilibrium condition, and computation of the magnetic field using the current profile and the boundary current produced by the solar wind. The method is applied for the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers data, and the result of the computation is found to compare reasonably well with the observed magnetic field profile near the geomagnetic equator.

  3. Study the adsorption of phenol from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaili; Pan, Jiayong; Chen, Yiwei; Cheng, Rongming; Xu, Xuecheng

    2009-01-15

    In this study, the hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanopowders prepared by chemical precipitation method were used as the adsorbent, and the potential of HAp nanopowders for phenol adsorption from aqueous solution was studied. The effect of contact time, initial phenol concentration, pH, adsorbent dosage, solution temperature and adsorbent calcining temperature on the phenol adsorption, and the adsorption kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic parameters were investigated. The results showed that the HAp nanopowders possessed good adsorption ability to phenol. The adsorption process was fast, and it reached equilibrium in 2h of contact. The initial phenol concentration, pH and the adsorbent calcining temperature played obvious effects on the phenol adsorption capacity onto HAp nanopowders. Increase in the initial phenol concentration could effectively increase the phenol adsorption capacity. At the same time, increase in the pH to high-acidity or to high-alkalinity also resulted in the increase in the phenol adsorption capacity. Increase in the HAp dosage could effectively increase the phenol adsorption percent. However, the higher calcining temperature of HAp nanopowders could obviously decrease the adsorption capacity. The maximum phenol adsorption capacity was obtained as 10.33mg/g for 400mg/L initial phenol concentrations at pH 6.4 and 60 degrees C. The adsorption kinetic and the isotherm studies showed that the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm were the best choices to describe the adsorption behaviors. The thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption of phenol onto HAp was physisorption, spontaneous and endothermic in nature. PMID:18573599

  4. Solids Far from Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godrèche, C.

    2011-03-01

    Preface; 1. Shape and growth of crystals P. Nozières; 2. Instabilities of planar solidification fronts B. Caroli, C. Caroli and B. Roulet; 3. An introduction to the kinetics of first-order phase transition J. S. Langer; 4. Dendritic growth and related topics Y. Pomeau and M. Ben Amar; 5. Growth and aggregation far from equilibrium L. M. Sander; 6. Kinetic roughening of growing surfaces J. Krug and H. Spohn; Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  5. Exoplanet Equilibrium Chemistry Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, J.; Bowman, M.; Blecic, J.

    2013-10-01

    Recently, Agundez et al. (2012, A&A 548, A73) used a chemical kinetics code to study a model HD 209458b (equilibrium temperature of 1450 K, assuming full redistribution and 0 albedo). They found that thermochemistry dominates most of the dayside, but that significant compositional gradients may exist across the dayside. We calculate equilibrium-chemistry molecular abundances for several model exoplanets, using NASA's open-source Chemical Equilibrium Abundances code (McBride and Gordon 1996). We vary the degree of radiation redistribution to the dark side, ranging from total redistribution to instantaneous reradiation. Atomically, both the solar abundance multiple and the carbon fraction vary. Planet substellar temperatures range from just above 1200 K, where photochemistry should no longer be important, to those of hot planets (3000 K). We present synthetic abundance images for the key spectroscopic molecules CO, CH4, and H2O for several hot-Jupiter model planets. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  6. Equilibrium Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.

    2015-03-01

    Since its prediction 15 years ago, hydrodynamic instability in concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface has been attributed to nonequilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current. This attribution had a double basis. On the one hand, it has been recognized that neither equilibrium electro-osmosis nor bulk electroconvection can yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. On the other hand, it has been shown that nonequilibrium electro-osmosis can. The first theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this Letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential of counterions in the solid) allows for the equilibrium electroconvective instability. In addition, we suggest a simple experimental test for determining the true, either equilibrium or nonequilibrium, origin of instability in concentration polarization.

  7. Adsorption study of Ammonia Nitrogen by watermelon rind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, A.; Yusof, L.; Beddu, N. S.; Galasin, N.; Lee, P. Y.; Lee, R. N. S.; Zahrim, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The utilization of fruit waste for low-cost adsorbents as a replacement for costly conventional methods of removing ammonia nitrogen from wastewater has been reviewed. The adsorption studies were conducted as a function of contact time and adsorbent dosage and it were carried out on four different adsorbents; fresh watermelon rind and modified watermelon rind with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4). Adsorbents were tested for characterization by using zeta potential test and all samples shows negative values thus makes it favourable for the adsorption process. The batch experimental result showed that adsorption process is rapid and equilibrium was established within 40 minutes of contact time. The ammonia nitrogen removal rate amounted in range of 96% to 99%, and the adsorption capacities were in range of 1.21 to 1.24 mg/g for all four different types of adsorbents used.

  8. Individual and competitive adsorption of phenol and nickel onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T.; El-Chaghaby, Ghadir A.; Helal, Farag S.

    2014-01-01

    Individual and competitive adsorption studies were carried out to investigate the removal of phenol and nickel ions by adsorption onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The carbon nanotubes were characterized by different techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. The different experimental conditions affecting the adsorption process were investigated. Kinetics and equilibrium models were tested for fitting the adsorption experimental data. The characterization experimental results proved that the studied adsorbent possess different surface functional groups as well as typical morphological features. The batch experiments revealed that 300 min of contact time was enough to achieve equilibrium for the adsorption of both phenol and nickel at an initial adsorbate concentration of 25 mg/l, an adsorbent dosage of 5 g/l, and a solution pH of 7. The adsorption of phenol and nickel by MWCNTs followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model and the intraparticle diffusion model was quite good in describing the adsorption mechanism. The Langmuir equilibrium model fitted well the experimental data indicating the homogeneity of the adsorbent surface sites. The maximum Langmuir adsorption capacities were found to be 32.23 and 6.09 mg/g, for phenol and Ni ions, respectively. The removal efficiency of MWCNTs for nickel ions or phenol in real wastewater samples at the optimum conditions reached up to 60% and 70%, respectively. PMID:26257938

  9. Effects of Humidity Swings on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Air purification systems are necessary to provide clean air in the closed environments aboard spacecraft. Trace contaminants are removed using adsorption. One major factor concerning the removal of trace contaminants is relative humidity. Water can reduce adsorption capacity and, due to constant fluctuations, its presence is difficult to incorporate into adsorption column designs. The purpose of the research was to allow for better design techniques in trace contaminant adsorption systems, especially for feeds with water present. Experiments and mathematical modeling research on effects of humidity swings on adsorption columns for air revitalization were carried out.

