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Sample records for adsorption ion exchange

  1. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  2. ION EXCHANGE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Taylor, M.D.

    1961-07-11

    Ion exchange processes for the separation of plutonium from fission products are described. In accordance with these processes an aqueous solution containing plutonium and fission products is contacted with a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring adsorption of plutonium and fission products on the resin. A portion of the fission product is then eluted with a solution containing 0.05 to 1% by weight of a carboxylic acid. Plutonium is next eluted with a solution containing 2 to 8 per cent by weight of the same carboxylic acid, and the remaining fission products on the resin are eluted with an aqueous solution containing over 10 per cent by weight of sodium bisulfate.

  3. Ion exchange and adsorption on low rank coals for liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vorres, K.S.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this program involve the study of the catalysis of liquefaction of low rank coals. Ion exchange and adsorption techniques are being used or modified to incorporate catalytically active metals into coal samples. Relative oil yields will be determined by Sandia National Laboratory and PETC collaborators to establish the effectiveness of the catalyst incorporation techniques. This report describes work done over the past 12 months of an on-going project.

  4. Adsorption of fluoride, phosphate, and arsenate ions on a new type of ion exchange fiber.

    PubMed

    Ruixia, Liu; Jinlong, Guo; Hongxiao, Tang

    2002-04-15

    A new type of ion exchange fiber for the removal of fluoride, phosphate, and arsenate ions has been developed. A batch adsorption technique for investigating adsorption kinetic and equilibrium parameters and determining pH adsorption edges is applied. It is shown that the adsorption properties of the ion exchange fiber for fluoride, phosphate, and arsenate ions depend on the pH value and anion concentration. The adsorption of arsenate on the sorbent reaches a maximum of 97.9% in the pH value range of 3.5 to 7.0. The adsorption percentage of phosphate is more than 99% in the pH range of 3.0 to 5.5. The adsorption of fluoride on the ion exchange fiber is found to be 90.4% at pH 3.0. The Freundlich model can describe the adsorption equilibrium data of fluoride, arsenate, and phosphate anions. The sorption of the three anions on the ion exchange fiber is a rapid process, and the adsorption kinetic data can be simulated very well by the pseudo-second-order rate equation. The column performance is carried out to assess the applicability of the ion exchange fiber for the removal of fluoride, phosphate, and arsenate ions from synthetic wastewaters with satisfactory removal efficiency. The desorption experiment shows that fluoride ion sorbed by the fiber column can be quantitatively desorbed with 5 mL of 0.50 mol/L NaOH at elution rate of 1 mL/min, and 30 mL of NaOH is necessary for the quantitative recovery of phosphate and arsenate ions.

  5. Ion exchange and adsorption on low rank coals for liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vorres, K.S.

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of this program are to study the application of catalysts and the catalysis of liquefaction of low rank coals. Ion exchange and adsorption techniques are being used or modified to incorporate catalytically active metals (Fe, Co, Ni and Mo) in relatively small (100-2000 ppM) quantities into coal samples. Relative oil yields are being determined by PETC and Auburn University workers as collaborators to establish the effectiveness of the catalyst incorporation techniques. It is hoped that these techniques will provide highly active forms of the catalyst in low concentrations to minimize the need for metals recovery. A two step preparation of the coal is used to (1) remove material which both limits oil conversion and prepares for the addition of exchangeable catalyst, and (2) add catalytically active material which enhances the conversion of the coal matter to the oil fraction in the processing.

  6. Single and binary adsorption of proteins on ion-exchange adsorbent: The effectiveness of isothermal models.

    PubMed

    Liang, Juan; Fieg, Georg; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous and sequential adsorption equilibria of single and binary adsorption of bovine serum albumin and bovine hemoglobin on Q Sepharose FF were investigated in different buffer constituents and initial conditions. The results in simultaneous adsorption showed that both proteins underwent competitive adsorption onto the adsorbent following greatly by protein-surface interaction. Preferentially adsorbed albumin complied with the universal rule of ion-exchange adsorption whereas buffer had no marked influence on hemoglobin adsorption. Moreover, an increase in initial ratios of proteins was benefit to a growth of adsorption density. In sequential adsorption, hemoglobin had the same adsorption densities as single-component adsorption. It was attributed to the displacement of preadsorbed albumin and multiple layer adsorption of hemoglobin. Three isothermal models (i.e. extended Langmuir, steric mass-action, and statistical thermodynamic (ST) models) were introduced to describe the ion-exchange adsorption of albumin and hemoglobin mixtures. The results suggested that extended Langmuir model gave the lowest deviation in describing preferential adsorption of albumin at a given salt concentration while steric mass-action model could very well describe the salt effect in albumin adsorption. For weaker adsorbed hemoglobin, ST model was the preferred choice. In concert with breakthrough data, the research further revealed the complexity in ion-exchange adsorption of proteins.

  7. Adsorption of three pharmaceuticals on two magnetic ion-exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Yang, Weiben; Zhang, Ziwei; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuping

    2015-05-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments poses potential risks to the ecology and human health. This study investigated the removal of three widely detected and abundant pharmaceuticals, namely, ibuprofen (IBU), diclofenac (DC), and sulfadiazine (SDZ), by two magnetic ion-exchange resins. The adsorption kinetics of the three adsorbates onto both resins was relatively fast and followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Despite the different pore structures of the two resins, similar adsorption patterns of DC and SDZ were observed, implying the existence of an ion-exchange mechanism. IBU demonstrated a combination of interactions during the adsorption process. These interactions were dependent on the specific surface area and functional groups of the resin. The adsorption isotherm fittings verified the differences in the behavior of the three pharmaceuticals on the two magnetic ion-exchange resins. The presence of Cl- and SO4(2-) suppressed the adsorption amount, but with different inhibition levels for different adsorbates. This work facilitates the understanding of the adsorption behavior and mechanism of pharmaceuticals on magnetic ion-exchange resins. The results will expand the application of magnetic ion-exchange resins to the removal of pharmaceuticals in waters.

  8. Adsorption, partition, ion exchange and chemical reaction in batch reactors or in columns — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweich, D.; Sardin, M.

    The role of linear or non-linear adsorption, mass transfer kinetics, chemical reactions and ion exchange in column tracer experiments is qualitatively dealt with. The similarity of elution curves is emphasized even for very different phenomena. Some experimental procedures are proposed to point out the principal physico-chemical phenomenon which is responsible for the shape of the adsorption isotherm deduced from batch or column experiments.

  9. Protein adsorption on DEAE ion-exchange resins with different ligand densities and pore sizes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui-Li; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Zhu, Mi-Mi; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2012-11-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEC) is a common and powerful technique for the purification of proteins. The ligand density and pore properties of ion-exchange resins have significant effects on the separation behaviors of protein, however, the understandings are quite limited. In the present work, the adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated systematically with series of diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) ion-exchange resins, which have different ligand densities and pore sizes. The Langmuir equation was used to fit the experimental data and the influences of ligand density and pore size on the saturated adsorption capacity and the dissociation constant were discussed. The zeta potentials and hydrodynamic diameters of proteins at different pHs were also measured, and the surface charge characteristics of proteins and the adsorption mechanism were discussed. The results demonstrated that the ligand density, pore size, and protein properties affect the protein adsorption capacities in an integrative way. An integrative parameter was introduced to describe the complicated effects of ligand density and pore size on the protein adsorption. For a given protein, the ligand density and pore size should be optimized for improving the protein adsorption.

  10. Uranium Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins - Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    The uranium adsorption performance of five resins (Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 [fresh], Dowex 21K 16-30 [regenerated], Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200) were tested using unspiked, nitrate-spiked, and nitrate-spiked/pH adjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests were conducted in support of a resin selection process in which the best resin to use for uranium treatment in the 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system will be identified. The results from these tests are as follows: • The data from the high-nitrate (1331 mg/L) tests indicated that Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 all adsorbed uranium similarly well with Kd values ranging from ~15,000 to 95,000 ml/g. All four resins would be considered suitable for use in the treatment system based on uranium adsorption characteristics. • Lowering the pH of the high nitrate test conditions from 8.2 to 7.5 did not significantly change the uranium adsorption isotherms for the four tested resins. The Kd values for these four resins under high nitrate (1338 mg/L), lower pH (7.5) ranged from ~15,000 to 80,000 ml/g. • Higher nitrate concentrations greatly reduced the uranium adsorption on all four resins. Tests conducted with unspiked (no amendments; nitrate at 337 mg/L and pH at 8.2) source water yielded Kd values for Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 resins ranging from ~800,000 to >3,000,000 ml/g. These values are about two orders of magnitude higher than the Kd values noted from tests conducted using amended source water. • Compared to the fresh resin, the regenerated Dowex 21K 16-30 resin exhibited significantly lower uranium-adsorption performance under all test conditions. The calculated Kd values for the regenerated resin were typically an order of magnitude lower than the values calculated for the fresh resin. • Additional testing using laboratory columns is recommended to better

  11. The Role of Lactic Acid Adsorption by Ion Exchange Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tongcun; Zhang, Jian; Jia, Shiru; Yu, Changyan; Jiang, Kunyu; Gao, Nianfa

    2010-01-01

    Background The polyacrylic resin Amberlite IRA-67 is a promising adsorbent for lactic acid extraction from aqueous solution, but little systematic research has been devoted to the separation efficiency of lactic acid under different operating conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, we investigated the effects of temperature, resin dose and lactic acid loading concentration on the adsorption of lactic acid by Amberlite IRA-67 in batch kinetic experiments. The obtained kinetic data followed the pseudo-second order model well and both the equilibrium and ultimate adsorption slightly decreased with the increase of the temperature at 293–323K and 42.5 g/liter lactic acid loading concentration. The adsorption was a chemically heterogeneous process with a mean free energy value of 12.18 kJ/mol. According to the Boyd_plot, the lactic acid uptake process was primarily found to be an intraparticle diffusion at a lower concentration (<50 g/liter) but a film diffusion at a higher concentration (>70 g/liter). The values of effective diffusion coefficient Di increased with temperature. By using our Equation (21), the negative values of ΔG° and ΔH° revealed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. Moreover, the negative value of ΔS° reflected the decrease of solid-liquid interface randomness at the solid-liquid interface when adsorbing lactic acid on IRA-67. Conclusions/Significance With the weakly basic resin IRA-67, in situ product removal of lactic acid can be accomplished especially from an open and thermophilic fermentation system without sterilization. PMID:21085600

  12. Separation of low concentration of cesium ion from wastewater by electrochemically switched ion exchange method: experimental adsorption kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Hao, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Zhong-De; Guan, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Li, Yi-Bin; Liu, Shi-Bin

    2012-09-30

    A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the continuous separation of cesium based on an electrochemically switched ion exchange (ESIX) process using a diaphragm-isolated reactor with two identical nickel hexacyanoferrate/porous three-dimensional carbon felt (NiHCF/PTCF) electrodes as working electrodes. The effects of applied potential, initial concentrations and pH values of the simulation solutions on the adsorption of cesium ion were investigated. The adsorption rate of cesium ion in the ESIX process was fitted by a pseudo-first-order reaction model. The experiments revealed that the introduction of applied potential on the electrodes greatly enhanced the adsorption/desorption rate of Cs(+) and increased the separation efficiency. H(3)O(+) was found to play a dual role of electrolyte and competitor, and the adsorption rate constant showed a curve diversification with an increase in pH value. Also, it was found that the electrochemically switched adsorption process of Cs(+) by NiHCF/PTCF electrodes proceeded in two main steps, i.e., an ESIX step with a fast adsorption rate and an ion diffusion step with a slow diffusion rate. Meanwhile, the NiHCF/PTCF film electrode showed adsorption selectivity for Cs(+) in preference to Na(+).

  13. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P.; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C.; Landes, Christy F.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally. PMID:24459184

  14. Unified superresolution experiments and stochastic theory provide mechanistic insight into protein ion-exchange adsorptive separations.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-02-11

    Chromatographic protein separations, immunoassays, and biosensing all typically involve the adsorption of proteins to surfaces decorated with charged, hydrophobic, or affinity ligands. Despite increasingly widespread use throughout the pharmaceutical industry, mechanistic detail about the interactions of proteins with individual chromatographic adsorbent sites is available only via inference from ensemble measurements such as binding isotherms, calorimetry, and chromatography. In this work, we present the direct superresolution mapping and kinetic characterization of functional sites on ion-exchange ligands based on agarose, a support matrix routinely used in protein chromatography. By quantifying the interactions of single proteins with individual charged ligands, we demonstrate that clusters of charges are necessary to create detectable adsorption sites and that even chemically identical ligands create adsorption sites of varying kinetic properties that depend on steric availability at the interface. Additionally, we relate experimental results to the stochastic theory of chromatography. Simulated elution profiles calculated from the molecular-scale data suggest that, if it were possible to engineer uniform optimal interactions into ion-exchange systems, separation efficiencies could be improved by as much as a factor of five by deliberately exploiting clustered interactions that currently dominate the ion-exchange process only accidentally.

  15. Increasing parvovirus filter throughput of monoclonal antibodies using ion exchange membrane adsorptive pre-filtration.

    PubMed

    Brown, Arick; Bechtel, Charity; Bill, Jerome; Liu, Hui; Liu, Jun; McDonald, Dan; Pai, Satyan; Radhamohan, Asha; Renslow, Ryan; Thayer, Brooke; Yohe, Stefan; Dowd, Chris

    2010-07-01

    Pre-filtration using ion exchange membrane adsorbers can improve parvovirus filter throughput of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The membranes work by binding trace foulants, and although some antibody product also binds, yields > or =99% are easily achieved by overloading. Results show that foulant adsorption is dependent on pH and conductivity, but independent of scale and adsorber brand. The ability to use ion exchange membranes as pre-filters is significant because it provides a clean, well defined, chemically stable option for enhancing throughput. Additionally, ion exchange membranes facilitate characterization of parvovirus filter foulants. Examination of adsorber elution samples using sedimentation velocity analysis and SEC-MALS/QELS revealed the presence of high molecular weight species ranging from 8 to 13 nm in hydrodynamic radius, which are similar in size to parvoviruses and thus would be expected to plug the pores of a parvovirus filter. A study of two identical membranes in-series supports the hypothesis that the foulants are soluble, trace level aggregates in the feed. This study's significance lies in a previously undiscovered application of membrane chromatography, leading to a more cost effective and robust approach to parvovirus filtration for the production of monoclonal antibodies.

  16. Regulation of protein multipoint adsorption on ion-exchange adsorbent and its application to the purification of macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongdong; Bi, Jingxiu; Zhao, Lan; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2010-12-01

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) using commercial ionic absorbents is a widely used technique for protein purification. Protein adsorption onto ion-exchange adsorbents often involves a multipoint adsorption. In IEC of multimeric proteins or "soft" proteins, the intense multipoint binding would make the further desorption difficult, even lead to the destruction of protein structure and the loss of its biological activity. In this paper, DEAE Sepharose FF adsorbents with controllable ligand densities from 0.020 to 0.183 mmol/ml were synthesized, and then the effect of ligand density on the static ion-exchange adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto DEAE Sepharose FF was studied by batch adsorption technique. Steric mass-action (SMA) model was employed to analyze the static adsorption behavior. The results showed that the SMA model parameters, equilibrium constant (K(a)), characteristic number of binding sites (υ) and steric factor (σ), increased gradually with ligand density. Thus, it was feasible to regulate BSA multipoint adsorption by modulating the ligand density of ion-exchange adsorbent. Furthermore, IEC of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using DEAE Sepharose FF adsorbents with different ligand densities was carried out, and the activity recovery of HBsAg was improved from 42% to 67% when the ligand density was decreased from 0.183 to 0.020 mmol/ml. Taking the activity recovery of HBsAg, the purification factor and the binding capacity into account, DEAE Sepharose FF with a ligand density of 0.041 mmol/ml was most effective for the purification of HBsAg. Such a strategy may also be beneficial for the purification of macromolecules and multimeric proteins.

  17. Selective adsorption of Pt ions from chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on ion exchange resin Diaion WA21J.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shaobo; Guishen, Liang; Pan, Tonglin; He, JunZhang; Guo, Zhanchen

    2011-12-15

    Thermodynamic and kinetics studies for adsorption of Pt ions complexes from the chloride solutions obtained by leaching chlorinated spent automotive catalysts on anionic exchange resin Diaion WA21J were carried out. It was found that only Si, Pt, Rh and Pd from the solution were selectively adsorbed on the resin Diaion WA21J more strongly. The adsorption equilibrium time for Pt ions was about 20 h. The isothermal adsorption of Pt ions was found to fit Langmuir, Freundlich and DKR models. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities Q(max) and X(m) of Pt ions on the resin based on Langmuir and DKR model were 4.85, 5.36 and 5.69 mg/g as well as 5.01, 5.63 and 5.98 mg/g for temperatures 18°C, 28°C and 40°C, respectively. The apparent adsorption energy E(ad) based on DKR model were -11.79, -11.04 and -11.04 kJ/mol for the temperatures 18°C, 28°C and 40°C, respectively. Ion exchange was the mechanism involved in the adsorption process. The adsorption of Pt ions on the resin underwent pseudo-first-order kinetic process, and the apparent adsorption activation energy E(a,1) was 12.6 kJ/mol. The intraparticle diffusion of Pt ions was a main rate-controlling step in most of time of adsorption process.

  18. Electrostatic model for protein adsorption in ion-exchange chromatography and application to monoclonal antibodies, lysozyme and chymotrypsinogen A.

    PubMed

    Guélat, Bertrand; Ströhlein, Guido; Lattuada, Marco; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-08-27

    A model for the adsorption equilibrium of proteins in ion-exchange chromatography explicitly accounting for the effect of pH and salt concentration in the limit of highly diluted systems was developed. It is based on the use of DLVO theory to estimate the electrostatic interactions between the charged surface of the ion-exchanger and the proteins. The corresponding charge distributions were evaluated as a function of pH and salt concentration using a molecular approach. The model was verified for the adsorption equilibrium of lysozyme, chymotrypsinogen A and four industrial monoclonal antibodies on two strong cation-exchangers. The adsorption equilibrium constants of these proteins were determined experimentally at various pH values and salt concentrations and the model was fitted with a good agreement using three adjustable parameters for each protein in the whole range of experimental conditions. Despite the simplifications of the model regarding the geometry of the protein-ion-exchanger system, the physical meaning of the parameters was retained.

  19. Integrated separation scheme for coal-derived liquids using ion-exchange and adsorption chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, M.G.; Johns, R.B.

    1986-02-01

    A separation scheme for coal-derived liquids has been developed that separates by functionality into discrete compound classes using ion-exchange resins; neutrals are further subdivided into fractions differing in polarity, structure, and molecular weight by adsorption chromatography. Sufficient material can be separated to allow further characterization at both gross structural and molecular levels. It gives excellent overall reproducibility (+/- 4%) and recovery (>97%). Removal of acidic and base species prior to recovery of the liquefaction solvent by distillation is a major advantage of the method because it leads to a reduction both in the loss of lower boiling components and in the potential thermal alteration of the sample. The selectivity and discrimination of the procedure are demonstrated for a Victorian brown coal (Loy Yang field) liquefaction product as shown by spectroscopic and chemical analyses of its major fractions. The use of this method as a chemical probe can facilitate investigation of liquefaction mechanisms by enabling a ready selection for analysis of components varying according to a choice of parameters encompassing functionality, polarity, and structure. 29 references, 7 figures, 5 tables.

  20. High ionic strength narrows the population of sites participating in protein ion-exchange adsorption: a single-molecule study.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Kulla, Eliona; Kang, Marci K; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-05-23

    The retention and elution of proteins in ion-exchange chromatography is routinely controlled by adjusting the mobile phase salt concentration. It has repeatedly been observed, as judged from adsorption isotherms, that the apparent heterogeneity of adsorption is lower at more-eluting, higher ionic strength. Here, we present an investigation into the mechanism of this phenomenon using a single-molecule, super-resolution imaging technique called motion-blur Points Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography (mbPAINT). We observed that the number of functional adsorption sites was smaller at high ionic strength and that these sites had reduced desorption kinetic heterogeneity, and thus narrower predicted elution profiles, for the anion-exchange adsorption of α-lactalbumin on an agarose-supported, clustered-charge ligand stationary phase. Explanations for the narrowing of the functional population such as inter-protein interactions and protein or support structural changes were investigated through kinetic analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and microscopy of agarose microbeads, respectively. The results suggest the reduction of heterogeneity is due to both electrostatic screening between the protein and ligand and tuning the steric availability within the agarose support. Overall, we have shown that single molecule spectroscopy can aid in understanding the influence of ionic strength on the population of functional adsorbent sites participating in the ion-exchange chromatographic separation of proteins.

  1. High ionic strength narrows the population of sites participating in protein ion-exchange adsorption: A single-molecule study

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P.; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Kulla, Eliona; Kang, Marci; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C.; Landes, Christy F.

    2014-01-01

    The retention and elution of proteins in ion-exchange chromatography is routinely controlled by adjusting the mobile phase salt concentration. It has repeatedly been observed, as judged from adsorption isotherms, that the apparent heterogeneity of adsorption is lower at more-eluting, higher ionic strength. Here, we present an investigation into the mechanism of this phenomenon using a single-molecule, super-resolution imaging technique called motion-blur Points Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography (mbPAINT). We observed that the number of functional adsorption sites was smaller at high ionic strength and that these sites had reduced desorption kinetic heterogeneity, and thus narrower predicted elution profiles, for the anion-exchange adsorption of α-lactalbumin on an agarose-supported, clustered-charge ligand stationary phase. Explanations for the narrowing of the functional population such as inter-protein interactions and protein or support structural changes were investigated through kinetic analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and microscopy of agarose microbeads, respectively. The results suggest the reduction of heterogeneity is due to both electrostatic screening between the protein and ligand and tuning the steric availability within the agarose support. Overall, we have shown that single molecule spectroscopy can aid in understanding the influence of ionic strength on the population of functional adsorbent sites participating in the ion-exchange chromatographic separation of proteins. PMID:24751557

  2. Kafirin adsorption on ion-exchange resins: isotherm and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Lau, Pei Wen; Kale, Sandeep; Johnson, Stuart; Pareek, Vishnu; Utikar, Ranjeet; Lali, Arvind

    2014-08-22

    Kafirin is a natural, hydrophobic and celiac safe prolamin protein obtained from sorghum seeds. Today kafirin is found to be useful in designing delayed delivery systems and coatings of pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals where its purity is important and this can be obtained by adsorptive chromatography. This study is the first scientific insight into the isotherm and kinetic studies of kafirin adsorption on anion- and cation-exchange resins for practical applications in preparative scale chromatography. Adsorption isotherms of kafirin were determined for five anion- and two cation-exchange resins in batch systems. Isotherm parameters such as maximum binding capacity and dissociation constant were determined from Langmuir isotherm, and adsorptive capacity and affinity constant from Freundlich isotherm. Langmuir isotherm was found to fit the adsorption equilibrium data well. Batch uptake kinetics for kafirin adsorption on these resins was also carried out and critical parameters including the diffusion coefficient, film mass transfer coefficient, and Biot number for film-pore diffusion model were calculated. Both the isotherm and the kinetic parameters were considered for selection of appropriate resin for kafirin purification. UNOsphere Q (78.26 mg/ml) and Toyopearl SP-650M (57.4 mg/ml) were found to offer better kafirin binding capacities and interaction strength with excellent uptake kinetics under moderate operating conditions. With these adsorbents, film diffusion resistance was found to be major governing factor for adsorption (Bi<10 and δ<1). Based on designer objective function, UNOsphere Q was found be best adsorbent for binding of kafirin. The data presented is valuable for designing large scale preparative adsorptive chromatographic kafirin purification systems.

  3. Vacancy ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography of aliphatic amines on a polymethacrylate-based weakly basic anion-exchange column.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Helaleh, Murad I H; Xu, Qun; Hu, Wenzhi; Ikedo, Mikaru; Ding, Ming-Yu; Taoda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-11

    Vacancy ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography has been applied to investigate the separation behavior of five aliphatic amines (ethylamine, propylamine, butylamine, pentylamine and hexylamine) on a polymethacrylate-based weakly basic anion-exchange column (Tosoh TSKgel DEAE-5PW). This system is consisted of analytes as a mobile phase and water as an injected sample. In the vacancy ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography, the elution order was as follows: ethylamine < propylamine < butylamine < pentylamine < hexylamine, depending on their hydrophobicity. The retention times of the amines were decreased with decreasing their concentrations in the mobile phase. The retention times and resolutions of the amines were increased by adding a basic compound (e.g., lithium hydroxide or heptylamine) and by increasing the pH of mobile phase (pH > 11). This was because the dissociations of amine samples in the mobile phase were suppressed and thus the hydrophobic adsorption effects were enhanced. The linearity of calibration graphs could be obtained from the peak areas of the amine samples injected to the 0.05, 0.5 and 5 mM of amine mobile phase at pH 11 by heptylamine. The detection limits of aliphatic amines as injected samples were around 1 microM for five aliphatic amines at three different amine mobile phases. From these results, the retention behaviors of aliphatic amines on vacancy ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography were concluded to be governed by the hydrophobic adsorption effect.

  4. CO2 adsorption properties of ion-exchanged zeolite Y prepared from natural clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djeffal, Nadjiba; Benbouzid, Mohammed; Boukoussa, Bouhadjar; Sekkiou, Housseyn; Bengueddach, Abdelkader

    2017-03-01

    Ordered microporous Y zeolite was successfully synthesized by hydrothermal treatment using metakaolin and Ludox (40% SiO2) as an aluminum and silica source respectively. The metakaolin was obtained by thermal treatment of Algerian kaolin. The obtained Y zeolite was exchanged by different cations such as Cu2+, Ni2+, Ca2+, Na+ and used for the CO2 adsorption at 0 °C. The structural features of the materials were determined by various physico-chemical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption at 77 K, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electronic microscopy. The CO2 adsorption at 0 °C was carried using a volumetric method. The adsorption isotherms of CO2 exhibit nonlinear concave curves and showed a high adsorption capacity for CO2 from the M-Y zeolites. The equilibrium CO2 adsorption capacity increase in the following order of Cu2+  <  Ni2+  <  Ca2+  <  Na+. The experimental isotherm data of the CO2 adsorption was best described by the Langmuir model giving a maximum adsorbed amount q m  =  77.57 cm3 · g‑1 STP for Na-Y zeolite.

  5. Protein adsorption on ion exchange resins and monoclonal antibody charge variant modulation.

    PubMed

    Guélat, Bertrand; Khalaf, Rushd; Lattuada, Marco; Costioli, Matteo; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-05-20

    A novel multicomponent adsorption equilibrium model for proteins on ion-exchange resins is developed on a statistical thermodynamic basis including surface coverage effects and protein-resin and protein-protein interactions. The resulting model exhibits a general competitive Langmuirian behavior and was applied to the study and optimization of the separation of monoclonal antibody charge variants on two strong cation exchangers. The model accounts explicitly for the effect of both pH and salt concentration, and its parameters can be determined in diluted conditions, that is, through physically sound assumptions, all model parameters can be obtained using solely experiments in diluted conditions, and be used to make predictions in overloaded conditions. The parameterization of the model and optimization of the separation is based on a two-step approach. First, gradient experiments in diluted conditions are undertaken in order to determine the model parameters. Based on these experiments and on information about the proteins of interest and the stationary phase used, all the model parameters can be estimated. Second, using the parameterized model, an initial Pareto optimization is undertaken where overloaded operating conditions are investigated. Experiments from this Pareto set are then used to refine the estimation of the model parameters. A second Pareto optimization can then be undertaken, this time with the refined parameters. This can be repeated until a satisfactory set of model parameters is found. This iterative approach is shown to be extremely efficient and to provide large amounts of knowledge based on only a few experiments. It is shown that due to the strong physical foundation of the model and the very low number of adjustable parameters, the number of iterations is expected to be at most two or three. Furthermore, the model based tool is improved as more experimental knowledge is provided, allowing for better estimations of the chromatographic

  6. Nitroguanidine Wastewater Pollution Control Technology: Phase III. Ion Exchange and Carbon Adsorption Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    these :.ons as well as NQ. I/’ I . , I * MATERIALS AND METHODS RESINS AND CARBONS Three ion-exchange materials were studied: clinoptilolite , an...SD are synthetic cross-linked resins provided as moist spherical beads nominally of 50 percent water content. The clinoptilolite was supplied presized...to the nearest mg and maintained at the test temperature for at least 24 hours prior to use. Carbons and clinoptilolite were considered dry as

  7. Competitive ion-exchange adsorption of proteins: competitive isotherms with controlled competitor concentration.

    PubMed

    Cano, Tony; Offringa, Natalie D; Willson, Richard C

    2005-06-24

    The competitive adsorption processes inevitably present in chromatographic separations of complex mixtures have not been extensively studied. This is partly due to the difficulty of measuring true competitive isotherms, in which all system parameters (including competitor concentrations) are held constant. We report a novel approach to determining competitive protein adsorption isotherms in which the competitor concentration is held constant across the entire isotherm. By using the heme prosthetic group in cytochrome b5 as a quantitative spectrophotometric label, competitive isotherms between cytochrome b5 and alpha-lactalbumin can be constructed. Similarly, manganese-substituted protoporphyrin IX heme replacement allows the non-perturbing labeling of individual cytochrome b5 conservative surface charge mutants by replacement of a single atom in the interior of the protein. This labeling allows the study of competition between cytochrome b5 charge mutants of identical size and shape, which differ only in charge arrangement. Using these techniques, the effect of competing species on equilibrium behavior and the apparent heterogeneity of anion-exchange adsorbents in the presence of competitors can be quantitatively studied by fitting the data to two popular single-component binding models, the Temkin and the Langmuir-Freundlich (L-F) isotherms.

