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Sample records for adsorption experiments show

  1. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  2. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  3. Protein adsorption and interfacial rheology interfering in dilatational experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühs, P. A.; Scheuble, N.; Windhab, E. J.; Fischer, P.

    2013-05-01

    The static and dilatational response of β-lactoglobulin fibrils and native β-lactoglobulin (monomers) at water-air and water-oil interfaces (pH 2) was measured using the pendant drop method. The resulting adsorption behavior and viscoelasticity is dependent of concentration and adsorption time. The interfacial pressure of the β-lactoglobulin fibrils obtained in static measurements was 16-18 mN/m (against air) and 7 mN/m (against oil) for all concentrations. With higher concentrations, faster adsorption kinetics and slightly higher interfacial and surface pressure is achieved but did not lead to higher viscoelastic moduli. The transient saturation of the interface is similar for both the fibril solution and the monomers, however the fibril solution forms a strong viscoelastic network. To evaluate the superimposed adsorption behavior and rheological properties, the formed interfacial layer was subjected to dilatational experiments, which were performed by oscillating the surface area of the drop in sinusoidal and sawtooth (diagonal) deformation manner. The sinusoidal oscillations (time depended area deformation rate) result in a complex interfacial tension behavior against air and oil interfaces and show remarkable differences during compression and expansion as emphasized by Lissajous figures. For diagonal (constant area deformation rate) experiments, a slight bending of the interfacial tension response was observed at low frequencies emphasizing the influence of protein adsorption during rheological measurements.

  4. Experiments showing dynamics of materials interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1997-02-01

    The discipline of materials science and engineering often involves understanding and controlling properties of interfaces. The authors address the challenge of educating students about properties of interfaces, particularly dynamic properties and effects of unstable interfaces. A series of simple, inexpensive, hands-on activities about fluid interfaces provides students with a testbed to develop intuition about interface dynamics. The experiments highlight the essential role of initial interfacial perturbations in determining the dynamic response of the interface. The experiments produce dramatic, unexpected effects when initial perturbations are controlled and inhibited. These activities help students to develop insight about unstable interfaces that can be applied to analogous problems in materials science and engineering. The lessons examine ``Rayleigh-Taylor instability,`` an interfacial instability that occurs when a higher-density fluid is above a lower-density fluid.

  5. Kinetic Interpretation of Water Vapor Adsorption-Desorption Behavior of a Desiccant Rotor Showing S-shaped Adsorption Isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kumiko; Oshima, Kazunori; Takewaki, Takahiko; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor containing an iron aluminophosphate type zeolite FAM-Z01 (Functional Adsorbent Material Zeolite 01) was experimentally investigated for humidity swing. This rotor exhibited an S-shaped adsorption isotherm with its temperature dependence. Humidity swing, using a small piece of the rotor, could be usefully applied to interpret adsorption / desorption mechanisms by observing their rates. The most significant finding was that the adsorption / desorption rates in humidity swing could be described by the amount of adsorption, temperature and amplitude of the humidity swing, not by cycle time. Also, using the liner driving force (LDF) model, the overall mass transfer coefficient changed with the elapse of time or with the amount of adsorbed water. This implied that the LDF model, considering constant value of the overall mass transfer coefficient, was probably unable to explain the water adsorption / desorption behavior of FAM-Z01 desiccant rotor.

  6. Worldwide experience shows horizontal well success

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, H.; Bitto, R.

    1989-03-01

    The convergence of technology and experience has made horizontal drilling an important tool in increasing production and solving a variety of completion problems. Since the early 1980s, horizontal drilling has been used to improve production on more than 700 oil and gas wells throughout the world. Approximately 200 horizontal wells were drilled in 1988 alone. Interest in horizontal drilling has been accelerating rapidly as service companies have developed and offered new technology for drilling and producing horizontal wells. Simultaneously, oil companies have developed better methods for evaluating reservoirs for potential horizontal applications, while their production departments have gained experience at completing and producing them. To date, most horizontal wells have been drilled in the United States. A major application is to complete naturally fractured formations, such as the Austin chalk in Texas, the Bakken shale in the Williston basin, the Spraberry in West Texas and the Devonian shale in the Eastern states. In addition, many horizontal wells have been drilled to produce the Niagaran reefs and the irregular Antrim shale reservoirs in Michigan.

  7. Children's Art Show: An Educational Family Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakerlis, Julienne

    2007-01-01

    In a time of seemingly rampant budget cuts in the arts in school systems throughout the country, a children's art show reaps many rewards. It can strengthen family-school relationships and community ties and stimulate questions and comments about the benefits of art and its significance in the development of young children. In this photo essay of…

  8. The adsorption of amino acids and cations onto goethite: a prebiotic chemistry experiment.

    PubMed

    Farias, Ana Paula S F; Carneiro, Cristine E A; de Batista Fonseca, Inês C; Zaia, Cássia T B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2016-06-01

    Few prebiotic chemistry experiments have assessed the adsorption of biomolecules by iron oxide-hydroxides. The present work investigated the effects of cations in artificial seawaters on the adsorption of Gly, α-Ala and β-Ala onto goethite, and vice versa. Goethite served to concentrate K and Mg cations from solution; these effects could have played important roles in peptide nucleoside formation. Goethite showed low adsorption of Gly and α-Ala. On the other hand, β-Ala (a non-protein amino acid) was highly adsorbed by goethite. Because Gly and α-Ala are the most common amino acids in living beings, and iron oxide-hydroxides are widespread on Earth, additional iron oxides should be studied. Increased ionic strength in artificial seawaters decreased the adsorption of amino acids by goethite. Because Na was highly abundant in the artificial seawater, it showed the highest effect on amino acid adsorption. β-Ala increased the adsorption of K and Ca by goethite, this effect could have been important for peptide synthesis. PMID:26984319

  9. A high surface area Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework showing stepwise gas adsorption and selective dye uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Xiu-Liang; Tong, Minman; Huang, Hongliang; Wang, Bin; Gan, Lei; Yang, Qingyuan; Zhong, Chongli; Li, Jian-Rong

    2015-03-15

    Exploitation of new metal–organic framework (MOF) materials with high surface areas has been attracting great attention in related research communities due to their broad potential applications. In this work, a new Zr(IV)-based MOF, [Zr{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4}(eddb){sub 6}] (BUT-30, H{sub 2}eddb=4,4′-(ethyne-1,2-diyl)dibenzoic acid) has been solvothermally synthesized, characterized, and explored for gases and dyes adsorptions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrates a three-dimensional cubic framework structure of this MOF, in which each Zr{sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 4} building unit is linked by 12 linear eddb ligands. BUT-30 has been found stable up to 400 °C and has a Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area as high as 3940.6 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} (based on the N{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K) and total pore volume of 1.55 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}. It is more interesting that this MOF exhibits stepwise adsorption behaviors for Ar, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} at low temperatures, and selective uptakes towards different ionic dyes. - Graphical abstract: A new Zr(IV)-based MOF with high surface area has been synthesized and structurally characterized, which shows stepwise gas adsorption at low temperature and selective dye uptake from solution. - Highlights: • A new Zr-based MOF was synthesized and structurally characterized. • This MOF shows a higher surface area compared with its analogous UiO-67 and 68. • This MOF shows a rare stepwise adsorption towards light gases at low temperature. • This MOF performs selective uptakes towards cationic dyes over anionic ones. • Using triple-bond spacer is confirmed feasible in enhancing MOF surface areas.

  10. A molecular model for adsorption of water on activated carbon: Comparison of simulation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, C.L.; McGrother, S.C.; Bandosz, T.J.; Mueller, E.A.; Gubbins, K.E.

    1999-01-19

    Experimental and molecular simulation results are presented for the adsorption of water onto activated carbons. The pore size distribution for the carbon studied was determined from nitrogen adsorption data using density functional theory, and the density of acidic and basic surface sites was found using Boehm and potentiometric titration. The total surface site density was 0.675 site/nm{sup 2}. Water adsorption was measured for relative pressures P/P{sub 0} down to 10{sup {minus}3}. A new molecular model for the water/activated carbon system is presented, which the authors term the effective single group model, and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are reported for the range of pressures covered in the experiments. A comparison of these simulations with the experiments show generally good agreement, although some discrepancies are attributed to the simplification of using a single surface group species, while those at high pressure are believed to arise from uncertainties in the pore size distribution. The simulation results throw new light on the adsorption mechanism for water at low pressures. The influence of varying both the density of surface sites and the size of the graphite microcrystals is studied using molecular simulation.

  11. Experiments and Modeling of Uranium Adsorption in the Presence of Other Ions in Simulated Seawater

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ladshaw, Austin; Das, Sadananda; Liao, Wei-Po; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Janke, Christopher James; Mayes, Richard T.; Dai, Sheng; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-11-19

    Seawater contains uranium at an average concentration of 3.3 ppb, as well as a variety of other ions at either overwhelmingly higher or similar concentrations, which complicate the recovery of uranium. This report describes an investigation of the effects of various factors such as uranium speciation and presence of salts including sodium, calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate, as well as trace elements such as vanadium on uranium adsorption kinetics in laboratory experiments. Adsorption models are also developed to describe the experimental data of uranium extraction from seawater. Results show that the presence of calcium and magnesium significantly slows down the uraniummore » adsorption kinetics. Vanadium can replace uranium from amidoxime-based adsorbent in the presence of sodium in the solution. Results also show that bicarbonate in the solution strongly competes with amidoxime for binding uranium, and thus slows down the uranium adsorption kinetics. Developed on the basis of the experimental findings, the model is capable of describing the effects of pH, ionic strength, temperature, and concentration of various species. The results of this work are useful in the understanding of the important factors that control the adsorbent capacity and kinetics of uranium uptake by amidoxime-based adsorbents.« less

  12. Experiments and Modeling of Uranium Adsorption in the Presence of Other Ions in Simulated Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Ladshaw, Austin; Das, Sadananda; Liao, Wei-Po; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Janke, Christopher James; Mayes, Richard T.; Dai, Sheng; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-11-19

    Seawater contains uranium at an average concentration of 3.3 ppb, as well as a variety of other ions at either overwhelmingly higher or similar concentrations, which complicate the recovery of uranium. This report describes an investigation of the effects of various factors such as uranium speciation and presence of salts including sodium, calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate, as well as trace elements such as vanadium on uranium adsorption kinetics in laboratory experiments. Adsorption models are also developed to describe the experimental data of uranium extraction from seawater. Results show that the presence of calcium and magnesium significantly slows down the uranium adsorption kinetics. Vanadium can replace uranium from amidoxime-based adsorbent in the presence of sodium in the solution. Results also show that bicarbonate in the solution strongly competes with amidoxime for binding uranium, and thus slows down the uranium adsorption kinetics. Developed on the basis of the experimental findings, the model is capable of describing the effects of pH, ionic strength, temperature, and concentration of various species. The results of this work are useful in the understanding of the important factors that control the adsorbent capacity and kinetics of uranium uptake by amidoxime-based adsorbents.

  13. Effects of Humidity Swings on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Air purification systems are necessary to provide clean air in the closed environments aboard spacecraft. Trace contaminants are removed using adsorption. One major factor concerning the removal of trace contaminants is relative humidity. Water can reduce adsorption capacity and, due to constant fluctuations, its presence is difficult to incorporate into adsorption column designs. The purpose of the research was to allow for better design techniques in trace contaminant adsorption systems, especially for feeds with water present. Experiments and mathematical modeling research on effects of humidity swings on adsorption columns for air revitalization were carried out.

  14. Evaluating protocols and analytical methods for peptide adsorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Fears, Kenan P; Petrovykh, Dmitri Y; Clark, Thomas D

    2013-12-01

    This paper evaluates analytical techniques that are relevant for performing reliable quantitative analysis of peptide adsorption on surfaces. Two salient problems are addressed: determining the solution concentrations of model GG-X-GG, X5, and X10 oligopeptides (G = glycine, X = a natural amino acid), and quantitative analysis of these peptides following adsorption on surfaces. To establish a uniform methodology for measuring peptide concentrations in water across the entire GG-X-GG and X n series, three methods were assessed: UV spectroscopy of peptides having a C-terminal tyrosine, the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay, and amino acid (AA) analysis. Due to shortcomings or caveats associated with each of the different methods, none were effective at measuring concentrations across the entire range of representative model peptides. In general, reliable measurements were within 30% of the nominal concentration based on the weight of as-received lyophilized peptide. In quantitative analysis of model peptides adsorbed on surfaces, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data for a series of lysine-based peptides (GGKGG, K5, and K10) on Au substrates, and for controls incubated in buffer in the absence of peptides, suggested a significant presence of aliphatic carbon species. Detailed analysis indicated that this carbonaceous contamination adsorbed from the atmosphere after the peptide deposition. The inferred adventitious nature of the observed aliphatic carbon was supported by control experiments in which substrates were sputter-cleaned by Ar(+) ions under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) then re-exposed to ambient air. In contrast to carbon contamination, no adventitious nitrogen species were detected on the controls; therefore, the relative surface densities of irreversibly-adsorbed peptides were calculated by normalizing the N/Au ratios by the average number of nitrogen atoms per residue. PMID:24706133

  15. Detailed characterization and preliminary adsorption model for materials for an intermediate-scale reactive-transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R.; Siegel, M.D.

    1994-12-31

    An experiment involving migration of fluid and tracers (Li, Br, Ni) through a 6-m-high x 3-m-dia caisson Wedron 510 sand, is being carried out for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Sand`s surface chemistry of the sand was studied and a preliminary surface-complexation model of Ni adsorption formulated for transport calculations. XPS and leaching suggest that surface of the quartz sand is partially covered by thin layers of Fe-oxyhydroxide and Ca-Mg carbonate and by flakes of kaolinite. Ni adsorption by the sand is strongly pH-dependent, showing no adsorption at pH 5 and near-total adsorption at pH 7. Location of adsorption edge is independent of ionic strength and dissolved Ni concentration; it is shifted to slightly lower pH with higher pCO2 and to slightly higher pH by competition with Li. Diminished adsorption at alkiline pH with higher pCO2 implies formation of dissolved Ni-carbonato complexes. Ni adsorption edges for goethite and quartz, two components of the sand were also measured. Ni adsorption on pure quartz is only moderately pH-dependent and differs in shape and location from that of the sand, whereas Ni adsorption by goethite is strongly pH-dependent. A triple-layer surface-complexation model developed for goethite provides a good fit to the Ni-adsorption curve of the sand. Based on this model, the apparent surface area of the Fe-oxyhydroxide coating is estimated to be 560 m{sup 2}/g, compatible with its occurrence as amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxide. Potentiometric titrations on sand also differ from pure quartz and suggest that effective surface area of sand may be much greater than that measured by N{sub 2}-BET gas adsorption. Attempts to model the adsorption of bulk sand in terms of properties of pure end member components suggest that much of the sand surface is inert. Although the exact Ni adsorption mechanisms remain ambiguous, this preliminary adsorption model provides an initial set of parameters that can be used in transport calculations.

  16. Adsorption of lead at variable pH onto a natural porous medium: Modeling of batch and column experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Papini, M.P.; Kahie, Y.D.; Troia, B.; Majone, M.

    1999-12-15

    The surface complexation approach has been applied to describe the adsorption of lead and proton onto a heterogeneous natural porous medium at constant ionic strength. Acid-base titration experiments were used to determine the minimum number of sites needed to describe the surface heterogeneity. Lead adsorption tests at several pH and total lead concentration were used to complete the model structure, whose adjustable parameters (site concentration and apparent formation constants) were determined by nonlinear multivariate regression of titration and adsorption data. The final model represents the acid-base properties of the surface by the presence of two amphoteric sites, SOH and TOH, and a monoprotic one, MOH; whereas lead adsorption is considered only onto SOH and MOH sites. The model allows a good representation of the experimental behavior in the whole experimental range. Theoretical surface speciation shows that lead adsorption occurs mostly onto site MOH at low pH level and on both SOH and MOH sites at higher values. The model was independently validated by simulating Pb and pH breakthrough experiments performed in small chromatographic columns. Experimental breakthroughs are well predicted by an advection-dispersion transport model coupled with the chemical equilibrium routine (IMPACT), without any parameter adjustment. A large spreading of Pb and pH breakthroughs was calculated and experimentally observed, even in the absence of any kinetic effect. That spreading is explained in terms of the concomitant presence of competitive adsorption and surface heterogeneity.

  17. A Biomedical Application of Activated Carbon Adsorption: An Experiment Using Acetaminophen and N-Acetylcysteine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybolt, Thomas R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Illustrates an interesting biomedical application of adsorption from solution and demonstrates some of the factors that influence the in vivo adsorption of drug molecules onto activated charcoal. Uses acetaminophen and N-acetylcysteine for the determination. Suggests several related experiments. (MVL)

  18. Lithium inclusion in indium metal-organic frameworks showing increased surface area and hydrogen adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, Mathieu; Zhang, Muwei; Feng, Dawei; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Xuan; Chen, Ying-Pin; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of counterion exchange in two anionic In-Metal-Organic Frameworks (In-MOFs) showed that partial replacement of disordered ammonium cations was achieved through the pre-synthetic addition of LiOH to the reaction mixture. This resulted in a surface area increase of over 1600% in (Li [In(1,3 − BDC){sub 2}]){sub n} and enhancement of the H{sub 2} uptake of approximately 275% at 80 000 Pa at 77 K. This method resulted in frameworks with permanent lithium content after repeated solvent exchange as confirmed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lithium counterion replacement appears to increase porosity after activation through replacement of bulkier, softer counterions and demonstrates tuning of pore size and properties in MOFs.

  19. Insights into tetracycline adsorption onto kaolinite and montmorillonite: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanping; Gu, Xueyuan; Li, Shiyin; Han, Ruiming; Wang, Guoxiang

    2015-11-01

    Adsorption of tetracycline (TC) on kaolinite and montmorillonite was investigated using batch adsorption experiments with different pH, ionic strength, and surface coverage. As a result, pH and ionic strength-dependent adsorption of TC was observed for the two clay minerals. The adsorption of TC decreased with the increase of pH and ionic strength, and high initial TC concentration had high adsorption. In addition, a triple-layer model was used to predict the adsorption and surface speciation of TC on the two minerals. As a result, four complex species on kaolinite (≡X(-)∙H3TC(+), ≡X(-)∙H2TC(±), ≡SOH(0)∙H2TC(±), and ≡SOH(0)∙HTC(-)) and three species on montmorillonite (≡X(-)∙H3TC(+), ≡X(-)∙H2TC(±), and ≡SOH(0)∙HTC(-)) were structurally constrained by spectroscopy, and these species were also successfully fitted to the adsorption edges of TC. Three functional groups of TC were involved in these adsorption reactions, including the positively charged dimethylamino group, the C=O amide I group, and the C=O group at the C ring. Combining adsorption experiments and model in this study, the adsorption of TC on kaolinite and montmorillonite was mainly attributed to cation exchange on the surface sites (≡X(-)) compared to surface complexation on the edge sites (≡SOH) at natural soil pH condition. Moreover, the surface adsorption species, the corresponding adsorption modes, and the binding constants for the surface reactions were also estimated. PMID:26122570

  20. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; DerSarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures. Materials and Methods We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ), a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level. Results Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute

  1. [Virus adsorption from batch experiments as influenced by air-water interface].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Bing-zi; Zhang, Jia-bao; Zhang, Cong-zhi; Wang, Qiu-ying; Chen, Ji

    2007-12-01

    The presence of air-water interface in batch sorption experiments may result in inaccurate estimation of virus adsorption onto various soils. A batch sorption experiment was conducted to compare the adsorption results of MS2 in different soils under presence/absence of air-water interface. Soils with sterilization/nonterilization treatment were used. Virus recovery efficiency in a blank experiment (no soil) was also evaluated as affected by different amount of air-water interface. The presence of air-water interface altered the results of virus adsorption in different soils with different extent, with Sandy fluvo-aquic soil being the most considerably affected, followed by Red loam soil, and the least being Red clay soil, probably because of different soil properties associated with virus adsorption/inactivation. Soil sterilization resulted in more significant difference of virus adsorption onto the Sandy fluvo-aquic soil between the presence and absence of air-water interface, while a reduced difference was observed in the Red loam soil. The presence of air-water interface significantly decreased virus recovery efficiency, with the values being decreased with increase in the amount of air-water interface. Soil particles likely prohibit viruses from reaching the air-water interface or alter the forces at the solid-water-air interface so that the results from the blank experiment did not truly represent results from control blank, which probably resulted in adsorption difference between presence and absence of the air-water interface. PMID:18290440

  2. Adsorption of probe molecules in pillared interlayered clays: Experiment and computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, A. Guil, J. M.; Lomba, E.; Almarza, N. G.; Khatib, S. J.; Cabrillo, C.; Sanz, A.; Pires, J.

    2014-06-14

    In this paper we investigate the adsorption of various probe molecules in order to characterize the porous structure of a series of pillared interlayered clays (PILC). To that aim, volumetric and microcalorimetric adsorption experiments were performed on various Zr PILC samples using nitrogen, toluene, and mesitylene as probe molecules. For one of the samples, neutron scattering experiments were also performed using toluene as adsorbate. Various structural models are proposed and tested by means of a comprehensive computer simulation study, using both geometric and percolation analysis in combination with Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations in order to model the volumetric and microcalorimetric isotherms. On the basis of this analysis, we propose a series of structural models that aim at accounting for the adsorption experimental behavior, and make possible a microscopic interpretation of the role played by the different interactions and steric effects in the adsorption processes in these rather complex disordered microporous systems.

  3. Water adsorption on O(2x2)/Ru(0001) from STM experiments andfirst-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera-Sanfelix, P.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Mugarza, A.; Shimizu,T.K.; Salmeron, M.; Arnau, A.

    2007-10-15

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of water adsorption on Ru(0001) pre-covered with 0.25 monolayers (ML) of oxygen forming a (2 x 2) structure. Several structures were analyzed by means of Density Functional Theory calculations for which STM simulations were performed and compared with experimental data. Up to 0.25 monolayers the molecules bind to the exposed Ru atoms of the 2 x 2 unit cell via the lone pair orbitals. The molecular plane is almost parallel to the surface with its H atoms pointing towards the chemisorbed O atoms of the 2 x 2 unit cell forming hydrogen bonds. The existence of these additional hydrogen bonds increases the adsorption energy of the water molecule to approximately 616 meV, which is {approx}220 meV more stable than on the clean Ru(0001) surface with a similar configuration. The binding energy shows only a weak dependence on water coverage, with a shallow minimum for a row structure at 0.125 ML. This is consistent with the STM experiments that show a tendency of the molecules to form linear rows at intermediate coverage. Our calculations also suggest the possible formation of water dimers near 0.25 ML.

  4. Adsorption of iodine on hydrogen-reduced silver-exchanged mordenite: Experiments and modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nan, Yue; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.; DePaoli, David W.

    2016-08-03

    The adsorption process of iodine, a major volatile radionuclide in the off-gas streams of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, on hydrogen-reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z) was studied at the micro-scale. The gas-solid mass transfer and reaction involved in the adsorption process were investigated and evaluated with appropriate models. Optimal conditions for reducing the silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) in a hydrogen stream were determined. Kinetic and equilibrium data of iodine adsorption on Ag0Z were obtained by performing single-layer adsorption experiments with experimental systems of high precision at 373–473 K over various iodine concentrations. Results indicate approximately 91% to 97% of the iodine adsorption wasmore » through the silver-iodine reaction. The effect of temperature on the iodine loading capacity of Ag0Z was discussed. In conclusion, the Shrinking Core model describes the data well, and the primary rate controlling mechanisms were macro-pore diffusion and silver-iodine reaction. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 2016« less

  5. Adsorption of HMF from water/DMSO solutions onto hydrophobic zeolites: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ruichang; León, Marta; Nikolakis, Vladimiros; Sandler, Stanley I; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), DMSO, and water from binary and ternary mixtures in hydrophobic silicalite-1 and dealuminated Y (DAY) zeolites at ambient conditions was studied by experiments and molecular modeling. HMF and DMSO adsorption isotherms were measured and compared to those calculated using a combination of grand canonical Monte Carlo and expanded ensemble (GCMC-EE) simulations. A method based on GCMC-EE simulations for dilute solutions combined with the Redlich-Kister (RK) expansion (GCMC-EE-RK) is introduced to calculate the isotherms over a wide range of concentrations. The simulations, using literature force fields, are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. In HMF/water binary mixtures, large-pore hydrophobic zeolites are much more effective for HMF adsorption but less selective because large pores allow water adsorption because of H2 O-HMF attraction. In ternary HMF/DMSO/water mixtures, HMF loading decreases with increasing DMSO fraction, rendering the separation of HMF from water/DMSO mixtures by adsorption difficult. The ratio of the energetic interaction in the zeolite to the solvation free energy is a key factor in controlling separation from liquid mixtures. Overall, our findings could have an impact on the separation and catalytic conversion of HMF and the rational design of nanoporous adsorbents for liquid-phase separations in biomass processing. PMID:24106213

  6. Adsorption structures and energetics of molecules on metal surfaces: Bridging experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Reinhard J.; Ruiz, Victor G.; Camarillo-Cisneros, Javier; Liu, Wei; Ferri, Nicola; Reuter, Karsten; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-05-01

    Adsorption geometry and stability of organic molecules on surfaces are key parameters that determine the observable properties and functions of hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOSs). Despite many recent advances in precise experimental characterization and improvements in first-principles electronic structure methods, reliable databases of structures and energetics for large adsorbed molecules are largely amiss. In this review, we present such a database for a range of molecules adsorbed on metal single-crystal surfaces. The systems we analyze include noble-gas atoms, conjugated aromatic molecules, carbon nanostructures, and heteroaromatic compounds adsorbed on five different metal surfaces. The overall objective is to establish a diverse benchmark dataset that enables an assessment of current and future electronic structure methods, and motivates further experimental studies that provide ever more reliable data. Specifically, the benchmark structures and energetics from experiment are here compared with the recently developed van der Waals (vdW) inclusive density-functional theory (DFT) method, DFT + vdWsurf. In comparison to 23 adsorption heights and 17 adsorption energies from experiment we find a mean average deviation of 0.06 Å and 0.16 eV, respectively. This confirms the DFT + vdWsurf method as an accurate and efficient approach to treat HIOSs. A detailed discussion identifies remaining challenges to be addressed in future development of electronic structure methods, for which the here presented benchmark database may serve as an important reference.

  7. Simple fabrication of carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes showing dual functions with adsorption and photocatalytic decomposition of Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Im, Ji Hyuk; Yang, Seung Jae; Yun, Chang Hun; Park, Chong Rae

    2012-01-27

    Carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes were fabricated via a very simple electrospinning process and their dual functionalities of adsorptivity and photocatalytic activity were evaluated using Rhodamine B (RhB) as a model organic pollutant. A poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) aqueous solution was directly electrospun into a coagulation bath containing titanium (IV) tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) solution so that PVA-core/TiO2-shell composite nanofibers were formed through the in situ sol-gel reaction of TTIP. The carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes were then fabricated by heat treatment of composite nanofibers under nitrogen atmosphere. By using several characterization methods, we confirmed that the resultant nanotubes consisted of anatase TiO2 nanocrystallites embedded in a carbonaceous matrix. The prepared nanotubes exhibited fast adsorption of RhB with high capacity compared with a commercial porous carbon, and they also showed the photocatalytic decomposition activity for the dye molecules under UV irradiation comparable to the degradation by P-25 and ST-01 (commercial TiO2). Finally, the carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes exhibited several cycle performances of adsorption-photodegradation for RhB. This indicates that the composite nanotubes can adsorb and photodecompose organic pollutants repeatedly without additional activating processes. PMID:22172680

  8. Simple fabrication of carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes showing dual functions with adsorption and photocatalytic decomposition of Rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Ji Hyuk; Yang, Seung Jae; Yun, Chang Hun; Park, Chong Rae

    2012-01-01

    Carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes were fabricated via a very simple electrospinning process and their dual functionalities of adsorptivity and photocatalytic activity were evaluated using Rhodamine B (RhB) as a model organic pollutant. A poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) aqueous solution was directly electrospun into a coagulation bath containing titanium (IV) tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) solution so that PVA-core/TiO2-shell composite nanofibers were formed through the in situ sol-gel reaction of TTIP. The carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes were then fabricated by heat treatment of composite nanofibers under nitrogen atmosphere. By using several characterization methods, we confirmed that the resultant nanotubes consisted of anatase TiO2 nanocrystallites embedded in a carbonaceous matrix. The prepared nanotubes exhibited fast adsorption of RhB with high capacity compared with a commercial porous carbon, and they also showed the photocatalytic decomposition activity for the dye molecules under UV irradiation comparable to the degradation by P-25 and ST-01 (commercial TiO2). Finally, the carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes exhibited several cycle performances of adsorption-photodegradation for RhB. This indicates that the composite nanotubes can adsorb and photodecompose organic pollutants repeatedly without additional activating processes.

  9. Adsorption and transformation of ammonium ion in a loose-pore geothermal reservoir: Batch and column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li; Li, Yanli; Wang, Shidong; Wang, Xinyi; Meng, Hongqi; Luo, Shaohe

    2016-09-01

    Adsorption kinetics and transformation process of ammonium ion (NH4+) were investigated to advance the understanding of N cycle in a low-temperature loose-pore geothermal reservoir. Firstly, batch experiments were performed in order to determine the sorption capacity and the kinetic mechanism of NH4+ onto a loose-pore geothermal reservoir matrix. Then column experiments were carried out at temperatures from 20 °C to 60 °C in order to determine the transport parameters and transformation mechanism of NH4+ in the studied matrix. The results showed that the adsorption process of NH4+ onto the porous media well followed the pseudo-second-order model. No obvious variation of hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient (D) and retardation factor (R) was observed at different transport distances at a Darcy's flux of 2.27 cm/h, at which nitrification could be neglected. The simulated D obtained by the CDE model in CXTFIT2.1 increased with temperature while R decreased with temperature, indicating that the adsorption capacity of NH4+ onto the matrix decreased with the increasing of temperature. When the Darcy's flux was decreased to 0.014 cm/h, only a little part of NH4+ could be transformed to nitrate, suggesting that low density of nitrifiers existed in the simulated loose-pore geothermal reservoir. Although nitrification rate increased with temperature in the range of 20 °C to 60 °C, it was extremely low and no accumulation of nitrite was observed under the simulated low-temperature geothermal conditions without addition of biomass and oxygen.

  10. Adsorption and transformation of ammonium ion in a loose-pore geothermal reservoir: Batch and column experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Li, Yanli; Wang, Shidong; Wang, Xinyi; Meng, Hongqi; Luo, Shaohe

    2016-09-01

    Adsorption kinetics and transformation process of ammonium ion (NH4(+)) were investigated to advance the understanding of N cycle in a low-temperature loose-pore geothermal reservoir. Firstly, batch experiments were performed in order to determine the sorption capacity and the kinetic mechanism of NH4(+) onto a loose-pore geothermal reservoir matrix. Then column experiments were carried out at temperatures from 20°C to 60°C in order to determine the transport parameters and transformation mechanism of NH4(+) in the studied matrix. The results showed that the adsorption process of NH4(+) onto the porous media well followed the pseudo-second-order model. No obvious variation of hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient (D) and retardation factor (R) was observed at different transport distances at a Darcy's flux of 2.27cm/h, at which nitrification could be neglected. The simulated D obtained by the CDE model in CXTFIT2.1 increased with temperature while R decreased with temperature, indicating that the adsorption capacity of NH4(+) onto the matrix decreased with the increasing of temperature. When the Darcy's flux was decreased to 0.014cm/h, only a little part of NH4(+) could be transformed to nitrate, suggesting that low density of nitrifiers existed in the simulated loose-pore geothermal reservoir. Although nitrification rate increased with temperature in the range of 20°C to 60°C, it was extremely low and no accumulation of nitrite was observed under the simulated low-temperature geothermal conditions without addition of biomass and oxygen. PMID:27356192

  11. Effects of Humidity Swings on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization: Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, John E.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a dynamic model which can predict the effect of humidity swings on activated carbon adsorption beds used to remove trace contaminants from the atmosphere in spacecraft. Specifically, the model was to be incorporated into a computer simulation to predict contaminant concentrations exiting the bed as a function of time after a humidity swing occurs. Predicted breakthrough curves were to be compared to experimentally measured results. In all respects the research was successful. The two major aspects of this research were the mathematical model and the experiments. Experiments were conducted by Mr. Appel using a fixed-bed apparatus at NASA-Ames Research Center during the summers of 1994 and 1995 and during the first 8 months of 1996. Mr. Appel conducted most of his mathematical modeling work at the University of Virginia. The simulation code was used to predict breakthrough curves using adsorption equilibrium correlations developed previously by M. D. LeVan's research group at the University of Virginia. These predictions were compared with the experimental measurements, and this led to improvements in both the simulation code and the apparatus.

  12. Effect of gas adsorption on acoustic wave propagation in MFI zeolite membrane materials: experiment and molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Manga, Etoungh D; Blasco, Hugues; Da-Costa, Philippe; Drobek, Martin; Ayral, André; Le Clezio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles; Coasne, Benoit; Julbe, Anne

    2014-09-01

    The present study reports on the development of a characterization method of porous membrane materials which consists of considering their acoustic properties upon gas adsorption. Using acoustic microscopy experiments and atomistic molecular simulations for helium adsorbed in a silicalite-1 zeolite membrane layer, we showed that acoustic wave propagation could be used, in principle, for controlling the membranes operando. Molecular simulations, which were found to fit experimental data, showed that the compressional modulus of the composite system consisting of silicalite-1 with adsorbed He increases linearly with the He adsorbed amount while its shear modulus remains constant in a large range of applied pressures. These results suggest that the longitudinal and Rayleigh wave velocities (VL and VR) depend on the He adsorbed amount whereas the transverse wave velocity VT remains constant. PMID:25089584

  13. Adsorption of CO2, N2, and CH4 in Cs-exchanged chabazite: A combination of van der Waals density functional theory calculations and experiment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jin; Li, Gang; Singh, Ranjeet; Xiao, Penny; Danaci, David; Liu, Jefferson Z.; Webley, Paul A.

    2014-02-01

    The crucial role of dispersion force in correctly describing the adsorption of some typical small-size gas molecules (e.g., CO2, N2, and CH4) in ion-exchanged chabazites has been investigated at different levels of theory, including the standard density functional theory calculation using the Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional and van der Waals density functional theory (vdWDFT) calculations using different exchange-correlation models - vdW_DF2, optB86b, optB88, and optPBE. Our results show that the usage of different vdWDFT functionals does not significantly change the adsorption configuration or the profile of static charge rearrangement of the gas-chabazite complexes, in comparison with the results obtained using the PBE. The calculated values of adsorption enthalpy using different functionals are compared with our experimental results. We conclude that the incorporation of dispersion interaction is imperative to correctly predict the trend of adsorption enthalpy values, in terms of different gas molecules and Cs+ cation densities in the adsorbents, even though the absolute values of adsorption enthalpy are overestimated by approximate 10 kJ/mol compared with experiments.

  14. Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E.; Brown, G.O.

    1998-04-01

    Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with {sup 3}H, {sup 22}Na, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Np, {sup 228}Th, {sup 232}U and {sup 241}Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The {sup 3}H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics.

  15. STS-42 closeup view shows SE 81-09 Convection in Zero Gravity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 closeup view shows Student Experiment 81-09 (SE 81-09), Convection in Zero Gravity experiment, with radial pattern caused by convection induced by heating an oil and aluminum powder mixture in the weightlessness of space. While the STS-42 crewmembers activated the Shuttle Student Involvement Program (SSIP) experiment on Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, middeck, Scott Thomas, the student who designed the experiment, was able to observe the procedures via downlinked television (TV) in JSC's Mission Control Center (MCC). Thomas, now a physics doctoral student at the University of Texas, came up with the experiment while he participated in the SSIP as a student at Richland High School in Johnstown, Pennsylvia.

  16. Lysozyme adsorption at a silica surface using simulation and experiment: effects of pH on protein layer structure.

    PubMed

    Kubiak-Ossowska, Karina; Cwieka, Monika; Kaczynska, Agnieszka; Jachimska, Barbara; Mulheran, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    Hen Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL) is a widely used exemplar to study protein adsorption on surfaces and interfaces. Here we use fully atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, Multi-Parametric Surface Plasmon Resonance (MP-SPR), contact angle and zeta potential measurements to study HEWL adsorption at a silica surface. The simulations provide a detailed description of the adsorption mechanism and indicate that at pH7 the main adsorption driving force is electrostatics, supplemented by weaker hydrophobic forces. Moreover, they reveal the preferred orientation of the adsorbed protein and show that its structure is only slightly altered at the interface with the surface. This provides the basis for interpreting the experimental results, which indicate the surface adsorbs a close-packed monolayer at about pH10 where the surface has a large negative zeta potential and the HEWL is positively charged. At higher pH, the adsorption amount of the protein layer is greatly reduced due to the loss of charge on the protein. At lower pH, the smaller zeta potential of the surface leads to lower HEWL adsorption. These interpretations are complemented by the contact angle measurements that show how the hydrophobicity of the surface is greatest when the surface coverage is highest. The simulations provide details of the hydrophobic residues exposed to solution by the adsorbed HEWL, completing the picture of the protein layer structure. PMID:26315945

  17. Ethane adsorption on aggregates of dahlia-like nanohorns: experiments and computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Russell, Brice A; Migone, Aldo D; Petucci, Justin; Mercedes Calbi, M; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio

    2016-06-01

    This is a report on a study of the adsorption characteristics of ethane on aggregates of unopened dahlia-like carbon nanohorns. This sorbent presents two main groups of adsorption sites: the outside surface of individual nanohorns and deep, interstitial spaces between neighbouring nanohorns towards the interior of the aggregates. We have explored the equilibrium properties of the adsorbed ethane films by determining the adsorption isotherms and isosteric heat of adsorption. Computer simulations performed on different model structures indicate that the majority of ethane adsorption occurs on the outer region of the aggregates, near the ends of the nanohorns. We have also measured the kinetics of adsorption of ethane on this sorbent. The measurements and simulations were conducted along several isotherms spanning the range between 120 K and 220 K. PMID:27218414

  18. Competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline on two acid soils: Stirred flow chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Fernández-Sanjurjo, Maria J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work was to study the competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) on two acid soils. We used the stirred flow chamber technique to obtain experimental data on rapid kinetic processes affecting the retention/release of the antibiotics. Both adsorption and desorption were higher on soil 1 (which showed the highest carbon, clay and Al and Fe oxides content) than on soil 2. Moreover, hysteresis affected the adsorption/desorption processes. Experimental data were fitted to a pseudo-first order equation, resulting qamax (adsorption maximum) values that were higher for soil 1 than for soil 2, and indicating that CTC competed with TC more intensely than OTC in soil 1. Regarding soil 2, the values corresponding to the adsorption kinetics constants (ka) and desorption kinetics constants for fast sites (kd1), followed a trend inverse to qamax and qdmax respectively. In conclusion, competition affected adsorption/desorption kinetics for the three antibiotics assayed, and thus retention/release and subsequent transport processes in soil and water environments. PMID:25973861

  19. Exploring the Stability of Gold Nanoparticles by Experimenting with Adsorption Interactions of Nanomaterials in an Undergraduate Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chi-Feng; You, Pei-Yun; Lin, Ying-Chiao; Hsu, Tsai-Ling; Cheng, Pi-Yun; Wu, Yu-Xuan; Tseng, Chi-Shun; Chen, Sheng-Wen; Chang, Huey-Por; Lin, Yang-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The proposed experiment can help students to understand the factors involved in the stability of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) by exploring the adsorption interaction between Au NPs and various substances. The students in this study found that the surface plasmon resonance band of Au NP solutions underwent a red shift (i.e., from 520 to 650 nm)…

  20. Glyphosate and AMPA adsorption in soils: laboratory experiments and pedotransfer rules.

    PubMed

    Sidoli, Pauline; Baran, Nicole; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of the herbicide glyphosate and its main metabolite AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid) was investigated on 17 different agricultural soils. Batch equilibration adsorption data are shown by Freundlich adsorption isotherms. Glyphosate adsorption is clearly affected by equilibration concentrations, but the nonlinear AMPA adsorption isotherms indicate saturation of the adsorption sites with increasing equilibrium concentrations. pHCaCl2 (i.e. experimental pH) is the major parameter governing glyphosate and AMPA adsorption in soils. However, considering pHCaCl2 values, available phosphate amount, and amorphous iron and aluminium oxide contents by using a nonlinear multiple regression equation, obtains the most accurate and powerful pedotransfer rule for predicting the adsorption constants for these two molecules. As amorphous iron and aluminium oxide contents in soil are not systematically determined, we also propose a pedotransfer rule with two variables-pHCaCl2 values and available phosphate amount-that remains acceptable for both molecules. Moreover, the use of the commonly measured pHwater or pHKCl values gives less accurate results compared to pHCaCl2 measurements. To our knowledge, this study is the first AMPA adsorption characterization for a significant number of temperate climate soils. PMID:26581693

  1. Polymeric micelles with α-glutamyl-terminated PEG shells show low non-specific protein adsorption and a prolonged in vivo circulation time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoju; Yang, Cuiping; Wang, Chenhong; Guo, Leijia; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Yan, Husheng; Liu, Keliang

    2016-02-01

    Although PEG remains the gold standard for stealth functionalization in drug delivery field up to date, complete inhibition of protein corona formation on PEG-coated nanoparticles remains a challenge. To improve the stealth property of PEG, herein an α-glutamyl group was conjugated to the end of PEG and polymeric micelles with α-glutamyl-terminated PEG shells were prepared. After incubation with bovine serum albumin or in fetal calf serum, the size of the micelles changed slightly, while the size of the micelles of similar diblock copolymer but without α-glutamyl group increased markedly. These results indicated that the micelles with α-glutamyl-terminated PEG shells showed low non-specific protein adsorption. In vivo blood clearance kinetics assay showed that the micelles with α-glutamyl-terminated PEG shells exhibited a longer in vivo blood circulation time compared with similar micelles but without α-glutamyl groups. The better stealth property of the micelles with α-glutamyl-terminated PEG shells was presumably attributed to the zwitterionic property of the α-glutamyl groups. PMID:26652431

  2. Evaluating the long-term performance of low-cost adsorbents using small-scale adsorption column experiments.

    PubMed

    Callery, O; Healy, M G; Rognard, F; Barthelemy, L; Brennan, R B

    2016-09-15

    This study investigated a novel method of predicting the long-term phosphorus removal performance of large-scale adsorption filters, using data derived from short-term, small-scale column experiments. The filter media investigated were low-cost adsorbents such as aluminum sulfate drinking water treatment residual, ferric sulfate drinking water treatment residual, and fine and coarse crushed concretes. Small-bore adsorption columns were loaded with synthetic wastewater, and treated column effluent volume was plotted against the mass of phosphorus adsorbed per unit mass of filter media. It was observed that the curve described by the data strongly resembled that of a standard adsorption isotherm created from batch adsorption data. Consequently, it was hypothesized that an equation following the form of the Freundlich isotherm would describe the relationship between filter loading and media saturation. Moreover, the relationship between filter loading and effluent concentration could also be derived from this equation. The proposed model was demonstrated to accurately predict the performance of large-scale adsorption filters over a period of up to three months with a very high degree of accuracy. Furthermore, the coefficients necessary to produce said model could be determined from just 24 h of small-scale experimental data. PMID:27295617

  3. Kinetic Study of Adsorption Processes in Solution: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casado, Julio; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Background information, apparatus needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for a simple kinetic method for the monitoring of adsorption processes. The method, which involved adsorption of crystal violet onto activated carbon, is suitable for classroom and/or research purposes. (JN)

  4. Batch and column studies of adsorption of Li, Ni and Br by a reference sand for contaminant transport experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Seigel, M.D.; Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R.

    1995-09-01

    A processed quartz sand (Wedron 510), mined from the St. Peter sandstone, has been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical methods for use as a reference porous media in transport model validation experiments. Wedron 510 sand was used in an intermediate-scale experiment involving migration of Ni, Li and Br through a 6-m high x 3-m diameter caisson. Ni and Li adsorption/desorption, and Li/Ni site-competition experiments yielded information on the importance of the trace mineral phases to adsorption of Li and Ni by the sand. The presence of an iron hydroxide coating similar to goethite on the sand grains is suggested by visual observation and leaching experiments. Kaolinite was identified by SEM and XRD as a significant trace mineral phase in the sand and occurs as small particles coating the sand grains. Quartz, the predominant constituent of the sand by weight, does not appear to contribute significantly to the adsorption properties of the sand. Qualitatively, the adsorption properties of the sand can be adequately modeled as a two-mineral system (goethite and kaolinite). The studies described in this report should provide a basis for understanding transport of Ni, Li and Br through porous media similar to the reference sand. Techniques were developed for obtaining parameter values for surface complexation and kinetic adsorption models for the sand and its mineral components. These constants can be used directly in coupled hydrogeochemical transport codes. The techniques should be useful for characterization of other natural materials and elements in high-level nuclear waste in support of coupled hydrogeochemical transport calculations for Yucca Mountain.

  5. Removal of phenol from aqueous solutions by adsorption.

    PubMed

    Roostaei, Nadia; Tezel, F Handan

    2004-02-01

    Experiments have been conducted to examine the liquid-phase adsorption of phenol from water by silica gel, HiSiv 3000, activated alumina, activated carbon, Filtrasorb-400, and HiSiv 1000. Experiments were carried out for the analysis of adsorption equilibrium capacities and kinetics. The adsorption isotherm model of the Langmuir-Freundlich type was the best to describe adsorption equilibrium data for phenol for the adsorbents studied. Results of kinetic experiments indicated that HiSiv 1000 had the highest rate of adsorption among the adsorbents studied and therefore more detailed studies were carried out with this adsorbent. The influence of particle size, temperature, and thermal regeneration on adsorption of phenol by HiSiv 1000 was evaluated. From particle size experiments it appeared that adsorption capacity of HiSiv 1000 did not change by changing the particle size, but the rate of adsorption decreased considerably by increasing the particle size. The effect of temperature on adsorption was studied by determining equilibrium isotherms for HiSiv 1000 at 25, 40, and 55 degrees C. The results showed that adsorption capacity decreased with increasing temperature. Thermal regeneration of HiSiv 1000 was performed at 360 degrees C. It was observed that adsorption capacity of HiSiv 1000 did not change after 14 regeneration cycles. Equilibrium experiments showed that the adsorption capacities of activated carbon and Filtrasorb-400 were several times higher than that of HiSiv 1000. PMID:15160741

  6. Adsorption mechanisms for fatty acids on DLC and steel studied by AFM and tribological experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simič, R.; Kalin, M.

    2013-10-01

    Fatty acids are known to affect the friction and wear of steel contacts via adsorption onto the surface, which is one of the fundamental boundary-lubrication mechanisms. The understanding of the lubrication mechanisms of polar molecules on diamond-like carbon (DLC) is, however, still insufficient. In this work we aimed to find out whether such molecules have a similar effect on DLC coatings as they do on steel. The adsorption of hexadecanoic acid in various concentrations (2-20 mmol/l) on DLC was studied under static conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The amount of surface coverage of the adsorbed fatty-acid molecules was analysed. In addition, tribological tests were performed to correlate the wear and friction behaviours in tribological contacts with the adsorption of molecules on the surface under static conditions. A good correlation between the AFM results and the tribological behaviour was observed. We confirmed that fatty acids can adsorb onto the DLC surfaces and are, therefore, potential boundary-lubrication agents for DLC coatings. The adsorption of the fatty acid onto the DLC surfaces reduces the wear of the coatings, but it is less effective in reducing the friction. Tentative adsorption mechanisms that include an environmental species effect, a temperature effect and a tribochemical effect are proposed for DLC and steel surfaces based on our results and few potential mechanisms found in literature.

  7. A field experiment shows that subtle linguistic cues might not affect voter behavior.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Alan S; Huber, Gregory A; Biggers, Daniel R; Hendry, David J

    2016-06-28

    One of the most important recent developments in social psychology is the discovery of minor interventions that have large and enduring effects on behavior. A leading example of this class of results is in the work by Bryan et al. [Bryan CJ, Walton GM, Rogers T, Dweck CS (2011) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(31):12653-12656], which shows that administering a set of survey items worded so that subjects think of themselves as voters (noun treatment) rather than as voting (verb treatment) substantially increases political participation (voter turnout) among subjects. We revisit these experiments by replicating and extending their research design in a large-scale field experiment. In contrast to the 11 to 14% point greater turnout among those exposed to the noun rather than the verb treatment reported in the work by Bryan et al., we find no statistically significant difference in turnout between the noun and verb treatments (the point estimate of the difference is approximately zero). Furthermore, when we benchmark these treatments against a standard get out the vote message, we estimate that both are less effective at increasing turnout than a much shorter basic mobilization message. In our conclusion, we detail how our study differs from the work by Bryan et al. and discuss how our results might be interpreted. PMID:27298362

  8. Adsorption and desorption of phosphate on limestone in experiments simulating seawater intrusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The absorption and desorption of phosphorus on a large block of limestone was investigated using deionized water (DIW) and seawater. The limestone had a high affinity to adsorb phosphorus in DIW. Phosphate adsorption was significantly less in seawater, and more phosphorus was desorbed in the seawate...

  9. A Prebiotic Chemistry Experiment on the Adsorption of Nucleic Acids Bases onto a Natural Zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anizelli, Pedro R.; Baú, João Paulo T.; Gomes, Frederico P.; da Costa, Antonio Carlos S.; Carneiro, Cristine E. A.; Zaia, Cássia Thaïs B. V.; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    2015-09-01

    There are currently few mechanisms that can explain how nucleic acid bases were synthesized, concentrated from dilute solutions, and/or protected against degradation by UV radiation or hydrolysis on the prebiotic Earth. A natural zeolite exhibited the potential to adsorb adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil over a range of pH, with greater adsorption of adenine and cytosine at acidic pH. Adsorption of all nucleic acid bases was decreased in artificial seawater compared to water, likely due to cation complexation. Furthermore, adsorption of adenine appeared to protect natural zeolite from thermal degradation. The C=O groups from thymine, cytosine and uracil appeared to assist the dissolution of the mineral while the NH2 group from adenine had no effect. As shown by FT-IR spectroscopy, adenine interacted with a natural zeolite through the NH2 group, and cytosine through the C=O group. A pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of adenine adsorption, which occurred faster in artificial seawaters.

  10. A Prebiotic Chemistry Experiment on the Adsorption of Nucleic Acids Bases onto a Natural Zeolite.

    PubMed

    Anizelli, Pedro R; Baú, João Paulo T; Gomes, Frederico P; da Costa, Antonio Carlos S; Carneiro, Cristine E A; Zaia, Cássia Thaïs B V; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2015-09-01

    There are currently few mechanisms that can explain how nucleic acid bases were synthesized, concentrated from dilute solutions, and/or protected against degradation by UV radiation or hydrolysis on the prebiotic Earth. A natural zeolite exhibited the potential to adsorb adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil over a range of pH, with greater adsorption of adenine and cytosine at acidic pH. Adsorption of all nucleic acid bases was decreased in artificial seawater compared to water, likely due to cation complexation. Furthermore, adsorption of adenine appeared to protect natural zeolite from thermal degradation. The C=O groups from thymine, cytosine and uracil appeared to assist the dissolution of the mineral while the NH2 group from adenine had no effect. As shown by FT-IR spectroscopy, adenine interacted with a natural zeolite through the NH2 group, and cytosine through the C=O group. A pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of adenine adsorption, which occurred faster in artificial seawaters. PMID:25754589

  11. Phenolic acids from wheat show different absorption profiles in plasma: a model experiment with catheterized pigs.

    PubMed

    Nørskov, Natalja P; Hedemann, Mette S; Theil, Peter K; Fomsgaard, Inge S; Laursen, Bente B; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2013-09-18

    The concentration and absorption of the nine phenolic acids of wheat were measured in a model experiment with catheterized pigs fed whole grain wheat and wheat aleurone diets. Six pigs in a repeated crossover design were fitted with catheters in the portal vein and mesenteric artery to study the absorption of phenolic acids. The difference between the artery and the vein for all phenolic acids was small, indicating that the release of phenolic acids in the large intestine was not sufficient to create a porto-arterial concentration difference. Although, the porto-arterial difference was small, their concentrations in the plasma and the absorption profiles differed between cinnamic and benzoic acid derivatives. Cinnamic acids derivatives such as ferulic acid and caffeic acid had maximum plasma concentration of 82 ± 20 and 200 ± 7 nM, respectively, and their absorption profiles differed depending on the diet consumed. Benzoic acid derivatives showed low concentration in the plasma (<30 nM) and in the diets. The exception was p-hydroxybenzoic acid, with a plasma concentration (4 ± 0.4 μM), much higher than the other plant phenolic acids, likely because it is an intermediate in the phenolic acid metabolism. It was concluded that plant phenolic acids undergo extensive interconversion in the colon and that their absorption profiles reflected their low bioavailability in the plant matrix. PMID:23971623

  12. Adsorption and transport of polymaleic acid on Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone: Batch and transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durce, Delphine; Landesman, Catherine; Grambow, Bernd; Ribet, Solange; Giffaut, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) can affect the mobility of radionuclides in pore water of clay-rich geological formations, such as those intended to be used for nuclear waste disposal. The present work studies the adsorption and transport properties of a polycarboxylic acid, polymaleic acid (PMA, Mw = 1.9 kDa), on Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples (COx). Even though this molecule is rather different from the natural organic matter found in clay rock, the study of its retention properties on both dispersed and intact samples allows assessing to which extent organic acids may undergo sorption under natural conditions (pH 7) and what could be the impact on their mobility. PMA sorption and desorption were investigated in dispersed systems. The degree of sorption was measured after 1, 8 and 21 days and for a range of PMA initial concentrations from 4.5 × 10- 7 to 1.4 × 10- 3 mol.L- 1. The reversibility of the sorption process was estimated by desorption experiments performed after the sorption experiments. At the sorption steady state, the sorption was described by a two-site Langmuir model. A total sorption capacity of COx for PMA was found to be 1.01×10- 2 mol.kg- 1 distributed on two sorption sites, one weak and one strong. The desorption of PMA was incomplete, independently of the duration of the sorption phase. The amount of desorbable PMA even appeared to decrease for sorption phases from 1 to 21 days. To describe the apparent desorption hysteresis, two conceptual models were applied. The two-box diffusion model accounted for intraparticle diffusion and more generally for nonequilibrium processes. The two-box first-order non-reversible model accounted for a first-order non-reversible sorption and more generally for kinetically-controlled irreversible sorption processes. The use of the two models revealed that desorption hysteresis was not the result of nonequilibrium processes but was due to irreversible sorption. Irreversible sorption on the strong site was

  13. Potential soluble, reactive, adsorptive and particulate tracers for source-receptor experiments in MATEX

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

    1985-07-01

    A survey of potential non-conservative tracers for use in source-receptor studies in acid deposition is presented. Classes of tracers considered were water soluble tracers, chemically reactive tracers, adsorptive tracers and particulate tracers. A criterion used for the selection of compounds for nonconservative tracers is that they be as reasonably compatible in the analytical detection system used for the conservative perfluorocarbon tracers. For each class of non-conservative tracers several example compounds are given and discussed, along with the research needed to develop these tracers. A reasonable development time for these tracers is as follows; adsorptive tracers, 2 years; particulate tracers, 2 1/2 years; soluble tracers, 3 years and reactive tracers, 3 1/2 years. By development, it is meant that 1 or 2 tracers have been developed and at least demonstrated in a small field test. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This L-shaped probe mounted on the forward fuselage of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft was the focus of an air data collection experiment flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip information as well as traditional airspeed and altitude data from a single system. For the experiment, the probes--one mounted on either side of the F-18's forward fuselage--were hooked to a series of four transducers, which relayed pressure measurements to an on-board research computer.

  15. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P.; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C.; Landes, Christy F.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally. PMID:24459184

  16. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  17. Lullaby Light Shows: Everyday Musical Experience among Under-Two-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on information gathered from a set of interviews carried out with 88 mothers of under-two-year-olds. The interviews enquired about the everyday musical experiences of their babies and very young children in the home. From the process of analysis, the responses to the interviews were grouped into three main areas: musical…

  18. Real Science: MIT Reality Show Tracks Experiences, Frustrations of Chemistry Lab Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    A reality show about a college course--a chemistry class no less? That's what "ChemLab Boot Camp" is. The 14-part series of short videos is being released one episode at a time on the online learning site of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The novel show follows a diverse group of 14 freshmen as they struggle to master the laboratory…

  19. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  20. Argon and nitrogen adsorption in disordered nanoporous carbons: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Pikunic, Jorge; Llewellyn, Philip; Pellenq, Roland; Gubbins, Keith E

    2005-05-10

    We report experimental measurements of the isosteric heats of adsorption for argon and nitrogen in two microporous saccharose-based carbons, using a Tian-Calvet microcalorimeter. These data are used to test recently developed molecular models of these carbons, obtained by a constrained reverse Monte Carlo method. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats for these systems, and the results for the latter are compared to the experimental data. For argon, excellent quantitative agreement is obtained over the entire range of pore filling. In the case of nitrogen, very good agreement is obtained over the range of coverage 0.25 < or = gamma/gamma 0 < or = 0.85, but discrepancies are observed at lower and higher coverages. The discrepancy at low coverage may be due to the presence of oxygenated groups on the pore surfaces, which are not taken into account in the model. The differences at high coverage are believed to arise from the presence of a few mesopores, which again are not included in the model. Pair correlation functions (argon-carbon and argon-argon) are determined from the simulations and are discussed as a function of pore filling. Snapshots of the simulations are presented and provide a picture of the pore filling process. PMID:16032857

  1. The Experience Of Massachusetts Shows That Consumers Will Need Help In Navigating Insurance Exchanges

    PubMed Central

    Sinaiko, Anna D.; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Soumerai, Stephen B.; Lieu, Tracy; Galbraith, Alison

    2014-01-01

    In 2022 twenty-five million people are expected to purchase health insurance through exchanges to be established under the Affordable Care Act. Understanding how people seek information and make decisions about the insurance plans that are available to them may improve their ability to select a plan and their satisfaction with it. We conducted a survey in 2010 of enrollees in one plan offered through Massachusetts’s unsubsidized health insurance exchange to analyze how a sample of consumers selected their plans. More than 40 percent found plan information difficult to understand. Approximately one-third of respondents had help selecting plans—most commonly from friends or family members. However, one-fifth of respondents wished they had had help narrowing plan choices; these enrollees were more likely to report negative experiences related to plan understanding, satisfaction with affordability and coverage, and unexpected costs. Some may have been eligible for subsidized plans. Exchanges may need to provide more resources and decision-support tools to improve consumers’ experiences in selecting a health plan. PMID:23297274

  2. The experience of Massachusetts shows that consumers will need help in navigating insurance exchanges.

    PubMed

    Sinaiko, Anna D; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Soumerai, Stephen B; Lieu, Tracy; Galbraith, Alison

    2013-01-01

    In 2022 twenty-five million people are expected to purchase health insurance through exchanges to be established under the Affordable Care Act. Understanding how people seek information and make decisions about the insurance plans that are available to them may improve their ability to select a plan and their satisfaction with it. We conducted a survey in 2010 of enrollees in one plan offered through Massachusetts's unsubsidized health insurance exchange to analyze how a sample of consumers selected their plans. More than 40 percent found plan information difficult to understand. Approximately one-third of respondents had help selecting plans-most commonly from friends or family members. However, one-fifth of respondents wished they had had help narrowing plan choices; these enrollees were more likely to report negative experiences related to plan understanding, satisfaction with affordability and coverage, and unexpected costs. Some may have been eligible for subsidized plans. Exchanges may need to provide more resources and decision-support tools to improve consumers' experiences in selecting a health plan. PMID:23297274

  3. Adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes by experiments and molecular simulation II: Effect of morphology and temperature on organic adsorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Mota, J.P.B.; Rood, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Hexane adsorption on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles was studied. Hexane adsorption capacities of two purified SWNT samples was gravimetrically determined at isothermal conditions of 25??, 37??, and 50??C for 10-4 < p/po < 0.9, where p/po is hexane vapor pressure relative to its saturation pressure. Simulation of hexane adsorption under similar temperature and pressure conditions were performed on the external and internal sites of nanotube bundles of diameters same as those in experimental samples. The simulations could predict isotherms for a hypothetical scenario where all nanotubes in a sample would be open. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase (Cincinnati, OH 10/30/2005-11/4/2005).

  4. Global decomposition experiment shows soil animal impacts on decomposition are climate-dependent

    PubMed Central

    WALL, DIANA H; BRADFORD, MARK A; ST JOHN, MARK G; TROFYMOW, JOHN A; BEHAN-PELLETIER, VALERIE; BIGNELL, DAVID E; DANGERFIELD, J MARK; PARTON, WILLIAM J; RUSEK, JOSEF; VOIGT, WINFRIED; WOLTERS, VOLKMAR; GARDEL, HOLLEY ZADEH; AYUKE, FRED O; BASHFORD, RICHARD; BELJAKOVA, OLGA I; BOHLEN, PATRICK J; BRAUMAN, ALAIN; FLEMMING, STEPHEN; HENSCHEL, JOH R; JOHNSON, DAN L; JONES, T HEFIN; KOVAROVA, MARCELA; KRANABETTER, J MARTY; KUTNY, LES; LIN, KUO-CHUAN; MARYATI, MOHAMED; MASSE, DOMINIQUE; POKARZHEVSKII, ANDREI; RAHMAN, HOMATHEVI; SABARÁ, MILLOR G; SALAMON, JOERG-ALFRED; SWIFT, MICHAEL J; VARELA, AMANDA; VASCONCELOS, HERALDO L; WHITE, DON; ZOU, XIAOMING

    2008-01-01

    Climate and litter quality are primary drivers of terrestrial decomposition and, based on evidence from multisite experiments at regional and global scales, are universally factored into global decomposition models. In contrast, soil animals are considered key regulators of decomposition at local scales but their role at larger scales is unresolved. Soil animals are consequently excluded from global models of organic mineralization processes. Incomplete assessment of the roles of soil animals stems from the difficulties of manipulating invertebrate animals experimentally across large geographic gradients. This is compounded by deficient or inconsistent taxonomy. We report a global decomposition experiment to assess the importance of soil animals in C mineralization, in which a common grass litter substrate was exposed to natural decomposition in either control or reduced animal treatments across 30 sites distributed from 43°S to 68°N on six continents. Animals in the mesofaunal size range were recovered from the litter by Tullgren extraction and identified to common specifications, mostly at the ordinal level. The design of the trials enabled faunal contribution to be evaluated against abiotic parameters between sites. Soil animals increase decomposition rates in temperate and wet tropical climates, but have neutral effects where temperature or moisture constrain biological activity. Our findings highlight that faunal influences on decomposition are dependent on prevailing climatic conditions. We conclude that (1) inclusion of soil animals will improve the predictive capabilities of region- or biome-scale decomposition models, (2) soil animal influences on decomposition are important at the regional scale when attempting to predict global change scenarios, and (3) the statistical relationship between decomposition rates and climate, at the global scale, is robust against changes in soil faunal abundance and diversity.