  10. Impact of biochar produced from post-harvest residue on the adsorption behavior of diesel oil on loess soil.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu Feng; Sun, Hang; Yves, Uwamungu J; Li, Hong; Hu, Xue Fei

    2016-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of biochar, produced from wheat residue at different temperatures, on the adsorption of diesel oil by loess soil. Kinetic and equilibrium data were processed to understand the adsorption mechanism of diesel by biochar-affected loess soil; dynamic and thermodynamic adsorption experiments were conducted to characterize this adsorption. The surface features and chemical structure of biochar, modified at varying pyrolytic temperatures, were investigated using surface scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The kinetic data showed that the adsorption of diesel oil onto loess soil could be described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model, with the rate-controlling step being intraparticle diffusion. However, in the presence of biochar, boundary layer control and intraparticle diffusion were both involved in the adsorption. Besides, the adsorption equilibrium data were well described by the Freundlich isothermal model. The saturated adsorption capacity weakened as temperature increased, suggesting a spontaneous exothermic process. Thermodynamic parameter analysis showed that adsorption was mainly a physical process and was enhanced by chemical adsorption. The adsorption capacity of loess soil for diesel oil was weakened with increasing pH. The biochar produced by pyrolytic wheat residue increased the adsorption behavior of petroleum pollutants in loess soil. PMID:25980560

  11. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  12. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  13. Adsorption properties of. cap alpha. -modification of boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilova, T.B.; Kiselev, A.V.; Parshina, I.V.; Roshchina, T.M.

    1986-11-01

    The adsorption properties of four samples of ..cap alpha..-BN were studied by means of gas chromatography. The particles of ..cap alpha..-BN particles, according to data obtained by electron microscopy, have the shape of thin platelets. A sample of ..cap alpha..-BN prepared from magnesium polyboride was found to be the most nearly homogeneous adsorbent. For a number of n-alkanes, benzene, and alkylbenzenes, data have been obtained on the retention volumes (Henry constants) and the differential heats of adsorption for surface coverages approaching zero. These thermodynamic data on the adsorption showed that ..cap alpha..-BN, like graphitized thermal carbon black, is a nonspecific adsorbent.

  14. Adsorption of alkenyl succinic anhydride from solutions in carbon tetrachloride on a fine magnetite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmasova, O. V.; Ramazanova, A. G.; Korolev, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption of alkenyl succinic anhydride from a solution in carbon tetrachloride on a fine magnetite surface at a temperature of 298.15 K is studied using fine magnetite, which forms the basis of magnetic fluids, as the adsorbent. An adsorption isotherm is recorded and interpreted in terms of the theory of the volume filling of micropores (TVFM). Adsorption process parameters are calculated on the basis of the isotherm. It is shown that at low equilibrium concentrations, the experimental adsorption isotherm is linear in the TVFM equation coordinates.

  15. Studies on Thorium Adsorption Characteristics upon Activated Titanium Hydroxide Prepared from Rosetta Ilmenite Concentrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gado, M Zaki, S

    2016-01-01

    The titanium hydroxide prepared from Rosetta ilmenite concentrate has been applied for Th (IV) adsorption from its acid aqueous solutions. The prepared hydroxide is first characterized by both Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum and thermogravimetric analysis. The relevant factors affecting the adsorption process have been studied. The obtained equilibrium data fits well with the Langmuir isotherm rather than Freundlich isotherm, while the adsorption kinetic data follow the pseudo-second order model. The different thermodynamic parameters have also been calculated and indicate that the adsorption process is spontaneous.

  16. Adsorption-Desorption Kinetics of Soft Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberg, Brendan; Nuebler, Johannes; Gerland, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Adsorption-desorption processes are ubiquitous in physics, chemistry, and biology. Models usually assume hard particles, but within the realm of soft matter physics the adsorbing particles are compressible. A minimal 1D model reveals that softness fundamentally changes the kinetics: Below the desorption time scale, a logarithmic increase of the particle density replaces the usual Rényi jamming plateau, and the subsequent relaxation to equilibrium can be nonmonotonic and much faster than for hard particles. These effects will impact the kinetics of self-assembly and reaction-diffusion processes.

  17. Equilibrium thermodynamics in modified gravitational theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2010-04-01

    We show that it is possible to obtain a picture of equilibrium thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in the expanding cosmological background for a wide class of modified gravity theories with the Lagrangian density f(R,ϕ,X), where R is the Ricci scalar and X is the kinetic energy of a scalar field ϕ. This comes from a suitable definition of an energy-momentum tensor of the “dark” component that respects to a local energy conservation in the Jordan frame. In this framework the horizon entropy S corresponding to equilibrium thermodynamics is equal to a quarter of the horizon area A in units of gravitational constant G, as in Einstein gravity. For a flat cosmological background with a decreasing Hubble parameter, S globally increases with time, as it happens for viable f(R) inflation and dark energy models. We also show that the equilibrium description in terms of the horizon entropy S is convenient because it takes into account the contribution of both the horizon entropy S' in non-equilibrium thermodynamics and an entropy production term.

  18. Adsorption of antimony onto iron oxyhydroxides: adsorption behavior and surface structure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuejun; Wu, Zhijun; He, Mengchang; Meng, Xiaoguang; Jin, Xin; Qiu, Nan; Zhang, Jing

    2014-07-15

    Antimony is detected in soil and water with elevated concentration due to a variety of industrial applications and mining activities. Though antimony is classified as a pollutant of priority interest by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Europe Union (EU), very little is known about its environmental behavior and adsorption mechanism. In this study, the adsorption behaviors and surface structure of antimony (III/V) on iron oxides were investigated using batch adsorption techniques, surface complexation modeling (SCM), X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The adsorption isotherms and edges indicated that the affinity of Sb(V) and Sb(III) toward the iron oxides depended on the Sb species, solution pH, and the characteristics of iron oxides. Sb(V) adsorption was favored at acidic pH and decreased dramatically with increasing pH, while Sb(III) adsorption was constant over a broad pH range. When pH is higher than 7, Sb(III) adsorption by goethite and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was greater than Sb(V). EXAFS analysis indicated that the majority of Sb(III), either adsorbed onto HFO or co-precipitated by FeCl3, was oxidized into Sb(V) probably due to the involvement of O2 in the long duration of sample preservation. Only one Sb-Fe subshell was filtered in the EXAFS spectra of antimony adsorption onto HFO, with the coordination number of 1.0-1.9 attributed to bidentate mononuclear edge-sharing ((2)E) between Sb and HFO. PMID:24910911

  19. Quality properties and adsorption behavior of freeze-dried beef meat from the Biceps femoris and Semimembranosus muscles.