  8. Magnesium adsorption and ion exchange in marine sediments: A multi-component model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Breymann, Marta T.; Collier, Robert; Suess, Erwin

    1990-12-01

    The observed distribution of dissolved magnesium in the pore water of rapidly accumulating sediments shows significant deviations from the seawater value. We have shown that deviations during early diagenesis can be explained by reactions occurring at the surface of sediment particles. In anoxic pore water environments with high levels of dissolved total carbon dioxide the formation of Mg +2·CO 3-2 complexes significantly reduces the concentration of the free Mg +2 ion. This decrease in the Mg +2 activity results in desorption of magnesium from the solid surfaces due to the re-equilibration of the adsorbed Mg +2 with the dissolved species. The effect of increasing carbonate complexation of Mg +2 in anoxic environments is initially compensated by the loss of sulfate, which is also a strong Mg +2 ligand. Therefore, significant changes in free Mg +2 concentration and thus in the magnesium desorption from solid surfaces by ligand competition for Mg +2 are more pronounced in sulfate-depleted systems undergoing methanogenesis. Such conditions are characteristic of most continental margin sediments. Another consequence of the decomposition of organic matter in hemipelagic sediments is the accumulation of high levels of ammonium ions which also displace Mg +2 from sediment-particle surfaces by ion exchange. These equilibria in the pore water-sediment systems can be described by empirical parameters, which were experimentally obtained. A computer model was used to determine the equilibrium conditions for solid-solution reactions as a function of changes in the pore-water composition in organicrich hemipelagic environments. This model includes complex formation, competition for Mg +2 between dissolved ligands and exchange sites and Mg +2/NH +4 exchange reactions. The relative proportion of desorbed and displaced Mg +2 from the solid surface depends on the characteristics of the sediment and on the ΣCO 2:NH +4 regenerative ratio in the pore waters. In sediments from

  9. Kinetics and equilibrium adsorption studies of dimethylamine (DMA) onto ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinhai; Meng, Yuanyuan; Sun, Tongxi; Mahmood, Qaisar; Wu, Donglei; Zhu, Jianhang; Lu, George

    2011-01-30

    The fine grained resin ZGSPC106 was used to adsorb dimethylamine (DMA) from aqueous solution in the present research. Batch experiments were performed to examine the effects of initial pH of solution and agitation time on the adsorption process. The thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were also analyzed. The maximum adsorption was found at natural pH of DMA solution and equilibrium could be attained within 12 min. The equilibrium adsorption data were conformed satisfactorily to the Langmuir equation. The evaluation based on Langmuir isotherm gave the maximal static saturated adsorption capacity of 138.89 mg/g at 293K. Various thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) showed that the adsorption was spontaneous, endothermic and feasible. DMA adsorption on ZGSPC106 fitted well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Furthermore, the adsorption mechanism was discussed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis.

  10. Ion exchange - Simulation and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Cal C.; Finn, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for simulating multicomponent adsorption by ion-exchange resins was adapted for use as both an ASPEN-callable module and as a free-standing simulator of the ion-exchange bed. Four polystyrene-divinylbenzene sulfonic acid resins have been characterized for three principal ions. It is concluded that a chelating resin appears appropriate as a heavy-metal trap. The same ASPEN-callable module is used to model this resin when Wilson parameters can be obtained.

  11. Adsorption behaviors of thiophene, benzene, and cyclohexene on FAU zeolites: Comparison of CeY obtained by liquid-, and solid-state ion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yucai; Mo, Zhousheng; Yu, Wenguang; Dong, Shiwei; Duan, Linhai; Gao, Xionghou; Song, Lijuan

    2014-02-01

    Cerium containing Y zeolites were prepared by liquid- (L-CeY) and solid- (S-CeY) state ion exchange from NaY and HY, respectively. The structural and textural properties were characterized by XRD and N2 adsorption, and acidity properties were characterized by NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and in situ FTIR spectrum of chemisorbed pyridine (in situ Py-FTIR). Furthermore, the single component adsorption and multi-component competitive adsorption behavior of thiophene, benzene and cyclohexene on those zeolites have also been studied by using vapor adsorption isotherms, solution adsorption breakthrough curves, thermogravimetry and derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG), frequency response (FR) and in situ FTIR techniques. The results indicate that the primary adsorption mode of benzene is simply micropore filling process, but the nature of effect of aromatics on selective adsorption of thiophene is competitive adsorption. The strong chemical adsorptions and protonization reactions of thiophene and cyclohexene occur upon the Brönsted acid sites of the HY and L-CeY zeolites, and the preferable acid catalytic protonization reactions of olefins hinder the further adsorption of sulfur compounds.

  12. Adsorption characteristics of malic acid from aqueous solutions by weakly basic ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Pan, Chaoqiang; Liu, Fabao; Lu, Fuping; Wang, Depei; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Yan

    2012-08-17

    In this study, we reported the effects of temperature, malic acid loading concentration, and resin dose on malic acid adsorption by IRA-67 in batch experiments. The kinetic data well fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Both the equilibrium and ultimate adsorption slightly decreased with increased temperature from 303 to 323 K at 74.7 g/L malic acid loading concentration. The malic acid adsorption was revealed as a homogeneous adsorbent process by the Langmuir model and film diffusion process at loading concentrations of 18.2-94.5 g/L malic acid by the Boyd plot. The values of effective diffusion coefficient D(i) also increased with the temperature. Based on Eq. (15), the negative values of ΔG° and ΔH° revealed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. The negative value of ΔS° also indicated the decrease in the solid-liquid interface randomness at this interface when malic acid is adsorbed by IRA-67.

  13. Adsorption of saponin compound in Carica papaya leaves extract using weakly basic ion exchanger resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Noraziani Zainal; Janam, Anathasia; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2016-11-01

    Adsorption of saponin compound in papaya leaves juice extract using Amberlite® IRA-67 resin was not reported in previous studies. In this research, Amberlite® IRA-67 was used to determine the amount of saponin that can be adsorbed using different weights of dry resin (0.1 g and 0.5 g). Peleg model was used to determine the maximum yield of saponin (43.67 mg) and the exhaustive time (5.7 days) prior to a preliminary resin-saponin adsorption study. After adsorption process, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in total saponin content (mg) for sample treated with 0.1 g (3.79 ± 0.55 mg) and sample treated with 0.5 g (3.43 ± 0.51 mg) dry weight resin. Long-term kinetic adsorption of resin-saponin method (>24 hours) should be conducted to obtain optimum freed saponin extract. Besides that, sample treated with 0.1 g dry weight resin had high free radical scavenging value of 50.33 ± 2.74% compared to sample treated with 0.5 g dry weight resin that had low free radical scavenging value of 24.54 ± 1.66% dry weights. Total saponin content (mg), total phenolic content (mg GAE) and free radical scavenging activity (%) was investigated to determine the interaction of those compounds with Amberlite® IRA-67. The RP-HPLC analysis using ursolic acid as standard at 203 nm showed no peak even though ursolic acid was one of the saponin components that was ubiquitous in plant kingdom. The absence of peak was due to weak solubility of ursolic acid in water and since it was only soluble in solvent with moderate polarity. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for total saponin content (mg) versus total phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) were +0.959 and +0.807. Positive values showed that whenever there was an increase in saponin content (mg), the phenolic content (mg GAE) and radical scavenging activity (%) would also increase. However, as the resin-saponin adsorption was carried out, there was a significant decrease of radical scavenging activity

  14. The mechanism of ion exchange and adsorption coexist on medium-low concentration ammonium-nitrogen removal by ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Yunnen, Chen; Xiaoyan, Luo; Changshi, Xiong; Liming, Liang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the removal of medium-low concentration ammonium-nitrogen ([Formula: see text]) from waters and wastewaters on D113 resin was investigated with respect to pH, initial [Formula: see text] concentration, temperature and contact time. The equilibrium of [Formula: see text] on D113 resin reached in 20-30 min. The process of [Formula: see text] removal by D113 resin fitted Langmuir isotherm well. The pseudo second-order kinetic and intra-particle diffusion models were used to investigate the kinetic data of [Formula: see text] on D113 resin. The desorption solution can be returned to production after pretreatment. The mechanism of removal of [Formula: see text] by D113 resin was coexistence of adsorption and cation exchange. When the dosage of D113 resin was 5 g L(-1), pH 6, contact 30 min at room temperature, initial [Formula: see text] concentration being 116 mg L(-1) in rare earth metallurgical wastewater was reduced to 13 mg L(-1) after adsorption treatment.

  15. [Ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium in natural clinoptilolite].

    PubMed

    He, Yun-Hua; Li, Hang; Liu, Xin-Min; Xiong, Hai-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Zeolites have been widely applied in soil improvement and environment protection. The study on ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium is of important significance for better use of zeolites. The maximum adsorption capacities of alkali ions during ion exchange equilibrium in the clinoptilolite showed obvious specificity. For alkali metal ions with equivalent valence, the differences in adsorption capacity increased with the decrease of ionic concentration. These results cannot be well explained by the classical theories including coulomb force, ionic size, hydration, dispersion force, classic induction force and surface complexation. We found that the coupling of polarization effects resulted from the quantum fluctuation of diverse alkali metal ions and electric field near the zeolite surface should be the primary reason for specific ion effect during ion exchange in zeolite. The result of this coupling effect was that the difference in the ion dipole moment increased with the increase of surface potential, which further expanded the difference in the adsorption ability between zeolite surface and ions, resulting in different ion exchange adsorption ability at the solid/liquid interface. Due to the high surface charge density of zeolite, ionic size also played an important role in the distribution of ions in the double diffuse layer, which led to an interesting result that distinct differences in exchange adsorption ability of various alkali metal ions were only detected at high surface potential (the absolute value was greater than 0.2 V), which was different from the ion exchange equilibrium result on the surface with low charge density.

  16. Iodine adsorption on ion-exchange resins and activated carbons: batch testing

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-09-30

    Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows. The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine

  17. Adsorption of virus-like particles on ion exchange surface: Conformational changes at different pH detected by dual polarization interferometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanli; Mengran Yu; Zhang, Songping; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-08-21

    Disassembling of virus-like particles (VLPs) like hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HB-VLPs) during chromatographic process has been identified as a major cause of loss of antigen activity. In this study, dual polarization interferometry (DPI) measurement, together with chromatography experiments, were performed to study the adsorption and conformational change of HB-VLPs on ion exchange surface at three different pHs. Changes in pH values of buffer solution showed only minimal effect on the HB-VLPs assembly and antigen activity, while significantly different degree of HB-VLPs disassembling was observed after ion exchange chromatography (IEC) at different pHs, indicating the conformational change of HB-VLPs caused mainly by its interactions with the adsorbent surface. By creating an ion exchange surface on chip surface, the conformational changes of HB-VLPs during adsorption to the surface were monitored in real time by DPI for the first time. As pH increased from 7.0 to 9.0, strong electrostatic interactions between oppositely charged HB-VLPs and the ion exchange surface make the HB-VLPs spread thinly or even adsorbed in disassembled formation on the surface as revealed by significant decrease in thickness of the adsorbed layer measured by DPI. Such findings were consistent with the results of IEC experiments operated at different pHs, that more disassembled HB-VLPs were detected in the eluted proteins at pH 9.0. At low pH like pH 5.0, however, possible bi-layer adsorption was involved as evidenced by an adsorbed layer thickness higher than average diameter of the HB-VLPs. The "lateral" protein-protein interactions might be unfavorable and would make additional contribution to the disassembling of HB-VLPs besides the primary mechanism related to the protein-surface interactions; therefore, the lowest antigen activity was observed after IEC at pH 5.0. Such real-time information on conformational change of VLPs is helpful for better understanding the real mechanism

  18. Adsorption of peptides and small proteins with control access polymer permeation to affinity binding sites. Part II: Polymer permeation-ion exchange separation adsorbents with polyethylene glycol and strong anion exchange groups.

    PubMed

    González-Ortega, Omar; Porath, Jerker; Guzmán, Roberto

    2012-03-02

    In chromatographic separations, the most general problem in small biomolecule isolation and purification is that such biomolecules are usually found in extremely low concentrations together with high concentrations of large molecular weight proteins. In the first part of this work, adsorption and size exclusion chromatography (AdSEC) controlled access media, using polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a semi-permeable barrier on a polysaccharide Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography (IMAC) matrix was synthesized and used to develop chromatographic adsorbents that preferentially adsorb and separate low molecular weight biomolecules while rejecting large molecular weight proteins. In this second part, we expand the concept of controlled access polymer permeation adsorption (CAPPA) media by grafting polyethylene glycol (PEG) on a high capacity polysaccharide ion exchange (IEX) chromatographic resin where PEG acts as a semi-permeable barrier that preferentially allows the permeation of small molecules while rejecting large ones. The IEX resin bearing quaternary ammonium groups binds permeated biomolecules according to their ion exchange affinity while excluding large biomolecules by the PEG barrier and thus cannot compete for the binding sites. This new AdSEC media was used to study the retention of peptides and proteins covering a wide range of molecular weights from 1 to 150 kDa. The effect of protein molecular weight towards retention by ion exchange was performed using pure protein solutions. Recovery of insulin from insulin-spiked human serum and insulin-spiked human urine was evaluated under polymer controlled permeation conditions. The CAPPA media consisted of agarose beads modified with amino-PEG-methoxy and with trimethyl ammonium groups, having chloride capacities between 20 and 40 μeq/mL and were effective in rejecting high molecular weight proteins while allowing the preferential adsorption of small proteins and peptides.

  19. Combined Yamamoto approach for simultaneous estimation of adsorption isotherm and kinetic parameters in ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rüdt, Matthias; Gillet, Florian; Heege, Stefanie; Hitzler, Julian; Kalbfuss, Bernd; Guélat, Bertrand

    2015-09-25

    Application of model-based design is appealing to support the development of protein chromatography in the biopharmaceutical industry. However, the required efforts for parameter estimation are frequently perceived as time-consuming and expensive. In order to speed-up this work, a new parameter estimation approach for modelling ion-exchange chromatography in linear conditions was developed. It aims at reducing the time and protein demand for the model calibration. The method combines the estimation of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters based on the simultaneous variation of the gradient slope and the residence time in a set of five linear gradient elutions. The parameters are estimated from a Yamamoto plot and a gradient-adjusted Van Deemter plot. The combined approach increases the information extracted per experiment compared to the individual methods. As a proof of concept, the combined approach was successfully applied for a monoclonal antibody on a cation-exchanger and for a Fc-fusion protein on an anion-exchange resin. The individual parameter estimations for the mAb confirmed that the new approach maintained the accuracy of the usual Yamamoto and Van Deemter plots. In the second case, offline size-exclusion chromatography was performed in order to estimate the thermodynamic parameters of an impurity (high molecular weight species) simultaneously with the main product. Finally, the parameters obtained from the combined approach were used in a lumped kinetic model to simulate the chromatography runs. The simulated chromatograms obtained for a wide range of gradient lengths and residence times showed only small deviations compared to the experimental data.

  20. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  1. A combined process of activated carbon adsorption, ion exchange resin treatment and membrane concentration for recovery of dissolved organics in pre-hydrolysis liquor of the kraft-based dissolving pulp production process.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; Kaur, Ishneet; Baktash, Mir Mojtaba; He, Zhibin; Ni, Yonghao

    2013-01-01

    To recover dissolved organics in pre-hydrolysis liquor (PHL) of the kraft-based dissolving pulp production process, a new combined process concept of sequential steps of activated carbon adsorption, ion exchange resin treatment, and membrane concentration, was proposed. The removal of lignin in the PHL was achieved in the activated carbon adsorption step, which also facilitates the subsequent operations, such as the membrane filtration and ion exchange resin treatment. The ion exchange resin treatment resulted in the removal/concentration of acetic acid, which opens the door for acetic acid recovery. The membrane filtration is to recover/concentrate the dissolved sugars. The combined process resulted in the production of PHL-based concentrate with relatively high concentration of hemicellulosic sugars, i.e., 22.13%.

  2. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  3. Economic evaluation of carbon adsorption/ion exchange wastewater-treatment options for Sunflower AAP (Army Ammunition Plant) NQ (nitroguanidine) wastewater-treatment facility. Final report, October 1986-July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Balasco, A.A.; Cheng, G.C.; Field, E.L.; Vejins, V.R.

    1987-07-31

    The objective of this subtask was to provide an estimate of the capital investment and operating costs for the wastewater-treatment technology option involving activated-carbon adsorption and ion exchange for primary separation, and multiple-effect evaporation and spray drying for volume reduction. During the course of this study, however, it became evident that the process economics could be significantly improved of the ion-exchange step was eliminated from the process scheme. The bases for the system design, plant operation, and cost evaluation were provided to Arthur D. Little by Sunflower AAP personnel to make certain that direct comparisons could be made with other treatment options under consideration.

  4. FTIR spectrophotometry, kinetics and adsorption isotherms modeling, ion exchange, and EDX analysis for understanding the mechanism of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) removal by mango peel waste.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Saeed, Asma; Zafar, Saeed Iqbal

    2009-05-15

    Mango peel waste (MPW) was evaluated as a new sorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) from aqueous solution. The maximum sorption capacity of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) was found to be 68.92 and 99.05mgg(-1), respectively. The kinetics of sorption of both metals was fast, reaching at equilibrium in 60min. Sorption kinetics and equilibria followed pseudo-second order and Langmuir adsorption isotherm models. FTIR analysis revealed that carboxyl and hydroxyl functional groups were mainly responsible for the sorption of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+). Chemical modification of MPW for blocking of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups showed that 72.46% and 76.26% removal of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+), respectively, was due to the involvement of carboxylic group, whereas 26.64% and 23.74% was due to the hydroxyl group. EDX analysis of MPW before and after metal sorption and release of cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+)) and proton H(+) from MPW with the corresponding uptake of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) revealed that the main mechanism of sorption was ion exchange. The regeneration experiments showed that the MPW could be reused for five cycles without significant loss in its initial sorption capacity. The study points to the potential of new use of MPW as an effective sorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) from aqueous solution.

  5. Macroreticular chelating ion-exchangers.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, R F; E Gancher, R; Russo, F R

    1970-06-01

    Two macroreticular chelating ion-exchangers have been prepared and characterized. One contains the iminodiacetate group and the second contains the arsonate group as the ion-exchanging site. The macroreticular resins show selectivities among metal ions similar to those of the commercially available naicroreticular chelating resins. Chromatographie separations on the new resins are rapid and sharp.

  6. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  7. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-12-31

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  8. Contamination weeping: A chemical ion exchange model

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, W.B.; Doughty, D.H.; Jones, H.D.T.; Martinez, S.L.; Bennett, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to determine the applicability of a chemical ion-exchange model to characterize the problem of nuclear fuel transportation cask contamination and release ( weeping''). Surface charge characteristics of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and stainless steel (304) powders have been measured to determine the potential for ion exchange at metal oxide -- aqueous interfaces. The solubility of pool contaminant Co and Cs electrolytes at varying pH and the adsorption characteristics of these ions on Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and stainless steel powders in aqueous slurries have been studied. Experiments show that Co ions do reversibly adsorb on these powder surfaces and, more specifically, that adsorption occurs in the nominal pH range (pH = 4--6) of a boric acid-moderated spent fuel pool. Desorption has been demonstrated to occur at pH {le} 3. Cs ions also have been shown to have an affinity for these surfaces although the reversibility of Cs{sup +} bonding by H{sup +} ion exchange has not been fully demonstrated. These results have significant implications for effective decontamination and coating processes used on nuclear fuel transportation casks. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  10. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  11. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  12. Electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Schwartz, D.T.; Genders, D.

    1997-10-01

    A variety of waste types containing radioactive {sup 137}Cs are found throughout the DOE complex. These waste types include water in reactor cooling basins, radioactive high-level waste (HLW) in underground storage tanks, and groundwater. Safety and regulatory requirements and economics require the removal of radiocesium before these wastes can be permanently disposed of. Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is an approach for radioactive cesium separation that combines IX and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible, and economic separation method that also produces little or no secondary waste. In the ESIX process, an electroactive IX film is deposited electrochemically onto a high-surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. For cesium, the electroactive films under investigation are ferrocyanides, which are well known to have high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. When a cathode potential is applied to the film, Fe{sup +3} is reduced to the Fe{sup +2} state, and a cation must be intercalated into the film to maintain charge neutrality (i.e., Cs{sup +} is loaded). Conversely, if an anodic potential is applied, a cation must be released from the film (i.e., Cs{sup +} is unloaded). Therefore, to load the film with cesium, the film is simply reduced; to unload cesium, the film is oxidized.

  13. Material Exhibiting Efficient CO2 Adsorption at Room Temperature for Concentrations Lower Than 1000 ppm: Elucidation of the State of Barium Ion Exchanged in an MFI-Type Zeolite.

    PubMed

    Itadani, Atsushi; Oda, Akira; Torigoe, Hiroe; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Sato, Mineo; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2016-04-06

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is well-known as a greenhouse gas that leads to global warming. Many efforts have been made to capture CO2 from coal-fired power plants, as well as to reduce the amounts of excess CO2 in the atmosphere to around 400 ppm. However, this is not a simple task, particularly in the lower pressure region than 1000 ppm. This is because the CO2 molecule is chemically stable and has a relatively low reactivity. In the present study, the CO2 adsorption at room temperature on MFI-type zeolites exchanged with alkaline-earth-metal ions, with focus on CO2 concentrations <1000 ppm, was investigated both experimentally and by calculation. These materials exhibited a particularly efficient adsorption capability for CO2, compared with other presented samples, such as the sodium-form and transition-metal ion-exchanged MFI-type zeolites. Ethyne (C2H2) was used as a probe molecule. Analyses were carried out with IR spectroscopy and X-ray absorption, and provided significant information regarding the presence of the M(2+)-O(2-)-M(2+) (M(2+): alkaline-earth-metal ion) species formed in the samples. It was subsequently determined that this species acts as a highly efficient site for CO2 adsorption at room temperature under very low pressure, compared to a single M(2+) species. A further advantage is that this material can be easily regenerated by a treatment, e.g., through the application of the temperature swing adsorption process, at relatively low temperatures (300-473 K).

  14. Protein adsorption in polyelectrolyte brush type cation-exchangers.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Rushd; Coquebert de Neuville, Bertrand; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-11-04

    Ion exchange chromatography materials functionalized with polyelectrolyte brushes (PEB) are becoming an integral part of many protein purification steps. Adsorption onto these materials is different than that onto traditional materials, due to the 3D partitioning of proteins into the polyelectrolyte brushes. Despite this mechanistic difference, many works have described the chromatographic behavior of proteins on polyelectrolyte brush type ion exchangers with much of the same methods as used for traditional materials. In this work, unconventional chromatographic behavior on polyelectrolyte brush type materials is observed for several proteins: the peaks shapes reveal first anti-Langmuirian and then Langmuirian types of interactions, with increasing injection volumes. An experimental and model based description of these materials is carried out in order to explain this behavior. The reason for this behavior is shown to be the 3D partitioning of proteins into the polyelectrolyte brushes: proteins that fully and readily utilize the 3D structure of the PEB phase during adsorption show this behavior, whereas those that do not show traditional ion exchange behavior.

  15. Chromate (CrO(4)(2-)) and copper (Cu2+) adsorption by dual-functional ion exchange resins made from agricultural by-products.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Wayne E; Wartelle, Lynda H

    2006-07-01

    Ion exchange resins commonly have a single functionality for either cations or anions. Resins that have a dual functionality for both cations and anions are uncommon. The objective of this study was to create dual-functional ion exchange resins derived from soybean hulls, sugarcane bagasse and corn stover. Dual-functional resins were prepared by two separate two-step processes. In the first two-step process, by-products were reacted with a solution of citric acid in order to impart additional negative charge, and then reacted with the cross-linking reagent dimethyloldihydroxyethylene urea (DMDHEU) and a quaternary amine (choline chloride) to add positive charge to the lignocellulosic material. In the second two-step process, the order of reaction was reversed, with positive charge added first, followed by the addition of negative charge. These combined reactions added both cationic and anionic character to the by-products as evidenced by the increased removal from solution of copper (Cu(2+)) cation and the chromate (CrO(4)(2-)) anion compared to unmodified by-products. The order of reaction appeared to slightly favor the functionality that was added last. That is, if negative charge was added last, the resulting resin sequestered more copper ion than a comparable resin where the negative charge was added first and vice-versa. Cu(2+) and CrO(4)(2-) were used as marker ions in a solution that contained both competing cations and anions. The dual-functional resins adsorbed as much as or more of the marker ions compared to commercial cation or anion exchange resins used for comparison. None of the commercial resins exhibited dual-functional properties to the same extent as the by-product-based resins.

  16. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Workman, Rhonda Jackson

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  17. Electrically Switched Cesium Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    JPH Sukamto; ML Lilga; RK Orth

    1998-10-23

    This report discusses the results of work to develop Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) for separations of ions from waste streams relevant to DOE site clean-up. ESIX combines ion exchange and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible method for radionuclide separation that lowers costs and minimizes secondary waste generation typically associated with conventional ion exchange. In the ESIX process, an electroactive ion exchange film is deposited onto. a high surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. As a result, the production of secondary waste is minimized, since the large volumes of solution associated with elution, wash, and regeneration cycles typical of standard ion exchange are not needed for the ESIX process. The document is presented in two parts: Part I, the Summary Report, discusses the objectives of the project, describes the ESIX concept and the approach taken, and summarizes the major results; Part II, the Technology Description, provides a technical description of the experimental procedures and in-depth discussions on modeling, case studies, and cost comparisons between ESIX and currently used technologies.

  18. Preparation and adsorption properties of. lambda. -MnO sub 2 -cellulose hybrid-type ion-exchanger for lithium ion. Application to the enrichment of lithium ion from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Sagara, Fumio; Ning, Wang Bao; Yoshida, Isao; Ueno, Keihei )

    1989-11-01

    Spherical beads of a hybrid-type ion-exchange (HIE) have been prepared by dispersing microcrystalline {lambda}-MnO{sub 2} in macroporous cellulose gel beads. The beads were 0.1 to 0.3 mm in diameter and contained 0.71 g {lambda}-MnO{sub 2}/g dry HIE. The ion-exchange behaviors of HIE for lithium and sodium ions were investigated by batch and column methods. The uptakes for lithium and sodium ions were 2.8 and 0.1 mmol/g dry HIE, respectively, at pH 12.3 by the batch method and 1.0 and 0.1 mmol/g dry HIE at pH 11.6-11.8, respectively, by the column method. When 1.52 L seawater was passed through a column containing 0.05 g wet HIE at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min, 2.0 mg lithium/g dry HIE was recovered.