  5. Pest control experiments show benefits of complexity at landscape and local scales.

    PubMed

    Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca; Kremen, Claire

    2012-10-01

    Farms benefit from pest control services provided by nature, but management of these services requires an understanding of how habitat complexity within and around the farm impacts the relationship between agricultural pests and their enemies. Using cage experiments, this study measures the effect of habitat complexity across scales on pest suppression of the cabbage aphid Brevicoryne brassicae in broccoli. Our results reveal that proportional reduction of pest density increases with complexity both at the landscape scale (measured by natural habitat cover in the 1 km around the farm) and at the local scale (plant diversity). While high local complexity can compensate for low complexity at landscape scales and vice versa, a delay in natural enemy arrival to locally complex sites in simple landscapes may compromise the enemies' ability to provide adequate control. Local complexity in simplified landscapes may only provide adequate top-down pest control in cooler microclimates with relatively low aphid colonization rates. Even so, strong natural enemy function can be overwhelmed by high rates of pest reproduction or colonization from nearby source habitat. PMID:23210310

  6. Specific yield - laboratory experiments showing the effect of time on column drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prill, Robert C.; Johnson, A.I.; Morris, Donald Arthur

    1965-01-01

    The increasing use of ground water from many major aquifers in the United States has required a more thorough understanding of gravity drainage, or specific yield. This report describes one phase of specific yield research by the U.S. Geological Survey's Hydrologic Laboratory in cooperation with the California Department of Water Resources. An earlier phase of the research concentrated on the final distribution of moisture retained after drainage of saturated columns of porous media. This report presents the phase that concentrated on the distribution of moisture retained in similar columns after drainage for various periods of time. Five columns, about 4 cm in diameter by 170 cm long, were packed with homogenous sand of very fine, medium, and coarse sizes, and one column was packed with alternating layers of coarse and medium sand. The very fine materials were more uniform in size range than were the medium materials. As the saturated columns drained, tensiometers installed throughout the length recorded changes in moisture tension. The relation of tension to moisture content, determined for each of the materials, was then used to convert the tension readings to moisture content. Data were then available on the distribution of retained moisture for different periods of drainage from 1 to 148 hours. Data also are presented on the final distribution of moisture content by weight and volume and on the degree of saturation. The final zone of capillary saturation was approximately 12 cm for coarse sand, 13 cm for medium sand, and 52 cm for very fine sand. The data showed these zones were 92 to 100 percent saturated. Most of the outflow from the columns occurred in the earlier hours of drainage--90 percent in 1 hour for the coarse materials, 50 percent for the medium, and 60 percent for the very fine. Although the largest percentage of the specific yield was reached during the early hours of .drainage, this study amply demonstrates that a very long time would be

  7. Does medicine still show an unresolved discrimination against women? Experience in two European university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, A; Merino, A; Viñas, O; Arrizabalaga, P

    2009-02-01

    Have invisible barriers for women been broken in 2007, or do we still have to break through medicine's glass ceiling? Data from two of the most prestigious university hospitals in Barcelona with 700-800 beds, Hospital Clínic (HC) and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP) address this issue. In the HSCSP, 87% of the department chairs are men and 85% of the department unit chiefs are also men. With respect to women, only 5 (13%) are in the top position (department chair) and 4 (15%) are department unit chiefs. Similar statistics are also found at the HC: 87% of the department chairs and 89% of the department unit chiefs are men. Currently, only 6 women (13%) are in the top position and 6 (11%) are department unit chiefs. Analysis of the 2002 data of internal promotions in HC showed that for the first level (senior specialist) sex distribution was similar. Nevertheless, for the second level (consultant) only 25% were women, and for the top level (senior consultant) only 8% were women. These proportions have not changed in 2007 in spite of a 10% increase in leadership positions during this period. Similar proportions were found in HSCSP where 68% of the top promotions were held by men. The data obtained from these two different medical institutions in Barcelona are probably representative of other hospitals in Spain. It would be ethically desirable to have males and females in leadership positions in the medical profession. PMID:19181883

  8. [Adsorption characteristics of the antibiotic sulfanilamide onto rice husk ash].

    PubMed

    Ji, Ying-Xue; Wang, Feng-He; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Gu, Zhong-Zhu

    2013-10-01

    Under different conditions of initial rice husk ash (RHA) dosage, oscillating temperature, oscillating frequency and solution pH, the adsorption characteristics of sulfanilamide on RHA with the change of time and its adsorption kinetics were investigated. RHA was characterized by SEM and FTIR before and after sulfanilamide adsorption. The results indicated that the adsorption characteristics of sulfanilamide on RHA was influenced by RHA dosage, oscillating temperature, oscillating frequency and solution pH. Within the RHA dosing range (0. 1-2.0 g.L-1) in this experiment, the optimal temperature for the adsorption was 25C , and with the increase of RHA dosage, the removal efficiency of sulfanilamide increased, the time required to reach adsorption equilibrium was shortened and the adsorptive quantity of sulfanilamide by per unit mass of RHA decreased. A high oscillating frequency was used to ensure the adsorption effect when the RHA concentration was high. Strong acidic and strong alkaline conditions were conducive to the adsorption of sulfanilamide. The analysis of adsorption dynamics showed that for the adsorption process with high RHA dosage ( >or= 1.0 g.L-1), the pseudo-second-order model fitted the adsorption behavior well, and the process was controlled by physical and chemical adsorption. Intraparticle diffusion model showed that the adsorption process was controlled by both membrane diffusion and internal diffusion, and the influence of the former became more obvious with the increase of the adsorbent concentration. Both the SEM and FTIR spectra proved the effective adsorption of sulfanilamide by RHA. PMID:24364310

  9. Adsorption experiment of toxic micro-pollutants derived from automobiles using red soil.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takahiro; Ichiki, Atsushi; Sawada, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    In some countries, non-point source pollution derived from a city's economic activities tends to be a barrier to the improvement of water quality. Roadway runoff is known to contain toxic micro-pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Conversely, red soil is known to adsorb some organic matter. In this study, artificial roadway runoff water containing toxic micro-pollutants was made using roadway dust collected from a highway, and used for both batch-type tests and soil column tests with red soil in order to understand adsorption ability of the red soil on such toxic micro-pollutants, especially PAHs. In the batch-type tests, PAHs could be removed by approximately 40% when the contact time was 90 minutes. In the soil column tests, PAHs were removed by more than 80% while suspended solids were removed by more than 90%. Notably, PAHs with a high molecular weight were removed more readily in the tests than PAHs with a low molecular weight. PMID:26606103

  10. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  11. Calcium lignosulfonate adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Reid B; Bai, Baojun

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes adsorption and desorption studies carried out with calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) on Berea sandstone. Circulation experiments were performed to determine CLS adsorption isotherms and the effects of CLS concentration, temperature, salinity, brine hardness, and injection rate on adsorption density. Flow-through experiments were performed to assess the reversibility of CLS adsorption and the influence of postflush rate, brine concentration, brine hardness, brine pH, and temperature on the desorption process. Results indicate that CLS adsorption isotherms on Berea sandstone follow the Freundlich isotherm law. The results presented in this paper on the effects of CLS adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone show that: (1) increasing CLS concentration and salinity increases CLS adsorption density; (2) increasing temperature will decrease adsorption density; (3) increasing injection rate of CLS solution will slightly decrease CLS adsorption density; (4) postflush rate and salinity of brine have a large impact on the CLS desorption process; (5) the adsorption and desorption process are not completely reversible; and (5) temperature and pH of the postflush brine have little effect on desorption. PMID:15380409

  12. Potential failure of life detection experiments on Mars resulting from adsorption of organic compounds on to common instrument materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Court, Richard W.; Sims, Mark R.; Cullen, David C.; Sephton, Mark A.

    2012-12-01

    Some life detection instruments under development for operation on Mars use solvents to extract organic compounds from samples of Martian regolith and rock and to transfer the extracts to dedicated detectors. However, it is possible that organic compounds extracted from Martian samples and dissolved in the solvent could adsorb to instrument surfaces, potentially resulting in a failure to detect organic matter that could have been avoided by using more appropriate instrument materials. If successful detection and characterisation is to take place it is therefore essential to understand the interactions between dissolved organic targets and the surfaces of space instrument components. One such life detection instrument is the Life Marker Chip (LMC) being developed for the ExoMars mission, which relies on a novel surfactant-based solvent system and antibody-based detectors. We have tested the ability of a range of materials, including titanium, stainless steel, aluminium, the fluoropolymer Viton™, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), nylon, polypropylene, polyethersulfone and cellulose acetate to adsorb a range of organic standards from the surfactant solution intended to be used by the LMC. Results indicate that aromatic hydrocarbons, specifically anthracene, are more prone to adsorption than straight chain, branched and cyclic aliphatic species. Titanium, aluminium and stainless steel show little adsorption ability and are suitable for larger-area applications. PTFE and Viton™ are suitable for use in small-area applications such as seals and filters. Nylon, polypropylene, polyethersulfone and cellulose acetate show stronger adsorption characteristics and should be avoided in the forms employed here. The ability of some materials to selectively adsorb organic compounds from solvent extracts can lower the sensitivity of life detection instruments. In future, it would be prudent to test all space instrument materials for their ability to adsorb target organic compounds

  13. Adsorption of a Textile Dye on Commercial Activated Carbon: A Simple Experiment to Explore the Role of Surface Chemistry and Ionic Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Angela; Nunes, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an adsorption experiment is proposed using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent and a textile azo dye, Mordant Blue-9, as adsorbate. The surface chemistry of the activated carbon is changed through a simple oxidation treatment and the ionic strength of the dye solution is also modified, simulating distinct conditions of water…

  14. Argon adsorption and the lunar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of Ar adsorption experiments on a terrestrial labradorite and lunar rock 15415 crushed in vacuo are reported. The experiments were designed to test lunar atmosphere simulation models for the behavior of Ar on the lunar surface, as determined from the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer results. These models (Hodges, 1980, 1982) used a single adsorption potential to characterize the surfaces of lunar soil grains, with the result that high (6-7 kcal/mol) heats of adsorption were inferred. The present experimental results show that very high adsorption potentials are indeed associated with fresh mineral surfaces, but that these energetic surfaces occupy only small fractions of the total surface area. Nonetheless, these small fractions of surface, if they can be maintained in the lunar regolith in steady-state condition, could be sufficient to account for the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer observations.

  15. [Characteristic of ammonia nitrogen adsorption on karst underground river sediments].

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Chen, Kun-Kun; Jiang, Guang-Hui

    2011-02-01

    Karst aquifers are one of the most important aquifers in Southwestern China. One of the characteristics of karst aquifers is the enhanced permeability permits high flow velocities are capable of transporting suspended and bedload sediments. Mobile sediment in karst may act as a vector for the transport of contaminates. 14 sediment samples were collected from two underground rivers in two typical karst areas in Liuzhou city, Guangxi Autonomous Region, China. According to simulated experiment methods, characteristic of adsorption of ammonia nitrogen on sediment was studied. The results of ammonia nitrogen adsorption dynamics on sediments showed that the maximum adsorption velocity was less than 2 h. The adsorption balance quantity in 5 h accounted for 71% - 98% of the maximum adsorption quantity. The maximum adsorption quantity of ammonia nitrogen was 385.5 mg/kg, which was sediment from a cave in the middle areas of Guancun underground river system. The study of isotherm adsorption indicated adsorption quantity of NH4+ increase followed by incremental balance concentration of NH4+ in the aquatic phase. Adsorption quantity of ammonia nitrogen in sediments has a relative linear relationship with adsorption balance concentrations. Adsorption-desorption balance concentrations were all low, indicating sediments from underground rivers have great adsorption potential. Under the condition of low and high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen in overlying water, Langmuir and Tempkin couldn't simulate or simulate results couldn't reach remarkable level, whilst Linear and Freundlich models could simulate well. Research on different type sediments, sampling times and depths from two underground rivers shows characteristic of ammonia nitrogen adsorption on karst underground river sediments doesn't have good correspondence with the type of sediments. One of the reasons is there is no big difference between sediments in the development of climate, geology, hydrological conditions

  16. Effect of grain size on uranium(VI) surface complexation kinetics and adsorption additivity.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M

    2011-07-15

    The contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption was studied using a sediment from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.053-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (<0.053 mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch and flow-cell experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms and kinetic uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. One important implication of this study is that grain-size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location. PMID:21648458

  17. Hydrogen and helium adsorption on potassium

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, R.; Mulders, N.; Hess, G.

    1995-04-01

    A previous quartz microbalance study of adsorption of helium on sodium indicates that the inert layer is surprisingly small. Similar experiments with hydrogen on sodium show layer by layer growth below a temperature of 7K. These results motivated the authors to extend the experiments to lower temperatures. A suitable apparatus, capable of reaching 0.45 K, while still enabling them to do in situ alkali evaporation, has been constructed. The authors will report on the results of microbalance adsorption experiments of helium and hydrogen on potassium.

  18. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2011-07-27

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  19. [Adsorption characteristics of f2 bacteriophages by four substrates in constructed wetland].

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Zheng, Xiang; Wei, Yuan-Song; Yang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Performance of f2 phages adsorption by four substrates including anthracite coal, steel slag, zeolite and forsterite was investigated through batch and dynamic experiments. Results of batch experiments showed that the removal efficiency of f2 phages by these four substrates was in the order of anthracite > steel slag > forsterite approximately zeolite. The adsorption of f2 phages by anthracite experienced fast, medium and slow stages, and the removal efficiency of f2 phages increased gradually with the increase of anthracite dosage, e. g. the optimized dosage of anthracite was 8.0 g at a solid/liquid ratio of 1:12.5 (m/V). The isothermal adsorption of all four substrates was described with Freundlich and Langmuir isothermal adsorption equation very well, and the adsorption of f2 phages by both anthracite and steel slag fitted pseudo-second order adsorption kinetics at their theoretical adsorption capacities of 3. 35 x 10(8) PFU.g-1 and 2.56 x 10(8) PFU.g-1, respectively, nearly the same as the equilibrium adsorption capacities obtained under the experiment conditions. And the liquid diffusion process was a rate-limiting step of the adsorption of f2 phage by both anthracite and steel slag, but not the only one. The results of dynamic adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption process of f2 phages in the three adsorption columns including anthracite, steel slag and zeolite experienced four stages of adaption, adsorption, pulse adsorption and adsorption equilibrium, and the total removal rates of f2 phages were more than 2. 55 Ig. PMID:24364309

  20. Understanding H isotope adsorption and absorption of Al-alloys using modeling and experiments (LDRD: #165724)

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Donald K.; Zhou, Xiaowang; Karnesky, Richard A.; Kolasinski, Robert; Foster, Michael E.; Thurmer, Konrad; Chao, Paul; Epperly, Ethan Nicholas; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Wong, Bryan M.; Sills, Ryan B.

    2015-09-01

    Current austenitic stainless steel storage reservoirs for hydrogen isotopes (e.g. deuterium and tritium) have performance and operational life-limiting interactions (e.g. embrittlement) with H-isotopes. Aluminum alloys (e.g.AA2219), alternatively, have very low H-isotope solubilities, suggesting high resistance towards aging vulnerabilities. This report summarizes the work performed during the life of the Lab Directed Research and Development in the Nuclear Weapons investment area (165724), and provides invaluable modeling and experimental insights into the interactions of H isotopes with surfaces and bulk AlCu-alloys. The modeling work establishes and builds a multi-scale framework which includes: a density functional theory informed bond-order potential for classical molecular dynamics (MD), and subsequent use of MD simulations to inform defect level dislocation dynamics models. Furthermore, low energy ion scattering and thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments are performed to validate these models and add greater physical understanding to them.

  1. Influence of elastic strains on the adsorption process in porous materials. Thermodynamics and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosman, A.; Ortega, C.

    2010-06-01

    If we disregard the shape of the boundary hysteresis loop, H1 for SBA-15, MCM-41 and KIT-6, H2 for p +-type porous silicon and porous glass, the hysteretic features inside the loop are qualitatively the same for all these systems and show that none of them are composed of independent pores whether the pores are interconnected or not. We hence believe that the physical parameter which couples the pores is not the interconnectivity but the elastic deformation of the porous matrix. The thermodynamic approach we develop includes the elastic energy of the solid. We show that the variation of the surface free energy, which is proportional to the deformation of the porous matrix, is an important component of the total free energy. With porous silicon, we experimentally show that a stress external to the porous matrix exerted by the substrate on which it is supported significantly increases the total free energy and the adsorbed amount and decreases the condensation pressure compared to that of the same porous matrix detached from its substrate which is the relaxed state of the supported layer. This stress can be partly relaxed by making thicker porous layers due to the breaking of Si-Si bonds. This results in the shift of the isotherms towards that of the membrane. We propose a new interaction mechanism occurring through the pore wall elastic deformation in which the external mechanical stress is imposed on a given pore by its neighbours.

  2. Low-pressure equilibrium binary argon-methane gas mixture adsorption on exfoliated graphite: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albesa, Alberto; Russell, Brice; Vicente, José Luis; Rafti, Matías

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium measurements of pure methane, pure argon, and binary mixtures over exfoliated graphite were carried for different initial compositions, temperatures, and total pressures in the range of 0.1-1.5 Torr using the volumetric static method. Diagrams for gas and adsorbed phase compositions were constructed for the conditions explored, and isosteric heats of adsorption were calculated. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained with Monte Carlo simulations and using the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST).

  3. Adsorption efficiency of natural materials for low-concentration cesium in solution.

    PubMed

    Miura, A; Kubota, T; Hamada, K; Hitomi, T

    2016-01-01

    In this study, several natural materials were investigated in order to clarify their potential use as cesium (Cs) adsorbents in situ. Four materials--carbonized rice hull, beech sawdust, oak sawdust, and charcoal (Japanese cedar)--which were previously shown to have Cs adsorption capabilities, were examined. Cs adsorption experiments were conducted using different initial Cs and adsorbent concentrations. The physical properties, adsorption isotherms, and adsorption processes were then examined, so as to exploit the Cs adsorption characteristics in the field. Based on these findings, carbonized rice hull and beech sawdust were selected as effective Cs adsorbents. It was found that these materials show continuous and stable Cs adsorption rates for different initial Cs concentrations. The adsorption efficiency of these two adsorption materials in combination was considered, and it was shown that the adsorption isotherms for carbonized rice hull and beech sawdust follow the Freundlich model. Furthermore, the beech sawdust adsorption process exhibited better agreement with the calculated values obtained via the adsorption rate model and the adsorption kinetics model than did the carbonized rice hull adsorption. PMID:27191567

  4. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing L-Probe experiment and standard air data sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This under-the-nose view of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows three critical components of the aircraft's air data systems which are mounted on both sides of the forward fuselage. Furthest forward are two L-probes that were the focus of the recent Advanced L-probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment. Behind the L-probes are angle-of-attack vanes, while below them are the aircraft's standard pitot-static air data probes. The ALADIN experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip air data as well as traditional airspeed and altitude information, all from a single system. Once fully developed, the new L-probes have the potential to give pilots more accurate air data information with less hardware.

  5. Adsorption of diethyl phthalate ester to clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanhua; Si, Youbin; Zhou, Dongmei; Gao, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Phthalate esters are a group of plasticizers, which have been widely detected in China's agricultural and industrial soils. In this study, batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate the environmental effects on the adsorption of diethyl phthalate ester (DEP) to clay minerals. The results showed that DEP adsorption isotherms were well fitted with the Freundlich model; the interlayer spacing of K(+) saturated montmorillonite (K-mont) was the most important adsorption area for DEP, and di-n-butyl ester (DnBP) was limited to intercalate into the interlayer of K-mont due to the bigger molecular size; there was no significant effect of pH and ionic strength on DEP adsorption to K-mont/Ca-mont, but to Na-mont clay. The adsorption to kaolinite was very limited. Data of X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectra further proved that DEP molecules could intercalate into K-/Ca-mont interlayer, and might interact with clay through H-bonding between carbonyl groups and clay adsorbed water. Coated humic acid on clay surface would enhance DEP adsorption at low concentration, but not at high concentration (eg. Ce>0.26 mM). The calculated adsorption enthalpy (ΔHobs) and adsorption isotherms at varied temperatures showed that DEP could be adsorbed easier as more adsorbed. This study implied that clay type, compound structure, exchangeable cation, soil organic matter and temperature played important roles in phthalate ester's transport in soil. PMID:25150972

  6. Influence of Ca2+ on tetracycline adsorption on montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Parolo, M Eugenia; Avena, Marcelo J; Pettinari, Gisela R; Baschini, Miria T

    2012-02-15

    The adsorption of tetracycline (TC) on montmorillonite was studied as a function of pH and Ca(2+) concentration using a batch technique complemented with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. In the absence of Ca(2+), TC adsorption was high at low pH and decreased as the pH increased. In the presence of Ca(2+), at least two different adsorption processes took place in the studied systems, i.e., cation exchange and Ca-bridging. Cation exchange was the prevailing process at pH<5, and thus, TC adsorption decreased by increasing total Ca(2+) concentration. On the contrary, Ca-bridging was the prevailing process at pH>5, and thus, TC adsorption increased by increasing Ca(2+) concentration. The pH 5 represents an isoadsorption pH where both adsorption processes compensate each other. TC adsorption became independent of Ca(2+) concentration at this pH. For TC adsorption on Ca(2+)-montmorillonite in 0.01 M NaCl experiments, the ratio adsorbed TC/retained Ca(2+) was close to 1 in the pH range of 5-9, indicating an important participation of Ca(2+) in the binding of TC to montmorillonite. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that TC adsorption induced intercalation between montmorillonite layers forming a multiphase system with stacking of layers with and without intercalated TC. PMID:22189389

  7. Adsorption behavior of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) on boehmite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Chengshuai; Shih, Kaimin

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the interaction of perfluorochemicals, persistent pollutants with known human health effects, with mineral compounds in surface water and groundwater environments is essential to determining their fate and transport. Kinetic experiments showed that adsorption equilibrium can be achieved within 48 h and the boehmite (AlOOH) surface is receptive to perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorption. The adsorption isotherms estimated the maximum adsorption capacities of PFOS and PFOA on boehmite as 0.877 μg m(-2) and 0.633 μg m(-2), respectively. Compared to the adsorption capacity on γ-alumina, the abundant hydroxyl groups on boehmite surfaces resulted in the 2-3 times higher adsorption of PFOS and PFOA. Increasing solution pH led to a moderate decrease in PFOS and PFOA adsorption, owing to an increase in ligand exchange reactions and the decrease of electrostatic interactions. The presence of NaCl and CaCl(2) in solution demonstrated negative effects for PFOS and PFOA adsorption on boehmite surfaces, with potential mechanisms being electrical double layer compression, competitive adsorption of chloride, and the Ca(2+) bridging effect between perfluorochemicals. PMID:22897837

  8. Internally labeled Cy3/Cy5 DNA constructs show greatly enhanced photo-stability in single-molecule FRET experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonbae; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    DNA constructs labeled with cyanine fluorescent dyes are important substrates for single-molecule (sm) studies of the functional activity of protein–DNA complexes. We previously studied the local DNA backbone fluctuations of replication fork and primer–template DNA constructs labeled with Cy3/Cy5 donor–acceptor Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) chromophore pairs and showed that, contrary to dyes linked ‘externally’ to the bases with flexible tethers, direct ‘internal’ (and rigid) insertion of the chromophores into the sugar-phosphate backbones resulted in DNA constructs that could be used to study intrinsic and protein-induced DNA backbone fluctuations by both smFRET and sm Fluorescent Linear Dichroism (smFLD). Here we show that these rigidly inserted Cy3/Cy5 chromophores also exhibit two additional useful properties, showing both high photo-stability and minimal effects on the local thermodynamic stability of the DNA constructs. The increased photo-stability of the internal labels significantly reduces the proportion of false positive smFRET conversion ‘background’ signals, thereby simplifying interpretations of both smFRET and smFLD experiments, while the decreased effects of the internal probes on local thermodynamic stability also make fluctuations sensed by these probes more representative of the unperturbed DNA structure. We suggest that internal probe labeling may be useful in studies of many DNA–protein interaction systems. PMID:24627223

  9. Initial heats of H{sub 2}S adsorption on activated carbons: Effect of surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Bagreev, A.; Adib, F.; Bandosz, T.J.

    1999-11-15

    The sorption of hydrogen sulfide was studied on activated carbons of various origins by means of inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. The conditions of the experiment were dry and anaerobic. Prior to the experiments the surface of some carbon samples was oxidized using either nitric acid or ammonium persulfate. Then the structural parameters of carbons were evaluated from the sorption of nitrogen. From the IGC experiments at various temperatures, heats of adsorption were calculated. The results showed that the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption under dry anaerobic conditions does not depend on surface chemistry. The dependence of the heat of adsorption on the characteristic energy of nitrogen adsorption calculated from the Dubinin-Raduskevich equation was found. This correlation can be used to predict the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption based on the results obtained from nitrogen adsorption.

  10. Adsorption and reactions of O2 and D2 on small free palladium clusters in a cluster-molecule scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Mats; Rosén, Arne

    2010-08-01

    The adsorption of oxygen and hydrogen (deuterium) on small neutral palladium clusters was investigated in a cluster beam experiment. The beam passes through two low-pressure reaction cells, and the clusters, with and without adsorbed molecules, are detected using laser ionization and mass spectrometry. Both H2 and O2 adsorb efficiently on the palladium clusters with only moderate variations with cluster size in the investigated range, i.e. between 8 and 28 atoms. The co-adsorption of H2 and O2 results in the formation of H2O, detected as a decrease in the number of adsorbed oxygen atoms with an increasing number of collisions with H2 molecules. A comparison is done with an earlier similar study of clusters of Pt. Furthermore a comparison is done with what is known for sticking and reactivity of surfaces.

  11. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions.

    PubMed

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-21

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers--or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)--has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials. PMID:27049950

  12. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M.; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S.; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers—or metal–organic frameworks (MOFs)—has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials.

  13. Adsorption of a multicomponent rhamnolipid surfactant to soil

    SciTech Connect

    Noordmann, W.H.; Brusseau, M.L.; Janssen, D.B.

    2000-03-01

    The adsorption of rhamnolipid, a multicomponent biosurfactant with potential application in soil remediation, to two sandy soils was investigated using batch and column studies. The surfactant mixture contained six anionic components differing in lipid chain length and number of rhamnose moieties. Batch adsorption experiments indicated that the overall adsorption isotherms of total surfactant and of the individual components leveled off above a concentration at which micelles were formed. Column experiments showed that the retardation factors for the total surfactant and for the individual components decreased with increasing influent concentration. Extended tailing was observed in the distal portion of the surfactant breakthrough curve. The concentration-dependent retardation factors and the extended tailing are in accordance with the nonlinear (concave) adsorption isotherms found in the batch adsorption studies. The more hydrophobic rhamnolipid components were preferentially adsorbed, but adsorption was not correlated with the organic carbon content of the soil. This suggests that adsorption of rhamnolipid to soil is not a partitioning process but mainly an interfacial adsorption process.

  14. Direct injection method for HPLC/MS/MS analysis of acrylamide in aqueous solutions: application to adsorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Ines; Hurel, Charlotte; Marmier, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    Polyacrylamides are polymers used in many fields and represent the main source of release of the highly toxic acrylamide in the environment. In this work, a simple, rapid, and sensitive analytical method was developed with HPLC/MS/MS and direct injection for acrylamide analysis in water and adsorption samples. AFNOR standards NF T90-210 and NF T90-220 were used for the analytical method validation and uncertainty estimation. Limit of quantification (LOQ) for acrylamide was 1 μg/L, and accuracy was checked at three acrylamide levels (1, 6, and 10 μg/L). Uncertainties were estimated at 34.2, 22, and 12.4 % for acrylamide concentrations at LOQ, 6 μg/L, and 10 μg/L, respectively. Acrylamide adsorption on clays (kaolinite, illite) and sludge was then studied as a function of pH, time, and acrylamide concentrations. Acrylamide adsorption on kaolinite, illite, and sludge was found to be very weak since adsorption percentages were inferior to 10 %, whatever the pH value and the initial acrylamide concentration. The low affinity of acrylamide for clays and sludge is likely due to its hydrophilic property, small size, and charge neutrality. PMID:25388555

  15. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part II--A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment on Surface Adsorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Larsen, Sarah C.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. The use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in organic and inorganic chemistry laboratory courses as well as in undergraduate research was presented…

  16. Kinetic models for the adsorption of lead ions by steel slag.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng-Yu; Gao, Jin; Qu, Bin; Yang, Yi-Jin; Xin, Xin

    2010-08-01

    Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the kinetics of adsorption of lead ions by steel slag on the basis of the external diffusion, intraparticle diffusion and adsorption reaction model (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order). The results showed that the controlling step for the adsorption kinetics changed with experimental parameters varied. When the particle size of steel slag was larger than 120 mesh, intraparticle diffusion of Pb(2+) was the controlling step; when the initial concentration of Pb(2+) was less than 150 mg L(-1) or the shaking rate was lower than 150 rpm, external diffusion of Pb(2+) was promoted. Contrary to the former experimental conditions, the adsorption reaction was the controlling step, and the adsorption followed second-order kinetics, with an adsorption rate constant of 13.26 g mg(-1) min(- 1). The adsorption isotherm of Pb(2+) with steel slag followed the Langmuir model, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. PMID:19808736

  17. [Adsorption-desorption Characteristics of Fermented Rice Husk for Ferrous and Sulfur Ions].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-mei; Liao, Min; Hua, Jia-yuan; Chen, Na; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Pei-zhi; Xie Kai-zhi; XU, Chang-xu; Liu, Guang-rong

    2015-10-01

    To understand the potential of rice husk to fix Fe2+ and S2- ions, the sorption of Fe2+ and S2- by fermented rice husk was studied by using batch incubation experiments in the present study. The effects of adsorption time, Fe2+ and S2- concentration, pH, the temperature and ionic strength in adsorption reaction solution on the sorption were investigated. Therefore, the stability of Fe2+ and S2- adsorbed by fermented rice husk was further validated by desorption experiments performed under similar conditions as adsorption. The results showed that, the adsorption kinetics of Fe2+ (r = 0.912 1) and S2- (r = 0.901 1) by fermented rice husk fits the Elovich kinetics equation, and Freundlich isotherm model could simulate the isotherm adsorption processes of Fe2+ (R2 = 0.965 1) and S2- (R2 = 0.936 6) on fermented rice husk was better than other models. The adsorption processes on fermented rice husk were non- preferential adsorption for Fe2+ and S2, while the adsorption process of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was spontaneous reaction and the adsorption process of S2- was non-spontaneous reaction. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk were endothermic process since high temperature could benefit to the adsorption. The adsorption mechanism of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by coordination adsorption, the adsorption mechanism of S2- on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by ligand exchange adsorption. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk showed greater pH adaptability which ranged from 1.50 to 11.50. With the increasing of ionic strength, the amount of adsorbed Fe2+ on fermented rice husk wasincreased in some extent, the amount of adsorbed S2- on fermented rice husk was slightly decreased, which further proved the adsorption of Fe2+ was major in inner sphere complexation and the adsorption of S2- was major in outer complexation. The desorption rates of Fe2+ and S2- which was adsorbed by fermented

  18. Adsorption of Pyrene onto the Agricultural By-Product: Corncob.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Tong, Dongli; Allinson, Graeme; Jia, Chunyun; Gong, Zongqing; Liu, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of pyrene on corncob was studied to provide a theoretical basis for the possible use of this material as an immobilized carrier for improving the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil. The results were as follows. Kinetic experiments showed that the adsorption processes obeyed a pseudo-second-order model. The intraparticle diffusion of Weber-Morris model fitting showed that the film and intraparticle diffusions were the key rate-limiting processes, and the adsorption process mainly consisted of three steps: boundary layer diffusion and two intra-particle diffusions. Experimental adsorption data for pyrene were successfully described by the adsorption-partition equilibrium model. The maximum adsorption capacity at 25°C was 214.8 μg g(-1). The adsorption contribution decreased significantly when the Ce/Sw (the equilibrium concentration/solubility in water) was higher than 1. Adsorption decreased with increased temperature. Based on the above results, the corncob particles could be helpful in the bioremediation of pyrene-contaminated soil. PMID:26573838

  19. [Adsorption of Congo red from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yan-Hui; Lin, Jian-Wei

    2013-08-01

    The adsorption of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite was investigated using batch experiments. The hydroxyapatite was effective for CR removal from aqueous solution. The adsorption kinetics of CR on hydroxyapatite well followed a pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium adsorption data of CR on hydroxyapatite could be described by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and showed that the adsorption of CR on hydroxyapatite was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The CR adsorption capacity for hydroxyapatite decreased significantly with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Thermal regeneration showed that hydroxyapatite could be used for six desorption-adsorption cycles with high removal efficiency for CR in each cycle. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value below the pH at point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) include electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value above its pH(PZC) include hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. Results of this work indicate that hydroxyapatite is a promising adsorbent for CR removal from aqueous solution. PMID:24191561

  20. Kinetics of phosphate adsorption on goethite: comparing batch adsorption and ATR-IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina; Brigante, Maximiliano; Antelo, Juan; Avena, Marcelo

    2006-08-15

    The adsorption kinetics of phosphate on goethite has been studied by batch adsorption experiments and by in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy at different pH, initial phosphate concentrations and stirring rates. Batch adsorption results are very similar to those reported by several authors, and show a rather fast initial adsorption taking place in a few minutes followed by a slower process taking place in days or weeks. The adsorption kinetics could be also monitored by integrating the phosphate signals obtained in ATR-IR experiments, and a very good agreement between both techniques was found. At pH 4.5 two surface complexes, the bidentate nonprotonated (FeO)(2)PO(2) and the bidentate protonated (FeO)(2)(OH)PO complexes, are formed at the surface. There are small changes in the relative concentrations of these species as the reaction proceeds, and they seem to evolve in time rather independently. At pH 7.5 and 9 the dominating surface species is (FeO)(2)PO(2), which is accompanied by an extra unidentified species at low concentration. They also seem to evolve independently as the reaction proceeds. The results are consistent with a mechanism that involve a fast adsorption followed by a slow diffusion into pores, and are not consistent with surface precipitation of iron phosphate. PMID:16643942

  1. Adsorptive removal of methylene blue by CuO-acid modified sepiolite as effective adsorbent and its regeneration with high-temperature gas stream.

    PubMed

    Su, Chengyuan; Wang, Liang; Chen, Menglin; Huang, Zhi; Lin, Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic adsorption of methylene blue dye onto CuO-acid modified sepiolite was investigated. Meanwhile, the equilibrium and kinetic data of the adsorption process were studied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Furthermore, a high-temperature gas stream was applied to regenerate the adsorbent. The results showed that the Langmuir isotherm model was applied to describe the adsorption process. The positive value of enthalpy change indicated that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. In the dynamic adsorption process, the best adsorption performance was achieved when the ratio of column height to diameter was 2.56 and the treatment capacity was 6 BV/h. The optimal scenario for regeneration experiments was the regeneration temperature of 550-650 °C, the space velocity of 100 min(-1) and the regeneration time of 10 min. The effective adsorption of CuO-acid modified sepiolite was kept for 12 cycles of adsorption and regeneration. PMID:27533859

  2. [Adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto modified activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Tong, Xi-Zhen; Shi, Bao-You; Xie, Yue; Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-09-01

    Modified coal and coconut shell based powdered activated carbons (PACs) were prepared by FeCl3 and medium power microwave treatment, respectively. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the characteristics of adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto original and modified PACs. Based on pore structure and surface functional groups characterization, the adsorption behaviors of modified and original PACs were compared. The competitive adsorption of humic acid (HA) and PFOS on original and modified coconut shell PACs were also investigated. Results showed that both Fe3+ and medium power microwave treatments changed the pore structure and surface functional groups of coal and coconut shell PACs, but the changing effects were different. The adsorption of PFOS on two modified coconut shell-based PACs was significantly improved. While the adsorption of modified coal-based activated carbons declined. The adsorption kinetics of PFOS onto original and modified coconut shell-based activated carbons were the same, and the time of reaching adsorption equilibrium was about 6 hours. In the presence of HA, the adsorption of PFOS by modified PAC was reduced but still higher than that of the original. PMID:23243870

  3. Adsorption of CO Molecules on Si(001) at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eonmi; Eom, Daejin; Kim, Hanchul; Koo, Ja-Yong

    2015-03-01

    Initial adsorption of CO molecules on Si(001) is investigated by using room-temperature (RT) scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. Theoretical calculations show that only one adsorption configuration of terminal-bond CO (T-CO) is stable and that the bridge-bond CO is unstable. All the abundantly observed STM features due to CO adsorption can be identified as differently configured T-COs. The initial sticking probability of CO molecules on Si(001) at RT is estimated to be as small as ~ 1 x 10-4 monolayer/Langmuir, which is significantly increased at high-temperature adsorption experiments implying a finite activation barrier for adsorption. Thermal annealing at 900 K for 5 min results in the dissociation of the adsorbed CO molecules with the probability of 60-70% instead of desorption, indicating both a strong chemisorption state and an activated dissociation process. The unique adsorption state with a large binding energy, a tiny sticking probability, and a finite adsorption barrier is in stark contrast with the previous low-temperature (below 100 K) observations of a weak binding, a high sticking probability, and a barrierless adsorption. We speculate that the low-temperature results might be a signature of a physisorption state in the condensed phase.

  4. Adsorption of clofibric acid and ketoprofen onto powdered activated carbon: effect of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaohuan; Deshusses, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of two acidic pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), clofibric acid and ketoprofen, onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated with a particular focus on the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the PhACs. Suwannee River humic acids (SRHAs) were used as a substitute for NOM. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to obtain adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms with and without SRHAs in the system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption ofclofibric acid was not significantly affected by the presence of SRHAs at a concentration of 5 mg (as carbon) L(-1). An adsorption capacity of 70 to 140 mg g(-1) was observed and equilibrium was reached within 48 h. In contrast, the adsorption of ketoprofen was markedly decreased (from about 120 mg g(-1) to 70-100 mg g(-1)) in the presence of SRHAs. Higher initial concentrations of clofibric acid than ketoprofen during testing may explain the different behaviours that were observed. Also, the more hydrophobic ketoprofen molecules may have less affinity for PAC when humic acids (which are hydrophilic) are present. The possible intermolecular forces that could account for the different behaviour of clofibric acid and ketoprofen adsorption onto PAC are discussed. In particular, the relevance of electrostatic forces, electron donor-acceptor interaction, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces are discussed PMID:22439557

  5. [Adsorption Characteristics of Norfloxacin by Biochars Derived from Reed Straw and Municipal Sludge].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han-yu; Wang, Zhao-wei; Gao, Jun-hong; Zhu, Jun-min; Xie, Chao-ran; Xie, Xiao-yun

    2016-02-15

    Two types of biochars were prepared by pyrolyzing reed straw and municipal sludge at the temperature of 500 degrees C. The structure and properties of biochars were characterized by BET, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy ( FTIR ). The effects of pH value, adsorption time, temperature and initial concentration of norfloxacin (NOR) on the adsorption behaviors were determined by single factor experiments, which were used to preliminarily discuss adsorption mechanism. The results showed that the adsorption of NOR onto biochars derived from reed straw and municipal sludge could reach 70% and 60% of the total adsorption within 12 h, respectively; the maximum adsorption capacities of the two biochars were 2.13 mg x g(-1) (biochar derived from reed straw) and 2.09 mg x g(-1) (biochar derived from municipal sludge). The quantities of both absorptions increased with the decreasing solution pH. The two adsorption kinetics of NOR onto biochars followed the pseudo second order kinetic equations, and adsorption isotherms fitted well with the Langmuir equations. Adsorption thermodynamics parameters such as Gibbs free energy (AG), enthalpy (AH) and entropy (AS) indicated that the two adsorptions were endothermic reactions. Infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that oxygen-containing functional groups on biochars provided NOR molecules with adsorptive sites, which facilitated the formation of hydrogen bonds between NOR and the biochars. PMID:27363161

  6. Preparation of titanium peroxide and its selective adsorption property on cationic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-guang; Huang, Ji-guo; Wang, Bo; Bi, Qiang; Dong, Li-li; Liu, Xing-juan

    2014-02-01

    Titanium peroxide powder was prepared with the reaction of titanium sulfate and H2O2 and showed good selective adsorption property on cationic dyes. The obtained material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The selective adsorption property was confirmed and evaluated by adsorption experiments of methyl orange (MO), phenol and three kinds of cationic dyes including methylene blue (MB), malachite green (MG) and neutral red (NR). The adsorption was very fast and adsorption equilibrium was reached in a very short time for all three cationic dyes. The adsorption kinetics of MB, MG and NR were studied then. It was found that the adsorption data fitted perfectly with the pseudo-second-order kinetics and the saturated adsorption capacities for MB, MG and NR were 224.37, 251.38 and 327.61 mg/g at 25 °C, respectively. The characterization and adsorption results indicated the controlling mechanism of adsorption processes could be electrostatic adsorption.

  7. Use of Activated Charcoal for {sup 220}Rn Adsorption for Operations Associated with the Uranium Deposit in the Auxiliary Charcoal Bed at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.L.

    1999-03-01

    Measurements have been collected with the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness of activated charcoal for the removal of {sup 220}Rn from process off-gas at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A series of bench-scale tests were performed at superficial flow velocities of 10, 18, 24, and 33 cm/s (20, 35, 47, and 65 ft/min) with a continuous input concentration of {sup 220}Rn in the range of 9 x 10{sup 3} pCi/L. In addition, two tests were performed at the MSRE facility by flowing helium through the auxiliary charcoal bed uranium deposit. These tests were performed so that the adsorptive effectiveness could be evaluated with a relatively high concentration of {sup 220}Rn. In addition to measuring the effectiveness of activated charcoal as a {sup 220}Rn adsorption media, the source term for available {sup 220}Rn in the deposit is actually available for removal and that the relative activity of fission gases is very small when compared to {sup 220}Rn. The measurement data were then used to evaluate the expected effectiveness of a proposed charcoal adsorption bed consisting of a right circular cylinder having a diameter of 43 cm and a length of 91 cm (17 in. I.D. x 3 ft.). The majority of the measurement data predicts an overall 220Rn activity reduction factor of about 1 x 10{sup 9} for such a design; however, two measurements collected at a flow velocity of 18 cm/s (35 ft/min) indicated that the reduction factor could be as low as 1 x 10{sup 6}. The adsorptive capacity of the proposed trap was also evaluated to determine the expected life prior to degradation of performance. Taking a conservative vantage point during analysis, it was estimated that the adsorption effectiveness should not begin to deteriorate until a {sup 220}Rn activity on the order of 10{sup 10} Ci has been processed. It was therefore concluded that degradation of performance would likely occur as the result of causes other than filling by radon progeny.

  8. Use of Activated Charcoal for Rn-220 Adsorption for Operations Associated with the Uranium Deposit in the Auxiliary Charcoal Bed at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.L.

    1999-03-17

    Measurements have been collected with the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness of activated charcoal for the removal of {sup 220}Rn from process off-gas at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A series of bench-scale tests were performed at superficial flow velocities of 10, 18, 24, and 33 cm s{sup -1} (20, 35, 47, and 65 ft min{sup -1}) with a continuous input concentration of {sup 220}Rn in the range of 9 x 10{sup 3} pCi L{sup -1}. In addition, two tests were performed at the MSRE facility by flowing helium through the auxiliary charcoal bed uranium deposit. These tests were performed so that the adsorptive effectiveness could be evaluated with a relatively high concentration of {sup 220}Rn. In addition to measuring the effectiveness of activated charcoal as a {sup 220}Rn adsorption media, the source term for available {sup 220}Rn and gaseous fission products was evaluated and compared to what is believed to be present in the deposit. The results indicate that only a few percent of the total {sup 220}Rn in the deposit is actually available for removal and that the relative activity of fission gases is very small when compared to {sup 220}Rn. The measurement data were then used to evaluate the expected effectiveness of a proposed charcoal adsorption bed consisting of a right circular cylinder having a diameter of 43 cm and a length of 91 cm (17 in. I.D. x 3 ft.). The majority of the measurement data predicts an overall {sup 220}Rn activity reduction factor of about 1 x 10{sup 9} for such a design; however, two measurements collected at a flow velocity of 18 cm s{sup -1} (35 ft min{sup -1}) indicated that the reduction factor could be as low as 1 x 10{sup 6}. The adsorptive capacity of the proposed trap was also evaluated to determine the expected life prior to degradation of performance. Taking a conservative vantage point during analysis, it was estimated that the adsorption effectiveness should not begin to deteriorate

  9. Impact of biochar produced from post-harvest residue on the adsorption behavior of diesel oil on loess soil.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu Feng; Sun, Hang; Yves, Uwamungu J; Li, Hong; Hu, Xue Fei

    2016-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of biochar, produced from wheat residue at different temperatures, on the adsorption of diesel oil by loess soil. Kinetic and equilibrium data were processed to understand the adsorption mechanism of diesel by biochar-affected loess soil; dynamic and thermodynamic adsorption experiments were conducted to characterize this adsorption. The surface features and chemical structure of biochar, modified at varying pyrolytic temperatures, were investigated using surface scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The kinetic data showed that the adsorption of diesel oil onto loess soil could be described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model, with the rate-controlling step being intraparticle diffusion. However, in the presence of biochar, boundary layer control and intraparticle diffusion were both involved in the adsorption. Besides, the adsorption equilibrium data were well described by the Freundlich isothermal model. The saturated adsorption capacity weakened as temperature increased, suggesting a spontaneous exothermic process. Thermodynamic parameter analysis showed that adsorption was mainly a physical process and was enhanced by chemical adsorption. The adsorption capacity of loess soil for diesel oil was weakened with increasing pH. The biochar produced by pyrolytic wheat residue increased the adsorption behavior of petroleum pollutants in loess soil. PMID:25980560

  10. Co-adsorption of phosphate and zinc(II) on the surface of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Runliang; Xu, Tianyuan; Xu, Yin; Ge, Fei; Xi, Yunfei; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping

    2016-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is of great importance in affecting the migration and transformation of heavy-metal cations and oxyanions. To advance the understanding of co-adsorption reactions on Fh surface, the co-adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) from aqueous solution to a synthesized Fh was determined. The batch experiments demonstrated a synergistic adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) on Fh. In the pH range of 3.5-6, the adsorption of the two contaminants showed strong pH dependence in the single solute adsorption systems, but the dependence alleviated in the simultaneous adsorption system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the chemical shifts of Zn 2p1/2 and Zn 2p3/2 binding energies were more significant than that of P 2p in the single and simultaneous adsorption systems. On the other side, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) observed increased formation of outer- and inner-sphere complexes of phosphate in the simultaneous system. Thus, the synergistic adsorption of the two contaminants could be attributed to the formation of ternary complexes as well as electrostatic interactions, while surface precipitation could not be completely ruled out. On the basis of the results from both the batch adsorption experiments and structural characterization, these two contaminants were likely to form phosphate-bridged ternary complexes (≡Fe-P-Zn) in the simultaneous adsorption system. PMID:26461439

  11. Effect of moisture on adsorption isotherms and adsorption capacities of CO{sub 2} on coals

    SciTech Connect

    Ekrem Ozdemir; Karl Schroeder

    2009-05-15

    The effect of moisture on the adsorption isotherms and adsorption capacities of CO{sub 2} on Argonne Premium coals has been investigated. In some experiments a small hysteresis was observed between the adsorption and desorption isotherms. The hysteresis was absent or negligible for high-rank and as-received coals but was discernible for lower rank and dried coals. An equation that accounted for the volumetric changes when an adsorbate alters the structure of an adsorbent was employed to interpret the data. The best-fit solutions indicate that the coal volume decreases upon drying. The microscopic shrinkage estimated using helium expansion was greater than the shrinkage reported using the bed-height technique. The microscopic shrinkage was 5-10% for low-moisture medium and high-rank coals and up to 40% for low-rank coals having higher moisture contents. The CO{sub 2} swelling of coals during adsorption isotherm measurements was estimated to be about the same as the shrinkage that occurred during the moisture loss. The adsorption capacity, isosteric heat of adsorption, average pore size, and surface area of the as-received (moist) and dried Argonne coals were estimated after accounting for the volume changes. The isosteric heat of adsorption of CO{sub 2} was found to be between 23 and 25 kJ/mol for as-received coals and between 25 and 27 kJ/mol for dried coals, regardless of the rank. The degree of drying was shown to affect the adsorption capacity and the calculated surface area. For dried coals, the adsorption capacity showed the typical 'U-shape' dependence on rank whereas the as-received coals displayed a more linear dependence. A relationship is proposed to quantify the effect of moisture on the adsorption capacity. The mechanism of CO{sub 2} adsorption on moist coals and the implications of the lower adsorption capacity of wet coals to coal seam sequestration of CO{sub 2} are presented. 70 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  13. Neptunium(V) adsorption to calcite.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Frank; Brendebach, Boris; Bosbach, Dirk

    2008-12-12

    The migration behavior of the actinyl ions U(VI)O2(2+), Np(V)O2+ and Pu(V,VI)O2(+,2+) in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption reactions (inner- or outer-sphere adsorption, ion-exchange, coprecipitation/structural incorporation) with minerals. Here NpO2+ adsorption onto calcite is studied in batch type experiments over a wide range of pH (6.0-9.4) and concentration (0.4 microM-40 microM) conditions. pH is adjusted by variation of CO2 partial pressure. Adsorption is found to be pH dependent with maximal adsorption at pH 8.3 decreasing with increasing and decreasing pH. pH dependence of adsorption decreases with increasing Np(V) concentration. EXAFS data of neptunyl adsorbed to calcite and neptunyl in the supernatant shows differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance, 1.85+/-0.01 angstroms for the adsorbed and 1.82+/-0.01 angstroms for the solution species. The equatorial environment of the neptunyl in solution shows about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.45+/-0.02 angstroms. For adsorbed neptunyl there are also about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.46+/-0.01 angstroms. An additional feature in the adsorbed species' R-space spectrum can be related to carbonate neighbours, 3 to 6 carbon backscatterers (C-eq) at 3.05+/-0.03 angstroms and 3 to 6 oxygen backscatterers (O-eq2) at 3.31+/-0.02 angstroms. The differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance and the C-eq and O-eq2 backscatterers which are only present for the adsorbed species indicate inner-sphere bonding of the adsorbed neptunyl species to the calcite surface. Experiments on adsorption kinetics indicate that after a fast surface adsorption process a continuous slow uptake occurs which may be explained by incorporation via surface dissolution and reprecipitation processes. This is also indicated by the part irreversibility of the adsorption as shown by increased KD values after desorption compared to adsorption. PMID:18973965

  14. Adsorption of atrazine on soils: model study.

    PubMed

    Kovaios, Ilias D; Paraskeva, Christakis A; Koutsoukos, Petros G; Payatakes, Alkiviades Ch

    2006-07-01

    The adsorption of the widely used herbicide atrazine onto three model inorganic soil components (silica gel, gamma-alumina, and calcite (CaCO(3)) was investigated in a series of batch experiments in which the aqueous phase equilibrated with the solid, under different solution conditions. Atrazine did not show discernible adsorption on gamma-alumina (theta=25 degrees C, 3.8adsorption from solutions was found for silica gel suspensions. The adsorption isotherms obtained for atrazine uptake on silica gel particles were best fitted with the Freundlich model. An increase of the ionic strength of the electrolytic solution induced an increase of the surface concentration of atrazine on silica gel, indicating significant electrostatic interactions between atrazine and silica gel particles, possibly through interaction with the surface silanol groups of the solid substrate. Increase of the pH value of the electrolyte solution from 6 to 9 considerably decreased the amount of atrazine adsorbed on the silica gel substrate. Decrease of the solution pH from 6 to 3 had only a slight effect on the surface concentration of the adsorbed atrazine. The adsorption of atrazine on silica gel increased when the temperature was decreased from 40 to 25 degrees C, an indication that the adsorption is exothermic. The calculated enthalpy of adsorption ( approximately 10 kJ/mol) indicates that the uptake at the solid-liquid equilibrium pH (6.1) was largely due to physisorption. PMID:16556447

  15. F-15B on ramp showing closeup of the Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow (SS-NLF) experiment attached ve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A close up of the Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow (SS-NLF) experiment on the F-15B. The wing shape - designed by the Reno Aeronautical Corp. - had only minimal sweep and a short span. The low sweep angle gave this airfoil better take off and landing characteristics, as well as better subsonic cruise efficiency, than wings with a greater sweep angle. Engineers had reason to believe that improvements in aerodynamic efficiency from supersonic natural laminar flow might actually render a supersonic aircraft more economical to operate than slower, subsonic designs. To gather substantiate data, the SS-NLF experiment used an advanced, non-intrusive collection technique. Rather than instrumentation built into the wing, a high resolution infrared camera mounted on the F-15B fuselage recorded the data, a system with possible applications for future research aircraft.

  16. F-15B in flight showing Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow (SS-NLF) experiment attached vertically to t

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In-flight photo of the F-15B equipped with the Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow (SS-NLF) experiment. During four research flights, laminar flow was achieved over 80 percent of the test wing at speeds approaching Mach 2. This was accomplished as the sole result of the shape of the wing, without the use of suction gloves, such as on the F-16XL. Laminar flow is a condition in which air passes over a wing in smooth layers, rather than being turbulent The greater the area of laminar flow, the lower the amount of friction drag on the wing, thus increasing an aircraft's range and fuel economy. Increasing the area of laminar flow on a wing has been the subject of research by engineers since the late 1940s, but substantial success has proven elusive. The SS-NLF experiment was intended to provide engineers with the data by which to design natural laminar flow wings.

  17. A comparative adsorption study: 17β-estradiol onto aerobic granular sludge and activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-ying; He, Yu-jie; Chen, Wei; Wang, Ming-yang; Cao, Su-lan; Ni, Ming; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption plays a significant role in removing hydrophobic 17β-estradiol (E2) from wastewater. Batch experiments were conducted to compare the adsorption of E2 onto activated aerobic granular sludge (AGS) and activated sludge (AS), and features evaluated included the adsorption kinetics, thermodynamics, and influence of other environmental factors. By using a non-chemical wet-heat technique, both AGS and AS were treated to inactivated status. Then, after loading E2, the adsorption equilibrium capacity of the AGS was found to be greater than that of the AS at the same initial concentration of E2. Moreover, both the adsorption processes corresponded to a pseudo-second-order kinetic model; the adsorption rate constant of AGS was found to be higher and the half-adsorption time was shorter than that of AS. Next, evaluations of adsorption isotherms and thermodynamics indicated that the adsorption process was mainly a physical process. Lower temperatures facilitated a higher equilibrium adsorption capacity. However, the adsorption binding sites of AGS were distributed more uniformly at higher temperature, in contrast to the distribution found for AS. Finally, acidic conditions and an appropriate ionic strength (0.4 mol/L) were found to be particularly conducive to the adsorption process. Overall, the results showed that AGS has the potential to adsorb E2 with significant efficiency, thereby offering a new and more efficient means of treating E2 and trace oestrogens in wastewater. PMID:26209151

  18. Facile synthesis of boehmite/PVA composite membrane with enhanced adsorption performance towards Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Luo, Lei; Cai, Weiquan; Zhou, Jiabin; Li, Yuanzhi

    2016-11-15

    A novel boehmite/PVA composite membrane (BPCM) with remarkably enhanced adsorption performance towards Cr(VI) was successfully synthesized from Al(NO3)3·9H2O using HAc as the peptizing agent via a facile sol-gel method. The physicochemical properties of the BPCM, the boehmite powder (BP) without PVA and a commercial boehmite powder (CBP) were comparatively characterized by XRD, TGA-DSC, FT-IR and XPS. Batch adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption performance of the BPCM is much better than those of BP and CBP. Its adsorption process was well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and its equilibrium data fit the Langmuir isotherm well with a maximum adsorption capacity of 36.41mgg(-1). Its interference adsorption experiment in presence of coexisting anions showed that SO4(2-) and HPO4(2-) have greater effect than those of the Cl(-), F(-), C2O4(2-) and HCO3(-). A three step action mechanism including adsorption of Cr(VI) anions, complexation between Cr(VI) anions and the functional groups on the surface of BPCM, and the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was proposed to illustrate the adsorption process. This efficient film could be easily separated after adsorption, exhibiting great potential for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution, and other fields of environmental remediation. PMID:27450337

  19. [Characteristics of Adsorption Leaching and Influencing Factors of Dimethyl Phthalate in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Song, Jiao-yan; Zeng, Wei; Wang, Fa

    2016-02-15

    The typical soil-purple soil in Three Gorges Reservoir was the tested soil, the characteristics of adsorption leaching of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) in contaminated water by the soil, and the influencing factors in the process were conducted using soil column leaching experiment. The results showed that the parabolic equation was the best equation describing adsorption kinetics of DMP by soils. The concentration of DMP in the leaching solution had significant effect on the adsorption amounts of DMP. With the increasing concentration of DMP in the leaching solution, the adsorption capacities of DMP by purple soil increased linearly. The ionic strength and pH in leaching solution had significant effects on adsorption of DMP. On the whole, increasing of the ionic strength restrained the adsorption. The adsorption amounts at pH 5.0-7.0 were more than those under other pH condition. The addition of exogenous organic matter (OM) in purple soil increased the adsorption amount of DMP by purple soil. However, the adsorption amount was less than those with other addition amounts of exogenous OM when the addition of exogenous OM was too high (> or = 30 g x kg(-1)). The addition of surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (SDBS) in purple soil increased the adsorption amount of DMP by purple soil. The adsorption amount was maximal when the addition amount of SDBS was 50 mg x kg(-1). However, the adsorption amounts decreased with increasing addition amounts of SDBS although the adsorption amounts were still more than that of the control group, and the adsorption amount was almost equal to that of the control group when the addition amount of SDBS was 800 mg x kg(-1). Continuous leaching time affected the vertical distribution of DMP in the soil column. When the leaching time was shorter, the upper soil column adsorbed more DMP, while the DMP concentrations in upper and lower soil columns became similar with the extension of leaching time. PMID:27363166

  20. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  1. The Effect of Pore Connectivity on Water Adsorption Isotherms in Non-activated Graphitic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    StrioloDr., A; Gubbins, Dr. K. E.; Chialvo, Ariel A; Cummings, Peter T

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption of water in graphitic carbons is usually simulated via a weighted average of the adsorption isotherms simulated in carbon-slit pore of different widths. By following this procedure, details about pore morphology and pore connectivity may be overlooked. Towards a better match between virtual and real experiments, we present simulated adsorption isotherms for SPC/E model water in porous carbons composed by interconnected carbon-slit pores. The pores are separated from each other by one graphene layer. Imperfections (lack of carbon atoms) in the graphene layers result in interconnections between pores. The grand canonical Monte Carlo algorithm is used here to simulate water adsorption. Our results show that while the qualitative features obtained in the simulation of independent slit-shaped pores are reproduced when interconnected pores are considered, the adsorption isotherms rise more gradually and the adsorption/desorption hysteresis loops are narrower in the latter case.

  2. Perfluorocarbon Tracer Experiments on a 2 km Scale in Manchester Showing Ingress of Pollutants into a Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, James; Wright, Matthew; Bacak, Asan; Silva, Hugo; Priestley, Michael; Martin, Damien; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic perfluorocarbons (PFCs) have been used to measure the passage of air in urban and rural settings as they are chemically inert, non-toxic and have low background concentrations. The use of pre-concentrators and chemical ionisation gas chromatography enables concentrations of a few parts per quadrillion (ppq) to be measured in bag samples. Three PFC tracers were used in Manchester, UK in the summer of 2015 to map airflow in the city and ingress into buildings: perfluomethylcyclohexane (PMCH), perfluoro-2-4-dimethylcyclohexane (mPDMCH) and perfluoro-2-methyl-3-ethylpentene (PMEP). A known quantity of each PFC was released for 15 minutes from steel canisters using pre-prepared PFC mixtures. Release points were chosen to be upwind of the central sampling location (Simon Building, University of Manchester) and varied in distance up to 2.2 km. Six releases using one or three tracers in different configurations and under different conditions were undertaken in the summer. Three further experiments were conducted in the Autumn, to more closely investigate the rate of ingress and decay of tracer indoors. In each experiment, 10 litre samples were made over 30 minutes into Tedlar bags, starting at the same time the as PFC release. Samples were taken in 11 locations chosen from 15 identified areas including three in public parks, three outside within the University of Manchester area, seven inside and five outside of the Simon building and two outside a building nearby. For building measurements, receptors were placed inside the buildings on different floors; outside measurements were achieved through a sample line out of the window. Three of the sample positions inside the Simon building were paired with samplers outside to allow indoor-outdoor comparisons. PFC concentrations varied depending on location and height. The highest measured concentrations occurred when the tracer was released at sunrise; up to 330 ppq above background (11 ppq) of PMCH was measured at the 6

  3. Conceptualizing the aesthetic experience: using the influence matrix to show causal relationships between basic concepts in aesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Rué, Emma; Mrotzek, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that using tools from systems science for teaching and learning in the Humanities offers innovative insights that can prove helpful for both students and lecturers. Our contention here is that a method used in systems science, namely the influence matrix, can be a suitable tool to facilitate the understanding of elementary notions in Aesthetics by means of systematizing this process. As we will demonstrate in the upcoming sections, the influence matrix can help us to understand the nature and function of the basic elements that take part in the aesthetic experience and their evolving relevance in the history of Aesthetics. The implementation of these elements to an influence matrix will contribute to a more detailed understanding of (i) the nature of each element, (ii) the interrelation between them and (iii) the influence each element has on all the others.

  4. A simple optical index shows spatial and temporal heterogeneity in phytoplankton community composition during the 2008 North Atlantic Bloom Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetinić, I.; Perry, M. J.; D'Asaro, E.; Briggs, N.; Poulton, N.; Sieracki, M. E.; Lee, C. M.

    2015-04-01

    The ratio of two in situ optical measurements - chlorophyll fluorescence (Chl F) and optical particulate backscattering (bbp) - varied with changes in phytoplankton community composition during the North Atlantic Bloom Experiment in the Iceland Basin in 2008. Using ship-based measurements of Chl F, bbp, chlorophyll a (Chl), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pigments, phytoplankton composition and carbon biomass, we found that oscillations in the ratio varied with changes in plankton community composition; hence we refer to Chl F/bbp as an "optical community index". The index varied by more than a factor of 2, with low values associated with pico- and nanophytoplankton and high values associated with diatom-dominated phytoplankton communities. Observed changes in the optical index were driven by taxa-specific chlorophyll-to-autotrophic carbon ratios and by physiological changes in Chl F associated with the silica limitation. A Lagrangian mixed-layer float and four Seagliders, operating continuously for 2 months, made similar measurements of the optical community index and followed the evolution and later demise of the diatom spring bloom. Temporal changes in optical community index and, by implication, the transition in community composition from diatom to post-diatom bloom communities were not simultaneous over the spatial domain surveyed by the ship, float and gliders. The ratio of simple optical properties measured from autonomous platforms, when carefully validated, provides a unique tool for studying phytoplankton patchiness on extended temporal scales and ecologically relevant spatial scales and should offer new insights into the processes regulating patchiness.

  5. The Majorana Demonstrator: Progress towards showing the feasibility of a 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Finnerty, P.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barton, P. J.; Beene, Jim; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Looker, Q.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Phillips, David; Poon, Alan; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, Werner; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2014-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0*) of the 76Ge isotope with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate the neutrino is its own anti-particle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass-scale of the neutrino. The Demonstrator is being assembled at the 4850 foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The array will be contained in a lowbackground environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. The goals for the Demonstrator are: demonstrating a background rate less than 3 counts tonne -1 year-1 in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) surrounding the 2039 keV 76Ge endpoint energy; establishing the technology required to build a tonne-scale germanium based double-beta decay experiment; testing the recent claim of observation of 0; and performing a direct search for lightWIMPs (3-10 GeV/c2).