    PubMed

    Aykın, Elif; Erbaş, Mustafa

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the quality properties and adsorption behavior of freeze-dried beef meat from the Biceps femoris and Semimembranosus muscles. Most quality properties of both muscles were similar apart from total fat content. Freeze-dried meat pieces were kept in ten different equilibrium levels of relative humidity (2.0-97.3%) at 5, 15, 25 and 30°C. The experimental data were evaluated using BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) and GAB (Guggenheim, Anderson and deBoer) models. The equilibrium moisture contents of freeze-dried Biceps femoris were lower than those of Semimembranosus at all water activities and temperature. The constants m0 and C of BET and GAB equations were determined to be between 6.27 and 8.07g/100g dry matter and 9.32-13.73, respectively. Constant k was about 0.90 at all temperatures, and the GAB equation exhibited a better fit to the experimental data of both muscles as a result of all %E values being approximately equal to 10%. PMID:27379930

  20. The Equilibrium Spreading Tension of Pulmonary Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Maayan P; Hall, Stephen B

    2015-12-01

    Monomolecular films at an air/water interface coexist at the equilibrium spreading tension (γ(e)) with the bulk phase from which they form. For individual phospholipids, γ(e) is single-valued, and separates conditions at which hydrated vesicles adsorb from tensions at which overcompressed monolayers collapse. With pulmonary surfactant, isotherms show that monolayers compressed on the surface of bubbles coexist with the three-dimensional collapsed phase over a range of surface tensions. γ(e) therefore represents a range rather than a single value of surface tension. Between the upper and lower ends of this range, rates of collapse for spread and adsorbed films decrease substantially. Changes during adsorption across this narrow region of coexistence between the two- and three-dimensional structures at least partially explain how alveolar films of pulmonary surfactant become resistant to collapse. PMID:26583569

  1. Chemical equilibrium. [maximizing entropy of gas system to derive relations between thermodynamic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The entropy of a gas system with the number of particles subject to external control is maximized to derive relations between the thermodynamic variables that obtain at equilibrium. These relations are described in terms of the chemical potential, defined as equivalent partial derivatives of entropy, energy, enthalpy, free energy, or free enthalpy. At equilibrium, the change in total chemical potential must vanish. This fact is used to derive the equilibrium constants for chemical reactions in terms of the partition functions of the species involved in the reaction. Thus the equilibrium constants can be determined accurately, just as other thermodynamic properties, from a knowledge of the energy levels and degeneracies for the gas species involved. These equilibrium constants permit one to calculate the equilibrium concentrations or partial pressures of chemically reacting species that occur in gas mixtures at any given condition of pressure and temperature or volume and temperature.

  2. Structural design using equilibrium programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple nonlinear programming methods are combined in the method of equilibrium programming. Equilibrium programming theory has been appied to problems in operations research, and in the present study it is investigated as a framework to solve structural design problems. Several existing formal methods for structural optimization are shown to actually be equilibrium programming methods. Additionally, the equilibrium programming framework is utilized to develop a new structural design method. Selected computational results are presented to demonstrate the methods.

  3. Kinetics and isotherms of Neutral Red adsorption on peanut husk.

    PubMed

    Han, Runping; Han, Pan; Cai, Zhaohui; Zhao, Zhenhui; Tang, Mingsheng

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption of Neutral Red (NR) onto peanut husk in aqueous solutions was investigated at 295 K. Experiments were carried out as function of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, and initial concentration. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich, and Toth isotherm models. The results indicated that the Toth and Langmuir models provided the best correlation of the experimental data. The adsorption capacity of peanut husk for the removal of NR was determined with the Langmuir and found to be 37.5 mg/g at 295 K. The adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic equations. It was seen that the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic equations could describe the adsorption kinetics. The intraparticle diffusion model was also used to express the adsorption process at the two-step stage. It was implied that peanut husk may be suitable as adsorbent material for adsorption of NR from aqueous solutions. PMID:19143308

  4. Boronate affinity adsorption of RNA: possible role of conformational changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Willson, R. C.; Fox, G. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Batch equilibrium adsorption isotherm determination is used to characterize the adsorption of mixed yeast RNA on agarose-immobilized m-aminophenylboronic acid. It is shown that the affinity-enhancing influence of divalent cations depends strongly on the precise nature of the cation used, with barium being far more effective than the conventionally-used magnesium. This adsorption-promoting influence of barium is suggested to arise primarily from ionic influences on the structure and rigidity of the RNA molecule, as the adsorption of ribose-based small molecules is not similarly affected. The substitution of barium for the standard magnesium counterion does not greatly promote the adsorption of DNA, implying that the effect is specific to RNA and may be useful in boronate-based RNA separations. RNA adsorption isotherms exhibit sharp transitions as functions of temperature, and these transitions occur at different temperatures with Mg2+ and with Ba2+. Adsorption affinity and capacity were found to increase markedly at lower temperatures, suggestive of an enthalpically favored interaction process. The stoichiometric displacement parameter, Z, in Ba2+ buffer is three times the value in Mg2+ buffer, and is close to unity.

  5. Continuous water treatment by adsorption and electrochemical regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, F M; Roberts, E P L; Hill, A; Campen, A K; Brown, N W

    2011-05-01

    This study describes a process for water treatment by continuous adsorption and electrochemical regeneration using an air-lift reactor. The process is based on the adsorption of dissolved organic pollutants onto an adsorbent material (a graphite intercalation compound, Nyex(®)1000) and subsequent electrochemical regeneration of the adsorbent leading to oxidation of the adsorbed pollutant. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherm for adsorption of a sample contaminant, the organic dye Acid Violet 17. The adsorbent circulation rate, the residence time distribution (RTD) of the reactor, and treatment by continuous adsorption and electrochemical regeneration were studied to investigate the process performance. The RTD behaviour could be approximated as a continuously stirred tank. It was found that greater than 98% removal could be achieved for continuous treatment by adsorption and electrochemical regeneration for feed concentrations of up to 300 mg L(-1). A steady state model has been developed for the process performance, assuming full regeneration of the adsorbent in the electrochemical cell. Experimental data and modelled predictions (using parameters for the adsorbent circulation rate, adsorption kinetics and isotherm obtained experimentally) of the dye removal achieved were found to be in good agreement. PMID:21511325

  6. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  7. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  8. XrayOpticsConstants

    2005-06-20

    This application (XrayOpticsConstants) is a tool for displaying X-ray and Optical properties for a given material, x-ray photon energy, and in the case of a gas, pressure. The display includes fields such as the photo-electric absorption attenuation length, density, material composition, index of refraction, and emission properties (for scintillator materials).

  9. Water Vapor Adsorption - Desorption Behavior of a Small Piece of Desiccant Rotor in Temperature Swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washio, Yasuko; Kodama, Akio

    This study aims to clarify the adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor onto / from a desiccant rotor in temperature swing. A magnetic suspension balance followed time variations of the weight of a small piece of desiccant rotor at various desorption temperature, adsorption / desorption time and their duration time ratio. Adsorption-desorption swing in steady state settled down at certain amplitude of the amount adsorbed keeping the balance of the adsorption and desorption rates averaged over each period. At low regeneration temperature around 40-50 oC, adsorption and desorption rates were affected considerably by the change of driving force of adsorption q*-q rather than the temperature dependence of the mass transfer coefficient. At constant adsorption and desorption air conditions, the adsorption /desorption rates could be summarized by the amount of adsorption and temperature, independently of the length of cycle time. Also, region of the amount of adsorption at which adsorption - desorption swing occurred was predicted considering the adsorption / desorption rates - amount adsorbed relationship and the adsorption / desorption duration ratio.