  19. Cellulosic ion-exchange membranes for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Mollison, A N; Graydon, W F

    1977-07-01

    The application of cellulosic ion-exchange membranes to hemodialysis was studied in vitro. The membranes were prepared by radiation-grafting methacrylic acid and vinylpyridine to films of DuPont cellophane PD-215 to produce cation-exchange and anion-exchange membranes, respectively. Solutions of urea, creatinine, glucose, and uric acid were studied for their interactions with and diffusion through the membranes. Ultrafiltration rates were also determined. Cuprophane and PD-215 cellophane were studied as controls. Dialysis plots for the membranes revealed a mechanism of "assisted transport." Initially, the solutes were removed from solution by a sorption/adsorption mechanism followed by a steady-state diffusion process. The calculated diffusivities for these later steady-state regions increased linearly with capacity for urea, creatinine, and uric acid, while for glucose the reverse was true. The combined processes involved provided considerably greater mass transport per unit thickness than either DuPont PD-215 cellophane or Cupropane.

  20. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  1. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  2. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-04-08

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  3. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1998-01-27

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

  4. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1997-01-01

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  5. Comparative isosteric ion adsorption for minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omenyi, Samuel N.; Herren, Blair J.; Snyder, Robert S.; Seaman, Geoffrey V. F.

    1986-01-01

    A comparative isosteric ion adsorption study for minerals (kaolinite, rutile, and quartz) was performed in aqueous solutions of CaCl2, LaCl3, and Th(NO3)4 in the presence of the neutral salt NaCl. It was observed that the concentration of Ca(2+) ions required to produce a standard reduction in the electrophoretic mobility of mineral particles was always appreciably greater than the concentration required for the Th(4+) ions. The effectiveness of adsorption of the cations differed from particle to particle and showed that ion adsorption on a mineral surface depends, among other things, on the nature of the mineral surface and on the particular adsorbed cation. The number of cation binding sites on mineral surfaces and the electrochemical free energies of cation adsorption were calculated. It was found that the adsorption energy of La(3+) and Th(4+) ions on rutile, kaolinite, and quartz was greater than that of Ca(2+) on these minerals.

  6. Radiation Studies with Argentine Ion Exchange Material

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.

    2002-06-28

    A recent technology exchange between Argentina Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEA) and the US Department of Energy involved vitrification studies of ion exchange resins. Details of the spent ion exchange resins currently stored at two Argentine nuclear power plants, Atucha I and Embalse, have been presented in earlier reports. The present study examines irradiation of simulant samples of ion exchange resins.

  7. Quaternized dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate strong base anion exchange fibers for As(V) adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavaklı, Cengiz; Akkaş Kavaklı, Pınar; Turan, Burcu Dila; Hamurcu, Aslı; Güven, Olgun

    2014-09-01

    N,N-Dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) grafted polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) nonwoven fibers (DMAEMA-g-PE/PP) was prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization. DMAEMA graft chains on nonwoven fibers were quaternized with dimethyl sulfate solution for the preparation of strong base anion exchange fibers (QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP). Fiber structures were characterized by FTIR, XPS and SEM techniques. The effect of solution pH, contact time, initial As(V) ion concentration and coexisting ions on the As(V) adsorption capacity of the QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP fibers were investigated by performing batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption of As(V) by QDMAEMA-g-PE/PP fibers was found to be independent on solution pH in the range 4.00-10.00. Kinetic experiments show that the As(V) adsorption rate was rapid and As(V) adsorption follows pseudo second-order kinetic model. As(V) adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm model equations. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models fitted the experimental data well. The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) calculated from Langmuir isotherm was found to be 83.33 mg As(V)/g polymer at pH 7.00. The adsorbent was used for three cycles without significant loss of adsorption capacity. The adsorbed As(V) ions were desorbed effectively by a 0.1 M NaOH solution.

  8. Use of a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column and propionic acid as an eluent in ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography of aliphatic carboxylic acids and ethanol in food samples.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Hironaga, Takahiro; Kajiwara, Hiroe; Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Itabashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We developed an ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography (IEAC) method employing a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin (PS-WCX) column with propionic acid as the eluent for the simultaneous determination of multivalent aliphatic carboxylic acids and ethanol in food samples. The PS-WCX column well resolved mono-, di-, and trivalent carboxylic acids in the acidic eluent. Propionic acid as the eluent gave a higher signal-to-noise ratio, and enabled sensitive conductimetric detection of analyte acids. We found the optimal separation condition to be the combination of a PS-WCX column and 20-mM propionic acid. Practical applicability of the developed method was confirmed by using a short precolumn with a strongly acidic cation-exchange resin in the H(+)-form connected before the separation column; this was to remove cations from food samples by converting them to hydrogen ions. Consequently, common carboxylic acids and ethanol in beer, wine, and soy sauce were successfully separated by the developed method.

  9. Ion Exchange and Liquid Column Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Harold F.

    1980-01-01

    Emphasizes recent advances in principles and methodology in ion exchange and chromatography. Two tables list representative examples for inorganic ions and organic compounds. Cites 544 references. (CS)

  10. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    DOEpatents

    Herchenroeder, Laurie A.; Burkholder, Harvey R.

    1990-10-23

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity.

  11. Ion exchange purification of scandium

    DOEpatents

    Herchenroeder, L.A.; Burkholder, H.R.

    1990-10-23

    An improvement in purification of scandium through ion exchange chromatography is disclosed in which the oxidation potential of the eluting solution is altered by the addition of potassium chlorate or ammonium chloride so that removal of contaminants is encouraged. The temperature, pH and concentration of the eluent HEDTA are controlled in order to maintain the scandium in the column while minimizing dilution of the scandium band. Recovery of scandium is improved by pumping dilute scandium over the column prior to stripping the scandium and precipitation. This eliminates the HEDTA ion and other monovalent cations contaminating the scandium band. This method maximizes recovery of scandium while maintaining purity. 2 figs.

  12. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, David

    2005-01-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchanged resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchanged process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange are provided that include drug stabilization, pharmaceutical excipients, taste-masking agents, oral sustained-release products, topical products for local application…

  13. Synthesis and adsorption properties of the cation exchange forms of OFF-type zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshunova, K. K.; Travkina, O. S.; Kustov, L. M.; Kutepov, B. I.

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of the ion-exchange of Na+ and K+ cations contained in OFF-type zeolite for H+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Co2+, and La3+ cations is investigated. Chemical and phase compositions, the morphology of crystals, and the adsorption properties of synthesized samples are studied via X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction analysis, IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and adsorption measurements.

  14. Analysis of diffusion models for protein adsorption to porous anion-exchange adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Dong; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2002-07-12

    The ion-exchange adsorption kinetics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and gamma-globulin to an anion exchanger, DEAE Spherodex M, has been studied by batch adsorption experiments. Various diffusion models, that is, pore diffusion, surface diffusion, homogeneous diffusion and parallel diffusion models, are analyzed for their suitabilities to depict the adsorption kinetics. Protein diffusivities are estimated by matching the models with the experimental data. The dependence of the diffusivities on initial protein concentration is observed and discussed. The adsorption isotherm of BSA is nearly rectangular, so there is little surface diffusion. As a result, the surface and homogeneous diffusion models do not fit to the kinetic data of BSA adsorption. The adsorption isotherm of gamma-globulin is less favorable, and the surface diffusion contributes greatly to the mass transport. Consequently, both the surface and homogeneous diffusion models fit to the kinetic data of gamma-globulin well. The adsorption kinetics of BSA and gamma-globulin can be very well fitted by parallel diffusion model, because the model reflects correctly the intraparticle mass transfer mechanism. In addition, for both the favorably bound proteins, the pore diffusion model fits the adsorption kinetics reasonably well. The results here indicate that the pore diffusion model can be used as a good approximate to depict protein adsorption kinetics for protein adsorption systems from rectangular to linear isotherms.

  15. Electrically controlled cesium ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.

    1996-10-01

    Several sites within the DOE complex (Savannah River, Idaho, Oak Ridge and Hanford) have underground storage tanks containing high-level waste resulting from nuclear engineering activities. To facilitate final disposal of the tank waste, it is advantageous to separate and concentrate the radionuclides for final immobilization in a vitrified glass matrix. This task proposes a new approach for radionuclide separation by combining ion exchange (IX) and electrochemistry to provide a selective and economic separation method.

  16. Removal of fluoride ions from water by adsorption onto carbonaceous materials produced from coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Tominaga, Hisato; Yabutani, Hitoshi; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2011-01-01

    Carbonaceous material for the removal of fluoride ions from water was prepared from coffee grounds (CGs) by calcination and subsequent HCl treatment. The characteristics of the CGs, including the surface area, mean pore diameter, pore volume, and surface functional groups were determined, and the morphological characteristics were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The adsorption isotherms, saturated amount of fluoride ions adsorbed, and the effect of contact time and temperature on the adsorption of fluoride ions were investigated for a sample of tap water. The specific surface area of CG calcined at 600° (CG600) was larger than that of CGs calcined at 400, 800, and 1000°. Phenolic, lactonic, and carboxyl groups were detected on the CG600 surface. The adsorption capacity of the carbonized CGs for fluoride was ranked in the order CG400 < CG1000 < CG800 < CG600 (where the numeral indicates the carbonization temperature), whereas virgin CG and CG600-NAT (not treated with hydrochloric acid solution) did not exhibit any adsorption ability for fluoride ions. The amount of fluoride ions adsorbed onto CG600 increased with increasing temperature and was consistent with chemical adsorption. The mechanism of adsorption of fluoride ions onto CG600 proceeded via ion exchange with chloride ions (1:1) present on the surface of CG600. The adsorption isotherms were fitted to the Freundlich and Langmuir equations. Moreover, CG600 showed an acceptable adsorption capacity for fluoride ions present in tap water.

  17. Carbon dioxide and nitrogen adsorption on cation-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolites.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong D; Liu, Qingling; Lobo, Raul F

    2013-01-15

    Samples of high-silica SSZ-13, ion exchanged with protons and alkali-metal cations Li(+), Na(+), and K(+), were investigated using adsorption isotherms of CO(2) and N(2). The results show that Li-, Na-SSZ-13 have excellent CO(2) capacity at ambient temperature and pressure; in general, Li-SSZ-13 shows the highest capacity for N(2), CO(2) particularly in the low-pressure region. The effect of cation type and Si/Al ratio (6 and 12) on the adsorption properties was investigated through analysis of adsorption isotherms and heats of adsorption. The separation of CO(2) in a flue gas mixture was evaluated for these adsorbents in the pressure swing adsorption and vacuum pressure adsorption processes.

  18. Adsorption of Ions at Uncharged Insoluble Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Peshkova, Tatyana V; Minkov, Ivan L; Tsekov, Roumen; Slavchov, Radomir I

    2016-09-06

    A method is proposed for the experimental determination of the adsorption of inorganic electrolytes at a surface covered with insoluble surfactant monolayer. This task is complicated by the fact that the change of the salt concentration alters both chemical potentials of the electrolyte and the surfactant. Our method resolves the question by combining data for the surface pressure versus area of the monolayer at several salt concentrations with data for the equilibrium spreading pressure of crystals of the surfactant (used to fix a standard state). We applied the method to alcohols spread at the surface of concentrated halide solutions. The measured salt adsorption is positive and has nonmonotonic dependence on the area per surfactant molecule. For the liquid expanded film, depending on the concentration, there is one couple of ions adsorbed per each 3-30 surfactant molecules. We analyzed which ion, the positive or the negative, stands closer to the surface, by measuring the effect of NaCl on the Volta potential of the monolayer. The potentiometric data suggest that Na(+) is specifically adsorbed, while Cl(-) remains in the diffuse layer, i.e., the surface is positively charged. The observed reverse Hofmeister series of the adsorptions of NaF, NaCl, and NaBr suggests the same conclusion holds for all these salts. The force that causes the adsorption of Na(+) seems to be the interaction of the ion with the dipole moment of the monolayer.

  19. Adsorption of Ions at Uncharged Insoluble Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshkova, T. V.; Minkov, I. L.; Tsekov, R.; Slavchov, R. I.

    2016-08-01

    A method is proposed for the experimental determination of the adsorption of inorganic electrolytes at a surface covered with insoluble surfactant monolayer. This task is complicated by the fact that the change of the salt concentration alters both chemical potentials of the electrolyte and the surfactant. Our method resolves the question by combining data for the surface pressure versus area of the monolayer at several salt concentrations with data for the equilibrium spreading pressure of crystals of the surfactant (used to fix a standard state). We applied the method to alcohols spread at the surface of concentrated halide solutions. The measured salt adsorption is positive and has nonmonotonic dependence on the area per surfactant molecule. For the liquid expanded film, depending on the concentration, there is one couple of ions adsorbed per each 3–30 surfactant molecules. We analyzed which ion, the positive or the negative, stands closer to the surface, by measuring the effect of NaCl on the Volta potential of the monolayer. The potentiometric data suggest that Na+ is specifically adsorbed, while Cl– remains in the diffuse layer, i.e., the surface is positively charged. The observed reverse Hofmeister series of the adsorptions of NaF, NaCl, and NaBr suggests the same conclusion holds for all these salts. The force that causes the adsorption of Na+ seems to be the interaction of the ion with the dipole moment of the monolayer.

  20. Genesis of ion-adsorption type REE ores in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanematsu, K.; Yoshiaki, K.; Watanabe, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Ion-adsorption type REE deposits, which have been economically mined only in southern China, are predominant supply sources for HREE in the world. The ore bodies consist of weathered granites called ion-adsorption ores. The majority of REE (>50 %) are electrostatically adsorbed onto weathering products in the ores and they can be extracted by ion exchange using an electrolyte solution (e.g., ammonium sulfate solution). Recently the occurrences of ion-adsorption ores have been reported in Indochina, SE Asia. In this study, we discuss geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of parent granites and weathered granites in Thailand in order to reveal the genesis of ion-adsorption ores. Permo-Triassic and Cretaceous-Paleogene granite plutons are distributed from northern Thailand to western Indonesia through eastern Myanmar and Peninsular Malaysia. They are mostly ilmenite-series calcalkaline biotite or hornblende-biotite granites. REE contents of the granites range from 60 to 600 ppm and they are relatively high in Peninsula Thailand. REE-bearing minerals consist mainly of apatite, zircon, allanite, titanite, monazite and xenotime. Some I-type granites contain REE fluorocarbonate (probably synchysite-(Ce)) in cavities and cracks in feldspars and it is the dominant source of REE for ion-adsorption ores because the fluorocarbonate is easily soluble during weathering. In contrast, insoluble monazite and xenotime are not preferable for ion-adsorption ores although they are common ore minerals of placer REE deposits. Weathered granites show REE contents ranging from 60 to 1100 ppm in Thailand because REE are relatively immobile compared with mobile elements (e.g., Na, K, Ca). In the weathered granites, REE are contained in residual minerals and secondary minerals and are adsorbed onto the surface of weathering products. A weathering profile of granite with ion-adsorption type mineralization can be divided into upper and lower parts based on REE enrichment and Ce

  1. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  2. Regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon saturated with inorganic ions by cavitation united with ion exchange method.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Hong; Li, Yansheng; Yang, Huixin

    2011-06-01

    Using ion exchange resin as transfer media, regenerate powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbed inorganic ions by cavitation to enhance the transfer; we studied how the regeneration time and the mass ratio of resin and PAC influence the regeneration rate respectively through re-adsorption. The result showed that the effective regeneration of PAC saturated with inorganic ions was above 90% using ion exchange resin as media and transfer carrier, the quantity of PAC did not reduced but activated in the process.

  3. CATALYTIC PROMOTION OF THE ADSORPTION OF VANADIUM ON AN ANIONIC EXCHANGE RESIN

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement in the process for the recovery of vanadium from acidic phosphatic solutions is presented. In this process the vanadium is first oxidized to the pentavaleat state, and is then separated by contacting such solutions with an anion exchange resin whereby adsorption of the complexed pentavalent vanadium is effected. The improvement lies in the fact that adsorp tion of the vanadium complex by the anion exchange resin is promoted and improved by providing fiuoride ions in solution to be contacted.

  4. Adsorption of cadmium ions on oxygen surface sites in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.F.; Thomas, K.M.

    2000-02-08

    Various types of oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the surface of coconut shell derived activated carbon by oxidation using nitric acid. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and selective neutralization were used to characterize the surface oxygen functional groups. The oxidized carbons were also heat treated to provide a suite of carbons where the oxygen functional groups of various thermal stabilities were varied progressively. The adsorption of cadmium ions was enhanced dramatically by oxidation of the carbon. The ratio of released protons to adsorbed cadmium ions on oxidized carbon was approximately 2, indicating cation exchange was involved in the process of adsorption. Na{sup +} exchange studies with the oxidized carbon gave a similar ratio. After heat treatment of the oxidized carbons to remove oxygen functional groups, the ratio of H{sup +} released to Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed and the adsorption capacity decreased significantly. Both reversible and irreversible processes were involved in cadmium ion adsorption with reversible adsorption having higher enthalpy. The irreversible adsorption resulted from cation exchange with carboxylic acid groups, whereas the reversible adsorption probably involved physisorption of the partially hydrated cadmium ion.

  5. Adsorption of ions onto high silica volcanic glass.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Georg; Bichler, Max

    2008-01-01

    Chemical fingerprint techniques are frequently applied to airborne volcanic eruption products, so-called tephra, such as ash and pumice for archeological and geoscientific purposes. However, in some cases, a meaningful interpretation of the results is complicated by superficial contaminations. Therefore, this situation was simulated by the use of powdered rhyolitic pumice to investigate its capability to adsorb several ions from aqueous solutions. Using neutron activation analysis, adsorption could be proven for Cr(3+), Cr(2)O(7)(2-) (dichromate), Fe(3+), Co(2+), HAsO(4)(2-) (hydrogen arsenate), Rb(+), Sr(2+), Cs(+), Ba(2+), La(3+), Ce(3+), Ce(4+), Sm(3+), Th(4+) and UO(2)(2+), which is a clear evidence for the interaction of those ions with the volcanic glass. In our experiments, pumice powder showed the ability to adsorb ions in the range from 1.8 mg kg(-1) (in case of HAsO(4)(2-)) to 5.8 wt% (in case of Fe(3+)). Adsorption is probably due to ion-exchange reactions. It could also be shown that a few ions are not adsorbed in detectable quantities: Na(+), K(+), Fe(2+), Zn(2+) and Nd(3+). The knowledge about adsorption of ions enables us not only to examine the possible influence of contaminations where chemical fingerprinting methods are applied to volcanic material for archaeometry, but it also suggests the technical application of pumiceous materials for technical purposes, like water purification or as an adsorbent in the final storage of nuclear waste. In another series of INAA supported experiments, the influence of chemicals like ascorbic acid, acetic acid, HCl, HF, HNO(3), H(2)O, H(2)O(2), H(3)PO(4), H(2)SO(4), NaOH and NH(3) on the bulk composition of pumice powder was investigated-resulting in no detectable change. We conclude that superficially contaminated tephra can be washed in diluted HF to remove contaminations without influencing the chemical fingerprint.

  6. Using Ion Exchange Chromatography to Separate and Quantify Complex Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography is an important technique in the separation of charged species, particularly in biological, inorganic, and environmental samples. In this experiment, students are supplied with a mixture of two substitution-inert complex ions. They separate the complexes by ion exchange chromatography using a "flash"…

  7. Ion Exchange Formation via Sulfonated Bicomponent Nonwovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoughton, Hannah L.

    For many years ion exchange resins were used to: remove heavy metals from water, recover materials from wastewater, and eliminate harmful gases from the air. While use of these resin beads dominates the ion exchange industry, the beads have limitations that should be considered when decisions are made to employ them. For instance, officials must balance the inherent zero sum surface area and porosity of the materials. This series of studies investigates the use of bicomponent nonwovens as a base substrate for producing high surface area ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metal ions. Functionalized materials were produced in a two-step process: (1) PET/PE spunbond bicomponent fibers were fractured completely, producing the high surface area nonwoven to be used as the base ion exchange material, and (2) the conditions for functionalizing the PET fibers of the nonwoven webs were investigated where an epoxy containing monomer was grafted to the surface followed by sulfonation of the monomer. The functionalization reactions of the PET fibers were monitored based on: weight gain, FTIR, TOF-SIMS, and SEM. Ion exchange properties were evaluated using titration and copper ion removal capacity from test solutions. The relationship between web structure and removal efficiency of the metal ions was defined through a comparison of the bicomponent and homocomponent nonwovens for copper ion removal efficiency. The investigation revealed that utilizing the high surface area, fractured bicomponent nonwoven ion exchange materials with capacities comparable to commercially available ion exchange resins could be produced.

  8. Kinetic studies of clavulanic acid recovery by ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Barboza, M; Almeida, R M; Hokka, C O

    2001-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a beta-lactamase inhibitor produced by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus. Nowadays, the combination of CA with amoxycillin is the most successful example of the use of a beta-lactam antibiotic sensitive to beta-lactamases together with an inhibitor of these enzymes. Clavulanic acid is purified from fermentation broth by a series of steps consisting mainly of two-phase separation processes such as liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption or ion-exchange chromatography, among others. Amberlite IRA 400, a strong anion-exchange resin, has a very high adsorption capacity for CA (Mayer et al. 1997). This resin can be pre-treated with NaCl (chloride cycle), to remove selectively only those anions, which are able to displace chloride from the resin or with NaOH (hydroxyl cycle), to remove all species of anions. In order to decide the best operating conditions for CA recovery by ion-exchange resins and then to construct a model of this separation process, batch experiments were conducted using Amberlite IRA 400 in the chloride cycle. These runs were carried out in a 200 ml stirred tank, at two different initial solution pH, 6.2 and 4.0; the temperature was maintained at 10 degrees C and 20 degrees C during adsorption and 30 degrees C during the desorption step. It was possible, on the basis of these batch results, to model the separation process, including the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium data and mass transfer limitations.

  9. Exchange and reduction of Cu(2+) ions in clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Iznaga, I Rodríguez; Petranovskii, V; Fuentes, G Rodríguez; Mendoza, C; Aguilar, A Benítez

    2007-12-15

    The ion-exchange and reduction processes for Cu(2+) ions in clinoptilolite from the Caimanes deposit (Moa, Cuba) were studied at different temperatures. The ion-exchange studies were done to determine the kinetic parameters of Cu(2+) removal from solution by this clinoptilolite modified previously to NH(+)(4) form, and thermodynamic parameters of Cu(2+) elution from zeolite using NH(4)Cl solution. The results show that temperature increase favors the exchange and that it is a reversible process. The external diffusion rate appreciably increases with temperature, while, the internal diffusion coefficient rises relatively little. This means that besides ion exchange other processes (such as precipitation of the low-solubility phase and/or salt adsorption) occur, which cause copper removal from solution and affect the intracrystalline diffusion of the ions. For steric reasons the exchange of [Cu(H(2)O)(6)](2+) ions from a solution must occur with a number of water molecules n smaller than 6 (6 > n > or = 0). Cu(2+) reduction by hydrogen and the formation of Cu-particles in the clinoptilolite were verified. The Cu(2+) reduction mechanism is complex, indirect, and sensitive to reduction temperature; consequently, Cu(+)(n) states intermediate between Cu(2+) and Cu(0) should be present in the reduced samples.

  10. Trace adsorption of positively charged proteins onto Sepharose FF and Sepharose FF-based anion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Ling; Sun, Yan

    2012-08-31

    Agarose-based matrices have been widely used in ion exchange chromatography (IEC). We have herein observed that positively charged proteins (lysozyme and cytochrome c) are adsorbed on the agarose-based anion-exchangers (Q and DEAE Sepharose FF gels) in a capacity of 10-40 μg/mL. In contrast, negatively charged protein (bovine serum albumin) is not adsorbed to Sepharose FF and SP Sepharose FF gels. Elemental analysis of the gel indicated that the residual anionic sulfate groups in agarose would have worked as the cation exchange groups for the positively charged proteins. The trace adsorption behavior of lysozyme onto Sepharose FF and Sepharose FF-based anion exchangers was studied and the effects of NaCl concentration and cation group density on the adsorption were examined for better understanding of the trace adsorption in chromatographic processes. At NaCl concentrations less than 0.05 mol/L, which is the normal adsorption condition in IEC, the trace adsorption kept at a high level, so this trace adsorption cannot be avoided in the ionic strength range of routine IEC operations. Grafting poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) chain of 60 kDa to a cation group density of 700 mmol/L could reduce the adsorption capacity to about 20 μg/mL, but further reduction was not possible by increasing the cation group density to 1200 mmol/L. Therefore, attentions need to be paid to the phenomenon in protein purification practice using agarose-based matrices. The research is expected to call attentions to the trace adsorption on agarose-based matrices and to the importance in the selection of the suitable solid matrices in the production of high-purity protein products in large-scale bioprocesses.

  11. Ion exchange in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Ion exchange is used in nearly every part of the nuclear fuel cycle -- from the purification of uranium from its ore to the final recovery of uranium and transmutation products. Ion exchange also plays a valuable role in the management of nuclear wastes generated in the fuel cycle.

  12. Ion exchange in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, J.P.

    1990-12-31

    Ion exchange is used in nearly every part of the nuclear fuel cycle -- from the purification of uranium from its ore to the final recovery of uranium and transmutation products. Ion exchange also plays a valuable role in the management of nuclear wastes generated in the fuel cycle.

  13. Titania bound sodium titanate ion exchanger

    DOEpatents

    DeFilippi, Irene C. G.; Yates, Stephen Frederic; Shen, Jian-Kun; Gaita, Romulus; Sedath, Robert Henry; Seminara, Gary Joseph; Straszewski, Michael Peter; Anderson, David Joseph

    1999-03-23

    This invention is method for preparing a titania bound ion exchange composition comprising admixing crystalline sodium titanate and a hydrolyzable titanium compound and, thereafter drying the titania bound crystalline sodium titanate and subjecting the dried titania bound ion exchange composition to optional compaction and calcination steps to improve the physical strength of the titania bound composition.

  14. Adsorptional removal of methylene blue by guar gum-cerium (IV) tungstate hybrid cationic exchanger.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K; Pathania, Deepak; Singh, Pardeep; Kumar, Amit; Rathore, B S

    2014-01-30

    Guar gum-cerium (IV) tungstate nanocomposite (GG/CTNC) cationic exchanger was synthesized using simple sol gel method. The GG/CTNC was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometer (EDX). The XRD studies confirmed amorphous and fibrous in nature of GG/CTNC. The high percentage of oxygen in the nanocomposite material confirmed the functionality tungstate (WO4(-)). The ion exchange capacity of GG/CTNC for Na(+) ion was observed to be 1.30 mequivg(-1). The hybrid exchanger was used as potential adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous system. The correlation coefficients value indicated a good fit of monolayer Langmuir model to the adsorption of methylene blue onto GG/CTNC. The adsorption kinetic study revealed that the adsorption process followed the pseudo second order kinetic. The Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values confirmed the spontaneous nature of adsorption process.

  15. Microcalorimetric study of adsorption of glycomacropeptide on anion-exchange chromatography adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Lira, Rafael A; Minim, Luis A; Bonomo, Renata C F; Minim, Valéria P R; da Silva, Luis H M; da Silva, Maria C H

    2009-05-15

    The adsorption of glycomacropeptide (GMP) from cheese whey on an anion-exchange adsorbent was investigated using isothermal titration microcalorimetry to measure thermodynamic information regarding such processes. Isotherms data were measured at temperatures of 25 and 45 degrees C, pH 8.2 and various ionic strengths (0-0.08 molL(-1) NaCl). The equilibrium data were fit using the Langmuir model and the process was observed to be reversible. Temperature was observed to positively affect the interaction of the protein and adsorbent. Microcalorimetric studies indicated endothermic adsorption enthalpy in all cases, except at 45 degrees C and 0.0 molL(-1) NaCl. The adsorption process was observed to be entropically driven at all conditions studied. It was concluded that the increase in entropy, attributed to the release of hydration waters as well as bounded ions from the adsorbent and protein surface due to interactions of the protein and adsorbent, was a major driving force for the adsorption of GMP on the anion-exchange adsorbent. These results could allow for design of more effective ion-exchange separation processes for proteins.

  16. Ion Exchange Membrane Influence on Ohmic Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selection of the proper ion exchange membrane can have a significant influence on bioelectrochemical system (BES) power densities. Because ions move across the membrane to achieve electroneutrality, the ion transport resistance (ohmic loss) needs to be minimized to increase power densities. Ohmic ...