  6. Studies of gas adsorption in flexible Metal-Organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Sarmishtha

    Flexible Metal-Organic frameworks that exhibit a gate-opening (GO) adsorption mechanism have potential for gas separations and gas storage. The GO phenomenon occurs when molecular gates in the structure expand/contract in response to the activation/de-activation of a system variable e.g. temperature, pressure or gas. Sharp discontinuities in the isotherm leading to S-shapes and large adsorption-desorption hysteresis are typical of this phenomenon. This study investigates the kinetics and thermodynamics of the GO behavior by combining adsorption measurements and analytical modeling of adsorption kinetics and capacity as a function of adsorbate, GO pressure, and temperature. Basic understanding of GO mechanism will help harness GO-MOF's as adsorbents for gas separations and storage. Experiments were performed on two precharacterized MOFs with verified GO behavior. These are (1) Zn2(bpdc)2(bpee), which expands from a relative amorphous to crystalline structure and (2) Cu[(dhbc) 2(4,4f-bpy)]H2O, a mutually interdigitated 2-D structure (bpdc = biphenyldicarboxylate, bpee = 1,2]bipyridylethene; DMF = N,N-dimethyl formamide, dhbc= 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, bpy=bipyridine). Both sub- and super-critical adsorption data were collected using three adsorption units: a standard low-pressure volumetric adsorption unit, a commercial high-pressure gravimetric analyzer and a custom-built high-pressure differential volumetric unit. Collected laboratory data were combined with published adsorption rate and isotherm data for analysis to broaden the range of data collection. The accuracy of the high-pressure differential unit was improved by over 300-fold by changing analytical methods of processing data to establish a reliable null correction. A pronounced effect of the allowed experimental time was found at cryogenic temperatures on (1). Tightening the stability criteria used by the adsorption equipment to determine equilibration increased the experimental time from the order of

  7. [Adsorption of Cr (VI) on magnetic graphene from aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yang, Qi; Li, Bo; Chen, Hai; Nie, Lan-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Chemical deposition method was applied to prepare magnetic graphene composites using graphite oxide and ferric salt (FeCl2 - 4H2O and FeCl3 x 6H2O) as starting materials. The static experiments were performed to study kinetics, thermodynamic, adsorption isotherm and effects of various parameters, such as pH, temperature and time on Cr(VI) adsorption. The results showed that adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model. Compared with Freundlich isotherm, Langmuir isotherm could better describe the adsorption process. The parameters of thermodynamics were ΔHθ = 33.89 kJ x mol(-1), ΔSθ = 120.15 J x (mol x K)(-1), ΔGθ = -2.51 kJ x mol(-1) (303 K), it demonstrated that the adsorption was a spontaneously endothermic process. It also indicated that the optimal pH was 2. Higher temperature and extension of time were in favor of adsorption. When used repeatedly for three times, the adsorption capacity decreased from 3.9 mg x g(-1) to 2.1 mg x g(-1) with an initial concentration of 5 mg x L(-1). By using a permanent magnet, the recycling process of adsorbent was easy to be operated and adsorbent could be regenerated by sodium hydrate solution. Hence, the composites is a promising adsorbent for efficient removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater. PMID:26031080

  8. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of glufosinate onto goethite.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Gu, Xueyuan; Guo, Yong; Tong, Fei; Chen, Liangyan

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of glufosinate (GLU), a widely used herbicide similar to glyphosate (GLY), onto goethite was investigated as a function of the pH, ionic strength, background cations and anions, heavy metal ions and fulvic acids (FAs) by using batch adsorption experiments. In situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to characterize the molecular interactions between GLU and goethite surfaces. The macroscopic results indicated that an increasing pH exerted an adverse effect on GLU adsorption because of the electrostatic repulsion, and the adsorption was not sensitive to ionic strengths or background cation types, indicating that an inner-sphere surface complex was involved. GLU adsorption can be considerably depressed by PO4(3-), SO4(2-), and a high level of FA because of the competitive effect, while being enhanced by Cu(2+) with a maximum adsorption at approximately pH5 because of the metal ion bridging effect. Other examined divalent metal cations (Cd(2+), Zn(2+), and Pb(2+)) showed almost no effect on GLU adsorption, indicating weak interaction between them. ATR-FTIR spectra and the DFT calculations further proved that GLU was bonded to goethite surfaces through the formation of a monodentate mononuclear inner-sphere complex between the phosphinic moiety and surface Fe(III) centers under an acidic condition. The results showed that GLU had a similar adsorption mechanism to that of GLY onto goethite, but with a lower adsorption affinity, possibly exerting higher mobility and risk in soils. PMID:27096492

  9. Zinc modulates thrombin adsorption to fibrin

    SciTech Connect

    Hopmeier, P.; Halbmayer, M.; Fischer, M.; Marx, G. )

    1990-05-01

    Human thrombin with high affinity to Sepharose insolubilized fibrin monomers (high-affinity thrombin) was used to investigate the effect of Zn(II) on the thrombin adsorption to fibrin. Results showed that at Zn(II) concentrations exceeding 100 mumols/l, thrombin binding to fibrin was decreased concomitant with the Zn(II) concentration and time; at lower Zn(II) concentrations, thrombin adsorption was enhanced. Experimental results were identical by using 125I-labelled high-affinity alpha-thrombin or by measuring the thrombin activity either by chromogenic substrate or by a clotting time method. In contrast, Ca(II) alone (final conc. 3 mmol/l) or in combination with Zn(II) was not effective. However, at higher Ca(II) concentrations (7.5-15 mmol/l), thrombin adsorption was apparently decreased. Control experiments revealed that Zn(II) had no impact on the clottability of fibrinogen, and that the results of the experiments with Ca(II) were not altered by possible cross-linking of fibrin. We conclude that unlike Ca(II), Zn(II) is highly effective in modulating thrombin adsorption to fibrin.

  10. Influence of milling on the adsorption ability of eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Baláž, Matej; Ficeriová, Jana; Briančin, Jaroslav

    2016-03-01

    Eggshell waste was successfully used for the removal of heavy metal ions from model solutions. The effect of ball milling on the structure and adsorption ability of eggshell (ES) and its membrane (ESM) was investigated, with the conclusion that milling is benefitial only for the ES. The adsorption experiments showed that the ESM is a selective adsorbent, as the adsorption ability toward different ions decreased in the following order: Ag(I) > Cd(II) > Zn(II). The obtained Qm values for Ag(I) adsorption on the ESM and ES were 52.9 and 55.7 mg g(-1), respectively. The potential industrial application of ES was also demonstrated by successful removal of Ag(I) from the technological waste. PMID:26741552

  11. Selective adsorption of protein by a high-efficiency Cu(2+) -cooperated magnetic imprinted nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lu; Tang, Yuhai; Hao, Yi; He, Gaiyan; Gao, Ruixia; Tang, Xiaoshuang

    2016-07-01

    We report a core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer with high affinity through a facile sol-gel method for the selective adsorption of bovine hemoglobin from real bovine blood. Copper ions grafted on the surface of the matrix could immobilize template protein through chelation, which greatly enhances the orderliness of imprinted cavities and affinity of polymers. The obtained products exhibit a desired level of magnetic susceptibility, resulting in the highly efficient adsorption process. The results of adsorption experiments show that the saturation adsorption capacity of imprinted products could reach 116.3 mg/g within 30 min. Meanwhile, the specific binding experiment demonstrates the high selectivity of polymers for bovine hemoglobin. Furthermore, satisfactory reusability is demonstrated by ten adsorption-desorption cycles with no obvious deterioration in binding capacity. Electrophoretic analysis suggests the polymer could be used successfully in separation and enrichment of bovine hemoglobin from the bovine blood sample, which exhibits potential application in pretreatment of proteomics. PMID:27234958

  12. The effects of Concentration and Salinity on Polymer Adsorption Isotherm at Sandstone Rock Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M.; Ben Mahmud, H.

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) polymers on sandstone rock surface was studied by static adsorption experiments. Total of 10 Runs of static experiments were conducted in test tubes by mixing the desired solution with crushed rock sample, at temperature of 25 °C, and salinity range from 0-4 wt%. The results are in conformity with Langmuir's isotherm. Ten different isotherms were generated at each Run. The initial polymer concentration was varied from 0.3-2.1 g/l. The effects of salinity have been studied by observation on Langmuir adsorption coefficients (Y and K). The results show that the adsorption coefficient (Y) was found to have linear relationship with salinity. The adsorption coefficient (K) was found to be related to salinity by a quadratic relationship.

  13. Co-adsorption of Trichloroethylene and Arsenate by Iron-Impregnated Granular Activated Carbon.

    PubMed

    Deng, Baolin; Kim, Eun-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Co-adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and arsenate [As(V)] was investigated using modified granular activated carbons (GAC): untreated, sodium hypochlorite-treated (NaClO-GAC), and NaClO with iron-treated GAC (NaClO/Fe-GAC). Batch experiments of single- [TCE or As(V)] and binary- [TCE and As(V)] components solutions are evaluated through Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and adsorption kinetic tests. In the single-component system, the adsorption capacity of As(V) was increased by the NaClO-GAC and the NaClO/Fe-GAC. The untreated GAC showed a low adsorption capacity for As(V). Adsorption of TCE by the NaClO/Fe-GAC was maximized, with an increased Freundlich constant. Removal of TCE in the binary-component system was decreased 15% by the untreated GAC, and NaClO- and NaClO/Fe-GAC showed similar efficiency to the single-component system because of the different chemical status of the GAC surfaces. Results of the adsorption isotherms of As(V) in the binary-component system were similar to adsorption isotherms of the single-component system. The adsorption affinities of single- and binary-component systems corresponded with electron transfer, competitive adsorption, and physicochemical properties. PMID:27131303

  14. [Toluene, Benzene and Acetone Adsorption by Activated Carbon Coated with PDMS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Han-bing; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Xin; Yang, Bing; Xue, Nan-dong; Zhang, Shi-lei

    2016-04-15

    To improve the adsorption selectivity of volatile organic compounds ( VOCs) , activated carbon ( AC) was modified by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and characterized by BET analysis and Boehm titration. Dynamic adsorption column experiments were conducted and Yoon-Neslon(Y-N) model was used to identify adsorption effect for toluene, beuzene and acetone on AC when relative humidity was 0%, 50% and 90%, respectively. The results showed that the BET area, micropore volume and surface functional groups decreased with the PDMS modification, and surface hydrophobicity of the modified AC was enhanced leading to a lower water adsorption capacity. The results of dynamic adsorption showed that the adsorption kinetics and capacity of Bare-AC decreased with the increase of relative humidity, and the adsorption capacities of PDMS coated AC were 1.86 times (toluene) and 1.92 times (benzene) higher than those of Bare-AC, while a significant improvement of adsorption capacity for acetone was not observed. These findings suggest that polarity of molecule can be an important influencing factor for adsorption on hydrophobic surface developed by PDMS. PMID:27548948

  15. Adsorption of a cationic surfactant by a magsorbent based on magnetic alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Layaly; El Kolli, Nadia; Dali, Noëlle; Talbot, Delphine; Abramson, Sébastien; Welschbillig, Mathias; Cabuil, Valérie; Bée, Agnès

    2014-10-15

    Adsorption of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), a cationic surfactant, by magnetic alginate beads (MagAlgbeads) was investigated. The magnetic adsorbent (called magsorbent) was prepared by encapsulation of magnetic functionalized nanoparticles in an alginate gel. The influence on CPC adsorption of several parameters such as contact time, pH and initial surfactant concentration was studied. The equilibrium isotherm shows that adsorption occurs through both electrostatic interactions with charge neutralization of the carboxylate groups of the beads and hydrophobic interactions inducing the formation of surfactant aggregates in the beads. The dosage of calcium ions released in the solution turns out to be a useful tool for understanding the adsorption mechanisms. Adsorption is accompanied by a shrinking of the beads that corresponds to a 45% reduction of the volume. Adsorption kinetic experiments show that equilibrium time is strongly dependent on the surfactant concentration, which monitors the nature of the interactions. On the other hand, since the pH affects the ionization state of adsorption sites, adsorption depends on the pH solution, maximum adsorption being obtained in a large pH range (3.2-12) in agreement with the pKa value of alginate (pKa=3.4-4.2). Finally, due to the formation of micelle-like surfactants aggregates in the magnetic alginate beads, they could be used as a new efficient magsorbent for hydrophobic pollutants. PMID:25086393

  16. Adsorption dynamics of methyl violet onto granulated mesoporous carbon: Facile synthesis and adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yohan; Bae, Jiyeol; Park, Hosik; Suh, Jeong-Kwon; You, Young-Woo; Choi, Heechul

    2016-09-15

    A new and facile one-step synthesis method for preparing granulated mesoporous carbon (GMC) with three-dimensional spherical mesoporous symmetry is prepared to remove large molecular weight organic compounds in aqueous phase. GMC is synthesized in a single step using as-synthesized mesoporous carbon particles and organic binders through a simple and economical synthesis approach involving a simultaneous calcination and carbonization process. Characterization results obtained from SEM, XRD, as well as surface and porosity analysis indicate that the synthesized GMC has similar physical properties to those of the powdered mesoporous carbon and maintains the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume because the new synthesis method prevents the collapse of the pores during the granulation process. Batch adsorption experiments revealed GMC showed a substantial adsorption capacity (202.8 mg/g) for the removal of methyl violet as a target large molecular contaminant in aqueous phase. The mechanisms and dynamics modeling of GMC adsorption were also fully examined, which revealed that surface diffusion was rate limiting step on adsorption process of GMC. Adsorption kinetics of GMC enables 3 times faster than that of granular activated carbon in terms of surface diffusion coefficient. This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to synthesize GMC as an adsorbent for water purification by using facile granulation method and to investigate the adsorption kinetics and characteristics of GMC. This study introduces a new and simple method for the synthesis of GMC and reveals its adsorption characteristics for large molecular compounds in a water treatment. PMID:27262123

  17. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA. PMID:26469934

  18. Surface chemistry of ferrihydrite: Part 2. Kinetics of arsenate adsorption and coprecipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Dadis, J.A.; Waychunas, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of As(V) adsorption by ferrihydrite was investigated in coprecipitation and postsynthesis adsorption experiments conducted in the pH range 7.5-9.0. In coprecipitation experiments, As(V) was present in solution during the hydrolysis and precipitation of iron. In adsorption experiments, a period of rapid (<5 min) As(V) uptake from solution was followed by continued uptake for at least eight days, as As(V) diffused to adsorption sites on ferrihydrite surfaces within aggregates of colloidal particles. The time dependence of As(V) adsorption is well described by a general model for diffusion into a sphere if a subset of surface sites located near the exterior of aggregates is assumed to attain adsorptive equilibrium rapidly. The kinetics of As(V) desorption after an increase in pH were also consistent with diffusion as a rate-limiting process. Aging of pure ferrihydrite prior to As(V) adsorption caused a decrease in adsorption sites on the precipitate owing to crystallite growth. In coprecipitation experiments, the initial As(V) uptake was significantly greater than in post-synthesis adsorption experiments, and the rate of uptake was not diffusion limited because As(V) was coordinated by surface sites before crystallite growth and coagulation processes could proceed. After the initial adsorption, As(V) was slowly released from coprecipitates for at least one month, as crystallite growth caused desorption of As(V). Adsorption densities as high as 0.7 mole As(V) per mole of Fe were measured in coprecipitates, in comparison to 0.25 mole As(V) per mole of Fe in post-synthesis adsorption experiments. Despite the high Concentration of As(V) in the precipitates, EXAFS spectroscopy (Waychunas et al., 1993) showed that neither ferric arsenate nor any other As-bearing surface precipitate or solid solution was formed. The high adsorption densities are possible because the ferrihydrite particles are extremely small, approaching the size of small dioctahedral chains at

  19. First Molecular Dynamics simulation insight into the mechanism of organics adsorption from aqueous solutions on microporous carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzyk, Artur P.; Gauden, Piotr A.; Zieliński, Wojciech; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Wesołowski, Radosław P.; Klimek, Kamil K.

    2011-10-01

    The results of 84 MD simulations showing the influence of porosity and carbon surface oxidation on adsorption of three organic compounds from aqueous solutions on carbons are reported. Based on a model of 'soft' activated carbon, three carbon structures with gradually changed microporosity were created. Next, different number of surface oxygen groups was introduced. We observe quantitative agreement between simulation and experiment i.e. the decrease in adsorption from benzene down to paracetamol. Simulation results clearly demonstrate that the balance between porosity and carbon surface chemical composition in organics adsorption on carbons, and the pore blocking determine adsorption properties of carbons.

  20. Protein nanoparticle interaction: A spectrophotometric approach for adsorption kinetics and binding studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishanav, Sandeep K.; Chandraker, Kumudini; Korram, Jyoti; Nagwanshi, Rekha; Ghosh, Kallol K.; Satnami, Manmohan L.

    2016-08-01

    Investigating the protein nanoparticle interaction is crucial to understand how to control the biological interactions of nanoparticles. In this work, Model protein Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used to evaluate the process of protein adsorption to the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) surface. The binding of a model protein (BSA) to GNPs was investigated through fluorescence quenching measurements. The strong affinities of BSA for GNPs were confirmed by the high value of binding constant (Ks) which was calculated to be 2.2 × 1011 L/mol. In this consequence, we also investigated the adsorption behavior of BSA on GNPs surface via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effect of various operational parameters such as pH, contact time, initial BSA concentration, and temperature on adsorption of BSA was investigated using batch adsorption experiments. Kinetics of adsorption was found to follow the pseudo-second order rate equation. The suitability of Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models to the equilibrium data was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption was well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity for BSA adsorbed on GNPs was 58.71 mg/g and equilibrium constant was 0.0058 calculated by the Langmuir model at 298 K and pH = 11.0. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of BSA onto GNPs was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic.

  1. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reserpine Adsorption onto Strong Acidic Cationic Exchange Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhanjing; Liu, Xiongmin; Huang, Hongmiao

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process of reserpine adsorbed onto the strong acidic cationic exchange fiber (SACEF) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on pH values, and the optimum reserpine adsorption onto the SACEF occurred at pH = 5 of reserpine solution. With the increase of temperature and initial concentration, the adsorption capacity increased. The equilibrium was attained within 20 mins. The adsorption process could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm model. The calculated activation energy Ea was 4.35 kJ/mol. And the thermodynamic parameters were: 4.97<ΔH<7.44 kJ/mol, -15.29<ΔG<-11.87 kJ/mol and 41.97<ΔS<47.35 J/mol·K. The thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption was an endothermic, spontaneous and feasible process of physisorption within the temperature range between 283 K and 323 K and the initial concentration range between 100 mg/L and 300 mg/L. All the results showed that the SACEF had a good adsorption performance for the adsorption of reserpine from alcoholic solution. PMID:26422265

  2. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-Won; Leckie, J.O.; Siegel, M.D.

    1995-09-01

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption.

  3. [Rapid Synthesis of Metal Organic Framework and Its Adsorption Properties on Anonic Dyes].

    PubMed

    Sun, De-shuai; Liu, Ya-li; Zhang, Xiao-dong; Qin, Ting-ting

    2016-03-15

    The waste water containing dyes is difficult to be biochemically treated because of its deep color. Adsorption becomes an important treatment method for this kind of waste water. The iron organic framework was rapidly synthesized at room temperature, and characterized by IR and XRD. Adsorption properties of the materials were tested using four anonic dyes solutions. It was found that the iron organic framework could be formed rapidly, with higher surface area and pore volumes. The pH value of zero point charge was 3.7. The adsorption experiments showed that the iron organic material could remove more dyes in acid solution. The dye adsorption capacity increased with increasing dye concentration. These adsorption data fitted well with Langmuir thermoadsorption equation. The calculated parameter from Langmuir adsorption indicated that the adsorption process could be performed easily. The second order kinetic equation could describe the adsorption data. In addition, the structure of dyes could affect the adsorption process. The metal complex dyes could be quickly removed. PMID:27337895

  4. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium on dunite.

    PubMed

    Demetriou, Antri; Pashalidis, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses the effect of various physicochemical parameters (e.g. pH, ionic strength, Cr(VI) initial concentration, amount of the adsorbent, temperature and contact time between metal ion and adsorbent) on the adsorption efficiency of Cr(VI) on dunite in aqueous solutions under atmospheric conditions. Evaluation of the experimental data shows that dunite presents increased affinity for Cr(VI) over a wide pH range and Cr(VI) concentration, and the experimental data are well fitted by the K(d) adsorption model. The relative adsorption is pH dependent and decreases slightly (about 10%) with increasing pH, because of changes in the surface charge of the solid. The effect of the ionic strength is significant (particularly at low pH), indicating the predominance of outer-sphere complexes. Moreover, adsorption experiments at various temperatures, two different pH values (pH 3 and pH 8) and three different ionic strengths (0.0, 0.1 and 1.0 M NaClO(4)), indicate an endothermic but spontaneous entropy-driven processes. PMID:21330733

  5. Adsorption of bacteriocins by ingestible silica compounds.

    PubMed

    Wan, J; Gordon, J; Hickey, M W; Mawson, R F; Coventry, M J

    1996-08-01

    Bacteriocins including nisin, pediocin PO2, brevicin 286 and piscicolin 126 were adsorbed from culture supernates by various food-grade porous silica anti-caking agents and the food colourant, titanium dioxide. All the porous silica (calcium silicate or silicon dioxide) materials showed substantial capacity in adsorbing bacteriocin activities from the culture supernate and biological activity was recovered in the adsorbents. In contrast, the food colourant titanium dioxide adsorbed most of the bacteriocin activity from the supernate, with minimal biological activity retained in the adsorbent. Experiments with piscicolin 126 showed that optimum adsorption could be achieved with Micro-Cel E within 30 min, independent of the supernate pH (2.0-10.0). Piscicolin activity of up to 5 x 10(7) AU g(-1) of Micro-Cel E was obtained after adsorption from culture supernates and the adsorbed piscicolin demonstrated substantial biological activity against Listeria monocytogenes in both broth and a milk growth medium. PMID:8926221

  6. Column Experiments for Radionuclide Adsorption Studies of the Culebra Dolomite: Retardation Parameter Estimation for Non-Eluted Actinide Species

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.O.; Lucero, D.A.; Perkins, W.G.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been developing a nuclear waste disposal facility, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located approximately 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP is designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic wastes produced by the defense nuclear-weapons program. Performance assessment analyses (U.S. DOE, 1996) indicate that human intrusion by inadvertent and intermittent drilling for resources provide the only credible mechanisms for significant releases of radionuclides horn the disposal system. These releases may occur by five mechanisms: (1) cuttings, (2) cavings, (3) spallings, (4) direct brine releases, and (5) long-term brine releases. The first four mechanisms could result in immediate release of contaminant to the accessible environment. For the last mechanism, migration pathways through the permeable layers of rock above the Salado are important, and major emphasis is placed on the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation because this is the most transmissive geologic layer in the disposal system. For reasons of initial quantity, half-life, and specific radioactivity, certain isotopes of Th, U, Am, and Pu would dominate calculated releases from the WIPP. In order to help quanti~ parameters for the calculated releases, radionuclide transport experiments have been carried out using five intact-core columns obtained from the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. This report deals primarily with results of mathematical analyses related to the retardation of %J%, 24%, and 24'Am in two of these cores (B-Core - VPX26-11A and C-Core - VPX28-6C). All B-Core transport experiments were done using Culebra-simukmt brine relevant to the core recovery location (the WIPP air-intake shaft - AIS). Most experiments with C-Core were done with AIS brine with some admixture of a brine composition (ERDA-6) that simulated deeper formation

  7. Irreversible adsorption of particles on heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Jaszczółt, Katarzyna; Michna, Aneta; Siwek, Barbara; Szyk-Warszyńska, Lilianna; Zembala, Maria

    2005-12-30

    evaluated by direct particle counting using the optical and electron microscopy. Adsorption kinetics was quantitatively interpreted in terms of numerical solutions of the governing diffusion equation with the non-linear boundary condition derived from Monte-Carlo simulations. It was proven that for site coverage as low as a few percent the initial flux at heterogeneous surfaces attained the maximum value pertinent to homogeneous surfaces. It also was demonstrated that the structure of larger particle monolayers, characterized in terms of the pair correlation function, showed much more short-range ordering than predicted for homogeneous surface monolayers at the same coverage. The last part of this review was devoted to detection of polyelectrolyte multilayers on various substrates via particle deposition experiments. PMID:15961056

  8. Adsorption of divalent metal ions from aqueous solutions using graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Sitko, Rafal; Turek, Edyta; Zawisza, Beata; Malicka, Ewa; Talik, Ewa; Heimann, Jan; Gagor, Anna; Feist, Barbara; Wrzalik, Roman

    2013-04-28

    The adsorptive properties of graphene oxide (GO) towards divalent metal ions (copper, zinc, cadmium and lead) were investigated. GO prepared through the oxidation of graphite using potassium dichromate was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The results of batch experiments and measurements by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F-AAS) indicate that maximum adsorption can be achieved in broad pH ranges: 3-7 for Cu(II), 5-8 for Zn(II), 4-8 for Cd(II), 3-7 for Pb(II). The maximum adsorption capacities of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) on GO at pH = 5 are 294, 345, 530, 1119 mg g(-1), respectively. The competitive adsorption experiments showed the affinity in the order of Pb(II) > Cu(II) ≫ Cd(II) > Zn(II). Adsorption isotherms and kinetic studies suggest that sorption of metal ions on GO nanosheets is monolayer coverage and adsorption is controlled by chemical adsorption involving the strong surface complexation of metal ions with the oxygen-containing groups on the surface of GO. Chemisorption was confirmed by XPS (binding energy and shape of O1s and C1s peaks) of GO with adsorbed metal ions. The adsorption experiments show that the dispersibility of GO in water changes remarkably after complexation of metal ions. After adsorption, the tendency to agglomerate and precipitate is observed. Excellent dispersibility of GO and strong tendency of GO-Me(II) to precipitate open the path to removal of heavy metals from water solution. Potential application of GO in analytical chemistry as a solid sorbent for preconcentration of trace elements and in heavy metal ion pollution cleanup results from its maximum adsorption capacities that are much higher than those of any of the currently reported sorbents. PMID:23443993

  9. [Study on treatment of methylene blue wastewater by fly ash adsorption-Fenton and thermal regeneration].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Ai-Li; Zhou, Ji-Ti

    2012-07-01

    The physicochemical properties of water-washed fly ash (FA) and acid modified fly ash (M-FA) were investigated. The adsorption of methylene blue by FA and M-FA were studied by batch experiments. Two methods, Fenton-drive oxidation regeneration and thermal regeneration, were used for regeneration of the used FA and M-FA. The result showed that the rate of adsorption process followed the second order kinetics and the adsorption followed Langmuir isotherms. The adsorption equilibrium time was 30 min, and the equilibrium adsorption capacity of FA and M-FA were 4.22 mg x g(-1) and 5.98 mg x g(-1) respectively. The adsorption capability of M-FA was higher than that of FA. In the range of pH 2-12, the adsorption capacity of M-FA increased with the increase of pH, whereas the adsorption capacity of FA decreased slowly until the pH 8 and then increased. Electrostatic adsorption was the major factor on the adsorption capacity. Around 61% and 55% percentage regeneration (PR) were obtained for FA and M-FA respectively when 78.4 mmol x L(-1) H2O2 and 0.72 mmol x L(-1) Fe2+ were used. When the condition of thermal regeneration was 400 degrees C and 2 h, a positive correlation can be found between the PRs of FA and regeneration times, the PRs were 102%, 104% and 107% in three cycles of adsorption-thermal regeneration process. However a negative correlation can be found between the PRs of M-FA and regeneration times, the PRs were 82%, 75% and 74% in three cycles of adsorption-thermal regeneration process. The PR of FA was higher than that of M-FA, and thermal regeneration was superior to Fenton-drive regeneration. PMID:23002621

  10. Adsorption of mercury in coal-fired power plants gypsum slurry on TiO2/chitosan composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Gao, B. B.; Gao, J. Q.; Zhang, K.; Chen, Y. J.; Yang, Y. P.; Chen, H. W.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a simple method was used to prepare a chitosan adsorbent to mix with KI and TiO2. Gravimetric analysis (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize the samples before and after adsorption of Hg2+. A mercury adsorption experiment was also conducted in the gypsum slurry. The results show that using hydrobromic acid as a solvent of adsorbent resulted in a better adsorption effect than using acetic acid alone. Also, the sample (CS-KI/TiO2-HBr) had a maximum mercury adsorption capacity when the pH=5 and the t=50°C. The characterization experiments showed that the thermal stability of composite materials declined and the TiO2 uniformly dispersed in the surface of the samples with a lamellar structure, generating a lot of cracks and recesses that increased the reactive sites. Furthermore, when the TiO2 reacted with CS, it resulted in Ti-C, Ti-O and Ti-N bonds. The Br- can prevent the growth of TiO2 crystal grains and strengthen the ability of I- to remove mercury. The adsorption isotherm and kinetic results indicated that the adsorption behaviour of CS-KI/TiO2-HBr as it removes Hg2+ is an inhomogeneous multilayer adsorption process. The surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion effects are both important in the Hg2+ adsorption process.

  11. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best…

  12. Adsorption edge study about cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc adsorption by variable charge soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, J. C.; Mouta, E. R.; Soares, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    The improper discharge of industrial and urban residues and the inadvertent use of fertilizers and pesticides can result in soil and water pollution and improve the potential of trace metals to enter in the human food chain. Adsorption reactions occur at the solid/liquid interface and are the most important mechanisms for controlling the activity of metal ions in soil solution. In a complex system with amphoteric behavior, the comprehension of the mobility, availability and fate of pollutants in the soil system is crucial for the prediction of the environmental consequences and for development of prevention/remediation strategies. A comparative study of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) adsorption by highly weathered soils was carried out. Surface (0-0.2m) and subsoil (B horizon) samples were taken from a Rhodic Kandiudalf (RH), an Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox (XA) and an Anionic "Rhodic" Acrudox (RA), located in brazilian humid tropical area. As the pH and the ionic strength are important environmental factors influencing the solution chemistry of heavy metals in variable charge systems, adsorption envelopes, in a batch adsorption experiment, were elaborated by reacting, for 24 h, soil samples with individual 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 aqueous solutions containing nitrate salts of the adsorptive heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) at the initial concentration of 5 mg L-1, with an increasing pH value from 3.0 to 8.0. pH50-100%, the difference between the pH of 100 and 50 percent metal adsorption was determined. A sharp increase of adsorption density (adsorption edge) was observed within a very narrow pH range, usually less than two pH units. Commonly, the relative affinity of a soil for a metal cation increases with the tendency of the cation to form inner-sphere surface complexes. This may be caused by differences in extent of hydrolysis of Cu ions and in affinity of adsorption sites for Cu. In general, subsurface samples showed low pH50

  13. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  14. The different adsorption mechanism of methane molecule onto a boron nitride and a graphene flakes

    SciTech Connect

    Seyed-Talebi, Seyedeh Mozhgan; Neek-Amal, M.

    2014-10-21

    Graphene and single layer hexagonal boron-nitride are two newly discovered 2D materials with wonderful physical properties. Using density functional theory, we study the adsorption mechanism of a methane molecule over a hexagonal flake of single layer hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) and compare the results with those of graphene. We found that independent of the used functional in our ab-initio calculations, the adsorption energy in the h-BN flake is larger than that for graphene. Despite of the adsorption energy profile of methane over a graphene flake, we show that there is a long range behavior beyond minimum energy in the adsorption energy of methane over h-BN flake. This result reveals the higher sensitivity of h-BN sheet to the adsorption of a typical closed shell molecule with respect to graphene. The latter gives insight in the recent experiments of graphene over hexagonal boron nitride.

  15. The different adsorption mechanism of methane molecule onto a boron nitride and a graphene flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Talebi, Seyedeh Mozhgan; Neek-Amal, M.

    2014-10-01

    Graphene and single layer hexagonal boron-nitride are two newly discovered 2D materials with wonderful physical properties. Using density functional theory, we study the adsorption mechanism of a methane molecule over a hexagonal flake of single layer hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) and compare the results with those of graphene. We found that independent of the used functional in our ab-initio calculations, the adsorption energy in the h-BN flake is larger than that for graphene. Despite of the adsorption energy profile of methane over a graphene flake, we show that there is a long range behavior beyond minimum energy in the adsorption energy of methane over h-BN flake. This result reveals the higher sensitivity of h-BN sheet to the adsorption of a typical closed shell molecule with respect to graphene. The latter gives insight in the recent experiments of graphene over hexagonal boron nitride.

  16. Adsorption Behaviors of 17α-Ethinylestradiol in Sediment-Water System in Northern Taihu Lake, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonghua; Hu, Liangfeng; Wang, Qiuying; Lu, Guanghua; Li, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption behavior of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in northern Taihu Lake sediment was analyzed by using batch equilibrium experiment. Freundlich isotherm could describe the adsorption thermodynamic behavior of EE2 in sediment. Sediment organic matter (SOM) contents had important impacts on the adsorption capacity for EE2. The pH values also influenced the adsorption capacity for EE2. Increase of pH value could decrease the EE2 adsorption, which might be due to the electrostatic repulsion between the anionic form of EE2 and sediments with negative charge under high pH values. Competitive effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on EE2 adsorption were further analyzed. The results showed that low concentration BPA did not have significant influences on EE2 adsorption. However, high concentration BPA could reduce EE2 adsorption, which might be due to the similar molecular diameter of BPA with adsorption sites and one more benzene ring with a hydroxyl group in BPA. These results provide primary information of EE2 adsorption in sediment-water system in Taihu Lake, which is useful for the environmental risk assessment and management of EE2 in studied area. PMID:25152910

  17. Phosphate adsorption performance of a novel filter substrate made from drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendong; Ma, Cui; Zhang, Yinting; Yang, Shengjiong; Shao, Yue; Wang, Xiaochang

    2016-07-01

    Phosphate is one of the most predominant pollutants in natural waters. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the phosphate adsorption performance of a (NFS) made from drinking water treatment residuals. The adsorption of phosphate on the NFS fitted well with the Freundlich isotherm and pseudo second-order kinetic models. At pH7.0, the maximum adsorption capacity of 1.03mg/g was achieved at 15°C corresponding to the wastewater temperature in cold months, and increased notably to 1.31mg/g at 35°C. Under both acidic conditions (part of the adsorption sites was consumed) and basic conditions (negative charges formed on the surface of NFS, which led to a static repulsion of PO4(3-) and HPO4(2-)), the adsorption of phosphate was slightly inhibited. Further study showed that part of the adsorption sites could be recovered by 0.25mol/L NaOH. The activation energy was calculated to be above 8.0kJ/mol, indicating that the adsorption of phosphate on NFS was probably a chemical process. Considering the strong phosphate adsorption capacity and recoverability, NFS showed great promise on enhancing phosphate removal from the secondary treated wastewater in the filtration process. PMID:27372133

  18. Excellent adsorption and desorption characteristics of polypyrrole/TiO2 composite for Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingjing; Feng, Jiangtao; Yan, Wei

    2013-08-01

    P25 or self-prepared TiO2 coated polypyrrole (PPy/P25 or PPy/TiO2) composites as novel adsorbents were prepared. Their adsorption-desorption characteristics for Methylene Blue (MB) were comparatively investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that PPy/TiO2 possessed higher doping level than PPy/P25. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that PPy/TiO2 contained more PPy than PPy/P25. The results of water vapor adsorption suggested that the PPy/TiO2 composite was more hydrophobic than PPy/P25. The adsorption results revealed that the composites pretreated in the solution with higher pH value exhibited larger adsorption capacities. The ionic concentration in MB solution slightly impacted the removal of MB by the PPy/TiO2 composite. The adsorption equilibrium results showed that the adsorption of MB was completed in a short time of 30 min. Pseudo-second-order and Langmuir isotherm models were effectively employed to describe the adsorption behavior of MB. PPy/TiO2 and PPy/P25 were found to have better removal ability for MB compared with pure PPy; especially PPy/TiO2, on which the maximum adsorption amount was about 3.6 or 5.5 times higher than that of PPy/P25 or pure PPy, respectively. The thermodynamic analysis indicated that the adsorption of MB was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The regeneration experiments exhibited that PPy/TiO2 can be reused at least seven times without obvious loss of its original adsorption capacity. Electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction played the roles in MB adsorption performance. It is expected that the PPy/TiO2 composite can be considered as a stable adsorbent for dye removal.

  19. Random sequential adsorption on fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-01

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  20. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions. PMID:22852643

  1. Extracorporeal adsorption of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Staubach, K H; Rosenfeldt, J A; Veit, O; Bruch, H P

    1997-02-01

    In a porcine endotoxin shock model using a continuous intravenous endotoxin infusion of 250 ng/kg body weight per hour, the cardiorespiratory and hematologic parameters were studied while applying a new on-line polymyxin B immobilized adsorption system. This preliminary report shows that the new adsorbent can remove endotoxin selectively from the circulation and confers a good amount of protection from endotoxin-induced cardiopulmonary decompensation as well as hematologic alterations. Survival time could be extended from 216 min to 313 min. Whereas cardiac output and mean arterial pressure declined critically after 3 h in the controls, the treated group remained stable for another 3 h. These data show that endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B coupled covalently to acrylic spheres as an adjunctive on-line measure in the septic syndrome seems feasible. PMID:10225785

  2. Comparing the removal of perchlorate when using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon: adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie C; Hsu, Yung S; Hsu, Kai L; Chou, Ming S; Han, Jia Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to remove perchlorate using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon (GAC). Dynamic and equilibrium adsorption experiments were performed to evaluate the thermodynamic behavior of perchlorate on SWCNTs and GAC. Key parameters affecting the adsorption, such as pH, ionic strength, and temperature were studied. The experimental results showed that the dynamic adsorption experiment achieved equilibrium in approximately eight hours. The adsorption capacity increased as the concentration of perchlorate increased or as the ionic strength decreased. The selected adsorption models were the modified Freundlich, the pseudo-1st-order, and the pseudo-2nd-order equations. The results showed that the modified Freundlich equation best described the kinetic adsorption processes. The maximal adsorption capacities of GAC and SWCNTs were 33.87-28.21 mg/g and 13.64 - 10.03 mg/g, respectively, at a constant temperature between 5°C and 45°C. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the equilibrium constant (K0 ), the standard free energy changes (ΔG°), the standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and the standard entropy change (ΔS°), were obtained. The results of the isothermal equilibrium adsorption experiment showed that low pH levels, low ionic strength, and low-temperature conditions facilitated the perchlorate adsorption, indicating that GAC and SWCNTs are potential absorbents for water treatment. PMID:24410681

  3. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity. PMID:24981747

  4. The Calculation of Adsorption Isotherms from Chromatographic Peak Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between adsorption isotherms and elution peak shapes in gas chromatography, and describes a laboratory experiment which involves the adsorption of hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene on alumina at different temperatures. (MLH)

  5. Enthalpy of adsorption and isotherms for adsorption of naphthenic acid onto clays

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, L.; Han, B.; Yan, H.; Kasperski, K.L.; Xu, Y.; Hepler, L.G.

    1997-06-15

    The enthalpies of adsorption and the isotherms for adsorption of naphthenic acid onto Na-montmorillonite, Na-kaolinite, and Na-illite were studied by means of calorimetry and the static method at 298.15 K. The results show that the enthalpies of adsorption and saturated adsorption amounts of naphthenic acid on different clays change in the order Na-montmorillonite > Na-illite > Na-kaolinite. The interaction between naphthenic acid and clays is discussed.

  6. The mechanism of Zn sup 2+ adsorption on calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M. ); Kittrick, J.A.; Harsh, J.B. )

    1988-09-01

    The adsorption of Zn{sup 2+} on calcite (CaCO{sub 3(s)}) was investigated from aqueous solutions in equilibrium with CaCO{sub 3(s)} and undersaturated with respect to Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 6}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2(s)}. Zinc adsorption occurred via exchange with Ca{sub 2+} in a surface-adsorbed layer on calcite. The validity of this exchange reaction was supported by adsorption isotherm and constant concentration experiments, where Ca{sup 2+}{sub aq} was varied by systematically changing the pH and CO{sub 2(g)}. Greater adsorption of Zn{sup 2+} occurred at higher pH and Co{sub 2(g)} levels, where Ca{sup 2+} activities were lowest. Sites available for Zn{sup 2+} sorption were less than 10% of Ca{sup 2+} sites on the calcite surface. Surface exchange of Zn{sup 2+} did not affect the solubility of calcite. Zinc sorption was apparently independent of surface charge, which suggested that the surface complex had covalent character. Desorption and isotopic exchange experiments indicated that the surface complex remained hydrated and labile as Zn{sup 2+} was rapidly exchangeable with Ca{sup 2+}. Careful analysis of the adsorption data showed that Zn{sup 2+} and ZnOH{sup +} were the sorbing species.

  7. Charge induced enhancement of adsorption for hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiang

    2009-12-01

    . Direct measurement of the amount of hydrogen adsorption was also carried out with porous nickel oxides and magnesium oxides using the piezoelectric material PMN-PT as the charge supplier due to the pressure. The adsorption enhancement from the PMN-PT generated charges is obvious at hydrogen pressure between 0 and 60 bars, where the hydrogen uptake is increased at about 35% for nickel oxide and 25% for magnesium oxide. Computer simulation reveals that under the external electric field, the electron cloud of hydrogen molecules is pulled over to the adsorbent site and can overlap with the adsorbent electrons, which in turn enhances the adsorption energy. Experiments were also carried out to examine the effects of hydrogen spillover with charge induced enhancement. The results show that the overall storage capacity in nickel oxide increased remarkably by a factor of 4.

  8. [Influence of Three Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids on the Adsorption of Phenanthrene in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Chen, Ben-shou; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Lu, Song; Jiang, Tao

    2016-03-15

    The effects of three low-molecular-weight organic acids (citric acid, malic acid and oxalic acid) on the adsorption of phenanthrene in purple soil were studied by static adsorption experiment. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process of phenanthrene in purple soil could be described by the second-order kinetic model, and the adsorption rate constant would significantly decrease in the presence of the three low-molecular-weight organic acids ( LMWOAs). The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by linear adsorption model, which was dominated by distribution role. The three LMWOAs could promote the adsorption of phenantherene in purple soil when their concentrations were less than 5 mmol · L⁻¹, whereas inhibit the adsorption when their concentrations were more than 10 mmol · L⁻¹, and the inhibition would increase with increasing concentrations. Moreover, the inhibitory ability displayed a decreasing order of citric acid, oxalic acid, and malic acid when their concentrations were 20 mmol · L⁻¹, which is related to the molecular structure and acidity of the three LMWOAs. Compared with the control, the content of dissolved organic matter (DOM) released from purple soil showed a trend of first decrease and then increase with increasing LMWOAs concentration, and the adsorption capacity of phenanthrene in purple soil was negatively related to DOM content. PMID:27337897

  9. Highly enhanced adsorption for the removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solution by Mercaptoethylamine/Mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane functionalized vermiculites.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lytuong; Wu, Pingxiao; Zhu, Yajie; Yang, Lin; Zhu, Nengwu

    2015-05-01

    Vermiculites modified with Mercaptoethylamine (MEA) and 3-Mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) were used as effective adsorbents for the removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solution. The physicochemical characteristics of the pristine and functionalized vermiculites were analyzed by XRD, BET, FTIR, SEM, TEM and Zeta potentials, confirming that the vermiculite was successfully functionalized by the organic ligands containing the thiol (SH) metal-chelating groups. Batch adsorption experiments demonstrated that the factors such as initial pH, contact time, temperature, coexisting cations and initial Hg(II) concentration could significantly influence the adsorption behaviors typically for VER and MEA-VER, whereas the adsorption capacity of MPTMS-VER showed negligible dependence on such factors. The maximum adsorption capacity of Hg(II) ions was greatly improved after functionalization, which was in the order of MPTMS-VER>MEA-VER>VER (286.29 μg g(-1), 176.33 μg g(-1), 99.95 μg g(-1), respectively). The adsorption isotherm could be well described with Langmuir model and the kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption process fitted well with the pseudo-second-order model. The calculated thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption process was feasible and spontaneous. The adsorption mechanism of Hg(II) on thiol groups was studied through XPS analysis. Considering the favorable adsorption capacities, thiol-functionalized vermiculites show a promising application in the removal of Hg(II) from wastewater. PMID:25643962

  10. A comparative study and evaluation of sulfamethoxazole adsorption onto organo-montmorillonites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Laifu; Gao, Manglai; Gu, Zheng; Yang, Senfeng; Liu, Yuening

    2014-12-01

    Three organo-montmorillonites were prepared using surfactants, and their adsorption behaviors toward sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were investigated. The surfactants used were cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTMAB), 3-(N,N-dimethylhexadecylammonio) propane sulfonate (HDAPS) and 1,3-bis(hexadecyldimethylammonio)-propane dibromide (BHDAP). The properties of the organo-montmorillonites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements. Results showed that the interlayer spacing of montmorillonite was increased and the surface area as well as the morphology were changed. Batch adsorption experiments showed that the surfactant loading amount had a great effect on the adsorption of SMX. The adsorption process was pH dependent and the maximum adsorption capacity was obtained at pH3 for HDAPS-Mt, while CTMAB-Mt and BHDAP-Mt showed a high removal efficiency at 3-11. The adsorption capacity increased with the initial SMX concentration and contact time but decreased with increasing solution ionic strength. Kinetic data were best described by the pseudo second-order model. Equilibrium data were best represented by the Langmuir model, and the Freundlich constant (n) indicated a favorable adsorption process. The maximum adsorption capacity of SMX was 235.29 mg/g for CTMAB-Mt, 155.28 mg/g for HDAPS-Mt and 242.72 mg/g for BHDAP-Mt. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated to evaluate the spontaneity and endothermic or exothermic nature. The adsorption mechanism was found to be dominated by electrostatic interaction, while hydrophobic interaction played a secondary role. PMID:25499502

  11. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solution onto untreated coffee grounds: equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Azouaou, N; Sadaoui, Z; Djaafri, A; Mokaddem, H

    2010-12-15

    Adsorption can be used as a cost effective and efficient technique for the removal of toxic heavy metals from wastewater. Waste materials with no further treatment such as coffee grounds from cafeterias may act as adsorbents for the removal of cadmium. Batch kinetic and equilibrium experiments were conducted to study the effects of contact time, adsorbent dose, initial pH, particle size, initial concentration of cadmium and temperature. Three adsorption isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich were used to analyse the equilibrium data. The Langmuir isotherm which provided the best correlation for Cd(2+) adsorption onto coffee grounds, shows that the adsorption was favourable and the adsorption capacity found was equal to 15.65 mg g(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and the adsorption was exothermic. The equilibrium was achieved less than 120 min. The adsorption kinetic data was fitted with first and second order kinetic models. Finally it was concluded that the cadmium adsorption kinetic onto coffee grounds was well fitted by second order kinetic model rather than first order model. The results suggest that coffee grounds have high possibility to be used as effective and economical adsorbent for Cd(2+) removal. PMID:20817346

  12. Adsorption of methylene blue and Congo red from aqueous solution by activated carbon and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Szlachta, M; Wójtowicz, P

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the adsorption removal of dyes by powdered activated carbon (PAC, Norit) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, Chinese Academy of Science) from an aqueous solution. Methylene blue (MB) and Congo red (CR) were selected as model compounds. The adsorbents tested have a high surface area (PAC 835 m(2)/g, MWCNTs 358 m(2)/g) and a well-developed porous structure which enabled the effective treatment of dye-contaminated waters and wastewaters. To evaluate the capacity of PAC and MWCNTs to adsorb dyes, a series of batch adsorption experiments was performed. Both adsorbents exhibited a high adsorptive capacity for MB and CR, and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model, with the maximum adsorption capacity up to 400 mg/g for MB and 500 mg/g for CR. The separation factor, RL, revealed the favorable nature of the adsorption process under experimental conditions. The kinetics of adsorption was studied at various initial dye concentrations and solution temperatures. The pseudo-second-order model was used for determining the adsorption kinetics of MB and CR. The data obtained show that adsorption of both dyes was rapid in the initial stage and followed by slower processing to reach the plateau. The uptake of dyes increased with contact time, irrespective of their initial concentration and solution temperature. However, changes in the solution temperature did not significantly influence dye removal. PMID:24292474

  13. Critical conditions of polymer adsorption and chromatography on non-porous substrates.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Richard T; Rasmussen, Christopher J; Brun, Yefim; Neimark, Alexander V

    2016-07-15

    We present a novel thermodynamic theory and Monte Carlo simulation model for adsorption of macromolecules to solid surfaces that is applied for calculating the chain partition during separation on chromatographic columns packed with non-porous particles. We show that similarly to polymer separation on porous substrates, it is possible to attain three chromatographic modes: size exclusion chromatography at very weak or no adsorption, liquid adsorption chromatography when adsorption effects prevail, and liquid chromatography at critical conditions that occurs at the critical point of adsorption. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the critical conditions, at which the retention is chain length independent. The theoretical results are verified with specially designed experiments on isocratic separation of linear polystyrenes on a column packed with non-porous particles at various solvent compositions. Without invoking any adjustable parameters related to the column and particle geometry, we describe quantitatively the observed transition between the size exclusion and adsorption separation regimes upon the variation of solvent composition, with the intermediate mode occurring at a well-defined critical point of adsorption. A relationship is established between the experimental solvent composition and the effective adsorption potential used in model simulations. PMID:27089017

  14. Adsorption of Cd(II) by two variable-charge soils in the presence of pectin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ru-Hai; Zhu, Xiao-Fang; Qian, Wei; Zhao, Min-Hua; Xu, Ren-Kou; Yu, Yuan-Chun

    2016-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate cadmium(II) (Cd(II)) adsorption by two variable-charge soils (an Oxisol and an Ultisol) as influenced by the presence of pectin. When pectin dosage was less than 30 g kg(-1), the increase in Cd(II) adsorption with the increasing dose of pectin was greater than that when the pectin dosage was >30 g kg(-1). Although both Langmuir and Freundlich equations fitted the adsorption isotherms of Cd(II) and electrostatic adsorption data of Cd(II) by the two soils well, the Langmuir equation showed a better fit. The increase in the maximum total adsorption of Cd(II) induced by pectin was almost equal in both the soils, whereas the increase in the maximum electrostatic adsorption of Cd(II) was greater in the Oxisol than in the Ultisol because the former contained greater amounts of free Fe/Al oxides than the latter, which, in turn, led to a greater increase in the negative charge on the Oxisol. Therefore, the presence of pectin induced the increase in Cd(II) adsorption by the variable-charge soils mainly through the electrostatic mechanism. Pectin increased the adsorption of Cd(II) by the variable-charge soils and thus decreased the activity and mobility of Cd(II) in these soils. PMID:26996909

  15. Adsorption of lipase on polypropylene powder.

    PubMed

    Gitlesen, T; Bauer, M; Adlercreutz, P

    1997-04-01

    Adsorption of different lipases by EP-100 polypropylene powder from crude and pure lipase preparations was studied. Langmuir isotherms described the adsorption equilibria well both for protein and lipase activity adsorption. Adsorption isotherms for five different proteins all gave a similar saturation level of 220 mg protein per g carrier. Twelve commercial lipase preparations were tested for selectivity in the adsorption of lipase. For all preparations the selectivity factor was larger than one. In a crude lipase preparation from Pseudomonas fluorescence, the specific activity in solution decreased by two orders of magnitude after adsorption. The adsorption was not significantly influenced by pH changes in the adsorption buffer, indicating that hydrophobic and not electrostatic interactions are the dominating adsorption forces. Adsorption of a crude lipase from Candida rugosa (Sigma) was fast and equilibrium was reached in 30 and 100 min for protein and lipase activity adsorption respectively. Desorption in aqueous solution was negligible. Investigations with seven different lipases showed no correlation between the specific lipolytic activity of dissolved enzyme in aqueous solution and the specific activity of adsorbed enzyme in an esterification reaction in organic solvent. PMID:9106498

  16. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  17. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC. PMID:26871732

  18. Bovine Serum Albumin Adsorption in Mesoporous Titanium Dioxide: Pore Size and Pore Chemistry Effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Guo, Yanhua; Hong, Qiliang; Rao, Chao; Zhang, Haijuan; Dong, Yihui; Huang, Liangliang; Lu, Xiaohua; Bao, Ningzhong

    2016-04-26

    Understanding the mechanism of protein adsorption and designing materials with high sensitivity, high specificity and fast response are critical to develop the next-generation biosensing and diagnostic platforms. Mesoporous materials with high surface area, tunable pores, and good thermal/hydrostatic stabilities are promising candidates in this field. Because of the excellent biocompatibility, titanium dioxide has received an increasing interest in the past decade for biomedical applications. In this work, we synthesized mesoporous titanium dioxide with controlled pore sizes (7.2-28.0 nm) and explored their application for bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and nitrogen adsorption/desorption experiments were performed to characterize the mesoporous TiO2 samples before and after BSA adsorption. Isothermal microcalorimetry was applied to measure both the adsorption heat and conformation rearrangement heat of BSA in those mesopores. We also carried out thermogravimetry measurements to qualitatively estimate the concentration of hydroxyl groups, which plays an important role in stabilizing BSA in-pore adsorption. The adsorption stability was also examined by leaching experiments. The results showed that TiO2 mesopores can host BSA adsorption when their diameters are larger than the hydrodynamic size of BSA (∼9.5 nm). In larger mesopores studied, two BSA molecules were adsorbed in the same pores. In contrast to the general understanding that large mesopores demonstrate poor stabilities for protein adsorptions, the synthesized mesoporous TiO2 samples demonstrated good leaching stabilities for BSA adsorption. This is probably due to the combination of the mesoporous confinement and the in-pore hydroxyl groups. PMID:27048991

  19. Adsorption of methyl violet from aqueous solutions by the biochars derived from crop residues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren-kou; Xiao, Shuang-cheng; Yuan, Jin-hua; Zhao, An-zhen

    2011-11-01

    The adsorption of methyl violet by the biochars from crop residues was investigated with batch and leaching experiments--adsorption capacity varied with their feedstock in the following order: canola straw char>peanut straw char>soybean straw char>rice hull char. This order was generally consistent with the amount of negative charge of the biochars. Zeta potentials and Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy, combined with adsorption isotherms and effect of ionic strength, indicated that adsorption of methyl violet on biochars involved electrostatic attraction, specific interaction between the dye and carboxylate and phenolic hydroxyl groups on the biochars, and surface precipitation. Leaching experiments showed that 156 g of rice hull char almost completely removed methyl violet from 18.2 L of water containing 1.0 mmol/L of methyl violet. The biochars had high removal efficiency for methyl violet and could be effective adsorbents for removal of methyl violet from wastewater. PMID:21924897

  20. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium study of nitrogen species onto radiata pine (Pinus radiata) sawdust.

    PubMed

    Harmayani, Kadek D; Faisal Anwar, A H M

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen species (NH3-N, NO3-N, and NO2-N) are found as one of the major dissolved constituents in wastewater or stormwater runoff. In this research, laboratory experiments were conducted to remove these pollutants from the water environment using radiata pine (Pinus radiata) sawdust. A series of batch tests was conducted by varying initial concentration, dosage, particle size, pH, and contact time to check the removal performance. Test results confirmed the effectiveness of radiata pine sawdust for removing these contaminants from the aqueous phase (100% removal of NO3-N, and NO2-N; 55% removal of NH3-N). The adsorbent dosage and initial concentration showed a significantly greater effect on the removal process over pH or particle sizes. The optimum dosage for contaminant removal on a laboratory scale was found to be 12 g. Next, the adsorption kinetics were studied using intraparticle diffusion, liquid-film diffusion, and a pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order model. The adsorption of all species followed a pseudo-second order model but NO2-N adsorption followed both models. In addition, the kinetics of NO2-N adsorption showed two-step adsorption following intraparticle diffusion and liquid-film diffusion. The isotherm study showed that NO3-N and NO2-N adsorption fitted slightly better with the Freundlich model but that NH3-N adsorption followed both Freundlich and Langmuir models. PMID:27438245

  1. The effect of polysaccharide types on adsorption properties of LbL assembled multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Yang, Lixing; Hu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Shimei; Wang, Jide; Feng, Shun

    2015-03-01

    Three types of biocompatible films were fabricated via electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of oppositely charged cationic polyurethane and anionic polysaccharides with different primary structures, including sodium hyaluronate, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium alginate. The adsorption behaviors of films were investigated by using the cationic dye methylene blue (MB) as a model drug at various pH values and salt concentrations. The relationship between the type of polysaccharide and the adsorption behavior of LbL films was comparatively studied. It was found that the adsorption capacity increased with an increase of the initial concentration of MB in the concentration range of the experiment to all of the films, and the pH of environment ranged from 3.0 to 9.0. The Langmuir equation fit perfectly to the experiment data. In addition, a pseudo second-order adsorption model can well describe the adsorption behaviors of MB for three films. The results showed that the type of side chains and the charge density of the polysaccharides played key roles in the adsorption properties of the PU/polysaccharide multilayer films. PMID:25609027

  2. [Adsorption of methylene blue from water by the biochars generated from crop residues].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren-Kou; Zhao, An-Zhen; Xiao, Shuang-Cheng; Yuan, Jin-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Biochars were prepared from straws of rice, peanut and soybean and rice hull using a low temperature pyrolysis method and adsorption of methylene blue by these biochars were investigated with batch and leaching experiments. Results indicated that biochars have high adsorption capacity for methylene blue and followed the order: rice straw char > soybean straw char > peanut straw char > rice hull char. This order is generally consistent with the amount of negative charge and specific surface area of these biochars. While methylene blue was mainly adsorbed specifically by the biochars, because the adsorption of methylene blue increased with the increase of ionic strength and the adsorption led to the shift of zeta potential of biochar particles to positive value direction. Langmuir equation fitted the adsorption isotherms well and can be used to describe the adsorption behaviors of methylene blue by the biochars. The maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue predicted by langmuir equation was 196.1, 169.5, 129.9 and 89.3 mmol x kg(-1) for rice straw char, soybean straw char, peanut straw char and rice hull char, respectively. Leaching experiments show that rice hull char of 156 g can remove methylene blue from 30 L water containing 0.3 mmol x L(-1) of methylene blue completely and the cumulative amount of methylene blue absorbed by the biochar reaches 57.7 mmol x kg(-1). The biochars can be used as efficient adsorbents to remove methylene blue from waste water of dye. PMID:22452202

  3. Understanding the Adsorption of PFOA on MIL-101(Cr)-Based Anionic-Exchange Metal-Organic Frameworks: Comparing DFT Calculations with Aqueous Sorption Experiments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Zhang, Siyu; Hu, Xiyue; Zhang, Kunyang; Roy, Ajay; Yu, Gang

    2015-07-21

    To examine the effects of different functionalization methods on adsorption behavior, anionic-exchange MIL-101(Cr) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were synthesized using preassembled modification (PAM) and postsynthetic modification (PSM) methods. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) adsorption results indicated that the maximum PFOA adsorption capacity was 1.19 and 1.89 mmol g(-1) for anionic-exchange MIL-101(Cr) prepared by PAM and PSM, respectively. The sorption equilibrium was rapidly reached within 60 min. Our results indicated that PSM is a better modification technique for introducing functional groups onto MOFs for adsorptive removal because PAM places functional groups onto the aperture of the nanopore, which hinders the entrance of organic contaminants. Our experimental results and the results of complementary density functional theory calculations revealed that in addition to the anion-exchange mechanism, the major PFOA adsorption mechanism is a combination of Lewis acid/base complexation between PFOA and Cr(III) and electrostatic interaction between PFOA and the protonated carboxyl groups of the bdc (terephthalic acid) linker. PMID:26066631

  4. A Robust Metal-Organic Framework with An Octatopic Ligand for Gas Adsorption and Separation: A Combined Characterization by Experiments and Molecular Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Wenjuan; Yuan, Daqiang; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli; Li, Jian-Rong; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2012-01-10

    A newly designed octatopic carboxylate ligand, tetrakis[(3,5-dicarboxyphenyl)oxamethyl]methane (TDM8–) has been used to connect a dicopper paddlewheel building unit affording a metal–organic framework (MOF), Cu₄(H₂O)₄(TDM)·xS (PCN-26·xS, S represents noncoordinated solvent molecules, PCN = porous coordination network) with novel structure, high gas uptake, and interesting gas adsorption selectivity. PCN-26 contains two different types of cages, octahedral and cuboctahedral, to form a polyhedron-stacked three-dimensional framework with open channels in three orthogonal directions. Gas adsorption studies of N₂, Ar, and H₂ on an activated PCN-26 at 77 K, 1 bar, reveals a Langmuir surface area of 2545 m²/g, a Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of 1854 m²/g, a total pore volume of 0.84 cm³/g, and a H₂ uptake capacity of 2.57 wt %. Additionally, PCN-26 exhibits a CO₂/N₂ selectivity of 49:1 and CO₂/CH₄ selectivity of 8.4:1 at 273 K. To investigate properties of gas adsorption and the adsorption sites for CO₂ in activated PCN-26, theoretical simulations of the adsorption isotherms of CO₂, CH₄, and N₂ at different temperatures were carried out. Experimental results corroborate very well with those of molecular simulations.

  5. Adsorption of divalent copper, zinc, cadmium and lead ions from aqueous solution by waste tea and coffee adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Djati Utomo, H; Hunter, K A

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption of the divalent cations of Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb by tea leaves and coffee grounds from aqueous solutions is described. Both adsorbents exhibited strong affinity for these ions which could be described by a simple single-site equilibrium model. For coffee, the order of increasing adsorption equilibrium constant K was Cu < Pb < Zn < Cd, while for tea the opposite order was observed indicating that the adsorption sites on each adsorbent have a different chemical nature. Adsorption decreased at low pH < 4 through competition with H+ for adsorption sites, and for all metals except Cu, at high pH > 10, probably because of anion formation in the case of Zn2+ and also increased leaching of metal-binding soluble materials. The effect of metal ion concentration on the adsorptive equilibria indicated a threshold concentration above which overall adsorption became limited by saturation of the adsorption sites. Competition between two metal ions for the same sites was not observed with Cu(II) and Pb(II), however Zn(II) reacted competitively with Cd(II) binding sites on both tea and coffee. If fresh coffee or tea adsorbents were used, the fraction of metal ion taken up by the adsorbent was diminished by the competitive effects of soluble metal-binding ligands released by the tea or coffee. Experiments with coffee showed that roasting temperature controls the formation of metal ion adsorption sites for this adsorbent. PMID:16457172

  6. Effect of ferrihydrite crystallite size on phosphate adsorption reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Li, Wei; Harrington, Richard; Liu, Fan; Parise, John B; Feng, Xionghan; Sparks, Donald L

    2013-09-17

    The influence of crystallite size on the adsorption reactivity of phosphate on 2-line to 6-line ferrihydrites was investigated by combining adsorption experiments, structure and surface analysis, and spectroscopic analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the ferrihydrite samples possessed a similar fundamental structure with a crystallite size varying from 1.6 to 4.4 nm. N2 adsorption on freeze-dried samples revealed that the specific surface area (SSABET) decreased from 427 to 234 m(2) g(-1) with increasing crystallite size and micropore volume (Vmicro) from 0.137 to 0.079 cm(3) g(-1). Proton adsorption (QH) at pH 4.5 and 0.01 M KCl ranged from 0.73 to 0.55 mmol g(-1). Phosphate adsorption capacity at pH 4.5 and 0.01 M KCl for the ferrihydrites decreased from 1690 to 980 μmol g(-1) as crystallite size increased, while the adsorption density normalized to SSABET was similar. Phosphate adsorption on the ferrihydrites exhibited similar behavior with respect to both kinetics and the adsorption mechanism. The kinetics could be divided into three successive first-order stages: relatively fast adsorption, slow adsorption, and a very slow stage. With decreasing crystallite size, ferrihydrites exhibited increasing rate constants per mass for all stages. Analysis of OH(-) release and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) and differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) results indicated that initially phosphate preferentially bound to two Fe-OH2(1/2+) groups to form a binuclear bidentate surface complex without OH(-) release, with smaller size ferrihydrites exchanging more Fe-OH2(1/2+) per mass. Subsequently, phosphate exchanged with both Fe-OH2(1/2+) and Fe-OH(1/2-) with a constant amount of OH(-) released per phosphate adsorbed. Also in this stage binuclear bidentate surface complexes were formed with a P-Fe atomic pair distance of ~3.25 Å. PMID:23992548

  7. Molecular structure-adsorption study on current textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Örücü, E; Tugcu, G; Saçan, M T

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the adsorption of a diverse set of textile dyes onto granulated activated carbon (GAC). The adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch system. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to experimental data and the isotherm constants were calculated for 33 anthraquinone and azo dyes. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted more adequately to the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model. Added to a qualitative analysis of experimental results, multiple linear regression (MLR), support vector regression (SVR) and back propagation neural network (BPNN) methods were used to develop quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models with the novel adsorption data. The data were divided randomly into training and test sets. The predictive ability of all models was evaluated using the test set. Descriptors were selected with a genetic algorithm (GA) using QSARINS software. Results related to QSPR models on the adsorption capacity of GAC showed that molecular structure of dyes was represented by ionization potential based on two-dimensional topological distances, chromophoric features and a property filter index. Comparison of the performance of the models demonstrated the superiority of the BPNN over GA-MLR and SVR models. PMID:25529487

  8. Characterisation of protein adsorption on different liquid crystal phthalocyaninethin films.

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Paul, D; Basova, T; Ray, A K

    2010-03-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein adsorption on thin spun films of different metal octakishexylthiophthalocyanine [(C(6)S)(8)PcM, M=Cu, Ni] derivatives is investigated by using three independent spectroscopic measurements namely Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry and surface plasmon resonance imaging. Thermally induced molecular self-reorganisations in the phthalocyanine films are found to have produced the changes in the surface energy which, in turn, control protein adsorption. The amount of BSA adsorption on [(C(6)S)(8)PcNi] is more limited than that on [(C(6)S)(8)PcCu] and this observation is consistent with the results on the surface wettability obtained from the contact angle measurements. The shift from the plasmonic resonance wavelength because of the BSA adsorption was significantly larger for the heat-treated [(C(6)S)(8)PcCu] than as-deposited film. Similar measurements on the [(C(6)S)(8)PcNi] films showed a limited BSA adsorption. The results of surface plasmon resonance experiments are consistent with those obtained from Raman spectroscopic and ellipsometric techniques. PMID:20170253

  9. Modeling of chlorophenols competitive adsorption on soils by means of the ideal adsorbed solution theory.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, Renato; Boni, Maria Rosaria; Lavecchia, Roberto

    2005-02-14

    The adsorption of 3-chlorophenol (3-CP) and 3,5-dichlorophenol (3,5-CP) on two Italian soils was studied at 20 degrees C. Experiments on the pure components showed that 3,5-CP was more strongly adsorbed than 3-CP, and that the adsorption capacity could be related to the organic carbon fraction of the soil. Competitive adsorption data were described by the fully predictive ideal adsorbed solution (IAS) theory. To this end, the Langmuir parameters determined from pure component adsorption data were used. Results showed that at low 3,5-CP concentration (up to 5-10 mM) the model describes satisfactorily the binary system behavior, whereas at higher concentrations predictions fail, suggesting that non ideality effects in the adsorbed phase should be accounted for. PMID:15721549

  10. Adsorption of copper at aqueous illite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.; Sun, Z.; Forsling, W.; Tang, H.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, the authors conducted potentiometric titrations, batch adsorption experiments and FT-IR analysis to study the uptake of copper in illite/water suspensions and then applied the constant capacitance surface complexation model to interpret the reaction mechanism at the aqueous illite surfaces. This research shows that the copper adsorption at these surfaces is strongly dependent on pH and that the adsorption causes a deprotonation of surface groups. The authors propose that the uptake of copper in the carbonate-free illite suspensions can be explained by the formation of mononuclear surface complexes, {triple_bond}SOCu{sup +} and {triple_bond}SOCuOH, and a multinuclear surface complex, {triple_bond}SOCu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}{sup +}, followed by the formation of a bulk precipitate, Cu(OH){sub 2}(s), or a surface precipitate, {triple_bond}SOCu{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}(sp). For the illite suspensions containing carbonates, the authors propose that the copper-illite interaction can be depicted by the formation of mononuclear surface complexes, {triple_bond}SOCu{sup +} and {triple_bond}SOCuOH, followed by the formation of a copper hydroxylcarbonate precipitate, Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s), rather than a copper hydroxide precipitate. The existence of Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s) in the carbonate-containing illite suspensions was identified by FT-IR analysis.