  10. Uranium removal from aqueous solution by coir pith: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Parab, Harshala; Joshi, Shreeram; Shenoy, Niyoti; Verma, Rakesh; Lali, Arvind; Sudersanan, M

    2005-07-01

    Basic aspects of uranium adsorption by coir pith have been investigated by batch equilibration. The influence of different experimental parameters such as final solution pH, adsorbent dosage, sorption time, temperature and various concentrations of uranium on uptake were evaluated. Maximum uranium adsorption was observed in the pH range 4.0-6.0. The Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the adsorption equilibrium. The equilibrium data fitted well to both the equilibrium models in the studied concentration range of uranium (200-800 mg/l) and temperatures (305-336 K). The coir pith exhibited the highest uptake capacity for uranium at 317 K, at the final solution pH value of 4.3 and at the initial uranium concentration of 800 mg/l. The kinetics of the adsorption process followed a second-order adsorption. The adsorbent used proved to be suitable for removal of uranium from aqueous solutions. 0.2 N HCl was effective in uranium desorption. The results indicated that the naturally abundant coir pith of otherwise nuisance value exhibited considerable potential for application in removal of uranium from aqueous solution. PMID:15734311

  11. Diffusional analysis of the adsorption of methyl iodide on silver exchanged mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.; Counce, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The removal of organic iodides from off-gas streams is an important step in controlling the release of radioactive iodine to the environment during the treatment of radioactive wastes or the processing of some irradiated materials. Nine-well accepted mass transfer models were evaluated for their ability to adequately explain the observed CH{sub 3}I uptake behavior onto the Ag{degrees}Z. Linear and multidimensional regression techniques were used to estimate the diffusion constants and other model parameters, which then permitted the selection of an appropriate mass transfer model. Although a number of studies have been conducted to evaluate the loading of both elemental and methyl iodide on silver-exchanged mordenite, these studies focused primarily on the macro scale (deep bed) while evaluating the material under a broad range of process conditions and contaminants for total bed loading at the time of breakthrough. A few studies evaluated equilibrium or maximum loading. Thus, to date, only bulk loading data exist for the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z. Hence this is believed to be the first study to quantify the controlling mass transfer mechanisms of this process, It can be concluded from the analysis of the experimental data obtained by the {open_quotes}single-pellet{close_quotes} type experiments and for the process conditions used in this study that the overall mass transfer rate associated with the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z is affected by both micropore and macropore diffusion. The macropore diffusion rate was significantly faster than the micropore diffusion, resulting in a two-step adsorption behavior which was adequately modeled by a bimodal pore distribution model. The micropore diffusivity was determined to be on the order of 2 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s. The system was also shown to be isothermal under all conditions of this study. 21 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Adsorption of a cationic surfactant by a magsorbent based on magnetic alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Layaly; El Kolli, Nadia; Dali, Noëlle; Talbot, Delphine; Abramson, Sébastien; Welschbillig, Mathias; Cabuil, Valérie; Bée, Agnès

    2014-10-15

    Adsorption of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cationic surfactant, by magnetic alginate beads (MagAlgbeads) was investigated. The magnetic adsorbent (called magsorbent) was prepared by encapsulation of magnetic functionalized nanoparticles in an alginate gel. The influence on CPC adsorption of several parameters such as contact time, pH and initial surfactant concentration was studied. The equilibrium isotherm shows that adsorption occurs through both electrostatic interactions with charge neutralization of the carboxylate groups of the beads and hydrophobic interactions inducing the formation of surfactant aggregates in the beads. The dosage of calcium ions released in the solution turns out to be a useful tool for understanding the adsorption mechanisms. Adsorption is accompanied by a shrinking of the beads that corresponds to a 45% reduction of the volume. Adsorption kinetic experiments show that equilibrium time is strongly dependent on the surfactant concentration, which monitors the nature of the interactions. On the other hand, since the pH affects the ionization state of adsorption sites, adsorption depends on the pH solution, maximum adsorption being obtained in a large pH range (3.2-12) in agreement with the pKa value of alginate (pKa=3.4-4.2). Finally, due to the formation of micelle-like surfactants aggregates in the magnetic alginate beads, they could be used as a new efficient magsorbent for hydrophobic pollutants. PMID:25086393

  13. Nanoscale elastic properties of montmorillonite upon water adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Davoud; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Whittle, Andrew J

    2012-12-11

    Smectites are an important group of clay minerals that experience swelling upon water adsorption. This paper uses molecular dynamics with the CLAYFF force field to simulate isothermal isobaric water adsorption of interlayer Wyoming Na-montmorillonite, a member of the smectite group. Nanoscale elastic properties of the clay-interlayer water system are calculated from the potential energy of the model system. The transverse isotropic symmetry of the elastic constant matrix was assessed by calculating Euclidean and Riemannian distance metrics. Simulated elastic constants of the clay mineral are compared with available results from acoustic and nanoindentation measurements. PMID:23181550

  14. Adsorption Model for Off-Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2011-03-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed in gPROMS software. Inputs include gas stream constituents, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. It models dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions for a multiple component gas stream. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which the breakthrough data is obtained. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data will be input into the adsorption model to develop a model specific for iodine adsorption on silver mordenite as well as model(s) specific for krypton and xenon adsorption. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Another future off-gas modeling goal is to develop a model for the unit operation absorption. The off-gas models will be made available via the server or web for evaluation by customers.