  17. Ibuprofen ion-exchange fiber complex: improved dissolution and gastric tolerance based on ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Che, Xin; Wang, Li-hong; Yang, Yang; Yuan, Yue; Wang, Qi-fang; Wang, Yan; Li, San-ming

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to develop a novel method to improve the dissolution of water-insoluble drug ibuprofen and the gastric tolerance of this non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which has potentially serious gastrointestinal side effects. This method is based on ion exchange of ion-exchange fibers. Water-insoluble drug ibuprofen was dispersed in deionized water, and then the ion-exchange fibers in OH(-) type was immersed in it. Ibuprofen and the active groups of the ion-exchange fibers combined into ion pairs based on the acid-base reaction. This drug carrier did not release drugs in deionized water, but in water solution containing other ions it would release the drugs into the solution by ion exchange. Confirmed by the X-ray diffraction and the scanning electron microscopy, the ibuprofen combined onto the ion-exchange fibers was in a highly molecular level dispersed state. The improved dissolution of ibuprofen ion-exchange fiber complexes is likely to originate from this ibuprofen's highly dispersed state. Due to this, ibuprofen's highly dispersed state, ibuprofen ion-exchange fiber complexes significantly decreases the gastrointestinal side effects of ibuprofen by avoiding the solid ibuprofen's educing. The present study showed that ibuprofen ion-exchange fiber complexes have the two-fold advantages. One is to improve the dissolution of ibuprofen. The other is to decrease the ibuprofen's gastrointestinal toxicity.

  18. Ion Exchange in Glass-Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beall, George; Comte, Monique; Deneka, Matthew; Marques, Paulo; Pradeau, Philippe; Smith, Charlene

    2016-08-01

    In the past few years ion-exchange in glasses has found a renewed interest with a lot of new development and research in industrial and academic labs and the commercialization of materials with outstanding mechanical properties. These glasses are now widely used in many electronic devices including hand-held displays and tablets. The exchange is generally conducted in a bath of molten salt below the transition temperature of the glass. The exchange at the surface of an alkali ion by a bigger one brings compressive stress at the surface. The mechanical properties are dependent on the stress level at the surface and the depth of penetration of the bigger ion. As compared to glasses, glass-ceramics have the interest to display a wide range of aspects (transparent to opaque) and different mechanical properties (especially higher modulus and toughness). There has been little research on ion-exchange in glass-ceramics. In these materials the mechanisms are much more complex than in glasses because of their polyphasic nature: ion-exchange generally takes place mostly in one phase (crystalline phase or residual glass). The mechanism can be similar to what is observed in glasses with the replacement of an ion by another in the structure. But in some cases this ion-exchange leads to microstructural modifications (for example amorphisation or phase change). This article reviews these ion-exchange mechanisms using several transparent and opaque alumino-silicate glass-ceramics as examples. The effect of the ion exchange in the various glass-ceramics will be described, with particular emphasis on flexural strength.

  19. Separation of phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis using ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Silvana Terra; Quines, Luci Kelin de Menezes; Burkert, Carlos André Veiga; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of some important parameters for the purification of phycocyanin using ion exchange chromatography. The influences of pH and temperature on the equilibrium partition coefficient were investigated to establish the best conditions for phycocyanin adsorption. The equilibrium isotherm for the phycocyanin-resin system was also determined. The separation of phycocyanin using the Q-Sepharose ion exchange resin was evaluated in terms of the pH and elution volume that improved the increase in purity and recovery. The highest partition coefficients were obtained in the pH range from 7.5 to 8.0 at 25 degrees C. Under these conditions the equilibrium isotherm for phycocyanin adsorption was well described by the Langmuir model, attaining a Q (m) of 22.7 mg/mL and K (d) of 3.1 x 10(-2) mg/mL. The best conditions for phycocyanin purification using the ion exchange column were at pH 7.5 with an elution volume of 36 mL, obtaining 77.3% recovery and a 3.4-fold increase in purity.

  20. Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred

    2005-01-01

    A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

  1. Isotope effects of neodymium in different ligands exchange systems studied by ion exchange displacement chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ibrahim; Fawzy, Ahmed S; Ahmad, Mohammad I; Aly, Hisham F; Nomura, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-03-01

    The isotope effects of neodymium in Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were studied by using ion exchange chromatography. The separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε's, were calculated from the observed isotopic ratios at the front and rear boundaries of the neodymium adsorption band. The values of separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε's, for the Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were compared with those of Nd-malate and Nd-citrate, which indicated that the isotope effects of neodymium as studied by the three ligands takes the following direction Malate > Citrate > Glycolate. This order agrees with the number of available sites for complexation of each ligand. The values of the plate height, HETP of Nd in Nd-ligand exchange systems were also calculated.

  2. Isotope effects of neodymium in different ligands exchange systems studied by ion exchange displacement chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ibrahim; Fawzy, Ahmed S.; Ahmad, Mohammad I.; Aly, Hisham F.; Nomura, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The isotope effects of neodymium in Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were studied by using ion exchange chromatography. The separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε’s, were calculated from the observed isotopic ratios at the front and rear boundaries of the neodymium adsorption band. The values of separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε’s, for the Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were compared with those of Nd-malate and Nd-citrate, which indicated that the isotope effects of neodymium as studied by the three ligands takes the following direction Malate > Citrate > Glycolate. This order agrees with the number of available sites for complexation of each ligand. The values of the plate height, HETP of Nd in Nd-ligand exchange systems were also calculated. PMID:25685410

  3. Ion exchanges in apatites for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Cazalbou, S; Eichert, D; Ranz, X; Drouet, C; Combes, C; Harmand, M F; Rey, C

    2005-05-01

    The modification of the composition of apatite materials can be made by several processes corresponding to ion exchange reactions which can conveniently be adapted to current coatings and ceramics and are an alternative to setting up of new synthesis methods. In addition to high temperature thermal treatments, which can partly or almost totally replace the monovalent OH- anion of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite by any halogen ion or carbonate, aqueous processes corresponding to dissolution-reprecipitation reactions have also been proposed and used. However, the most interesting possibilities are provided by aqueous ion exchange reactions involving nanocrystalline apatites. These apatites are characterised by the existence on the crystal surface of a hydrated layer of loosely bound mineral ions which can be easily exchanged in solution. This layer offers a possibility to trap mineral ions and possibly active molecules which can modify the apatite properties. Such processes are involved in mineralised tissues and could be used in biomaterials for the release of active mineral species.

  4. ION EXCHANGE SOFTENING: EFFECTS ON METAL CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corrosion control pipe loop study to evaluate the effect of ion exchange water softening on metal leaching from household plumbing materials was conducted on two different water qualities having different pH's and hardness levels. The results showed that removing hardness ions ...

  5. Inorganic ion exchangers for nuclear waste remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Clearfield, A.; Bortun, A.; Bortun, L.; Behrens, E.

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this work is to provide a broad spectrum of inorganic ion exchangers that can be used for a range of applications and separations involving remediation of groundwater and tank wastes. The authors intend to scale-up the most promising exchangers, through partnership with AlliedSignal Inc., to provide samples for testing at various DOE sites. While much of the focus is on exchangers for removal of Cs{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+} from highly alkaline tank wastes, especially at Hanford, the authors have also synthesized exchangers for acid wastes, alkaline wastes, groundwater, and mercury, cobalt, and chromium removal. These exchangers are now available for use at DOE sites. Many of the ion exchangers described here are new, and others are improved versions of previously known exchangers. They are generally one of three types: (1) layered compounds, (2) framework or tunnel compounds, and (3) amorphous exchangers in which a gel exchanger is used to bind a fine powder into a bead for column use. Most of these exchangers can be regenerated and used again.

  6. Preparation and properties of ion-imprinted hollow particles for the selective adsorption of silver ions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hongbin; Yu, Demei; Hu, Guohe

    2015-02-03

    Four kinds of silver ion-imprinted particles (Ag-IIPs) with different morphologies were prepared by the surface ion-imprinting technology (SIIT) and were used for the selective removal and concentration of silver ions from wastewater. The favorable adsorptivity and selectivity of Ag-IIPs for Ag(+) were confirmed by a series of adsorption experiments at a suitable pH value. The adsorption mechanism was elucidated by analyzing the adsorption isotherms, adsorption thermodynamics, and adsorption kinetics systematically. The Ag(+) adsorption onto the Ag-IIPs was well-described by the Langmuir isotherm model, and it was likely to be a monolayer chemical adsorption. This conclusion was also confirmed by the thermodynamic parameters. Moreover, the adsorption kinetics indicated that the adsorption rate would be controlled jointly by the intraparticle diffusion and the inner surface adsorption process, and the latter process was generally associated with the formation and breaking of chemical bonds. Finally, the effects of different morphologies of the Ag-IIPs for Ag(+) adsorption were also investigated. In aqueous solution, the adsorptivity of the Ag(+) ion-imprinting single-hole hollow particles (Ag-IISHPs) for Ag(+) was highest (80.5 mg g(-1)) because of a specific morphology that features a single hole in the shell. In an oil-water mixture, Ag(+) in the water phase could be adsorbed efficiently by the Ag(+) ion-imprinting Janus hollow particles (Ag-IIJHPs), with emulsifiability originating from the Janus structure.

  7. Adsorption of deamidated antibody variants on macroporous and dextran-grafted cation exchangers: II. Adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yinying; Carta, Giorgio; Ferreira, Gisela; Robbins, David

    2011-03-18

    Single and multicomponent batch adsorption kinetics were obtained for deamidated mAb variants on two commercial cation exchangers, one with an open macroporous structure--UNOsphere S--and the other with charged dextran grafts--Capto S. The adsorption kinetics for the macroporous matrix was found to be controlled largely by pore diffusion. The effective diffusivity estimated from single component data was a fraction of the mAb free solution diffusivity, and its value could be used to accurately predict the adsorption kinetics for two- and three-component systems. In this case, when two or more variants were adsorbed simultaneously, both experimental and predicted results showed a temporary overshoot of the amount adsorbed above the equilibrium value for the more deamidated variant followed by a gradual approach to equilibrium. Adsorption rates on the dextran grafted material were much faster than those observed for the macroporous matrix for both single component and simultaneous adsorption cases. In this case, no significant overshoot was observed for the more deamidated forms. The Capto S adsorption kinetics could be described well by a diffusion model with an adsorbed phase driving force for single component adsorption and for the simultaneous adsorption of multiple variants. However, this model failed to predict the adsorption kinetics when more deamidated forms pre-adsorbed on the resin were displaced by less deamidated ones. In this case, the kinetics of the displacement process was much slower indicating that the pre-adsorbed components severely hindered transport of the more strongly bound variants. Overall, the results indicate that despite the lower capacity, the macroporous resin may be more efficient in process applications where displacement of one variant by another takes place as a result of the faster and more predictable kinetics.

  8. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.20 Ion-exchange membranes. Ion-exchange... ion-exchange membrane is prepared by subjecting a polyethylene base conforming to § 177.1520 of...

  9. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food... for Food Treatment § 173.20 Ion-exchange membranes. Ion-exchange membranes may be safely used in the processing of food under the following prescribed conditions: (a) The ion-exchange membrane is prepared...

  10. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.20 Ion-exchange membranes. Ion-exchange... ion-exchange membrane is prepared by subjecting a polyethylene base conforming to § 177.1520 of...

  11. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.20 Ion-exchange membranes. Ion-exchange... ion-exchange membrane is prepared by subjecting a polyethylene base conforming to § 177.1520 of...

  12. 21 CFR 173.20 - Ion-exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ion-exchange membranes. 173.20 Section 173.20 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.20 Ion-exchange membranes. Ion-exchange... ion-exchange membrane is prepared by subjecting a polyethylene base conforming to § 177.1520 of...

  13. [Adsorption-desorption Characteristics of Fermented Rice Husk for Ferrous and Sulfur Ions].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-mei; Liao, Min; Hua, Jia-yuan; Chen, Na; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Pei-zhi; Xie Kai-zhi; XU, Chang-xu; Liu, Guang-rong

    2015-10-01

    To understand the potential of rice husk to fix Fe2+ and S2- ions, the sorption of Fe2+ and S2- by fermented rice husk was studied by using batch incubation experiments in the present study. The effects of adsorption time, Fe2+ and S2- concentration, pH, the temperature and ionic strength in adsorption reaction solution on the sorption were investigated. Therefore, the stability of Fe2+ and S2- adsorbed by fermented rice husk was further validated by desorption experiments performed under similar conditions as adsorption. The results showed that, the adsorption kinetics of Fe2+ (r = 0.912 1) and S2- (r = 0.901 1) by fermented rice husk fits the Elovich kinetics equation, and Freundlich isotherm model could simulate the isotherm adsorption processes of Fe2+ (R2 = 0.965 1) and S2- (R2 = 0.936 6) on fermented rice husk was better than other models. The adsorption processes on fermented rice husk were non- preferential adsorption for Fe2+ and S2, while the adsorption process of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was spontaneous reaction and the adsorption process of S2- was non-spontaneous reaction. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk were endothermic process since high temperature could benefit to the adsorption. The adsorption mechanism of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by coordination adsorption, the adsorption mechanism of S2- on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by ligand exchange adsorption. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk showed greater pH adaptability which ranged from 1.50 to 11.50. With the increasing of ionic strength, the amount of adsorbed Fe2+ on fermented rice husk wasincreased in some extent, the amount of adsorbed S2- on fermented rice husk was slightly decreased, which further proved the adsorption of Fe2+ was major in inner sphere complexation and the adsorption of S2- was major in outer complexation. The desorption rates of Fe2+ and S2- which was adsorbed by fermented

  14. Adsorption of Cd2+ ions on plant mediated SnO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Sirajul; Rehman, Wajid; Waseem, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Mahfooz-ur-Rehman; Hussain Shah, Khizar; Nawaz, Mohsan

    2016-10-01

    Plant mediated SnO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by using SnCl4.5H2O as a precursor material. The nanoparticles were then characterized for BET surface area measurements, energy dispersive x-rays (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis diffuse reflectance (DRS) spectra and x-rays diffraction (XRD) analysis. The successful synthesis of SnO2 nanoparticles was confirmed by EDX analysis. The particle sizes were in the range 19-27 nm whereas the crystallite size computed from XRD measurement was found to be 19.9 nm. Batch adsorption technique was employed for the removal of Cd2+ ions from aqueous solution. The sorption studies of Cd2+ ions were performed at pHs 4 and 6. The equilibrium concentration of Cd2+ ions was determined by atomic absorption spectrometer (flame mode). The uptake of Cd2+ ions was affected by initial concentration, pH and temperature of the electrolytic solution. It was observed that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions enhanced with increase in the initial concentration of Cd2+ ions whereas a decrease in the percent adsorption was detected. From the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption process was found spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The n values confirmed 2:1 exchange mechanism between surface protons and Cd2+ ions.

  15. Effect of polyamine reagents on exchange capacity in ion exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, T. I.; Dyachenko, F. V.; Bogatyreva, Yu. V.; Borodastov, A. K.; Ershova, I. S.

    2016-05-01

    Effect of compounds involved in complex reagents is described using Helamin 906H reagent as an example. The working exchange capacity of KU-2-8chs cation exchanger in hydrogen form and Amberlite IRA 900Cl anion exchanger in OH form remained almost unchanged when they were used repeatedly to purify water that contained Helamin 906H reagent; in addition, this capacity was the same upon filtration of water that did not contain this reagent. Leakage of total organic carbon was observed earlier than that of calcium ions upon filtration of the solution through the cation exchanger layer. The test results obtained in industrial conditions indicated that using H-OH filters to purify turbine condensate enables the decrease of the concentration of organic and other impurities therein.

  16. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-09

    Non-elutable ion exchange is being considered as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removing cesium from Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) particles are the reference ion exchange medium for the process. A major factor in the construction cost of this process is the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications for decontaminated waste. To validate SRS column sizing calculations, SRS subcontracted two reknowned experts in this field to perform similar calculations: Professor R. G. Anthony, Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&038;M University, and Professor S. W. Wang, Department of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University. The appendices of this document contain reports from the two subcontractors. Definition of the design problem came through several meetings and conference calls between the participants and SRS personnel over the past few months. This document summarizes the problem definition and results from the two reports.

  17. Adsorption of aqueous metal ions on oxygen and nitrogen functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Xiao, B; Thomas, K M

    2005-04-26

    In this study, the adsorption characteristics of two series of oxygen and nitrogen functionalized activated carbons were investigated. These series were a low nitrogen content (approximately 1 wt % daf) carbon series derived from coconut shell and a high nitrogen content (approximately 8 wt % daf) carbon series derived from polyacrylonitrile. In both series, the oxygen contents were varied over the range approximately 2-22 wt % daf. The porous structures of the functionalized activated carbons were characterized using N(2) (77 K) and CO(2) (273 K) adsorption. Only minor changes in the porous structure were observed in both series. This allowed the effect of changes in functional group concentrations on metal ion adsorption to be studied without major influences due to differences in porous structure characteristics. The surface group characteristics were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, acid/base titrations, and measurement of the point of zero charge (pH(PZC)). The adsorption of aqueous metal ion species, M(2+)(aq), on acidic oxygen functional group sites mainly involves an ion exchange mechanism. The ratios of protons displaced to the amount of M(2+)(aq) metal species adsorbed have a linear relationship for the carbons with pH(PZC) < or = 4.15. Hydrolysis of metal species in solution may affect the adsorption of metal ion species and displacement of protons. In the case of basic carbons, both protons and metal ions are adsorbed on the carbons. The complex nature of competitive adsorption between the proton and metal ion species and the amphoteric character of carbon surfaces are discussed in relation to the mechanism of adsorption.

  18. Ion exchange tempering of glass ophthalmic lenses.

    PubMed

    Keeney, A H; Duerson, H L

    1975-08-01

    We performed low velocity drop-ball tests using 5/8-, 7/8-, and 1-inch diameter steel balls on ophthalmic crown glass lenses chemically tempered by the ion exchange process. Four representative dioptric strengths (+ 2.50 spherical, - 2.50 spherical, -2.50 cylindrical, and plano) were studied with the isolated lenses mounted, convex side up, on the American National Standards Institute Z80 test block. New ion exchange lenses exhibited a 100 to 350% greater capacity for attenuation of energy from low velocity, large size missiles than matched lenses of similar strength prepared by the conventional heat-treating and air-quenching process.

  19. Organic ion exchange resin separation methods evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Witwer, K.S.

    1998-05-27

    This document describes testing to find effective methods to separate Organic Ion Exchange Resin (OIER) from a sludge simulant. This task supports a comprehensive strategy for treatment and processing of K-Basin sludge. The simulant to be used resembles sludge that has accumulated in the 105KE and 105KW Basins in the 1OOK area of the Hanford Site. The sludge is an accumulation of fuel element corrosion products, organic and inorganic ion exchange materials, canister gasket materials, iron and aluminum corrosion products, sand, dirt, and other minor amounts of organic matter.

  20. Adsorptive Desulfurization of Model Gasoline by Using Different Zn Sources Exchanged NaY Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Rui, Jingwei; Liu, Fei; Wang, Rijie; Lu, Yanfei; Yang, Xiaoxia

    2017-02-17

    A series of Zn-modified NaY zeolites were prepared by the liquid-phase ion-exchange method with different Zn sources, including Zn(NO₃)₂, Zn(Ac)₂ and ZnSO₄. The samples were tested as adsorbents for removing an organic sulfur compound from a model gasoline fuel containing 1000 ppmw sulfur. Zn(Ac)₂-Y exhibited the best performance for the desulfurization of gasoline at ambient conditions. Combined with the adsorbents' characterization results, the higher adsorption capacity of Zn(Ac)₂-Y is associated with a higher ion-exchange degree. Further, the results demonstrated that the addition of 5 wt % toluene or 1-hexene to the diluted thiophene (TP) solution in cyclohexane caused a large decrease in the removal of TP from the model gasoline fuel. This provides evidence about the competition through the π-complexation between TP and toluene for adsorption on the active sites. The acid-catalyzed alkylation by 1-hexene of TP and the generated complex mixture of bulky alkylthiophenes would adsorb on the surface active sites of the adsorbent and block the pores. The regenerated Zn(Ac)₂-Y adsorbent afforded 84.42% and 66.10% of the initial adsorption capacity after the first two regeneration cycles.

  1. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.

    1995-08-15

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio. 2 figs.

  2. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, Jane P.; Wallace, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio.

  3. Chromate ion adsorption by agricultural by-products modified with dimethyloldihydroxyethylene urea and choline chloride.

    PubMed

    Wartelle, Lynda H; Marshall, Wayne E

    2005-08-01

    The use of cellulose-containing agricultural by-products modified with the cross-linking reagent dimethyloldihydroxyethylene urea (DMDHEU) and the quaternary amine, choline chloride, as anion exchange resins, has not been reported. The objective of the present study was to convert the readily available by-products, soybean hulls, sugarcane bagasse and corn stover to functional anion exchange resins using DMDHEU and choline chloride. Optimization of the modification method was achieved using soybean hulls as a substrate. The optimized method was additionally used to modify sugarcane bagasse and corn stover. Adsorption efficiency results with chromate ion showed that modification with both DMDHEU and choline chloride was required for the highest efficiencies. Adsorption capacities of the modified by-products were determined using chromate ion and found to be 1.97, 1.61 and 1.12 mmol/g for sugarcane bagasse, corn stover and soybean hulls, respectively. Competitive adsorption studies were conducted at 10 and 50 times US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) limits for arsenic, chromium and selenium in a simulated wastewater at pH 7. The results showed preferential adsorption of chromate ion over arsenate or selenate ion. Estimated product costs for the three resins ranged from $0.88/kg to $0.99/kg, which was considerably lower than the market costs for the two commercial anion exchange resins QA-52 and IRA-400 also used in this study. DMDHEU/choline chloride modification of the three by-products produced an anion exchange resin with a high capacity to adsorb chromate ion singly or competitively in the presence of other anions from aqueous solutions.

  4. Adsorption of Cu2+ and Pb2+ ion on dolomite powder.

    PubMed

    Pehlivan, Erol; Ozkan, Ali Müjdat; Dinç, Salih; Parlayici, Serife

    2009-08-15

    Natural Turkish dolomite was shown to be effective for removing Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) from aqueous solution. Selected information on pH, dose required, initial metal concentration, adsorption capacity of the raw dolomite powder was evaluated for its efficiency in adsorbing metal ions. Dolomite exhibited good Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) removal levels at all initial metal amount tested (0.04-0.32 mmol, 20 mL). It is important to note that the adsorption capacities of the materials in equilibrium vary, depending on the characteristics of the individual adsorbent, the initial concentration of the adsorbate and pH of the solution. One hour was enough for the removal of metal ions from (0.2 mmol in 20 mL) aqueous solution. Effective removal of metal ions was demonstrated at pH values of 5.0. The adsorptive behavior of dolomite was described by fitting data generated from the study of the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The adsorption capacity of dolomite was found as 8.26 mg for Cu(2+) and 21.74 mg for Pb(2+), respectively, from the calculation of adsorption isotherm equation. More than 85% of studied cations were removed by dolomite from aqueous solution in single step. The mechanism for cations removal by dolomite includes surface complexation and ion exchange.

  5. Synergistic integration of ion-exchange and catalytic reduction for complete decomposition of perchlorate in waste water.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Na; Choi, Minkee

    2014-07-01

    Ion-exchange has been frequently used for the treatment of perchlorate (ClO4(-)), but disposal or regeneration of the spent resins has been the major hurdle for field application. Here we demonstrate a synergistic integration of ion-exchange and catalytic decomposition by using Pd-supported ion-exchange resin as an adsorption/catalysis bifunctional material. The ion-exchange capability of the resin did not change after generation of the Pd clusters via mild ethanol reduction, and thus showed very high ion-exchange selectivity and capacity toward ClO4(-). After the resin was saturated with ClO4(-) in an adsorption mode, it was possible to fully decompose the adsorbed ClO4(-) into nontoxic Cl(-) by the catalytic function of the Pd catalysts under H2 atmosphere. It was demonstrated that prewetting the ion-exchange resin with ethanol significantly accelerate the decomposition of ClO4(-) due to the weaker association of ClO4(-) with the ion-exchange sites of the resin, which allows more facile access of ClO4(-) to the catalytically active Pd-resin interface. In the presence of ethanol, >90% of the adsorbed ClO4(-) could be decomposed within 24 h at 10 bar H2 and 373 K. The ClO4(-) adsorption-catalytic decomposition cycle could be repeated up to five times without loss of ClO4(-) adsorption capacity and selectivity.

  6. ION EXCHANGE SUBSTANCES BY SAPONIFICATION OF ALLYL PHOSPHATE POLYMERS

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, J.

    1959-04-14

    An ion exchange resin having a relatively high adsorption capacity tor uranyl ion as compared with many common cations is reported. The resin comprises an alphyl-allyl hydrogen phosphate polymer, the alphyl group being either allyl or a lower alkyl group having up to 5 carbon atoins. The resin is prepared by polymerizing compounds such as alkyl-diallyl phosphate and triallyl phosphate in the presence of a free radical generating substance and then partially hydrolyzing the resulting polymer to cause partial replacement of organic radicals by cations. A preferred free radical gencrating agent is dibenzoyl peroxide. The partial hydrolysis is brought about by refluxing the polymer with concentrated aqueous NaOH for three or four hours.

  7. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOEpatents

    Barkey, Dale P.

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid embrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selected for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  8. Liquid membrane coated ion-exchange column solids

    DOEpatents

    Barkey, Dale P.

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for improving the performance of liquid membrane separations by coating a liquid membrane onto solid ion-exchange resin beads in a fixed bed. Ion-exchange beads fabricated from an ion-exchange resin are swelled with water and are coated with a liquid membrane material that forms a film over the beads. The beads constitute a fixed bed ion-exchange column. Fluid being treated that contains the desired ion to be trapped by the ion-exchange particle is passed through the column. A carrier molecule, contained in the liquid membrane ion-exchange material, is selective for the desired ion in the fluid. The carrier molecule forms a complex with the desired ion, transporting it through the membrane and thus separating it from the other ions. The solution is fed continuously until breakthrough occurs at which time the ion is recovered, and the bed is regenerated.

  9. Conversion of ion exchange resin to various functional resins and the application in the field of pharmaceutical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Morio

    Ion exchange resins are widely used for separating ions in the solution, desalination, removal of impurities, and etc. Giving a new function to these ion exchange resins enables the application in more various fields. Until now, we carried out the research work about the following 5 project.: (1) Conversion of ion exchange resins into selective adsorbents by using low molecular reagents, which possess capabilities of a selective reaction with target ions, ion exchange reaction with the ion exchange resin and strong physical adsorption to the ion exchange resin. (2) Synthesis of resins for ion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (IEHPLC) and the analysis of biomaterials. (3) Development of insoluble macromolecular Sn(II) complex based on the aminophosphonic acid type ion exchange resin and its application to the 99mTc labeling of proteins. (4) Development of a new 68Ge-68Ga generator using N-methylglucamine type organic polymer as the adsorbent for 68Ge and production of 68Ga for PET. (5) Preparation of an ion-exchangeable polymer bead wrapped with bilayer membrane structures. In this paper, the application of various functional resins prepared based on ion exchange resin in the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been summarized.

  10. An Empirical Formula From Ion Exchange Chromatography and Colorimetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Steven D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a detailed procedure for finding an empirical formula from ion exchange chromatography and colorimetry. Introduces students to more varied techniques including volumetric manipulation, titration, ion-exchange, preparation of a calibration curve, and the use of colorimetry. (JRH)

  11. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    DOEpatents

    Arora, Michelle B.; Hestekin, Jamie A.; Lin, YuPo J.; St. Martin, Edward J.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2007-12-11

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  12. MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

    2008-08-26

    The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

  13. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.21 Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in...

  14. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ion-exchange resins. 173.25 Section 173.25 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.25 Ion-exchange resins. Ion-exchange resins may be safely used in the treatment of food under the following prescribed conditions: (a) The...

  15. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in the treatment of bulk quantities of liquid food under...

  16. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in the treatment of bulk quantities of liquid food under...

  17. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ion-exchange resins. 173.25 Section 173.25 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.25 Ion-exchange resins. Ion-exchange resins may be safely used in the treatment of food under the following prescribed conditions: (a) The...

  18. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in the treatment of bulk quantities of liquid food under...