  11. Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption by a natural aluminum- and iron-bearing surface coating on an aquifer sand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coston, J.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption was studied in batch experiments with material collected from a shallow, unconfined aquifer of glacial outwash sand and gravel in Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA. The aquifer solids contain primarily quartz with minor amounts of alkali feldspars and ferromagnetic minerals. Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption experiments with various grain size and mineral fractions of the aquifer solids showed that: 1) Zn2+ adsorption was independent of grain size, but Pb2+ was preferentially adsorbed by the <64 ??m size fraction and 2) Pb2+ adsorption decreased after removal of the paramagnetic, Fe-bearing mineral fraction, but Zn2+ adsorption was unaffected. Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption on mineral separates from the aquifer material compared with metal adsorption on a purified quartz powder indicated that adsorption of both metal ions was dominated by coatings on the quartz fraction of the sediment. Characterization of the coatings by AES, SEM-EDS, and TOF-SIMS demonstrated that the natural quartz grains were extensively coated with Al- and Fe-bearing minerals of variable composition. -from Authors

  12. Field experiments of Controlled Drainage of agricultural clay soils show positive effects on water quantity (retention, runoff) and water quality (nitrate leaching).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    schipper, peter; stuyt, lodewijk; straat, van der, andre; schans, van der, martin

    2014-05-01

    processes in the soil have been modelled with simulation model SWAP. The experiment started in 2010 and is ongoing. Data, collected so far show that the plots with controlled drainage (all compared with plots equipped with conventional drainage) conserve more rain water (higher groundwater tables in early spring), lower discharges under average weather conditions and storm events, reduce N-loads and saline seepage to surface waters, enhance denitrification, show a different 'first flush' effect and show similar crop yields. The results of the experiments will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of controlled drainage on complex hydrological en geochemical processes in agricultural clay soils, the interaction between ground- en surface water and its effects on drain water quantity, quality and crop yield.

  13. Fixed-bed adsorption of toluene on high silica zeolites: experiments and mathematical modelling using LDF approximation and a multisite model.

    PubMed

    Brodu, Nicolas; Sochard, Sabine; Andriantsiferana, Caroline; Pic, Jean-Stéphane; Manero, Marie-Hélène

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of toluene (TOL) as a target volatile organic compound has been studied experimentally and modelled on various hydrophobic zeolites: Faujasite (FAU), ZSM-5 (Z) and Mordenite (MOR). The influence of the nature of the compensating cation (H+ or Na+) has also been investigated for ZSM-5 zeolite, which is known to possess three kinds of adsorption sites (sinusoidal channels, straight channels and intersections). Type I isotherms observed on FAU, Na-Z and MOR fitted well with the Langmuir model. A deviation from a type I isotherm was observed for H-Z, because of the structure of this zeolite. The Successive Langmuir Model was more successful to fit the 'bump' of the experimental curve than the Double Langmuir. Classical shapes were found for MOR, FAU and Na-Z breakthrough curves that were fitted with good accuracy using the Linear Driving Force (LDF) approximation. In the case of H-Z, a change of profile was observed during the dynamic adsorption and the differences seen between the Na-Z and H-Z behaviours were explained by the strong interactions between Na+ and adsorbed TOL at the intersection sites. The Na+ cations prevented reorientation of TOL molecules at the intersection and thereby avoided the filling of the sinusoidal channel segments. Thus, a specific model was developed for fitting the breakthrough curve of H-Z. The model developed took into account these two types of adsorption sites with the overall uptake for each site being given by an LDF approximation. PMID:25624172

  14. Investigation of the adsorption of water vapor and carbon dioxide by KA zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Khanitonov, V.P.; Shtein, A.S.

    1984-05-01

    According to the present data, KA zeolite, which can adsorb only water vapor, helium, and hydrogen, has the greatest selectivity in drying. The feasibility of using this zeolite in devices for selective drying of gases used in gas-analysis systems was studied. The results of the experiments were approximated by the thermal equation of the theory of bulk filling of micropores. The limiting value of the adsorption depends on the temperature, and it can be calculated according to the density of the adsorbed phase and the adsorption volume. The critical diameters of the water and carbon dioxide molecules are close to the dimensions of the KA-zeolite pores, something that determines the activated nature of the adsorption of these substances. Experiments on coadsorption of water vapor and carbon dioxide by a fixed bed of KA-zeolite under dynamic conditions showed that the adsorption of these substances has a frontal nature. The time of the protective action of the layer of zeolite during adsorption af water vapor exceeded by more than an order the time of the protective action during adsorption of carbon dioxide. The results showed that this adsorbent can be used for selective drying of gas mixtures containing carbon dioxide in batch-operation devices. Beforehand, the adsorbent should be regenerated with respect to moisture, and then it should be saturated with carbon dioxide by blowing the adsorbent with a gas mixture of the working composition until the equilibrium state is reached.

  15. Adsorptive removal of nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) antiscalant from membrane concentrates by iron-coated waste filtration sand.

    PubMed

    Boels, L; Tervahauta, T; Witkamp, G J

    2010-10-15

    Iron-coated waste filtration sand was investigated as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) from membrane concentrates. The adsorption of this phosphonate-based antiscalant on this material was measured and compared with two commercially available anion exchange resins and activated carbon. Comprehensive adsorption experiments were conducted in several synthetic concentrate solutions and in a concentrate collected from a full scale nano-filtration brackish water desalination plant. The effect of pH, ionic strength and the presence of competitive anions on the equilibrium adsorption were investigated. The results showed that, in contrast to the anion exchange resins, the adsorption on coated filtration sand is not suppressed at increasing ionic strength and is much less affected by the competitive anions carbonate and sulphate. The adsorption decreased slightly when the pH was raised from 7.0 to 8.0. The adsorption isotherms in the real nano-filtration concentrate, measured in the concentration interval of 5-50 mg dm(-1) NTMP, showed that the maximum adsorption capacity of coated filtration sand was 4.06 mg g(-1). The adsorption capacity per unit mass of the adsorbents at low NTMP concentration (12.5 mg dm(-3)) followed the decreasing order Amberlite IRA-410>coated filtration sand>Amberlite IRA-900>Norit SAE Super. This demonstrates that the use of iron-coated waste filtration sand offers a promising means for the removal of NTMP from membrane concentrates. PMID:20667427

  16. Competitive adsorption of arsenate and phosphate onto calcite; experimental results and modeling with CCM and CD-MUSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Larsen, Flemming

    2012-09-01

    The competitive adsorption of arsenate and phosphate onto calcite was studied in batch experiments using calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions had circum-neutral pH (7-8.3) and covered a wide span in the activity of Ca2+ and CO32-. The results show that the adsorption of arsenate onto calcite is strongly reduced by the presence of phosphate, whereas phosphate adsorption is only slightly reduced by arsenate addition. Simultaneous and sequential addition (3 h apart) yields the same reduction in adsorption, underlining the high reversibility of the system. The reduction in adsorption of both arsenate and phosphate is most likely due to competition for the same sorption sites at the calcite surface, considering the similarity in sorption edges, pKa's and geometry of the two anions. The strong reduction in arsenate adsorption by competition with phosphate suggests that adsorption of arsenate onto calcite is of minor importance in most groundwater aquifers, as phosphate is often present at concentration levels sufficient to significantly reduce arsenate adsorption. The CD-MUSIC model for calcite was used successfully to model adsorption of arsenate and phosphate separately. By combining the models for single sorbate systems the competitive adsorption of phosphate and arsenate onto calcite in the binary system could be predicted. This is in contrast to the constant capacitance model (CCM) which under-predicted the competition when combining the models for single sorbate systems. This study clearly shows the importance of performing competitive adsorption studies for validation of multi-component models and for estimating the mobility of an ion in the environment.

  17. Liquid-Phase Adsorption of Phenol onto Activated Carbons Prepared with Different Activation Levels.

    PubMed

    Hsieh; Teng

    2000-10-01

    The influence of the pore size distribution of activated carbon on the adsorption of phenol from aqueous solutions was explored. Activated carbons with different porous structures were prepared by gasifying a bituminous coal char to different extents of burn-off. The results of adsorption experiments show that the phenol capacity of these carbons does not proportionally increase with their BET surface area. This reflects the heterogeneity of the carbon surface for adsorption. The pore size distributions of these carbons, determined according to the Dubinin-Stoeckli equation, were found to vary with the burn-off level. By incorporating the distribution with the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation using an inverse proportionality between the micropore size and the adsorption energy, the isotherms for the adsorption of phenol onto these carbons can be well predicted. The present study has demonstrated that the heterogeneity of carbon surface for the phenol adsorption can be attributed to the different energies required for adsorption in different-size micropores. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10998301

  18. Adsorption of benzoic acid on [alpha]-alumina and [gamma]-boehmite

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, L. . Dept. of Geology and Geotechnical Engineering); Blokhus, A.M. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-08-01

    The adsorption of benzoic acid (BzCOOH) on [alpha]-alumina ([alpha]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) and [gamma]-boehmite ([gamma]-AlOOH) from the aqueous phase has been studied. The adsorption experiments were carried out in 0 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, with pH adjusted to 4 or 6. For both [alpha]-alumina and [gamma]-boehmite, increasing ionic strength decreases the maximum adsorption. Increasing the pH to 6 at the same ionic strength also reduces the maximum adsorption markedly. This suggests that both the anion and the corresponding acid participate in the adsorption process. The results show that benzoic acid has a greater affinity for [alpha]-alumina than for [gamma]-boehmite. Under the same experimental conditions (0.1 M NaCl, pH 4) the maximum adsorption capacities are 5.0 and 1.5 [mu]mol/m[sup 2] for [alpha]-alumina and [gamma]-boehmite, respectively. This difference in adsorption capacities is probably due to the mineralogical difference. These results illustrate the importance of knowing the mineralogical composition of the solid phase.

  19. Adsorption and recognition characteristics of surface molecularly imprinted polymethacrylic acid/silica toward genistein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Gao, Baojiao; An, Fuqiang; Xu, Zeqing; Zhang, Tingting

    2014-09-12

    In this paper, on the basis of surface-initiated graft polymerization, a new surface molecular imprinting technique is established by molecular design. And molecularly imprinted polymer MIP-PMAA/SiO2 is successfully prepared with genistein as template. The adsorption and recognition characteristics of MIP-PMAA/SiO2 for genistein are studied in depth by using static method, dynamic method and competitive adsorption experiment. The experimental results show that MIP-PMAA/SiO2 possesses very strong adsorption affinity and specific recognition for genistein. The saturated adsorption capacity could reach to 0.36mmolg(-1). The selectivity coefficients relative to quercetin and rutin are 5.4 and 11.8, respectively. Besides, MIP-PMAA/SiO2 is regenerated easily and exhibits excellent reusability. PMID:25085816

  20. Novel hollow α-Fe2O3 nanofibers via electrospinning for dye adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qiang; Luo, Jun; Wang, Xingyue; Gao, Chunxia; Ge, Mingqiao

    2015-04-01

    Nanomaterials such as iron oxides and ferrites have been intensively investigated for water treatment and environmental remediation applications. In this work, hollow α-Fe2O3 nanofibers made of rice-like nanorods were successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal reaction on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofiber template followed by calcination. The crystallographic structure and the morphology of the as-prepared α-Fe2O3 nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, and scanning electron microscope. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted, and ultraviolet-visible spectra were recorded before and after the adsorption to investigate the dye adsorption performance. The results showed that hollow α-Fe2O3 fiber assembles exhibited good magnetic responsive performance, as well as efficient adsorption for methyl orange in water. This work provided a versatile strategy for further design and development of functional nanofiber-nanoparticle composites towards various applications.

  1. Novel hollow α-Fe2O3 nanofibers via electrospinning for dye adsorption.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Luo, Jun; Wang, Xingyue; Gao, Chunxia; Ge, Mingqiao

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials such as iron oxides and ferrites have been intensively investigated for water treatment and environmental remediation applications. In this work, hollow α-Fe2O3 nanofibers made of rice-like nanorods were successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal reaction on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofiber template followed by calcination. The crystallographic structure and the morphology of the as-prepared α-Fe2O3 nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, and scanning electron microscope. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted, and ultraviolet-visible spectra were recorded before and after the adsorption to investigate the dye adsorption performance. The results showed that hollow α-Fe2O3 fiber assembles exhibited good magnetic responsive performance, as well as efficient adsorption for methyl orange in water. This work provided a versatile strategy for further design and development of functional nanofiber-nanoparticle composites towards various applications. PMID:25918495

  2. Adsorption of heterobifunctional 4-nitrophenol on the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shong, Bonggeun; Hellstern, Thomas R.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2016-08-01

    We report the adsorption chemistry of a heterobifunctional molecule, 4-nitrophenol, on the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface. X-ray photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy experiments and density functional theory calculations were used to determine the adsorption products. The results show that 4-nitrophenol reacts with the Ge surface through either one or both of the sbnd OH or sbnd NO2 functionalities. It was found that the fraction of dually and singly tethered adsorbates varies according to reaction conditions: namely, singly tethered adsorbates are favored at higher adsorbate coverages and lower adsorption temperatures. These variations are explained by a two-step adsorption mechanism for 4-nitrophenol, in which geometrical limitations of the adsorbates on the surface affect the product distribution.

  3. Parameterization and evaluation of sulfate adsorption in a dynamic soil chemistry model.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Liisa; Alveteg, Mattias; Warfvinge, Per

    2003-01-01

    Sulfate adsorption was implemented in the dynamic, multi-layer soil chemistry model SAFE. The process is modeled by an isotherm in which sulfate adsorption is considered to be fully reversible and dependent on sulfate concentration as well as pH in soil solution. The isotherm was parameterized by a site-specific series of simple batch experiments at different pH (3.8-5.0) and sulfate concentration (10-260 micromol 1(-1)) levels. Application of the model to the Lake Gardsj6n roof covered site shows that including sulfate adsorption improves the dynamic behavior of the model and sulfate adsorption and desorption delay acidification and recovery of the soil. The modeled adsorbed pool of sulfate at the site reached a maximum level of 700 mmol/m(2) in the late 1980s, well in line with experimental data. PMID:12683988

  4. Rethinking Critical Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Peach, Sarah; Polak, Robert D.

    1996-03-01

    Recent reflectivity experiments on near-critical mixtures of carbon disulfide and nitromethane contained in glass cells footnote Niraj S. Desai, Sarah Peach, and Carl Franck, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4129 (1995) have shown that preferential adsorption of one liquid component onto the wall can be controlled by chemical modification of the glass. The glass was treated with varying amounts of hexamethyldisilazane to decrease surface polarity and therefore enhance the adsorption of carbon disulfide in a surprisingly continuous way. The effect of the glass wall on the local liquid composition can be described by two different scaling hypotheses: using a short range field on the liquid closest to the wall, or pinning the amplitude of the order parameter at the surface. We have found that only the second approach is consistent with the experimental data, although this is difficult to reconcile with observed wetting critical phenomena. We also have reexamined the issue of substrate inhomogeneity and conclude that the substrates were indeed homogeneous on relevant length scales. Supported by the NSF under DMR-9320910 and the central facilities of the Materials Science Center at Cornell University.

  5. Separation of toxic rhodamine B from aqueous solution using an efficient low-cost material, Azolla pinnata, by adsorption method.

    PubMed

    Kooh, Muhammad Raziq Rahimi; Lim, Linda B L; Lim, Lee Hoon; Dahri, Muhammad Khairud

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the potential of untreated Azolla pinnata (AP) to remove toxic rhodamine B (RB) dye. The effects of adsorbent dosage, pH, ionic strength, contact time, and concentration were studied. Experiments involving the effects of pH and ionic strength indicated that hydrophobic-hydrophobic interactions might be the dominant force of attraction for the RB-AP adsorption system. The kinetics modelling of the kinetics experiment showed that pseudo-second-order best represented the adsorption process. The Weber-Morris intraparticle diffusion model showed that intraparticle diffusion is not the rate-limiting step, while the Boyd model suggested that film diffusion might be rate-limiting. The adsorption isotherm model, Langmuir, best represented the adsorption process, and the maximum adsorption capacity was predicted to be 72.2 and 199.7 mg g(-1) at 25 and 65 °C, respectively. Thermodynamics study indicates spontaneity, endothermic and physisorption-dominant adsorption process. The adsorbents were regenerated to satisfactory level with distilled water, HNO3 and NaOH. Pre-treatment of adsorbent with oxalic acid, citric acid, NaOH, HCl and phosphoric acid was investigated but the adsorption capacity was less than the untreated AP. PMID:26797814

  6. Study by Raman spectroscopy of the adsorption of Ru-bi and ter pyridinium complexes on nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} during photoelectrochemical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hugot-Le Goff, A.; Joiret, S.; Falaras, P.; Graetzel, M.; Pechy, P.; Vlakopoulos, N.; Zakeeruddin, M.

    1995-12-31

    The adsorption on a titanium dioxide substrate of organic monolayers used in the nanocrystalline dye sensitized solar cells was investigated by Raman Spectroscopy, owing to the high resonance effect in these molecules. During the polarization of TiO{sub 2} modified by Ru-bi or ter pyridinium compounds in a photoelectrochemical cell, an enhancement effect appeared, allowing to scrutinize the part of the complex which is in contact with the substrate. This effect remains in a large extend unexplained; it could be assimilated to SERRS (Surface Enhanced Raman Resonant). Noticeable differences appeared in function of the nature of the pyridil ligands. In the case of bipy, in addition to the ``normal`` (ground state) Raman bands, a new series of bands appeared which correspond to the particular ligand exchanging electrons with the substrate titanium atoms. The Raman intensity of these new peaks is directly related to the electric field (i.e., to the potential magnitude independently of its cathodic or anodic nature). In the case of terpy, the enhancement mechanism seems different. The similarity of the molecular configuration created by the adsorption with the radical anion formed by the excitation of the metal ligand charge transfer complex has to be emphasized. Very interesting prospects for the understanding of the adsorption mechanisms are therefore opened.

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of sulforaphane adsorption on macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Wu; Lei, Zhang; Jianwei, Mao; Shiwang, Liu; Jun, Huang; Yuru, You; Lehe, Mei

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of sulforaphane (SF) adsorption onto macroporous resin in aqueous phase were studied. The SP850 resin was screened as the appropriate resin for SF purification. From the equilibrium studies, the Redlich-Peterson model was found to be the best for description of the adsorption behavior of SF onto SP850 resin, followed by the Freundlich model and the Langmuir model. Batch equilibrium experiments demonstrated that, in the examined temperature range, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of SP850 resin decreased with increasing adsorption temperature. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of SF was a physical, exothermic, and spontaneous process. The adsorption kinetics revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was suitable to characterize the kinetics of adsorption of SF onto SP850. Finally, the intra-particle diffusion model demonstrated that SF diffused quickly into macropores, and that diffusion slowed down in the meso- and micropores. PMID:27391585

  8. DNA adsorption onto glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Krista Lynn

    Streaming potential measurements were performed on microspheres of silica, lime silicate (SLS) and calcium aluminate (CA) glasses containing silica and iron oxide (CASi and CAFe). The silicate based glasses exhibited acidic surfaces with isoelectric points (IEP) around a pH of 3 while the calcium aluminates displayed more basic surfaces with IEP ranging from 8--9.5. The surface of the calcium aluminate microspheres containing silica reacted with the background electrolyte, altering the measured zeta potential values and inhibiting electrolyte flow past the sample at ˜ pH 4 due to formation of a solid plug. DNA adsorption experiments were performed using the microspheres and a commercially available silicate based DNA isolation filter using a known quantity of DNA suspended in a chaotropic agent free 0.35 wt% Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) buffer solution. The microspheres and commercial filter were also used to isolate DNA from macrophage cells in the presence of chaotropic agents. UV absorbance at ˜260 nm and gel electrophoresis were used to quantify the amount and size of the DNA strands that adsorbed to the microsphere surfaces. In both experiments, the 43--106 microm CAFe microspheres adsorbed the largest quantity of DNA. However, the 43--106 microm SLS microspheres isolated more DNA from the cells than the <43 microm CAFe microspheres, indicating that microsphere size contributes to isolation ability. The UV absorbance of DNA at ˜260 nm was slightly altered due to the dissolution of the calcium aluminate glasses during the adsorption process. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) determined that calcium and aluminum ions leached from the CA and CAFe microsphere surfaces during these experiments. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the leached ions had no effect on the conformation of the DNA, and therefore would not be expected to interfere in downstream applications such as DNA replication. The 0.35 wt

  9. Operating Room Environment Control. Part A: a Valve Cannister System for Anesthetic Gas Adsorption. Part B: a State-of-the-art Survey of Laminar Flow Operating Rooms. Part C: Three Laminar Flow Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. S.; Kosovich, J.

    1973-01-01

    An anesthetic gas flow pop-off valve canister is described that is airtight and permits the patient to breath freely. Once its release mechanism is activated, the exhaust gases are collected at a hose adapter and passed through activated coal for adsorption. A survey of laminar air flow clean rooms is presented and the installation of laminar cross flow air systems in operating rooms is recommended. Laminar flow ventilation experiments determine drying period evaporation rates for chicken intestines, sponges, and sections of pig stomach.

  10. Adsorption of asphaltenes from heavy oil onto in situ prepared NiO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abu Tarboush, Belal J; Husein, Maen M

    2012-07-15

    Removal of asphaltenes from heavy oil improves the quality of oil and makes it easier to process. To this end, Nassar et al. [1] recently showed that NiO nanoparticles have high affinity toward asphaltene adsorption. This investigation, however, involved toluene model solutions and commercially available nanoparticles. In the current work, we show that NiO nanoparticles prepared in situ within heavy oil display much higher affinity toward asphaltenes adsorption, and uptake in the order of 2.8 g asphaltene/g nanoparticles is reported. This uptake way exceeds asphaltene adsorption onto conventional porous adsorbents and commercial nanoparticles from toluene model solutions. Nanoparticle preparation followed a method developed by our group [2], and XRD, EDX, and TEM analyses confirmed the formation of NiO nanoparticles of 12±5 nm mean diameter. Kinetic experiments showed that, while equilibrium could be achieved in less than 2 h for both in situ prepared and commercial NiO particles, much higher adsorption took place onto the in situ prepared ones, owing to their better dispersion. Contrary to literature findings on adsorption from model solutions onto nanoparticles, surface coverage calculations revealed multilayer adsorption. PMID:22560489

  11. Adsorption characteristics of hexavalent chromium on HCB/TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yonggang

    2014-10-01

    Sol-gel method was adopted to prepare HCB/TiO2 and its adsorption ability of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), and removal from aqueous solution were investigated. The samples were characterized by Power X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) which showed that the TiO2 was deposited on the surface of HCB. FTIR was used to identify the changes of the surface functional groups before and after adsorption. Potentiometric titration method was used to characterize the zero charge (pHpzc) characteristics of the surface of HCB/TiO2 which showed more acidic functional groups containing. Batch experiments showed that initial pH, absorbent dosage, contact time and initial concentration of Cr(VI) were important parameters for the Cr(VI) adsorption studies. The Freundlich isotherm model better reflected the experimental data better. Cr(VI) adsorption process followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model, which illustrated chemical adsorption. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy (ΔG), changes in enthalpy change (ΔH) and changes in entropy change (ΔS) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy occurred at temperature range of 25-45 °C, so Cr(VI) adsorption by HCB/TiO2 is spontaneous. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity could maintain 80% after five cycles. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was at 27.33 mg g-1 in an acidic medium, of which the value is worth comparable with other low-cost adsorbents.

  12. Removal of bisphenol A by adsorption mechanism using PES-SiO2 composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Muhamad, Mimi Suliza; Salim, Mohd Razman; Lau, Woei Jye; Hadibarata, Tony; Yusop, Zulkifli

    2016-08-01

    Polyethersulphone (PES) membranes blended with silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles were prepared via a dry-jet wet spinning technique for the removal of bisphenol A (BPA) by adsorption mechanism. The morphology of SiO2 nanoparticles was analysed using a transmission electron microscopy and particle size distribution was also analysed. The prepared membranes were characterized by several techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and water contact angle. The adsorption mechanism of membrane towards BPA was evaluated by batch experiments and kinetic model. The influence of natural organic matter (NOM) in feed water on membrane BPA removal was also studied by filtration experiments. Results showed that BPA adsorption capacity as high as 53 µg/g could be achieved by the PES membrane incorporated with 2 wt% SiO2 in which the adsorption mechanism was in accordance with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The intraparticles diffusion model suggested that the rate limiting factor of membrane adsorption mechanism is governed by the diffusion of BPA into the membrane pores. The presence of 10 ppm NOM has reported to negatively reduce BPA removal by 24%, as it tended to compete with BPA for membrane adsorption. This work has demonstrated that PES-SiO2 membrane has the potential to eliminate trace amount of BPA from water source containing NOM. PMID:26729509

  13. Competitive adsorption of ibuprofen and amoxicillin mixtures from aqueous solution on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Hayet; Carmona, Rocio J; Gomis-Berenguer, Alicia; Souissi-Najar, Souad; Ouederni, Abdelmottaleb; Ania, Conchi O

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the competitive adsorption under dynamic and equilibrium conditions of ibuprofen (IBU) and amoxicillin (AMX), two widely consumed pharmaceuticals, on nanoporous carbons of different characteristics. Batch adsorption experiments of pure components in water and their binary mixtures were carried out to measure both adsorption equilibrium and kinetics, and dynamic tests were performed to validate the simultaneous removal of the mixtures in breakthrough experiments. The equilibrium adsorption capacities evaluated from pure component solutions were higher than those measured in dynamic conditions, and were found to depend on the porous features of the adsorbent and the nature of the specific/dispersive interactions that are controlled by the solution pH, density of surface change on the carbon and ionization of the pollutant. A marked roll-up effect was observed for AMX retention on the hydrophobic carbons, not seen for the functionalized adsorbent likely due to the lower affinity of amoxicillin towards the carbon adsorbent. Dynamic adsorption of binary mixtures from wastewater of high salinity and alkalinity showed a slight increase in IBU uptake and a reduced adsorption of AMX, demonstrating the feasibility of the simultaneous removal of both compounds from complex water matrices. PMID:25554087

  14. Albumin (BSA) Adsorption over Graphene in Aqueous Environment: Influence of Orientation, Adsorption Protocol, and Solvent Treatment.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vellosillo, Perceval; Serena, P A; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-02-23

    We report 150 ns explicit solvent MD simulations of the adsorption on graphene of albumin (BSA) in two orientations and using two different adsorption protocols, i.e., free and forced adsorption. Our results show that free adsorption occurs with little structural rearrangements. Even taking adsorption to an extreme, by forcing it with a 5 nN downward force applied during the initial 20 ns, we show that along a particular orientation BSA is able to preserve the structural properties of the majority of its binding sites. Furthermore, in all the cases considered in this work, the ibuprofen binding site has shown a strong resilience to structural changes. Finally, we compare these results with implicit solvent simulations and find that the latter predicts an extreme protein unfolding upon adsorption. The origin of this discrepancy is attributed to a poor description of the water entropic forces at interfaces in the implicit solvent methods. PMID:26799950

  15. Influence of fulvic acid on bacteriophage adsorption and complexation in soil.

    PubMed Central

    Bixby, R L; O'Brien, D J

    1979-01-01

    The effect of fulvic acid, the major fraction of natural soluble organic matter, on the adsorption of MS2 bacteriophage to soil was investigated in controlled laboratory experiments. Batch experiments together with scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray analysis showed that fulvic acid complexed phage, which prevented its adsorption to soil. Phage strongly adsorbed to soil in the absence of fulvic acid. Phage which was complexed with fulvic acid was not irreversibly inactivated and could become viable under proper conditions, illustrating the importance of assay and elution procedures in the recovery of virus from aqueous solutions. PMID:396884

  16. Studies of gas adsorption in flexible Metal-Organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Sarmishtha

    Flexible Metal-Organic frameworks that exhibit a gate-opening (GO) adsorption mechanism have potential for gas separations and gas storage. The GO phenomenon occurs when molecular gates in the structure expand/contract in response to the activation/de-activation of a system variable e.g. temperature, pressure or gas. Sharp discontinuities in the isotherm leading to S-shapes and large adsorption-desorption hysteresis are typical of this phenomenon. This study investigates the kinetics and thermodynamics of the GO behavior by combining adsorption measurements and analytical modeling of adsorption kinetics and capacity as a function of adsorbate, GO pressure, and temperature. Basic understanding of GO mechanism will help harness GO-MOF's as adsorbents for gas separations and storage. Experiments were performed on two precharacterized MOFs with verified GO behavior. These are (1) Zn2(bpdc)2(bpee), which expands from a relative amorphous to crystalline structure and (2) Cu[(dhbc) 2(4,4f-bpy)]H2O, a mutually interdigitated 2-D structure (bpdc = biphenyldicarboxylate, bpee = 1,2]bipyridylethene; DMF = N,N-dimethyl formamide, dhbc= 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, bpy=bipyridine). Both sub- and super-critical adsorption data were collected using three adsorption units: a standard low-pressure volumetric adsorption unit, a commercial high-pressure gravimetric analyzer and a custom-built high-pressure differential volumetric unit. Collected laboratory data were combined with published adsorption rate and isotherm data for analysis to broaden the range of data collection. The accuracy of the high-pressure differential unit was improved by over 300-fold by changing analytical methods of processing data to establish a reliable null correction. A pronounced effect of the allowed experimental time was found at cryogenic temperatures on (1). Tightening the stability criteria used by the adsorption equipment to determine equilibration increased the experimental time from the order of

  17. Removal of humic acid from aqueous solution by magnetically separable polyaniline: adsorption behavior and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiahong; Bi, Lijuan; Ji, Yanfen; Ma, Hongrui; Yin, Xiaolong

    2014-09-15

    Magnetically separable polyaniline (Fe3O4@SiO2-PANI) was prepared by in situ chemical polymerization of aniline on the surface of silica-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles, and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Characterization results showed that Fe3O4@SiO2-PANI with amino groups of 1.78 mmol/g and the average diameter of 21.6 nm are superparamagnetic. Adsorption behavior of Fe3O4@SiO2-PANI nanoparticles for humic acid (HA) was investigated by batch experiments and adsorption kinetic tests. HA adsorption amount on the adsorbent decreased with increasing solution pH and the presence of Ca(2+) resulted in the enhanced HA adsorption. HA adsorption on Fe3O4@SiO2-PANI could be well described by Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption amount of the adsorbent for HA at 25°C was 36.36 mg/g. HA adsorption process on the adsorbent obey pseudo-second-order kinetics and the adsorption rates decrease with increasing initial HA concentration. The XPS analysis verified that HA adsorption over the adsorbent could be attributed to the surface complexation between the disassociated HA molecules and the protonated nitrogen of polyaniline on the adsorbent. HA loaded adsorbent could be magnetically separated and easily desorbed in 0.01 mol/L NaOH solution. Regeneration tests indicated that Fe3O4@SiO2-PANI could be used repeatedly. PMID:24998066

  18. Adsorption of aniline and toluidines on montmorillonite: Implications for the disposal of shale oil production wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Essington, M.E.; Bowen, J.M.; Wills, R.A.; Hart, B.K.

    1992-01-01

    Bentonite clay liners are commonly employed to mitigate the movement of contaminants from waste disposal sites. Solid and liquid waste materials that arise from the production of shale oil contain a vast array of organic compounds. Common among these compounds are the aromatic amines. in order to assess the ability of clay liner material to restrict organic compound mobility, the adsorption of aniline and o-, m-, and p-toluidine on Ca{sup 2+} - and K{sup +}-saturated Wyoming bentonite was investigated. Adsorption experiments were performed under conditions of varied pH, ionic strength, and dominate electrolyte cation and anion. organic adsorption on Ca{sup 2+} - and K{sup +}-saturated montmorillonite is pH dependent. For any given organic compound, maximum adsorption increases with decreasing ionic strength. organic compound adsorption is inhibited in the presence of sulfate and is greater in the Ca{sup 2+} systems than in the K{sup +} systems at any given ionic strength. High salt content and K{sup +} collapse the bentonite layers and limit access to and compete for adsorption sites. The K{sup +} ion is also more difficult to displace than Ca{sup 2+} from interlayer positions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic data show that the aniline compounds are adsorbed on bentonite through the hydrogen bonding of an amine hydrogen to a surface silica oxygen. Sulfate reduces amine adsorption by removing positively charged anilinium species from solution to form negatively charge sulfate complexes. Although adsorption of the substituted amines on bentonite is observed, aniline and toluidine adsorption is minimal in saline systems and not detected in alkaline systems. Thus, in shale oil process waste disposal sites, the mobility of the anilines through bentonite liners will not be mitigated by sorption processes, as spent oil shale leachates are both highly alkaline and saline.

  19. Adsorption of aniline and toluidines on montmorillonite: Implications for the disposal of shale oil production wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Essington, M.E.; Bowen, J.M.; Wills, R.A.; Hart, B.K.

    1992-01-01

    Bentonite clay liners are commonly employed to mitigate the movement of contaminants from waste disposal sites. Solid and liquid waste materials that arise from the production of shale oil contain a vast array of organic compounds. Common among these compounds are the aromatic amines. in order to assess the ability of clay liner material to restrict organic compound mobility, the adsorption of aniline and o-, m-, and p-toluidine on Ca[sup 2+] - and K[sup +]-saturated Wyoming bentonite was investigated. Adsorption experiments were performed under conditions of varied pH, ionic strength, and dominate electrolyte cation and anion. organic adsorption on Ca[sup 2+] - and K[sup +]-saturated montmorillonite is pH dependent. For any given organic compound, maximum adsorption increases with decreasing ionic strength. organic compound adsorption is inhibited in the presence of sulfate and is greater in the Ca[sup 2+] systems than in the K[sup +] systems at any given ionic strength. High salt content and K[sup +] collapse the bentonite layers and limit access to and compete for adsorption sites. The K[sup +] ion is also more difficult to displace than Ca[sup 2+] from interlayer positions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic data show that the aniline compounds are adsorbed on bentonite through the hydrogen bonding of an amine hydrogen to a surface silica oxygen. Sulfate reduces amine adsorption by removing positively charged anilinium species from solution to form negatively charge sulfate complexes. Although adsorption of the substituted amines on bentonite is observed, aniline and toluidine adsorption is minimal in saline systems and not detected in alkaline systems. Thus, in shale oil process waste disposal sites, the mobility of the anilines through bentonite liners will not be mitigated by sorption processes, as spent oil shale leachates are both highly alkaline and saline.

  20. [Adsorption of Cu on Core-shell Structured Magnetic Particles: Relationship Between Adsorption Performance and Surface Properties].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-mei; Chen, Jing; Li, Hai-ning; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Gao-sheng

    2015-12-01

    In order to reveal the relationship between the adsorption performance of adsorbents and their compositions, structure, and surface properties, the core-shell structured Fe₃O₄/MnO2 and Fe-Mn/Mn₂2 magnetic particles were systematically characterized using multiple techniques and their Cu adsorption behaviors as well as mechanism were also investigated in details. It was found that both Fe₃O4 and Fe-Mn had spinel structure and no obvious crystalline phase change was observed after coating with MnO₂. The introduction of Mn might improve the affinity between the core and the shell, and therefore enhanced the amount and distribution uniformity of the MnO₂ coated. Consequently, Fe-Mn/MnO₂ exhibited a higher BET specific surface area and a lower isoelectric point. The results of sorption experiments showed that Fe-Mn had a higher maximal Cu adsorption capacity of 33.7 mg · g⁻¹ at pH 5.5, compared with 17.5 mg · g⁻¹ of Fe₃O4. After coating, the maximal adsorption capacity of Fe-Mn/MnO₂ was increased to 58.2 mg · g⁻¹, which was 2.6 times as high as that of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ and outperformed the majority of magnetic adsorbents reported in literature. In addition, a specific adsorption of Cu occurred at the surface of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ or Fe-Mn/MnO₂ through the formation of inner-sphere complexes. In conclusion, the adsorption performance of the magnetic particles was positively related to their compositions, structure, and surface properties. PMID:27011990

  1. Double-walled carbon nanotube array for CO2 and SO2 adsorption.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mahshid; Babu, Deepu J; Singh, Jayant K; Yang, Yong-Biao; Schneider, Jörg J; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2015-09-28

    Grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations and adsorption experiments are combined to find the optimized carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays for gas adsorption at low pressures and 303 K. Bundles of 3D aligned double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) with inner diameter of 8 nm and different intertube distances were made experimentally. The experimental results show that decreasing intertube distance leads to a significant enhancement in carbon-dioxide (CO2) adsorption capacity at 1 bar. The molecular simulation study on CO2 adsorption onto bundles of 3D aligned DWCNT with inner diameters of 1, 3, and 8 nm and intertube distance of 0-15 nm shows that the intertube distance plays a more important role than the CNT diameter. The simulation results show that decreasing the intertube distance up to 1 nm increases the excess adsorption generally in all the studied systems at pressures 0 < p < 14 bars (the increase can be up to ∼40% depending on the system and pressure). This is in agreement with the experimental result. Further reduction in intertube distance leads to a decrease in the excess adsorption in the pressure range 9 < p < 14 bars. However, at lower pressure, 0 < p < 9 bars, intertube distance of 0.5 nm is found to have the highest excess adsorption. This result is indifferent to tube diameter. Furthermore, molecular simulations are conducted to obtain the optimal parameters, for the DWCNT bundle, for SO2 adsorption, which are similar to those observed for CO2 in the pressure range 0 < p < 3 bars. PMID:26429026

  2. Interplay of vapor adsorption and liquid imbibition in nanoporous Vycor glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiepsch, Sebastian; Pelster, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the kinetics of spontaneous capillary rise and of the concurrent vapor adsorption in nanoporous, monolithic samples of Vycor glass with a mean pore diameter of 7.5 nm. As liquids, we have chosen n -alcohols (n =4 -10 ) whose vapor pressures at room temperature range from p0=965 Pa down to p0=0.743 Pa. Dielectric measurements allow us to achieve spatial selectivity to predefined parts of the porous Vycor glass. In this way, we are able to measure the overall uptake of molecules as well as vapor adsorption from the surroundings in unfilled parts of the pore network, i.e., above the liquid menisci of the rising imbibition front. We show that the latter process is unaltered compared to free adsorption in samples suspended above a liquid reservoir. Only at low vapor pressures, i.e., for long alcohols, vapor adsorption can be neglected and the capillary rise follows the theoretical predictions of the Lucas-Washburn √{t } law. The more volatile the alcohol, the more important the additional adsorption of molecules becomes. We show that the overall filling process in the pore network is well described by a superposition of the Lucas-Washburn law and the measured vapor adsorption. In addition, the experiments give insight into the vapor diffusion dynamics in the porous matrix.

  3. Arsenic removal from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto iron oxide/activated carbon magnetic composite

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work the adsorption features of activated carbon and the magnetic properties of iron oxides were combined in a composite to produce magnetic adsorbent. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption behavior of arsenate onto the synthetic magnetic adsorbent. The effects of initial solution pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage and co-existing anionic component on the adsorption of arsenate were investigated. The results showed that the removal percentage of arsenate could be over 95% in the conditions of adsorbent dosage 5.0 g/L, initial solution pH 3.0-8.0, and contact time 1 h. Under the experimental conditions, phosphate and silicate caused greater decrease in arsenate removal percentage among the anions, and sulfate had almost no effect on the adsorption of arsenate. Kinetics study showed that the overall adsorption rate of arsenate was illustrated by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich models for the arsenate adsorption data was tested. Both the models adequately describe the experimental data. Moreover, the magnetic composite adsorbent could be easily recovered from the medium by an external magnetic field. It can therefore be potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by arsenate. PMID:24602339

  4. U(VI) adsorption on aquifer sediments at the Hanford Site.

    PubMed

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R Jeffrey; Brown, Christopher F; Last, George V

    2007-08-15

    Aquifer sediments collected via split-spoon sampling in two new groundwater wells in the 200-UP-1 operable unit at the Hanford Site were characterized and showed typical Ringold Unit E Formation properties dominated by gravel and sand. High iron-oxide content in Fe oxide/clay coatings caused the highest U(VI) adsorption as quantified by batch K(d) values, indicating iron oxides are the key solid adsorbent in the 200-UP-1 sediments that affect U(VI) fate and mobility. Even though U(VI) adsorption on the gravel-sized fraction of the sediments is considered to be negligible, careful characterization should be conducted to determine U(VI) adsorption on gravel, because of presence of Fe oxides coatings and diffusion-controlled adsorption into the gravel particles' interior surfaces. A linear adsorption isotherm was observed up to 10(-6) M (238 microg/L) of total U(VI) concentration in batch U(VI) adsorption tests with varying total U(VI) concentrations in spiked groundwater. U(VI) adsorption decreased with increasing concentrations of dissolved carbonate, because strong anionic aqueous uranium-carbonate complexes formed at high pH and high alkalinity conditions. Noticeable uranium desorption hysteresis was observed in a flow-through column experiment, suggesting that desorption K(d) values for aged uranium-contaminated sediments at the Hanford Site can be larger than adsorption K(d) values determined in short-term laboratory experiments and slow uranium release from contaminated sediments into the groundwater is expected. PMID:17499879

  5. U(VI) adsorption on aquifer sediments at the Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Brown, Christopher F.; Last, George V.

    2007-08-01

    Aquifer sediments collected via split-spoon sampling in two new groundwater wells in the 200-UP-1 operable unit at the Hanford Site were characterized and showed typical Ringold Unit E Formation properties dominated by gravel and sand. High iron-oxide content in Fe oxide/clay coatings caused the highest U(VI) adsorption as quantified by batch Kd values, indicating iron oxides are the key solid adsorbent in the 200-UP-1 sediments that affect U(VI) fate and mobility. Even though U(VI) adsorption on the gravel-sized fraction of the sediments is considered to be negligible, careful characterization should be conducted to determine U(VI) adsorption on gravel, because of presence of Fe oxides coatings and diffusion-controlled adsorption into the gravel particles' interior surfaces. A linear adsorption isotherm was observed up to 10 - 6 M (238 μg/L) of total U(VI) concentration in batch U(VI) adsorption tests with varying total U(VI) concentrations in spiked groundwater. U(VI) adsorption decreased with increasing concentrations of dissolved carbonate, because strong anionic aqueous uranium-carbonate complexes formed at high pH and high alkalinity conditions. Noticeable uranium desorption hysteresis was observed in a flow-through column experiment, suggesting that desorption Kd values for aged uranium-contaminated sediments at the Hanford Site can be larger than adsorption Kd values determined in short-term laboratory experiments and slow uranium release from contaminated sediments into the groundwater is expected.

  6. Studies on Vapor Adsorption Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamsundar, N.; Ramotowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The project consisted of performing experiments on single and dual bed vapor adsorption systems, thermodynamic cycle optimization, and thermal modeling. The work was described in a technical paper that appeared in conference proceedings and a Master's thesis, which were previously submitted to NASA. The present report describes some additional thermal modeling work done subsequently, and includes listings of computer codes developed during the project. Recommendations for future work are provided.

  7. The role of van der Waals interactions in the adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, De-Li; Al-Saidi, W A; Johnson, J Karl

    2012-10-03

    Adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces is determined by weak interactions. We applied two versions of the nonlocal van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) to compute adsorption energies of Ar, Kr, and Xe on Pt(111), Pd(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) metal surfaces. We have compared our results with data obtained using other density functional approaches, including the semiempirical vdW corrected DFT-D2. The vdW-DF results show considerable improvements in the description of adsorption energies and equilibrium distances over other DFTbased methods, giving good agreement with experiments. We have also calculated perpendicular vibrational energies for noble gases on the metal surfaces using vdWDF data and found excellent agreement with available experimental results. Our vdW-DF calculations show that adsorption of noble gases on low-coordination sites is energetically favored over high-coordination sites, but only by a few meV. Analysis of the 2-dimensional potential energy surface shows that the high-coordination sites are local maxima on the 2-dimensional potential energy surface and therefore unlikely to be observed in experiments, which provides an explanation of the experimental observations. The DFT-D2 approach with the standard parameterization was found to overestimate the dispersion interactions, and to give the wrong adsorption site preference for four of the nine systems we studied.

  8. Preparation and characterization of a lipoid adsorption material and its atrazine removal performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Wen, Qinxue; Lian, Jiaxiang; Ren, Nanqi

    2011-01-01

    A novel adsorbent named lipoid adsorption material (LAM), with a hydrophobic nucleolus (triolein) and a hydrophilic membrane structure (polyamide), was synthesized to remove hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) from solution. Triolein, a type of lipoid, was entrapped by the polyamide membrane through an interfacial polymerization reaction. The method of preparation and the structure of the LAM were investigated and subsequent experiments were conducted to determine the characteristics of atrazine (a type of HOC) removal from wastewater using LAM as the adsorbent. The results showed that LAM had a regular structure compared with the prepolymer, where compact particles were linked with each other and openings were present in the structure of the LAM in which the fat drops formed from triolein were entrapped. In contrast to the atrazine adsorption behavior of powdered activated carbon (PAC), LAM showed a persistent adsorption capacity for atrazine when initial concentrations of 0.57, 1.12, 8.31 and 19.01 mg/L were present, and the equilibrium time was 12 hr. Using an 8 mg/L initial concentration of atrazine as an indicator of HOCs in aqueous solution, experiments on the adsorption capacity of the LAM showed 69.3% removal within 6-12 hr contact time, which was close to the 75.5% removal of atrazine by PAC. Results indicated that LAM has two atrazine removal mechanisms, namely the bioaccumulation of atrazine by the nucleous material and physical adsorption to the LAM membrane. Bioaccumulation was the main removal mechanism. PMID:22128536

  9. Adsorption orientations and immunological recognition of antibodies on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhena, J. G.; Dumitru, A. C.; Herruzo, Elena T.; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I.; Garcia, Ricardo; Serena, P. A.; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid are combined to characterize the adsorption of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies over a hydrophobic surface modeled with a three-layer graphene slab. We consider explicitly the water solvent, simulating systems with massive sizes (up to 770 000 atoms), for four different adsorption orientations. Protocols based on steered MD to speed up the protein diffusion stage and to enhance the dehydration process are combined with long simulation times (>150 ns) in order to make sure that the final adsorption states correspond to actual stable configurations. Our MD results and the AFM images demonstrate that the IgG antibodies are strongly adsorbed, do not unfold, and retain their secondary and tertiary structures upon deposition. Statistical analysis of the AFM images shows that many of the antibodies adopt vertical orientations, even at very small coverages, which expose at least one Fab binding site for recognition events. Single molecule force spectroscopy experiments demonstrate the immunological response of the deposited antibodies by recognizing its specific antigens. The above properties together with the strong anchoring and preservation of the secondary structure, make graphene an excellent candidate for the development of immunosensors.Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid are combined to characterize the adsorption of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies over a hydrophobic surface modeled with a three-layer graphene slab. We consider explicitly the water solvent, simulating systems with massive sizes (up to 770 000 atoms), for four different adsorption orientations. Protocols based on steered MD to speed up the protein diffusion stage and to enhance the dehydration process are combined with long simulation times (>150 ns) in order to make sure that the final adsorption states correspond to actual stable configurations. Our

  10. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  11. Adsorption of Pb(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) onto a vanadium mine tailing from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Shi, Taihong; Jia, Shiguo; Chen, Ying; Wen, Yinghong; Du, Changming; Guo, Huilin; Wang, Zhuochao

    2009-09-30

    The adsorption of heavy metal cations Pb(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solution by a mine tailing which mainly contains muscovite was investigated. The property of the mineral was investigated by using SEM, FT-IR, XRD and BET analysis. pH(pzc) was measured by an titration technique to give a value of 5.4+/-0.1. Kinetics experiments indicated that the processes can be simulated by pseudo-second-order model. Total adsorption amounts of the heavy metal increased, while the adsorption density decreased when the solid-to-liquid ratio (S/L) increased. Grain size did not affect the adsorption capacity significantly. The resulting isotherms can be described by Frendlich relationship. And the maximum adsorption capacity (molar basis) followed the order of Cr(III)>Pb(II)>Cu(II)>Ni(II)>Cd(II). Thermodynamic analysis showed that the adsorption processed were endothermic and may be chemical in nature with positive DeltaH(0). The positive DeltaS(0) suggested that dissociative processed were involved. Small positive DeltaG(0) suggested that the adsorption processes required a small amount of energy. Adsorption processes were slightly affected by electrolyte ion concentration but strongly dependent on pH value. The most possible mechanism of the adsorption processes involve the inner-sphere-complexions by the aluminol or silanol groups on the surface of the mineral. PMID:19427115

  12. Adsorption and desorption of arsenic to aquifer sediment on the Red River floodplain at Nam Du, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Hoa Mai, Nguyen; Postma, Dieke; Thi Kim Trang, Pham; Jessen, Søren; Hung Viet, Pham; Larsen, Flemming

    2014-10-01

    The adsorption of arsenic onto aquifer sediment from the Red River floodplain, Vietnam, was determined in a series of batch experiments. Due to water supply pumping, river water infiltrates into the aquifer at the field site and has leached the uppermost aquifer sediments. The leached sediments remain anoxic but contain little reactive arsenic and iron, and are used in our experiments. The adsorption and desorption experiments were carried out by addition or removal of arsenic from the aqueous phase in sediment suspensions under strictly anoxic conditions. Also the effects of HCO3, Fe(II), PO4 and Si on arsenic adsorption were explored. The results show much stronger adsorption of As(V) as compared to As(III), full reversibility for As(III) adsorption and less so for As(V). The presence or absence of HCO3 did not influence arsenic adsorption. Fe(II) enhanced As(V) sorption but did not influence the adsorption of As(III) in any way. During simultaneous adsorption of As(III) and Fe(II), As(III) was found to be fully desorbable while Fe(II) was completely irreversibly adsorbed and clearly the two sorption processes are uncoupled. Phosphate was the only solute that significantly could displace As(III) from the sediment surface. Compiling literature data on arsenic adsorption to aquifer sediment in Vietnam and Bangladesh revealed As(III) isotherms to be almost identical regardless of the nature of the sediment or the site of sampling. In contrast, there was a large variation in As(V) adsorption isotherms between studies. A tentative conclusion is that As(III) and As(V) are not adsorbing onto the same sediment surface sites. The adsorption behavior of arsenic onto aquifer sediments and synthetic Fe-oxides is compared. Particularly, the much stronger adsorption of As(V) than of As(III) onto Red River as well as on most Bangladesh aquifer sediments, indicates that the perception that arsenic, phosphate and other species compete for the same surface sites of iron oxides in

  13. An in vitro Study of Protein Adsorption to Biocompatible Coatings.

    PubMed

    Seeberg, Trine M; Austad, Hanne O; Clausen, Ingelin; Cederkvist, Henning; Bjørås, Magnar; Johansen, Rune Forstrøm

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for these experiments was to investigate the amount and type of protein adsorption on surfaces that can be used as protective coatings on membrane based in vivo devices. Adsorption of proteins to a selection of biocompatible coatings (titanium oxide, diamond-like carbon, parylene C) and typical construction materials for Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (silicon, silicon nitride), were investigated during in vitro tests. The samples were incubated in human liver extract and bovine serum albumin (BSA) for up to 12 hours. The amount of protein adsorption was found to be low for all surfaces. Measurements of bound Iodine-125 labeled BSA, showed a protein adsorption of up to 0.2 μg BSA/cm2. The specific proteins adsorbed to the surfaces after incubation in human liver extract were identified using mass spectrometry. Most of the identified adsorbed proteins were intracellular, but plasma proteins like Immunoglobulin (Ig) and serum albumin as well as hemoglobin were also identified. PMID:25980864

  14. Surface Analysis of 4-Aminothiophenol Adsorption at Polycrystalline Platinum Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Fachini, Estevao R.; Contes, Enid J.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2008-01-01

    Formation of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on polycrystalline platinum electrodes has been studied by surface analysis and electrochemistry techniques. The 4-ATP monolayer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), Raman spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments give an idea about the packing quality of the monolayer. RAIR and Raman spectra for 4-ATP modified platinum electrodes showed the characteristic adsorption bands for neat 4-ATP indicating the adsorption of 4-ATP molecules on platinum surface. The adsorption on platinum was also evidenced by the presence of sulfur and nitrogen peaks by XPS survey spectra of the modified platinum electrodes. High resolution XPS studies and RAIR spectrum for platinum electrodes modified with 4-ATP indicate that molecules are sulfur-bonded to the platinum surface. The formation of S-Pt bond suggests that ATP adsorption gives up an amino terminated SAM. Thickness of the monolayer was evaluated via angle-resolved XPS (AR-XPS) analyses. Derivatization of 4-ATP SAM was performed using 16-Br hexadecanoic acid.

  15. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  16. Adsorption of surfactants on sand surface in enhanced oil recovery: Isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Achinta; Kumar, T.; Ojha, Keka; Mandal, Ajay

    2013-11-01

    Adsorption of surfactants onto reservoir rock surface may result in the loss and reduction of their concentrations in surfactant flooding, which may render them less efficient or ineffective in practical applications of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques. Surfactant flooding for EOR received attraction due to its ability to increase the displacement efficiency by lowering the interfacial tension between oil and water and mobilizing the residual oil. This article highlights the adsorption of surfactants onto sand surface with variation of different influencing factors. It has been experimentally found that adsorption of cationic surfactant on sand surface is more and less for anionic surfactant, while non-ionic surfactant shows intermediate behaviour. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study of clean sand particles has been made to determine the main component present in the sand particles. The interaction between sand particles and surfactant has been studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the sand particles before and after aging with surfactant. Salinity plays an important role in adsorption of anionic surfactant. Batch experiments were also performed to understand the effects of pH and adsorbent dose on the sorption efficiency. The sand particles exhibited high adsorption efficiency at low pH for anionic and nonionic surfactants. But opposite trend was found for cationic surfactant. Adsorption data were analyzed by fitting with Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Sips isotherm models. Results show that the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetics models suit the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption on sand surface. Thermodynamics feasibility of the adsorption process was also studied to verify the spontaneity of the process.

  17. "I like that He Always Shows Who He Is": The Perceptions and Experiences of Siblings with a Brother with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petalas, Michael A.; Hastings, Richard P.; Nash, Susie; Dowey, Alan; Reilly, Deirdre

    2009-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were used to explore the perceptions and experiences of eight typically developing siblings in middle childhood who had a brother with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). The analysis yielded five main themes: (i) siblings' perceptions of the…

  18. ADSORPTION AND TRANSPORT OF U(VI) IN SUBSURFACE MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    U(VI) adsorption and transport in three natural, heterogeneous subsurface media were investigated in batch and column experiments. The rate of U(VI) adsorption to the natural samples was rapid over the first few hours of the experiments, and then slowed appreciably after twenty-f...

  19. [Adsorption of Phosphate by Lanthanum Hydroxide/Natural Zeolite Composites from Low Concentration Phosphate Solution].

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-wei; Wang, Hong; Zhan, Yan-hui; Chen, Dong-mei

    2016-01-15

    A series of composites of lanthanum hydroxide/natural zeolite ( La( OH) 3/NZ composites) were prepared by co-precipitation method, and these composites were used as adsorbents to remove phosphate from aqueous solution. The phosphate adsorption capacities of different composites prepared with different precipitated pH values were compared in batch mode. The adsorption characteristics of phosphate from aqueous solution on the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11 was investigated using batch experiments. The results showed that the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH values of 5-7 and 13 had a low adsorption capacity for phosphate in aqueous solution, while the La( OH) 3/NZ composites prepared with the precipitated pH values of 9-12 exhibited much higher phosphate adsorption capacity. The phosphate adsorption capacity of the La (OH)3/NZ composite increased with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 9 to 11, but remained basically unchanged with the increase of the precipitated pH value from 11 to 12. The equilibrium adsorption data of phosphate from aqueous solution on the La ( OH ) 3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11 could be described by the Langmuir isotherm model with the predicted maximum phosphate adsorption of 44 mg x g(-1) (phosphate solution pH 7 and 30 degrees C). The kinetic data of phosphate adsorption from low concentration phosphate solution on the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11 well followed a pseudo-second-order model. The presence of Cl- and SO4(2-) in low concentration phosphate solution had no negative effect on phosphate adsorption onto the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the precipitated pH value of 11, while the presence of HCO3- slightly inhibited the adsorption of phosphate. Coexisting humic acid had a negative effect on the adsorption of phosphate at low concentration on the La(OH)3/NZ composite prepared with the

  20. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  1. Isotherm study of reactive Blue 19 adsorption by an alum sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khim, Ong Keat; Nor, Mohd Asri Md; Mohamad, Syuriya; Nasaruddin, Nas Aulia Ahmad; Jamari, Nor Laili-Azua; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 using dewatered alum sludge. The dewatered alum sludge was a sludge produced from drinking water treatment plant. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism of the dye adsorption. The adsorption was rapid at its initial stage but the rate decreased as it approached equilibrium. The adsorption data were evaluated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models but was best described by the Langmuir isotherm model as it gave the highest correlation.

  2. Competitive adsorption of furfural and phenolic compounds onto activated carbon in fixed bed column.

    PubMed

    Sulaymon, Abbas H; Ahmed, Kawther W

    2008-01-15

    For a multicomponent competitive adsorption of furfural and phenolic compounds, a mathematical model was builtto describe the mass transfer kinetics in a fixed bed column with activated carbon. The effects of competitive adsorption equilibrium constant, axial dispersion, external mass transfer, and intraparticle diffusion resistance on the breakthrough curve were studied for weakly adsorbed compound (furfural) and strongly adsorbed compounds (parachlorophenol and phenol). Experiments were carried out to remove the furfural and phenolic compound from aqueous solution. The equilibrium data and intraparticle diffusion coefficients obtained from separate experiments in a batch adsorber, by fitting the experimental data with theoretical model. The results show that the mathematical model includes external mass transfer and pore diffusion using nonlinear isotherms and provides a good description of the adsorption process for furfural and phenolic compounds in a fixed bed adsorber. PMID:18284136

  3. Studies on chelating adsorption properties of novel composite material polyethyleneimine/silica gel for heavy-metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Baojiao; An, Fuqiang; Liu, Kangkai

    2006-12-01

    Firstly, the coordination processes of line-type polyethyleneimine with Cu 2+, Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ were studied by using visible light absorption spectroscopy and chelation conductivity titration method, and the structures of the chelates were determined. Afterwards, polyethyleneimine (PEI) was grafted onto the surface of silica gel particles via the coupling effect of γ-chloropropyl trimethoxysilane (CP), and the novel composite adsorption material PEI/SiO 2 with strong adsorption ability towards heavy-metal ions was prepared. The chelating adsorption properties of PEI/SiO 2 for Cu 2+, Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ were researched by both static (batch) and dynamic (flow) methods. The experiment results show that water-soluble polyamine PEI with line-type structure reacts with Cu 2+, Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ easily and quantitatively, and water-soluble chelates with four ligands are formed. The composite material PEI/SiO 2 possesses very strong chelating adsorption ability for heavy-metal ions, and the saturated adsorption amount can reach 25.94 mg g -1 and 50.01 mg g -1 for Cu 2+ under static and dynamic conditions, respectively. The isothermal adsorption data fit to Langmuir equation, and the adsorption is typical chemical adsorption with monomolecular layer. The adsorbing ability of PEI/SiO 2 towards the three kinds of the ions follows the order of Cu 2+ > Cd 2+ > Zn 2+. The pH value has great influence on the sorption, and at pH 6-7, the adsorption capacity is the greatest. The fact that adsorption capacity increases with temperature rising indicates the adsorbing process of PEI/SiO 2 for metal ions is endothermic. As diluted hydrochloric acid is used as eluent, the adsorbed heavy-metal ions are eluted easily from PEI/SiO 2, and the regeneration and reuse without decreasing sorption for PEI/SiO 2 are demonstrated.