  15. Effect of organic matter and calcium carbonate on behaviors of cadmium adsorption-desorption on/from purple paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiulan; Jiang, Tao; Du, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Batch experiments and sequential extraction analysis were employed to investigate the effects of soil organic matter and CaCO3 on the adsorption and desorption of cadmium (Cd(2+)) onto and from two purple paddy soils, an acidic purple paddy soil (APPS) and a calcareous purple paddy soil (CPPS). The Cd(2+) adsorption isotherms on both soils could be well-described by the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. CPPS had a higher capacity and a stronger affinity for Cd(2+) adsorption compared with APPS. The adsorption process of Cd(2+) on APPS was dominated by electrostatic attractions, whereas the adsorption mechanism varied depending on the Cd(2+) concentrations in equilibrium solutions on CPPS. At low equilibrium concentrations, the adsorption process was primarily specific adsorption, but nonspecific adsorption dominated at high equilibrium concentrations. Removal of organic matter decreased the amount of Cd(2+) adsorption on both of the soils, slightly affected the Cd(2+) desorption rate and exchangeable Cd (EXC-Cd) in APPS and increased the desorption rate and EXC-Cd in CPPS, suggesting that the effect of organic matter on Cd(2+) adsorption-desorption depends on the soils. CPPS and APPS containing CaCO3 exhibited higher adsorption amounts but lower desorption rates and lower proportions of EXC-Cd than those of their corresponding soils without CaCO3, demonstrating that CaCO3 played an important role in Cd(2+) specific adsorption on soil. The changes in the thermodynamic parameters, including free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)) and entropy (ΔS(0)), as evaluated by the Van't Hoff equations, indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process with the primary interaction forces of dipole interactions and hydrogen bonds on APPS, whereas both physical and chemical interactions dominated the adsorption on CPPS. PMID:24289979

  16. Adsorption and attenuation behavior of 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) in eleven soils.

    PubMed

    Mark, Noah; Arthur, Jennifer; Dontsova, Katerina; Brusseau, Mark; Taylor, Susan

    2016-02-01

    NTO (3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one) is one of the new explosive compounds used in insensitive munitions (IM) developed to replace traditional explosives, TNT and RDX. Data on NTO fate and transport is needed to determine its environmental behavior and potential for groundwater contamination. We conducted a series of kinetic and equilibrium batch experiments to characterize the fate of NTO in soils and the effect of soil geochemical properties on NTO-soil interactions. A set of experiments was also conducted using sterilized soils to evaluate the contribution of biodegradation to NTO attenuation. Measured pH values for NTO solutions decreased from 5.98 ± 0.13 to 3.50 ± 0.06 with increase in NTO concentration from 0.78 to 100 mg L(-1). Conversely, the pH of soil suspensions was not significantly affected by NTO in this concentration range. NTO experienced minimal adsorption, with measured adsorption coefficients being less than 1 cm(3) g(-1) for all studied soils. There was a highly significant inverse relationship between the measured NTO adsorption coefficients and soil pH (P = 0.00011), indicating the role of NTO and soil charge in adsorption processes. In kinetic experiments, 1st order transformation rate constant estimates ranged between 0.0004 h(-1) and 0.0142 h(-1) (equivalent to half-lives of 72 and 2 d, respectively), and correlated positively with organic carbon in the soil. Total attenuation of NTO was higher in untreated versus sterilized samples, suggesting that NTO was being biodegraded. The information presented herein can be used to help evaluate NTO potential for natural attenuation in soils. PMID:26473550

  17. Non-equilibrium DMFT - Polaritonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubatsch, Andreas; Frank, Regine

    Non-equilibrium physics recently really becomes important with the progress of ultrafast laser sciences. However in our understanding there is still a gap between equilibrium physics and the non-equilibrium, even though numerical methods have been advanced in recent years. We compare in this talk novel results at hand with equilibrium physics. The comparison will show that especially theoretical efforts are needed to explain many - so far - unresolved problems and to predict novel research on the basis of ab initio computing. We specifically discuss several non-equilibrium extensions of DMFT, numerical methods as well as semi-analytical solvers.

  18. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    PubMed

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation. PMID:27157333

  19. Adsorption of clofibric acid and ketoprofen onto powdered activated carbon: effect of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaohuan; Deshusses, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of two acidic pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), clofibric acid and ketoprofen, onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated with a particular focus on the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the PhACs. Suwannee River humic acids (SRHAs) were used as a substitute for NOM. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to obtain adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms with and without SRHAs in the system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption ofclofibric acid was not significantly affected by the presence of SRHAs at a concentration of 5 mg (as carbon) L(-1). An adsorption capacity of 70 to 140 mg g(-1) was observed and equilibrium was reached within 48 h. In contrast, the adsorption of ketoprofen was markedly decreased (from about 120 mg g(-1) to 70-100 mg g(-1)) in the presence of SRHAs. Higher initial concentrations of clofibric acid than ketoprofen during testing may explain the different behaviours that were observed. Also, the more hydrophobic ketoprofen molecules may have less affinity for PAC when humic acids (which are hydrophilic) are present. The possible intermolecular forces that could account for the different behaviour of clofibric acid and ketoprofen adsorption onto PAC are discussed. In particular, the relevance of electrostatic forces, electron donor-acceptor interaction, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces are discussed PMID:22439557

  20. Preparation of titanium peroxide and its selective adsorption property on cationic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-guang; Huang, Ji-guo; Wang, Bo; Bi, Qiang; Dong, Li-li; Liu, Xing-juan

    2014-02-01

    Titanium peroxide powder was prepared with the reaction of titanium sulfate and H2O2 and showed good selective adsorption property on cationic dyes. The obtained material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The selective adsorption property was confirmed and evaluated by adsorption experiments of methyl orange (MO), phenol and three kinds of cationic dyes including methylene blue (MB), malachite green (MG) and neutral red (NR). The adsorption was very fast and adsorption equilibrium was reached in a very short time for all three cationic dyes. The adsorption kinetics of MB, MG and NR were studied then. It was found that the adsorption data fitted perfectly with the pseudo-second-order kinetics and the saturated adsorption capacities for MB, MG and NR were 224.37, 251.38 and 327.61 mg/g at 25 °C, respectively. The characterization and adsorption results indicated the controlling mechanism of adsorption processes could be electrostatic adsorption.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of gas-solid adsorption processes at pore scale level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Chen, L.; Tao, W. Q.

    2015-11-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) approach was established to implement kinetic concentration boundary conditions in interfacial mass-transfer processes and to simulate the adsorption process in porous media at pore scale and mesoscopic levels. A general treatment was applied to conduct three types of concentration boundary conditions effectively and accurately. Applicability for adsorption was verified by two benchmark examples, which were representative of the interparticle mass transport and intraparticle mass transport in the adsorption system, respectively. The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed porous media at the pore scale level was numerically investigated. Mass-transfer processes of the adsorption reaction were simulated by executing Langmuir adsorption kinetics on surfaces of adsorbent particles. Meanwhile, the homogeneous solid diffusion model (HSDM) was used for mass transport in interior particles. The transient adsorbed amount was obtained in detail, and the impact of flow condition, porosity, and adsorbent particle size on the entire dynamic adsorption performance was investigated. The time needed to approach steady state decreased with increased fluid velocity. Transient adsorption capability and time consumption to equilibrium were nearly independent of porosity, whereas increasing pore size led to a moderating adsorption rate and more time was consumed to approach the saturation adsorption. Benefiting from the advantages of the LB method, both bulk and intraparticle mass transfer performances during adsorption can be obtained using the present pore scale approach. Thus, interparticle mass transfer and intraparticle mass transfer are the two primary segments, and intraparticle diffusion has the dominant role.