  19. 21 CFR 173.21 - Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Perfluorinated ion exchange membranes. 173.21... ion exchange membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as ion exchange membranes intended for use in the treatment of bulk quantities of liquid food under...

  20. Charge exchange lifetimes for ions in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1977-01-01

    Latest and best measurements of physical quantities involved in complete calculation of the charge exchange lifetime of mirroring magnetospheric ions are coalesced and summarized. It is critical that the charge exchange lifetimes for ions be known as accurately as possible in order to apply the charge exchange mechanism to ion phenomena within the earth's magnetosphere.

  1. Adsorption of ions on surfaces modified with brushes of polyampholytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borówko, M.; Sokołowski, S.; Staszewski, T.; Sokołowska, Z.; Ilnytskyi, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    We apply density functional theory to study adsorption of ions, treated in the framework of the restricted primitive model (RPM), on surfaces modified by tethered polyampholytes. The residual electrostatic contribution to the free energy functional is approximated by using the approach proposed by Wang et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 23, 175002 (2011)], 10.1088/0953-8984/23/17/175002 for simple nonuniform RPMs systems. Our research concentrates on the problems how the distribution of the charges within chains of polyampholytes changes the selectivity of adsorption of ions species, the structure of the surface layer, and its electric properties.

  2. PRTR ion exchange vault water removal

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents the removal of radiologically contaminated water from the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. Approximately 57,000 liters (15,000 gallons) of water had accumulated in the vault due to the absence of a rain cover. The water was removed and the vault inspected for signs of leakage. No evidence of leakage was found. The removal and disposal of the radiologically contaminated water decreased the risk of environmental contamination.

  3. Cesium and strontium ion specific exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.

    1996-10-01

    This work is one of two parallel projects that are part of an ESP task to develop high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. In this subtask, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with AlliedSignal, Inc. (Des Plaines, Illinois) to develop inorganic ion exchangers that are selective for strontium and cesium from alkaline high-level waste and groundwater streams.

  4. Adsorption of plasmid DNA on anion exchange chromatography media.

    PubMed

    Tarmann, Christina; Jungbauer, Alois

    2008-08-01

    Anion exchange chromatography (AEC) is a useful and effective tool for DNA purification, but due to average pore sizes between 40 and 100 nm most AEC resins lack truly useful binding capacities for plasmid DNA (pDNA). Equilibrium binding capacities and uptake kinetics of AEC media including conventional media (Source 30 Q, Q Sepharose HP), a polymer grafted medium (Fractogel EMD DEAE (M)), media with large pores (Celbeads DEAE, PL SAX 4000 A 30 microm) and a monolithic medium (CIM-DEAE) were investigated by batch uptake or shallow bed experiments at two salt concentrations. Theoretical and experimental binding capacities suggest that the shape of the pDNA molecule can be described by a rod with a length to diameter ratio of 20:1 and that the molecule binds in upright position. The arrangement of DNA like a brush at the surface can be considered as entropy driven, kind of self-assembly process which is inherent to highly and uniformly charged DNA molecules. The initial phase of adsorption is very fast and levels off, associated with a change in mass transfer mechanism. Feed concentrations higher than 0.1 mg/mL pDNA pronounce this effect. Monolithic media showed the fastest adsorption rate and highest binding capacity with 13 mg pDNA per mL.

  5. Ion-exchange chromatographic protein refolding.

    PubMed

    Freydell, Esteban J; van der Wielen, Luuk; Eppink, Michel; Ottens, Marcel

    2010-11-12

    The application of ion-exchange (IEX) chromatography to protein refolding (IExR) has been successfully proven, as supported by various studies using different model proteins, ion-exchange media and flow configurations. Ion-exchange refolding offers a relatively high degree of process intensification, represented by the possibility of performing protein refolding, product purification and product concentration, in one unit operation. Besides its high degree of process intensification, IExR offers an additional set of key advantages including: spatial isolation of the bound protein molecules and the controllable change in chemical composition using gradients. Despite of the acknowledgement of the former advantages, the lack of mechanistic understanding on how they influence the process performance of the ion-exchange refolding reactor, limits the ability to exploit them in order to optimize the performance of the unit. This paper presents a quantitative analysis that assesses the effect that the spatial isolation and the urea gradient, have on the IExR performance, judged on the basis of the refolding yield (Y(N)) and the fractional mass recovery (f(Prot,Rec)). Additionally, this work discusses the effect of the protein load, the protein loading state (i.e., native, denatured, denatured and reduced (D&R)) and the adsorbent type on f(Prot,Rec). The presented work shows: (1) that the protein load has a direct effect on f(Prot,Rec), and the magnitude of this effect depends on the loading state of the protein solution and the adsorbent type; (2) that irrespectively of the type of adsorbent used, the saturation capacity of a denatured protein is less than the native protein and that this difference can be linked to differences in accessible binding surface area; (3) that there is a clear correlation between fractional surface coverage (θ) and f(Prot,Rec), indicating that the former could serve as a good descriptor to assess spatial isolation, and (4) that the urea

  6. Features of ion transport in perfluorinated ion-exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Timashev, S.F.

    1986-02-01

    The conditions for functioning for various systems and devices electrolyzers for ''chlorate'' electrolysis, current sources, etc.) with perfluorinated ion-exchange membranes and septums are determined to a considerable degree by the physicochemical properties of the perfluorinated materials. In this work, on the basis of concepts developed in streaming theory as to the topology of the ''infinite clusters'' (ICs), the author defines more precisely the form of the preexponential dependence of ion transport coefficients and draws conclusions on the character of heat evolution in a perfluorinated membrane when an electric current is passed through the membrane.

  7. Studies on the batch adsorption of plasmid DNA onto anion-exchange chromatographic supports.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, G N; Cabral, J M; Prazeres, D M

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption of a supercoiled 4.8 kbp plasmid onto quaternary ammonium anion-exchangers was studied in a finite bath. Equilibrium experiments were performed with pure plasmid, at 25 degrees C, using commercial Q-Sepharose matrices differing in particle diameter (High Performance, 34 microm; Fast Flow, 90 microm; and Big Beads, 200 microm) and a recently commercialized ion-exchanger, Streamline QXL (d(p) = 200 microm) at different salt concentrations (0.5, 0.7, and 1 M NaCl). Plasmid adsorption was found to follow second-order kinetics (Langmuir isotherm) with average association constants K(A) = 0.32+/-0.12 mL microg(-)(1) and K(A) = 0.25+/-0.15 mL microg(-1) at 0.5 and 0.7 M Nacl, respectively. The maximum binding capacities were not dependent on the ionic strength in the range 0.5-0.7 M but decreased with increasing particle diameter, suggesting that adsorption mainly occurs at the surface of the particles. No adsorption was found at 1 M NaCl. A nonporous model was applied to describe the uptake rate of plasmid onto Streamline QXL at 0.5 M NaCl. The overall process rate was controlled by mass transfer in the regions of low relative amounts of adsorbent (initial stages) and kinetically controlled in the later stages of the process for high relative amounts of adsorbent. The forward reaction rate constant (k(1) = 0.09+/-0.01 mL mg(-1) s(-1)) and film mass transfer coefficient (K(f) = (6 +/- 2) x 10(-4) cm s(-1)) were calculated. Simulations were performed to study the effect of the relative amount of adsorbent on the overall process rate, yield, and media capacity utilization.

  8. Adsorption of Cu(II) ions on cotton boll.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, H Duygu; Kumbur, Halil

    2006-08-25

    In this study, cotton boll was used as an adsorbent for the aim of removing of the Cu(II) ions from the aqueous solutions. The adsorption process was carried out in a batch process and the effects of contact time (2-24h), adsorbent concentration (1-20 g l(-1)), initial pH (2.0-6.0), initial metal ion concentration (20-160 mg l(-1)) and temperature (20-45 degrees C) on the adsorption were investigated. Experimental results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity was determined at pH 5.0 and adsorbed Cu(II) ion concentration was increased with increasing adsorbent concentration and contact time. The isothermal data of cotton boll could be well described by the Langmuir equations and the Langmuir monolayer capacity had a mean value of 11.40 mg g(-1). Experimental results indicated that the pseudo-second order reaction model provided the best description of the data with a correlation coefficient 0.99 for different initial metal concentrations and therefore it was explained that chemical sorption was the basic mechanism in this system. FT-IR results showed that oxygen and nitrogen atoms in structure of cotton boll were involved in Cu(II) ions adsorption.

  9. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  10. Anion exchangers with branched functional ion exchange layers of different hydrophilicity for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shchukina, O I; Zatirakha, A V; Smolenkov, A D; Nesterenko, P N; Shpigun, O A

    2015-08-21

    Novel polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) based anion exchangers differing from each other in the structure of the branched functional ion exchange layer are prepared to investigate the role of linker and functional site on ion exchange selectivity. The proposed method of synthesis includes the obtaining of aminated PS-DVB particles by means of their acylation with following reductive amination with methylamine. Further modification of the obtained secondary aminogroups is provided by the alkylation with either 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (1,4-BDDGE) or resorcinol diglycidyl ether (RDGE), which form the linkers of different hydrophobicity, and amination of terminal epoxide rings with trimethylamine (TMA), dimethylethanolamine (DMEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) or triethanolamine (TEA). The variation of the structure and hydrophobicity of the linker and terminal quaternary ammonium sites in the functional layer allows the alteration of selectivity and separation efficiency of the obtained adsorbents. The ion exchange selectivity and separation efficiency of the anion exchangers are evaluated using the model mixtures of anions (F(-), HCOO(-), Cl(-), NO2(-), Br(-), NO3(-), HPO4(2-) and SO4(2-)) in potassium hydroxide eluents. The adsorbents show the decrease of selectivity with increasing the hydrophilicity of the terminal functional site. The anion exchangers having more flexible and hydrophilic 1,4-BDDGE linker provide smaller separation factors for most of the analytes as compared with RDGE-containing adsorbents with the same terminal ion exchange sites, but are characterized with higher column efficiencies and better peak symmetry for polarizable anions. In case of 1,4-BDDGE-modified anion exchangers of the particle size of 3.3μm functionalized with DMEA and MDEA the calculated values of column efficiencies for polarizable NO3(-) and Br(-) are up to 49,000 and 53,000N/m, respectively, which is almost twice higher than the values obtained for the RDGE

  11. Ion exchange in hydroxyapatite with lanthanides.

    PubMed

    Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Orvig, Chris

    2015-02-16

    Naturally occurring hydroxyapatite, Ca5(PO4)3(OH) (HAP), is the main inorganic component of bone matrix, with synthetic analogues finding applications in bioceramics and catalysis. An interesting and valuable property of both natural and synthetic HAP is the ability to undergo cationic and anionic substitution. The lanthanides are well-suited for substitution for the Ca(2+) sites within HAP, because of their similarities in ionic radii, donor atom requirements, and coordination geometries. We have used isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the thermodynamics of ion exchange in HAP with a representative series of lanthanide ions, La(3+), Sm(3+), Gd(3+), Ho(3+), Yb(3+) and Lu(3+), reporting the association constant (Ka), ion-exchange thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, ΔG), and binding stoichiometry (n). We also probe the nature of the La(3+):HAP interaction by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P NMR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), in support of the ITC results.

  12. Synthesis and ion-exchange properties of lanthanum tungstate, a new inorganic ion exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, S.W.; Rasheedzad, S.; Manzoori, J.L.; Jabbari, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Amorphous samples of a new inorganic ion exchanger, lanthanum tungstate, have been prepared under varying conditions. The material prepared by mixing 0.05 M lanthanum nitrate and 0.05 M sodium tungstate in a ratio of 1:2 was studied in detail for its ion-exchange capacity, chemical stability, ir, thermogravimetry, and K/sub d/ values. Its columns have been used for the separation of C/sup 2 +/ from Pd/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/, and Cu/sup 2 +/, and Ni/sup 2 +/ from Pd/sup 2 +/. 3 figures, 4 tables.

  13. Single-ion adsorption and switching in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bushmaker, Adam W.; Oklejas, Vanessa; Walker, Don; Hopkins, Alan R.; Chen, Jihan; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2016-01-25

    Single-ion detection has, for many years, been the domain of large devices such as the Geiger counter, and studies on interactions of ionized gasses with materials have been limited to large systems. To date, there have been no reports on single gaseous ion interaction with microelectronic devices, and single neutral atom detection techniques have shown only small, barely detectable responses. Here we report the observation of single gaseous ion adsorption on individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which, because of the severely restricted one-dimensional current path, experience discrete, quantized resistance increases of over two orders of magnitude. Only positive ions cause changes, by the mechanism of ion potentialinduced carrier depletion, which is supported by density functional and Landauer transport theory. Lastly, our observations reveal a new single-ion/CNT heterostructure with novel electronic properties, and demonstrate that as electronics are ultimately scaled towards the one-dimensional limit, atomic-scale effects become increasingly important.

  14. Single-ion adsorption and switching in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Bushmaker, Adam W.; Oklejas, Vanessa; Walker, Don; Hopkins, Alan R.; Chen, Jihan; Cronin, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Single-ion detection has, for many years, been the domain of large devices such as the Geiger counter, and studies on interactions of ionized gasses with materials have been limited to large systems. To date, there have been no reports on single gaseous ion interaction with microelectronic devices, and single neutral atom detection techniques have shown only small, barely detectable responses. Here we report the observation of single gaseous ion adsorption on individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which, because of the severely restricted one-dimensional current path, experience discrete, quantized resistance increases of over two orders of magnitude. Only positive ions cause changes, by the mechanism of ion potential-induced carrier depletion, which is supported by density functional and Landauer transport theory. Our observations reveal a new single-ion/CNT heterostructure with novel electronic properties, and demonstrate that as electronics are ultimately scaled towards the one-dimensional limit, atomic-scale effects become increasingly important. PMID:26805462

  15. Ion exchange materials, method of forming ion exchange materials, and methods of treating liquids

    DOEpatents

    Wertsching, Alan K.; Peterson, Eric S.; Wey, John E.

    2007-12-25

    The invention includes an ion affinity material having an organic component which is sulfonated and which is chemically bonded to an inorganic substrate component. The invention includes a method of forming a metal binding material. A solid support material comprising surface oxide groups is provided and an organic component having at least one alkyl halide is covalently linked to at least some of the surface oxide groups to form a modified support material. The at least one alkyl halide is subsequently converted into an alkyl sulfonate. The invention further includes a method and system for extracting ions from a liquid. An ion exchange material having a sulfonated alkyl silane component covalently bonded to a metal oxide support material is provided and a liquid is exposed to the ion exchange material.

  16. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  17. Kinetics, thermodynamics and surface heterogeneity assessment of uranium(VI) adsorption onto cation exchange resin derived from a lignocellulosic residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anirudhan, T. S.; Radhakrishnan, P. G.

    2009-02-01

    A new cation exchange resin (PGTFS-COOH) having a carboxylate functional group at the chain end was prepared by grafting poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) onto tamarind fruit shell, TFS (a lignocellulosic residue) using potassium peroxydisulphate-sodium thiosulphate redox initiator, and in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) as a crosslinking agent, followed by functionalisation. The adsorbent was characterized with the help of FTIR, XRD, scanning electron micrographs (SEM), and potentiometric titrations. The kinetic and isotherm data, obtained at optimum pH value 6.0 at different temperatures could be fitted with pseudo-second-order equation and Sips isotherm model, respectively. An increase in temperature induces positive effect on the adsorption process. The calculated activation energy of adsorption ( Ea, 18.67 kJ/mol) indicates that U(VI) adsorption was largely due to diffusion-controlled process. The values of adsorption enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, and entropy were calculated using thermodynamic function relationships. The decrease in adsorption enthalpy with increasing U(VI) uploading on the adsorbent, reflects the surface energetic heterogeneity of the adsorbent. The isosteric heat of adsorption was quantitatively correlated with the fractional loading for the U(VI) ions adsorption onto PGTFS-COOH. The results showed that the PGTFS-COOH possessed heterogeneous surface with sorption sites having different activities.

  18. Prediction of equilibrium parameters of adsorption of lead (II) ions onto diatomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Taylan; Ardalı, Yüksel; Gamze Turan, N.

    2013-04-01

    Heavy metals from industrial wastewaters are one of the most important environmental issues to be solved today. Due to their toxicity and nonbiodegradable nature, heavy metals cause environmental and public health problems. Various techniques have been developed to remove heavy metals from aqueous solutions. These include chemical precipitation, reverse osmosis, ion Exchange and adsorption. Among them, adsorption is considered to be a particularly competitive and effective process for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions. There is growing interest in using low cost, commercially available materials for the adsorption of heavy metals. Diatomite is a siliceous sedimentary rock having an amorphous form of silica (SiO2. nH2O) containing a small amount of microcrystalline material. It has unique combination of physical and chemical properties such as high porosity, high permeability, small particle size, large surface area, and low thermal conductivity. In addition, it is available in Turkey and in various locations around the world. Therefore, diatomite has been successfully used as adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals. The aim of the study is to investigate the adsorption properties of diatomite. The equilibrium adsorption data were applied to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevic (D-R) isotherm models. Adsorption experiments were performed under batch process, using Pb (II) initial concentration, pH of solution and contact time as variables. The results demonstrated that the adsorption of Pb (II) was strongly dependent on pH of solution. The effect of pH on adsorption of Pb(II) on diatomite was conducted by varying pH from 2 to 12 at 20 oC. In the pH range of 2.0-4.0, the adsorption percentage increases slightly as the pH increasing. At pH>4, the adsorption percentage decreases with increasing pH because hydrolysis product and the precipitation begin to play an important role in the sorption of Pb (II). At pH4, the maximum adsorption

  19. Biodegradation of ion-exchange media

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, B.S.; Clinton, J.H.; Cowdery, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate further the potential for ion-exchange media (resin beads or powdered filter media) to support biological growth. A mixed microbial culture was grown from resin wastes obtained from the BNL HFBR by mixing the resin with a nutrient salt solution containing peptone and yeast extract. Bacterial and fungal growths appeared in the solution and on the resins after 7 to 10 days incubation at 337)degree)C. The mixed microbial cultures were used to inoculate several resin types, both irradiated and unirradiated. 12 refs., 5 tabs.

  20. Ion exchange polymers and method for making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H. (Inventor); Street, Kenneth W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange polymer comprised of an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt of a poly(carboxylic acid) in a poly(vinyl acetal) matrix is described. The polymer is made by treating a mixture made of poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(acrylic acid) with a suitable aldehyde and an acid catalyst to cause acetalization with some cross-linking. The material is then subjected to an alkaline aqueous solution of an alkali metal salt or an alkali earth metal salt. All of the film forming and cross-linking steps can be carried out simultaneously, if desired.

  1. Fixation of radioactive ions in porous media with ion exchange gels

    DOEpatents

    Mercer, Jr., Basil W.; Godfrey, Wesley L.

    1979-01-01

    A method is provided for fixing radioactive ions in porous media by injecting into the porous media water-soluble organic monomers which are polymerizable to gel structures with ion exchange sites and polymerizing the monomers to form ion exchange gels. The ions and the particles of the porous media are thereby physically fixed in place by the gel structure and, in addition, the ions are chemically fixed by the ion exchange properties of the resulting gel.

  2. Adsorption and Exchange Kinetics of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Phosphorus Ligands on Gold Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuge, X. Q.; Bian, Z. C.; Luo, Z. H.; Mu, Y. Y.; Luo, K.

    2017-02-01

    The adsorption kinetics process of hydrophobic ligand (triphenylphosphine, PPh3) and hydrophilic ligand (tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine oxide, THPO) on the surface of gold electrode were estimated by using electrical double layer capacitance (EDLC). Results showed that the adsorption process of both ligands included fast and slow adsorption processes, and the fast adsorption process could fit the first order kinetic equation of Langmuir adsorption isotherm. During the slow adsorption process, the surface coverage (θ) of PPh3 was higher than that of THPO due to the larger adsorption kinetic constant of PPh3 than that of THPO, which implied that PPh3 could replace THPO on the gold electrode. The exchange process of both ligands on the surface of gold electrode proved that PPh3 take the place of THPO by testing the variation of EDLC which promote the preparation of Janus gold, and the theoretic simulation explained the reason of ligands exchange from the respect of energy..

  3. Characterization of poly(allylamine) as a polymeric ligand for ion-exchange protein chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Yanying; Yu, Linling; Sun, Yan

    2017-02-24

    This work reports poly(allylamine) (PAA), as a polymeric ion-exchange ligand for protein chromatography. Sepharose FF was modified with PAA, and six anion exchangers with ionic capacities (ICs) from 165 to 618mmol/L were prepared. Inverse size exclusion chromatography, adsorption equilibrium, uptake kinetics and column elution were performed. It was found that both the adsorption capacity and effective diffusivity maintained low values in the IC range of 165-373mmol/L, but they started to increase beyond 373mmol/L, and increased by 80% and 23 times, respectively, when the IC reached 618mmol/L. Interestingly, a drastic decrease of pore size was observed around the IC of 373mmol/L. The results suggest that the PAA chains played an important role in protein adsorption by altering the inner pore structure of the gels. It is considered that, PAA chains turn from inextensible states with multipoint-grafting on the pore surface at low coupling densities (IC<373mmol/L) to closer, extended and flexible grafting states with less coupling points at higher coupling densities (IC>373mmol/L). These characters of the grafted chains at higher IC values benefit in protein adsorption by three-dimensional binding and encouraged the happening of "chain delivery" of bound proteins on the chains. Besides, the ion exchangers showed favorable adsorption and uptake properties in a wide ionic strength range, 0-500mmol/L NaCl, indicating much better salt tolerance feature than the so-far reported ion exchangers. Moreover, a mild condition of pH 5.0 offered effective recovery of bound proteins in elution chromatography. The results indicate that the PAA-based anion exchanger of a high IC value is promising for high-capacity protein chromatography dealing with feedstock of a wide range of ionic strengths.

  4. Isotopic exchange of uranium. II. Exchange kinetics in solution-organic-ion exchanger systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhinskii, M.V.; Bronzov, P.A.; Vitinskii, M.Yu.

    1987-07-01

    The results of a study of the sorption of uranium and the kinetics of isotopic exchange between uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) in systems consisting of a hydrochloric acid solution and the KU-2-8P and AV-17-10P ion-exchange resins have been studied. It has been shown that the sorption of uranium is limited by diffusion in the sorbent grains and that isotopic exchange is limited by the reaction between uranium(IV) and uranium(VI).

  5. Ion Exchange Chromatography and Spectrophotometry: An Introductory Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, N.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which students use ion exchange chromatography to separate a mixture of chloro complexes of transition metal ions and then use spectrophotometry to define qualitatively the efficiency of the ion exchange columns. Background information, materials needed, and procedures used are included. (JN)

  6. Multicomponent liquid ion exchange with chabazite zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.M.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Byers, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In spite of the increasing commercial use of zeolites for binary and multicomponent sorption, the understanding of the basic mass-transfer processes associated with multicomponent zeolite ion-exchange systems is quite limited. This study was undertaken to evaluate Na-Ca-Mg-Cs-Sr ion exchange from an aqueous solution using a chabazite zeolite. Mass-transfer coefficients and equilibrium equations were determined from experimental batch-reactor data for single and multicomponent systems. The Langmuir isotherm was used to represent the equilibrium relationship for binary systems, and a modified Dubinin-Polyani model was used for the multicomponent systems. The experimental data indicate that diffusion through the microporous zeolite crystals is the primary diffusional resistance. Macropore diffusion also significantly contributes to the mass-transfer resistance. Various mass-transfer models were compared to the experimental data to determine mass-transfer coefficients. Effective diffusivities were obtained which accurately predicted experimental data using a variety of models. Only the model which accounts for micropore and macropore diffusion occurring in series accurately predicted multicomponent data using single-component diffusivities. Liquid and surface diffusion both contribute to macropore diffusion. Surface and micropore diffusivities were determined to be concentration dependent.

  7. Radionuclide Leaching from Organic Ion Exchange Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of leach treatments for decontaminating organic ion exchange resins (OIER), which have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East Basin sludge. Based on process records, the OIER found in the K Basins is a mixed-bet strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolite{trademark} NRW-037. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the OIER can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). To help understand the effects of anticipated OIER elutriation and washing, tests were performed with well-rinsed OIER material from K East Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed OIER having approximately 5% added K East canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). The rinsed resin-bearing material also contained the inorganic ion exchanger Zeolon-900{trademark}, a zeolite primarily composed of the mineral mordenite. The zeolite was estimated to comprise 27 weight percent of the dry H-08 BEAD G material.

  8. Adsorption of copper ion on magnetite-immobilised chitin.

    PubMed

    Wong, K S; Wong, K H; Ng, S; Chung, W K; Wong, P K

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption of Cu2+ from aqueous solution by magnetite-immobilised chitin (MC) was studied in batch mode. Two conventional adsorbents, cation exchange resin (CER) and activated carbon (AC) were used for the comparison. The physicochemical parameters including pH, concentration of adsorbent, temperature and initial Cu2+ concentration were optimised. Under the optimised conditions, the removal efficiencies of Cu2+ for MC, CER and AC were 91.67, 93.36 and 89.16%, respectively. In addition, the removal capacities of Cu2+ for MC, CER and AC were 56.71, 74.84 and 6.55 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption isotherm studies indicated that the adsorptive behaviour of Cu2+ on three adsorbents could be well described by the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacities (qmax) for MC, CER and AC were 53.19, 89.29 and 5.82 mg/g, respectively. The applicability of the kinetic model has been investigated for MC. Experimental results indicated that a pseudo-second-order reaction model provided the best description of the data with a correlation coefficient 0.999 for different initial Cu2+ concentrations. The rate constants were also determined. Various thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (DeltaG 0), enthalpy (DeltaH 0) and entropy (DeltaS 0) were calculated for predicting the adsorption nature of MC. The results indicated that this system was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  9. Characterization of cross-linked cellulosic ion-exchange adsorbents: 2. Protein sorption and transport.

    PubMed

    Angelo, James M; Cvetkovic, Aleksandar; Gantier, Rene; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-03-18

    Adsorption behavior in the HyperCel family of cellulosic ion-exchange materials (Pall Corporation) was characterized using methods to assess, quantitatively and qualitatively, the dynamics of protein uptake as well as static adsorption as a function of ionic strength and protein concentration using several model proteins. The three exchangers studied all presented relatively high adsorptive capacities under low ionic strength conditions, comparable to commercially available resins containing polymer functionalization aimed at increasing that particular characteristic. The strong cation- and anion-exchange moieties showed higher sensitivity to increasing salt concentrations, but protein affinity on the salt-tolerant STAR AX HyperCel exchanger remained strong at ionic strengths normally used in downstream processing to elute material fully during ion-exchange chromatography. Very high uptake rates were observed in both batch kinetics experiments and time-series confocal laser scanning microscopy, suggesting low intraparticle transport resistances relative to external film resistance, even at higher bulk protein concentrations where the opposite is typically observed. Electron microscopy imaging of protein adsorbed phases provided additional insight into particle structure that could not be resolved in previous work on the bare resins.

  10. Brown coals as natural electron-ion-exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kossov, I.I.; Aleksandrov, I.V.; Kamneva, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of electron-ion-exchange properties in brown coals has been established. The influence of the redox properties of the organic and mineral fractions of the coals on their capacity for electron exchange has been shown.

  11. Ion exchange of cesium by crystalline silico-titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhixin; Anthony, R.G.; Miller, J.E.; Trudell, D.

    1995-12-01

    The crystalline silico-titanates developed by the Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University, Sandia National Laboratories and UOP exhibits extremely high ion exchange selectivity for removing cesium from aqueous defense wastes. Based on experimental data and structure studies, a competitive ion exchange model was proposed to predict the ion exchange performance in different simulated waste solutions. The predicted distribution coefficients were within 10% of the experimentally determined values.

  12. Mineral Separation in a CELSS by Ion-exchange Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Spitze, L. A.; Wong, F. W.; Wydeven, T.; Johnson, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    Operational parameters pertinent to ion exchange chromatography separation were identified. The experiments were performed with 9 mm diameter ion exchange columns and conventional column accessories. The cation separation beds were packed with AG 50W-X2 strong acid cation exchange resin in H(+) form and 200-400 dry mesh particle size. The stripper beds used in some experiments were packed with AG 1-XB strong base cation exchange resin in OH(-) form and 200-400 dry mesh particle size.