  4. [Preparation of magnetic quaternary chitosan salt and its adsorption of methyl orange from water].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cong-lu; Hu, Xiao-min; Ying, Shi-ying; Wang, Fang

    2013-05-01

    First, quaternary chitosan salts with different substitution degrees were prepared in glycine hydrochloride ([Gly]Cl) ionic liquid. Nano-sized Fe3O4 powder was obtained through chemical co-precipitation method. And then, magnetic quaternary chitosan particles were prepared through inverse suspension cross-linking using Fe3O4 was the nucleus and glutaraldehyde as the cross-linking agent. The influence of different reaction conditions on adsorption was discussed. Adsorption of methyl orange (MO) by magnetic quaternary chitosan particles was studied through the static adsorption method. The results showed that at pH 3.0 and 25 degrees C the adsorption capacity varied from 37.45 mg x g(-1) to 277.5 mg x g(-1) with the MO concentration ranging from 20 mg x L(-1) to 150 mg x L(-1). The adsorption isotherm was fitted to the Freundlich model and the adsorption kinetics was fitted to the pseudo-second order kinetic isotherms capacity experiment. It was found that after the adsorbent was used for four times, its removal rate still exceeded 90%. PMID:23914533

  5. Adsorption of dye from wastewater using chitosan-CTAB modified bentonites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianzhong; Chen, Shunwei; Liu, Li; Li, Bing; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Lijun; Feng, Yanlong

    2012-09-15

    Dyeing wastewater removal is important for the water treatment, and adsorption is an efficient treatment process. In this study, three modified bentonites, chitosan modified bentonite (CTS-Bent), hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) modified bentonite (CTAB-Bent), and both chitosan and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide modified bentonite (CTS-CTAB-Bent) were prepared and characterized by FTIR and XRD analysis. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the adsorptive removal of weak acid scarlet from aqueous phase using modified bentonites under different conditions. The results show that the adsorption capacity of weak acid scarlet onto natural bentonite was low (4.9%), but higher for 1CTS-Bent and 1CTS-10CTAB-Bent. The optimal conditions for weak acid scarlet adsorption were 1% chitosan, 10% CTAB, at 80°C and reaction time 2.5h. The best removal efficiency was ∼85%, and the adsorption capacity of weak acid scarlet was around 102.0mg g(-1), much higher than that of commercial activated carbon (27.2mg g(-1)). These results suggest that 1CTS-10CTAB-Bent is an excellent adsorbent for effective weak acid scarlet removal from water. The adsorption isotherms of weak acid scarlet were investigated. It was found that Langmuir and Temkin models fitted the data very well (R(2)>0.99). PMID:22738850

  6. Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Aldred, Nick; Emami, Kaveh; Enander, Karin; Ederth, Thomas; Clare, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and α2-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested. PMID:25657832

  7. Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Aldred, Nick; Emami, Kaveh; Enander, Karin; Ederth, Thomas; Clare, Anthony S

    2015-02-01

    Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and α2-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested. PMID:25657832

  8. Adsorption of Procion Red MX 8B using spent tea leaves as adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heraldy, Eddy; Osa, Riesta Ramdhaniyati; Suryanti, Venty

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of Procion Red MX 8B using spent tea leaves (STL) as adsorbent, has been studied by batch adsorption technique. The adsorbent was activated by NaOH 4% for 24 hours for delignification process. The adsorbent was characterized using FTIR to indetify the functional groups of cellulose was shown by uptake -OH, C-H and C-O. The optimum conditions of adsorption experiments were achieved when pH was set as 6 with contact time of 75 minutes and capacity of adsorption was 3.28 mg/g. The equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir and Isotherm Freundlichs. The kinetic models, pseudo first order and pseudo second order were employed to describe the adsorption mechanism. The experimental results showed that the pseudo second order equation was the best model that described the adsorption behavior with the coefficient of correlation (R2) was equal higher than 0.99 The results suggested that STL had high potential to be used as effective adsorbent for Procion Red MX 8B removal.

  9. Adsorption studies of Cu(II) onto biopolymer chitosan and its nanocomposite 5%bentonite/chitosan.

    PubMed

    Moussout, Hamou; Ahlafi, Hammou; Aazza, Mustapha; Zegaoui, Omar; El Akili, Charaf

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) and nanocomposite 5%bentonite/chitosan (5%Bt/CS) prepared from the natural biopolymer CS were tested to remove Cu(II) ions using a batch adsorption experiment at various temperatures (25, 35 and 45°C). X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) were used in CS and the nanocomposite characterisation. This confirmed the exfoliation of bentonite (Bt) to form the nanocomposite. The adsorption kinetics of copper on both solids was found to follow a pseudo-second-order law at each studied temperature. The Cu(II) adsorption capacity increased as the temperature increased from 25 to 45°C for nanocomposite adsorbent but slightly increased for CS. The data were confronted to the nonlinear Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson models. It was found that the experimental data fitted very well the Langmuir isotherm over the whole temperature and concentration ranges. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for the Cu(II) was 404-422 mg/g for CS and 282-337 mg/g for 5%Bt/CS at 25-45°C. The thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. The complexation of Cu(II) with NH(2) and C = O groups as active sites was found to be the main mechanism in the adsorption processes. PMID:27148722

  10. Karst show caves - how DTN technology as used in space assists automatic environmental monitoring and tourist protection - experiment in Postojna cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrovšek, F.; Grašič, B.; Božnar, M. Z.; Mlakar, P.; Udén, M.; Davies, E.

    2013-10-01

    The paper presents an experiment demonstrating a novel and successful application of Delay- and Disruption-Tolerant Networking (DTN) technology for automatic data transfer in a karst cave Early Warning and Measuring System. The experiment took place inside the Postojna Cave in Slovenia, which is open to tourists. Several automatic meteorological measuring stations are set up inside the cave, as an adjunct to the surveillance infrastructure; the regular data transfer provided by the DTN technology allows the surveillance system to take on the role of an Early Warning System (EWS). One of the stations is set up alongside the railway tracks, which allows the tourist to travel inside the cave by train. The experiment was carried out by placing a DTN "data mule" (a DTN-enabled computer with WiFi connection) on the train and by upgrading the meteorological station with a DTN-enabled WiFi transmission system. When the data mule is in the wireless drive-by mode, it collects measurement data from the station over a period of several seconds as the train passes the stationary equipment, and delivers data at the final train station by the cave entrance. This paper describes an overview of the experimental equipment and organisation allowing the use of a DTN system for data collection and an EWS inside karst caves where there is a regular traffic of tourists and researchers.

  11. Karst show caves - how DTN technology as used in space assists automatic environmental monitoring and tourist protection - experiment in Postojna Cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrovšek, F.; Grašič, B.; Božnar, M. Z.; Mlakar, P.; Udén, M.; Davies, E.

    2014-02-01

    The paper presents an experiment demonstrating a novel and successful application of delay- and disruption-tolerant networking (DTN) technology for automatic data transfer in a karst cave early warning and measuring system. The experiment took place inside the Postojna Cave in Slovenia, which is open to tourists. Several automatic meteorological measuring stations are set up inside the cave, as an adjunct to the surveillance infrastructure; the regular data transfer provided by the DTN technology allows the surveillance system to take on the role of an early warning system (EWS). One of the stations is set up alongside the railway tracks, which allows the tourist to travel inside the cave by train. The experiment was carried out by placing a DTN "data mule" (a DTN-enabled computer with WiFi connection) on the train and by upgrading the meteorological station with a DTN-enabled WiFi transmission system. When the data mule is in the wireless drive-by mode, it collects measurement data from the station over a period of several seconds as the train without stopping passes the stationary equipment, and delivers data at the final train station by the cave entrance. This paper describes an overview of the experimental equipment and organization allowing the use of a DTN system for data collection and an EWS inside karst caves where there is regular traffic of tourists and researchers.

  12. ENVITEC shows off air technologies

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, R.W.

    1995-08-01

    The ENVITEC International Trade Fair for Environmental Protection and Waste Management Technologies, held in June in Duesseldorf, Germany, is the largest air pollution exhibition in the world and may be the largest environmental technology show overall. Visitors saw thousands of environmental solutions from 1,318 companies representing 29 countries and occupying roughly 43,000 square meters of exhibit space. Many innovations were displayed under the category, ``thermal treatment of air pollutants.`` New technologies include the following: regenerative thermal oxidizers; wet systems for removing pollutants; biological scrubbers;electrostatic precipitators; selective adsorption systems; activated-coke adsorbers; optimization of scrubber systems; and air pollution monitors.

  13. ARSENIC TREATMENT BY ADSORPTIVE TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the removal of arsenic from drinking water using the adsorptive media treatment process. Fundamental information is provided on the design and operation of adsorptive media technology including the selection of the adsorptive media. The information cites...

  14. Kinetics and mechanism studies of p-nitroaniline adsorption on activated carbon fibers prepared from cotton stalk by NH4H2PO4 activation and subsequent gasification with steam.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunquan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng

    2010-06-15

    Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were prepared for the removal of p-nitroaniline (PNA) from cotton stalk by chemical activation with NH(4)H(2)PO(4) and subsequent physical activation with steam. Surface properties of the prepared ACFs were performed using nitrogen adsorption, FTIR spectroscopy and SEM. The influence of contact time, solution temperature and surface property on PNA adsorption onto the prepared ACFs was investigated by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. The kinetic rates at different temperatures were modeled by using the Lagergren-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Morris's intraparticle diffusion and Boyd's film-diffusion models, respectively. It was found that the maximum adsorption of PNA on the ACFs was more than 510 mg/L, and over 60% adsorption occurred in first 25 min. The effect of temperature on the adsorption was related to the contacting time and the micropore structure of the adsorbents. And the increase of micropore surface area favored the adsorption process. Kinetic rates fitted the pseudo-second-order model very well. The pore diffusion played an important role in the entire adsorption period, and intraparticle diffusion was the rate-limiting step in the beginning 20 min. The Freundlich model provided a better data fitting as compared with the Langmuir model. The surface micrograph of the ACF after adsorption showed a distinct roughness with oval patterns. The results revealed that the adsorption was in part with multimolecular layers of coverage. PMID:20202747

  15. Magnetic Zn (II) ion-imprinted polymer prepared by the surface imprinting technique and its adsorption properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-xin; Dou, Qian; Jin, Xiu-hong; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Ting-ru; Han, Xu; Wang, Dong-dong

    2015-01-01

    A novel magnetic Zn (II) ion-imprinted polymer was prepared by the surface ion-imprinted technique by using magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 microspheres as supporter, methacrylic acid and salicylaldoxime as monomers, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the crosslinker. The products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, vibrating sample magnetometer and scanning electron microscope. The adsorption experiments showed that the imprinted polymer was employed successfully in comparison with non-imprinted polymer. When the temperature was in a range of 291-297 K, the maximum adsorption was about 52.69 mg g(-1) with an optimal pH 6.0 for an equilibrium time of 40 min. The imprinted polymer possessed high selectivity and specific recognition towards Zn (II). The Langmuir adsorption model was more favourable than the Freundlich or the Temkin adsorption model. Thermodynamic experiment showed that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process for Zn (II). The mechanism for Zn (II) adsorption on the imprinted polymer was investigated. PMID:25919981

  16. Fixed-bed adsorption study of methylene blue onto pyrolytic tire char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrigianni, Vassiliki; Giannakas, Aris; Papadaki, Maria; Albanis, Triantafyllos; Konstantinou, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the adsorption efficiency of acid treated pyrolytic tire char to cationic methylene blue (MB) dye adsorption from aqueous solutions was investigated by fixed-bed adsorption column experiments. The effects of the initial dye concentration (10 - 40 mg L-1) and feed flow rate (50 - 150 mL min -1) with a fixed bed height (15 cm) were studied in order to determine the breakthrough characteristics of the adsorption system. The Adams-Bohart, Yoon-Nelson and Thomas model were applied to the adsorption of MB onto char at different operational conditions to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column. The results showed that the maximum adsorbed quantities decreased with increasing flow rate and increased with increasing initial MB concentration. Breakthrough time and exhaustion time increased with decreasing inlet dye concentration and flow rate. In contrast with Adams-Bohart model, Yoon-Nelson model followed by Thomas model were found more suitable to describe the fixed-bed adsorption of methylene blue by char. The correlation coefficient values R2 for both models at different operating conditions are higher than 0.9 and the low average relative error values provided very good fittings of experimental data at different operating conditions. Higher adsorption capacity of 3.85 mg g -1 was obtained at 15 cm of adsorbent bed height, flow rate of 100 mL min -1and initial MB concentration of 40 mg L-1. Although that activated carbons exhibited higher adsorption capacities in the literature, acid-treated pyrolytic tire char was found to be considerably efficient adsorbent for the removal of MB dye column taking into account the advantages of the simpler production process compared to activated carbons, as well as, the availability of waste tire feedstock and concurrent waste tire management.

  17. [Low-Concentration CO₂ Adsorption on Polyaniline/Zeolite Y Composites].

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng-lin; Lu, Xia; Zhang, Hui; Ge, Xin; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Yong-zhen

    2015-12-01

    Three polyaniline (PANI)/zeolite Y composites with different polyaniline loads, PANI-Y-1, PANI-Y-2 and PANI-Y-3, were prepared by in situ chemical oxidation polymerization method using different amounts of aniline. The structural characteristics of these materials were analyzed by FT-IR and nitrogen adsorption experiment. The adsorption and regeneration properties of the composites for low-concentration CO₂ at atmosphere pressure were investigated. Characterization results show that aniline is successfully polymerized in and out side of channels of zeolite Y. The above three materials, whose pores are composed of macropores and mesopores, have specific surface areas of 52, 54 and 35 m2 g -¹, respectively. In addition, a composite with high polyaniline loading has low pore volumes. At 20°C, CO₂ adsorption on the three composites and zeolite Y are well fitted with the Logistic model, and the adsorption amount of CO₂ with initial concentration of 10% follows an order of PANI-Y-2 (2.09 mmol · g⁻¹) > PANI-Y-3 (1.79 mmol · g⁻¹) > PANI-Y-l (1.07 mmol · g⁻¹) > zeolite Y (0.80 mmol · g⁻¹. The adsorption order of the composites is the result of combined effects from polyaniline amount and specific surface area of adsorbents. With concentrations ranging between 2% and 10% CO2 adsorption amount increases when initial concentration is raised. With adsorption temperature changing from 25° to 6°C, low temperature is advantageous to enhancing CO₂ adsorption. For PANI-Y-2, only a low regeneration efficiency of 68% is obtained after four times thermal desorption at 80°C. However, the regeneration efficiency could be increased up to 94% by aqueous ammonia combined with thermal treatment method. PMID:27011973

  18. Proton and Cd adsorption onto natural bacterial consortia: Testing universal adsorption behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrok, David; Fein, Jeremy B.; Kulpa, Charles F.

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial surface adsorption can control metal distributions in some natural systems, yet it is unclear whether natural bacterial consortia differ in their adsorption behaviors. In this study, we conduct potentiometric titration and metal adsorption experiments to measure proton and Cd adsorption onto a range of bacterial consortia. We model the experimental data using a surface complexation approach to determine thermodynamic stability constants. Our results indicate that these consortia adsorb similar extents of protons and Cd and that the adsorption onto all of the consortia can be modeled using a single set of stability constants. Consortia of bacteria cultured from natural environments also adsorb metals to lesser extents than individual strains of laboratory-cultivated species. This study suggests that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit similar adsorption behaviors, potentially simplifying the task of modeling the distribution and speciation of metals in bacteria-bearing natural systems. Current models for bacteria-metal adsorption that rely on pure strains of laboratory-cultivated species likely overpredict the amount of bacteria-metal adsorption in natural systems.

  19. Effect of low-concentration rhamnolipid on adsorption of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hua; Jiang, Yongbing; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Zhifeng; Liu, Liuxia; Liu, Yang; Yang, Xin; Lai, Mingyong; He, Yibin

    2015-03-21

    The effects of low-concentration monorhamnolipid (monoRL) on the adsorption of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 grown on glucose or hexadecane to glass beads with hydrophobic or hydrophilic surfaces was investigated using batch adsorption experiments. Results showed that adsorption isotherms of the cells on both types of glass beads fitted the Freundlich equation better than the Langmuir equation. The Kf of the Freundlich equation for adsorption of hexadecane-grown cell to glass beads with hydrophobic surface was remarkably higher than that for adsorption of hexadecane-grown cell to glass beads with hydrophilic surface, or glucose-grown cell to glass beads with either hydrophilic or hydrophobic surface. Furthermore, it decreased with the increasing monoRL concentration. For both groups of cells, the zeta potential was close to each other and stable with the increase of monoRL concentration. The surface hydrophobicity of hexadecane-grown cells, however, was significantly higher than that of the glucose-grown cells and it decreased with the increase of monoRL concentration. The results indicate the importance of hydrophobic interaction on adsorption of bacterial cells to surfaces and monoRL plays a role in reducing the bacterial adsorption by affecting cell surface hydrophobicity. PMID:25528238

  20. The corrosive influence of chloride ions preference adsorption on α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuan-Hui; Liu, Min; Jin, Ying; Sun, Dong-Bai

    2015-08-01

    Conductor-like screening model (COSMO), Periodic DFT calculations have been performed on a Al2O3 surface to model the influence of preference adsorption and interaction of chloride ions at increasing monolayer coverage on undefective passive film on Aluminum in solution environment. The results evidence that the critical monolayer of Cl- is 3/7, which is redefined. With increasing Cl- adsorption, both the first and second Cl- move from Al(1) atop and bridge10 sites to O(5) sites, suggesting that the weaker interaction between Cl- and Al2O3 surface but stronger interactions between three ions make the electrons uniformly occupy on the energy levels of them. More calculations shows that the preference adsorption sites of Cl- are independent of the surface area of oxide, and the adsorption energy decrease in three steps, each adsorption energy step only relate to the adsorption site and the morphology. On undefective oxide film, low coverage Cl- adsorption would restrain surface breakdown to happen which is consistent with the experiment results.

  1. Column studies for the adsorption of cationic surfactant onto an organic polymer resin and a granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Vergili, Ilda; Kaya, Yasemin; Gönder, Zeren Beril; Barlas, Hulusi

    2010-03-01

    Adsorption beds containing granular activated carbon and organic polymer resin are used widely to remove organic pollutants from wastewaters and water streams. Adsorption polymers are becoming alternatives to activated carbon for removal of surfactants by adsorption techniques. This study investigated the adsorption characteristics of cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a cationic surfactant for selected concentrations below and above critical micelle concentration (CMC). A series of column tests were performed to determine the breakthrough curves by using two different adsorbents: (1) Hydraffin CC 8 x 30 as a commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) and (2) Lewatit VPOC 1064 MD PH as a commercial organic polymer resin. In the experiments, the volumetric flow rate was maintained at 10.5 mL/min (approximately 2 m3/ m2 x h). Loading of adsorbents was continued until breakthrough was 10% of the feed concentration. The breakthrough took place at 488 bed volume (BV) below CMC (C0 = 40 mg/L) and 39 BV above CMC (C0 = 400 mg/ L) onto GAC. The organic polymer resin, however, showed a higher adsorption capacity than GAC (1412 BV below CMC and 287 BV above CMC). From the Logit method, the value of adsorption rate coefficient (K) and adsorption capacity coefficient (N) were obtained. PMID:20369564

  2. Selectivity of Ni-based surface alloys toward hydrazine adsorption: A DFT study with van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan-Bin; Jia, Jian-Feng; Wu, Hai-Shun

    2015-06-01

    We use dispersion corrected DFT calculations (DFT + D3) to investigate the selectivity of Ni-based surface alloys toward hydrazine adsorption. A series of Ni-M (M = Fe, Pt, Ir, Pd and Rh) alloy films were investigated, namely Ni15/M1/Ni(1 1 1), Ni14/M2/Ni(1 1 1), Ni12/M4/Ni(1 1 1) and Ni8/M8/Ni(1 1 1). Our results show that the doped atoms of Ir, Rh and Fe provide stronger adsorption sites than the Ni atom on the Ni(1 1 1) surface, while the doped atoms of Pt and Pd provide weaker adsorption sites. By analyzing the most favorable adsorption of hydrazine on Ni-M alloy surfaces we found that Ni8Fe8/Ni(1 1 1), Ni8Rh8/Ni(1 1 1), Ni15Ir1/Ni(1 1 1) and Ni14Ir2/Ni(1 1 1) present enhanced adsorption properties if compared to the pure Ni(1 1 1) surface, and seem to be better candidates for hydrazine catalysis, which are in agreement with that found by experiments. The correlation between d-band center position and adsorption energies of top modes in the Ni or doped atom has been calculated at DFT + D3 level to provide further insight into the Ni-based surface alloy properties for hydrazine adsorption.

  3. Salinity and pH affect Na+-montmorillonite dissolution and amino acid adsorption: a prebiotic chemistry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, Ana Paula S. F.; Tadayozzi, Yasmin S.; Carneiro, Cristine E. A.; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    2014-06-01

    The adsorption of amino acids onto minerals in prebiotic seas may have played an important role for their protection against hydrolysis and formation of polymers. In this study, we show that the adsorption of the prebiotic amino acids, glycine (Gly), α-alanine (α-Ala) and β-alanine (β-Ala), onto Na+-montmorillonite was dependent on salinity and pH. Specifically, adsorption decreased from 58.3-88.8 to 0-48.9% when salinity was increased from 10 to 100-150% of modern seawater. This result suggests reduced amino acid adsorption onto minerals in prebiotic seas, which may have been even more saline than the tested conditions. Amino acids also formed complexes with metals in seawater, affecting metal adsorption onto Na+-montmorillonite, and amino acid adsorption was enhanced when added before Na+-montmorillonite was exposed to high saline solutions. Also, the dissolution of Na+-montmorillonite was reduced in the presence of amino acids, with β-Ala being the most effective. Thus, prebiotic chemistry experiments should also consider the integrity of minerals in addition to their adsorption capacity.

  4. Measured Enthalpies of Adsorption of Boron-Doped Activated Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Dohnke, E.; Singh, A.; Schaeperkoetter, J.; Stalla, D.; Burress, J.; Jalisatgi, S.; Suppes, G.; Hawthorne, M. F.; Yu, P.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2012-02-01

    There is significant interest in the properties of boron-doped activated carbons for their potential to improve hydrogen storage.ootnotetextMultiply Surface-Functionalized Nanoporous Carbon for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage, P. Pfeifer et al. DOE Hydrogen Program 2011 Annual Progress Report, IV.C.3, 444-449 (2011). Boron-doped activated carbons have been produced using a process involving the pyrolysis of decaborane (B10H14) and subsequent high-temperature annealing. In this talk, we will present a systematic study of the effect of different boron doping processes on the samples' structure, hydrogen sorption, and surface chemistry. Initial room temperature experiments show a 20% increase in the hydrogen excess adsorption per surface area compared to the undoped material. Experimental enthalpies of adsorption will be presented for comparison to theoretical predictions for boron-doped carbon materials. Additionally, results from a modified version of the doping process will be presented.

  5. Nickel adsorption on single and dual site clay surfaces; Effect of pH and nickel loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksha, A. U.; Vithanage, M. S.; Bandara, A.; Weerasooriya, R.

    2011-12-01

    We examined Ni sorption to single and dual site clays (Al dominant, Fe dominant and both Al and Fe rich sorbents) as adsorbents for removal of Ni from aqueous solutions to (i) compare the capacities, (ii) study the effect of solution pH, (iii) examine the effect of ionic strength on adsorption (iv) determine the adsorption capacity through isotherm models. Gibbsite and goethite were selected as the single site sorbent for Al and Fe while Natural Red Earth (NRE) and laterite, were used as the sorbents with dual sites for this study. The effect of pH on the sorption was studied by adjusting the pH in the range of 4-10. In these experiments, the adsorbent concentration was kept at 5 g/l of solution containing 10 mg/l Ni(II) at 25 0C. Adsorption isotherms were conducted in 0.01 M NaNO3 solution, at pH ≈ 7.5. Both single and dual site clay minerals have exhibited no dependence on ionic strength indicating inner-sphere surface complexation. However, gibbsite demonstrated highest adsorption. Adsorption increased 4-5 folds with the pH increase from 6.0 to 8.5 with maximum adsorption at pH > 8.0. Elemental mapping demonstrated the distribution of elements on the grain including sorbed Ni. These results indicate that > AlO- sites attract Ni better than >FeO- sites. Adsorption shows decrease from gibbsite > laterite > goethite > NRE. Gibbsite showed best fit for the Langmuir equation with r2 around 0.98. This indicates homogeneous adsorption. Maximum adsorption capacity for gibbsite is reported as 5.08x10-4 mol/kg. Therefore, gibbsite and laterite have a good potential to be used to remove nickel from aqueous solutions. Key words : Gibbsite, Geothite, Laterite, Natural Red Earth, Ni sorption

  6. Cu and Zn adsorption to a heterogeneous natural sediment: Influence of leached cations and natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Power, Leanne M; Cheng, Tao; Rastghalam, Zahra Sadat

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption of heavy metals by natural sediments has important implications to the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface environments. Although the importance of major multivalent cations and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in heavy metal adsorption had been previously demonstrated, the leaching of major cations and DOM from sediments and its influence on heavy metal adsorption have not been fully examined. In this study, the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, and natural organic matter that leached from a natural sediment in Cu and Zn adsorption experiments were measured and used in surface complexation models to elucidate their effects on Cu and Zn adsorption. Experimental results showed that the leaching of cations and DOM was substantial and pH-dependent. The leached concentrations of Ca and Mg were reasonably simulated based on BaCl2 extractable Ca and Mg at pH < 5, and Al and Fe activities were accurately predicted for specific pH ranges by assuming solubility control by Al(OH)3 and Fe(OH)3. Visual MINTEQ simulations showed that the leached cations markedly decreased Cu adsorption at pH < 6 and Zn adsorption at pH 3-8. Due to varying affinity for DOM between Cu and Zn, DOM was found to decrease Cu adsorption at pH > 6 due to formation of Cu-DOM aqueous complexes, but increase Zn adsorption at pH 4-7 due to formation of aqueous complexes between DOM and major cations, which reduced competition from these cations against Zn for binding sites on the sediment. PMID:26547878

  7. Adsorption of Cu2+ ions using chitosan-modified magnetic Mn ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yuying; Chen, Deyang; Sun, Yitao; Jiao, Dongling; Zeng, Dechang; Liu, Zhongwu

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-modified Mn ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a one-step microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. These Mn ferrite magnetic composite nanoparticles were employed to absorb Cu2+ ions in water. XRD verified the spinel structure of the MnFe2O4 nanoparticles. Chitosan modification does not result in any phase change of MnFe2O4. FTIR and zeta potentials curves for all samples suggest that chitosan can be successfully coated on the Mn ferrites. TEM characterization showed that the modified MnFe2O4 nanoparticles have a cubic shape with a mean diameter of ∼100 nm. For adsorption behavior, the effects of experiment parameters such as solution pH value, contact time and initial Cu2+ ions concentration on the adsorption efficiency were systematically investigated. The results showed that increasing solution pH value and extending contact time are favorable for improving adsorption efficiency. Especially, adsorption efficiency can reach up to 100% and 96.7% after 500 min adsorption at pH 6.5 for the solutions with initial Cu2+ ions concentration of 50 mg/L and 100 mg/L. Adsorption data fits well with the Langmuir isotherm models with a maximum adsorption capacity (qm) and a Langmuir adsorption equilibrium constant (K) of 65.1 mg/g and 0.090 L/mg, respectively. The adsorption kinetic agrees well with pseudo second order model with the pseudo second rate constants (K2) of 0.0468 and 0.00189 g/mg/min for solutions with initial Cu2+ ions of 50 and 100 mg/L, respectively.

  8. Adsorptive removal of methylene blue by rhamnolipid-functionalized graphene oxide from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhibin; Zhong, Hua; Yuan, Xingzhong; Wang, Hou; Wang, Lele; Chen, Xiaohong; Zeng, Guangming; Wu, Yan

    2014-12-15

    In this article, a rhamnolipid-functionalized graphene oxide (RL-GO) hybrid was prepared by one-step ultrasonication and adsorptive removal of methylene blue (MB) from both artificial and real wastewater by the RL-GO was investigated. The Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) area and Zeta potential analysis were used to characterize the adsorbent. The results showed that RL-GO had abundant functional groups and a mesopores feature. MB adsorption by the RL-GO increased with increase in adsorbent dose, pH, temperature and initial MB concentration, while it was insensitive to ionic strength variation. The adsorption kinetics fitted well to the pseudo-second-order model with correlation coefficients greater than 0.999. The Intra-particle diffusion and Boyd's film-diffusion models showed that the rate-controlled step was dominated by film-diffusion in the beginning and then followed by intra-particle diffusion. The adsorption isotherm was fitted by adsorption models with the suitability in order of BET > Freundlich > Langmuir > Temkin, based on comparison between correlation coefficients. Thermodynamic analysis of equilibriums suggested that the adsorption MB on RL-GO was spontaneous and endothermic. The adsorption mechanism was also proposed to be electrostatic attraction, π-π interaction and hydrogen bond. In addition, the real wastewater experiment, the regeneration study and the comparative cost analysis showed that the RL-GO composites could be a cost-effective and promising sorbent for MB wastewater treatment owing to its high efficiency and excellent reusability. PMID:25314573

  9. Fluorocarbon Adsorption in Hierarchical Porous Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Vijayakumar, M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Martin, P F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-09

    The adsorption behavior of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives was examined on a set of microporous metal organic framework (MOF) sorbents and another set of hierarchical mesoporous MOFs. The microporous M-DOBDC (M = Ni, Co) showed a saturation uptake capacity for R12 of over 4 mmol/g at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous MOF MIL-101 showed an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching over 14 mmol/g at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption were found to generally correlate with the polarizability of the refrigerant with R12 > R22 > R13 > R14 > methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting MOFs for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling and refrigeration applications.

  10. Nanoporous chalcogenides for adsorption and gas separation.

    PubMed

    Ori, Guido; Massobrio, Carlo; Pradel, Annie; Ribes, Michel; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-21

    The adsorption and gas separation properties of amorphous porous chalcogenides such as GeS2 are investigated using statistical mechanics molecular simulation. Using a realistic molecular model of such amorphous adsorbents, we show that they can be used efficiently to separate different gases relevant to environmental and energy applications (H2, CO2, CH4, N2). In addition to shedding light on the microscopic adsorption mechanisms, we show that coadsorption in this novel class of porous materials can be described using the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST). Such a simple thermodynamic model, which allows avoiding complex coadsorption measurements, describes the adsorption of mixture from pure component adsorption isotherms. Our results, which are found to be in good agreement with available experimental data, paves the way for the design of gas separation membranes using the large family of porous chalcogenides. PMID:27126718

  11. VIRUS ADSORPTION TO MINERAL SURFACES IS REDUCED BY MICROBIAL OVERGROWTH AND ORGANIC COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In experiments with strains of poliovirus, reovirus, echovirus and Coxsackievirus, overgrowth with exopolymer-forming bacteria reduced virus adsorption to mineral surfaces. Adsorption was improved when organic materials adsorbed to minerals were removed by low-temperature ashing....

  12. METAL INTERACTIONS AT SULFIDE MINERAL SURFACES. PART 2. ADSORPTION AND DESORPTION OF LANTHANUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Batch-type adsorption experiments with four sulfide minerals (chalcocite, galena, pyrite, and sphalerite) were used to investigate the adsorption and desorption behavior of lanthanum (III) in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), a model humic substance. Linear ...

  13. The Majorana Demonstrator: Progress towards showing the feasibility of a tonne-scale 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnerty, P.; Aguayo, E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T., Iii; Barabash, A. S.; Barton, P. J.; Beene, J. R.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Collar, J. I.; Combs, D. C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, J.; Fast, J. E.; Fields, N.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, V. M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M. P.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Horton, M.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P. N.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, M. G.; Martin, R. D.; Merriman, J. H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, L.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, N. R.; Perumpilly, G.; Phillips, D. G., Ii; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Steele, D.; Strain, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, H.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Majorana Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0vββ) of the 76Ge isotope with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate the neutrino is its own anti-particle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass-scale of the neutrino. The Demonstrator is being assembled at the 4850 foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The array will be contained in a low-background environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. The goals for the Demonstrator are: demonstrating a background rate less than 3 t-1 y-1 in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) surrounding the 2039 keV 76Ge endpoint energy; establishing the technology required to build a tonne-scale germanium based double-beta decay experiment; testing the recent claim of observation of 0vββ [1]; and performing a direct search for light WIMPs (3-10 GeV/c2).

  14. Adsorption of Poly(methyl methacrylate) on Concave Al2O3 Surfaces in Nanoporous Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nunnery, Grady; Hershkovits, Eli; Tannenbaum, Allen; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of polymer molecular weight and surface curvature on the adsorption of polymers onto concave surfaces. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) of various molecular weights was adsorbed onto porous aluminum oxide membranes having various pore sizes, ranging from 32 to 220 nm. The surface coverage, expressed as repeat units per unit surface area, was observed to vary linearly with molecular weight for molecular weights below ~120 000 g/mol. The coverage was independent of molecular weight above this critical molar mass, as was previously reported for the adsorption of PMMA on convex surfaces. Furthermore, the coverage varied linearly with pore size. A theoretical model was developed to describe curvature-dependent adsorption by considering the density gradient that exists between the surface and the edge of the adsorption layer. According to this model, the density gradient of the adsorbed polymer segments scales inversely with particle size, while the total coverage scales linearly with particle size, in good agreement with experiment. These results show that the details of the adsorption of polymers onto concave surfaces with cylindrical geometries can be used to calculate molecular weight (below a critical molecular weight) if pore size is known. Conversely, pore size can also be determined with similar adsorption experiments. Most significantly, for polymers above a critical molecular weight, the precise molecular weight need not be known in order to determine pore size. Moreover, the adsorption developed and validated in this work can be used to predict coverage also onto surfaces with different geometries. PMID:19415910

  15. The effects of oil on As(V) adsorption on illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite and chlorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainipee, Wimolporn; Cuadros, Javier; Sephton, Mark A.; Unsworth, Catherine; Gill, Martin G.; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Weiss, Dominik J.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of oil on As(V) adsorption on clay minerals has been investigated using batch experiments at low and high pH, NaCl concentration and oil contents. Four clay minerals were chosen because of their abundance in sediments and their different crystal chemistry: illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, and chlorite. The values for pH were 4 and 8 and salt concentrations were 0.001 and 0.7 M NaCl to appreciate the effects of changing salinity, e.g. from fresh water to seawater conditions. For the coating experiments, a well-characterised oil was used to survey the main effects of complex organic mixtures on adsorption and oil to clay mineral (w/w) ratios were 0.0325 and 0.3250. As(V) adsorption increased with increasing NaCl concentration, suggesting that the mechanisms of As(V) adsorption are related to the formation of surface complexes in which Na+ ions act as bridges between the clay surface and the As(V) anions. Cation bridging is also indicated by zeta potential measurements which show that higher NaCl concentrations along with the presence of As(V) can cause the clay particles and adsorbed ions to have a more negative overall charge. Adsorption is lower at higher pH due to the reduced number of positively charged sites on the edge of clay mineral layers. Oil coating reduces As(V) adsorption by decreasing the available surface area of clay minerals, except in the case of oil-coated montmorillonite, where surface area following dispersion in water is increased. The main variables controlling As(V) adsorption are surface area and surface charge density, as confirmed by a simplified quantitative model. These findings advance our ability to predict the effects of complex pollution events in various freshwater and marine settings.

  16. Rapid Adsorption of Copper(II) and Lead(II) by Rice Straw/Fe3O4 Nanocomposite: Optimization, Equilibrium Isotherms, and Adsorption Kinetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B.; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:25815470

  17. Adsorption of ferrous ions onto montmorillonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dawei; Niu, Xia; Qiao, Min; Liu, Gang; Li, Hongxin; Meng, Zhenxiao

    2015-04-01

    The adsorption of Fe (II) onto montmorillonites was investigated through initial concentration, contact time, pH and temperature. During the whole adsorption process, the ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) was added as a kind of antioxidant, at the same time, deionized water (after boiling) and nitrogen protection were also used to avoid oxidation. The Fe2+/Fetotal ratio of the iron exists in the Fe-montmorillonites was found more than 95%. Two kinetic models, including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model, were used to analyze the adsorption process of Fe (II) on montmorillonites. The results of our study showed that adsorption process fitted with pseudo-second-order well. Adsorption isotherms showed that Langmuir model was better than Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters ΔG0 and ΔH0 were 3.696 kJ/mol and 6.689 kJ/mol (we just gave the values at 298 K), respectively. The positive values at different temperatures showed that the adsorption process was non-spontaneous and endothermic. The characteristics of materials were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Surface area and porosity analyzer, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and Zeta potential distribution.

  18. Enhancing adsorption capacity of toxic malachite green dye through chemically modified breadnut peel: equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Hei Ing; Lim, Linda B L; Priyantha, Namal

    2015-01-01

    Breadnut skin, in both its unmodified (KS) and base-modified (BM-KS) forms, was investigated for its potential use as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of toxic dye, malachite green (MG). Characterization of the adsorbents was carried out using scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Batch adsorption experiments, carried out under optimized conditions, for the adsorption of MG were fitted using five isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin and Sips) and six error functions to determine the best-fit model. The adsorption capacity was greatly enhanced when breadnut skin was chemically modified with NaOH, leading to an adsorption capacity of 353.0 mg g(-1), that was far superior to most reported adsorbents for the removal of MG. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of MG was spontaneous on KS and BM-KS, and the reactions were endothermic and exothermic, respectively. Kinetics studies showed that both followed the pseudo-second order. Regeneration experiments on BM-KS indicated that its adsorption capacity was still maintained at>90% even after five cycles. It can be concluded that NaOH-modified breadfruit skin has great potential to be utilized in real-life application as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of MG in wastewater treatment. PMID:25409587

  19. Models of pure CO2 and pure CH4 adsorption on the late paleozoic coals from the Kailuan Coalfield, Hebei, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dai, S.; Zhang, B.; Peng, S.; Zhang, X.; Chou, C.

    2009-01-01

    Isothermal adsorption experiments of pure CO2 and CH4 on different coals in rank (the No. 11 Coal from the Linnancang Mine and the No. 9 Coal from the Majiagou Mine) from the Kailuan Coalfield of Hebei Province, China, have been studied. Four different models (Langmuir, BET, D-R, and D-A) were used to fit the experimental data of CO2 and CH4 adsorption and their fitting degree were investigated. The results showed that the adsorption capacity of the Majiagou coal(Ro, ran = 1. 21%) is higher than that of the Linnancang coal (Ro, ran = 0. 58%). The adsorption capacity of CO2 is higher than that of CH4 on the same coal under the same pressure. The adsorption isotherms of pure CO 2 and pure CH4 on the Majiagou coal can be classified as Type I and their fitting errors of curves are very weak; thus the experimental data can be presented using the Langmuir isotherm. However, the adsorption of Linnancang coal is more complicated, and can be presented using D-A model because of its minimum error. Monolayer adsorption occurs during the adsorption of pure CO2 and pure CH4 on the No. 11 Coal and that of pure CH4 on the No. 9 Coal.

  20. A simple method to prepare magnetic modified beer yeast and its application for cationic dye adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun-Xia; Wang, Li-Yan; Chi, Ru-An; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Xu, Zhi-Gao; Guo, Jia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to use a simple method to prepare magnetic modified biomass with good adsorption performances for cationic ions. The magnetic modified biomass was prepared by two steps: (1) preparation of pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) modified biomass in N, N-dimethylacetamide solution and (2) preparation of magnetic PMDA modified biomass by a situ co-precipitation method under the assistance of ultrasound irradiation in ammonia water. The adsorption potential of the as-prepared magnetic modified biomass was analyzed by using cationic dyes: methylene blue and basic magenta as model dyes. Optical micrograph and x-ray diffraction analyses showed that Fe(3)O(4) particles were precipitated on the modified biomass surface. The as-prepared biosorbent could be recycled easily by using an applied magnetic field. Titration analysis showed that the total concentration of the functional groups on the magnetic PMDA modified biomass was calculated to be 0.75 mmol g(-1) by using the first derivative method. The adsorption capacities (q(m)) of the magnetic PMDA modified biomass for methylene blue and basic magenta were 609.0 and 520.9 mg g(-1), respectively, according to the Langmuir equation. Kinetics experiment showed that adsorption could be completed within 150 min for both dyes. The desorption experiment showed that the magnetic sorbent could be used repeatedly after regeneration. The as-prepared magnetic modified sorbent had a potential in the dyeing industry wastewater treatment. PMID:22529003

  1. A combined spectrophotometric-AAS method for the analysis of trace metal, EDTA, and metal-EDTA mixture solutions in adsorption modeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Güçlü, K; Hugül, M; Demirci-Cekiç, S; Reşat; Apak

    2000-10-01

    The adsorption of free- and bound-metal ions (metal complexes) as well as of ligands onto various hydrous oxide type sorbents have been extensively modelled using EDTA as the model ligand. This type of modelling uses metal ion-EDTA mixture solutions containing stoichiometrically equivalent or excessive amounts of either constituent. Consequently, for mixture solutions equilibrated with the sorbent, the aim was to develop a suitable method for determining either metal complex+free ligand (MY(2-)+H(2)Y(2-)) or metal complex+free metal (MY(2-)+M(2+)) in the aqueous filtrate, the metal M being lead or cadmium. The conventional method of analyzing such filtrates is exchanging different metal-EDTA complexes with Fe(NO(3))(3) followed by HPLC using UV detection. The developed method utilizes Vis- and AA-spectrometry widespread in common laboratories, eliminating the need for HPLC and UV techniques that require higher operational cost, expertise and contaminant-free media. The developed procedure is based on the following analyses for the possible constituents of equilibrated solution (with the sorbent). All EDTA (free or bound, as H(2)Y(2-) or MY(2-)) species are converted into FeY(-) by adding Fe(NO(3))(3), and heating at 80 degrees C for 1 h. All metal (free or bound, as M(2+) or MY(2-)) species are determined by AAS. All unbound (free) Fe(3+) species are determined by the thiocyanate spectrophotometric method at 480 nm. Then 'EDTA-bound iron (III)' is defined as added Fe minus colorimetrically (thiocyanate method) found Fe, and 'AAS-found metal' (lead or cadmium) corresponds to M(2+) and/or MY(2-), depending on the analyzed solution. If EDTA-bound Fe(III) is greater than AAS-found metal, then one has a (MY(2-)+H(2)Y(2-)) mixture where AAS-found metal is (MY(2-)), and free EDTA, i.e. (H(2)Y(2-)), is calculated from the difference. If EDTA-bound Fe(III) is smaller than AAS-found metal, then one has a (M(2+)+ MY(2-)) mixture where EDTA-bound Fe(III) is (MY(2-)), and the

  2. Effect of biochar amendment on tylosin adsorption-desorption and transport in two different soils.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang Yoon; Wang, Jim J; Dodla, Syam K; Eberhardt, Thomas L; Groom, Les

    2012-01-01

    The role of biochar as a soil amendment on the adsorption-desorption and transport of tylosin, a macrolide class of veterinary antibiotic, is little known. In this study, batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics and transport of tylosin in forest and agricultural corn field soils amended with hardwood and softwood biochars. Tylosin adsorption was rapid at initial stages, followed by slow and continued adsorption. Amounts of adsorption increased as the biochar amendment rate increased from 1 to 10%. For soils with the hardwood biochar, tylosin adsorption was 10 to 18% higher than that when using the softwood biochar. Adsorption kinetics was well described by Elovich equation ( ≥ 0.921). As the percent of biochar was increased, the rates of initial reactions were generally increased, as indicated by increasing α value at low initial tylosin concentration, whereas the rates during extended reaction times were generally increased, as indicated by decreasing β value at high initial tylosin concentration. A considerably higher amount of tylosin remained after desorption in the corn field soil than in the forest soil regardless of the rate of biochar amendment, which was attributed to the high pH and silt content of the former. The breakthrough curves of tylosin showed that the two soils with biochar amendment had much greater retardation than those of soils without biochar. The CXTFIT model for the miscible displacement column study described well the peak arrival time as well as the maximum concentration of tylosin breakthrough curves but showed some underestimation at advanced stages of tylosin leaching, especially in the corn field soil. Overall, the results indicate that biochar amendments enhance the retention and reduce the transport of tylosin in soils. PMID:22751061

  3. Role of electrostatic interactions in the adsorption kinetics of nanoparticles at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Muthukuru, Jyothi Sri; Mani, Ethayaraja; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2016-02-21

    The adsorption of particles to the fluid-fluid interface is a key factor for the stabilization of fluid-fluid interfaces such as those found in emulsions, foams and bijels. However, for the formation of stable particle-laden interfaces, the particles must migrate to the interface from the bulk. Recent studies show that the adsorption of particles to the interface formed during emulsification is influenced by the surface charge of the particles. To further investigate this phenomenon, we study the effect of the surface charge of the particle on the adsorption kinetics of particles to the oil-water interface. By suspending a drop of aqueous dispersion of charge stabilized nanoparticles in decane, the adsorption dynamics of particles to the decane-water interface is studied using the dynamic surface tension measurements. When the particles are highly charged (low salt), a negligible change in the interface tension is observed indicating that almost no particles are adsorbed. These results show that the charged particles experience an energy barrier when they approach the interface. But when the particle surface charge is screened by the addition of monovalent salt, a significant reduction in surface tension is observed indicating the migration and adsorption of particles to the decane-water interface. We estimate the effective diffusivity of particles to the interface by analyzing the initial decay in the measured surface tension by considering particle laden drops containing different amounts of salt using the modified Ward and Tordai theory. This effective diffusivity is used to calculate the energy barrier for the adsorption of particles to the interface. The energy barrier from the analysis of dynamic surface tension data agrees well with the concept of image charge repulsion which inhibits the adsorption of highly charged particles to the interface. By considering various types of relevant interactions, we derive an analytical expression that qualitatively

  4. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of Cr(VI) using Sakura waste from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wenfang; Zhao, Yingxin; Zheng, Xinyi; Ji, Min; Zhang, Zhenya

    2016-01-01

    A forestall waste, Sakura leave, has been studied for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. The materials before and after adsorption were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). To investigate the adsorption performance of Sakura waste, batch experiments were conducted under different adsorbent dosage, contact time, initial concentration of Cr(VI), and co-existing ions. Results showed the data fitted pseudo-second-order better than pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data was analyzed with Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson isotherm models at temperature ranges from 25 °C to 45 °C. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir model was 435.25 mg g-1 at pH 1.0. The presence of Cl-, SO42- and PO43- would lead to an obvious negative effect on Cr(VI) adsorption, and their influence order follows PO43- > SO42- > Cl-. The study developed a new way to reutilize wastes and showed a great potential for resource recycling.

  5. Effect of surface acidity and basicity of aluminas on asphaltene adsorption and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Nashaat N; Hassan, Azfar; Pereira-Almao, Pedro

    2011-08-01

    This study investigates the effect of surface acidity and basicity of aluminas on asphaltene adsorption followed by air oxidation. Equilibrium batch adsorption experiments were conducted at 25°C with solutions of asphaltenes in toluene at concentrations ranging from 100 to 3000 g/L using three conventional alumina adsorbents with different surface acidity. Data were found to better fit to the Freundlich isotherm model showing a multilayer adsorption. Results showed that asphaltene adsorption is strongly affected by the surface acidity, and the adsorption capacities of asphaltenes onto the three aluminas followed the order acidic>basic and neutral. Asphaltenes adsorbed over aluminas were subjected to oxidation in air up to 600°C in a thermogravimetric analyzer to study the catalytic effect of aluminas with different surface acidity. A correlation was found between Freundlich affinity constant (1/n) and the catalytic activity. Basic alumina that has the lowest 1/n value, depicting strongest interactions, has the highest catalytic activity, followed by neutral and acidic aluminas, respectively. PMID:21571295

  6. Infant rats with chronic neonatal isolation experience show decreased extracellular serotonin levels in ventral striatum at baseline and in response to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Kosten, Therese A; Zhang, Xiang Yang; Kehoe, Priscilla

    2004-08-18

    Previously, we demonstrated that the early life stress of neonatal isolation enhances extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in ventral striatum in response to psychostimulants in infant rats. Yet, neonatal isolation does not alter baseline DA levels. DA levels are affected by serotonin (5-HT) and striatal levels of this transmitter are also enhanced by cocaine. Other early life stresses are reported to alter various 5-HT neural systems. Thus, the purpose of this study is to test whether neonatal isolation alters ventral striatal 5-HT levels at baseline or in response to cocaine. Litters were subjected to neonatal isolation (1-h individual isolation/day on postnatal days 2-9) or to non-handled conditions and pups assigned to one of three cocaine doses (0, 2.5, or 5.0 mg/kg) groups. On postnatal day 10, probes were implanted in the ventral striatum. Dialysate samples obtained over a 60-min baseline period and for 120 min post cocaine injections were assessed for levels of 5-HT and its metabolite, 5-HIAA. ISO decreased ventral striatal 5-HT levels at baseline and after cocaine administration but did not alter 5-HIAA levels. These data add to the literature on the immediate effects of early life stress on 5-HT systems by showing alterations in the ventral striatal system. Because serotonergic effects in this neural area are associated with reward and with emotion and affect regulation, the results of this study suggest that early life stress may be a risk factor for addiction and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:15283991

  7. Characterization and ciprofloxacin adsorption properties of activated carbons prepared from biomass wastes by H3PO4 activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Li, Hong; Li, Guangci; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Xuebing

    2016-10-01

    As biomass wastes, Arundo donax Linn and pomelo peel were used as precursors for activated carbons (ALAC and PPAC) preparation by phosphoric acid activation. The pore structure and surface acidic functional groups of both carbons were characterized by nitrogen adsorption/desorption experiment, NH3-temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A batch of experiments was carried out to investigate the adsorption performances of ciprofloxacin under different conditions. Results showed that PPAC exhibited larger surface area (1252m(2)/g) and larger portion of mesoporous, while ALAC was typical of microporous materials. Results from NH3-TPD suggested that ALAC was characteristic of more acidic functional group than PPAC. The maximum monolayer adsorption capability was 244mg/g for ALAC and 400mg/L for PPAC. Kinetics studies showed intra-particle diffusion was not the unique rate-controlling step. Boundary layer resistance existed between adsorbent and adsorbate. PMID:27034157

  8. Study on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Xinfang; Luo, Wei; Yang, Hang; He, Yanlan; Liu, Yixing; Zhang, Xueao; Peng, Gang

    2015-12-01

    The gas sensor based on pristine graphene with conductance type was studied theoretically and experimentally. The time response of conductance measurements showed a quickly and largely increased conductivity when the sensor was exposed to ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water. However, the desorption process in vacuum took more than 1 h which indicated that there was a larger number of transferred carriers and a strong adsorption force between ammonia and graphene. The desorption time could be greatly shortened down to about 2 min by adding the flow of water-vapor-enriched air at the beginning of the recovery stage which had been confirmed as a rapid and high-efficiency desorption process. Moreover, the optimum geometries, adsorption energies, and the charge transfer number of the composite systems were studied with first-principle calculations. However, the theoretical results showed that the adsorption energy between NH3 and graphene was too small to fit for the experimental phenomenon, and there were few charges transferred between graphene and NH3 molecules, which was completely different from the experiment measurement. The adsorption energy between NH4 and graphene increased stage by stage which showed NH4 was a strong donor. The calculation suggested that H2O molecule could help a quick desorption of NH4 from graphene by converting NH4 to NH3 or (NH3)n(H2O)m groups, which was consistent with the experimental results. This study demonstrates that the ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water is mainly ammonium groups of NH3 and NH4, and the NH4 moleculars are ideal candidates for the molecular doping of graphene while the interaction between graphene and the NH3 moleculars is weak. PMID:26377212

  9. Study on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Xinfang; Luo, Wei; Yang, Hang; He, Yanlan; Liu, Yixing; Zhang, Xueao; Peng, Gang

    2015-09-01

    The gas sensor based on pristine graphene with conductance type was studied theoretically and experimentally. The time response of conductance measurements showed a quickly and largely increased conductivity when the sensor was exposed to ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water. However, the desorption process in vacuum took more than 1 h which indicated that there was a larger number of transferred carriers and a strong adsorption force between ammonia and graphene. The desorption time could be greatly shortened down to about 2 min by adding the flow of water-vapor-enriched air at the beginning of the recovery stage which had been confirmed as a rapid and high-efficiency desorption process. Moreover, the optimum geometries, adsorption energies, and the charge transfer number of the composite systems were studied with first-principle calculations. However, the theoretical results showed that the adsorption energy between NH3 and graphene was too small to fit for the experimental phenomenon, and there were few charges transferred between graphene and NH3 molecules, which was completely different from the experiment measurement. The adsorption energy between NH4 and graphene increased stage by stage which showed NH4 was a strong donor. The calculation suggested that H2O molecule could help a quick desorption of NH4 from graphene by converting NH4 to NH3 or (NH3)n(H2O)m groups, which was consistent with the experimental results. This study demonstrates that the ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water is mainly ammonium groups of NH3 and NH4, and the NH4 moleculars are ideal candidates for the molecular doping of graphene while the interaction between graphene and the NH3 moleculars is weak.

  10. Adsorption of nisin and pediocin on nanoclays.

    PubMed

    Meira, Stela Maris Meister; Jardim, Arthur Izé; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-01

    Three different nanoclays (bentonite, octadecylamine-modified montmorillonite and halloysite) were studied as potential carriers for the antimicrobial peptides nisin and pediocin. Adsorption occurred from peptide solutions in contact with nanoclays at room temperature. Higher adsorption of nisin and pediocin was obtained on bentonite. The antimicrobial activity of the resultant bacteriocin-nanoclay systems was analyzed using skimmed milk agar as food simulant and the largest inhibition zones were observed against Gram-positive bacteria for halloysite samples. Bacteriocins were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonites as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) assay. Infrared spectroscopy suggested non-electrostatic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding between siloxane groups from clays and peptide molecules. Transmission electron microscopy did not show any alteration in morphologies after adsorption of antimicrobial peptides on bentonite and halloysite. These results indicate that nanoclays, especially halloysite, are suitable nanocarriers for nisin and pediocin adsorption. PMID:26041178

  11. Properties and reactivity of Fe-organic matter associations formed by coprecipitation versus adsorption: Clues from arsenate batch adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Robert; Lorenz, Dennis; Guggenberger, Georg; Haumaier, Ludwig; Freund, Anja

    2014-11-01

    Ferric oxyhydroxides play an important role in controlling the bioavailability of oxyanions such as arsenate and phosphate in soil. Despite this, little is known about the properties and reactivity of Fe(III)-organic matter phases derived from adsorption (reaction of organic matter (OM) to post-synthesis Fe oxide) versus coprecipitation (formation of Fe oxides in presence of OM). Coprecipitates and adsorption complexes were synthesized at pH 4 using two natural organic matter (NOM) types extracted from forest floor layers (Oi and Oa horizon) of a Haplic Podzol. Iron(III) coprecipitates were formed at initial molar metal-to-carbon (M/C) ratios of 1.0 and 0.1 and an aluminum (Al)-to-Fe(III) ratio of 0.2. Sample properties were studied by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 gas adsorption, dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic mobility measurements. Arsenic [As(V)] adsorption to Fe-OM phases was studied in batch experiments (168 h, pH 4, 100 μM As). The organic carbon (OC) contents of the coprecipitates (82-339 mg g-1) were higher than those of adsorption complexes (31 and 36 mg g-1), leading to pronounced variations in specific surface area (9-300 m2 g-1), average pore radii (1-9 nm), and total pore volumes (11-374 mm3 g-1) but being independent of the NOM type or the presence of Al. The occlusion of Fe solids by OM (XPS surface concentrations: 60-82 atom% C) caused comparable pHPZC (1.5-2) of adsorption complexes and coprecipitates. The synthesis conditions resulted in different Fe-OM association modes: Fe oxide particles in 'M/C 0.1' coprecipitates covered to a larger extent the outermost aggregate surfaces, for some 'M/C 1.0' coprecipitates OM effectively enveloped the Fe oxides, while OM in the adsorption complexes primarily covered the outer aggregate surfaces. Despite of their larger OC contents, adsorption of As(V) was fastest to coprecipitates formed at low Fe availability (M/C 0.1) and facilitated by desorption of weakly

  12. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  13. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  14. Adsorption of chlorine dioxide gas on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Ryan, Shawn P; Snyder, Emily Gibb; Serre, Shannon D; Touati, Abderrahmane; Clayton, Matthew J

    2010-08-01

    Research and field experience with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas to decontaminate structures contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores and other microorganisms have demonstrated the effectiveness of this sterilant technology. However, because of its hazardous properties, the unreacted ClO2, gas must be contained and captured during fumigation events. Although activated carbon has been used during some decontamination events to capture the ClO2 gas, no data are available to quantify the performance of the activated carbon in terms of adsorption capacity and other sorbent property operational features. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine and compare the ClO2 adsorption capacities of five different types of activated carbon as a function of the challenge ClO2 concentration. Tests were also conducted to investigate other sorbent properties, including screening tests to determine gaseous species desorbed from the saturated sorbent upon warming (to provide an indication of how immobile the ClO2 gas and related compounds are once captured on the sorbent). In the adsorption tests, ClO2 gas was measured continuously using a photometric-based instrument, and these measurements were verified with a noncontinuous method utilizing wet chemistry analysis. The results show that the simple activated carbons (not impregnated or containing other activated sorbent materials) were the most effective, with maximum adsorption capacities of approximately 110 mg/g. In the desorption tests, there was minimal release of ClO(2) from all sorbents tested, but desorption levels of chlorine (Cl2) gas (detected as chloride) varied, with a maximum release of nearly 15% of the mass of ClO2 adsorbed. PMID:20842929

  15. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal–halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the “Cl-down” configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable. PMID:27066160

  16. Removal Rate of Organic Matter Using Natural Cellulose via Adsorption Isotherm and Kinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Din, Mohd Fadhil Md; Ponraj, Mohanadoss; Low, Wen-Pei; Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali; Iwao, Kenzo; Songip, Ahmad Rahman; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Ismail, Zulhilmi; Jamal, Mohamad Hidayat

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) using coconut fiber (CF) and palm oil fiber (POF) was investigated. Preliminary analysis was performed using a jar test for the selection of optimal medium before the fabricated column model experiment. The equilibrium studies on isotherms and kinetic models for NOM adsorption were analyzed using linearized correlation coefficient. Results showed that the equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir isotherm model for both CF and POF. The most suitable adsorption model was the pseudo-first-order kinetic model for POF and pseudo-second-order kinetic model for CF. The adsorption capacities achieved by the CF and POF were 15.67 and 30.8 mg/g respectively. Based on this investigation, it can be concluded that the POF is the most suitable material for the removal of NOM in semi polluted river water. PMID:26803100

  17. Adsorption of gas molecules on monolayer MoS2 and effect of applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Qu; Shao, Zhengzheng; Chang, Shengli; Li, Jingbo

    2013-10-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the adsorption of various gas molecules (H2, O2, H2O, NH3, NO, NO2, and CO) on monolayer MoS2. The most stable adsorption configuration, adsorption energy, and charge transfer are obtained. It is shown that all the molecules are weakly adsorbed on the monolayer MoS2 surface and act as charge acceptors for the monolayer, except NH3 which is found to be a charge donor. Furthermore, we show that charge transfer between the adsorbed molecule and MoS2 can be significantly modulated by a perpendicular electric field. Our theoretical results are consistent with the recent experiments and suggest MoS2 as a potential material for gas sensing application.

  18. Adsorption of gas molecules on monolayer MoS2 and effect of applied electric field.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qu; Shao, Zhengzheng; Chang, Shengli; Li, Jingbo

    2013-01-01

    : Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the adsorption of various gas molecules (H2, O2, H2O, NH3, NO, NO2, and CO) on monolayer MoS2. The most stable adsorption configuration, adsorption energy, and charge transfer are obtained. It is shown that all the molecules are weakly adsorbed on the monolayer MoS2 surface and act as charge acceptors for the monolayer, except NH3 which is found to be a charge donor. Furthermore, we show that charge transfer between the adsorbed molecule and MoS2 can be significantly modulated by a perpendicular electric field. Our theoretical results are consistent with the recent experiments and suggest MoS2 as a potential material for gas sensing application. PMID:24134512

  19. Adsorptive Removal and Adsorption Kinetics of Fluoroquinolone by Nano-Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yajun; Lan, Tao; Duan, Lunchao; Wang, Fenghe; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Shengtian; Wei, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Various kinds of antibiotics, especially fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) have been widely used for the therapy of infectious diseases in human and livestock. For their poorly absorbed by living organisms, large-scale misuse or abuse of FQs will foster drug resistance among pathogenic bacteria, as well as a variety of environmental problems when they were released in the environment. In this work, the adsorption properties of two FQs, namely norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP), by nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HAP) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption curves of FQs by n-HAP were simulated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The results shown that NOR and CIP can be adsorbed effectively by the adsorbent of n-HAP, and the adsorption capacity of FQs increase with increasing dosage of n-HAP. The optimum dosage of n-HAP for FQs removal was 20 g·L-1, in which the removal efficiencies is 51.6% and 47.3%, and an adsorption equilibrium time is 20 min. The maximum removal efficiency occurred when pH is 6 for both FQs. The adsorption isotherm of FQs fits well for both Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The adsorption of both FQs by n-HAP follows second-order kinetics. PMID:26698573

  20. Adsorption and degradation of ketoprofen in soils.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Wu, Laosheng; Chen, Weiping; Chang, Andrew C

    2009-01-01

    Ketoprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), was commonly found in treated wastewater due to its incomplete removal during sewage treatment plant processes. As treated wastewater is increasingly used for landscape irrigation, it is imperative to understand the leaching potential for ketoprofen in receiving soils. In this study, adsorption and degradation experiments were conducted in four U.S. soils with different physicochemical characteristics. Ketoprofen was not strongly adsorbed to the four soils with K(d) values ranging from 1.26 to 8.24 L kg(-1), suggesting its potential to move downward with percolating water. The adsorption was positively related to the soil organic matter (OM) content (R(2) = 0.890). Degradation experiment showed that half-lives (t(1/2)) of ketoprofen were 4.58 d in Arlington sandy loam (ASL, coarse-loamy, mixed, active, thermic Haplic Durixeralfs), 8.04 d in Hanford loamy sand (HLS, coarse-loamy, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Typic Xerorthents), 15.37 d in Imperial silty clay (ISC, fine, semectitc, calcareous, hyperthermic Vertic Torrifluvents), and 27.61 d in Palouse silt loam (PSL) soil (fine-silty, mixed, superactive, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxerolls), respectively. Degradation of ketoprofen in soils appeared to be influenced by the soil OM content. The prolonged t(1/2) by sterilization indicated that microbial degradation was the dominant pathway for ketoprofen degradation in soils, while photodegradation only contributed a small portion to the ketoprofen degradation. The t(1/2) and K(oc) values were fitted to screening models to predict the leaching potential of ketoprofen in soils. It appeared that relatively high leaching potential of ketoprofen existed in ISC and PSL soils. PMID:19398515

  1. Biocomposite fiber of calcium alginate/multi-walled carbon nanotubes with enhanced adsorption properties for ionic dyes.