  2. Removal of ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine in aqueous solution onto natural clay: equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazri, Hassen; Ghorbel-Abid, Ibtissem; Kalfat, Rafik; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the adsorption of three pharmaceuticals compounds (ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine) onto natural clay on the basis of equilibrium parameters such as a function of time, effect of pH, varying of the concentration and the temperature. Adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the Lagergren's first-order and the pseudo-second-order kinetic equations. The kinetic results of adsorption are described better using the pseudo-second order model. The isotherm results were tested in the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. The thermodynamic parameters obtained indicate that the adsorption of pharmaceuticals on the clay is a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  3. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  4. Renormalization of Newton's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falls, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    The problem of obtaining a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant is addressed. By a specific parametrization of metric fluctuations a gauge independent functional integral is constructed for the semiclassical theory around an arbitrary Einstein space. The effective action then has the property that only physical polarizations of the graviton contribute, while all other modes cancel with the functional measure. We are then able to compute a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant in d dimensions to one-loop order. No Landau pole is present provided Ng<18 , where Ng=d (d -3 )/2 is the number of polarizations of the graviton. While adding a large number of matter fields can change this picture, the absence of a pole persists for the particle content of the standard model in four spacetime dimensions.

  5. Varying constants quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczyńska, Katarzyna; Balcerzak, Adam; Dabrowski, Mariusz P. E-mail: abalcerz@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2015-02-01

    We discuss minisuperspace models within the framework of varying physical constants theories including Λ-term. In particular, we consider the varying speed of light (VSL) theory and varying gravitational constant theory (VG) using the specific ansätze for the variability of constants: c(a) = c{sub 0} a{sup n} and G(a)=G{sub 0} a{sup q}. We find that most of the varying c and G minisuperspace potentials are of the tunneling type which allows to use WKB approximation of quantum mechanics. Using this method we show that the probability of tunneling of the universe ''from nothing'' (a=0) to a Friedmann geometry with the scale factor a{sub t} is large for growing c models and is strongly suppressed for diminishing c models. As for G varying, the probability of tunneling is large for G diminishing, while it is small for G increasing. In general, both varying c and G change the probability of tunneling in comparison to the standard matter content (cosmological term, dust, radiation) universe models.

  6. Connecting Fundamental Constants

    SciTech Connect

    Di Mario, D.

    2008-05-29

    A model for a black hole electron is built from three basic constants only: h, c and G. The result is a description of the electron with its mass and charge. The nature of this black hole seems to fit the properties of the Planck particle and new relationships among basic constants are possible. The time dilation factor in a black hole associated with a variable gravitational field would appear to us as a charge; on the other hand the Planck time is acting as a time gap drastically limiting what we are able to measure and its dimension will appear in some quantities. This is why the Planck time is numerically very close to the gravitational/electric force ratio in an electron: its difference, disregarding a {pi}{radical}(2) factor, is only 0.2%. This is not a coincidence, it is always the same particle and the small difference is between a rotating and a non-rotating particle. The determination of its rotational speed yields accurate numbers for many quantities, including the fine structure constant and the electron magnetic moment.

  7. The Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-09-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H_0 values of around 72-74 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, with typical errors of 2-3 km s^-1 Mpc^-1. This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s^-1 Mpc^-1 and typical errors of 1-2 km s^-1 Mpc^-1. The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  8. Particle concentration effect: adsorption of divalent metal ions on coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Utomo, Handojo Djati; Hunter, Keith A

    2010-03-01

    The adsorption of divalent metal ions Cu2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ on coffee grounds as a function of coffee grounds concentration was studied in which adsorption density decreased as the concentration of coffee grounds (C(s)) increased. Adsorption studies were conducted by equilibrating aqueous solutions of each metal ion at concentrations in the range 19-291 micromol L(-1) with coffee suspensions in the concentration range 0.971-8.738 g L(-1), with the initial pH adjusted to 5.0+/-0.1 using NaOH or HNO3. Metastable Equilibrium Adsorption theory did not adequately explain the adsorption phenomenon, except at low concentrations of coffee grounds and trace metal ions. Instead the results indicated that flocculation might reduce the surface availability thus reducing the adsorption density. The flocculation theory was confirmed after a further experiment adding dispersant sodium hexa-meta-phosphate (NaHMP) to the suspension. PMID:19660940

  9. Ethane adsorption on aggregates of dahlia-like nanohorns: experiments and computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Russell, Brice A; Migone, Aldo D; Petucci, Justin; Mercedes Calbi, M; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio

    2016-06-01

    This is a report on a study of the adsorption characteristics of ethane on aggregates of unopened dahlia-like carbon nanohorns. This sorbent presents two main groups of adsorption sites: the outside surface of individual nanohorns and deep, interstitial spaces between neighbouring nanohorns towards the interior of the aggregates. We have explored the equilibrium properties of the adsorbed ethane films by determining the adsorption isotherms and isosteric heat of adsorption. Computer simulations performed on different model structures indicate that the majority of ethane adsorption occurs on the outer region of the aggregates, near the ends of the nanohorns. We have also measured the kinetics of adsorption of ethane on this sorbent. The measurements and simulations were conducted along several isotherms spanning the range between 120 K and 220 K. PMID:27218414

  10. Adsorption of myoglobin to Cu(II)-IDA and Ni(II)-IDA functionalized langmuir monolayers : study of the protein layer structure during the adsorption process by neutron and X-ray reflectivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young-Soo; Satija, Sushil K.; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Kent, Michael Stuart; Yim, Hyun

    2005-05-01

    The structure and orientation of adsorbed myoglobin as directed by metal-histidine complexation at the liquid-film interface was studied as a function of time using neutron and X-ray reflectivity (NR and XR, respectively). In this system, adsorption is due to the interaction between iminodiacetate (IDA)-chelated divalent metal ions Ni(II) and Cu(II) and histidine moieties at the outer surface of the protein. Adsorption was examined under conditions of constant area per lipid molecule at an initial pressure of 40 mN/m. Adsorption occurred over a time period of about 15 h, allowing detailed characterization of the layer structure throughout the process. The layer thickness and the in-plane averaged segment volume fraction were obtained at roughly 40 min intervals by NR. The binding constant of histidine with Cu(II)-IDA is known to be about four times greater than that of histidine with Ni(II)-IDA. The difference in interaction energy led to significant differences in the structure of the adsorbed layer. For Cu(II)-IDA, the thickness of the adsorbed layer at low protein coverage was {le} 20 {angstrom} and the thickness increased almost linearly with increasing coverage to 42 {angstrom}. For Ni(II)-IDA, the thickness at low coverage was - 38 {angstrom} and increased gradually with coverage to 47 {angstrom}. The in-plane averaged segment volume fraction of the adsorbed layer independently confirmed a thinner layer at low coverage for Cu(II)-IDA. These structural differences at the early stages are discussed in terms of either different preferred orientations for isolated chains in the two cases or more extensive conformational changes upon adsorption in the case of Cu(II)-IDA. Subphase dilution experiments provided additional insight, indicating that the adsorbed layer was not in equilibrium with the bulk solution even at low coverages for both IDA-chelated metal ions. We conclude that the weight of the evidence favors the interpretation based on more extensive

  11. Adsorption of Myoglobin to Cu(II)-IDA and Ni(II)-IDA Functionalized Langmuir Monolayers: Study of the Protein Layer Structure during the Adsorption Process by Neutron and X-Ray Reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, M.S.; Yim, H.; Sasaki, D.Y.; Satija, Sushil; Seo, Young-Soo; Majewski, J.