  13. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

  14. Adsorption of Heavy Metal Ions from Aqueous Solutions by Bentonite Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Su, Guojun; Zhang, Xueping; Huang, Wen

    2016-08-01

    A series of bentonite nanocomposites have been synthesized by modifying bentonite with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) and the common complexing agents, complexone (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, EDTA) or mercaptocomplexant (2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, MBT). These adsorbents are used to remove heavy metal ions (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+),Co(2+)). The Bent-CTMAB-MBT adsorbed metal ions are higher than Bent-CTMAB-EDTA under the same ion concentration in AAS. Compared with the single ion system, the adsorption of the mixed ion system of Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+) had decreased differently. In the mixed system, the adsorption of Mn(2+) is significantly lower, but the adsorption of Cu(2+) was highest. The adsorption sequence of these four metal ions was Cu(2+) > Zn(2+) > Co(2+) > Mn(2+), and the selective adsorption was closely related to the hydration energy of heavy metal ions. We could remove more metal ions in different stages with the adsorption sequence.

  15. Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins - 12210

    SciTech Connect

    Braehler, Georg; Slametschka, Rainer

    2012-07-01

    Organic ion exchangers (IEX) play a major and increasing role in the reactor coolant and other water purification processes. During their operation time they receive significant amounts of radioactivity, making their disposal, together with their organic nature, as medium active waste challenging. Processes applied so far do not eliminate the organic matter, which is unwanted in disposal facilities, or, if high temperatures are applied, raise problems with volatile radionuclides. NUKEM Technologies offers their well introduces process for the destruction of spent solvent (TBP), the pebble bed pyrolysis, now for the treatment of spent IEX (and other problematic waste), with the following benefits: the pyrolysis product is free of organic matter, and the operation temperature with approx. 500 deg. C keeps Cs radionuclides completely in the solid residue. (authors)

  16. TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

    2010-12-28

    At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

  17. Effects of the spaces available for cations in strongly acidic cation-exchange resins on the exchange equilibria by quaternary ammonium ions and on the hydration states of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuuya; Ohnaka, Kenji; Fujita, Saki; Kishi, Midori; Yuchi, Akio

    2011-10-01

    The spaces (voids) available for cations in the five exchange resins with varying exchange capacities and cross-linking degrees were estimated, on the basis of the additivity of molar volumes of the constituents. Tetraalkylammonium ions (NR(4)(+); R: Me, Et, Pr) may completely exchange potassium ion on the resin having a larger void radius. In contrast, the ratio of saturated adsorption capacity to exchange capacity of the resin having a smaller void radius decreased with an increase in size of NR(4)(+) ions, due to the interionic contacts. Alkali metal ions could be exchanged quantitatively. While the hydration numbers of K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) were independent of the void radius, those of Li(+) and Na(+), especially Na(+), decreased with a decrease in void radius. Interionic contacts between the hydrated ions enhance the dehydration. Multivalent metal ions have the hydration numbers, comparable to or rather greater than those in water. A greater void volume available due to exchange stoichiometry released the interionic contacts and occasionally promoted the involvement of water molecules other than directly bound molecules. The close proximity between ions in the conventional ion-exchange resins having higher exchange capacities may induce varying interactions.

  18. Waste treatment by selective mineral ion exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Polito, Aurelie

    2007-07-01

    STMI, subsidiary company of the AREVA Group with over 40 years in the D and D business, has been continuously innovating and developing new decontamination techniques, with the objectives of achieving more efficient decontaminations on a growing spectrum of media. In the field of liquid waste treatment, STMI manufactures uses and commercialises selective inorganic ion exchangers (RAN). These are hydrated synthetic inorganic compounds prepared from very pure raw materials. Different types of RANs (POLYAN, OXTAIN, Fe-Cu, Fe-CoK, Si-Fe-CoK) can be used to trap a large number of radioactive elements in contaminated effluents. Different implementations could be applied depending on technical conditions. STMI's offers consist in building global solution and preliminary design of installation either in dispersed form (batch) or in column (cartridge filtration). Those products are used all over the world not only in the nuclear business (Canada, US, Belgium, France...) but also in other fields. Indeed, it provides competitive solutions to many domains of application especially water pollution control, liquid waste treatment in the nuclear business by decreasing the activity level of waste. The following paper will focus on the theoretical principle of the mineral exchanger, its implementation and the feed back collected by STMI. (author)

  19. Effects of pyrophosphate ions on protein adsorption onto calcium hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Kazuhiko; Oda, Shohei; Tsuyama, Shintaro

    2008-02-28

    The effects of pyrophosphate ions (PP: P2O7(4-)) on the adsorption of proteins onto calcium hydroxyapatite (Hap) were examined using typical proteins of bovine serum albumin (BSA: isoelectric point (iep) = 4.7, molecular mass (M(s)) = 67 200 Da, acidic protein), myoglobin (MGB: iep = 7.0, M(s) = 17 800 Da, neutral protein), and lysozyme (LSZ: iep = 11.1, M(s) = 14,600 Da, basic protein). The UV and CD measurements determined that both the secondary and the tertiary structures of protein molecules do not vary in the presence of PP. The adsorption of BSA was strongly depressed by the addition of PP in all the methods with changing the order of PP addition. Even if BSA was pre-adsorbed on the Hap surface, PP replaced BSA molecules by strong preferential adsorption onto Hap to reduce the amounts of adsorbed BSA. A similar effect was observed with the adsorption of MGB. On the other hand, the amount of adsorbed LSZ (n(LSZ)) was increased with an increase in the concentration of PP, and the n(LSZ) value showed a maximum point in each adsorption isotherm. This fact was explained by a compression of the electric double layer (EDL) around each LSZ molecule by PP. This compression of the EDL induced the reduction of lateral electrostatic repulsions between charged LSZ molecules on the Hap surface and enhanced the formation of closed-packed monolayers to raise the n(LSZ) value. However, since the number of PPs around a LSZ molecule is decreased by an increase in the LSZ concentration in each system, the thickness of the EDL may be increased. Hence, n(LSZ) was reduced again after the maximum point in each system. Tripolyphosphate (TPP: P3O10(5-)) ions exhibited similar effects on the adsorption behaviors of all proteins, but a much more pronounced effect was observed on the LSZ system. TPP with a higher eletronegativity shielded the EDL more highly than PP to increase the n(LSZ) value. The results of the zeta potential for all the protein systems supported the modes of protein

  20. ION EXCHANGE IN FUSED SALTS. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALKALI METAL AND ALKALINE EARTH IONS BETWEEN CHABAZITE AND FUSED LINO3, NANO3, AND KNO3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ION EXCHANGE, SALTS ), (*ALKALI METALS, ION EXCHANGE), (*ALKALINE EARTH METALS, ION EXCHANGE), (*NITRATES, ION EXCHANGE), SODIUM , CALCIUM, POTASSIUM...BARIUM, RUBIDIUM, CESIUM, LITHIUM COMPOUNDS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, POTASSIUM COMPOUNDS, DISTRIBUTION, MINERALS, IONS

  1. Rapid Preparation of Biosorbents with High Ion Exchange Capacity from Rice Straw and Bagasse for Removal of Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the preparation of the cellulose phosphate with high ion exchange capacity from rice straw and bagasse for removal of heavy metals. In this study, rice straw and bagasse were modified by the reaction with phosphoric acid in the presence of urea. The introduced phosphoric group is an ion exchangeable site for heavy metal ions. The reaction by microwave heating yielded modified rice straw and modified bagasse with greater ion exchange capacities (∼3.62 meq/g) and shorter reaction time (1.5–5.0 min) than the phosphorylation by oil bath heating. Adsorption experiments towards Pb2+, Cd2+, and Cr3+ ions of the modified rice straw and the modified bagasse were performed at room temperature (heavy metal concentration 40 ppm, adsorbent 2.0 g/L). The kinetics of adsorption agreed with the pseudo-second-order model. It was shown that the modified rice straw and the modified bagasse could adsorb heavy metal ions faster than the commercial ion exchange resin (Dowax). As a result of Pb2+ sorption test, the modified rice straw (RH-NaOH 450W) removed Pb2+ much faster in the initial step and reached 92% removal after 20 min, while Dowax (commercial ion exchange resin) took 90 min for the same removal efficiency. PMID:24578651

  2. Rapid preparation of biosorbents with high ion exchange capacity from rice straw and bagasse for removal of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Rungrodnimitchai, Supitcha

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the preparation of the cellulose phosphate with high ion exchange capacity from rice straw and bagasse for removal of heavy metals. In this study, rice straw and bagasse were modified by the reaction with phosphoric acid in the presence of urea. The introduced phosphoric group is an ion exchangeable site for heavy metal ions. The reaction by microwave heating yielded modified rice straw and modified bagasse with greater ion exchange capacities (∼3.62 meq/g) and shorter reaction time (1.5-5.0 min) than the phosphorylation by oil bath heating. Adsorption experiments towards Pb²⁺, Cd²⁺, and Cr³⁺ ions of the modified rice straw and the modified bagasse were performed at room temperature (heavy metal concentration 40 ppm, adsorbent 2.0 g/L). The kinetics of adsorption agreed with the pseudo-second-order model. It was shown that the modified rice straw and the modified bagasse could adsorb heavy metal ions faster than the commercial ion exchange resin (Dowax). As a result of Pb²⁺ sorption test, the modified rice straw (RH-NaOH 450W) removed Pb²⁺ much faster in the initial step and reached 92% removal after 20 min, while Dowax (commercial ion exchange resin) took 90 min for the same removal efficiency.

  3. Rupture Loop Annex (RLA) ion exchange vault entry and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.

    1996-01-04

    This engineering report documents the entry and characterization of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located near the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns were found in the vault. Some of which contained transuranics, Cs 137, and Co 60. The characterization information is necessary for future vault cleanout and column disposal.

  4. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.25 Ion-exchange resins. Ion-exchange resins may be...)(17) of this section is used only for industrial application to treat bulk quantities of aqueous...

  5. Cesium Ion Exchange Loading Kinetics Testing with SRF Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-11-02

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing 137Cs. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (2 to 8 M) due to caustic leaching and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of linear load velocity (4, 6, 8 cm/min), initial sodium concentration (2, 5, 8 M), initial sodium-to-cesium ratio (1.4E+05, 2.1E+05, 2.8E+05 mol/mol), initial sodium-to-hydroxide ratio (2.0, 3.0, 4.0 mol/mol), and resin degradation during extended solution flow using elevated temperature (45°, 50°, 55°, 60°, 65°, 75°C). Testing was performed using a~2mL column packed with SRF resin with feed flowing through it in an up-flow pattern. Samples were taken at set intervals and the data analyzed to help understand the impact of these conditions on the SRF resin performance. It was found that the loading kinetics were not significantly impacted by the sodium concentration over the range tested. However, the loading kinetics were impacted by the linear load velocity. These results indicated that at the test temperature, the adsorption of cesium is strongly dependent on mass transfer through the film and not significantly impacted by interparticle diffusion. Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45°C. Above 60°C the resin appears to not load at all.

  6. Ion exchange properties of novel hydrous metal oxide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrous metal oxide (HMO) materials are inorganic ion exchangers which have many desirable characteristics for catalyst support applications, including high cation exchange capacity, anion exchange capability, high surface area, ease of adjustment of acidity and basicity, bulk or thin film preparation, and similar chemistry for preparation of various transition metal oxides. Cation exchange capacity is engineered into these materials through the uniform incorporation of alkali cations via manipulation of alkoxide chemistry. Specific examples of the effects of Na stoichiometry and the addition of SiO{sub 2} to hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) on ion exchange behavior will be given. Acid titration and cationic metal precursor complex exchange will be used to characterize the ion exchange behavior of these novel materials.

  7. Local structures of ions at ion-exchange resin/solution interface.

    PubMed

    Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2005-08-26

    The local structures of Cl- and Br- in anion-exchange resins have been studied by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), and separation selectivity is discussed on the basis of results. When two different anion-exchange resins having trimethylammonium and dimethylammonium groups as anion-exchange groups are employed for ion-exchange experiments, slightly higher Br- selectivity has been obtained with the former. XAFS has indicated that the average hydration numbers for a given anion is not affected by the structure of the ion-exchange group, but that the extent of ion-association between the anion and the ion-exchange groups depends on the type of the ion-exchange group. Shorter interaction distance (and in turn stronger ion-association) has been confirmed for the dimethylammonium-type resin, and is consistent with lower Br- selectivity of this resin.

  8. Single-ion adsorption and switching in carbon nanotubes

    DOE PAGES

    Bushmaker, Adam W.; Oklejas, Vanessa; Walker, Don; ...

    2016-01-25

    Single-ion detection has, for many years, been the domain of large devices such as the Geiger counter, and studies on interactions of ionized gasses with materials have been limited to large systems. To date, there have been no reports on single gaseous ion interaction with microelectronic devices, and single neutral atom detection techniques have shown only small, barely detectable responses. Here we report the observation of single gaseous ion adsorption on individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which, because of the severely restricted one-dimensional current path, experience discrete, quantized resistance increases of over two orders of magnitude. Only positive ions cause changes,more » by the mechanism of ion potentialinduced carrier depletion, which is supported by density functional and Landauer transport theory. Lastly, our observations reveal a new single-ion/CNT heterostructure with novel electronic properties, and demonstrate that as electronics are ultimately scaled towards the one-dimensional limit, atomic-scale effects become increasingly important.« less

  9. Microcalorimetric study of adsorption and disassembling of virus-like particles on anion exchange chromatography media.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengran; Zhang, Songping; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Yanli; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-04-03

    Chromatographic purification of virus-like particles (VLPs) is important to the development of modern vaccines. However, disassembly of the VLPs on the solid-liquid interface during chromatography process could be a serious problem. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) measurements, together with chromatography experiments, were performed on the adsorption and disassembling of multi-subunits hepatitis B virus surface antigen virus-like particles (HB-VLPs). Two gigaporous ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) media, DEAE-AP-280 nm and DEAE-POROS, were used. The application of gigaporous media with high ligand density led to significantly increased irreversible disassembling of HB-VLPs and consequently low antigen activity recovery during IEC process. To elucidate the thermodynamic mechanism of the effect of ligand density on the adsorption and conformational change of VLPs, a thermodynamic model was proposed. With this model, one can obtain the intrinsic molar enthalpy changes related to the binding of VLPs and the accompanying conformational change on the liquid-solid interface during its adsorption. This model assumes that, when intact HB-VLPs interact with the IEC media, the total adsorbed proteins contain two states, the intact formation and the disassembled formation; accordingly, the apparent adsorption enthalpy, ΔappH, which can be directly measured from ITC experiments, presents the sum of three terms: (1) the intrinsic molar enthalpy change associated to the binding of intact HB-VLPs (ΔbindHintact), (2) the intrinsic molar enthalpy change associated to the binding of HB-VLPs disassembled formation (ΔbindHdis), and (3) the enthalpy change accompanying the disassembling of HB-VLPs (ΔconfHdis). The intrinsic binding of intact HB-VLPs and the disassembled HB-VLPs to both kinds of gigaporous media (each of which has three different ligand densities), were all observed to be entropically driven as indicated by positive values of

  10. Ion exchange defines the biological activity of titanate nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rónavári, Andrea; Kovács, Dávid; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiricsi, Mónika; Pfeiffer, Ilona

    2016-05-01

    One-dimensional titanate nanotubes (TiONTs) were subjected to systematic ion exchange to determine the impact of these modifications on biological activities. Ion exchanged TiONTs (with Ag, Mg, Bi, Sb, Ca, K, Sr, Fe, and Cu ions) were successfully synthesized and the presence of the substituted ions was verified by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A complex screening was carried out to reveal differences in toxicity to human cells, as well as in antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities between the various modified nanotubes. Our results demonstrated that Ag ion exchanged TiONTs exerted potent antibacterial and antifungal effects against all examined microbial species but were ineffective on viruses. Surprisingly, the antibacterial activity of Cu/TiONTs was restricted to Micrococcus luteus. Most ion exchanged TiONTs did not show antimicrobial activity against the tested bacterial and fungal species. Incorporation of various ions into nanotube architectures lead to mild, moderate, or even to a massive loss of human cell viability; therefore, this type of biological effect exerted by TiONTs can be greatly modulated by ion exchange. These findings further emphasize the contribution of ion exchange in determining not only the physical and chemical characteristics but also the bioactivity of TiONT against different types of living cells.

  11. Phosphate recovery from wastewater using engineered superparamagnetic particles modified with layered double hydroxide ion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Drenkova-Tuhtan, Asya; Mandel, Karl; Paulus, Anja; Meyer, Carsten; Hutter, Frank; Gellermann, Carsten; Sextl, Gerhard; Franzreb, Matthias; Steinmetz, Heidrun

    2013-10-01

    An innovative nanocomposite material is proposed for phosphate recovery from wastewater using magnetic assistance. Superparamagnetic microparticles modified with layered double hydroxide (LDH) ion exchangers of various compositions act as phosphate adsorbers. Magnetic separation and chemical regeneration of the particles allows their reuse, leading to the successful recovery of phosphate. Based upon the preliminary screening of different LDH ion exchanger modifications for phosphate selectivity and uptake capacity, MgFe-Zr LDH coated magnetic particles were chosen for further characterization and application. The adsorption kinetics of phosphate from municipal wastewater was studied in dependence with particle concentration, contact time and pH. Adsorption isotherms were then determined for the selected particle system. Recovery of phosphate and regeneration of the particles was examined via testing a variety of desorption solutions. Reusability of the particles was demonstrated for 15 adsorption/desorption cycles. Adsorption in the range of 75-97% was achieved in each cycle after 1 h contact time. Phosphate recovery and enrichment was possible through repetitive application of the desorption solution. Finally, a pilot scale experiment was carried out by treating 125 L of wastewater with the particles in five subsequent 25 L batches. Solid-liquid separation on this scale was carried out with a high-gradient magnetic filter (HGMF).

  12. Adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisaharu; Matsumoto, Michiaki

    1996-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose were examined. The pH dependency on the distribution ratio was found to be affected by the valency of the metal ion, and the apparent adsorption equilibrium constants of the metal ions were determined. The order of adsorption of the metal ions is Ga > In > Nd > Eu for the trivalent metal ions and Cu > Ni > Co for the divalent metal ions. It is believed that amino and hydroxyl groups in the chitosan act as a chelating ligand.

  13. Gadolinium-hydrogen ion exchange of zirconium phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, D. C.; Power, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The Gd(+3)/H(+) ion exchange on a commercial zirconium phosphate ion exchanger was investigated in chloride, sulfate, and phosphate solutions of Gd(+3) at gadolinium concentrations of 0.001 to 1 millimole per cc and in the pH range of 0 to 3.5. Relatively low Gd(+3) capacities, in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 millimole per g of ion exchanger were found at room temperature. A significant difference in Gd(+3) sorption was observed, depending on whether the ion exchanger was converted from initial conditions of greater or lesser Gd(+3) sorption than the specific final conditions. Correlations were found between decrease in Gd(+3) capacity and loss of exchanger phosphate groups due to hydrolysis during washing and between increase in capacity and treatment with H3PO4. Fitting of the experimental data to ideal ion exchange equilibrium expressions indicated that each Gd(+3) ion is sorbed on only one site of the ion exchanger. The selectivity quotient was determined to be 2.5 + or - 0.4 at room temperature on gadolinium desorption in chloride solutions.

  14. Anion exchangers with negatively charged functionalities in hyperbranched ion-exchange layers for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Uzhel, Anna S; Zatirakha, Alexandra V; Smirnov, Konstantin N; Smolenkov, Alexandr D; Shpigun, Oleg A

    2017-01-27

    Novel pellicular poly(styrene-divinylbenzene)-based (PS-DVB) anion exchangers with covalently-bonded hyperbranched functional ion-exchange layers containing negatively charged functionalities are obtained and examined. The hyperbranched coating is created on the surface of aminated PS-DVB substrate by repeating the modification cycles including alkylation with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (1,4-BDDGE), and amination of the terminal epoxide rings with methylamine (MA) or glycine (Gly). The influence of the position and the number of the layers with glycine, as well as of the total number of the layers of amine in the coating on the chromatographic properties of the obtained stationary phases is investigated. Chromatographic performance of the obtained stationary phases is evaluated using the model mixtures of inorganic and organic anions with hydroxide eluent. It is shown that the best selectivity toward weakly retained organic acids and oxyhalides is possessed by the anion exchanger obtained after 5 modification cycles, with glycine being used in the first one. Such anion exchanger packed in 25-cm long column is capable of separating 22 anions in 58min including 7 standard anions, mono-, di- and trivalent organic acids, oxyhalides, and some other double- and triple-charged anions.

  15. Ion adsorption and its influence on direct current electric field induced deformations of flexoelectric nematic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derfel, Grzegorz; Buczkowska, Mariola

    2011-07-01

    The influence of ion adsorption on the behavior of the nematic liquid crystal layers is studied numerically. The homeotropic flexoelectric layer subjected to the dc electric field is considered. Selective adsorption of positive ions is assumed. The analysis is based on the free energy formalism for ion adsorption. The distributions of director orientation angle, electric potential, and ion concentrations are calculated by numerical resolving of suitable torques equations and Poisson equation. The threshold voltages for the deformations are also determined. It was shown that adsorption affects the distributions of both cations and anions. Sufficiently large number of adsorbed ions leads to spontaneous deformation arising without any threshold if the total number of ions creates sufficiently strong electric field with significant field gradients in the neighborhood of electrodes. The spontaneous deformations are favored by strong flexoelectricity, large thickness, large ion concentrations, weak anchoring, and large adsorption energy.

  16. Hydrolyzed Poly(acrylonitrile) Electrospun Ion-Exchange Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Jassal, Manisha; Bhowmick, Sankha; Sengupta, Sukalyan; Patra, Prabir K.; Walker, Douglas I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A potential ion-exchange material was developed from poly(acrylonitrile) fibers that were prepared by electrospinning followed by alkaline hydrolysis (to convert the nitrile group to the carboxylate functional group). Characterization studies performed on this material using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-Transform infra-red spectroscopy, and ion chromatography confirmed the presence of ion-exchange functional group (carboxylate). Optimum hydrolysis conditions resulted in an ion-exchange capacity of 2.39 meq/g. Ion-exchange fibers were used in a packed-bed column to selectively remove heavy-metal cation from the background of a benign, competing cation at a much higher concentration. The material can be efficiently regenerated and used for multiple cycles of exhaustion and regeneration. PMID:24963270

  17. Theorization on ion-exchange equilibria: activity of species in 2-D phases.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Hiroki

    2004-11-01

    Ion-exchange reactions are naturally occurring at soil and sediment/water interphases, determining soil fertility and water quality. These ion-exchange reactions with inorganic and organic exchangers are applied to chemical analysis, recovery of useful ions from low-grade ores (potentially from sea water), water purification including the preparation of "ultrapure" water, production of foods and medicines, therapy, and other uses. It is important to theorize about or to model ion-exchange reactions for quantitative explanations of ion-exchange phenomena and for efficient operation of ion-exchange processes. This paper describes the modeling of ion-exchange equilibria for hydroxyl sites on metal oxides and carboxyl sites in resins with monovalent cations (alkali metal ions), a monovalent anion (nitrate ion), and divalent heavy metal ions. The procedure of modeling is as follows: the stoichiometry and material balance equations of the respective ion-exchange reactions were established based on findings here and by others. The equilibrium conditions were given by the Frumkin equation, where the mass-action relation is modified with lateral interactions between species at the interphase. The model equations were fitted to the measured data and model parameter values were determined by nonlinear regression analysis. The formation of bonds between ions and exchanger sites was evaluated by the equilibrium constant and the suppression of bond formation by electrostatic, geometric, and other lateral interactions was evaluated by the interaction constant. It was established that the properties of ions are determined by the valence, size, and hydration state of the ions. Monovalent ions (anions and cations) react with oxide surface hydroxyl and resin carboxyl sites as hydrated ions and form loose ion-site pairs by a weak electrostatic bond (nonspecific adsorption). However, the lateral interactions are large because of a large polarization of the ion-site pairs. When the

  18. Macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate-triallyl isocyanurate-divinylbenzene) matrix as an anion-exchange resin for protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Sun, Y

    1999-09-03

    A novel macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate-triallyl isocyanurate-divinylbenzene) matrix was prepared by a radical suspension copolymerization. The matrix contained epoxy groups, so diethylaminohydroxypropyl groups were coupled to the matrix, leading to an anion-exchange resin. We studied the components, surface and pore structures of the anion-exchange resin by Fourier transform infared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM observations showed that the resin abounded in macropores as large as 3 to 8 microns both in the surface and the interior. The back-pressure of the column packed with the resin was modest even at a high flow-rate (60.2 cm/min). Then, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein to examine the adsorption properties of the anion-exchange resin. The results showed that under optimum conditions the resin had a capacity as high as 22.8 mg BSA/g wet resin, or 68.7 mg/g dry resin. The adsorbed protein could be desorbed by increasing the liquid phase ionic strength. Most importantly, the matrix had little nonspecific adsorption for BSA before introducing the ion-exchange groups.

  19. Process parameters optimization in ion exchange 238Pu aqueous processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansoy-Hjelvik, M. E.; Nixon, J.; Laurinat, J.; Brock, J.; Silver, G.; Reimus, M.; Ramsey, K. B.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes bench-scale efforts (5-7 grams of 238Pu) to optimize the ion exchange process for 234U separation with minimal 238Pu losses to the effluent and wash liquids. The bench-scale experiments also determine the methodology to be used for the full-scale process: 5 kg238Pu annual throughput. Heat transfer calculations used to determine the thermal gradients expected during ion exchange processing are also described. The calculations were performed in collaboration with Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center (WSRTC) and provide information for the design of the full-scale ion exchange equipment.

  20. Ion-exchanged glass waveguide technology: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervonen, Ari; West, Brian R.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2011-07-01

    We review the history and current status of ion exchanged glass waveguide technology. The background of ion exchange in glass and key developments in the first years of research are briefly described. An overview of fabrication, characterization and modeling of waveguides is given and the most important waveguide devices and their applications are discussed. Ion exchanged waveguide technology has served as an available platform for studies of general waveguide properties, integrated optics structures and devices, as well as applications. It is also a commercial fabrication technology for both passive and active wave-guide components.

  1. Removal of thiosulfates from return waters by ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomovskii, V.L.; Kryzhandvskii, M.M.; Savva, V.P.; Timofeeva, I.V.

    1986-08-01

    The authors select an anion-exchange resin and its ionic form having high exchange capacity for thiosulfate, from which the sorbed thiosulfate ions can be effectively desorbed. Three types of strongly basic anion-exchangers were used: AV-17; AV-1710P; AV-29-10P. The experimental results showed that all three aninon-exchangers had approximately the same capacity for thiosulfate ions. Curves representing sorption and regeneration during purification of model solutions are show. The resins were regenerated under dynamic conditions by 1 N sodium sulfate solution. The degree of regeneration was 95%.

  2. Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

  3. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange of myoglobin ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dunmin; Ding, Chuanfan; Douglas, D J

    2002-01-01

    The hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of gas-phase ions of holo- and apo-myoglobin has been studied by confining the ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap with D(2)O or CD(3)OD at a pressure of several mTorr. Apo-myoglobin ions were formed by collision-induced dissociation of holo-myoglobin ions between the orifice and skimmer of the ion sampling system. The exchange takes place on a time scale of seconds. Earlier cross section measurements have shown that holo-myoglobin ions can have more compact structures than apo-myoglobin. Despite this, both holo-myoglobin and apo-myoglobin in charge states +8 to +14 are found to exchange nearly the same number of hydrogens (ca. 103) in 4 s. It is possible the ions fold or unfold to new conformations on the much longer time scale of the exchange experiment compared with the cross section measurements.

  4. Interpenetrating polymer network ion exchange membranes and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Danesi, Pier R.; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1989-01-01

    Interpenetrating polymer network ion exchange membranes include a microporous polymeric support film interpenetrated by an ion exchange polymer and are produced by absorbing and polymerizing monomers within the support film. The ion exchange polymer provides ion exchange ligands at the surface of and throughout the support film which have sufficient ligand mobility to extract and transport ions across the membrane.