    PubMed

    Sui, Kunyan; Li, Yujin; Liu, Rongzhan; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Xin; Liang, Hongchao; Xia, Yanzhi

    2012-09-01

    A bioadsorbent of calcium alginate/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CA/MWCNTs) composite fiber was fabricated by wet spinning and was characterized. Adsorptions of methylene blue (MB) and methyl orange (MO) ionic dyes onto CA/MWCNT composite fibers were investigated with different MWCNTs content and pH values. The results showed that introduction of MWCNTs of CA/MWCNTs composite fiber could not only sharply increase the adsorption capacity of MO onto bioadsorbent by 3 times, but enhanced the adsorption rate for MB compared to that of native CA fiber. Adsorption kinetics was determined by fitting pseudo-first, second-order and the intra-particle diffusion models to the experimental data, with the second-order model providing the best description of MB and MO adsorption onto CA/MWCNT fibers. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by two widely applied isotherms: Langmuir and Freundlich. The desorption experiments showed the percentage of desorption were found to be 79.7% and 80.2% for MB and MO, respectively. PMID:24751058

  2. Arsenite adsorption on cryogels embedded with iron-aluminium double hydrous oxides: possible polishing step for smelting wastewater?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashanth Suresh; Onnby, Linda; Kirsebom, Harald

    2013-04-15

    Arsenic is among the most toxic elements and it commonly exists in water as arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) ions. As(III) removal often requires a pre-oxidation or pH adjustment step and it is a challenge to adsorb As(III) at circumneutral pH. In this study, iron-aluminium double hydrous oxides were synthesized and incorporated into cryogels. The resulting composite cryogels were evaluated for As(III) adsorption. Initial experiments indicated that the adsorbent showed similar adsorption kinetics for both As(V) and As(III) ions. The adsorption of As(III) best fit the Langmuir isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacity was 24.6 mg/g. Kinetic modeling indicated that the mechanism of adsorption was chemisorption, making the adsorbent-adsorbate interactions independent of charge and hence allowing the adsorbent to function equally efficient across pH 4-11. A Swedish smelting wastewater was used to evaluate the adsorption performance in continuous mode. The studies showed that the adsorbent was successful in reducing the arsenic concentrations below the European Union emission limit (0.15 mg/l) in a smelting wastewater collected after two precipitation processes. The arsenic removal was obtained without requiring a pH adjustment or a pre-oxidation step, making it a potential choice as an adsorbent for As(III) removal from industrial wastewaters. PMID:23500428

  3. [Study of adsorption and desorption of behaviors of Pb2+ on thiol-modified bentonite by flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Xiong, Qiong-Xian; Pang, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Xia-Ping; Han, Mei; Zhao, Qiu-Xiang; Liu, Wen-Hua

    2013-03-01

    A comparative analysis of the functional groups and surface structure of the Ca-bentonite (RB) and thiol-modified bentonite (TMB) were characterized by means of FTIR and SEM. The absorptive property of Pb2+ on TMB and RB and its influential factors was studied and the conditions for the adsorption were optimized by using FAAS method. Then the conditions for desorption of Pb2+ from the TMB by using simulated acid rain were studied and the contrast analysis of absorptive stability of Pb2+ on TMB and RB was given. The results showed that the adsorption rate of Pb2+ by TMB could reach more than 98%, when the initial Pb2+ concentration was 100 mg.L-1, the liquid-solid ratio was 5 g.L-1, pH was 6. 0, KNO3 ionic strength was 0. 1 mol.L-1 and adsorption period was 60min at 25 C. The saturated adsorption capacity of TMB was 67.27 mg.g-1; it's much more than that of RB (9.667 mg.g-1). The adsorption of Pb2+ on TMB follows Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models well. Desorption experiments of Pb2+ from TMB with simulated acid rain (pH 3. 50) were done, and the desorption rate was 0. The results showed that TMB has a strong adsorption and fixation capacity for PbZ+; it is adapted to lead contaminated soil for chemical remediation. PMID:23705461

  4. The influence of using Jordanian natural zeolite on the adsorption, physical, and mechanical properties of geopolymers products.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Rushdi Ibrahim; El-Eswed, Bassam; Alshaaer, Mazen; Khalili, Fawwaz; Khoury, Hani

    2009-06-15

    Geopolymers consist of an amorphous, three-dimensional structure resulting from the polymerization of aluminosilicate monomers that result from dissolution of kaolin in an alkaline solution at temperatures around 80 degrees C. One potential use of geopolymers is as Portland cement replacement. It will be of great importance to provide a geopolymer with suitable mechanical properties for the purpose of water storage and high adsorption capacity towards pollutants. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of using Jordanian zeolitic tuff as filler on the mechanical performance and on the adsorption capacity of the geopolymers products. Jordanian zeolitic tuff is inexpensive and is known to have high adsorption capacity. The results confirmed that this natural zeolitic tuff can be used as a filler of stable geopolymers with high mechanical properties and high adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and Cu(II) ions. The XRD measurements showed that the phillipsite peaks (major mineral constituent of Jordanian zeolite) were disappeared upon geopolymerization. The zeolite-based geopolymers revealed high compressive strength compared to reference geopolymers that employ sand as filler. Adsorption experiments showed that among different geopolymers prepared, the zeolite-based geopolymers have the highest adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and copper(II) ions. PMID:19036505

  5. How polyelectrolyte adsorption depends on history: A combined Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection and surface forces study

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhishvili, S.A.; Dhinojwala, A.; Granick, S.

    1999-11-23

    The authors present a systematic study of how adsorption history affects the thickness, surface forces, and interfacial rheology of a model cationic polymer. The polymer was quaternized poly-4-vinylpyridine, QPVP (weight average degree of polymerization n{sub w} = 325 and 98% quaternized with ethyl bromide). The main comparisons concerned one-step adsorption from solution at a variable salt concentration up to 0.5 NaCl, versus two-step adsorption (initial adsorption from buffer solution without added salt, then NaCl added later). The aqueous solutions were buffered at pH = 9.2 such that the surfaces (mica in the case of surfaces forces (SFA) experiments, oxidized silicon in the case of in situ infrared (FTIR-ATR) experiments) in each case carried a large negative charge. The SFA and FTIR-ATR experiments gave consistent estimates of the amount of polymer adsorbed, confirming the expectation that adsorption should be driven by electrostatic attraction to the surface of large opposite charge. The adsorbed amount showed little dependence on path, validating the common assumption of equilibration in this respect. However the layer thickness measured by surface forces, the shear nanorheology response at a given surface force, and the dichroism of pendant side groups of the polymer all showed a pronounced dependence on the path to reach the adsorbed state. The authors interpret the measurements to suggest that two-step adsorption produces an inhomogeneous layer comprised of a dense layer of segments closest to the solid surface and a sparse outer layer. In particular, two-step adsorption produced thicker layers and a greater tendency to decouple shear forces from those that resist compression in the normal direction, thereby lessening the shear forces at a given level of normal force.

  6. Impact of carbon nanotube morphology on phenanthrene adsorption.

    PubMed

    Apul, Onur Guven; Shao, Ting; Zhang, Shujuan; Karanfil, Tanju

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the roles of the specific surface area (SSA), diameter, and length of carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the adsorption of phenanthrene (PNT) by analyzing the adsorption isotherms obtained with several single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). At low equilibrium concentrations (e.g., 1 ppb), MWNTs with larger outer diameters exhibited higher PNT adsorption capacity on an SSA basis than those with smaller diameters. With increasing equilibrium concentration, adsorption on an SSA basis became independent of MWNT diameter, and the total surface area controlled maximum adsorption capacity. A similar analysis for the adsorption of naphthalene, a planar molecule with one less benzene ring but 20 times higher solubility than PNT, showed no correlation with respect to MWNT outer diameter. The results indicated that the surface curvature of MWNT was more important on the adsorption of PNT than on the adsorption of naphthalene. Specific surface area normalized isotherms did not show a correlation between PNT adsorption and lengths of SWNTs and MWNTs. Characterization results indicated that the morphology of CNTs plays an important role on the SSA and pore volume. Data from the manufacturer may not always represent the characteristics of CNTs in a particular batch. Therefore, accurate characterization of CNTs is critical to systematically examine the behavior of CNTs, such as adsorption and transport, in environmental systems. PMID:22002628

  7. Quantifying nisin adsorption behavior at pendant PEO layers

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Justen K.; Auxier, Julie A.; Schilke, Karl F.; McGuire, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide nisin shows potent activity against Gram-positive bacteria including the most prevalent implant-associated pathogens. Its mechanism of action minimizes the opportunity for the rise of resistant bacteria and it does not appear to be toxic to humans, suggesting good potential for its use in antibacterial coatings for selected medical devices. A more quantitative understanding of nisin loading and release from polyethylene oxide (PEO) brush layers will inform new strategies for drug storage and delivery, and in this work optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy was used to record changes in adsorbed mass during cyclic adsorption-elution experiments with nisin, at uncoated and PEO-coated surfaces. PEO layers were prepared by radiolytic grafting of Pluronic® surfactant F108 or F68 to silanized silica surfaces, producing long- or short-chain PEO layers, respectively. Kinetic patterns were interpreted with reference to a model accounting for history-dependent adsorption, in order to evaluate rate constants for nisin adsorption and desorption, as well as the effect of pendant PEO on the lateral clustering behavior of nisin. Nisin adsorption was observed at the uncoated and F108-coated surfaces, but not at the F68-coated surfaces. Nisin showed greater resistance to elution by peptide-free buffer at the uncoated surface, and lateral rearrangement and clustering of adsorbed nisin was apparent only at the uncoated surface. We conclude peptide entrapment at the F108-coated surface is governed by a hydrophobic inner region of the PEO brush layer that is not sufficient for nisin entrapment in the case of the shorter PEO chains of the F68-coated surface. PMID:23445762

  8. Adsorption studies of chromium (VI) removal from water by lanthanum diethanolamine hybrid material.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sandip; Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Giri, Anil Kumar; Patel, Raj Kishore

    2014-01-01

    In the present research work, lanthanum diethanolamine hybrid material is synthesized by co-precipitation method and used for the removal of Cr(VI) from synthetic dichromate solution and hand pump water sample. The sorption experiments were carried out in batch mode to optimize various influencing parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, competitive anions and temperature. The characterization of the material and mechanism of Cr(VI) adsorption on the material was studied by using scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and thermogravimetric analysis-differential thermal analysis. Adsorption kinetics studies reveal that the adsorption process followed first-order kinetics and intraparticle diffusion model with correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. The adsorption data were best fitted to linearly transformed Langmuir isotherm with correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.997. The maximum removal of Cr(VI) is found to be 99.31% at optimal condition: pH = 5.6 of the solution, adsorbent dose of 8 g L(-1) with initial concentration of 10mgL(-1) of Cr(VI) solution and an equilibrium time of 50 min. The maximum adsorption capacity of the material is 357.1 mg g(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were evaluated to study the effect of temperature on the removal process. The study shows that the adsorption process is feasible and endothermic in nature. The value of E (260.6 kJ mol(-1)) indicates the chemisorption nature of the adsorption process. The material is difficult to be regenerated. The above studies indicate that the hybrid material is capable of removing Cr(VI) from water. PMID:24645464

  9. Peat and coconut fiber as biofilters for chromium adsorption from contaminated wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Henryk, Kołoczek; Jarosław, Chwastowski; Witold, Żukowski

    2016-01-01

    Batch adsorption experiments were performed for the removal of chromium (III) and chromium (VI) ions from aqueous solutions using Canadian peat and coconut fiber. The Langmuir model was used to describe the adsorption isotherm. The maximum adsorption for peat reached 18.75 mg/g for Cr(III) and 8.02 mg/g for Cr(VI), whereas the value for fiber was slightly higher and reached 19.21 mg/g for Cr(III) and 9.54 mg/g for Cr(VI). Both chromium forms could be easily eluted from the materials. The adsorption of chromium forms to organic matter could be explained in terms of formation of donor-acceptor chemical covalent bound with hydroxyl groups as ligands and chromium as the central atom in the formed complex. The chromate-reducing activities were monitored with the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results showed that both adsorption and reduction occurred simultaneously and the maximum adsorption capacity of hexavalent chromium being equal to 95% for fiber and 92% for peat was obtained at pH 1.5. The reduction of Cr(VI) in wastewaters began immediately and disappeared after 20 h. Both materials contained yeast and fungi species which can be responsible for reduction of chromium compounds, due to their enzymatic activity (Chwastowski and Koloczek (Acta Biochim Pol 60: 829-834, 2013)). The reduction of Cr(VI) is a two-phase process, the first phase being rapid and based on chemical reaction and the second phase having biological features. After the recovery step, both types of organic materials can be used again for chromium adsorption without any loss in the metal uptake. Both of the materials could be used as biofilters in the wastewater treatment plants. PMID:26315594

  10. Adsorption of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Studies were undertaken of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols from aqueous solution on granular activated carbon (Filtrasorb-400, 30 x 40 mesh). Single-component equilibrium adsorption data on the eight compounds in two concentration ranges at pH 7.0 fit the Langmuir equation better than the Freundlich equation. The adsorptive capacities at pH 7.0 increase from pentachlorophenol to trichlorophenols and are fairly constant from trichlorophenols to monochlorophenols. The adsorption process was found to be exothermic for pentachlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and endothermic for 2,4-dichlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol. Equilibrium measurements were also conducted for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 4-chlorophenol over a wide pH range. A surface complexation model was proposed to describe the effect of pH on adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on activated carbon. The simulations of the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Batch kinetics studies were conducted of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols on granular activated carbon. The results show that the surface reaction model best describes both the short-term and long-term kinetics, while the external film diffusion model describes the short-term kinetics data very well and the linear-driving-force approximation improved its performance for the long-term kinetics. Multicomponent adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon was investigated in the micromolar equilibrium concentration range. The Langmuir competitive and Ideal Adsorbed Solution (IAS) models were tested for their performance on the three binary systems of pentachlorophenol/2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and the tertiary system of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and found to fail to predict the two-component adsorption equilibria of the former two binary systems and the tertiary system.

  11. Argon adsorption in open-ended single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rols, S.; Johnson, M.R.; Zeppenfeld, P.; Bienfait, M.; Vilches, O.E.; Schneble, J.

    2005-04-15

    Thermodynamic and neutron-diffraction measurements combined with molecular dynamics simulation are used to determine the adsorption energies and the structure of argon condensed in the various adsorption sites of purified open-ended single-wall nanotube bundles. On the basis of these experiments and the simulation results, a consistent adsorption scenario has been derived. The adsorption proceeds first by the population of the walls inside the open nanotubes and the formation of one-dimensional Ar chains in the grooves at the outer surface of the bundles, followed by the filling of the remaining axial sites inside the nanotubes and the completion of a quasihexagonal monolayer on the outer surface of the bundle. The measurements also provide an estimate of the relative abundance of the various adsorption sites revealing that a major part of the adsorbed Ar is stored inside the open-ended nanotubes. Nanotube bundles generally show a certain degree of heterogeneity and some interstitial sites should be populated over a range of Ar chemical potential. However, for the sample used here, diffraction data and simulations suggest that heterogeneity is not a key feature of the bundles and there is little direct evidence of interstitial sites being populated.

  12. Dependence of the adsorption of chiral compounds on their enantiomeric composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Alexander D.; Karakalos, Stavros; Zaera, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption of two different chiral molecules on platinum surfaces has been explored as a function of enantiomeric composition. In the first case, the saturation monolayers obtained by the adsorption of 1-(naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA) from CCl4 solutions were characterized in situ by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). It was found that racemic mixtures yield different IR spectra than those obtained from enantiopure monolayers, a behavior that was interpreted as the result of the formation of racemate pairs via hydrogen bonding at the amine moiety also responsible for bonding to the surface. NEA adsorption under these conditions is reversible and can be modified by subsequent exposures to solutions of different chiral compositions, but that appears to take place only via changes in the relative fractions of enantiopure versus racemic domains on the surface; no other enantiomeric ratios are apparent in the IR data. The second study focused on the uptake of propylene oxide (PO) on Pt(111) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. In that case, racemic monolayers show densities up to ~ 20% lower than those obtained with one single enantiomer. This can be explained by kinetic arguments, since data from isothermal molecular-beam experiments indicated that the PO sticking coefficient depends on the chirality of the incoming PO molecules relative to that of the neighboring adsorbed PO species. Monte Carlo simulations could reproduce the experimental data by assuming adsorbate-assisted adsorption and enantiospecific adsorption geometries for molecules impinging on sites adjacent to previously adsorbed surface species.

  13. Competitive removal of pharmaceuticals from environmental waters by adsorption and photocatalytic degradation.

    PubMed

    Rioja, N; Benguria, P; Peñas, F J; Zorita, S

    2014-10-01

    This work explores the competitive removal of pharmaceuticals from synthetic and environmental waters by combined adsorption-photolysis treatment. Five drugs usually present in waterways have been used as target compounds, some are pseudo-persistent pollutants (carbamazepine, clofibric acid, and sulfamethoxazole) and others are largely consumed (diclofenac and ibuprofen). The effect of the light source on adsorption of drugs onto activated carbons followed by photolysis with TiO2 was assessed, being UV-C light the most effective for drug removal in both deionized water and river water. Different composites prepared from titania nanoparticles and powdered activated carbons were tested in several combined adsorption-photocatalysis assays. The composites prepared by calcination at 400 °C exhibited much better performance than those synthesized at 500 °C, being the C400 composite the most effective one. Furthermore, some synthetic waters containing dissolved species and environmental waters were used to investigate the effect of the aqueous matrix on each drug removal. In general, photocatalyst deactivation was found in synthetic and environmental waters. This was particularly evident in the experiments performed with bicarbonate ions as well as with wastewater effluent. In contrast, tests conducted in seawater showed adsorption and photocatalytic degradation yields comparable to those obtained in deionized water. Considering the peculiarities of substrate competition in each aqueous matrix, the combined adsorption-photolysis treatment generally increased the overall elimination of drugs in water. PMID:24532206

  14. Adsorption studies of cadmium ions on alginate-calcium carbonate composite beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Zahid; Amin, Athar; Zafar, Uzma; Raza, Muhammad Amir; Hafeez, Irfan; Akram, Adnan

    2015-07-01

    Alginate-calcium carbonate composite material was prepared in the form of beads and characterized using Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The adsorption of Cd2+ ions was studied through batch experiments. The adsorption parameters such as contact time (120 min), adsorbent dose (1.5 g), initial metal ion concentration(10 mg/L), pH (6) and agitation speed (150 rpm) were optimized at room temperature. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were applied to the data and it was noted that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions is better explained by Freundlich model. The kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions followed pseudo-first order kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters like ∆G 0, ∆H 0 and ∆S 0 were calculated and on the basis of these values it was established that the adsorption process is feasible and endothermic in nature. It was concluded from the study that the composite material of alginate and calcium carbonate can effectively be used to recover Cd2+ ions from wastewater.

  15. Adsorption behavior of antimony(III) oxyanions on magnetite surface in aqueous organic acid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Vinit K.; Bera, Santanu; Narasimhan, S. V.; Velmurugan, S.

    2013-02-01

    Antimony(III) adsorption is observed on magnetite (Fe3O4) surface under acidic and reducing condition through surface hydroxyl (SOH) groups bonding on Fe3O4 surface. Desorption of adsorbed Sb(III) is observed from Fe3O4 surface along with iron release in organic acid at 85 °C after 5 h of experiment. Tartaric acid (TA) shows minimum Sb(III) adsorption on Fe3O4 among the organic acid studied. The reason is TA having two sets of adjacent functional groups viz. Odbnd Csbnd OH and Csbnd OH which are responsible for the formation of five-membered bidendate chelate with Sb(III). Other oxyanions, cations or complexing agents along with TA influences the Sb(III) adsorption on Fe3O4. The surface of magnetite is modified by the addition of fatty acids viz. Lauric acid, benzoic acid to bind the Ssbnd OH groups present on the surface. This results in delaying the process of adsorption without changing the quantity of saturation adsorption of Sb(III) on Fe3O4 surface.

  16. Exploring molecular sieve capabilities of activated carbon fibers to reduce the impact of NOM preloading on trichloroethylene adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tanju Karanfil; Seyed A. Dastgheib; Dina Mauldin

    2006-02-15

    Adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) by two activated carbon fibers ACF10 and ACF20H and two granular activated carbons, coal-based F400 and Macro preloaded with hydrophobic and transphilic fractions of natural organic matter (NOM) was examined. ACF10, the most microporous activated carbon used in this study, had over 90% of its pore volume in pores smaller than 10 {angstrom}. It also had the highest volume in pores 5-8 {angstrom}, which is the optimum pore size region for TCE adsorption, among the four activated carbons. Adsorption of NOM fractions by ACF10 was, in general, negligible. Therefore, ACF10, functioning as a molecular sieve during preloading, exhibited the least NOM uptake for each fraction, and subsequently the highest TCE adsorption. The other three sorbents had wider pore size distributions, including high volumes in pores larger than 10 {angstrom}, where NOM molecules can adsorb. As a result, they showed a higher degree of uptake for all NOM fractions, and subsequently lower adsorption capacities for TCE, as compared to ACF10. The results obtained in this study showed that understanding the interplay between the optimum pore size region for the adsorption of target synthetic organic contaminant (SOC) and the pore size region for the adsorption of NOM molecules is important for controlling NOM-SOC competitions. Experiments with different NOM fractions indicated that the degree of NOM loading is important in terms of preloading effects; however the way that the carbon pores are filled and loaded by different NOM fractions can be different and may create an additional negative impact on TCE adsorption. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Chemisorption of estrone in nylon microfiltration membranes: Adsorption mechanism and potential use for estrone removal from water.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Qiu, Wei; Hu, Jiangyong; Gao, Wei

    2012-03-01

    Estrone is a representative steroid estrogen contaminant that has been detected in effluents from sewage treatment facilities, as well as in surface and ground waters. Our study shows that estrone can be readily removed from water via a unique chemisorption mechanism using nylon microfiltration membranes. Experiments on a laboratory in-line filtration system showed instant removal of estrone from 200 μg/l aqueous solutions by 0.45-μm nylon membranes (ca. 35 L per m(2) membrane). Comparisons with 0.45-μm PVDF, PTFE and glass microfiber membranes suggested that the significant estrone adsorption in nylon membrane should be predominately driven by a different mechanism rather than common physical adsorption. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study on nylon membranes and a model compound, N-methylacetamide, showed that the significant adsorption originated from the hydrogen bonding between terminal -OH groups on estrone molecules and nucleophile -C=O groups in amide groups of nylon 6,6. The saturated nylon membrane showed very low leachability in ambient water, while it could be effectively regenerated in alkaline or ethanol solutions. Preliminary reusability study showed that the membrane maintained a consistent adsorption capacity for estrone during ten cycles of reuse. The chemisorption-based polymeric adsorption may provide a new alternative approach for removing estrone and potentially other trace organic contaminants from water. PMID:22189293

  18. Adsorption of SOx and NOx in activated viscose fibers.

    PubMed

    Plens, Ana Carolina O; Monaro, Daniel L G; Coutinho, Aparecido R

    2015-01-01

    SOx and NOx are emissions resulting from combustion processes and are the main agents that contribute to the formation of acid rain, which causes harm to humans and the environment. Several techniques for removing these pollutants are applied in i.e. oil refineries, thermoelectric that use petroleum oils and vehicular pollution. Among these, highlight the adsorption of contaminants by the usage of activated carbon fibers and activated carbon, which are characterized by high surface area and uniform distribution of pores, providing appropriate conditions for application in processes of removing environmental contaminants. In the present work, activated viscose fibers (AVF) were prepared and applied in adsorption experiments of NO and SO2. The materials produced showed high values of surface area, with a predominance of micro pores with diameters in the range of 1.0 nm. The AVF had satisfactory performance in the removal of contaminants and are compatible with other synthetic fibers. Thus, the formation of active sites of carbon provides contaminants adsorption, demonstrating that carbon fibers cloth can be applied for the removal of pollutants. PMID:25993357

  19. Adsorption orientations and immunological recognition of antibodies on graphene.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Dumitru, A C; Herruzo, Elena T; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Garcia, Ricardo; Serena, P A; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid are combined to characterize the adsorption of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies over a hydrophobic surface modeled with a three-layer graphene slab. We consider explicitly the water solvent, simulating systems with massive sizes (up to 770 000 atoms), for four different adsorption orientations. Protocols based on steered MD to speed up the protein diffusion stage and to enhance the dehydration process are combined with long simulation times (>150 ns) in order to make sure that the final adsorption states correspond to actual stable configurations. Our MD results and the AFM images demonstrate that the IgG antibodies are strongly adsorbed, do not unfold, and retain their secondary and tertiary structures upon deposition. Statistical analysis of the AFM images shows that many of the antibodies adopt vertical orientations, even at very small coverages, which expose at least one Fab binding site for recognition events. Single molecule force spectroscopy experiments demonstrate the immunological response of the deposited antibodies by recognizing its specific antigens. The above properties together with the strong anchoring and preservation of the secondary structure, make graphene an excellent candidate for the development of immunosensors. PMID:27352029

  20. SANS Investigations of CO2 Adsorption in Microporous Carbon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; He, Lilin; Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Carmichael, Justin R.

    2015-08-07

    The high pressure adsorption behavior of CO2 at T = 296 K in microporous carbon was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique. A strong densification of CO2 in micropores accompanied by non-monotonic adsorption-induced pore deformation was observed. The density of confined CO2 increases rapidly with pressure and reaches the liquid –like density at 20 bar, which corresponds to the relative pressure of P/Psat ~0.3. At P > 20 bar density of confined CO2 increases slowly approaching a plateau at higher pressure. The size of micropores first increases with pressure, reaches a maximum at 20 bar,more » and then decreases with pressure. A complementary SANS experiment conducted on the same microporous carbon saturated with neutron-transparent and non-adsorbing inert gas argon shows no deformation of micropores at pressures up to ~200 bars. This result demonstrates that the observed deformation of micropores in CO2 is an adsorption-induced phenomenon, caused by the solvation pressure - induced strain and strong densification of confined CO2 .« less

  1. Adsorption combined with ultrafiltration to remove organic matter from seawater.

    PubMed

    Tansakul, Chatkaew; Laborie, Stéphanie; Cabassud, Corinne

    2011-12-01

    Organic fouling and biofouling are the major severe types of fouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes in seawater (SW) desalination. Low pressure membrane filtration such as ultrafiltration (UF) has been developed as a pre-treatment before reverse osmosis. However, UF alone may not be an effective enough pre-treatment because of the existence of low-molecular weight dissolved organic matter in seawater. Therefore, the objective of the present work is to study a hybrid process, powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption/UF, with real seawater and to evaluate its performance in terms of organic matter removal and membrane fouling. The effect of different PAC types and concentrations is evaluated. Stream-activated wood-based PAC addition increased marine organic matter removal by up to 70% in some conditions. Moreover, coupling PAC adsorption with UF decreased UF membrane fouling and the fouling occurring during short-term UF was totally reversible. It can be concluded that the hybrid PAC adsorption/UF process performed in crossflow filtration mode is a relevant pre-treatment process before RO desalination, allowing organic matter removal of 75% and showing no flux decline for short-term experiments. PMID:21996607

  2. Reversible adsorption of hydrogen chloride to ice surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Stefan; Kippenberger, Matthias; Crowley, John

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen chloride is the most important reservoir of gaseous, reactive chlorine in the atmosphere. Although several laboratory investigations of the interaction of HCl with ice surfaces have been conducted, there is still great uncertainty associated with the adsorption isotherms of HCl on ice, which is largely a consequence of most previous studies being unable to work at concentrations relevant for the atmosphere and to explore the non-saturated part of the isotherm at sub-monolayer coverage. We have conducted experiments on HCl uptake on ice surfaces at temperatures between 190 and 220 K, using a coated wall flow tube. HCl at concentrations as low as 2 × 109 molecule cm3 (~10-8 Torr) was detected using a chemical-ionization, quadrupole mass spectrometer. The equilibrium surface coverage of HCl on ice could be interpreted using the Langmuir-model to derive partition coefficients (KLang). We find that the dissociative Langmuir isotherm describes our data significantly better than the non-dissociative type. Surprisingly, and in contrast to the behavior of the majority of traces-gases which adsorb reversibly on ice surfaces, the partition-coefficients we derive for HCl do not show a systematic dependence on temperature, precluding the simple derivation of an adsorption enthalpy and indicating the presence of more complex adsorption and desorption mechanisms for strong acids ionizing on the surface compared to H-bonded trace gases.

  3. Microscopic Theory of Hysteretic Hydrogen Adsorption in Nanoporous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, J.; Wei, S. H.; Kim, Y. H.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding gas adsorption confined in nanoscale pores is a fundamental issue with broad applications in catalysis and gas storage. Recently, hysteretic H{sub 2} adsorption was observed in several nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Here, using first-principles calculations and simulated adsorption/desorption isotherms, we present a microscopic theory of the enhanced adsorption hysteresis of H{sub 2} molecules using the MOF Co(1,4-benzenedipyrazolate) [Co(BDP)] as a model system. Using activated H{sub 2} diffusion along the small-pore channels as a dominant equilibration process, we demonstrate that the system shows hysteretic H{sub 2} adsorption under changes of external pressure. For a small increase of temperature, the pressure width of the hysteresis, as well as the adsorption/desorption pressure, dramatically increases. The sensitivity of gas adsorption to temperature changes is explained by the simple thermodynamics of the gas reservoir. Detailed analysis of transient adsorption dynamics reveals that the hysteretic H{sub 2} adsorption is an intrinsic adsorption characteristic in the diffusion-controlled small-pore systems.

  4. Novel sandwich structure adsorptive membranes for removal of 4-nitrotoluene from water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuexin; Jia, Zhiqian

    2016-11-01

    Novel sandwich PES-SPES/PS-PDVB/PTFE adsorptive membranes were prepared by a filtration/immersion precipitation method and employed for the removal of 4-nitrotoluene from water. The static adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics, dynamic adsorption/desorption and membrane reusability were investigated. The results showed that the Freundlich model describes the adsorption isotherm satisfactorily. With increased PS-PDVB content, the maximum static adsorption capacity, partition coefficient, apparent adsorption rate constant, and dynamic adsorption capacity all significantly increased. The sandwich membranes showed much higher removal efficiency and adsorption capacity than those of mixed matrix membranes. With respect to dynamics adsorption/desorption, the sandwich membranes exhibited excellent reusability, with a removal efficiency greater than 95% even after five recycles. PMID:27322899

  5. Removal of reactive dyes from wastewater by adsorption on coir pith activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Santhy, K; Selvapathy, P

    2006-07-01

    The removal efficiency of activated carbon prepared from coir pith towards three highly used reactive dyes in textile industry was investigated. Batch experiments showed that the adsorption of dyes increased with an increase in contact time and carbon dose. Maximum de-colorisation of all the dyes was observed at acidic pH. Adsorption of dyes was found to follow the Freundlich model. Kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption followed first order and the values of the Lagergren rate constants of the dyes were in the range of 1.77 x 10(-2)-2.69 x 10(-2)min(-1). The column experiments using granular form of the carbon (obtained by agglomeration with polyvinyl acetate) showed that adsorption efficiency increased with an increase in bed depth and decrease of flow rate. The bed depth service time (BDST) analysis carried out for the dyes indicated a linear relationship between bed depth and service time. The exhausted carbon could be completely regenerated and put to repeated use by elution with 1.0M NaOH. The coir pith activated carbon was not only effective in removal of colour but also significantly reduced COD levels of the textile wastewater. PMID:16040240

  6. Ligand Functionalization in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Enhanced Carbon Dioxide Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Peng, Junjie; Li, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Ligand functionalization in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been studied extensively and has been demonstrated to enhance gas adsorption and induce interesting gas adsorption phenomena. This account summarizes our recent study of three series of MOFs by ligand functionalization, as well as their carbon dioxide adsorption properties. While ligand functionalization does not change the overall structure of the frameworks, it can influence their gas adsorption behavior. In the first two series, we show how ligand functionalization influences the CO2 affinity and adsorption capacity of MOFs. We also show a special case in which subtle changes in ligand functionality alter the CO2 adsorption profile. PMID:27071491

  7. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show. PMID:23631336

  8. Titanium-incorporated organic–inorganic hybrid adsorbent for improved CO{sub 2} adsorption performance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoyun; Qin, Hongyan; Zhang, Sisi; Wu, Wei

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Titanium-incorporated organic–inorganic hybrid adsorbent was prepared. • The incorporation of Ti to the adsorbent showed significant effect. • The sorbent shows high CO{sub 2} capture capacity both in pure and diluted CO{sub 2} at RT. • The sorbent exhibits a high recycling stability after 15 cycling runs. - Abstract: The CO{sub 2} adsorption performance of acrylonitrile (AN)–tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) adduct (hereafter referred to as TN) impregnated adsorbent was greatly enhanced by introduction of Titanium atom into the silica matrix. The adsorbents were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The adsorption experiments together with the physicochemical characterization demonstrated that these adsorbents containing an optimal amount of Titanium (Ti/Si ≈ 0.1) remarkably reinforced the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and recycling stability. The highest CO{sub 2} uptakes reached 4.65 and 1.80 mmol CO{sub 2}/g adsorbent at 25 °C under 90% CO{sub 2} (CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, 90:10 V/V) and 1% CO{sub 2} (CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, 1:99 V/V) conditions for sample Ti(0.1)-DMS-TN, respectively. Repeated adsorption/desorption cycles revealed that the Ti-incorporated adsorbent showed only a tiny decrease in adsorption capacity (1.778 mmol CO{sub 2}/g adsorbent after 15 cycles, decreased by 0.95%), significantly enhanced the adsorbent recycling stability.

  9. Adsorption of Roxarsone onto Drinking Water Treatment Residuals: Preliminary Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, J.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Sharma, S.

    2006-05-01

    Roxarsone (3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenyl-arsonic acid) is an organo-arsenical compound, commonly used as a feed additive in the broiler poultry industry to control coccidial intestinal parasites. Roxarsone is not toxic to the birds not only because of the low dose, and also because it most likely does not convert to toxic inorganic arsenic (As) in their systems. However, upon excretion, roxarsone may undergo transformation to inorganic As, posing a serious risk of contaminating the agricultural land and water bodies via surface runoff or leaching. The use of poultry litter as fertilizer results in As accumulation rates of up to 50 metric tons per year in agricultural lands. The immediate challenge, as identified by the various regulatory bodies in recent years is to develop an efficient, yet cost-effective and environmentally sound approach to cleaning up such As- contaminated soils. Recent studies conducted by our group have suggested that the drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) can effectively retain As, thereby decreasing its mobility in the environment. The WTRs are byproducts of drinking water treatment processes and are typically composed of amorphous Fe/Al oxides, activated C and cationic polymers. They can be obtained free-of-cost from water treatment plants. It is well demonstrated that the environmental mobility of As is controlled by adsorption/desorption reactions onto mineral surfaces. Hence, knowledge of adsorption and desorption of As onto the WTRs is of environmental relevance. The reported study examined the adsorption and desorption characteristics of As using two types of WTRs, namely the Fe-WTRs (byproduct of Fe salt treatment), and the Al-WTRs (byproduct of Al salt treatment). All adsorption experiments were carried out in batch and As retention on the WTRs was investigated as a function of solid/solution ratio (1:5, 1:10, 1:25 and 1:50), equilibration time (10 min - 48 hr), pH (2 - 10) and initial As load (100, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg As/L). The

  10. The adsorption of copper in a packed-bed of chitosan beads: modeling, multiple adsorption and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Osifo, Peter O; Neomagus, Hein W J P; Everson, Raymond C; Webster, Athena; vd Gun, Marius A

    2009-08-15

    In this study, exoskeletons of Cape rock lobsters were used as raw material in the preparation of chitin that was successively deacetylated to chitosan flakes. The chitosan flakes were modified into chitosan beads and the beads were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde in order to study copper adsorption and regeneration in a packed-bed column. Five consecutive adsorption and desorption cycles were carried out and a chitosan mass loss of 25% was observed, after the last cycle. Despite the loss of chitosan material, an improved efficiency in the second and third cycles was observed with the adsorbent utilizing 97 and 74% of its adsorbent capacity in the second and third cycles, respectively. The fourth and fifth cycles, however, showed a decreased efficiency, and breakage of the beads was observed after the fifth cycle. In the desorption experiments, 91-99% of the adsorbed copper was regenerated in the first three cycles. It was also observed that the copper can be regenerated at a concentration of about a thousand fold the initial concentration. The first cycle of adsorption could be accurately described with a shrinking core particle model combined with a plug flow column model. The input parameters for this model were determined by batch characterization methods, with as only fitting parameter, the effective diffusion coefficient of copper in the bead. PMID:19321260

  11. Adsorption and growth morphology of rare-earth metals on graphene studied by ab initio calculations and scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, C. Z.; Hupalo, M.; Yao, Y. X.; Tringides, M. C.; Lu, W. C.; Ho, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    Adsorption of rare-earth (RE) adatoms (Nd, Gd, Eu, and Yb) on graphene was studied by first-principles calculations based on the density-functional theory. The calculations show that the hollow site of graphene is the energetically favorable adsorption site for all the RE adatoms studied. The adsorption energies and diffusion barriers of Nd and Gd on graphene are found to be larger than those of Eu and Yb. Comparison with scanning tunneling microscopy experiments for Gd and Eu epitaxially grown on graphene confirms these calculated adsorption and barrier differences, since fractal-like islands are observed for Gd and flat-topped crystalline islands for Eu. The formation of flat Eu islands on graphene can be attributed to its low diffusion barrier and relatively larger ratio of adsorption energy to its bulk cohesive energy. The interactions between the Nd and Gd adatoms and graphene cause noticeable in-plane lattice distortions in the graphene layer. Adsorption of the RE adatoms on graphene also induces significant electric dipole and magnetic moments.

  12. The fabrication of porous N-doped carbon from widely available urea formaldehyde resin for carbon dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Du, Zhenyu; Song, Hao; Wang, Chuangye; Subhan, Fazle; Xing, Wei; Yan, Zifeng

    2014-02-15

    N-doped carbon material constitutes abundant of micropores and basic nitrogen species that have potential implementation for CO2 capture. In this paper, porous carbon material with high nitrogen content was simply fabricated by carbonizing low cost and widely available urea formaldehyde resin, and then followed by KOH activation. CO2 capture experiment showed high adsorption capacity of 3.21 mmol g(-1) at 25 °C under 1 atm for UFCA-2-600. XRD, SEM, XPS and FT-IR analysis confirmed that a graphitic-like structure was retained even after high temperature carbonization and strong base activation. Textural property analysis revealed that narrow micropores, especially below 0.8 nm, were effective for CO2 adsorption by physical adsorption mechanism. Chemical evolved investigation revealed that graphitic-like embedded basic nitrogen groups are generated from bridged and terminal amines of urea formaldehyde resin from thermal carbonization and KOH activation treatment, which is responsible for the enrichment of CO2 capacity by chemical adsorption mechanism. The relationship between CO2 adsorption capacity and pore size or basic N species was also studied, which turned out that both of them played crucial role by physical and chemical adsorption mechanism, respectively. PMID:24370411

  13. Adsorption of Anionic, Cationic and Nonionic Surfactants on Carbonate Rock in Presence of ZrO 2 Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Pouriya; Bahramian, Alireza; Fakhroueian, Zahra

    The adsorption of surfactants at the solid-water interface is important for the control of wetting, lubrication, detergency and in mineral flotation.We have studied the adsorptions of different types of surfactants, cationic (Dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide, DTAB), anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) and non-anionic (lauryl alcohol-7 mole ethoxylate, LA7) on carbonate rock in presence of zirconium oxide spherical nanoparticles (17-19 nm). ZrO2 nanoparticles with tetrahedral structure have significant effect on adsorption of surfactants on the carbonate rock. We have used the measured conductivities to determine the rate of adsorption of surfactants at rock-water interfaces. The conductivity of DTAB in aqueous solutions containing calcite powder decreases more than the other surfactants in contact with ZrO2 nanoparticles. We have also investigated the adsorption of surfactants at the air-water interface. The presence of nanoparticles, as demonstrated by our experiments, enhances the surface activity and surface adsorption of the surfactants through electrostatic forces or formation of nanostructures. Dynamic light structuring data shows similar aggregation number of nanoparticles in presence of nanoparticles.

  14. Accurate Treatment of Electrostatics during Molecular Adsorption in Nanoporous Crystals without Assigning Point Charges to Framework Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T; Manz, TA; Sholl, DS

    2011-03-24

    Molecular simulations have become an important complement to experiments for studying gas adsorption and separation in crystalline nanoporous materials. Conventionally, these simulations use force fields that model adsorbate-pore interactions by assigning point charges to the atoms of the adsorbent. The assignment of framework charges always introduces ambiguity because there are many different choices for defining point charges, even when the true electron density of a material is known. We show how to completely avoid such ambiguity by using the electrostatic potential energy surface (EPES) calculated from plane wave density functional theory (DFT). We illustrate this approach by simulating CO(2) adsorption in four metal-organic frameworks (MOFs): IRMOF-1, ZIE-8, ZIE-90, and Zn(nicotinate)(2). The resulting CO(2) adsorption isotherms are insensitive to the exchange-correlation functional used in the DFT calculation of the EPES but are sensitive to changes in the crystal structure and lattice parameters. Isotherms computed from the DFT EPES are compared to those computed from several point charge models. This comparison makes possible, for the first time, an unbiased assessment of the accuracy of these point charge models for describing adsorption in MOFs. We find an unusually high Henry's constant (109 mmol/g.bar) and intermediate isosteric heat of adsorption (34.9 kJ/mol) for Zn(nicotinate)(2), which makes it a potentially attractive mateiial for CO(2) adsorption applications.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Chitosan/Feldspar Biohybrid as an Adsorbent: Optimization of Adsorption Process via Response Surface Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Maryam; Bahrami, Hajir; Arami, Mokhtar

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan/feldspar biobased beads were synthesized, characterized, and tested for the removal of Acid Black 1 dye from aquatic phases. A four-factor central composite design (CCD) accompanied by response surface modeling (RSM) and optimization was used to optimize the dye adsorption by the adsorbent (chitosan/feldspar composite) in 31 different batch experiments. Independent variables of temperature, pH, initial dye concentration, and adsorbent dose were used to change to coded values. To anticipate the responses, a quadratic model was applied. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) tested the significance of the process factors and their interactions. The adequacy of the model was investigated by the correlation between experimental and predicted data of the adsorption and the calculation of prediction errors. The results showed that the predicted maximum adsorption amount of 21.63 mg/g under the optimum conditions (pH 3, temperature 15°C, initial dye concentration 125 mg/L, and dose 0.2 g/50 mL) was close to the experimental value of 19.85 mg/g. In addition, the results of adsorption behaviors of the dye illustrated that the adsorption process followed the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Langmuir sorption capacity was found to be 17.86 mg/g. Besides, thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and revealed that the adsorption process was exothermic and favourable. PMID:24587722

  16. Zn isotope fractionation during adsorption on birnessite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, A. L.; Dong, S.; Wasylenki, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of zinc (Zn), an important micronutrient in the ocean, may influence primary productivity and species composition within surface waters. The chemical speciation and bioavailability of Zn is governed by diverse abiotic and biotic processes. These processes include adsorption reactions at mineral/water interfaces, as nanoparticles of oxyhydroxide minerals are known to adsorb significant amounts of Zn in surface waters (and during formation of ferromanganese crusts). Investigation of Zn isotope fractionation caused by adsorption onto birnessite, the dominant manganese oxide mineral in ferromanganese crusts, may help to explain the enrichment of heavy Zn isotopes in ferromanganese crusts. This will provide insight into the role of adsorption of Zn to nanoparticulate minerals in surface waters and into the overall biogeochemical cycling of Zn. This work aims to determine the mechanism and magnitude of Zn isotope fractionation during adsorption onto synthetic birnessite (KMn2O4.1.5H2O). Our simple-system experiments involve mixing solutions of 130 ppb Zn with aliquots of birnessite suspension (proportions varied to give a range of surface coverage) and a fixed pH near that of seawater at ~8.5. The mixtures react for 48 hours. The recovered dissolved Zn and adsorbed Zn are then separated, purified, and analyzed isotopically on a Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS. Preliminary results show enrichment of light Zn isotopes on the mineral surfaces (Δ66/64Znsorbed-aqueous = -0.3‰). A time series will reveal whether this process is governed by equilibrium or Rayleigh fractionation. Contrary to our results, previously published studies led us to hypothesize that isotopically heavy Zn would adsorb compared to co-existing dissolved Zn. Maréchal et al. (2000) recorded ferromanganese crusts that were heavier than seawater with a mean δ66Zn value of 0.90‰. Dissolved Zn is octahedrally coordinated with oxygen atoms, but an EXAFS study by Manceau et al. (2002

  17. Synthesis of Quercetin Loaded Nanoparticles Based on Alginate for Pb(II) Adsorption in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yun; Jiang, Meng; Cui, Yuan-Lu; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Xia

    2015-10-01

    Pb(II) is a representative heavy metal in industrial wastewater, which may frequently cause serious hazard to living organisms. In this study, comparative studies between alginate nanoparticles (AN) and quercetin-decorated alginate nanoparticles (Q-AN) were investigated for Pb(II) ion adsorption. Characterization of AN and Q-AN were analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTG-DSC). The main operating conditions such as pH, initial concentration of Pb(II), and co-existing metal ions were also investigated using a batch experiment. AN and Q-AN, with a diameter of 95.06 and 58.23 nm, were constituted by many small primary nanoparticles. It revealed that when initial concentration of Pb(II) is between 250 and 1250 mg L-1, the adsorption rate and equilibrium adsorption were increased with the increase of pH from 2 to 7. The maximum adsorption capacities of 147.02 and 140.37 mg L-1 were achieved by AN and Q-AN, respectively, with 0.2 g adsorbents in 1000 mg L-1 Pb(II) at pH 7. The adsorption rate of Pb(II) was little influenced by the co-existing metal ions, such as Mn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II). Desorption experiments showed that Q-AN possessed a higher desorption rate than AN, which were 90.07 and 83.26 %, respectively. AN and Q-AN would probably be applied as adsorbents to remove Pb(II) and then recover it from wastewater for the advantages of simple preparation, high adsorption capacity, and recyclability.

  18. Adsorption on Highly Ordered Porous Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistura, Giampaolo; Bruschi, Lorenzo; Lee, Woo

    2016-04-01

    Porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is characterized by a regular arrangement of the pores with a narrow pore size distribution over extended areas, uniform pore depth, and solid pore walls without micropores. Thanks to significant improvements in anodization techniques, structural engineering of AAO allows to accurately tailor the pore morphology. These features make porous AAO an excellent substrate to study adsorption phenomena. In this paper, we review recent experiments involving the adsorption in porous AAO. Particular attention will be devoted to adsorption in straight and structured pores with a closed end which shed new light on fundamental issues like the origin of hysteresis in closed end pores and the nature of evaporation from ink-bottle pores. The results will be compared to those obtained in other synthetic materials like porous silicon and silica.

  19. Adsorption kinetics of silicic acid on akaganeite.

    PubMed

    Naren, Gaowa; Ohashi, Hironori; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2013-06-01

    As part of a series of studies on the interaction between ferric ions and silicic acid in the hydrosphere, the adsorption of silicic acid on akaganeite was investigated kinetically at various pH values. The adsorption of silicic acid increased with increasing pH over an initial pH range of 4-11.5. In the kinetic experiment, the Cl(-) was released from akaganeite much faster than silicic acid was adsorbed. From this result, we concluded that chloride ions bound on the surface of akaganeite are released and Fe-OH or Fe-O(-) sites are formed, which then acts as an adsorption site for silicic acid. The uptake mechanism of silicic acid by akaganeite is significantly different from that by schwertmannite, despite the presence of the same tunnel structure. PMID:23538050

  20. CRYOGENIC ADSORPTION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES OVER NANO-STRUCTURED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, S.; Heung, L.

    2010-10-07

    Porous materials such as zeolites, activated carbon, silica gels, alumina and a number of industrial catalysts are compared and ranked for hydrogen and deuterium adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. All samples show higher D{sub 2} adsorption than that of H{sub 2}, in which a HY sample has the greatest isotopic effect while 13X has the highest hydrogen uptake capacity. Material's moisture content has significant impact to its hydrogen uptake. A material without adequate drying could result in complete loss of its adsorption capacity. Even though some materials present higher H{sub 2} adsorption capacity at full pressure, their adsorption at low vapor pressure may not be as good as others. Adsorption capacity in a dynamic system is much less than in a static system. A sharp desorption is also expected in case of temperature upset.

  1. Adsorption studies of methylene blue dye on tunisian activated lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, A.; Hamdi, N.; Srasra, E.

    2011-02-01

    Activated carbon prepared from natural lignin, providing from a geological deposit, was used as the adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) dye from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to evaluate various experimental parameters like pH and contact time for the removal of this dye. Effective pH for MB removal was 11. Kinetic study showed that the adsorption of dye was gradual process. Quasi equilibrium reached in 4 h. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order were used to fit the experimental data. Pseudo-second-order rate equation was able to provide realistic description of adsorption kinetics. The experimental isotherms data were also modelled by the Langmuir and Freundlich equation of adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 147 mg/g. Activated lignin was shown to be a promising material for adsorption of MB from aqueous solutions.

  2. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  3. Adsorption of Amelogenin onto Self-Assembled and Fluoroapatite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Lea, Alan S.; Bernt, William; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2009-02-19

    Abstract. The interactions of proteins at surfaces are of great importance to biomineralizaton processes and to the development and function of biomaterials. Amelogenin is a unique biomineralization protein because it self-assembles to form supramolecular structures called “nanospheres,” spherical aggregates of monomers that are 20-60 nm in diameter. Although the nanosphere quaternary structure has been observed in solution, the quaternary structure of amelogenin adsorbed onto surfaces is also of great interest because the surface structure is critical to its function. We report studies of the adsorption of the amelogenin onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with COOH and CH3 end group functionality and single crystal fluoroapatite (FAP). Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments showed that the solutions contained nanospheres and aggregates of nanospheres. Protein adsorption onto the various substrates was evidenced by null ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and external reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ERFTIR). Although only nanospheres were observed in solution, ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the protein adsorbates were much smaller structures than the original nanospheres, from monomers to small oligomers in size. Monomer adsorption was promoted onto the CH3 surfaces and small oligomer adsorption was promoted onto the COOH and FAP substrates. In some cases, remnants of the original nanospheres adsorbed as multilayers on top of the underlying subnanosphere layers. This work suggests that amelogenin can adsorb by the “shedding” or disassembling of substructures from the nanospheres onto substrates and indicates that amelogenin may have a range of possible quaternary structures depending on whether it is in solution or interacting with surfaces.

  4. Adsorption of proteins onto poly(ether urethane) with a phosphorylcholine moiety and influence of preadsorbed phospholipid.

    PubMed

    van der Heiden, A P; Willems, G M; Lindhout, T; Pijpers, A P; Koole, L H

    1998-05-01

    In a previous report we demonstrated that the blood compatibility of poly(ether urethane) (PEU) was improved by grafting phosphorylcholine (PC) groups on the surface. The improved blood compatibility was indicated by decreased platelet adsorption/activation and reduced thrombin formation at the polymer surface in experiments in which the surfaces were contacted with platelet-rich plasma in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the effect of grafted PC groups at a PEU surface on protein and phospholipid adsorption. Adsorption of human fibrinogen (Fg), human serum albumin (Alb), human high-molecular-weight kininogen (HMWK), and dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) vesicles was measured by ellipsometry. For this purpose, thin PEU films were cast on silicon wafers. The polymer film was photochemically modified with a PC-containing aryl azide. The presence of PC groups on the polymer surface was demonstrated by ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis). The hydrophilicity of the polymer surface increased by the surface modification, as indicated by a decrease of the contact angle from 59 degrees before to 43 degrees after modification. Our data show that the presence of PC groups has little effect on the adsorption of proteins to a PEU surface. The highest adsorption was observed for Fg (0.49 microgram/cm2 on PC-modified PEU and 0.50 microgram/cm2 on PEU), followed by HMWK (0.28 microgram/cm2 on both PC-modified PEU and PEU), and Alb (0.16 microgram/cm2 on PC-modified PEU and 0.18 microgram/cm2 on PEU). Protein adsorption was further studied on a "biomembrane-like" DOPC bilayer formed on hydrophilic silicon. We found no protein adsorption on this DOPC bilayer. The adsorption of small unilamellar DOPC vesicles on the polymer surfaces amounted to about 0.06 microgram/cm2 (corresponding to circa 30% of monolayer coverage) and was similar for PC-modified PEU and PEU. Despite this partial surface coverage, preadsorbed DOPC on the polymer surface diminished the

  5. [Synthesis and Study on Adsorption Property of Congo Red Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Nanospheres].

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi-qiang; Chen, Fu-bin; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Zuo-long; Yang, Chun-yan; Zhang, Zhu-jun

    2015-07-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer nanospheres (MIP) were prepared with Congo red as the template, methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross linker, azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator, and acetonitrile as the porogen by precipitation polymerization. The morphology of MIP was characterized by SEM and TEM which showed that the diameter of MIP was nanometer grade (90 nm) and the shape was homogeneous. The specific surface area and pore volumes of MIP and NIP were examined through Brunauer-Emett-Teller method of nitrogen adsorption experiments. Then, the adsorption and selective recognition ability of MIPs were evaluated using the equilibrium rebinding experiments. The results indicated that the prepared MIP showed a good selectivity recognition ability to its template. It concluded that MIP could be employed as an effective material for removing Congo red from waste water. PMID:26489326

  6. Adsorption of PTCDA on Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Adsorption structures of the 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecule on the clean Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments in conjunction with first principles theoretical calculations. Four dominant adsorption structures were observed in the STM experiments and their atomic coordinates on the Si(001) surface were determined by comparison between the experimental STM images and the theoretical simulations. Maximizing the number of the Si—O bonds is more crucial than that of the Si—C bonds in the PTCDA adsorption.

  7. Adsorption of PTCDA on Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi

    2015-03-14

    Adsorption structures of the 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecule on the clean Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments in conjunction with first principles theoretical calculations. Four dominant adsorption structures were observed in the STM experiments and their atomic coordinates on the Si(001) surface were determined by comparison between the experimental STM images and the theoretical simulations. Maximizing the number of the Si-O bonds is more crucial than that of the Si-C bonds in the PTCDA adsorption. PMID:25770493

  8. Arsenic(V) adsorption-desorption in agricultural and mine soils: Effects of organic matter addition and phosphate competition.

    PubMed

    Arco-Lázaro, Elena; Agudo, Inés; Clemente, Rafael; Bernal, M Pilar

    2016-09-01

    High total and bioavailable concentrations of As in soils represent a potential risk for groundwater contamination and entry in the food chain. The use of organic amendments in the remediation of As-contaminated soils has been found to produce distinct effects on the solubility of As in the soil. Therefore, knowledge about As adsorption-desorption processes that govern its solubility in soil is of relevance in order to predict the behaviour of this element during these processes. In this paper, the objective was to determine As adsorption and desorption in four different soils, with and without compost addition, and also in competition with phosphate, through the determination of sorption isotherms. Batch experiments were carried out using three soils affected differently by previous mining activity of the Sierra Minera of La Unión-Cartagena (SE Spain) and an agricultural soil from Segovia province (central Spain). Adsorption was higher in the mining soils (and highest in the acidic one) than in the agricultural soils, although the latter were not affected negatively by organic matter or phosphate competition for sorption sites. The results show that As adsorption in most soils, both with and without compost, fitted better a multimolecular layer model (Freundlich), whereas As adsorption in competition with P fitted a monolayer model (Langmuir). Moreover, the use of compost and phosphate reduced the adsorption of As in the mining soils, while in the agricultural soils compost increased their low adsorption capacity. Therefore, the use of compost can be a good option to favour As immobilisation in soils of low adsorption, but knowledge of the soil composition will be crucial to predict the effects of organic amendments on As solubility in soils and its associated environmental risk. PMID:27239690

  9. Adsorption of transgenic insecticidal Cry1Ab protein to SiO2. 2. Patch-controlled electrostatic attraction.

    PubMed

    Madliger, Michael; Sander, Michael; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2010-12-01

    Adsorption governs the fate of Cry proteins from genetically modified Bt crops in soils. The effect of ionic strength (I) on the adsorption of Cry1Ab (isoelectric point IEP(Cry1Ab) ≈ 6) to negatively charged quartz (SiO(2)) and positively charged poly-L-lysine (PLL) was investigated at pH 5 to 8, using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy. Cry1Ab adsorbed via positively and negatively charged surface patches to SiO(2) and PLL, respectively. This patch controlled electrostatic attraction (PCEA) explains the observed increase in Cry1Ab adsorption to sorbents that carried the same net charge as the protein (SiO(2) at pH > IEP(Cry1Ab) and PLL at pH < IEP(Cry1Ab)) with decreasing I. In contrast, the adsorption of two reference proteins, BSA and HEWL, with different adsorption mechanism, were little affected by similar changes of I. Consistent with PCEA, Cry1Ab desorption from SiO(2) at pH > IEP(Cry1Ab) increased with increasing I and pH. Weak Cry1Ab-SiO(2) PCEA above pH 7 resulted in reversible, concentration dependent adsorption. Solution depletion experiments showed that PCEA also governed Cry1Ab adsorption to SiO(2) particles at environmentally relevant concentrations (a few ng mL(-1)). These results imply that models describing Cry1Ab adsorption to charged surfaces in soils need to account for the nonuniform surface charge distribution of the protein. PMID:21033744

  10. Adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid on activated bleaching earth-chitosan-SDS composites: Optimization, kinetics, isotherms.

    PubMed

    Naowanat, Nitiya; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich; Pongstabodee, Sangobtip

    2016-03-15

    The adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid (MWF) on activated bleaching earth (BE)-chitosan-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) composites (BE/MCS) was investigated under a statistical design of experiments at a 95% confidence interval to identify the critical factors and to optimize the adsorption capacity. The BE/MCS adsorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle analysis (sessile drop technique) and their zeta potential. From the results of a full 2(5) factorial design with three center points, the adsorbent weight and initial pH of the MWF had a significant antagonistic effect on the adsorption capacity while the initial MWF concentration and BE:chitosan:SDS weight ratio had a synergistic influence. Temperature factor has no discernible effect on the capacity. From the FCCC-RSM design, the optimal capacity range of 2840-2922.5 mg g(-1) was achieved at sorbent weight of 1.6-1.9 g, pH of 5.5-6.5, initial MWF concentration of 52-55 g l(-1) and BE:chitosan:SDS (w/w/w) ratio of 4.7:1:1-6.2:1:1. To test the validation and sensitivity of RSM model, the results showed that the estimated adsorption capacity was close to the experimental capacity within an error range of ±3%, suggesting that the RSM model was acceptable and satisfied. From three kinetics models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order model and Avrami's equation) and two adsorption isotherms (Langmuir model and Freundlich model), assessed using an error function (Err) and the coefficient of determination (R(2)), Avrami's equation and Freundlich isotherm model provided a good fitting for the data, suggesting the presence of more than one reaction pathway in the MWF adsorption process and the heterogeneous surface adsorption of the BC/ABE-5.5 composite. PMID:26731309

  11. Adsorption of aqueous copper on peanut hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kanika Octavia

    , scanning electron microscopy images coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that the percentage of copper on the modified hulls (2.5 %) was greater than on the unmodified hulls (1.6 %). This study concluded that the adsorption of copper using peanut hulls is a potential method for wastewater treatment and delignification and oxidation of the hulls increases the adsorption capacity approximately three-fold.

  12. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Competition from Mixtures and the Vroman Effect

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    A Vroman-like exchange of different proteins adsorbing from a concentrated mixture to the same hydrophobic adsorbent surface is shown to arise naturally from the selective pressure imposed by a fixed interfacial-concentration capacity (w/v, mg/mL) for which protein molecules compete. A size (molecular weight, MW) discrimination results because fewer large proteins are required to accumulate an interfacial w/v concentration equal to smaller proteins. Hence, the surface region becomes dominated by smaller proteins on a number-or-mole basis through a purely-physical process that is essentially unrelated to protein biochemistry. Under certain conditions, this size discrimination can be amplified by the natural variation in protein-adsorption avidity (quantified by partition coefficients P) because smaller proteins (MW <50 kDa) have been found to exhibit characteristically-higher P than larger proteins (MW >50kDa). The standard depletion method is implemented to measure protein-adsorption competition between two different test proteins (i and j) for the same hydrophobic octyl sepharose adsorbent particles. SDS-gel electrophoresis is used as a multiplexing, separation-and-quantification tool for this purpose. Identical results obtained using sequential and simultaneous competition of human immunoglobulin G (IgG, protein j) with human serum albumin (HSA, protein i) demonstrates that HSA was not irreversibly adsorbed to octyl sepharose over a broad range of competing solution concentrations. A clearly-observed exchange of HSA for IgG or fibrinogen (Fib) shows that adsorption of different proteins (i competing with j) to the same hydrophobic surface is coupled whereas adsorption among identical proteins (i or j adsorbing from purified solution) is not coupled. Interpretive theory shows that this adsorption coupling is due to competition for the fixed surface capacity. Theory is extended to hypothetical ternary mixtures using a computational experiment that illustrates the

  13. Efficient adsorption of phenanthrene by simply synthesized hydrophobic MCM-41 molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yun; He, Yinyun; Wang, Xiaowen; Wei, Chaohai

    2014-08-01

    Hydrophobic molecular sieve MCM-41 including surfactant template was synthesized by a simple method. The adsorption properties of this material toward phenanthrene were studied. The effects of adsorbent dose and pH value on the adsorption process as well as the adsorption mechanism and reuse performance were investigated. The template-containing MCM-41 showed a significant adsorption for phenanthrene, due to its hydrophobicity created by the surfactant template in MCM-41. The solution pH had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The adsorption kinetic could be fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption equilibrium was fitted well by the linear model, and the adsorption process followed the liquid/solid phase distribution mechanism. The thermodynamic results indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process.

  14. Application of termite nest for adsorption of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Araújo, B R; Reis, J O M; Rezende, E I P; Mangrich, A S; Wisniewski, A; Dick, D P; Romão, L P C

    2013-11-15

    This work proposes the use of tree termite nest as an adsorbent for the reduction/removal of Cr(VI) present in aqueous solution. In laboratory experiments, adsorption of Cr(VI) was sensitive to pH in the range investigated (2-5), with maximum adsorption capacity achieved at pH 2 (3.70 ± 0.04 mg g(-1), representing 93.2% removal of Cr). The termite nest was characterized by off-line pyrolysis GC/MS (py-GC/MS), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). Pyrolysis of the adsorbent produced a complex mixture of aromatic compounds, including the guaiacyl and syringilic derivatives that are characteristic of lignocellulosic materials. Infrared spectroscopy revealed deprotonation of the carboxylic acid group of the biomass with increasing pH, which was associated with a decrease in the capacity for adsorption of Cr(VI). The EPR g-factor for the termite nest samples varied between 2.0037 and 2.0038, indicating the presence of organic free radicals that were responsible for the redox reaction. A second line with g-factor values of 1.9790, only observed for the samples after contact with Cr(VI) solutions at different pH values, was assigned to Cr(III)-Cr(III) exchange coupled pairs, which explained the capacity of the adsorbent to retain a large portion of the Cr(III) ions produced after reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Fixed-bed column experiments showed that the termite nest had a maximum adsorption capacity of 18.60 mg Cr g(-1), an adsorption efficiency varying between 60.8 and 97.4%, and a desorption efficiency varying between 54.5 and 91.4%, for three successive cycles. The adsorbent presented excellent performance in the removal of chromium under acidic conditions, with the advantage that it could be regenerated and reused. PMID:23954388

  15. Evaluation of the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero coverage for hydrogen on activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnke, E.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Olsen, R.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Activated carbons made from corn cob show promise as materials for high-capacity hydrogen storage. As part of our characterization of these materials, we are interested in learning how different production methods affect the adsorption energies. In this talk, we will show how hydrogen adsorption isotherms may be used to calculate these adsorption energies at zero coverage using Henry's law. We will additionally discuss differences between the binding energy and the isosteric heat of adsorption by applying this analysis at different temperatures.

  16. [Solid adsorption and stability of essential oil from pericarp of Gaultheria yunnaensis (Franch.) Rehd].