    2010-07-19

    The structure and orientation of adsorbed myoglobin as directed by metal-histidine complexation at the liquid-film interface was studied as a function of time using neutron and X-ray reflectivity (NR and XR, respectively). In this system, adsorption is due to the interaction between iminodiacetate (IDA)-chelated divalent metal ions Ni(II) and Cu(II) and histidine moieties at the outer surface of the protein. Adsorption was examined under conditions of constant area per lipid molecule at an initial pressure of 40 mN/m. Adsorption occurred over a time period of about 15 h, allowing detailed characterization of the layer structure throughout the process. The layer thickness and the in-plane averaged segment volume fraction were obtained at roughly 40 min intervals by NR. The binding constant of histidine with Cu(II)-IDA is known to be about four times greater than that of histidine with Ni(II)-IDA. The difference in interaction energy led to significant differences in the structure of the adsorbed layer. For Cu(II)-IDA, the thickness of the adsorbed layer at low protein coverage was {le} 20 {angstrom} and the thickness increased almost linearly with increasing coverage to 42 {angstrom}. For Ni(II)-IDA, the thickness at low coverage was 38 {angstrom} and increased gradually with coverage to 47 {angstrom}. The in-plane averaged segment volume fraction of the adsorbed layer independently confirmed a thinner layer at low coverage for Cu(II)-IDA. These structural differences at the early stages are discussed in terms of either different preferred orientations for isolated chains in the two cases or more extensive conformational changes upon adsorption in the case of Cu(II)-IDA. Subphase dilution experiments provided additional insight, indicating that the adsorbed layer was not in equilibrium with the bulk solution even at low coverages for both IDA-chelated metal ions. We conclude that the weight of the evidence favors the interpretation based on more extensive

  12. Adsorption of aluminium by stream particulates.

    PubMed

    Tipping, E; Ohnstad, M; Woof, C

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study was made of the adsorption of aluminium by fine particulates from Whitray Beck, a hill stream in NW England. Adsorption increased with Al(3) activity, pH and concentration of particles, and could be quantitatively described by the empirical equation: [Formula: see text] [particles] where square brackets indicate concentrations, curly brackets, activities, and alpha, beta and gamma are constants with values of 5.14x10(-10) (mol litre(-1))(2.015) (g particles litre(-1))(-1), 0.457, and 1.472, respectively. For the experimental data, the equation gave a correlation ratio of 0.99. The equation accounts reasonably well for the adsorption of Al by particulates from seven other streams. In applying the equation, it must be borne in mind that the desorption kinetics of Al depend on pH, and rapid reversibility (<15min) can only be assumed for pHadsorption equation, and taking competition by dissolved humic substances into account, suggest that adsorbed Al may commonly account for a significant proportion (>or=10%) of total monomeric Al. PMID:15092454

  13. Surface rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Stanimirova, R; Marinova, K; Tcholakova, S; Denkov, N D; Stoyanov, S; Pelan, E

    2011-10-18

    Extracts of the Quillaja saponaria tree contain natural surfactant molecules called saponins that very efficiently stabilize foams and emulsions. Therefore, such extracts are widely used in several technologies. In addition, saponins have demonstrated nontrivial bioactivity and are currently used as essential ingredients in vaccines, food supplements, and other health products. Previous preliminary studies showed that saponins have some peculiar surface properties, such as a very high surface modulus, that may have an important impact on the mechanisms of foam and emulsion stabilization. Here we present a detailed characterization of the main surface properties of highly purified aqueous extracts of Quillaja saponins. Surface tension isotherms showed that the purified Quillaja saponins behave as nonionic surfactants with a relatively high cmc (0.025 wt %). The saponin adsorption isotherm is described well by the Volmer equation, with an area per molecule of close to 1 nm(2). By comparing this area to the molecular dimensions, we deduce that the hydrophobic triterpenoid rings of the saponin molecules lie parallel to the air-water interface, with the hydrophilic glucoside tails protruding into the aqueous phase. Upon small deformation, the saponin adsorption layers exhibit a very high surface dilatational elasticity (280 ± 30 mN/m), a much lower shear elasticity (26 ± 15 mN/m), and a negligible true dilatational surface viscosity. The measured dilatational elasticity is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions of the Volmer adsorption model (260 mN/m). The measured characteristic adsorption time of the saponin molecules is 4 to 5 orders of magnitude longer than that predicted theoretically for diffusion-controlled adsorption, which means that the saponin adsorption is barrier-controlled around and above the cmc. The perturbed saponin layers relax toward equilibrium in a complex manner, with several relaxation times, the longest of them being around 3

  14. Statistical physics ""Beyond equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    The scientific challenges of the 21st century will increasingly involve competing interactions, geometric frustration, spatial and temporal intrinsic inhomogeneity, nanoscale structures, and interactions spanning many scales. We will focus on a broad class of emerging problems that will require new tools in non-equilibrium statistical physics and that will find application in new material functionality, in predicting complex spatial dynamics, and in understanding novel states of matter. Our work will encompass materials under extreme conditions involving elastic/plastic deformation, competing interactions, intrinsic inhomogeneity, frustration in condensed matter systems, scaling phenomena in disordered materials from glasses to granular matter, quantum chemistry applied to nano-scale materials, soft-matter materials, and spatio-temporal properties of both ordinary and complex fluids.

  15. Equilibrium properties of chemically reacting gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The equilibrium energy, enthalpy, entropy, specific heat at constant volume and constant pressure, and the equation of state of the gas are all derived for chemically reacting gas mixtures in terms of the compressibility, the mol fractions, the thermodynamic properties of the pure gas components, and the change in zero point energy due to reaction. Results are illustrated for a simple diatomic dissociation reaction and nitrogen is used as an example. Next, a gas mixture resulting from combined diatomic dissociation and atomic ionization reactions is treated and, again, nitrogen is used as an example. A short discussion is given of the additional complexities involved when precise solutions for high-temperature air are desired, including effects caused by NO produced in shuffle reactions and by other trace species formed from CO2, H2O and Ar found in normal air.