  5. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reserpine Adsorption onto Strong Acidic Cationic Exchange Fiber.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhanjing; Liu, Xiongmin; Huang, Hongmiao

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process of reserpine adsorbed onto the strong acidic cationic exchange fiber (SACEF) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on pH values, and the optimum reserpine adsorption onto the SACEF occurred at pH = 5 of reserpine solution. With the increase of temperature and initial concentration, the adsorption capacity increased. The equilibrium was attained within 20 mins. The adsorption process could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm model. The calculated activation energy Ea was 4.35 kJ/mol. And the thermodynamic parameters were: 4.97<ΔH<7.44 kJ/mol, -15.29<ΔG<-11.87 kJ/mol and 41.97<ΔS<47.35 J/mol·K. The thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption was an endothermic, spontaneous and feasible process of physisorption within the temperature range between 283 K and 323 K and the initial concentration range between 100 mg/L and 300 mg/L. All the results showed that the SACEF had a good adsorption performance for the adsorption of reserpine from alcoholic solution.

  6. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reserpine Adsorption onto Strong Acidic Cationic Exchange Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhanjing; Liu, Xiongmin; Huang, Hongmiao

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process of reserpine adsorbed onto the strong acidic cationic exchange fiber (SACEF) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on pH values, and the optimum reserpine adsorption onto the SACEF occurred at pH = 5 of reserpine solution. With the increase of temperature and initial concentration, the adsorption capacity increased. The equilibrium was attained within 20 mins. The adsorption process could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm model. The calculated activation energy Ea was 4.35 kJ/mol. And the thermodynamic parameters were: 4.97<ΔH<7.44 kJ/mol, -15.29<ΔG<-11.87 kJ/mol and 41.97<ΔS<47.35 J/mol·K. The thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption was an endothermic, spontaneous and feasible process of physisorption within the temperature range between 283 K and 323 K and the initial concentration range between 100 mg/L and 300 mg/L. All the results showed that the SACEF had a good adsorption performance for the adsorption of reserpine from alcoholic solution. PMID:26422265

  7. XAFS Studies of Silver Environments in Ion-Exchanged Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. C.; Dubiel, M.

    2007-02-02

    The X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique was used to analyze the structural geometry of Ag atoms introduced into soda-lime silicate glass and soda aluminosilicate glass by ion-exchange methods. The results show that Ag+ ions in aluminosilicate glass are coordinated by about two oxygens and the nearest-neighbor Ag-O distance increases when the Ag+-for-Na+ ion-exchange ratio is larger than 0.47. When the exchange ratio is low, the introduced Ag+ ions are stabilized at the non-bridge oxygen (NBO) site with a Ag-O distance of 2.20 A, and the Na+ ions in the AlO4 site are exchanged by Ag+ ions after full replacement of the NBO sites with a Ag-O distance of 2.28 A. The disorder of Ag-O coordination increases with increasing ion-exchange ratio in aluminosilicate glass where Ag+ ions are coordinated by NBO and bridge oxygen (BO)

  8. Ion Exchange Separation of the Oxidation State of Vanadium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Richard

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment that emphasizes the discrete nature of the different oxidation states of vanadium by the separation of ammonium metavanadate into all four species by ion exchange chromatography. (CS)

  9. First principles derived, transferable force fields for CO2 adsorption in Na-exchanged cationic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hanjun; Kamakoti, Preeti; Ravikovitch, Peter I; Aronson, Matthew; Paur, Charanjit; Sholl, David S

    2013-08-21

    The development of accurate force fields is vital for predicting adsorption in porous materials. Previously, we introduced a first principles-based transferable force field for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites (Fang et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2012, 116, 10692). In this study, we extend our approach to CO2 adsorption in cationic zeolites which possess more complex structures. Na-exchanged zeolites are chosen for demonstrating the approach. These methods account for several structural complexities including Al distribution, cation positions and cation mobility, all of which are important for predicting adsorption. The simulation results are validated with high-resolution experimental measurements of isotherms and microcalorimetric heats of adsorption on well-characterized materials. The choice of first-principles method has a significant influence on the ability of force fields to accurately describe CO2-zeolite interactions. The PBE-D2 derived force field, which performed well for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites, does not do so for Na-exchanged zeolites; the PBE-D2 method overestimates CO2 adsorption energies on multi-cation sites that are common in cationic zeolites with low Si/Al ratios. In contrast, a force field derived from the DFT/CC method performed well. Agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment not only for LTA-4A on which the force field fitting is based, but for other two common adsorbents, NaX and NaY.

  10. Ion Exchanged, Glass Laminates that Exhibit a Threshold Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-10

    tests. The glass was then annealed at 550 ’C for 8hr to remove any residual stress. The ion exchange process was accomplished in a vertical clam ...bonded together (described below) before the ion exchange. Hence, when the bilayer plate was separated using a razor blade (described below), each...strain energy release rate for the bonded interface using the double cantilever beam test configuration. As detailed by Maszara et. al., 19 a razor blade

  11. Samarium Ion Exchanged Montmorillonite for High Temperature Cumene Cracking Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binitha, N. N.; Silija, P. P.; Suraj, V.; Yaakob, Z.; Sugunan, S.

    2011-02-01

    Montmorillonite clay is cation exchanged with samarium and its catalytic influence in cumene cracking reaction is investigated. Effect of exchange with sodium ions on further exchange with samarium ions is also noted. Acidity measurements are done using Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) of ammonia. The retention of basic structure is proved from FTIR spectra and XRD patterns. Elemental analysis result shows that samarium exchange has occurred, which is responsible for the higher catalytic activity. Surface area and pore volume remains more or less unaffected upon exchange. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates the enhanced thermal stability on exchanging. Cumene cracking reaction is carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed bed glass reactor at 673 K. The predominance of Brønsted acidity is confirmed from high selectivity to benzene.

  12. Calculation of adsorption free energy for solute-surface interactions using biased replica-exchange molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of a biomolecule, such as a peptide or protein, to a functionalized surface is of fundamental importance for a broad range of applications in biotechnology. The adsorption free energy for these types of interactions can be determined from a molecular dynamics simulation using the partitioning between adsorbed and nonadsorbed states, provided that sufficient sampling of both states is obtained. However, if interactions between the solute and the surface are strong, the solute will tend to be trapped near the surface during the simulation, thus preventing the adsorption free energy from being calculated by this method. This situation occurs even when using an advanced sampling algorithm such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). In this paper, the authors demonstrate the fundamental basis of this problem using a model system consisting of one sodium ion (Na+) as the solute positioned over a surface functionalized with one negatively charged group (COO−) in explicit water. With this simple system, the authors show that sufficient sampling in the coordinate normal to the surface cannot be obtained by conventional REMD alone. The authors then present a method to overcome this problem through the use of an adaptive windowed-umbrella sampling technique to develop a biased-energy function that is combined with REMD. This approach provides an effective method for the calculation of adsorption free energy for solute-surface interactions. PMID:19768127

  13. Copper (II) ion adsorption from aqueous solution onto fatty hydroxamic acid - Immobilized zeolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhsinun, Sugita, Purwantiningsih; Purwaningsih, Henny

    2017-01-01

    Separation of Cu (II) ion from a mixture containing Zn (II) ion was conducted by solid-liquid extraction method through column chromatography. The column was filled with FHA-ZEO resin. This resin is the result of immobilized fatty hydroxamic acid (FHA) into activated natural zeolite (ZEO) involving as solid phase. Parameters becoming variable were resin mass to concentration ratio and pH of Cu (II) ion solution. The research result shows that optimum condition of Cu (II) ion adsorption was 1 gram resin mass FHA-ZEO to ion Cu (II) solution concentration of 100 ppm with pH value of 5. This Cu (II) ion separation from its mixture containing Zn (II) ion gives Cu(II) ion adsorption capacity of 162.39 mg/g FHA-ZEO in that optimum condition, 4 times higher than Zn (II) ion adsorption with Cu (II) ion recovery of 93,88%.

  14. MODELING RESULTS FROM CESIUM ION EXCHANGE PROCESSING WITH SPHERICAL RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Hang, T.; Aleman, S.

    2011-01-03

    Ion exchange modeling was conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory to compare the performance of two organic resins in support of Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX). In-tank ion exchange (IX) columns are being considered for cesium removal at Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The spherical forms of resorcinol formaldehyde ion exchange resin (sRF) as well as a hypothetical spherical SuperLig{reg_sign} 644 (SL644) are evaluated for decontamination of dissolved saltcake wastes (supernates). Both SuperLig{reg_sign} and resorcinol formaldehyde resin beds can exhibit hydraulic problems in their granular (nonspherical) forms. SRS waste is generally lower in potassium and organic components than Hanford waste. Using VERSE-LC Version 7.8 along with the cesium Freundlich/Langmuir isotherms to simulate the waste decontamination in ion exchange columns, spherical SL644 was found to reduce column cycling by 50% for high-potassium supernates, but sRF performed equally well for the lowest-potassium feeds. Reduced cycling results in reduction of nitric acid (resin elution) and sodium addition (resin regeneration), therefore, significantly reducing life-cycle operational costs. These findings motivate the development of a spherical form of SL644. This work demonstrates the versatility of the ion exchange modeling to study the effects of resin characteristics on processing cycles, rates, and cold chemical consumption. The value of a resin with increased selectivity for cesium over potassium can be assessed for further development.

  15. Adsorption of Ba2+ by Ca-exchange clinoptilolite tuff and montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Chávez, M L; de Pablo, L; García, T A

    2010-03-15

    The adsorption of barium by Ca-exchanged clinoptilolite and montmorillonite is presented. The kinetics of adsorption of Ba(2+) were evaluated contacting 1g portion of each adsorber with 100mL 0.1N BaCl(2) for 200 h. Adsorption by Ca-clinoptilolite is defined by second-order kinetics of rate constant K(v) 8.232 x 10(-2) g mg(-1)h(-1) and maximum removal of 71.885 mg g(-1). It is a two-stage process initiated by a rapid uptake of Ba(2+) followed by more moderate kinetics. The adsorption isotherms were determined contacting 0.2g of each adsorber with 10 mL 0.1-0.005N BaCl(2)+CaCl(2) solution, Ba(2+)/Ca(2+) ratio 1, for periods of 7 days for the tuff and 2 days for the clay. The equilibrium adsorption is described by the Langmuir model, of equilibrium constant K 0.0151 L mg(-1) and maximum adsorption of 15.29 mg g(-1). The adsorption of Ba(2+) by Ca-exchanged montmorillonite also follows a second-order reaction of rate constant K(v) 3.179 x 10(-2) g mg(-1)h(-1), and calculated separation of 36.74 mg g(-1); the Langmuir isotherm is defined by the constant K 0.034 L mg(-1) and maximum adsorption of 15.29 mg g(-1). X-ray diffraction shows that the exchange of Ba(2+) modifies the d(001) of Ca-montmorillonite from 15.4 to 12.4A.

  16. Comparing Ion Exchange Adsorbents for Nitrogen Recovery from Source-Separated Urine.

    PubMed

    Tarpeh, William A; Udert, Kai M; Nelson, Kara L

    2017-02-21

    Separate collection of urine, which is only 1% of wastewater volume but contains the majority of nitrogen humans excrete, can potentially reduce the costs and energy input of wastewater treatment and facilitate recovery of nitrogen for beneficial use. Ion exchange was investigated for recovery of nitrogen as ammonium from urine for use as a fertilizer or disinfectant. Cation adsorption curves for four adsorbents (clinoptilolite, biochar, Dowex 50, and Dowex Mac 3) were compared in pure salt solutions, synthetic urine, and real stored urine. Competition from sodium and potassium present in synthetic and real urine did not significantly decrease ammonium adsorption for any of the adsorbents. Dowex 50 and Dowex Mac 3 showed nearly 100% regeneration efficiencies. Estimated ion exchange reactor volumes to capture the nitrogen for 1 week from a four-person household were lowest for Dowex Mac 3 (5 L) and highest for biochar (19 L). Although Dowex Mac 3 had the highest adsorption capacity, material costs ($/g N removed) were lower for clinoptilolite and biochar because of their substantially lower unit cost.

  17. Elucidating alkane adsorption in sodium-exchanged zeolites from molecular simulations to empirical equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pérez, E.; Torréns, I. M.; Lago, S.; Dubbeldam, D.; Vlugt, T. J. H.; Maesen, T. L. M.; Smit, B.; Krishna, R.; Calero, S.

    2005-10-01

    Configurational-bias Monte Carlo (CBMC) simulations provide adsorption isotherms, Henry coefficients and heats of adsorption of linear alkanes in sodium-exchanged MFI- and FAU-type zeolites. These simulations were carried out using our newly developed force field that reproduces experimental sodium positions in the dehydrated zeolites, and successfully predicts alkane adsorption properties over a wide range of sodium cation densities, temperatures, and pressures. We derived empirical expressions from the simulation data to describe the adsorption of linear alkanes in MFI- and FAU-type zeolites. These expressions afford a suitable substitute for complex CBMC simulations. In the low coverage regime we provide simple expressions that adequately describe the Henry coefficient and adsorption enthalpy of n-alkanes as a function of sodium density and temperature. The predicted Henry coefficients and heats of adsorption compare extremely well to available experimental data. In the high coverage regime we provide an expression for saturation capacities of linear alkanes in the zeolite. This expression, combined with the expression for the Henry coefficients, provides of the complete adsorption isotherms of pure adsorbents and mixtures, in good agreement with the adsorption isotherms obtained from CBMC.

  18. Polyphenylene sulfide based anion exchange fiber: synthesis, characterization and adsorption of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiajia; Zhang, Xin; Bai, Lingling; Yuan, Siguo

    2012-01-01

    A fibrous strong base anion exchanger (QAPPS) was prepared for the first time via chloromethylation and quaternary amination reaction of polyphenylene sulfide fiber (PPS), and its physical-chemical structure and adsorption behavior for Cr(VI) were characterized by FTIR, Energy Dispersive Spectrometry, TG-DTG, elemental analysis and batch adsorptive technique, respectively. The novel fibrous adsorbent could effectively adsorb Cr(VI) over the pH range 1-12, the maximum adsorption capacity was 166.39 mg/g at pH 3.5, and the adsorption behavior could be described well by Langmuir isotherm equation model. The adsorption kinetics was studied using pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order models, and the t1/2 and equilibrium adsorption time were 5 and 20 min respectively when initial Cr(VI) concentration was 100 mg/L. The saturated fibers could be regenerated rapidly by a mixed solution of 0.5 mol/L NaOH and 0.5 mol/L NaCl, and the adsorption capacity was well maintained after six adsorption-desorption cycles.

  19. The role of metal ion-ligand interactions during divalent metal ion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Daniel S; Crawford, Russell J; Harding, Ian H

    2015-09-15

    A suite of seven different divalent metal ions (Ca(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Mg(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II)) was adsorbed from solution onto two Fe2O3 samples, quartz SiO2 and three different amphoteric polystyrene latices (containing amine and carboxyl functional groups). For the metal oxides, a high correlation was observed between the pH at which 50% of the metal was removed from solution (pH50) and the first hydrolysis constant for the metal ion (pK1). For the polystyrene latices, a much higher correlation was observed between the pH50 and pKc (equilibrium constant describing metal-carboxyl affinity) as opposed to pK1. These observations provide evidence of a strong relationship that exists between a metal's affinity for a particular ligand in solution and for that metal ion's affinity for the same ligand present as part of an adsorbing surface. The isoelectric point of the amphoteric latex surface can be increased by decreasing the carboxyl content of the latex surface. For all 7 metal ions, this resulted in a substantial decrease, for any given pH, in adsorption. We suggest that this may be partly due to the decreased carboxyl content, but is dominantly attributable to the presence of less favorable electrostatic conditions. This, in turn, demonstrates that electrostatics play a controlling role in metal ion adsorption onto amphoteric latex surfaces and, in addition to the nature of the metal ion, also controls the pH at which adsorption takes place.

  20. Adsorption of lead ions on composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1996-04-01

    A fundamental study about the application of biopolymers to the recovery of lead from dilute solution was carried out. A membranous composite biopolymer adsorbent containing two kind of biopolymers, alginic acid (AA) and humic acid (HA), was prepared. HA, which has high solubility in water, was almost completely immobilized in the adsorbent by a combination of calcium alginate gel and activated carbon powder. A general model for complexation between divalent metal ions and acidic sites on biopolymers was applied to explain the adsorption mechanism of lead on the adsorbent (HA-M). The results showed that the complexation constants and the complexation capacities of lead-AA and lead-HA systems were scarcely influenced by immobilization.

  1. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  2. ELUTION OF URANIUM VALUES FROM ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, R.H.

    1959-11-24

    A process is described for eluting complex uranium ions absorbed on ion exchange resins. The resin is subjected to the action of an aqueous eluting solution contuining sulfuric acid and an alkali metal, ammonium, or magnesium chloride or nitrate, the elution being carried out until the desired amount of the uranium is removed from the resin.

  3. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-07

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution.

  4. Desalination of brackish waters using ion-exchange media

    SciTech Connect

    Pless, J.D.; Philips, M.L.F.; Voigt, J.A.; Moore, D.; Axness, M.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Nenoff, T.M.

    2006-06-21

    An environmentally friendly method and materials study for desalinating inland brackish waters (i.e., coal bed methane produced waters) using a set of ion-exchange materials is presented. This desalination process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps with minimal caustic waste generation. The anion-exchange material, hydrotalcite (HTC), exhibits an ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of around 3 mequiv g{sup -1}. The cation-exchange material, an amorphous aluminosilicate permutite-like material, (Na{sub x}+2yAl{sub x}Si{sub 1}-xO{sub 2+y}), has an IEC of around to 2.5 mequiv g{sup -1}. These ion-exchange materials were studied and optimized because of their specific ion-exchange capacity for the ions of interest and their ability to function in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. Room temperature, minimum pressure column studies (once-pass through) on simulant brackish water (total dissolved solids (TDS) = 2222 ppm) resulted in water containing TDS = 25 ppm. A second once-pass through column study on actual produced water (TDS = similar to 11 000) with a high carbonate concentration used an additional lime softening step and resulted in a decreased TDS of 600 ppm.

  5. Desalination of brackish waters using ion exchange media.

    SciTech Connect

    Pless, Jason D.; Krumhansl, James Lee; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Voigt, James A.; Phillips, Mark L. F.; Axness, Marlene; Moore, Diana Lynn

    2005-01-01

    An environmentally friendly method and materials study for desalinating inland brackish waters (i.e., coal bed methane produced waters) using a set of ion-exchange materials is presented. This desalination process effectively removes anions and cations in separate steps with minimal caustic waste generation. The anion-exchange material, hydrotalcite (HTC), exhibits an ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of {approx} 3 mequiv g{sup -1}. The cation-exchange material, an amorphous aluminosilicate permutite-like material, (Na{sub x+2y}Al{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}O{sub 2+y}), has an IEC of {approx}2.5 mequiv g{sup -1}. These ion-exchange materials were studied and optimized because of their specific ion-exchange capacity for the ions of interest and their ability to function in the temperature and pH regions necessary for cost and energy effectiveness. Room temperature, minimum pressure column studies (once-pass through) on simulant brackish water (total dissolved solids (TDS) = 2222 ppm) resulted in water containing TDS = 25 ppm. A second once-pass through column study on actual produced water (TDS = {approx}11,000) with a high carbonate concentration used an additional lime softening step and resulted in a decreased TDS of 600 ppm.

  6. Rate theory on water exchange in aqueous uranyl ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Liem X.; Vo, Quynh N.; Nilsson, Mikael; Nguyen, Hung D.

    2017-03-01

    We report a classical rate theory approach to predict the exchange mechanism that occurs between water and aqueous uranyl ion. Using our water and ion-water polarizable force field and molecular dynamics techniques, we computed the potentials of mean force for the uranyl ion-water pair as a function of different pressures at ambient temperature. These potentials of mean force were used to calculate rate constants using transition rate theory; the transmission coefficients also were examined using the reactive flux method and Grote-Hynes approach. The computed activation volumes are positive; thus, the mechanism of this particular water-exchange is a dissociative process.

  7. Electrical and magnetic properties of ion-exchangeable layered ruthenates

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Wataru . E-mail: wsugi@shinshu-u.ac.jp; Omoto, Masashi; Yokoshima, Katsunori; Murakami, Yasushi; Takasu, Yoshio

    2004-12-01

    An ion-exchangeable ruthenate with a layered structure, K{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 2.1}, was prepared by solid-state reactions. The interlayer cation was exchanged with H{sup +}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NH{sub 3}{sup +}, and ((C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N{sup +}) through proton-exchange, ion-exchange, and guest-exchange reactions. The electrical and magnetic properties of the products were characterized by DC resistivity and susceptibility measurements. Layered K{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 2.1} exhibited metallic conduction between 300 and 13K. The products exhibited similar magnetic behavior despite the differences in the type of interlayer cation, suggesting that the ruthenate sheet in the protonated form and the intercalation compounds possesses metallic nature.

  8. Quantitative ion-exchange separation of plutonium from impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Pietri, C.E.; Freeman, B.P.; Weiss, J.R.

    1981-09-01

    The methods used at the New Brunswick Laboratory for the quantitative ion exchange separation of plutonium from impurities prior to plutonium assay are described. Other ion exchange separation procedures for impurity determination and for isotopic abundance measurements are given. The primary technique used consists of sorption of plutonium(IV) in 8N HNO/sub 3/ on Dowex-1 anion exchange resin and elution of the purified plutonium with 0.3N HCl-0.01N HF. Other methods consist of the anion exchange separation of plutonium(IV) in 12N HCl and the cation exchange separation of plutonium(III) in 0.2 N HNO/sub 3/. The application of these procedures to the subsequent assay of plutonium, isotopic analysis, and impurity determination is described.

  9. ION EXCHANGE PERFORMANCE OF TITANOSILICATES, GERMANATES AND CARBON NANOTUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Alsobrook, A. N.; Hobbs, D. T.

    2013-04-24

    This report presents a summary of testing the affinity of titanosilicates (TSP), germanium-substituted titanosilicates (Ge-TSP) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for lanthanide ions in dilute nitric acid solution. The K-TSP ion exchanger exhibited the highest affinity for lanthanides in dilute nitric acid solutions. The Ge-TSP ion exchanger shows promise as a material with high affinity, but additional tests are needed to confirm the preliminary results. The MWCNT exhibited much lower affinities than the K-TSP in dilute nitric acid solutions. However, the MWCNT are much more chemically stable to concentrated nitric acid solutions and, therefore, may candidates for ion exchange in more concentrated nitric acid solutions. This technical report serves as the deliverable documenting completion of the FY13 research milestone, M4FT-13SR0303061 – measure actinide and lanthanide distribution values in nitric acid solutions with sodium and potassium titanosilicate materials.

  10. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm.

  11. Particle concentration effect: adsorption of divalent metal ions on coffee grounds.

    PubMed

    Utomo, Handojo Djati; Hunter, Keith A

    2010-03-01

    The adsorption of divalent metal ions Cu2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ on coffee grounds as a function of coffee grounds concentration was studied in which adsorption density decreased as the concentration of coffee grounds (C(s)) increased. Adsorption studies were conducted by equilibrating aqueous solutions of each metal ion at concentrations in the range 19-291 micromol L(-1) with coffee suspensions in the concentration range 0.971-8.738 g L(-1), with the initial pH adjusted to 5.0+/-0.1 using NaOH or HNO3. Metastable Equilibrium Adsorption theory did not adequately explain the adsorption phenomenon, except at low concentrations of coffee grounds and trace metal ions. Instead the results indicated that flocculation might reduce the surface availability thus reducing the adsorption density. The flocculation theory was confirmed after a further experiment adding dispersant sodium hexa-meta-phosphate (NaHMP) to the suspension.

  12. Dynamic and static adsorption and desorption of Hg(II) ions on chitosan membranes and spheres.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Rodrigo S; Beppu, Marisa M

    2006-05-01

    The adsorption and desorption of Hg(II) ions was studied using static and dynamic methods, employing membranes and spheres of chitosan as the adsorbent. The quantity of adsorption was influenced by chitosan crosslinking and by the adsorbent shape. The Langmuir model was applied to fit the experimental equilibrium data. Glutaraldehyde-crosslinked membranes presented a lower desorption capacity, when compared to natural membranes, but could be regenerated for use in successive cycles. Dynamic adsorption experiments suggested that the adsorption capacity depended mainly on adsorbent geometry, due to differences between surface area to mass ratio and initial concentration of Hg(II) ions. The adsorption capacity determined by the dynamic method was 65% and 77% for membranes and spheres, respectively of the value obtained static method results. A process combining dynamic adsorption and static desorption can be used to concentrate the Hg(II) ions by a factor of nearly seven (7x), when compared to the initially treated volume.

  13. Modification of porous starch for the adsorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaofei; Liu, Xueyuan; Anderson, Debbie P; Chang, Peter R

    2015-08-15

    Porous starch xanthate (PSX) and porous starch citrate (PSC) were prepared in anticipation of the attached xanthate and carboxylate groups respectively forming chelation and electrostatic interactions with heavy metal ions in the subsequent adsorption process. The lead(II) ion was selected as the model metal and its adsorption by PSX and PSC was characterized. The adsorption capacity was highly dependent on the carbon disulfide/starch and citric acid/starch mole ratios used during preparation. The adsorption behaviors of lead(II) ion on PSXs and PSCs fit both the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir isotherm equation reached 109.1 and 57.6 mg/g for PSX and PSC when preparation conditions were optimized, and the adsorption times were just 20 and 60 min, respectively. PSX and PSC may be used as effective adsorbents for removal of heavy metals from contaminated liquid.

  14. Studies on the application of temperature-responsive ion exchange polymers with whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Pankaj; Campi, Eva M; De Silva, Kirthi; Woonton, Brad W; Jackson, W Roy; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-03-18

    Several new types of temperature-responsive ion exchange resins of different polymer composition have been prepared by grafting the products from the co-polymerisation of N-phenylacrylamide, N-iso-propylacrylamide and acrylic acid derivatives onto cross-linked agarose. Analysis of the binding isotherms for these different resins obtained under batch adsorption conditions indicated that the resin based on N-iso-propylacrylamide containing 5% (w/w) N-phenylacrylamide and 5% (w/w) acrylic acid resulted in the highest adsorption capacity, Bmax, for the whey protein, bovine lactoferrin, e.g. 14 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 4 °C and 62 mg bovine lactoferrin/mL resin at 40 °C, respectively. Under dynamic loading conditions at 40 °C, 94% of the loaded bovine lactoferrin on a normalised mg protein per mL resin basis was adsorbed by this new temperature-responsive ion-exchanger, and 76% was eluted by a single cycle temperature shift to 4 °C without varying the composition of the 10mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, or the flow rate. The binding characteristics of these different ion exchange resins with bovine lactoferrin were also compared to results obtained using other resins based on N-isopropylacrylamide but contained N-tert-butylacrylamide rather than N-phenylacrylamide, where the corresponding dynamic capture and release properties for bovine lactoferrin required different temperature conditions of 20 °C and 50 °C, respectively for optimal desorption/adsorption. The cationic protein, bovine lactoperoxidase, was also adsorbed and desorbed with these temperature-responsive resins under similar conditions of changing temperature, whereas the anionic protein, bovine β-lactoglobulin, was not adsorbed under this regime of temperature conditions but instead eluted in the flow-through.

  15. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... between the isotopes of uranium causes small changes in chemical reaction equilibria that can be used as a... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange.... 110, App. E Appendix E to Part 110—Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange...

  16. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... between the isotopes of uranium causes small changes in chemical reaction equilibria that can be used as a... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange.... 110, App. E Appendix E to Part 110—Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange...

  17. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... between the isotopes of uranium causes small changes in chemical reaction equilibria that can be used as a... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange.... 110, App. E Appendix E to Part 110—Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange...

  18. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... between the isotopes of uranium causes small changes in chemical reaction equilibria that can be used as a... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange.... 110, App. E Appendix E to Part 110—Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion Exchange...