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Ma, J; Yang, L; Wu, J; Chen, H

    1998-01-01

    Experiments have been made on the solid adsorption and stability of the essential oil extracted from Gaultheria yunnanensis. The results show that among the chemical constituents of the oil, methyl salicylate accounts for 99.66%. Grain adsorbents of aluminum hydroxide gel have been proved useful in obtaining higher release rates of the oil at required temperatures as well as keeping the oil stable at room temperature. PMID:11243152

  17. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  18. Adsorption of aniline and toluidines on montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Essington, M.E. )

    1994-09-01

    Bentonite clay liners are commonly employed to mitigate the movement of contaminants from waste disposal sites. In order to assess the ability of clay liner material to restrict the mobility of amine compounds under a variety of chemical conditions and to further elucidate amine adsorption characteristics, the adsorption of aniline and o-, m-, and p-toluidine on Ca[sup 2+]- and K[sup +]-saturated Wyoming bentonite (SWy-1) was investigated. Adsorption experiments were performed under conditions of varied pH and ionic environment. Amine adsorption on montmorillonite is pH dependent. Maximum amine adsorption occurs when solution pH is approximately equal to the pK[sub a] of the anilinium ion deprotonation reaction (pH 4.45-5.08). An amine adsorption envelope results from the combined influence of increasing anilinium ion and anilinium-aniline complex formation (as pH decreases to the pK[sub a]) and amine competition with H[sup +] for surface sites, decreasing anilinium-aniline complex concentration, and decreasing aniline available for water bridging with exchangeable Ca[sup 2+] and K[sup +] (as solution pH decreases below the pK[sub a]). For any given amine, maximum adsorption increases with decreasing ionic strength. Maximum amine adsorption is greater in the Ca[sup 2+] systems than in the K[sup +] systems at equivalent cation charge and reflects the formation of an amine water bridge with the exchangeable Ca[sup 2+]. Amine adsorption is also greater in chloride systems compared with sulfate systems at comparable cation concentrations, possibly due to the formation of aqueous anilinium-sulfate complexes. The amine compounds are retained mainly by bentonite through a cation exchange process, the capacity of the clay to adsorb the amine compounds being a significant percentage of the exchange capacity at the pK[sub a]. However, amine retention decreases with increasing pH and is minimal at solution pH values greater than 7. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Adsorption of Cd(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution by carbonate hydroxylapatite derived from eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiao-ming; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guang-ming; Shen, Xiang-xin; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Jing-jin

    2007-08-17

    Carbonate hydroxylapatite (CHAP) synthesized by using eggshell waste as raw material has been investigated as metal adsorption for Cd(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. The effect of various parameters on adsorption process such as contact time, solution pH, amount of CHAP and initial concentration of metal ions was studied at room temperature to optimize the conditions for maximum adsorption. The results showed that the removal efficiency of Cd(II) and Cu(II) by CHAP could reach 94 and 93.17%, respectively, when the initial Cd(II) concentration 80 mg/L and Cu(II) 60 mg/L and the liquid/solid ratio was 2.5 g/L. The equilibrium sorption data for single metal systems at room temperature could be described by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The highest value of Langmuir maximum uptake, (b), was found for cadmium (111.1mg/g) and copper (142.86 mg/g). Similar Freundlich empirical constants, K, were obtained for cadmium (2.224) and copper (7.925). Ion exchange and surface adsorption might be involved in the adsorption process of cadmium and copper. Desorption experiments showed that CaCl2, NaCl, acetic acid and ultrasonic were not efficient enough to desorb substantial amount of metal ions from the CHAP. The results obtained show that CHAP has a high affinity to cadmium and copper. PMID:17368932

  20. Adsorptive removal of 2-chlorophenol by low-cost coir pith carbon.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Kavitha, D

    2003-03-17

    Adsorption of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) by coir pith carbon was carried out by varying the parameters such as agitation time, 2-CP concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and temperature. Adsorption equilibrium reached at 40, 60, 80 and 100 min for 2-CP concentration of 10, 20, 30 and 40 mg/l, respectively. Adsorption followed second-order kinetics. The adsorption equilibrium data obeyed Freundlich isotherm. Acidic pH was favorable for the adsorption of 2-CP. Desorption studies showed that chemisorption plays a major role in the adsorption process. PMID:12628792

  1. Effect of cropping systems on adsorption of metals by soils: I. Single-metal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Basta, N.T.; Tabatabai, M.A. )

    1992-02-01

    The effect of long-term cropping systems on adsorption of metals was studied for soils obtained from two sites, Clarion-Webster Research Center (CWRC site) at Kanawha and Galva-Primghar Research Center (GPRC site) at Sutherland, under long-term rotation experiments in Iowa. Each experiment consisted of three cropping systems: continuous corn (CCCC), corn-soybean-corn-soybean (CSCS), and corn-oats-meadow-meadow (COMM), and treated with (+N) and without (0 N) ammoniacal fertilizer. In general, CSCS and COMM cropping systems did not significantly affect the metal adsorption maxima of soils obtained from both sites. Cadmium, Cu, and Pb adsorption were significantly correlated with pH and percentage base saturation for soils from both sites.

  2. Phase 1 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent [Jubin 2012b]. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the first phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 and early FY-2014. Testing has been performed to address questions posed in the test plan, and followed the testing outline in the test plan. Tests established detection limits, developed procedures for sample analysis with minimal analytical interferences, and confirmed earlier results that show that the methyl iodide reacts when in contact with the AgZ sorbent, and not significantly in the gas flow upstream of the sorbent. The reaction(s) enable separation of the iodine from the organic moiety, so that the iodine can chemisorb onto the sorbent. The organic moiety can form other compounds, some of which are organic compounds that are detected and can be tentatively identified using GC-FID and GCMS. Test results also show that other gas constituents (NOx and/or H2O) can affect the methyl iodide reactions. With NOx and H2O present in the gas stream, the majority of uncaptured iodine exiting iodine-laden sorbent beds is in the form of I2 or HI, species that

  3. Direct coupling between stress, strain and adsorption reactions - A study on coal-CO2 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, S.; Peach, C. J.; Spiers, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Though it is well-known that adsorption reactions frequently assist deformation of porous rocks, very little understanding exists on the direct coupling with stress state and strain. One of the materials in which adsorption plays a large role is coal, as is observed in the particular case of Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production (ECBM), which involves the geological storage of CO2 and the recovery of CH4. In this case, adsorption and the associated swelling cause significant injectivity problems, which is experienced in almost all pilot field projects to date. This suggests that indeed a strong fundamental coupling exists between CO2 sorption, changes in the mechanical state of the coal matrix and changes in the transport properties of the system, and illustrates the need to understand coupled stress-strain-sorption behaviour. In this contribution, we describe several important observations made on coal-CO2 systems that can learn us about many other natural, stressed adsorbate-adsorbent systems. In our experiments, first of all, the adsorption of CO2 in the coal matrix gave rise to swelling. Although this is well-known, we found that the total volumetric strain occurring under unconfined conditions can be realistically modelled (up to at least 100 MPa) as the sum of an adsorption-related expansion term and an elastic compression term. Second, effective in situ stresses will directly reduce the sorption capacity, and associated swelling of the coal matrix significantly. Our general thermodynamic model for the effect of a 3D stress state on adsorbed CO2 concentration supports this observation, and also shows that "self-stressing", as a result of CO2 adsorption occurring under conditions of restricted or zero strain (i.e. fully constrained conditions), will more than double the expected in situ stresses. A constitutive equation was developed to describe the full coupling between stress state, total strain (i.e. combined strain of adsorption processes and poroelasticity

  4. Functionalized mesoporous silica materials for molsidomine adsorption: Thermodynamic study

    SciTech Connect

    Alyoshina, Nonna A.; Parfenyuk, Elena V.

    2013-09-15

    A series of unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials was prepared. The unmodified mesoporous silica was synthesized via sol–gel synthesis in the presence of D-glucose as pore-forming agent. The functionalized by phenyl, aminopropyl and mercaptopropyl groups silica materials were prepared via grafting. The fabricated adsorbent materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and elemental analysis methods. Then their adsorption properties for mesoionic dug molsidomine were investigated at 290–313 K and physiological pH value. Thermodynamic parameters of molsidomine adsorption on the synthesized materials have been calculated. The obtained results showed that the adsorption process of molsidomine on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. The unmodified and mercaptopropyl modified silica materials exhibit significantly higher adsorption capacities and energies for molsidomine than the aminopropyl modified sample. The effects are discussed from the viewpoint of nature of specific interactions responsible for the adsorption. - Graphical abstract: Comparative analysis of the thermodynamic characteristics of molsidomine adsorption showed that the adsorption process on mesoporous silica materials is controlled by chemical nature of surface functional groups. Molsidomine adsorption on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. Taking into account ambiguous nature of mesoionic compounds, it was found that molsidomine is rather aromatic than dipolar. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials were prepared. • Molsidomine adsorption on the silica materials was studied. • Phenyl modified silica shows the highest adsorption capacity and favorable energy. • Molsidomine exhibits the lowest affinity to aminopropyl modified silica.

  5. Characterization of micro- and mesoporous materials using accelerated dynamics adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qajar, Ali; Peer, Maryam; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Foley, Henry C

    2013-10-01

    Porosimetry is a fundamental characterization technique used in development of new porous materials for catalysis, membrane separation, and adsorptive gas storage. Conventional methods like nitrogen and argon adsorption at cryogenic temperatures suffer from slow adsorption dynamics especially for microporous materials. In addition, CO2, the other common probe, is only useful for micropore characterization unless being compressed to exceedingly high pressures to cover all required adsorption pressures. Here, we investigated the effect of adsorption temperature, pressure, and type of probe molecule on the adsorption dynamics. Methyl chloride (MeCl) was used as the probe molecule, and measurements were conducted near room temperature under nonisothermal condition and subatmospheric pressure. A pressure control algorithm was proposed to accelerate adsorption dynamics by manipulating the chemical potential of the gas. Collected adsorption data are transformed into pore size distribution profiles using the Horvath-Kavazoe (HK), Saito-Foley (SF), and modified Kelvin methods revised for MeCl. Our study shows that the proposed algorithm significantly speeds up the rate of data collection without compromising the accuracy of the measurements. On average, the adsorption rates on carbonaceous and aluminosilicate samples were accelerated by at least a factor of 4-5. PMID:23919893

  6. Adsorption behavior of epirubicin hydrochloride on carboxylated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Pierre, Dramou; He, Hua; Tan, Shuhua; Pham-Huy, Chuong; Hong, Hao; Huang, Jilong

    2011-02-28

    The aim of this study was to understand the interaction between carboxylated carbon nanotubes (c-CNTs) and anticancer agents and evaluate the drug-loading ability of c-CNTs. We prepared carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWNTs) with nitric acid treatment, then evaluated the adsorption ability of c-MWNTs as adsorbents for loading of the anticancer drug, epirubicin hydrochloride (EPI), and investigated the adsorption behavior of EPI on c-MWNTs. Unmodified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were included as comparative adsorbents. The results showed that carbon nanotubes were able to form supramolecular complexes with EPI via π-π stacking and possessed favorable loading properties as drug carriers. The Freundilich adsorption model was successfully employed to describe the adsorption process. Because of the high surface area and hydrogen bonding, c-MWNTs' adsorption efficiency was the highest and the most stable and their drug-loading capacity was superior to that of MWNTs. With the increase of pH, the adsorption capacity of EPI on the c-MWNTs increased. Low-temperature facilitated the adsorption. More rapid EPI adsorption rate and higher drug-loading ability were observed from c-MWNTs with smaller diameter. Moreover, the adsorption kinetics of EPI on c-MWNTs could be well depicted by using the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. PMID:21145959

  7. Surface shear rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Golemanov, Konstantin; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Pelan, Edward; Stoyanov, Simeon D

    2012-08-21

    Saponins are a wide class of natural surfactants, with molecules containing a rigid hydrophobic group (triterpenoid or steroid), connected via glycoside bonds to hydrophilic oligosaccharide chains. These surfactants are very good foam stabiliziers and emulsifiers, and show a range of nontrivial biological activities. The molecular mechanisms behind these unusual properties are unknown, and, therefore, the saponins have attracted significant research interest in recent years. In our previous study (Stanimirova et al. Langmuir 2011, 27, 12486-12498), we showed that the triterpenoid saponins extracted from Quillaja saponaria plant (Quillaja saponins) formed adsorption layers with unusually high surface dilatational elasticity, 280 ± 30 mN/m. In this Article, we study the shear rheological properties of the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins. In addition, we study the surface shear rheological properties of Yucca saponins, which are of steroid type. The experimental results show that the adsorption layers of Yucca saponins exhibit purely viscous rheological response, even at the lowest shear stress applied, whereas the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins behave like a viscoelastic two-dimensional body. For Quillaja saponins, a single master curve describes the data for the viscoelastic creep compliance versus deformation time, up to a certain critical value of the applied shear stress. Above this value, the layer compliance increases, and the adsorption layers eventually transform into viscous ones. The experimental creep-recovery curves for the viscoelastic layers are fitted very well by compound Voigt rheological model. The obtained results are discussed from the viewpoint of the layer structure and the possible molecular mechanisms, governing the rheological response of the saponin adsorption layers. PMID:22830458

  8. Enhancing adsorption efficiency of dichloroacetic acid onto mesoporous carbons: Procedure optimization, mechanism and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Zhu, Jianzhong; Ji, Dongliang; Cao, Yang; Ling, Xiaojia; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-15

    Highly ordered mesoporous carbon may be directly synthesized via supramolecular self-assembly with in situ evaporation-induced crystallization process by controlling thermal reaction temperatures and carbon mass loading. In the present study, the effects of thermal reaction temperatures on the structural characterization and adsorption capacity of mesoporous carbon have been investigated and analyzed with orthogonal test experiments. The results show the carbonization temperature (R=32.1) plays a more important role than the self-assembly temperature (R=8.5) and thermal polymerization temperature (R=10.1) in manipulating the pore texture structures. The optimization grouping temperature was 40-110-500 °C. The optimum mesoporous carbon sample had the highest BET specific surface area (474 m(2)/g), the largest pore volume (0.46 cm(3)/g), and with reasonable uniform pore size distribution. The adsorption evaluation also shows the adsorption capacity is strongly correlated with the pore structure of mesoporous carbon, the optimized mesoporous carbon sample displayed the largest adsorption capacity (350 mg/g) at an initial concentration of 20.0 mg/L of dichloroacetic acid. The study results indicate optimization of thermal reaction parameters is an effective approach for synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbons. PMID:25935284

  9. [Flotation mechanism on Mycobacterium phlei and adsorption of Pb2+ by collectors].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong-qin; Wei, De-zhou

    2006-02-01

    The possibility of removal of heavy metals from waste water by adsorption flotation using Mycobacterium phlei as adsorbent was investigated, and the collection mechanism of collectors on adsorbent was analyzed. From the single flotation tests, it shows that cationic collectors have a stronger collecting ability for Mycobacterium phlei than anionic collectors. The adsorptive flotation experiment shows that floatability process occurred within 10 minutes, the recovery of Mycobacterium phlei and the removing rate of Pb2+ are high by using cationic collectors during pH value from 4 to 7. At 45mmol/L of Di-buty lamine as collector, and 4.75 of pH, the recovery of Mycobacterium phlei and the removing rate of Pb2+ are 92 % and 98%. The isoelectric point of Mycobacterium phlei is 3.09 at pH of the solution, which increased when Pb2+ or Di-buty lamine is adsorption by Mycobacterium phlei. The good floatability of Mycobacterium phlei with cationic collectors results from the intense zeta potential on the surface of cell, Adsorptive flotation may have practical applications for the removal of hazardous metals from contaminated water supplies. PMID:16686201

  10. Low-cost magnetic adsorbent for As(III) removal from water: adsorption kinetics and isotherms.

    PubMed

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles as adsorbent for arsenic (As) were coated on sand particles. The coated sand was used for the removal of highly toxic element 'As(III)' from drinking water. Here, batch experiments were performed with the variation of solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and initial arsenic concentration. The adsorbent showed significant removal efficiency around 99.6 % for As(III). Analysis of adsorption kinetics revealed that the adsorbent follows pseudo-second-order kinetics model showing R (2) = 0.999, whereas for pseudo-first-order kinetics model, the value of R (2) was 0.978. In the case of adsorption equilibrium, the data is well fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm model (R (2) > 0.99), indicating monolayer adsorption of As(III) on the surface of adsorbent. The existence of commonly present ions in water influences the removal efficiency of As(III) minutely in the following order PO4 (3-) > HCO3 (-) > Cl(-) > SO4 (2-). The obtained adsorbent can be used to overcome the problem of water filtration in rural areas. Moreover, as the nano-magnetite is coated on the sand, it avoids the problem of extraction of nanoparticles from treated water and can easily be removed by a simple filtration process. PMID:26711813

  11. New nanostructured zinc phosphite templated by cetyltrimethylammonium cations: synthesis, crystal structure, adsorption, and photoluminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Min; Chang, Tsung-Yuan; Chiu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Hsiu-Mei; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2014-04-01

    Nanostructured zinc phosphite templated by cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA(+)) cations was synthesized using a hydro(solvo)thermal method. This is the first example of a crystalline metal phosphite containing long carbon tails of the CTA(+) ions as templates in its structure, as is structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The 2D inorganic structures with 4.8(2) topologies are constructed from the interconnection of tetrahedral ZnO3Br and HPO3 units, which are sandwiched between CTA(+) ion surfactants in a packing behavior of a largely lamellar liquid-crystalline structure to extend the interlayer d spacing to 28.05 Å. Adsorption experiment shows selective adsorption properties of 1-naphthol and a adsorption capacity of 0.17 mmol/mmol (CTA)ZnBr(HPO3). This compound has potential as an adsorbent for the removal of 1-naphthol pollutant from wastewater. In addition, the naphthol-adsorbed sample shows interesting luminescent properties that are different from that of an as-synthesized sample. The crystal structure, thermal stability, IR spectrum, adsorption, and photoluminescence properties have been studied. PMID:24661090

  12. Evaluation of the adsorption capacity of alkali-treated waste materials for the adsorption of sulphamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Lisha

    2012-01-01

    The present work is to develop potential adsorbents from waste material and employ them for the removal of a hazardous antibacterial, sulphamethoxazole, from the wastewater by the Adsorption technique. The Adsorption technique was used to impound the dangerous antibiotics from wastewater using Deoiled Soya (DOS), an agricultural waste, and Water Hyacinth (WH), a prolific colonizer. The adsorption capacity of these adsorbents was further enhanced by treating them with sodium hydroxide solution and it was seen that the adsorption capacity increases by 10 to 25%. Hence a comparative account of the adsorption studies of all the four adsorbents, i.e. DOS, Alkali-treated DOS, WH and Alkali-treated Water Hyacinth has been discussed in this paper. Different isotherms like Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich were also deduced from the adsorption data. Isotherm studies were in turn used in estimating the thermodynamic parameters. DOS showed sorption capacity of 0.0007 mol g(-1) while Alkali-treated Deoiled Soya exhibited 0.0011 mol g(-1) of sorption capacity, which reveals that the adsorption is higher in case of alkali-treated adsorbent. The mean sorption energy (E) was obtained between 9 and 12 kJ mol, which shows that the reaction proceeds by ion exchange reaction. Kinetic study reveals that the reaction follows pseudo-second-order rate equation. Moreover, mass transfer studies performed for the ongoing processes show that the mass transfer coefficient obtained for alkali-treated moieties was higher than the parent moieties. The breakthrough curves plotted from the column studies show percentage saturation of 90-98%. About 87-97% of sulphamethoxazole was recovered from column by desorption. PMID:22508113

  13. Enhanced Adsorption of Trivalent Arsenic from Water by Functionalized Diatom Silica Shells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhijian; Xu, Liping; Zhang, Chunlong

    2015-01-01

    The potential of porous diatom silica shells as a naturally abundant low-cost sorbent for the removal of arsenic in aqueous solutions was investigated in a batch study. The objective of this work was to chemically modify the silica shells of a diatom Melosira sp. with bifunctional (thiol and amino) groups to effectively remove arsenic in its toxic As(III) form (arsenite) predominant in the aquatic environment. Sorption experiments with this novel sorbent were conducted under varying conditions of pH, time, dosage, and As(III) concentration. A maximum adsorption capacity of 10.99 mg g-1 was achieved within 26 h for a solution containing 12 mg L-1 As(III) at pH 4 and sorbent dosage of 2 g L-1. The functionalized diatom silica shells had a surface morphological change which was accompanied by increased pore size at the expense of reduced specific surface area and total pore volume. As(III) adsorption was best fitted with the Langmuir-Freundlich model, and the adsorption kinetic data using pore surface diffusion model showed that both the external (film) and internal (intraparticle) diffusion can be rate-determining for As(III) adsorption. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that the thiol and amino groups potentially responsible for As(III) adsorption were grafted on the surface of diatom silica shells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) further verified that this unique sorbent proceeded via a chemisorption mechanism through the exchange between oxygen-containing groups of neutral As(III) and thiol groups, and through the surface complexation between As(III) and protonated nitrogen and hydroxyl groups. Results indicate that this functionalized bioadsorbent with a high As(III) adsorption capacity holds promise for the treatment of As(III) containing wastewater. PMID:25837498

  14. Fractionation of Natural Organic Matter Upon Adsorption to the Bacterium, Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manecki, M.; Maurice, P. A.; Fein, J. B.

    2001-12-01

    High pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was used to measure changes in molecular weight distribution and average molecular weight upon adsorption of fulvic acid onto Bacillus subtilis at pH 3-7. The FA was an XAD-8 extract from a stream in the New Jersey Pine Barrens (USA), and had a weight average molecular weight of 1890 Da. Adsorption of aqueous FA onto B.subtilis was relatively fast, with steady state attained within 2 hours. An adsorption isotherm at pH 4.5 revealed a strong affinity of FA for the B.subtilis surface. The maximum adsorption capacity of a 20g bacteria/L suspension was greater than 9 mg C/L of FA at pH 4.5. Adsorption of FA onto B.subtilis was strongly pH dependent, increasing markedly with decreasing pH over the pH range 3-7. Comparison of HPSEC analysis of control (FA not reacted with bacteria) versus reacted samples showed that in all experiments, the weight average molecular weight (Mw) of FA remaining in solution decreased by several hundred Da. The observed decrease in solution Mw upon adsorption indicated that the higher molecular weight FA components adsorbed preferentially to the bacterial surfaces, at all studied pH values (3-7). Additionally, there was a low molecular weight FA fraction that did not adsorb, even at low pH. Our results suggest that hydrophobic interactions may be important for FA sorption to B.subtilis and that low molecular weight, more hydrophilic components may thus be less likely to adsorb than higher molecular weight, more hydrophobic components.

  15. Enhanced adsorption of trivalent arsenic from water by functionalized diatom silica shells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Ding, Tengda; Zhang, Zhijian; Xu, Liping; Zhang, Chunlong

    2015-01-01

    The potential of porous diatom silica shells as a naturally abundant low-cost sorbent for the removal of arsenic in aqueous solutions was investigated in a batch study. The objective of this work was to chemically modify the silica shells of a diatom Melosira sp. with bifunctional (thiol and amino) groups to effectively remove arsenic in its toxic As(III) form (arsenite) predominant in the aquatic environment. Sorption experiments with this novel sorbent were conducted under varying conditions of pH, time, dosage, and As(III) concentration. A maximum adsorption capacity of 10.99 mg g-1 was achieved within 26 h for a solution containing 12 mg L-1 As(III) at pH 4 and sorbent dosage of 2 g L-1. The functionalized diatom silica shells had a surface morphological change which was accompanied by increased pore size at the expense of reduced specific surface area and total pore volume. As(III) adsorption was best fitted with the Langmuir-Freundlich model, and the adsorption kinetic data using pore surface diffusion model showed that both the external (film) and internal (intraparticle) diffusion can be rate-determining for As(III) adsorption. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated that the thiol and amino groups potentially responsible for As(III) adsorption were grafted on the surface of diatom silica shells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) further verified that this unique sorbent proceeded via a chemisorption mechanism through the exchange between oxygen-containing groups of neutral As(III) and thiol groups, and through the surface complexation between As(III) and protonated nitrogen and hydroxyl groups. Results indicate that this functionalized bioadsorbent with a high As(III) adsorption capacity holds promise for the treatment of As(III) containing wastewater. PMID:25837498

  16. Adsorption of oleic acid at sillimanite/water interface.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T V Vijaya; Prabhakar, S; Raju, G Bhaskar

    2002-03-15

    The interaction of oleic acid at sillimanite-water interface was studied by adsorption, FT-IR, and zeta potential measurements. The isoelectric point (IEP) of sillimanite obtained at pH 8.0 was found to shift in the presence of oleic acid. This shift in IEP was attributed to chemisorption of oleic acid on sillimanite. Adsorption experiments were conducted at pH 8.0, where the sillimanite surface is neutral. The adsorption isotherm exhibited a plateau around 5 micromol/m2 that correspond to a monolayer formation. Adsorption of oleic acid on sillimanite, alumina, and aluminum hydroxide was studied by FT-IR. Chemisorption of oleic acid on the above substrates was confirmed by FT-IR studies. Hydroxylation of mineral surface was found to be essential for the adsorption of oleic acid molecules. These surface hydroxyl sites were observed to facilitate deprotonation of oleic acid and its subsequent adsorption. Thus protons from oleic acid react with surface hydroxyl groups and form water molecules. Based on the experimental results, the mechanism of oleic acid adsorption on mineral substrate was proposed. Free energy of adsorption was estimated using the Stern-Graham equation for a sillimanite-oleate system. PMID:16290466

  17. Adsorption of sulfur compound utilizing rice husk ash modified with niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, Rodrigo M.; Pessoa Júnior, Wanison A. G.; Braga, Valdeilson S.; Barros, Ivoneide de C. L.

    2015-11-01

    Adsorbents based in rice husk ash (RHA) modified with niobium pentoxide were prepared for impregnation methods and applied in sulfur removal in liquid fuels. The solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen physisorption and thermal analysis; they show that there was no qualitative change in the amorphous structure of the RHA; however, the method of impregnation could modify the particle size and topology of RHA particles. The larger sulfur removal (>50%) was achieved using RHA with 5 wt.% Nb2O5 at a dosage of 10 g L-1, after 4 h of contact with the model fuel. The kinetic study of adsorption of thiophene showed that the models of pseudo-second order and intra-particle diffusion best fit the experimental data. The adsorption experiments with the thiophenic derivatives compounds show a large selectivity of the adsorbent.

  18. Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L.

    2009-12-15

    High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

  19. EDTA-Cross-Linked β-Cyclodextrin: An Environmentally Friendly Bifunctional Adsorbent for Simultaneous Adsorption of Metals and Cationic Dyes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feiping; Repo, Eveliina; Yin, Dulin; Meng, Yong; Jafari, Shila; Sillanpää, Mika

    2015-09-01

    The discharge of metals and dyes poses a serious threat to public health and the environment. What is worse, these two hazardous pollutants are often found to coexist in industrial wastewaters, making the treatment more challenging. Herein, we report an EDTA-cross-linked β-cyclodextrin (EDTA-β-CD) bifunctional adsorbent, which was fabricated by an easy and green approach through the polycondensation reaction of β-cyclodextrin with EDTA as a cross-linker, for simultaneous adsorption of metals and dyes. In this setting, cyclodextrin cavities are expected to capture dye molecules through the formation of inclusion complexes and EDTA units as the adsorption sites for metals. The adsorbent was characterized by FT-IR, elemental analysis, SEM, EDX, ζ-potential, and TGA. In a monocomponent system, the adsorption behaviors showed a monolayer adsorption capacity of 1.241 and 1.106 mmol g(-1) for Cu(II) and Cd(II), respectively, and a heterogeneous adsorption capacity of 0.262, 0.169, and 0.280 mmol g(-1) for Methylene Blue, Safranin O, and Crystal Violet, respectively. Interestingly, the Cu(II)-dye binary experiments showed adsorption enhancement of Cu(II), but no significant effect on dyes. The simultaneous adsorption mechanism was further confirmed by FT-IR, thermodynamic study, and elemental mapping. Overall, its facile and green fabrication, efficient sorption performance, and excellent reusability indicate that EDTA-β-CD has potential for practical applications in integrative and efficient treatment of coexistenting toxic pollutants. PMID:26237660

  20. Application of activated carbon derived from scrap tires for adsorption of Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Shuangxi; Zhu, Tan

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon derived from solid hazardous waste scrap tires was evaluated as a potential adsorbent for cationic dye removal. The adsorption process with respect to operating parameters was investigated to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of the activated pyrolytic tire char (APTC) for Rhodamine B (RhB). Systematic research including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic studies was performed. The results showed that APTC was a potential adsorbent for RhB with a higher adsorption capacity than most adsorbents. Solution pH and temperature exert significant influence while ionic strength showed little effect on the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data obey Langmuir isotherm and the kinetic data were well described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process followed intra-particle diffusion model with more than one process affecting the adsorption process. Thermodynamic study confirmed that the adsorption was a physisorption process with spontaneous, endothermic and random characteristics. PMID:21179969

  1. Volatile organic acid adsorption and cation dissociation by porphyritic andesite for enhancing hydrolysis and acidogenesis of solid food wastes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fan; Li, Ming; Li, Dawei; Chen, Ling; Jiang, Weizhong; Kitamura, Yutaka; Li, Baoming

    2010-07-01

    Volatile organic acid adsorption, cation dissociation by porphyritic andesite, and their effects on the hydrolysis and acidogenesis of solid food wastes were evaluated through batch experiments. The acetic acid adsorption experiments show that pH was mainly regulated by H(+) adsorption. The mono-layer and multi-layer adsorption were found under the low (8.3-83.2 mmol/L) and high (133.22-532.89 mmol/L) initial acetic acid concentration, respectively. The dissociated cations concentration in acidic solution showed the predominance of Ca(2+). Porphyritic andesite addition elevated the pH levels and accelerated hydrolysis and acidogenesis in the batch fermentation experiment. Leachate of porphyritic andesite addition achieved the highest hydrolysis constant of 22.1 x 10(-3)kgm(-2)d(-1) and VS degradation rates of 3.9 g L(-1)d(-1). The highest activity of microorganisms represented by specific growth rate of ATP, 0.16d(-1), and specific consumption rate of Ca(2+), 0.18d(-1), was obtained by adding leachate of porphyritic andesite. PMID:20156676

  2. Adsorption and disjoining pressure isotherms of confined polymers using dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goicochea, A Gama

    2007-11-01

    The adsorption and disjoining pressure isotherms of polymers confined by planar walls are obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in the Grand Canonical (GC) ensemble in combination with the mesoscopic technique known as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Two models of effective potentials for the confining surfaces are used: one with both an attractive and a repulsive term and one with a purely repulsive term. As for the polymer, seven-bead linear model of polyethylene glycol (PEG) dissolved in water is used. The results indicate remarkably good agreement between the trends shown by our adsorption isotherms and those obtained from experiments of PEG on oxide surfaces. Additionally, the disjoining pressure isotherm of water shows oscillations, while those of PEG display the same trend for both wall models. Moreover, it is found that the disjoining pressure isotherms are in qualitative agreement with those from experiments on confined linear polymers. PMID:17914849

  3. Poroelastic theory applied to the adsorption-induced deformation of vitreous silica.

    PubMed

    Coasne, Benoit; Weigel, Coralie; Polian, Alain; Kint, Mathieu; Rouquette, Jérome; Haines, Julien; Foret, Marie; Vacher, René; Rufflé, Benoit

    2014-12-11

    When vitreous silica is submitted to high pressures under a helium atmosphere, the change in volume observed is much smaller than expected from its elastic properties. It results from helium penetration into the interstitial free volume of the glass network. We present here the results of concurrent spectroscopic experiments using either helium or neon and molecular simulations relating the amount of gas adsorbed to the strain of the network. We show that a generalized poromechanical approach, describing the elastic properties of microporous materials upon adsorption, can be applied successfully to silica glass in which the free volume exists only at the subnanometer scale. In that picture, the adsorption-induced deformation accounts for the small apparent compressibility of silica observed in experiments. PMID:25383694

  4. Adsorption of the harmful hormone ethinyl estradiol inside hydrophobic cavities of CTA(+) intercalated montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Burgos, A E; Ribeiro-Santos, Tatiana A; Lago, Rochel M

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic cavities produced by cetyltrimethylammonium cation (CTA(+)) exchanged and trapped in the interlayer space of montmorillonite were used to remove the harmful hormone contaminant ethinyl estradiol (EE2) from water. X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry, elemental analysis (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen), Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and contact angle analyses showed that the intercalation of 9, 16 and 34 wt% CTA(+) in the montmorillonite resulted in the d001 expansion from 1.37 to 1.58, 2.09 and 2.18 nm, respectively. EE2 adsorption experiments showed that the original clay montmorillonite does not remove EE2 from water whereas the intercalated composites showed high efficiency with adsorption capacities of 4.3, 8.8 and 7.3 mg g(-1) for M9CTA(+), M16CTA(+) and M34CTA(+), respectively. Moreover, experiments with montmorillonite simply impregnated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide showed that the intercalation of CTA(+) to form the hydrophobic cavity is very important for the adsorption properties. Simple solvent extraction can be used to remove the adsorbed EE2 without significant loss of CTA(+), which allows the recovery and reuse of the adsorbent for at least five times. PMID:27508371

  5. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  6. Isosteric heat of hydrogen adsorption on MOFs: comparison between adsorption calorimetry, sorption isosteric method, and analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloutse, A. F.; Zacharia, R.; Cossement, D.; Chahine, R.; Balderas-Xicohténcatl, R.; Oh, H.; Streppel, B.; Schlichtenmayer, M.; Hirscher, M.

    2015-12-01

    Isosteric heat of adsorption is an important parameter required to describe the thermal performance of adsorptive storage systems. It is most frequently calculated from adsorption isotherms measured over wide ranges of pressure and temperature, using the so-called adsorption isosteric method. Direct quantitative estimation of isosteric heats on the other hand is possible using the coupled calorimetric-volumetric method, which involves simultaneous measurement of heat and adsorption. In this work, we compare the isosteric heats of hydrogen adsorption on microporous materials measured by both methods. Furthermore, the experimental data are compared with the isosteric heats obtained using the modified Dubinin-Astakhov, Tóth, and Unilan adsorption analytical models to establish the reliability and limitations of simpler methods and assumptions. To this end, we measure the hydrogen isosteric heats on five prototypical metal-organic frameworks: MOF-5, Cu-BTC, Fe-BTC, MIL-53, and MOF-177 using both experimental methods. For all MOFs, we find a very good agreement between the isosteric heats measured using the calorimetric and isosteric methods throughout the range of loading studied. Models' prediction on the other hand deviates from both experiments depending on the MOF studied and the range of loading. Under low-loadings of less than 5 mol kg-1, the isosteric heat of hydrogen adsorption decreases in the order Cu-BTC > MIL-53 > MOF-5 > Fe-BTC > MOF-177. The order of isosteric heats is coherent with the strength of hydrogen interaction revealed from previous thermal desorption spectroscopy measurements.

  7. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of arsenic onto ceria nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qinzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Yuhui; He, Xiao; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2012-01-01

    The rapid increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles [ENPs] has resulted in an increasing concern over the potential impacts of ENPs on the environmental and human health. ENPs tend to adsorb a large variety of toxic chemicals when they are emitted into the environment, which may enhance the toxicity of ENPs and/or adsorbed chemicals. The study was aimed to investigate the adsorption and desorption behaviors of arsenic on ceria NPs in aqueous solution using batch technique. Results show that the adsorption behavior of arsenic on ceria NPs was strongly dependent on pH and independent of ionic strength, indicating that the electrostatic effect on the adsorption of these elements was relatively not important compared to surface chemical reactions. The adsorption isotherms fitted very well to both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The thermodynamic parameters (Δ H 0 , Δ S 0 , and Δ G 0 ) for the adsorption of arsenic were determined at three different temperatures of 283, 303, and 323 K. The adsorption reaction was endothermic, and the process of adsorption was favored at high temperature. The desorption data showed that desorption hysteresis occurred at the initial concentration studied. High adsorption capacity of arsenic on ceria NPs suggests that the synergistic effects of ceria NPs and arsenic on the environmental systems may exist when they are released into the environment.

  8. Hey Teacher, Your Personality's Showing!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A study of 30 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teachers and 300 of their students showed that a teacher's age, sex, and years of experience did not relate to students' mathematics achievement, but that more effective teachers showed greater "freedom from defensive behavior" than did less effective teachers. (DT)

  9. Highly efficient and selective adsorption of In3+ on pristine Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (Zn/Al-LDH) from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnabas, Mary Jenisha; Parambadath, Surendran; Mathew, Aneesh; Park, Sung Soo; Vinu, Ajayan; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    A pristine Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide (Zn/Al-LDH) showed excellent adsorption ability and selectivity towards In3+ ions from aqueous solutions. The adsorption behaviour as a function of the contact time, solution pH, ionic strength, and amount of adsorbent under ambient conditions revealed a strong dependency on the pH and ionic strength over In3+ intake. The structure and properties of Zn/Al-LDH and In3+ adsorbed Zn/Al-LDH (In-Zn/Al-LDH) were examined carefully by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, N2-sorption/desorption, UV-vis spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorbent had a sufficient number of active sites that were responsible for the In3+ adsorption and quite stable even after the adsorption process. The selective adsorption of In3+ on Zn/Al-LDH was also observed even from a mixture containing competing ions, such as Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, and Cu2+. The adsorption experiments showed that Zn/Al-LDH is a promising material for the pre-concentration and selective removal of In3+ from large volumes of aqueous solutions.

  10. Adsorption of lead onto smectite from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Mhamdi, M; Galai, H; Mnasri, N; Elaloui, E; Trabelsi-Ayadi, M

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the effect of a new method of adsorption using membrane filtration to determine the maximum amount of lead adsorbed by clay and investigate the behavior of the clay after adsorption of the said metal. Treatment of wastewater contaminated with heavy metals depends on the characteristics of the effluent, the amount of final discharge, the cost of treatment, and the compatibility of the treatment process. The process of adsorption of heavy metals by clays may be a simple, selective, and economically viable alternative to the conventional physical-chemical treatment. This is justified by the importance of the surface developed by this material, the presence of negative charges on the said surface, the possibility of ion exchange taking place, and its wide availability in nature. The removal of lead from wastewater was studied by using the adsorption technique and using clay as the adsorbent. A method was optimized for adsorption through a membrane approaching natural adsorption. This new method is simple, selective, and the lead adsorption time is about 3 days. The various properties of clay were determined. It was observed that the cation exchange capacity of the clay was 56 meq/100 g of hydrated clay for the raw sample and 82 meq/100 g for the purified sample. The total surface area determined by the methylene blue method was equal to 556 and 783 m(2)/g for the raw and purified samples, respectively. The adsorption kinetics depends on several parameters. The Pb(II) clay, obeys the Langmuir, Freundlich, and the Elovich adsorption isotherms with high regression coefficients. The use of this adsorbent notably decreases the cost of treatment. It was concluded that clay shows a strong adsorption capacity on Pb(II), the maximum interaction occurring with purified clay treated at high concentration of lead. It is proposed that this adsorption through a membrane be extended for the treatment of effluents containing other metals. PMID

  11. Amino-functionalized mesoporous MCM-41 silica as an efficient adsorbent for water treatment: batch and fixed-bed column adsorption of the nitrate anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi-Gatkash, Mehdi; Younesi, Habibollah; Shahbazi, Afsaneh; Heidari, Ava

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, amino-functionalized Mobil Composite Material No. 41 (MCM-41) was used as an adsorbent to remove nitrate anions from aqueous solutions. Mono-, di- and tri-amino functioned silicas (N-MCM-41, NN-MCM-41 and NNN-MCM-41) were prepared by post-synthesis grafting method. The samples were characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption. The effects of pH, initial concentration of anions, and adsorbent loading were examined in batch adsorption system. Results of adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption capacity increased with increasing adsorbent loading and initial anion concentration. It was found that the Langmuir mathematical model indicated better fit to the experimental data than the Freundlich. According to the constants of the Langmuir equation, the maximum adsorption capacity for nitrate anion by N-MCM-41, NN-MCM-41 and NNN-MCM-41 was found to be 31.68, 38.58 and 36.81 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption kinetics were investigated with pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model. Adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order rate kinetics. The coefficients of determination for pseudo-second-order kinetic model are >0.99. For continuous adsorption experiments, NNN-MCM-41 adsorbent was used for the removal of nitrate anion from solutions. Breakthrough curves were investigated at different bed heights, flow rates and initial nitrate anion concentrations. The Thomas and Yan models were utilized to calculate the kinetic parameters and to predict the breakthrough curves of different bed height. Results from this study illustrated the potential utility of these adsorbents for nitrate removal from water solution.

  12. Competitive adsorption and transport of phthalate esters in the clay layer of JiangHan plain, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Dan; Li, Minjing; Tong, Lei; Feng, Liang

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the adsorption behavior of phthalate esters (PAEs) in the clay layer of JiangHan Plain, China, so as to make better understanding about the source and control of PAEs in groundwater. Adsorption kinetics, isotherms, and miscible displacement experiments were conducted, and different models were used to simulate the experiment data. Results showed that the adsorption kinetics followed pseudo-second-order model. The kinetic parameters showed quantitative relationships with straight and branched chain carbon numbers of PAEs. These relationships were simulated and carefully discussed. The adsorption isotherms followed linear model better. And partition coefficient (Kd) increased with the carbon chain length of PAEs. Miscible displacement experiments showed that DEHP could not flow out of the column in 100d. HYDRUS-1D and two-site sorption model (linear, first order nonequilibrium adsorption) were used for the simulation of the breakthrough and transport curves of DMP, DEP, DBP, and DiBP. Results showed that the dispersion coefficients (D) and partition coefficient (Kd(')) increased with the carbon chain length. About 10% DBP and DiBP and 1% DMP and DEP were absorbed on the type-1 sites. DMP and DEP were much easier to transfer into the type-2 sites than DBP and DiBP. DBP and DiBP might aggregate in micro-pores of the sorbent. Retardation coefficient and Damkohler number were also calculated and discussed. It was proved that clay layer is an important retarder for PAEs downward transport. However, it can be passed through if the time is sufficient. PMID:23706400

  13. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  14. Adsorption of xenon on vicinal copper and platinum surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Layton

    The adsorption of xenon was studied on Cu(111), Cu(221), Cu(643) and on Pt(111), Pt(221), and Pt(531) using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of xenon, and ultraviolet photoemission of adsorbed xenon (PAX). These experiments were performed to study the atomic and electronic structure of stepped and step-kinked, chiral metal surfaces. Xenon TPD and PAX were performed on each surface in an attempt to titrate terrace, step edge, and kink adsorption sites by adsorption energetics (TPD) and local work function differences (PAX). Due to the complex behavior of xenon on the vicinal copper and platinum metal surfaces, adsorption sites on these surfaces could not be adequately titrated by xenon TPD. On Cu(221) and Cu(643), xenon desorption from step adsorption sites was not apparent leading to the conclusion that the energy difference between terrace and step adsorption is minuscule. On Pt(221) and Pt(531), xenon TPD indicated that xenon prefers to bond at step edges and that the xenon-xenon interaction at step edges in repulsive but no further indication of step-kink adsorption was observed. The Pt(221) and Pt(531) TPD spectra indicated that the xenon overlayer undergoes strong compression near monolayer coverage on these surfaces due to repulsion between step-edge adsorbed xenon and other encroaching xenon atoms. The PAX experiments on the copper and platinum surfaces demonstrated that the step adsorption sites have lower local work functions than terrace adsorption sites and that higher step density leads to a larger separation in the local work function of terrace and step adsorption sites. The PAX spectra also indicated that, for all surfaces studied at 50--70 K, step adsorption is favored at low coverage but the step sites are not saturated until monolayer coverage is reached; this observation is due to the large entropy difference between terrace and step adsorption states and to repulsive interactions between xenon atoms

  15. Experimental study of water adsorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Salame, I.I.; Bandosz, T.J. |

    1999-01-19

    Two carbons of different origins (wood and coal) were oxidized with nitric acid. The materials were characterized using sorption of nitrogen. Boehm titration, and potentiometric titration. The water adsorption isotherms were measured at various temperatures close to ambient (relative pressure from 0.001 to 0.3). From these isotherms heats of adsorption were calculated using virial equation. The results showed that the isosteric heats of water adsorption are affected by surface chemical heterogeneity only at low surface coverage. The shapes of heats obtained indicate strong water-water interactions as a result of adsorption on secondary sites and cluster formation. In all cases the limiting heat of adsorption equal to the heat of water condensation (45 kJ/mol) was obtained.

  16. Fibrinogen adsorption onto 316L stainless steel, Nitinol and titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhijun; Filiaggi, M. J.; Dahn, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    Fibrinogen adsorption onto mechanically polished biomedical grade 316L stainless steel (316LSS), nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) and commercially pure titanium (CpTi) surfaces were studied by measurements of adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics using an ex-situ wavelength dispersive spectroscopy technique (WDS). Surface composition, roughness and wettability of these materials were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle (WCA) measurements. Adsorption isotherm results showed that surface protein concentration on these materials increased with increasing concentration of fibrinogen in phosphate buffer solution. The fibrinogen adsorption isotherms were modeled by both the monolayer Langmuir isotherm and the multilayer Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) isotherm. The results strongly suggest that fibrinogen forms multilayer structures on these materials when the concentration in solution is high. Complementary measurements on the absorbed fibrinogen films by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) support this view.

  17. Adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene on carboxylated porous polystyrene microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhengfang; Meng, Qingqiang; Lu, Shengtao

    2012-02-01

    Large-pore-size (150 nm) polystyrene (PSt) microspheres were carboxylated with phthalic anhydride (PA) through Friedel-Crafts acetylation to study the adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on this material from aqueous solution. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and mercury porosimetry measurements (MPM) of the microspheres showed that the pore structure was unchanged during the reaction. High adsorption capacity (11.2 mg g-1 of suction-dried adsorbent) and adsorption rate (33.9 mg g-1 h-1) for TNT were observed during the study. As shown by the adsorption isotherm, the adsorption of TNT on PA-PSt can be described by the Freundlich adsorption equation, indicating heterogeneous adsorption process. On-column adsorption of TNT on PA-PSt and elution indicated that TNT can be completely removed from aqueous solution and condensed into acetone.

  18. Preparation of adsorbent with magnesium sulfate and straw pulp black liquor and its phenol adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lugang; Wang, Haizeng

    2009-09-01

    A magnesia adsorbent was prepared from straw pulp black liquor and magnesium sulfate for the first time, and its adsorption of phenol from aqueous solution was examined. The characteristics of the adsorbent were tested through chemical analysis, surface analysis, X-ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy. The effects of various factors, such as dose, adsorption time and adsorption temperature, on phenol adsorption behavior were studied. The results show that the adsorption processes can be fitted to the isotherm Langmuir model very well. It was found that the adsorption process was strongly influenced by temperature and the optimal temperature for phenol removal was 40 °C. The optimum adsorption time was 10 min, and desorption would happen afterwards. Between the models of Langmuir and Freundlich, the adsorption process of phenol onto magnesia fitted the Langmuir equation better.

  19. Adsorption--from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, A

    2001-10-01

    of adsorption up to the 1918s has been following rather a zig-zag path, this arm of surface science is now generally considered to have become a well-defined branch of physical science representing an intrinsically interdisciplinary area between chemistry, physics, biology and engineering. This review presents in brief the history of adsorption and highlights the progress in theoretical description of the phenomenon under consideration. The paper deals with the above problems critically, showing the development of adsorption, presenting some of the latest important results and giving a source of up-to-date literature on it. Moreover, in this paper the most important aspects are overviewed referring to today's trends and visions in application of adsorption science in industry, environmental protection and in environmental analysis. The relationship between development of adsorption theory and adsorption practice is pointed out. Current understanding and perspectives pertaining to applications of adsorption phenomena on laboratory and on industrial scale as well as environmental protection are discussed and illustrated by means of a few spectacular examples. PMID:11591108

  20. Molecular simulations of cytochrome c adsorption on positively charged surfaces: the influence of anion type and concentration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chunwang; Liu, Jie; Xie, Yun; Zhou, Jian

    2016-04-21

    Contradictory results have been reported regarding cytochrome c (Cyt-c) adsorption onto the positively charged SAMs, and the role of small anions in the adsorption is still unclear. In this work, the adsorption of Cyt-c on the amino-terminated SAM (NH2-SAM) and the effect of chloride and phosphate ions on the adsorption were studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The results reveal that Cyt-c could not stably adsorb onto the surface even at a relatively high ionic strength when chloride ions were added, while phosphate ions could promote its adsorption. At a low phosphate concentration, Cyt-c can adsorb on the NH2-SAM mainly with two opposite orientations. One is similar to that characterized in the experiments for Cyt-c adsorbed on the NH2-SAMs, in which the heme group points far away from the surface. The other orientation is similar to that for Cyt-c on the carboxyl-terminated SAMs. In the latter case, phosphate ions formed a distinct counterion layer near the surface and overcompensated the positive charge of the surface. Further analysis shows that chloride ions have no significant tendency to aggregate near the NH2-SAM surface and cannot shield the electrostatic repulsion between Cyt-c and the surface, while the phosphate ions can easily adsorb onto the surface and bind specifically to certain lysine residues of Cyt-c, which mediate its adsorption. At a high phosphate concentration, the phosphate and sodium ions will aggregate to form clusters, which results in random adsorption orientation. This work may provide some guidance for the design of Cyt-c-based bioelectronic devices and controlled enzyme immobilization. PMID:26980271

  1. Engineering application of activated alumina adsorption dams for emergency treatment of arsenic-contaminated rivers.

    PubMed

    Dou, Junfeng; Qin, Wei; Ding, Aizhong; Xie, En; Zheng, Lei; Ding, Wencheng

    2015-01-01

    A batch of lab-based adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the arsenic (As) removal efficacy by activated alumina. Four factors including contact time, pH, initial As concentration and different coexisting ions were examined. The adsorbent made of activated alumina (AA) with particles of 2-4 mm diameter showed a high As removal efficiency and the As concentrations of the samples were below 0.05 mg/L when the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was operated above 5 min. The As concentrations of the samples could remain below 0.05 mg/L for 30 days. A series of AA adsorption dams coupled with several other supporting adsorption techniques were employed for As-contaminated river restoration. The engineering project functioned well, and the effluent As concentration was below 0.05 mg/L when the influent was between 0.2 and 0.7 mg/L, which met the discharge requirement of the Surface Water Quality Standards criteria III in China. The results demonstrated that AA adsorption dams could be applied for emergency treatments of small- or medium-sized rivers contaminated with As. PMID:25926343

  2. Enrichment and purification of marine polyphenol phlorotannins using macroporous adsorption resins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Yoon, Minseok; Yang, Hyejin; Jo, Jinho; Han, Daeseok; Jeon, You-Jin; Cho, Suengmok

    2014-11-01

    Phlorotannins are one of the most important bioactive polyphenols; however, their purification using chromatographic methods has not been explored. Here, we studied purification of phlorotannins from the crude phlorotannin extract (CPhE) of the brown seaweed Ecklonia cava using macroporous adsorption resins. For purification of phlorotannins, four resins (HP-20, SP-850, XAD-7HP, and XAD-2) were screened. Among them, HP-20 resin showed the highest adsorption and desorption capacities. In static adsorption tests, the adsorption capacity of HP-20 increased with increasing temperature (25-45°C). Optimal conditions for the dynamic experiments can be summarized as follows: total phlorotannin content (TPhC) in loading solution: 1.5mg PGE/mL, processing volume: 4 BV, flow rate: 1 mL/min, temperature: 45°C, desorption solvent: 40% ethanol solution. After purification, TPhC (452 mg PGE/g) and arsenic (180 μg/g) of CPhE increased and decreased to 905 mg PGE/g and 48 μg/g, respectively. Recovery rate of phlorotannins from CPhE was 92%. PMID:24874368

  3. Design of a hybrid advective-diffusive microfluidic system with ellipsometric detection for studying adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Cunlu; Wijnperlé, Daniel; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-05-01

    Establishing and maintaining concentration gradients that are stable in space and time is critical for applications that require screening the adsorption behavior of organic or inorganic species onto solid surfaces for wide ranges of fluid compositions. In this work, we present a design of a simple and compact microfluidic device based on steady-state diffusion of the analyte, between two control channels where liquid is pumped through. The device generates a near-linear distribution of concentrations. We demonstrate this via experiments with dye solutions and comparison to finite-element numerical simulations. In a subsequent step, the device is combined with total internal reflection ellipsometry to study the adsorption of (cat)ions on silica surfaces from CsCl solutions at variable pH. Such a combined setup permits a fast determination of an adsorption isotherm. The measured optical thickness is compared to calculations from a triple layer model for the ion distribution, where surface complexation reactions of the silica are taken into account. Our results show a clear enhancement of the ion adsorption with increasing pH, which can be well described with reasonable values for the equilibrium constants of the surface reactions. PMID:27375818

  4. Hydrophilic crosslinked-polymeric surface capable of effective suppression of protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamon, Yuri; Inoue, Naoko; Mihara, Erika; Kitayama, Yukiya; Ooya, Tooru; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the nonspecific adsorption of proteins towards three hydrophilic crosslinked-polymeric thin layers prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization using N,N‧-methylenebisacrylamide, 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-[N-(2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]phosphorylcholine (MMPC), or 6,6‧-diacryloyl-trehalose crosslinkers. Protein binding experiments were performed by surface plasmon resonance with six proteins of different pI values including α-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin, ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme in buffer solution at pH 7.4. All of the obtained crosslinked-polymeric thin layers showed low nonspecific adsorption of negatively charged proteins at pH 7.4 such as α-lactalbumin, BSA, and myoglobin. Nonspecific adsorption of positively charged proteins including ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme was the lowest for poly(MMPC). These results suggest poly(MMPC) can effectively reduce nonspecific adsorption of a wide range of proteins that are negatively or positively charged at pH 7.4. MMPC is a promising crosslinker for a wide range of polymeric materials requiring low nonspecific protein binding.

  5. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, and pseudoephedrine in soils.

    PubMed

    Pal, Raktim; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Kirkbride, K Paul; Naidu, Ravi

    2015-06-01

    This work presents, for the first time, information on the adsorption-desorption characteristics of illicit drugs and precursors in soils and an estimation of their potential bioavailability. The experiment was conducted using a batch equilibrium technique for the parent drugs methamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and the precursor pseudoephedrine in three South Australian soils varying in physiochemical properties. The individual compounds exhibited different adsorption mechanisms in the test soils, and the results fitted better with the Freundlich isotherm model (r (2) ≥ 0.99). The maximum adsorption capacity was recorded for pseudoephedrine (2,000 μg g(-1)). However, pseudoephedrine recorded lower organic carbon normalized adsorption coefficient values (<250 mL g(-1)), lower magnitudes of Gibb's free energy change, and higher percent desorption (73-92 %) compared to methamphetamine and MDMA. The results thus showed pseudoephedrine to be the most mobile compound in the soils under study, to have the highest availability for degradation of the three compounds, and to have the highest susceptibility to biotic degradation in test soils. PMID:24838127

  6. Molecular simulations of the adsorption of cycloalkanes in MFI-type silica.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Merijn; Smit, Berend; Maesen, Theo L M; Vlugt, Thijs J H

    2005-07-01

    A new force field for the simulation of the adsorption of cycloalkanes in nanoporous silica affords a significant improvement over any previously employed force field. The simulated isotherms reproduce the most salient features in the experimental isotherms extremely well. The study of cyclo-pentane, -hexane, and -heptane adsorption in MFI-type silica indicates an inflection for cyclopentane but not for cyclohexane at intermediate pressure. If corroborated by experiments, such an inflection point would afford an excellent calibration point for further force field developments. At low pressures, mixture isotherms of cyclohexane and n-hexane show a temperature dependence on the selectivity in accordance with recent results by J. P. Fox and S. P. Bates, J. Phys. Chem., 2004, 108, 17136. This dependence is caused by a difference in temperature dependence of the Henry coefficient for both molecules. At high pressures entropy effects due to packing always favor the sorption of n-hexane. Furthermore, the influence of the flexibility of the zeolite framework on the adsorption of these rather bulky molecules is investigated. It is found that this influence of the flexibility on the adsorption of cyclohexane is as small as with n-alkanes. PMID:16189573

  7. Protein adsorption on nano-scaled, rippled TiO2 and Si surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sommerfeld, Jana; Richter, Jessica; Niepelt, Raphael; Kosan, Stefanie; Keller, Thomas F; Jandt, Klaus D; Ronning, Carsten

    2012-12-01

    We synthesized nano-scaled periodic ripple patterns on silicon and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) surfaces by xenon ion irradiation, and performed adsorption experiments with human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) on such surfaces as a function of the ripple wavelength. Atomic force microscopy showed the adsorption of HPF in mostly globular conformation on crystalline and amorphous flat Si surfaces as well as on nano-structured Si with long ripple wavelengths. For short ripple wavelengths the proteins seem to adsorb in a stretched formation and align across or along the ripples. In contrast to that, the proteins adsorb in a globular assembly on flat and long-wavelength rippled TiO(2), but no adsorbed proteins could be observed on TiO(2) with short ripple wavelengths due to a decrease of the adsorption energy caused by surface curvature. Consequently, the adsorption behavior of HPF can be tuned on biomedically interesting materials by introducing a nano-sized morphology while not modifying the stoichiometry/chemistry. PMID:22956465

  8. Effect of oxidation degree on the synthesis and adsorption property of magnetite/graphene nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kun; Mu, Yuanying; Wang, Peng; Liu, Xiaoteng

    2015-12-01

    A facile approach is demonstrated to synthesize a series of magnetite/graphene nanocomposites by solvothermal method, which can be easily collected after removal of pollutants without secondary pollution of graphene powders. Raman and FT-IR analyses show that the reduction of the mixing vapor of ammonia and hydrazine at different reaction periods generates the discrepancy of oxidation degree for reduced graphene oxide (rGO), which can be kept after the solvothermal synthesis of Fe3O4/rGO nanocomposites. Batch adsorption experiments indicate that the nanocomposite with maximum oxidation degree of rGO presents the largest magnetization of 35.4 emu g-1 and adsorption capacity of 59.2 mg g-1 for Cu2+, while the one with minimum oxidation degree exhibits the strongest adsorption of 39.0 mg g-1 for methylene blue accompanied with appropriate magnetization of 9.0 emu g-1, and only 23% of initial capacity was lost after seven recycling use. The adsorption kinetics of the both composites follows the pseudo-second-order model, suggestive of physical and chemical interactions between the pollutants and adsorbent. The results suggest that the oxidation degree of the rGO substrate can apparently influence both the structure and the adsorbing behavior of Fe3O4/rGO nanocomposites, which allows the control over the adsorbent performance according to the pollutant of interest.

  9. Adsorption of mercury on laterite from Guizhou Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Lijun; Guo, Baiwei; He, Shouyang

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of Hg(II) on laterite from Guizhou Province, China, were studied and the adsorption mechanism was discussed. The results showed that different mineral compositons in the laterite will cause differences in the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). Illite and non-crystalloids are the main contributors to enhancing the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). The pH of the solution is an important factor affecting the adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite. The alkalescent environment (pH 7-9) is favorable to the adsorption of Hg(II). The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) increases with increasing pH. When the pH reaches a certain value, the amount of the adsorbed Hg(II) will reach the maximum level. The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) decreases with increasing pH. The optimal pHs of laterite and kaolinite are 9 and 8, respectively. The optimal initial concentrations of Hg(II) on laterite and kaolinite are 250 and 200 microg/ml, respectively. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Langmuir model. The adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite is a quick process while that of Hg(II) on kaolinite is a slow reaction. Laterite from Guizhou Province is a promising environmental material which can be used in the removal of Hg(II) from wastewater. PMID:19202872

  10. Mechanism of amitriptyline adsorption on Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2).

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Hsiang; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Li, Zhaohui; Kuo, Chung-Yih; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Chen, Wan-Ru; Lv, Guocheng

    2014-07-30

    The uptake of amitriptyline (AMI) from aqueous environment by Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2) was studied in a batch system under different physicochemical conditions. The adsorbent was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. The AMI adsorption on SAz-2 obeyed the Langmuir isotherm with a capacity of 330mg/g (1.05mmol/g) at pH 6-7. The adsorption kinetics was fast, almost reaching equilibrium in 2h, and followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Desorption of exchangeable cations correlated with the AMI adsorption well, indicating that cation exchange was the major mechanism. X-ray diffraction patterns showing significant expansions of the d001 spacing and characteristic FTIR band shifts toward higher frequencies after AMI adsorption onto SAz-2 indicated that the adsorbed AMI molecules were intercalated into the interlayers of the mineral. Thermodynamic parameters based on partitioning coefficients suggested that the AMI adsorption was an endothermic physisorption at high adsorption levels. At low and higher AMI adsorption levels, the intercalated AMI molecules take a horizontal monolayer and bilayer conformation, respectively. The higher adsorption capacity suggested that SAz-2 could be a good candidate to remove AMI from wastewater and would be an important environmental sink for the fate and transport of AMI in soils and groundwater. PMID:24373983

  11. Fluorocarbon adsorption in hierarchical porous frameworks.

    PubMed

    Motkuri, Radha Kishan; Annapureddy, Harsha V R; Vijaykumar, M; Schaef, H Todd; Martin, Paul F; McGrail, B Peter; Dang, Liem X; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2014-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks comprise an important class of solid-state materials and have potential for many emerging applications such as energy storage, separation, catalysis and bio-medical. Here we report the adsorption behaviour of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives on a set of microporous and hierarchical mesoporous frameworks. The microporous frameworks show a saturation uptake capacity for dichlorodifluoromethane of >4 mmol g(-1) at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous framework shows an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching >14 mmol g(-1) at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption is found to generally correlate with the polarizability and boiling point of the refrigerant, with dichlorodifluoromethane > chlorodifluoromethane > chlorotrifluoromethane > tetrafluoromethane > methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting these sorbents for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling. PMID:25006832

  12. Fluorocarbon adsorption in hierarchical porous frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motkuri, Radha Kishan; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Vijaykumar, M.; Schaef, H. Todd; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-01

    Metal-organic frameworks comprise an important class of solid-state materials and have potential for many emerging applications such as energy storage, separation, catalysis and bio-medical. Here we report the adsorption behaviour of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives on a set of microporous and hierarchical mesoporous frameworks. The microporous frameworks show a saturation uptake capacity for dichlorodifluoromethane of >4 mmol g-1 at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous framework shows an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching >14 mmol g-1 at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption is found to generally correlate with the polarizability and boiling point of the refrigerant, with dichlorodifluoromethane >chlorodifluoromethane >chlorotrifluoromethane >tetrafluoromethane >methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting these sorbents for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling.

  13. Fluorocarbon adsorption in hierarchical porous frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, RK; Annapureddy, HVR; Vijaykumar, M; Schaef, HT; Martin, PF; McGrail, BP; Dang, LX; Krishna, R; Thallapally, PK

    2014-07-09

    Metal-organic frameworks comprise an important class of solid-state materials and have potential for many emerging applications such as energy storage, separation, catalysis and bio-medical. Here we report the adsorption behaviour of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives on a set of microporous and hierarchical mesoporous frameworks. The microporous frameworks show a saturation uptake capacity for dichlorodifluoromethane of >4 mmol g(-1) at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/P-o) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous framework shows an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching >14 mmol g(-1) at P/P-o of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption is found to generally correlate with the polarizability and boiling point of the refrigerant, with dichlorodifluoromethane >chlorodifluoromethane >chlorotrifluoromethane >tetrafluoromethane >methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting these sorbents for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling.

  14. Removal of water and iodine by solid sorbents: adsorption isotherms and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    2013-07-01

    Tritium and iodine-129 are two major radioactive elements that are present in off-gases from spent fuel reprocessing plants. Adsorption by solid sorbents is the state-of-the-art technique for removal of these species from off-gases. Modeling and simulating adsorption processes require accurate adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data to permit reasonable estimates of process parameters. We have developed a continuous flow single-pellet adsorption system to gather accurate adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data for adsorption of water by molecular sieve 3A and for adsorption of iodine by silver exchanged mordenite. In this paper, the design of the water and iodine adsorption experimental systems are briefly described and results of water adsorption experiments are presented and discussed. Water uptake curves are fitted with the linear-driving force (LDF) model and the shrinking-core model to determine kinetic parameters. It is shown that the kinetics of water adsorption on zeolite 3A under current experimental conditions is controlled by both the external film resistance and the macro-pore diffusion and can be predicted by both the LDF model and the shrinking-core model with the former one performing slightly better. Preliminary results from iodine adsorption experiments will be presented in the conference.