  16. Potentiometric determination of aminal stability constants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P D

    1995-02-01

    Potentiometric titration was used to determine the logarithms of the stepwise equilibrium constants for the species formed between morpholine and formaldehyde in aqueous solution, ionic strength 0.5 and 2.5M (KCl) at 25 degrees C. The instrumental and computational techniques developed for metal-ligand stability constant determination were applied. Formaldehyde is equivalent to the metal-ion and is represented by M while neutral morpholine is equivalent to the ligand and is represented by L. The stability constants of the following equilibria were determined by non-linear regression (figures in parentheses are at ionic strength 2.5 M KCl): M + L left arrow over right arrow ML (hemi-aminal) logK(1) = 2.90 +/- 0.02 (2.980 +/- 0.004); ML + L left arrow over right arrow ML(2) (bis-aminal); log K(2) = 1.3 +/- 0.2 (1.41 +/- 0.07); MLH left arrow over right arrow ML + H(+) (protonated hemi-aminal) pK(a) = 5.87 +/- 0.01 (6.411 +/- 0.005); ML(2)H left arrow over right arrow ML(2) + H(+) (protonated bis-aminal) pK(a) = (7.6 +/- 0.2). the pK(a) of the protonated bis-aminal could only be determined at the higher ionic strength. The results are in good agreement with reported values determined using the classic formol titration. The automated titration system acquired the full time course of the pH change upon each titrant addition allowing a kinetic analysis to be performed as well as an equilibrium analysis. The forward and reverse rate constants for M + L left arrow over right arrow ML were 0.77M(-1) sec(-1) and 8.1 x 10(-4) sec(-1). respectively. PMID:18966223

  17. Use of Mg-Al oxide for boron removal from an aqueous solution in rotation: Kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohito; Oba, Jumpei; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Mg-Al oxide prepared through the thermal treatment of [Formula: see text] intercalated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (CO3·Mg-Al LDH) was found to remove boron (B) from an aqueous solution. B was removed by the rehydration of Mg-Al oxide accompanied by combination with [Formula: see text] . When using twice the stoichiometric quantity of Mg-Al oxide for Mg/Al = 4, the residual concentration of B dropped from 100 to 2.8 mg/L in 480 min, and for Mg/Al = 2, it decreased from 100 to 2.5 mg/L in 240 min. In both cases, the residual concentration of B was highlighted to be lower than the current Japanese effluent standards (10 mg/L). The removal of B can be explained by way of pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The apparent activation energy of 63.5 kJ mol(-1), calculated from the Arrhenius plot indicating that a chemical reaction dominates the removal of B by Mg-Al oxide (Mg/Al = 2). The adsorption of B acts upon a Langmuir-type phenomena. The maximum adsorption (qm) and equilibrium adsorption constants (KL) were 7.4 mmol g(-1) and 1.9 × 10(3), respectively, for Mg-Al oxide (Mg/Al = 2). [Formula: see text] in B(OH)4·Mg-Al LDH produced by the removal of B was observed to undergo anion exchange with [Formula: see text] in solution. Following regeneration, the Mg-Al oxide maintained the ability to remove B from an aqueous solution. This study has clarified the possibility of recycling Mg-Al oxide for B removal. PMID:26454072

  18. Kinetic models for the adsorption of lead ions by steel slag.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng-Yu; Gao, Jin; Qu, Bin; Yang, Yi-Jin; Xin, Xin

    2010-08-01

    Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the kinetics of adsorption of lead ions by steel slag on the basis of the external diffusion, intraparticle diffusion and adsorption reaction model (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order). The results showed that the controlling step for the adsorption kinetics changed with experimental parameters varied. When the particle size of steel slag was larger than 120 mesh, intraparticle diffusion of Pb(2+) was the controlling step; when the initial concentration of Pb(2+) was less than 150 mg L(-1) or the shaking rate was lower than 150 rpm, external diffusion of Pb(2+) was promoted. Contrary to the former experimental conditions, the adsorption reaction was the controlling step, and the adsorption followed second-order kinetics, with an adsorption rate constant of 13.26 g mg(-1) min(- 1). The adsorption isotherm of Pb(2+) with steel slag followed the Langmuir model, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. PMID:19808736

  19. Adsorption of cadmium by biochar derived from municipal sewage sludge: Impact factors and adsorption mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tan; Zhou, Zeyu; Han, Rong; Meng, Ruihong; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2015-09-01

    Static equilibrium experiments were carried out to investigate the impact factors and the mechanism of cadmium adsorption on biochar derived from municipal sewage sludge. An appropriate dosage of biochar is sufficient; in the experiment, 0.2% is the optimal dosage for the largest removal capacity, while the removal capacity of biochar reduces with the increasing dosage. pH is another dominant factor of the adsorption process. The removal capacity of biochar is lower than 20 mg·g(-1) when the solution initial pH is lower than 2 pH units, comparatively retaining more than 40 mg·g(-1) at the solution initial pH higher than 3 pH units. Temperature has weak influence on the adsorptive performance. The main mechanism of the adsorption process of biochar for cadmium mainly involves (1) surface precipitation by forming insoluble cadmium compounds in alkaline condition, and (2) ion exchange for cadmium with exchangeable cations in the biochar, such as calcium ions. PMID:25966459

  20. Effect of aging process on adsorption of diethyl phthalate in soils amended with bamboo biochar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaokai; Sarmah, Ajit K; Bolan, Nanthi S; He, Lizhi; Lin, Xiaoming; Che, Lei; Tang, Caixian; Wang, Hailong

    2016-01-01

    Biochar is a carbonaceous sorbent and can be used as a potential material to reduce the bioavailability of organic pollutants in contaminated soils. In the present study, the adsorption and desorption of diethyl phthalate (DEP) onto soils amended with bamboo biochar was investigated with a special focus on the effect of biochar application rates and aging conditions on the adsorption capacity of the soils. Biochar amendment significantly enhanced the soil adsorption of DEP that increased with increasing application rates of biochar. However, the adsorption capacity decreased by two aging processes (alternating wet and dry, and constantly moist). In the soil with low organic carbon (OC) content, the addition of 0.5% biochar (without aging) increased the adsorption by nearly 98 times compared to the control, and exhibited the highest adsorption capacity among all the treatments. In the soil with high OC content, the adsorption capacity in the treatment of 0.5% biochar without aging was 3.5 and 3 times greater than those of the treatments of biochar aged by alternating wet and dry, and constantly moist, respectively. Moreover, constantly moist resulted in a greater adsorption capacity than alternating wet and dry treatments regardless of biochar addition. This study revealed that biochar application enhanced soil sorption of DEP, however, the enhancement of the adsorption capacity was dependent on the soil organic carbon levels, and aging processes of biochar. PMID:26004250