  15. Adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on Freshly Prepared Ferric Hydroxide (FeOxHy)

    PubMed Central

    He, Zan; Liu, Ruiping; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study prepared fresh ferric hydroxide (in-situ FeOxHy) by the enhanced hydrolysis of Fe3+ ions, and investigates its adsorptive behaviors toward Sb(III) and Sb(V) through laboratory and pilot-scale studies. A contact time of 120-min was enough to achieve adsorption equilibrium for Sb(III) and Sb(V) on the in-situ FeOxHy, and the Elovich model was best to describe the adsorption kinetics of Sb(III) and Sb(V). The Freundlich model was better than Langmuir model to describe the adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on the in-situ FeOxHy, and the maximum adsorption capacity of Sb(III) and Sb(V) was determined to be 12.77 and 10.21 mmol/g the in-situ FeOxHy as Fe, respectively. Adsorption of Sb(V) decreased whereas that of Sb(III) increased with elevated pH over pH 3–10, owing to the different electrical properties of Sb(III) and Sb(V). Adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) was slightly affected by ionic strength, and thus indicated the formation of inner sphere complexes between Sb and the adsorbent. Sulfate and carbonate showed little effect on the adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V). Phosphate significantly inhibited the adsorption of Sb(V), whereas slightly effected that of Sb(III) due to its similar chemical structure to Sb(V). Pilot-scale continuous experiment indicated the feasibility of using in-situ FeOxHy to remove Sb(V), and equilibrium adsorption capacity at the equilibrium Sb(V) concentration of 10 μg/L was determined to be 0.11, 0.07, 0.07, 0.11, and 0.12 mg/g the in-situ FeOxHy as Fe at equilibrium pH of 7.5–7.7, 6.9–7.0, 6.3–6.6, 5.9–6.4, and 5.2–5.9, respectively. PMID:25741175

  16. Protein adsorption to poly(ethylenimine)-modified Sepharose FF: V. Complicated effects of counterions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Yu, Linling; Sun, Yan

    2015-07-24

    In the previous studies on protein adsorption to poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-grafted Sepharose FF resins, a critical ionic capacity (600mmol/L) of PEI-Sepharose resins was found for the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), above which both protein capacity and uptake rate increased drastically. In this work, the influence of counterions on the PEI-Sepharose resin with an ionic capacity of 683mmol/L (FF-PEI-L680) was investigated with sodium salts of SCN(-), Cl(-), HPO4(2-) and SO4(2-). Linear gradient elution, batch adsorption and breakthrough experiments showed that counterion preference, effective pore diffusion coefficient (De) and dynamic binding capacity (DBC) values increased in the order of SCN(-), Cl(-), HPO4(2-) and SO4(2-), while static adsorption capacity decreased in this order. It is considered that higher counterion preference of the ion exchange groups resulted in lower protein binding strength and adsorption capacity, while the De value increased due to the enhanced "chain delivery" effect (a kind of surface diffusion). Besides, the DBC value was mainly dependent on De value. In particular, SO4(2-) was the most favorable counterion for the PEI-Sepharose resin, which gave rise to the highest De value (De/D0=1.17, D0 is protein diffusivity in free solution) and DBC value (118mg/mL at a residence time of 2min). Moreover, the effects of counterions on BSA adsorption to DEAE Sepharose FF and Q Sepharose FF, which were non-grafted resins, were also studied for comparisons. It was found that the counterion preferences of the two non-grafted resins were different from each other and also different from that of FF-PEI-L680. The different counterion preferences were attributed to the differences in the ion-exchange ligand chemistries. In addition, the De values for DEAE Sepharose FF and Q Sepharose FF kept unchanged. The low counterion sensitivity of De values could be interpreted as the lack of "chain delivery" effect for the non-grafted resins. The

  17. Arsenic Adsorption and Desorption by Drinking Water Treatment Residuals: Incubation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandanapu, V.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Makris, K.

    2005-05-01

    Arsenic (As) has been used for a long time in agricultural practices, primarily to control pests and noxious weeds. In many cases, the indiscriminate usage of toxic arsenical compounds has left a legacy of contaminated soils. Recent awareness of the toxicity of As at much lower concentrations than previously deemed to be dangerous has led to increased interest in the environmental chemistry of As. The immediate challenge, as perceived by various regulatory bodies is to develop a cost-effective, reliable and environmentally sound approach to cleaning up such contaminated soils. In-situ immobilization technologies are an attractive alternative to conventional remediation methods. One of the most interesting of these in-situ techniques is the use of Water Treatment Residuals (WTRs). The WTRs are by-products of drinking water purification processes and generally contain sediments, organic carbon, and Al/Fe oxides. The oxides are typically amorphous (with very high specific surface area) and have tremendous affinity for oxyanions (e.g., arsenate), due to their high positive surface charge. Recent studies conducted by our group have suggested that WTRs retain As and decrease arsenic mobility. However, a better understanding of As adsorption/desorption by WTRs is necessary for effective implementation of appropriate in-situ remedial strategies. Hence, the present study examines the potential use of WTRs (Al-WTR and Fe-WTR) as adsorbents for the removal of arsenate in solutions. Furthermore, it investigates the extent of desorption of the pre-adsorbed arsenate onto the WTR surfaces. Effects of various key parameters, such as solid solution ratio, equilibration time and arsenic concentration were examined to achieve the optimized conditions for arsenate adsorption. Preliminary batch adsorption experiments showed the optimum equilibration time to be 24 h and the solid/solution ratio to be 1:5 for arsenate adsorption. Sorption data has been evaluated using both Langmuir and

  18. Show Me Your Badge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watters, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    As changing student demographics make it harder for today's learners to earn a four-year degree, educators are experimenting with smaller credentialing steps, such as digital badges. Mark Milliron, chancellor of Western Governors University Texas, advocates the creation of a "family of credentials," ranging from digital badges to certifications,…

  19. Polypropylene non-woven meshes with conformal glycosylated layer for lectin affinity adsorption: the effect of side chain length.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiang-Yu; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2014-03-01

    The unique characteristics of polypropylene non-woven meshes (PPNWMs), like random network of overlapped fibers, multiple connected pores and overall high porosity, make them high potentials for use as separation or adsorption media. Meanwhile, carbohydrates can specifically recognize certain lectin through multivalent interactions. Therefore glycosylated PPNWMs, combing the merits of both, can be regarded as superior affinity membranes for lectin adsorption and purification. Here, we describe a versatile strategy for the glycosylation of PPNWMs. Two hydrophilic polymers with different side chain length, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (POEGMA), were first conformally tethered on the polypropylene fiber surface by a modified plasma pretreatment and benzophenone (BP) entrapment UV irradiation process. Then glucose ligands were bound through the reaction between the hydroxyl group and acetyl glucose. Chemical changes of the PPNWMs surface were monitored by FT-IR/ATR. SEM pictures show that conformal glucose ligands can be achieved through the modified process. After deprotection, the glycosylated PPNWMs became superhydrophilic and had high specific recognition capability toward Concanavalin A (Con A). Static Con A adsorption experiments were further performed and the results indicate that fast adsorption kinetics and high binding capacity can be accomplished at the same time. We also found that increasing the side chain length of polymer brushes had positive effect on protein binding capacity due to improved chain mobility. Model studies suggest a multilayer adsorption behavior of Con A. PMID:24398082

  20. Adsorption characteristics of multiple microcystins and cylindrospermopsin on sediment: Implications for toxin monitoring and drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Maghsoudi, Ehsan; Prévost, Michèle; Vo Duy, Sung; Sauvé, Sébastien; Dorner, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Adsorption of mixtures of cyanotoxins onto sediment as a dominant mechanism in the elimination of cyanotoxins from the aqueous phase has not been extensively investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate adsorption and desorption behavior of six microcystins including microcystin (MC)-LR, RR, YR, LY, LW and LF and cylindrospermopsin (CYN) on natural sediment. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms could be fitted for MC-LR, RR, YR and CYN. Sorption kinetics showed immediate rapid adsorption for all cyanotoxins: CYN, MCLW and MCLF were adsorbed 72.6%, 56.7% and 55.3% respectively within 2 h. Results of desorption experiments demonstrated that less than 9% of cyanotoxins desorbed from sediment within 96 h. Adsorption of cyanotoxins onto three fractionated sediments particles, clay-silt (<75 μm), find sand (75-315 μm) and coarse sand (315-2000 μm) demonstrated that adsorption capacity of coarse sand fraction for all the tested cyanotoxins was less than 4% of the clay-silt fraction. Results of this study revealed that there is a potential for cyanotoxins to accumulate in the sediments of lakes, as well as in drinking water treatment plants. Monitoring programs must consider cyanotoxins in the particulate phase to avoid largely underestimating toxin concentrations following their release from blooms. PMID:26091872

  1. Development of a sodium alginate-based organic/inorganic superabsorbent composite hydrogel for adsorption of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Sourbh; Pandey, Sadanand; Arotiba, Omotayo A

    2016-11-20

    Batch adsorption experiments were carried out for the removal of methylene blue (MB) cationic dye from aqueous solution using organic/inorganic hydrogel nanocomposite of titania incorporated sodium alginate crosslinked polyacrylic acid (SA-cl-poly(AA)-TiO2). The hydrogel was prepared by graft copolymerization of acrylic acid (AA) onto sodium alginate (SA) biopolymer in the presence of a crosslinking agent, a free radical initiator and TiO2 nanoparticles. The hydrogel exhibited a high swelling capacity of 412.98g/g. The factors influencing adsorption capacity of the absorbents such as pH of the dye solutions, initial concentration of the dye, amount of absorbents, and temperature were investigated and used to propose a possible mechanism of adsorption. The adsorption process concurs with a pseudo-second-order kinetics and with Langmuir isotherm equation. A very high adsorption capacity (Qmax=2257.36 (mg/g)) and a correlation coefficient of 0.998 calculated from isotherm equations show the high efficiency of the absorbent and thus expected to be a good candidate as an absorbent for water treatment. PMID:27561469

  2. Mobility of pharmaceutical compounds in the terrestrial environment: Adsorption kinetics of the macrocyclic lactone eprinomectin in soils.

    PubMed

    Vassilis, Litskas D; George, Batzias C; Charalampos, Paraskevas G; Athina, Pavlatou-Ve; Xanthippos, Karamanlis N

    2016-02-01

    Avermectins, such as eprinomectin (EPM), are antiparasitic drugs widely and globally used. There is undisputed evidence that they could be a threat for the terrestrial ecosystem. Despite their global use, data for avermectins behaviour and fate in soils are scarce. The objectives of this research were to conduct adsorption experiments in the soil to determine kinetics and isotherms as well as to explore the EPM adsorption mechanism. Accordingly, various models were employed to study the adsorption behaviour and kinetics as well as the adsorption mechanism of EPM in soils. The results showed that the degree of EPM adsorption to soils is determined by the soils' physicochemical properties and the EPM initial concentration. It is possible that dissolved EPM concentration will be higher in soils that contain low amounts of clay minerals and organic matter, resulting in higher toxicity risk for the soil biota and shallow groundwater aquifers contamination. The results of this study are crucial for impact assessment of EPM and in the design of environmental fate or ecotoxicological studies. PMID:26469933

  3. Removal of xenobiotics from effluent discharge by adsorption on zeolite and expanded clay: an alternative to activated carbon?

    PubMed

    Tahar, A; Choubert, J M; Miège, C; Esperanza, M; Le Menach, K; Budzinski, H; Wisniewski, C; Coquery, M

    2014-04-01

    Xenobiotics such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals are an increasingly large problem in aquatic environments. A fixed-bed adsorption filter, used as tertiary stage of sewage treatment, could be a solution to decrease xenobiotics concentrations in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) effluent. The adsorption efficiency of two mineral adsorbent materials (expanded clay (EC) and zeolite (ZE)), both seen as a possible alternative to activated carbon (AC), was evaluated in batch tests. Experiments involving secondary treated domestic wastewater spiked with a cocktail of ten xenobiotics (eight pharmaceuticals and two pesticides) known to be poorly eliminated in conventional biological process were carried out. Removal efficiencies and partitions coefficients were calculated for two levels of initial xenobiotic concentration, i.e, concentrations lower to 10 μg/L and concentrations ranged from 100 to 1,000 μg/L. While AC was the most efficient adsorbent material, both alternative adsorbent materials showed good adsorption efficiencies for all ten xenobiotics (from 50 to 100 % depending on the xenobiotic/adsorbent material pair). For all the targeted xenobiotics, at lower concentrations, EC presented the best adsorption potential with higher partition coefficients, confirming the results in terms of removal efficiencies. Nevertheless, Zeolite presents virtually the same adsorption potential for both high and low xenobiotics concentrations to be treated. According to this first batch investigation, ZE and EC could be used as alternative absorbent materials to AC in WWTP. PMID:24430496

  4. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of phenol onto graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Liu, Tonghao; Sun, Jiankun; Jiao, Yuqin; Xia, Yanzhi; Xia, Linhua; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of temperature on phenol adsorbed by graphene shows that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of phenol increases with the increase in temperature from 285 to 333 K. Increasing adsorption capacities with temperature indicates that the adsorption of phenol is controlled by an endothermic reaction. Highlights: ► The graphene has high phenol adsorption capacity. ► The graphene has a high specific surface area of 305 m{sup 2}/g. ► The adsorption capacity is high at acidic pH range. ► The graphene has rapid phenol adsorption rate. ► Phenol adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. -- Abstract: Graphene, a new member of carbon family, has been prepared, characterized and used as adsorbent to remove phenol from aqueous solution. The effect parameters including pH, dosage, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption properties of phenol onto graphene were investigated. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity can reach 28.26 mg/g at the conditions of initial phenol concentration of 50 mg/L, pH 6.3 and 285 K. Adsorption data were well described by both Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene fit the pseudo second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene was endothermic and spontaneous.

  5. Random sequential adsorption of tetramers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał

    2013-07-01

    Adsorption of a tetramer built of four identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Tetramers were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Two different models of the adsorbate were investigated: a rhomboid and a square one; monomer centres were put on vertices of rhomboids and squares, respectively. Numerical simulations allow us to establish the maximal random coverage ratio as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining kinetics of the adsorption process. These results were compared with data obtained experimentally for KfrA plasmid adsorption. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured.

  6. Surface rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Stanimirova, R; Marinova, K; Tcholakova, S; Denkov, N D; Stoyanov, S; Pelan, E

    2011-10-18

    Extracts of the Quillaja saponaria tree contain natural surfactant molecules called saponins that very efficiently stabilize foams and emulsions. Therefore, such extracts are widely used in several technologies. In addition, saponins have demonstrated nontrivial bioactivity and are currently used as essential ingredients in vaccines, food supplements, and other health products. Previous preliminary studies showed that saponins have some peculiar surface properties, such as a very high surface modulus, that may have an important impact on the mechanisms of foam and emulsion stabilization. Here we present a detailed characterization of the main surface properties of highly purified aqueous extracts of Quillaja saponins. Surface tension isotherms showed that the purified Quillaja saponins behave as nonionic surfactants with a relatively high cmc (0.025 wt %). The saponin adsorption isotherm is described well by the Volmer equation, with an area per molecule of close to 1 nm(2). By comparing this area to the molecular dimensions, we deduce that the hydrophobic triterpenoid rings of the saponin molecules lie parallel to the air-water interface, with the hydrophilic glucoside tails protruding into the aqueous phase. Upon small deformation, the saponin adsorption layers exhibit a very high surface dilatational elasticity (280 ± 30 mN/m), a much lower shear elasticity (26 ± 15 mN/m), and a negligible true dilatational surface viscosity. The measured dilatational elasticity is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions of the Volmer adsorption model (260 mN/m). The measured characteristic adsorption time of the saponin molecules is 4 to 5 orders of magnitude longer than that predicted theoretically for diffusion-controlled adsorption, which means that the saponin adsorption is barrier-controlled around and above the cmc. The perturbed saponin layers relax toward equilibrium in a complex manner, with several relaxation times, the longest of them being around 3

  7. Adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixtures in porous carbons: effect of surface chemistry, water content, and pore disorder.

    PubMed

    Billemont, Pierre; Coasne, Benoit; De Weireld, Guy

    2013-03-12

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixtures in nanoporous carbons in the presence of water is studied using experiments and molecular simulations. Both the experimental and numerical samples contain polar groups that account for their partially hydrophilicity. For small amounts of adsorbed water, although the shape of the adsorption isotherms remain similar, both the molecular simulations and experiments show a slight decrease in the CO2 and CH4 adsorption amounts. For large amounts of adsorbed water, the experimental data suggest the formation of methane or carbon dioxide clathrates in agreement with previous work. In contrast, the molecular simulations do not account for the formation of such clathrates. Another important difference between the simulated and experimental data concerns the number of water molecules that desorb upon increasing the pressure of carbon dioxide and methane. Although the experimental data indicate that water remains adsorbed upon carbon dioxide and methane adsorption, the molecular simulations suggest that 40 to 75% of the initial amount of adsorbed water desorbs with carbon dioxide or methane pressure. Such discrepancies show that differences between the simulated and experimental samples are crucial to account for the rich phase behavior of confined water-gas systems. Our simulations for carbon dioxide-methane coadsorption in the presence of water suggest that the pore filling is not affected by the presence of water and that adsorbed solution theory can be applied for pressures as high as 15 MPa. PMID:23346958

  8. The Wordpath Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderton, Alice

    The Intertribal Wordpath Society is a nonprofit educational corporation formed to promote the teaching, status, awareness, and use of Oklahoma Indian languages. The Society produces "Wordpath," a weekly 30-minute public access television show about Oklahoma Indian languages and the people who are teaching and preserving them. The show aims to…

  9. Kinetics and isotherms of Neutral Red adsorption on peanut husk.

    PubMed

    Han, Runping; Han, Pan; Cai, Zhaohui; Zhao, Zhenhui; Tang, Mingsheng

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption of Neutral Red (NR) onto peanut husk in aqueous solutions was investigated at 295 K. Experiments were carried out as function of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, and initial concentration. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich, and Toth isotherm models. The results indicated that the Toth and Langmuir models provided the best correlation of the experimental data. The adsorption capacity of peanut husk for the removal of NR was determined with the Langmuir and found to be 37.5 mg/g at 295 K. The adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic equations. It was seen that the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic equations could describe the adsorption kinetics. The intraparticle diffusion model was also used to express the adsorption process at the two-step stage. It was implied that peanut husk may be suitable as adsorbent material for adsorption of NR from aqueous solutions. PMID:19143308

  10. Continuous water treatment by adsorption and electrochemical regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, F M; Roberts, E P L; Hill, A; Campen, A K; Brown, N W

    2011-05-01

    This study describes a process for water treatment by continuous adsorption and electrochemical regeneration using an air-lift reactor. The process is based on the adsorption of dissolved organic pollutants onto an adsorbent material (a graphite intercalation compound, Nyex(®)1000) and subsequent electrochemical regeneration of the adsorbent leading to oxidation of the adsorbed pollutant. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherm for adsorption of a sample contaminant, the organic dye Acid Violet 17. The adsorbent circulation rate, the residence time distribution (RTD) of the reactor, and treatment by continuous adsorption and electrochemical regeneration were studied to investigate the process performance. The RTD behaviour could be approximated as a continuously stirred tank. It was found that greater than 98% removal could be achieved for continuous treatment by adsorption and electrochemical regeneration for feed concentrations of up to 300 mg L(-1). A steady state model has been developed for the process performance, assuming full regeneration of the adsorbent in the electrochemical cell. Experimental data and modelled predictions (using parameters for the adsorbent circulation rate, adsorption kinetics and isotherm obtained experimentally) of the dye removal achieved were found to be in good agreement. PMID:21511325

  11. Selective adsorption of nonionic surfactant on hexagonal mesoporous silicates (HMSs) in the presence of ionic dyes.

    PubMed

    Punyapalakul, Patiparn; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2006-10-01

    Selective adsorption of alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APnEOs) from synthetic textile wastewater was investigated using hexagonal mesoporous silicates (HMSs). HMSs are synthetic silicate that have uniform mesopores, large surface areas and uniform surface functional groups. Five different types of HMSs were synthesized by surfactant-templating methods, and three of them were grafted with organic surface functional groups, i.e., n-octyldimethyl-, 3-aminopropyltriethoxy-, and 3-mercaptopropyl-groups. Titanium-substituted HMS was also made in the same way as HMS. Adsorption capacities and selectivities of these HMSs for APnEOs were investigated in batch adsorption experiments either in single-solute APnEO solutions or in mixed solutions with ionic dyes. Triton X-100 was used as a model APnEO and either Basic Yellow 1 or Acid Blue 45 was used as cationic or anionic dyes, respectively. All the HMSs except 3-aminopropyltriethoxy-grafted HMS had higher adsorption capacities of Triton X-100 than powdered activated carbon. HMS and Ti-HMS had the highest BET surface areas and mesopore volumes measured by the nitrogen adsorption method, and thereby the highest adsorption capacities for Triton X-100. Surface charge was the most important attractive force between HMSs and dyes. FT-IR spectra proved that hydrophilic HMSs adsorbed both Basic Yellow 1 and Acid Blue 45 by hydrogen bonding. Acid-base titration experiments revealed that all the HMSs except 3-aminopropyltriethoxy-grafted HMS were negatively charged at neutral pH, whereas PAC and 3-aminopropyltriethoxy-grafted HMS were positively charged. Due to negative surface charge, the anionic dye (Acid Blue 45) was not adsorbed on the four HMSs, which proves high selectivities of these HMSs for Triton X-100 over Acid Blue 45. On the contrary, a small amount of cationic dye (Basic Yellow 1) was adsorbed on all HMSs, but 3-aminopropyltriethoxy-grafted HMS showed the lowest adsorption capacity for Basic Yellow 1 due to positive

  12. Zirconium-carbon hybrid sorbent for removal of fluoride from water: oxalic acid mediated Zr(IV) assembly and adsorption mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Halla, Velazquez-Jimenez Litza; Hurt Robert, H; Juan, Matos; Rene, Rangel-Mendez Jose

    2014-01-01

    When activated carbon (AC) is modified with zirconium(IV) by impregnation or precipitation, the fluoride adsorption capacity is typically improved. There is significant potential to improve these hybrid sorbent by controlling the impregnation conditions, which determine the assembly and dispersion of the Zr phases on carbon surfaces. Here, commercial activated carbon was modified with Zr(IV) together with oxalic acid (OA) used to maximize the zirconium dispersion and enhance fluoride adsorption. Adsorption experiments were carried out at pH 7 and 25 °C with a fluoride concentration of 40 mg L−1. The OA/Zr ratio was varied to determine the optimal conditions for subsequent fluoride adsorption. The data was analyzed using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. FTIR, XPS and the surface charge distribution were performed to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Potentiometric titrations showed that the modified activated carbon (ZrOx-AC) possesses positive charge at pH lower than 7, and FTIR analysis demonstrated that zirconium ions interact mainly with carboxylic groups on the activated carbon surfaces. Moreover, XPS analysis demonstrated that Zr(IV) interacts with oxalate ions, and the fluoride adsorption mechanism is likely to involve –OH− exchange from zirconyl oxalate complexes. PMID:24359079

  13. A novel polar-modified post-cross-linked resin and its enhanced adsorption to salicylic acid: Equilibrium, kinetics and breakthrough studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Guoqiang; Guo, Deping; Zhang, Yaling; Huang, Jianhan

    2016-05-15

    Improving the surface polarity is of significance for the post-cross-linked resins to enhance their adsorption to polar aromatic compounds. In the present study, we prepared a novel polar-modified post-cross-linked PDEpc_D by the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and the amination reaction, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume increased significantly after the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and the surface polarity improved greatly after the amination reaction. Batch adsorption showed that PDEpc_D possessed a much enhanced adsorption to salicylic acid as compared the precursors PDE and PDEpc as well as the non-polar post-cross-linked PDVBpc. The equilibrium data was characterized by the Freundlich model, π-π stacking, hydrogen bonding and static interaction were the possible driving forces. The adsorption was a fast process and the kinetic data obeyed the micropore diffusion model. Column adsorption-desorption experiments suggested that PDEpc_D was a potential candidate for adsorptive removal of salicylic acid from aqueous solution. PMID:26928058

  14. Adsorption of F2Cdbnd CFCl on TiO2 nano-powder: Structures, energetics and vibrational properties from DRIFT spectroscopy and periodic quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasinato, Nicola; Moro, Daniele; Stoppa, Paolo; Pietropolli Charmet, Andrea; Toninello, Piero; Giorgianni, Santi

    2015-10-01

    Photodegradation over titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a very appealing technology for removing environmental pollutants from the air, the adsorption interaction being the first step of the whole reaction pathway. In the present work the adsorption of F2Cdbnd CFCl (chlorotrifluoroethene, halon 1113), a compound used by industry and detected in the atmosphere, on a commercial TiO2 nano-powder is investigated experimentally by in situ DRIFT spectroscopy and theoretically through periodic ab initio calculations rooted in DFT. The spectra of the adsorbed molecule suggest that the anchoring to the surface mainly takes place through F atoms. Theoretically, five adsorption configurations for the molecule interacting with the anatase (1 0 1) surface are simulated at B3LYP level and for each of them, structures, binding energies and vibrational frequencies are derived. The interplay between theory and experiments shows the coexistence of different adsorption configurations, the foremost ones featuring the interaction of one F atom with a fivefold coordinated Ti4+ of the surface. These two adsorption models, which mostly differ for the orientation of the adsorbate with respect to the surface, feature a binding energy of -45.6 and -41.0 kJ mol-1 according to dispersion corrected DFT calculations. The favorable adsorption interaction appears as an important requirement toward the application of titanium dioxide technologies for the photocatalytic degradation of halon 1113.

  15. Comparative studies on adsorptive removal of heavy metal ions by biosorbent, bio-char and activated carbon obtained from low cost agro-residue.

    PubMed

    Kırbıyık, Çisem; Pütün, Ayşe Eren; Pütün, Ersan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Fe(III) and Cr(III) metal ion adsorption processes were carried out with three adsorbents in batch experiments and their adsorption performance was compared. These adsorbents were sesame stalk without pretreatment, bio-char derived from thermal decomposition of biomass, and activated carbon which was obtained from chemical activation of biomass. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared techniques were used for characterization of adsorbents. The optimum conditions for the adsorption process were obtained by observing the influences of solution pH, adsorbent dosage, initial solution concentration, contact time and temperature. The optimum adsorption efficiencies were determined at pH 2.8 and pH 4.0 for Fe(III) and Cr(III) metal ion solutions, respectively. The experimental data were modelled by different isotherm models and the equilibriums were well described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetic, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich models were applied to analyze the kinetic data and to evaluate rate constants. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model gave a better fit than the others. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy change ΔG°, standard enthalpy change ΔH° and standard entropy change ΔS° were evaluated. The thermodynamic study showed the adsorption was a spontaneous endothermic process. PMID:26819399

  16. Adsorption of ammonium and phosphate by feather protein based semi-interpenetrating polymer networks hydrogel as a controlled-release fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuan; Liu, Jia; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian; Gao, Baoyu

    2014-01-01

    A new feather protein-grafted poly(potassium acrylate)/polyvinyl alcohol (FP-g-PKA/PVA) semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) hydrogel was produced through graft copolymerization with FP as a basic macromolecular skeletal material, acrylic acid as a monomer and PVA as a semi-IPNs polymer. The adsorption of ammonium and phosphate ions from aqueous solution using the new hydrogel as N and P controlled-release fertilizer with water-retention capacity was studied. The effects of pH value, concentration, contact time and ion strength on NH4+ and PO3-4 removal by FP-g-PKA/PVA semi-IPNs hydrogel were investigated using batch adsorption experiments. The results indicated that the hydrogel had high adsorption capacities and fast adsorption rates for NH4+ and PO3-4 in wide pH levels ranging from 4.0 to 9.0. Kinetic analysis presented that both NH4+ and PO3-4 removal were closely fitted with the pseudo-second-order model. Furthermore, the adsorption isotherms of hydrogel were best represented by the Freundlich model. The adsorption-desorption experimental results showed the sustainable stability of FP-g-PKA/PVA semi-IPNs hydrogel for NH4+ and PO3-4 removal. Overall, FP-g-PKA/PVA could be considered as an efficient material for the removal and recovery of nitrogen and phosphorus with the agronomic reuse as a fertilizer. PMID:24600885

  17. Potential-Assisted Adsorption of Bovine Serum Albumin onto Optically-Transparent Carbon Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Benavidez, Tomás E.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript describes the effect of the applied potential on the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to optically transparent carbon electrodes (OTCE). To decouple the effect of the applied potential from the high affinity of the protein for the bare surface, the surface of the OTCE was initially saturated with a layer of BSA. Experiments described in the manuscript show that potential values higher than +500 mV induced a secondary adsorption process (not observed at open-circuit potentials), yielding significant changes in the thickness (and adsorbed amount) of the BSA layer obtained. Although the process showed a significant dependence on the experimental conditions selected, the application of higher potentials, selection of pH values around the isoelectric point (IEP) of the protein, high concentrations of protein, and low ionic strengths yielded faster kinetics and the accumulation of larger amounts of protein on the substrate. These experiments, obtained around the IEP of the protein, contrast with the traditional hypothesis that enhanced electrostatic interactions between the polarized substrate and the (oppositely charged) protein are solely responsible for the enhanced adsorption. These results suggest that the potential applied to the electrode is able to polarize the adsorbed layer and induce dipole-dipole interactions between the adsorbed and the incoming protein. This mechanism could be responsible for the potential-dependent oversaturation of the surface and could bolster to the development of surfaces with enhanced catalytic activity and implants with improved biocompatibility. PMID:24156567

  18. Adsorption behaviour of bulgur.

    PubMed

    Erbaş, Mustafa; Aykın, Elif; Arslan, Sultan; Durak, Atike N

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this research was to determine the adsorption behaviour of bulgur. Three different particle sizes (2adsorption, because of %E values lower than 10%. Bulgur must be stored below 70% relative humidity and with less than 10 g water per 100 g of dry mater. PMID:26575716

  19. A Holographic Road Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Rugheimer, Mac

    1979-01-01

    Describes the viewing sessions and the holograms of a holographic road show. The traveling exhibits, believed to stimulate interest in physics, include a wide variety of holograms and demonstrate several physical principles. (GA)

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of adsorption refrigeration cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, B.B.; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    1997-12-31

    High- and mid-temperature waste heat can be recovered by using existing heat pump technologies. However, heat utilization near environmental temperatures still faces technical hurdles. Silica gel-water adsorption cycles have a distinct advantage over other systems in their ability to be driven by near-ambient temperature heat. Waste heat (above 60 C) can be exploited by using conventional silica gel-water adsorption chiller. The advanced silica gel-water adsorption chiller can operate effectively by utilizing low-grade waste heat ({approximately}50 C) as the driving source with a cooling source of 30 C. In this paper, the effect of operating temperatures on cycle performance is discussed from the thermodynamic viewpoint. The temperature effectiveness and the entropy generation number on cycle time are analyzed. For a comparatively short cycle time, adsorber/desorber heat exchanger temperature effectiveness reaches up to 92% after only 200 sec. The entropy generation number N{sub s} is defined by the ratio between irreversibility generated during a cycle and availability of the heat transfer fluid. The result showed that for the advanced adsorption cycle the entropy generation number N{sub s} is smaller for hot water temperature between 45 to 55 C with a cooling source of 30 C, while for the conventional cycle N{sub s} is smaller for hot water temperature between 65 to 75 C /with the same cooling source temperature.

  1. Adsorption of diblock polypeptides on polystyrene latex.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ritesh; Forciniti, Daniel

    2012-10-30

    The adsorption of peptides at solid/liquid interfaces is affected by peptide/surface and peptide/peptide hydrophobic and electrostatic forces. Three diblock copolypeptides and two homopeptides were adsorbed on poly(styrene) nanospheres from water, water/methanol, and water/glycerol mixtures at different pH's to study both of these effects. Peptides with one hydrophilic (glutamic acid or lysine) and one nonpolar block (alanine) or with both hydrophilic blocks with opposite charges (glutamic acid and lysine) were chemically synthesized and used as adsorbates in this study. The amount adsorbed was determined, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to measure the adsorbed layer thickness. It was found that peptide/surface and peptide/peptide electrostatic interactions dominate the adsorption process. Hydrophobic forces also play a role, but secondary to electrostatic forces. Positively charged blocks show high affinity for the surface, whereas negatively charged blocks were excluded from it. Poly(Lys) has the highest affinity by the surface, while (Glu)(14)-b-(Ala)(5) has the lowest. Adsorption of all peptides was inhibited by methanol and promoted by glycerol. The adsorption for (Lys)(5)-b-(Glu)(6) was extremely sensitive to pH, irrespective of cosolvent, whereas the thickness for (Lys)(30)-b-(Ala)(41) was sensitive to pH as well as cosolvent. Aggregation was observed in the presence of the nanosurfaces but not in the bulk peptides under some pH and solvent conditions. PMID:23009064

  2. Modeling the Adsorption of Oxalate onto Montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M Elena; Emiroglu, Caglayan; García, David; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Huertas, F Javier

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a multiscale modeling of the interaction of oxalate with clay mineral surfaces from macroscale thermodynamic equilibria simulations to atomistic calculations is presented. Previous results from macroscopic adsorption data of oxalate on montmorillonite in 0.01 M KNO3 media at 25 °C within the pH range from 2.5 to 9 have been used to develop a surface complexation model. The experimental adsorption edge data were fitted using the triple-layer model (TLM) with the aid of the FITEQL 4.0 computer program. Surface complexation of oxalate is described by two reactions: >AlOH + Ox(2-) + 2H(+) = >AlOxH + H2O (log K = 14.39) and >AlOH + Ox(2-) + H(+) = >AlOx(-) + H2O (log K = 10.39). The monodentate complex >AlOxH dominated adsorption below pH 4, and the bidentate complex >AlOx(-) was predominant at higher pH values. Both of the proposed inner-sphere oxalate species are qualitatively consistent with previously published diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopic results for oxalate on montmorillonite edge surface (Chem. Geol. 2014, 363, 283-292). Atomistic computational studies have been performed to understand the interactions at the molecular level between adsorbates and mineral surface, showing the atomic structures and IR frequency shifts of the adsorption complexes of oxalate with the edge surface of a periodic montmorillonite model. PMID:26444928

  3. Adsorption of cadmium by biochar derived from municipal sewage sludge: Impact factors and adsorption mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tan; Zhou, Zeyu; Han, Rong; Meng, Ruihong; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2015-09-01

    Static equilibrium experiments were carried out to investigate the impact factors and the mechanism of cadmium adsorption on biochar derived from municipal sewage sludge. An appropriate dosage of biochar is sufficient; in the experiment, 0.2% is the optimal dosage for the largest removal capacity, while the removal capacity of biochar reduces with the increasing dosage. pH is another dominant factor of the adsorption process. The removal capacity of biochar is lower than 20 mg·g(-1) when the solution initial pH is lower than 2 pH units, comparatively retaining more than 40 mg·g(-1) at the solution initial pH higher than 3 pH units. Temperature has weak influence on the adsorptive performance. The main mechanism of the adsorption process of biochar for cadmium mainly involves (1) surface precipitation by forming insoluble cadmium compounds in alkaline condition, and (2) ion exchange for cadmium with exchangeable cations in the biochar, such as calcium ions. PMID:25966459

  4. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Xochilt; Schiavi, Federica; Keppler, Hans

    2016-03-01

    data provided here, the gas compositions in equilibrium with the ash surfaces can be calculated. In particular, for dacitic composition, the molar ratio of S/Cl adsorbed to the ash surface is related to the molar S/Cl ratio in the gas phase according to the equation ln ⁡(S / Cl) adsorbed = 2855T-1 + 0.28 ln ⁡(S / Cl) gas - 11.14. Our data also show that adsorption on ash will significantly reduce the fraction of HCl reaching the stratosphere, only if the initial HCl content in the volcanic gas is low (<1 mol%). For higher initial HCl concentrations, adsorption on ash has only a minor effect. While HCl scavenging by hydrometeors may remove a considerable fraction of HCl from the eruption column, recent models suggest that this process is much less efficient than previously thought. Our experimental data therefore support the idea that the HCl loading from major explosive eruptions may indeed cause severe depletions of stratospheric ozone.

  5. Assessing the adsorption properties of shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Ronny

    2015-04-01

    applied, where these measures are simultaneously evaluated through a graphical method. The density of the adsorbed phase is estimated and compared to data reported in the literature; the latter is key to disclose gas-reserves and/or potential storage capacity estimates. The comparison with engineered materials highlights the complexity of the adsorption process in rocks. In fact, when evaluated against classic adsorbent materials, these preliminary data show that the adsorption mechanism in shales is further complicated by the presence of resident fluids (such as oil) that can additionally contribute to their total uptake capacity. This further highlights the need of improving our current understanding of the fundamental mechanisms controlling the uptake and release of fluids from these materials, and provides substantial research opportunities under the common goal of providing an efficient and sustainable use of unconventional resources.

  6. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks. First quarterly report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  7. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that themore » GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.« less

  8. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that the GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.

  9. Sulfate adsorption and surface precipitation on a volcanic ash soil (allophanic andisol).

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Makino, Tomoyuki; Hattori, Yasunobu

    2006-08-15

    Sulfate strongly adsorbs on metal oxides and soils with variable charges. However, its surface precipitation has not been clearly evaluated and its adsorption mechanism has been in dispute. In the present study, an allophanic andisol, a typical volcanic ash soil having both negative and positive variable charges, was used to identify the adsorption mechanism of sulfate. Sulfate adsorption isotherms were obtained by a batch method at pH values of 4, 5, 6, and 7 in a wide range of concentrations in an Na-H-SO(4)-OH system. Theoretical isotherms were applied to the measured values for the evaluation. The surface precipitation was detected by the measured adsorption isotherms, and the BET isotherm confirmed the presence of multilayer adsorption. Stronger and weaker adsorption sites were suggested by using the Langmuir isotherm for the monolayer adsorption. The adsorption energies obtained from the Langmuir equation and recent spectroscopic analysis suggested that the stronger adsorption corresponded to an inner-sphere surface complex and that the weaker adsorption corresponded to outer-sphere surface complexation. The BET and Langmuir equations showed three types of adsorption mechanisms for the sulfate adsorption on the soil. PMID:16750540

  10. The influence of the adsorption of metoclopramide on the surface ionization of fumed silica.

    PubMed

    Buyuktimkin, Tuba; Wurster, Dale Eric

    2015-01-15

    The effect of adsorbed metoclopramide on the surface ionization of fumed silica was studied using potentiometric titration. Adsorption isotherms of metoclopramide to unionized and negatively-charged silica surfaces were generated and compared to the titration data. The adsorption of metoclopramide caused the silica surface charge to become more negative with increasing pH that was independent of ionic strength which suggested that specific adsorbate-surface interactions were occurring. Adsorption studies showed that metoclopramide adsorbs to the unionized silica surface. Ionization caused drug adsorption to increase which was consistent with at least two distinct surface adsorption sites. The ratio of the additional amount of metoclopramide adsorbed to the surface ionized group density determined from the titration curves was approximately unity which showed conclusively that the negatively-charged silanols constitute one of the surface adsorption sites. Potentiometric titration has been shown to be a useful technique for determining the number and types of adsorption sites on the silica surface. PMID:25448578

  11. Limited adsorption selectivity of active carbon toward non-saccharide compounds in lignocellulose hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojiang; Zhuang, Jingshun; Wang, Xiaojun; Li, Zongquan; Fu, Yingjuan; Qin, Menghua

    2016-05-01

    Prehydrolysis of lignocellulose produces abundant hemicellulose-derived saccharides (HDS). To obtain pure HDS for application in food or pharmaceutical industries, the prehydrolysis liquor (PHL) must be refined to remove non-saccharide compounds (NSC) derived from lignin depolymerization and carbohydrate degradation. In this work, activated carbon (AC) adsorption was employed to purify HDS from NSC with emphasis on adsorption selectivity. The adsorption isotherms showed the priority of NSC to be absorbed over HDS at low AC level. However, increase of AC over 90% of NSC removal made adsorption non-selective due to competitive adsorption between NSC and HDS. Size exclusion chromatography showed that the adsorption of oligomeric HDS was dominant while monomeric HDS was inappreciable. The limited selectivity suggested that AC adsorption is infeasibility for HDS purification, but applicable as a pretreatment method. PMID:26944457

  12. Chitosan/maghemite composite: a magsorbent for the adsorption of methyl orange.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Layaly; Bée, Agnès; Talbot, Delphine; Ben Jaafar, Soukeina; Dupuis, Vincent; Abramson, Sébastien; Cabuil, Valérie; Welschbillig, Mathias

    2013-11-15

    In this study, magnetic beads were prepared by encapsulation of magnetic nanoparticles in epichlorohydrin cross-linked chitosan beads. Their adsorption characteristics were assessed by using methyl orange (MO) as an adsorbate. MO adsorption onto chitosan beads was found to be optimal in the pH range of 3-5. The adsorption isotherm was well described by the Langmuir model and showed high MO adsorption capacity (2.38 mmol/g, i.e. 779 mg/g). MO adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating that adsorption was the rate-limiting step. At 0.305 mmol/L, only 19 min was required to reach 90% adsorption and 50% of the MO was adsorbed in 2 min. Desorption studies of MO using NaOH showed the reusability of the magsorbent. No release of iron species was observed at pH>2.4. PMID:23998368

  13. Global versus local adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Marloie, Gael; Markovits, Alexis; Ellinger, Yves

    2015-10-01

    The origin of the enantiomeric excess found in the amino acids present in the organic matter of carbonaceous meteorites is still unclear. Selective adsorption of one of the two enantiomers existing after a racemic formation could be part of the answer. Hereafter we report a comparative study of the adsorption of the R and S enantiomers of α-alanine and lactic acid on the hydroxylated { } chiral surface of α-quartz using numerical simulation techniques. Structurally different adsorption sites were found with opposite R versus S selectivity for the same molecule-surface couple, raising the problem of whether to consider adsorption as a local property or as a global response characteristic of the whole surface. To deal with the second term of this alternative, a statistical approach was designed, based on the occurrence of each adsorption site whose energy was calculated using first principle periodic density functional theory. It was found that R-alanine and S-lactic acid are the enantiomers preferentially adsorbed, even if the adsorption process on the quartz { } surface stays with a disappointingly poor enantio-selectivity. Nevertheless, it highlighted the important point that considering adsorption as a global property changes perspectives in the search for more efficient enantio-selective supports and more generally changes the way to apprehend adsorption processes in astro-chemistry/biology.

  14. ADSORPTION MEDIA FOR ARSENIC REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the use of adsorptive media for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. Presentation is a fundamental discussion on the use of adsorptive media for arsenic removal and includes information from several EPA field studies on removal of arsenic from dr...

  15. Effects of Cabin Upsets on Adsorption Columns for Air Revitalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVan, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) utilizes adsorption technology as part of contaminant removal systems designed for long term missions. A variety of trace contaminants can be effectively removed from gas streams by adsorption onto activated carbon. An activated carbon adsorption column meets NASA's requirements of a lightweight and efficient means of controlling trace contaminant levels aboard spacecraft and space stations. The activated carbon bed is part of the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) which is utilized to purify the cabin atmosphere. TCCS designs oversize the adsorption columns to account for irregular fluctuations in cabin atmospheric conditions. Variations in the cabin atmosphere include changes in contaminant concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity. Excessively large deviations from typical conditions can result from unusual crew activity, equipment malfunctions, or even fires. The research carried out under this award focussed in detail on the effects of cabin upsets on the performance of activated carbon adsorption columns. Both experiments and modeling were performed with an emphasis on the roll of a change in relative humidity on adsorption of trace contaminants. A flow through fixed-bed apparatus was constructed at the NASA Ames Research Center, and experiments were performed there. Modeling work was performed at the University of Virginia.

  16. The effects of CO{sub 2} on steam adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Palar, Steve; Horne, Roland N.

    1994-01-20

    Water adsorption in geothermal reservoir materials was investigated by transient flow technique using steam and COz gas. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that water adsorption exists in vapordominated type of reservoir, but experiments in the past have been limited to pure gases. The common presence of CO2, a non-condensible gas, in a geothermal reservoir necessitated a study of the effect of partial CO2 concentration on adsorption. Experimental laboratory work using a crushed Geysers rock sample at low pressure was carried out. Transient pressure exerted by steam pressure inside the sample was measured against time during a desorption process. It was found that the partial presence of CO2 did not significantly affect the adsorption of water.

  17. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  18. Bovine and human insulin adsorption at lipid monolayers: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Sergio; Pandey, Ravindra; Rzeznicka, Izabela; Lu, Hao; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Insulin is a widely used peptide in protein research and it is utilised as a model peptide to understand the mechanics of fibril formation, which is believed to be the cause of diseases such as Alzheimer and Creutzfeld-Jakob syndrome. Insulin has been used as a model system due to its biomedical relevance, small size and relatively simple tertiary structure. The adsorption of insu lin on a variety of surfaces has become the focus of numerous studies lately. These works have helped in elucidating the consequence of surface/protein hydrophilic/hydrophobic interaction in terms of protein refolding and aggregation. Unfortunately, such model surfaces differ significantly from physiological surfaces. Here we spectroscopically investigate the adsorption of insulin at lipid monolayers, to further our understanding of the interaction of insulin with biological surfaces. In particular we study the effect of minor mutations of insulin’s primary amino acid sequence on its interaction with 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) model lipid layers. We probe the structure of bovine and human insulin at the lipid/water interface using sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG). The SFG experiments are complemented with XPS analysis of Langmuir-Schaefer deposited lipid/insulin films. We find that bovine and human insulin, even though very similar in sequence, show a substantially different behavior when interacting with lipid films.

  19. Adsorption-desorption kinetics of soft particles onto surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberg, Brendan; Gerland, Ulrich

    A broad range of physical, chemical, and biological systems feature processes in which particles randomly adsorb on a substrate. Theoretical models usually assume ``hard'' (mutually impenetrable) particles, but in soft matter physics the adsorbing particles can be effectively compressible, implying ``soft'' interaction potentials. We recently studied the kinetics of such soft particles adsorbing onto one-dimensional substrates, identifying three novel phenomena: (i) a gradual density increase, or ''cramming'', replaces the usual jamming behavior of hard particles, (ii) a density overshoot, can occur (only for soft particles) on a time scale set by the desorption rate, and (iii) relaxation rates of soft particles increase with particle size (on a lattice), while hard particles show the opposite trend. The latter occurs since unjamming requires desorption and many-bodied reorganization to equilibrate -a process that is generally very slow. Here we extend this analysis to a two-dimensional substrate, focusing on the question of whether the adsorption-desorption kinetics of particles in two dimensions is similarly enriched by the introduction of soft interactions. Application to experiments, for example the adsorption of fibrinogen on two-dimensional surfaces, will be discussed.

  20. Adsorption properties of. cap alpha. -modification of boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilova, T.B.; Kiselev, A.V.; Parshina, I.V.; Roshchina, T.M.

    1986-11-01

    The adsorption properties of four samples of ..cap alpha..-BN were studied by means of gas chromatography. The particles of ..cap alpha..-BN particles, according to data obtained by electron microscopy, have the shape of thin platelets. A sample of ..cap alpha..-BN prepared from magnesium polyboride was found to be the most nearly homogeneous adsorbent. For a number of n-alkanes, benzene, and alkylbenzenes, data have been obtained on the retention volumes (Henry constants) and the differential heats of adsorption for surface coverages approaching zero. These thermodynamic data on the adsorption showed that ..cap alpha..-BN, like graphitized thermal carbon black, is a nonspecific adsorbent.

  1. Density functional study of the cysteine adsorption on Au nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, L. A.; López-Lozano, X.; Garzón, I. L.

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption of the cysteine amino acid (H-SCβH2-CαH-NH2-COOH) on the Au55 cluster is investigated through density functional theory calculations. Two isomers, with icosahedral (Ih) and chiral (C1) geometries, of the Au55 cluster are used to calculate the adsorption energy of the cysteine on different facets of these isomers. Results, only involving the S(thiolate)-Au bonding show that the higher adsorption energies are obtained when the sulfur atom is bonded to an asymmetrical bridge site at the facet containing Au atoms with the lowest coordination of the C1 cluster isomer.

  2. Effective interactions in multisite cells for adsorption in microporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demontis, Pierfranco; Pazzona, Federico G.; Suffritti, Giuseppe B.

    2009-04-01

    Local, discrete models of self-interacting multisite adsorption cells have been shown to be able to provide a coarse-grained representation of equilibrium properties of small molecules adsorbed in nanoporous materials at the mesoscopic scale. In the present work we show how the essential statistical properties of a host cell of structured sites with multiple adsorption energies and particle-particle interactions (that is the partition function, the average energy, and the average number of guests close to the windows connecting the cell to its surroundings) can be reproduced by a less-structured cell with two occupancy-dependent adsorption energy levels.

  3. Show What You Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccleston, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Big things come in small packages. This saying came to the mind of the author after he created a simple math review activity for his fourth grade students. Though simple, it has proven to be extremely advantageous in reinforcing math concepts. He uses this activity, which he calls "Show What You Know," often. This activity provides the perfect…

  4. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  5. Talk Show Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  6. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  7. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  8. Mechanisms and factors affecting the adsorption of sodium alginate onto modified clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yongxin; Cao, Xihua; Song, Xiuxian; Wang, Nan; Yu, Zhiming

    2013-07-01

    Algal organic materials (AOMs) are one critical factor affecting the efficiency of modified clays used for the mitigation of harmful algal blooms (HABs). This study was conducted to develop a deeper understanding of the mechanisms and factors affecting the adsorption of AOMs onto modified clays. Sodium alginate (polysaccharide) and kaolinite modified with polyaluminium chloride (PACl) were used as AOMs and modified clay model substances, respectively, and the effects of modifier dosage, contact time, solution pH and ionic strength were investigated through batch adsorption experiments. Kinetics revealed that the alginate adsorption rate was described well by a pseudo-second order model. PACl effectively enhanced the adsorption capacity of kaolinite and increased the adsorption rate, and the optimum additive amount of PACl was 5%. The experimental data fitted both the Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption equations well. The adsorption thermodynamics for alginate onto modified clays suggests that alginate adsorption is a spontaneous process. The adsorption of alginate onto modified clays was highly dependent on pH, with a decrease in adsorption observed with increased pH to 9.48, but the opposite was true above pH 9.48. Finally, adsorption increased with increasing ionic strength.

  9. A Photochemical Reactor for the Study of Kinetics and Adsorption Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poce-Fatou, J. A.; Gil, M. L. A.; Alcantara, R.; Botella, C.; Martin, J.

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between light and matter is examined with the help of a photochemical experiment. This experiment is useful for the investigation of heterogeneous catalysis, semiconductor properties and adsorption phenomena.

  10. Protein adsorption onto medical alloys: Voltage effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettens, Robert T. T.

    This work examined the adsorption of an important-plasma protein, fibrinogen (Fb), onto a clinically-relevant-biomedical alloy, 316L stainless steel (SS) and electrically polarized 316L SS. Then, several key-interfacial properties important to protein adsorption were examined. The overriding role of electrochemical (EC) charge-transfer processes in the behavior of both the adsorption of Fb and interfacial properties was apparent. Adsorption of Fb onto polarized 316L SS was observed and quantified using both in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Significant differences in Fb adsorption were observed across potential. Ex situ studies showed significantly lower area coverage and height of adsorbed Fb at cathodic potentials. In situ studies showed significantly slower kinetics below -100 mV. Current density data showed large charge-transfer processes (˜1x10 -5 to 1x10-4 A/cm2) taking place at voltages below -100 mV. A parallel-plate electrocapillary method was used to measure changes in metal-electrolyte surface energy (Deltagammasl) with potential. The results showed increasingly negative Deltagamma sl values on 316L SS at more cathodic voltages (i.e., more hydrophilic) and little to no change above -100 mV. These data correlate linearly with current density. Force measurements using a colloidal-AFM probe measured interfacial forces. Increasingly repulsive forces scaled with increasingly cathodic potentials; little interaction was detected at anodic potentials. These data correlated linearly with current density. The EC impedance was also studied. Electrochemical AFM (ECAFM) simultaneously gave impedance and structural changes with potential. Several regions of oxide topography/impedance characteristic were apparent which matched closely with the impedance behavior of the system. Through Mott-Schottky analysis the presence of the flatband potential was determined to be around -150 mV. Property observations of polarized 316L SS, specifically

  11. A Study of Adsorptive Characteristics of Australian Coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Y. P.; Tsai, L. L.

    2012-04-01

    Ever since the Kyoto Protocol, controlling carbon dioxide emission and reducing its content in atmosphere are very important environmental issues up to today. One of the effective methods for permanent sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 is to inject CO2 into deep, unminable coal seams and recover coal bed methane at the same time. CO2-ECBM technology had been proved to be very promising to meet the needs of both environment and energy. Beside other external environment factors, capacity of CO2 adsorption and CH4 desorption are the most influencing factors in selection of sites for the geological storage of CO2. Therefore, the objective of this study is to understand the relationship between gas adsorption and CO2 sequestration, by various experiments for the characterization of Australian of coals. Generally speaking, coal seam gas comprises mostly of CH4, CO2, C2H6, and N2. However, some of the Australian coals were reported with significant amount of CO2 up to 90%, which might strongly affect their capacity of CO2 capture and storage (CCS). High to medium volatile bituminous coals from Sydney Basin and Bowen Basin, southeast Australia were selected in this study. Experiments include maceral composition and vitrinite reflectance measurements, petrographic analysis, Proximate analysis, Ultimate analysis, specific surface area analysis as well as CO2 and CH4 adsorption experiments were performed. Parameters for difference adsorption functions (Langmuir, BET, D-R and D-A) were then calculated to fit their adsorption isotherms the best fitting curve can then be found. Among these adsorption functions, Langmuir is the most basic and commonly used function theory. The results of all experiments were synthesized to discuss the relations among each other, so as to establish the relationship between gas adsorption and coal characteristics.

  12. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces. PMID:26753786

  13. Arsenate adsorption mechanisms at the allophane - Water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; Sparks, D.L.; Davis, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated arsenate (As(V)) reactivity and surface speciation on amorphous aluminosilicate mineral (synthetic allophane) surfaces using batch adsorption experiments, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The adsorption isotherm experiments indicated that As(V) uptake increased with increasing [As(V)]0 from 50 to 1000 ??M (i.e., Langmuir type adsorption isotherm) and that the total As adsorption slightly decreased with increasing NaCl concentrations from 0.01 to 0.1 M. Arsenate adsorption was initially (0-10 h) rapid followed by a slow continuum uptake, and the adsorption processes reached the steady state after 720 h. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses suggest that As(V) predominantly forms bidentate binuclear surface species on aluminum octahedral structures, and these species are stable up to 11 months. Solubility calculations and powder XRD analyses indicate no evidence of crystalline AI-As(V) precipitates in the experimental systems. Overall, macroscopic and spectroscopic evidence suggest that the As(V) adsorption mechanisms at the allophane-water interface are attributable to ligand exchange reactions between As(V) and surface-coordinated water molecules and hydroxyl and silicate ions. The research findings imply that dissolved tetrahedral oxyanions (e.g., H2PO42- and H2AsO42-) are readily retained on amorphous aluminosilicate minerals in aquifer and soils at near neutral pH. The innersphere adsorption mechanisms might be important in controlling dissolved arsenate and phosphate in amorphous aluminosilicate-rich low-temperature geochemical environments. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  14. Investigating the thermodynamic stability of Bacillus subtilis spore-uranium(VI) adsorption though surface complexation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Z.; Hertel, M.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolved uranium speciation, mobility, and remediation are increasingly important topics given continued and potential uranium (U) release from mining operations and nuclear waste. Vegetative bacterial cell surfaces are known to adsorb uranium and may influence uranium speciation in the environment. Previous investigations regarding U(VI) adsorption to bacterial spores, a differentiated and dormant cell type with a tough proteinaceous coat, include U adsorption affinity and XAFS data. We investigated the thermodynamic stability of aerobic, pH dependent uranium adsorption to bacterial spore surfaces using purified Bacillus subtilis spores in solution with 5ppm uranium. Adsorption reversibility and kinetic experiments indicate that uranium does not precipitate over the duration of the experiments and equilibrium is reached within 20 minutes. Uranium-spore adsorption edges exhibited adsorption at all pH measured between 2 and 10. Maximum adsorption was achieved around pH 7 and decreased as pH increased above 7. We used surface complexation modeling (SCM) to quantify uranium adsorption based on balanced chemical equations and derive thermodynamic stability constants for discrete uranium-spore adsorption reactions. Site specific thermodynamic stability constants provide insight on interactions occurring between aqueous uranium species and spore surface ligands. The uranium adsorption data and SCM parameters described herein, also provide a basis for predicting the influence of bacterial spores on uranium speciation in natural systems and investigating their potential as biosorption agents in engineered systems.

  15. A Density Functional Theory Study of Formaldehyde Adsorption on Ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Deskins, N. Aaron; Dupuis, Michel

    2007-11-01

    Molecular adsorption of formaldehyde on the stoichiometric CeO2(111) and CeO2(110) surfaces was studied using periodic density functional theory. Two adsorption modes (strong chemisorbed and weak physisorbed) were identified on both surfaces. This is consistent with recent experimental observations. On the (111) surface, formaldehyde strongly chemisorbs with an adsorption energy of 0.86 eV to form a dioxymethylene-like structure, in which a surface O lifts from the surface to bind with the C of formaldehyde. A weak physisorbed state with adsorption energy of 0.28 eV was found with the O of formaldehyde interacting with a surface Ce. On the (110) surface, dioxymethyelene formation was also observed, with an adsorption energy of 1.31 eV. The weakly adsorbed state of formaldehyde on the (110) surface was energetically comparable to the weak adsorption state on the (111) surface, but adsorption occurred through a formaldehyde C and surface O interaction. Analysis of the local density of states and charge density differences after adsorption shows that strong covalent bonding occurs between the C of formaldehyde and surface O when dioxymethylene forms. Calculated vibrational frequencies also confirm dioxymethylene formation. Our results also show that as the coverage increases, the adsorption of formaldehyde on the (111) surface becomes weak, but is nearly unaffected on the (110) surface. This work was supported by a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The computations were performed using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which is a U.S. Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at PNNL in Richland, Washington. Computing time was made under a Computational Grand Challenge “Computational Catalysis”. Part of the computing time was also granted by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing

  16. Surface adsorption considerations when working with amyloid fibrils in multiwell plates and Eppendorf tubes.

    PubMed

    Murray, Amber N; Palhano, Fernando L; Bieschke, Jan; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2013-11-01

    The accumulation of cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of amyloid diseases. Recently, we reported the discovery of amyloid disaggregase activities in extracts from mammalian cells and Caenorhabditis elegans. However, we have discovered a problem with the interpretation of our previous results as Aβ disaggregation in vitro. Here, we show that Aβ fibrils adsorb to the plastic surface of multiwell plates and Eppendorf tubes. This adsorption is markedly increased in the presence of complex biological mixtures subjected to a denaturing air-water interface. The time-dependent loss of thioflavin T fluorescence that we interpreted previously as disaggregation is due to increased adsorption of Aβ amyloid to the surfaces of multiwell plates and Eppendorf tubes in the presence of biological extracts. As the proteins in biological extracts denature over time at the air-water interface due to agitation/shaking, their adsorption increases, in turn promoting adsorption of amyloid fibrils. We delineate important control experiments that quantify the extent of amyloid adsorption to the surface of plastic and quartz containers. Based on the results described in this article, we conclude that our interpretation of the kinetic fibril disaggregation assay data previously reported in Bieschke et al., Protein Sci 2009;18:2231-2241 and Murray et al., Protein Sci 2010;19:836-846 is invalid when used as evidence for a disaggregase activity. Thus, we correct the two prior publications reporting that worm or mammalian cell extracts disaggregate Aβ amyloid fibrils in vitro at 37°C (see Corrigenda in this issue of Protein Science). We apologize for misinterpreting our previous data and for any confounding experimental efforts this may have caused. PMID:23963844

  17. Synthesis of Fe3O4/Polyacrylonitrile Composite Electrospun Nanofiber Mat for Effective Adsorption of Tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhong, Lu-Bin; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Frear, Craig; Zheng, Yu-Ming

    2015-07-15

    Novel Fe3O4/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite nanofibers (NFs) were prepared by a simple two-step process, an electrospinning and solvothermal method. Characterization by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated formation of a uniform nanoparticles coating (about 20 nm in thickness) on the PAN nanofiber backbone. The coating was constructed by well-crystallized cubic phase Fe3O4 nanoparticles as examined by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). The coating doubled the specific surface area of NFs, from 8.4 to 17.8 m2 g(-1), as confirmed by nitrogen sorption isotherm analysis. To evaluate the feasibility of Fe3O4/PAN composite NFs as a potential adsorbent for antibiotic removal, batch adsorption experiments were conducted using tetracycline (TC) as the model antibiotic molecule. The results showed that Fe3O4/PAN composite NFs were effective in removing TC with no impactful loss of Fe in the pH regime of environmental interest (5-8). The adsorption of TC onto Fe3O4/PAN composite NFs better fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetics model, and the maximum adsorption capacity calculated from Langmuir isotherm model was 257.07 mg g(-1) at pH 6. The composite NFs also exhibited good regenerability over repeated adsorption/desorption cycles. Surface complexation between TC and the composite NFs contributed most to the adsorption as elucidated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This highly effective and novel adsorbent can be easily modularized and separated, promising its huge potential in drinking and wastewater treatment for antibiotic removal. PMID:26079116

  18. Alkoxysilane adsorption on metal oxide substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsier, R. D.; Zhuang, G. R.; Henriksen, P. N.

    1989-01-01

    Reflection-absorption infrared and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopies have been used to study adsorption of liquid phase mono-, di-, and trialkoxysilanes on evaporated Al and Cu substrates. Spectral evidence shows that substrate properties influence the chemical and physical nature of trialkoxysilane films and that silane functionality plays a role in molecular orientation. Results show that dialkoxysilane films contain structural gradients, with adsorption at the monomolecular level influenced by surface morphology, and with organofunctionality and dosing procedure affecting the formation of thicker films. Evidence is presented that monoalkoxysilanes react with alumina surfaces, and a broad, multipeaked band from 1600 to 1900/cm has been interpreted as characteristic of the silylated AlO(x)Pb interface.

  19. Adsorption of maleic anhydride on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Godhuli; Heikkinen, Olli; Vestberg, Matias; Mether, Lotta; Nordlund, Kai; Lahtinen, Jouko

    2014-02-01

    The surface chemistry of maleic anhydride (MA) has been studied on Pt(111) with temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Adsorption of MA takes place at 170 K forming multilayers. We have studied the behavior of distinct carbon and oxygen species of MA depending on the surface temperature. MA-TPD indicates three main desorption temperatures; at 240 K, approximately 60% of total MA on the surface shows molecular desorption. At high temperatures (360 and 550 K) MA shows dissociative decomposition with production of C2H2, CO and CO2 fragments. A plausible decomposition pathway of MA on the Pt(111) surface is discussed. DFT calculations provide details of the adsorption geometry.

  20. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  1. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  2. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  3. Adsorption of water on O(2x2)/Ru(0001): thermal stability and inhibition of dissociation by H2O-O bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Mugarza, Aitor; Shimizu, Tomoko; Cabrera-Sanfelix, Pepa; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Arnau, Andres; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-08-01

    The effect of preadsorbed oxygen on the subsequent adsorption and reactions of water on Ru(0001) has been studied using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and DFT calculations. Experiments were carried out for O coverages close to 0.25 ML. It was found that no dissociation of water takes place up to the desorption temperature of {approx}180-230 K. DFT calculations show that intact water on O(2x2)/Ru(0001) is {approx} 0.49 eV more stable than the dissociation products, H and OH, at their preferred fcc and top adsorption sites.

  4. The adsorption of plutonium IV and V on goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Arthur L.; Murray, James W.; Sibley, Thomas H.

    1985-11-01

    The adsorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) on goethite (αFeOOH) from NaNO 3 solution shows distinct differences related to the different hydrolytic character of these two oxidation states. Under similar solution conditions, the adsorption edge of the more strongly hydrolyzable Pu(IV) occurs in the pH range 3 to 5 while that for Pu(V) is at pH 5 to 7. The adsorption edge for Pu(V) shifts with time to lower pH values and this appears to be due to the reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) in the presence of the goethite surface. These results suggest that redox transformations may be an important aspect of Pu adsorption chemistry and the resulting scavenging of Pu from natural waters. Increasing ionic strength (from 0.1 M to 3 M NaCl or NaNO 3 and 0.03 M to 0.