  19. Design of high efficiency fibers for ion exchange and heavy metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Lourdes

    Ion exchange materials coated on glass fiber substrates have a number of advantages over the conventional ion exchange beads. These include simplification of the overall synthesis including faster more efficient functionalization and elimination of toxic solvents. Other benefits include the ability to be fabricated in the form of felts, papers, or fabrics, improving media contact efficiency and enhancing both the rates of reaction and regeneration. In addition, physical and mechanical requirements of strength and dimensional stability are achieved by use of glass fiber substrates. Investigations were focused on design of: (1) polymeric cationic exchange fibers and their application for lead and mercury removal, (2) polymeric anionic exchange fibers and their application for arsenate removal, (3) enhancement of anionic fiber selectivity for monovalent ions over divalent ions through bulkier triaklylamine functional groups, and (4) polymeric mercaptyl fibers for the application of arsenite removal. The design and characterization of a cationic exchange fiber is described. Dynamic mode (breakthrough) experiments for calcium, lead, and mercury ion solutions are also presented. The second system consists of the preparation and characterization of anionic exchange fibers with equilibrium adsorption isotherms and dynamic mode kinetic experiments for arsenate removal. Modification of the resin with bulkier functional groups (trimethylamine, triethylamine, tripropylamine, tributylanmine), thereby effecting a change in the selectivity from divalent species to monovalent species, is considered in the separation of nitrates from sulfates. The ability of a thiol group to bind to the highly toxic arsenite ion (as is done in proteins and enzymes) provided the model used to chemically modify and characterize a polyvinyl alcohol mercaptyl fibrous system, coated on a fiberglass substrate, for the purpose of arsenite (As3+) removal from water. Physical/chemical aspects of naturally

  20. Promoting the Adsorption of Metal Ions on Kaolinite by Defect Sites: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiong; Li, Hang; Yang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Defect sites exist abundantly in minerals and play a crucial role for a variety of important processes. Here molecular dynamics simulations are used to comprehensively investigate the adsorption behaviors, stabilities and mechanisms of metal ions on defective minerals, considering different ionic concentrations, defect sizes and contents. Outer-sphere adsorbed Pb2+ ions predominate for all models (regular and defective), while inner-sphere Na+ ions, which exist sporadically only at concentrated solutions for regular models, govern the adsorption for all defective models. Adsorption quantities and stabilities of metal ions on kaolinite are fundamentally promoted by defect sites, thus explaining the experimental observations. Defect sites improve the stabilities of both inner- and outer-sphere adsorption, and (quasi) inner-sphere Pb2+ ions emerge only at defect sites that reinforce the interactions. Adsorption configurations are greatly altered by defect sites but respond weakly by changing defect sizes or contents. Both adsorption quantities and stabilities are enhanced by increasing defect sizes or contents, while ionic concentrations mainly affect adsorption quantities. We also find that adsorption of metal ions and anions can be promoted by each other and proceeds in a collaborative mechanism. Results thus obtained are beneficial to comprehend related processes for all types of minerals. PMID:26403873

  1. H/D exchange of gas phase bradykinin ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dunmin; Douglas, D J

    2003-02-01

    The gas phase H/D exchange reaction of bradykinin ions, as well as fragment ions of bradykinin generated through collisions in an orifice skimmer region, have been studied with a linear quadrupole ion trap (LIT) reflectron time-of-flight (rTOF) mass spectrometer system. The reaction in the trap takes only tens of seconds at a pressure of few mTorr of D2O or CD3OD. The exchange rate and hydrogen exchange level are not sensitive to the trapping q value over a broad range, provided q is not close to the stability boundary (q = 0.908). The relative rates and hydrogen exchange levels of protonated and sodiated +1 and +2 ions are similar to those observed previously by others with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer system. The doubly and triply protonated ions show multimodal isotopic distributions, suggesting the presence of several different conformations. The y fragment ions show greater exchange rates and levels than a or b ions, and when water or ammonia is lost from the fragment ions, no exchange is observed.

  2. Overloading ion-exchange membranes as a purification step for monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Arick; Bill, Jerome; Tully, Timothy; Radhamohan, Asha; Dowd, Chris

    2010-06-11

    The present study examined the overloading of ion-exchange membrane adsorbers, a form of frontal chromatography, as the final purification step in the production of mAbs (monoclonal antibodies) produced from CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cells. Preferential binding of impurities over antibody product was exploited using commercially available cation- and anion-exchange membranes. Three different antibody feedstreams previously purified over Protein A and ion-exchange column chromatography were tested. Feedstream conductivity and pH were adjusted to induce product and impurity adsorption. Membranes were then overloaded in a normal flow mode, resulting in retention of impurities and breakthrough of purified antibody. Although some amount of the product also binds to the membranes (usually < or =30 g mAb/l membrane), yields of > or =99% were achieved by marginalizing the losses, typically by loading more than 3 kg mAb/l membrane. Analyses of the purified pools show consistent removal of impurities despite strong mAb-ligand interactions and high membrane loadings. The clearance of host cell proteins was affected by pH and conductivity, but was unaffected by flow rate, membrane properties or scale. The importance of the present study lies in our demonstration of an alternative use of ion-exchange membranes for fast, effective and high yielding purification of mAbs.

  3. Perchlorate adsorption and desorption on activated carbon and anion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Meng, Xiaoguang; Wang, Chao; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Bang, Sunbaek; Choe, Eunyoung; Lippincott, Lee

    2009-05-15

    The mechanisms of perchlorate adsorption on activated carbon (AC) and anion exchange resin (SR-7 resin) were investigated using Raman, FTIR, and zeta potential analyses. Batch adsorption and desorption results demonstrated that the adsorption of perchlorate by AC and SR-7 resin was reversible. The reversibility of perchlorate adsorption by the resin was also proved by column regeneration test. Solution pH significantly affected perchlorate adsorption and the zeta potential of AC, while it did not influence perchlorate adsorption and the zeta potential of resin. Zeta potential measurements showed that perchlorate was adsorbed on the negatively charged AC surface. Raman spectra indicated the adsorption resulted in an obvious position shift of the perchlorate peak, suggesting that perchlorate was associated with functional groups on AC at neutral pH through interactions stronger than electrostatic interaction. The adsorbed perchlorate on the resin exhibited a Raman peak at similar position as the aqueous perchlorate, indicating that perchlorate was adsorbed on the resin through electrostatic attraction between the anion and positively charged surface sites.

  4. In Situ Investigations of Ion Exchange Processes in Microporous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Parise, J. B.; Hanson, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    The mechanism by which ions exchange in microporous and layered solids, such as zeolites and clays for example, has important implications in areas as diverse as soil fertility and environmental remediation. A detailed characterization of the ion-exchange pathway, the structural consequences of ion exchange and the specific sites involved in the course of exchange, is desirable. A probe that is both time- and structure-sensitive allows resolution of which specific sites are involved, along with the effects of different cation types on the uptake and release of ions. In order to discern the mechanism of ion exchange, it is necessary not only to observe the course of the reaction, which can now be done routinely using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction at synchrotron sources, but also to collect dynamic diffraction data of sufficient quality to allow structure refinement using Rietveld structure refinement techniques. This at present requires the collection of monochromatic data. Tradeoffs between time-resolution, peak-to-background discrimination and structural resolution are often required and depend on the problem at hand. We have developed a number of strategies for in situ ion exchange techniques that probe both structural and kinetic information from dynamic solid media. Examples include investigations of the site-specific ion-exchange mechanism in zeolite LSX using a combination of ex situ and in situ time-resolved synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, Iterative Target Transformation Factor Analysis (ITTFA) and Rietveld structural refinements. Measurement of competitive ion depletion curves showed that the newly synthesized gallosilicate TsG-1 is more selective for Sr than mineral clinoptilolite, and the structural pathway of Sr-exchange in TsG-1 was monitored by in situ and ex situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. In those cases where full structure refinement is desirable using less than optimal powder diffraction data, we found it necessary to first

  5. Properties of a Novel Ion-Exchange Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol M.; Philipp, Warren H.; Tanner, Stephen P.; Gorse, Joseph; Lusk, Amy; Taylor, Jason; Dickens, Jason

    2004-01-01

    A new ion-exchange material (based on polyacrylic acid) and some of its analytical applications have been reported. This paper contains data on the ion-exchange properties of the film form of the material and its potential application to the decontamination of waste water and drinking water. The film has a high exchange capacity of 5 to 6 meq/g and a pK(sub a) of 5.7. The calcium form is the most effective for removing metal ions from solution, and the optimum pH range is between 5 and 7. The exchange rates are slower for the film than for bead and powder forms of the ion-exchange material; otherwise, the properties are similar. The film is effective when hard water solutions are employed and also when metal ions are in the complex matrix of waste water from electroplating. The film can be used in flow systems having a flow channel large enough to allow passage of turbid solutions.

  6. Properties of a Novel Ion-Exchange Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol M.; Philipp, Warren H.; Tanner, Stephen P.; Gorse, Joseph; Lusk, Amy; Taylor, Jason; Dickens, Jason

    2002-01-01

    A new ion-exchange material (based on polyacrylic acid) and some of its analytical applications have been reported. This paper contains data on the ion-exchange properties of the film form of the material and its potential application to the decontamination of waste water and drinking water. The film has a high exchange capacity of 5 to 6 meq/g and a pK(sub a) of 5.7. The calcium form is the most effective for removing metal ions from solution, and the optimum pH range is between 5 and 7. The exchange rates are slower for the film than for bead and powder forms of the ion-exchange material; otherwise, the properties are similar. The film is effective when hard water solutions are employed and also when metal ions are in the complex matrix of waste water from electroplating. The film can be used in flow systems having a flow channel large enough to allow passage of turbid solutions.

  7. Cementation of residue ion exchange resins at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Dustin, D.F.; Beckman, T.D.; Madore, C.M.

    1998-03-03

    Ion exchange resins have been used to purify nitric acid solutions of plutonium at Rocky Flats since the 1950s. Spent ion exchange resins were retained for eventual recovery of residual plutonium, typically by incineration followed by the aqueous extraction of plutonium from the resultant ash. The elimination of incineration as a recovery process in the late 1980s and the absence of a suitable alternative process for plutonium recovery from resins led to a situation where spent ion exchange resins were simply placed into temporary storage. This report describes the method that Rocky Flats is currently using to stabilize residue ion exchange resins. The objective of the resin stabilization program is: (1) to ensure their safety during interim storage at the site, and (2) to prepare them for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Included in the discussion is a description of the safety concerns associated with ion exchange resins, alternatives considered for their stabilization, the selection of the preferred treatment method, the means of implementing the preferred option, and the progress to date.

  8. Ion exchange in KTiOPO4 crystals irradiated by copper and hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruifeng; Lu, Fei; Lian, Jie; Liu, Hanping; Liu, Xiangzhi; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Hongji

    2008-05-12

    Cs(+)-K+ ion exchanges were produced on KTiOPO4 crystals which is prior irradiated by Cu+ can H+ ions. The energy and dose of implanted Cu+ ions are 1.5 MeV and 0.5 x 10(14) ions/cm2, and that of H+ are 300 keV and 1 x 10(16) ions/cm2, respectively. The temperature of ions exchange is 430 degrees C, and the time range from 15 minutes to 30 minutes. The prism coupling method is used to measure the dark mode spectra of the samples. Compared with results of ion exchange on the sample without irradiations, both the number of guided mode and its corresponding effective refractive index are decreased. The experimental results indicate that the ion exchange rate closely related with the lattice damage and the damage layers formed in the depth of maximum nuclear energy deposition act as a barrier to block the ions diffuse into the sample and the concentration of defects can modify the speed of ion exchange..

  9. The electrochemical investigation of salts partition with ion exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Ata, Nejla; Yazicigil, Zafer; Oztekin, Yasemin

    2008-12-15

    The regenaration of acid and base from the solutions containing metallic salts was achieved by salt splitting method (SSM) using not only anion-exchange membranes (AEM) but also cation-exchange membrane (CEM). In these experiments, while the ion exchange membrane was anion-exchange membrane, acid solutions were used as an anolyte and different salts of potassium were used as a catholyte. In addition to these experiments, while the ion exchange membrane was cation-exchange membrane, base solutions were used as a catholyte and different salts of potassium were used as an anolyte. The effects of current density, initial concentrations of anolyte and catholyte solutions, the type of salt solution and the type of the ion-exchange membranes on the recovery ratio of bases and acids were investigated. The results of the experiments were investigated with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) program. The obtained results show that this technique can be used not only for recovering the acid and base wastes of industry but also for removing the impurities in order to obtain pure acids and bases in laboratory conditions.

  10. Adsorptive removal of cadmium ions by Spirulina platensis dry biomass.

    PubMed

    Al-Homaidan, Ali A; Alabdullatif, Jamila A; Al-Hazzani, Amal A; Al-Ghanayem, Abdullah A; Alabbad, Aljawharah F

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium is one of the most toxic substances found in aquatic ecosystems. This metal tends to accumulate in photosynthetic plants and fish and is transferred to humans causing many diseases. It has to be removed from our environment to reduce any health risks. Dry biomass of the microalga (cyanobacterium) Spirulina platensis was used as biosorbent for the removal of cadmium ions (Cd(2+)) from aqueous solutions. The effects of different levels of pH (3-9), biomass concentration (0.25-2 g), temperature (18-46 °C), metal concentration (40-200 mg/l) and contact time (30-120 min) were tested. Batch cultures were carried out in triplicate in an orbital shaker at 150 rpm. After centrifuging the biomass, the remaining levels of cadmium ions were measured in the supernatant by Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. Very high levels of removal, reaching up to 87.69% were obtained. The highest percentage of removal was reached at pH 8, 2 g of biosorbent, 26 °C, and 60 mg/l of cadmium concentration after 90 min of contact time. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to describe the adsorption isotherm of the metal ions by S. platensis. Langmuir model was found to be in better correlation with experimental data (R (2) = 0.92). Results of this study indicated that S. platensis is a very good candidate for the removal of heavy metals from aquatic environments. The process is feasible, reliable and eco-friendly.

  11. Adsorptive removal of cadmium ions by Spirulina platensis dry biomass

    PubMed Central

    Al-Homaidan, Ali A.; Alabdullatif, Jamila A.; Al-Hazzani, Amal A.; Al-Ghanayem, Abdullah A.; Alabbad, Aljawharah F.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is one of the most toxic substances found in aquatic ecosystems. This metal tends to accumulate in photosynthetic plants and fish and is transferred to humans causing many diseases. It has to be removed from our environment to reduce any health risks. Dry biomass of the microalga (cyanobacterium) Spirulina platensis was used as biosorbent for the removal of cadmium ions (Cd2+) from aqueous solutions. The effects of different levels of pH (3–9), biomass concentration (0.25–2 g), temperature (18–46 °C), metal concentration (40–200 mg/l) and contact time (30–120 min) were tested. Batch cultures were carried out in triplicate in an orbital shaker at 150 rpm. After centrifuging the biomass, the remaining levels of cadmium ions were measured in the supernatant by Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. Very high levels of removal, reaching up to 87.69% were obtained. The highest percentage of removal was reached at pH 8, 2 g of biosorbent, 26 °C, and 60 mg/l of cadmium concentration after 90 min of contact time. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to describe the adsorption isotherm of the metal ions by S. platensis. Langmuir model was found to be in better correlation with experimental data (R2 = 0.92). Results of this study indicated that S. platensis is a very good candidate for the removal of heavy metals from aquatic environments. The process is feasible, reliable and eco-friendly. PMID:26587009

  12. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Marsh, S. Fredric; Bartsch, Richard A.

    1997-01-01

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a ell-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  13. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Bartsch, R.A.

    1997-09-23

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a well-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  14. THERMODYNAMICS OF ION-EXCHANGED NATURAL CLINOPTILOLITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural clinoptilolite from Castle Creek, Idaho, and its cation-exchanged variants (Na-Cpt, NaK-Cpt, K-Cpt, and Ca-Cpt) were studied by high-temperature calorimetry. The hydration enthalpy for all clinoptilolites is about -30 kJ/mol H2O (liquid water reference state) at 25 C. T...

  15. Adsorption characteristics of copper, lead, zinc and cadmium ions by tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kan; Sun, Tie-heng; Sun, Li-na; Li, Hai-bo

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of heavy metals: Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) ions on tourmaline were studied. Adsorption equilibrium was established. The adsorption isotherms of all the four metal ions followed well Langmuir equation. Tourmaline was found to remove heavy metal ions efficiently from aqueous solution with selectivity in the order of Pb(II)>Cu(II)>Cd(II)>Zn(II). The adsorption of metal ions by tourmaline increased with the initial concentration of metal ions increasing in the medium. Tourmaline could also increase pH value of metal solution. -The maximum heavy metal ions adsorbed by tourmaline was found to be 78.86, 154.08, 67.25, and 66.67 mg/g for Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) and Cd(R), respectively. The temperature (25-55 degrees C) had a small effect on the adsorption capacity of tourmaline. Competitive adsorption of Cu(II), Pb(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) ions was also studied. The adsorption capacity of tourmaline for single metal decreased in the order of Pb>Cu>Zn >Cd and inhibition dominance observed in two metal systems was Pb>Cu, Pb>Zn, Pb>Cd, Cu>Zn, Cu>Cd, and Cd>Zn.

  16. Effect of surface property of activated carbon on adsorption of nitrate ion.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tatsuya; Amano, Yoshimasa; Machida, Motoi; Imazeki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the removal of acidic functional groups and introduction of basic groups/sites on activated carbons (ACs) by outgassing and ammonia gas treatment were respectively carried out to enhance the nitrate ion adsorption in aqueous solution. Then, the relationships between nitrate ion adsorption and solution pH as well as surface charge of AC were investigated to understand the basic mechanisms of nitrate ion adsorption by AC. The result showed that the nitrate ion adsorption depended on the equilibrium solution pH (pHe) and the adsorption amount was promoted with decreasing pHe. The ACs treated by outgassing and ammonia gas treatment showed larger amount of nitrate ion adsorption than that by untreated AC. These results indicated that, since basic groups/sites could adsorb protons in the solution, the AC surface would be charged positively, and that the nitrate ion would be electrically interacted with positively charged carbon surface. Accordingly, it was concluded that basic groups/sites on the surface of AC could promote nitrate ion adsorption.

  17. MINOR ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS USING ION EXCHANGERS OR IONIC LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-09-20

    This project seeks to determine if (1) inorganic-based ion exchange materials or (2) electrochemical methods in ionic liquids can be exploited to provide effective Am and Cm separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of inorganic-based ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. Furthermore, we seek to determine whether ionic liquids can serve as the electrolyte that would enable formation of higher oxidation states of Am and other actinides. Experiments indicated that pH, presence of complexants and Am oxidation state exhibit significant influence on the uptake of actinides and lanthanides by layered sodium titanate and hybrid zirconium and tin phosphonate ion exchangers. The affinity of the ion exchangers increased with increasing pH. Greater selectivity among Ln(III) ions with sodium titanate materials occurs at a pH close to the isoelectric potential of the ion exchanger. The addition of DTPA decreased uptake of Am and Ln, whereas the addition of TPEN generally increases uptake of Am and Ln ions by sodium titanate. Testing confirmed two different methods for producing Am(IV) by oxidation of Am(III) in ionic liquids (ILs). Experimental results suggest that the unique coordination environment of ionic liquids inhibits the direct electrochemical oxidation of Am(III). The non-coordinating environment increases the oxidation potential to a higher value, while making it difficult to remove the inner coordination of water. Both confirmed cases of Am(IV) were from the in-situ formation of strong chemical oxidizers.

  18. Adsorption of iodine on hydrogen-reduced silver-exchanged mordenite: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Yue; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.; DePaoli, David W.

    2016-08-03

    The adsorption process of iodine, a major volatile radionuclide in the off-gas streams of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, on hydrogen-reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z) was studied at the micro-scale. The gas-solid mass transfer and reaction involved in the adsorption process were investigated and evaluated with appropriate models. Optimal conditions for reducing the silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) in a hydrogen stream were determined. Kinetic and equilibrium data of iodine adsorption on Ag0Z were obtained by performing single-layer adsorption experiments with experimental systems of high precision at 373–473 K over various iodine concentrations. Results indicate approximately 91% to 97% of the iodine adsorption was through the silver-iodine reaction. The effect of temperature on the iodine loading capacity of Ag0Z was discussed. In conclusion, the Shrinking Core model describes the data well, and the primary rate controlling mechanisms were macro-pore diffusion and silver-iodine reaction. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 2016

  19. Adsorption of iodine on hydrogen-reduced silver-exchanged mordenite: Experiments and modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Nan, Yue; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.; DePaoli, David W.

    2016-08-03

    The adsorption process of iodine, a major volatile radionuclide in the off-gas streams of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, on hydrogen-reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z) was studied at the micro-scale. The gas-solid mass transfer and reaction involved in the adsorption process were investigated and evaluated with appropriate models. Optimal conditions for reducing the silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) in a hydrogen stream were determined. Kinetic and equilibrium data of iodine adsorption on Ag0Z were obtained by performing single-layer adsorption experiments with experimental systems of high precision at 373–473 K over various iodine concentrations. Results indicate approximately 91% to 97% of the iodine adsorption wasmore » through the silver-iodine reaction. The effect of temperature on the iodine loading capacity of Ag0Z was discussed. In conclusion, the Shrinking Core model describes the data well, and the primary rate controlling mechanisms were macro-pore diffusion and silver-iodine reaction. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 2016« less

  20. Development and evaluation of ion exchange hollow fibers. [vinyl copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    An ion exchange hollow fiber impregnated with a vinylpyridine base was developed. The basic exchange resin used to impart the necessary permselectivity to the hollow fiber is a copolymer of vinylpyridine and dibromoethane prepared according to Rembaum. A slight pressure was used to impregnate the exchange monomer mixture into the void structure of the fiber wall, and with maintenance of subambient temperatures, the rate of cross-linking is slow enough to allow the growing polymer to permeate the wall structure before significant increase in polymer molecular weight. These ion exchange fibers are produced from polyacrylonitrile hollow fibers with an appropriate wall structure that enables the impregnating vinylpyridine monomer mixture to form a truly semipermeable anion barrier after curing.

  1. ION EXCHANGE IN FUSED SALTS. IV. DISTRIBUTION OF SELECTED TRANSITION ELEMENTS IN THE CHABAZITE-MOLTEN NANO3 SYSTEM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MINERALS, ION EXCHANGE, ION EXCHANGE, FUEL CELLS, LANTHANUM, DECOMPOSITION, EUROPIUM, IONS, EQUILIBRIUM(PHYSIOLOGY), NITRATES, COBALT, DISTRIBUTION, CERIUM, SILICATES, TRANSITION METALS, MOLTEN SALT NUCLEAR REACTORS.

  2. Recovery of boric acid from ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Pollock, Charles W.

    1976-01-01

    The recovery of boric acid from an anion exchange resin is improved by eluting the boric acid with an aqueous solution of ammonium bicarbonate. The boric acid can be readily purified and concentrated by distilling off the water and ammonium bicarbonate. This process is especially useful for the recovery of boric acid containing a high percentage of .sup.10 B which may be found in some nuclear reactor coolant solutions.

  3. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  4. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    DOEpatents

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  5. Charge-exchange plasma generated by an ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The charge exchange plasma generated by an ion thruster was investigated experimentally using both 5 cm and 15 cm thrusters. Results are shown for wide ranges of radial distance from the thruster and angle from the beam direction. Considerations of test environment, as well as distance from the thruster, indicate that a valid simulation of a thruster on a spacecraft was obtained. A calculation procedure and a sample calculation of charge exchange plasma density and saturation electron current density are included.

  6. Bench-Scale Studies with Argentine Ion Exchange Material

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero-Herman, C.A.

    2002-06-28

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), as well as international atomic energy commission, facilities use ion exchange materials for purification of aqueous streams in the nuclear industry. Unfortunately, the use of the ion exchange materials creates a waste stream that can be very high in both organic and radioactive constituents. Therefore, disposal of the spent resins often becomes an economic problem because of the large volumes of resin produced and the relatively few technologies that are capable of economically stabilizing this waste. Vitrification of this waste stream presents a reasonable disposable alternative because of its inherent destruction capabilities, the volume reductions obtainable, and the durable product that it produces.

  7. Rupture loop annex ion exchange RLAIX vault deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.E.; Harris, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This engineering report documents the deactivation, stabilization and final conditions of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located northwest of the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns, piping debris, and column liquid were removed from the vault, packaged and shipped for disposal. The vault walls and floor were decontaminated, and portions of the vault were painted to fix loose contamination. Process piping and drains were plugged, and the cover blocks and rain cover were installed. Upon closure,the vault was empty, stabilized, isolated.

  8. Waste separation and pretreatment using crystalline silicotitanate ion exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Tadros, M.E.; Miller, J.E.; Anthony, R.G.

    1997-10-01

    A new class of inorganic ion exchangers called crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) has been developed jointly by Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University to selectively remove Cs and other radionuclides from a wide spectrum of radioactive defense wastes. The CST exhibits high selectivity and affinity for Cs and Sr under a wide range of conditions. Tests show it can remove part-per-million concentrations of Cs{sup +} from highly alkaline, high-sodium simulated radioactive waste solutions modeled after those at Hanford, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River. The materials exhibit ion exchange properties based on ionic size selectivity. Specifically, crystalline lattice spacing is controlled to be highly selective for Cs ions even in waste streams containing very high (5 to 10 M) concentrations of sodium. The CST technology is being demonstrated with actual waste at several DOE facilities. The use of inorganic ion exchangers. The inorganics are more resistant to chemical, thermal, and radiation degradation. Their high selectivities result in more efficient operations offering the possibility of a simple single-pass operation. In contrast, regenerable organic ion exchangers require additional processing equipment to handle the regeneration liquids and the eluant with the dissolved Cs.

  9. Ion exchange chromatography of proteins and clearance of aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yigzaw, Y; Hinckley, P; Hewig, A; Vedantham, G

    2009-06-01

    Clearance of product related aggregates in therapeutic proteins is a major focus of purification process development. A typical purification process will have one or two chromatographic steps that remove these product related aggregates to an acceptable level. Both cation exchange and anion exchange chromatography can provide robust clearance of aggregates. The primary factors that are critical for aggregate clearance are: resin chemistry, binding and elution condition, peak collection and column load factor. This review covers how these factors can be optimized to increase the effectiveness of ion exchange chromatography in removing aggregates.

  10. Insoluble polyelectrolyte and ion-exchange hollow fiber impregnated therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The number of quaternary sites and ion exchange capacity of a polyquaternary, cross linked, insoluble copolymer of a vinyl pyridine and a dihalo organic compound is increased by about 15-35% by reaction of the polymer with an amine followed by quaternization, if required. The polymer forms spontaneously in the presence of a substrate such as within the pores of a hollow fiber. The improved resin impregnated fiber may be utilized to remove ions from waste or process steams.

  11. Breakthrough performance of large proteins on ion-exchange membrane columns.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Cisneros, Rosa Maria; Lucero-Acuña, Armando; Ortega, Jaime; Guzmán, Roberto; Tejeda-Mansir, Armando

    2007-10-01

    Protein adsorption of large proteins on ion-exchange membrane columns was theoretically and experimentally investigated using batch and fixed-bed systems. Thyroglobulin was used as the model protein. The study strongly suggests that part of the protein is physically retained inside the column during frontal mode operation. These experimental results were used to obtain a filtration function of the chromatographic system. In the theoretical analysis of the frontal protein adsorption, a model was integrated by the serial coupling of the membrane-transport model, the filtration model and the system-dispersion model. Two different techniques were employed in the estimation of the maximum adsorption capacity, the equilibrium desorption constant and the forward interaction rate constant, which are the parameters of the membrane-transport model. The fit of the model to the experimental data was not possible using the equilibrium parameters obtained in the batch experiments. The parameter estimation using a simplex optimization routine coupled to the solution of the partial differential model equations yields full prediction of the adsorption phenomena.

  12. Specific ion effects on membrane potential and the permselectivity of ion exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Geise, Geoffrey M; Cassady, Harrison J; Paul, Donald R; Logan, Bruce E; Hickner, Michael A

    2014-10-21

    Membrane potential and permselectivity are critical parameters for a variety of electrochemically-driven separation and energy technologies. An electric potential is developed when a membrane separates electrolyte solutions of different concentrations, and a permselective membrane allows specific species to be transported while restricting the passage of other species. Ion exchange membranes are commonly used in applications that require advanced ionic electrolytes and span technologies such as alkaline batteries to ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis, but membranes are often only characterized in sodium chloride solutions. Our goal in this work was to better understand membrane behaviour in aqueous ammonium bicarbonate, which is of interest for closed-loop energy generation processes. Here we characterized the permselectivity of four commercial ion exchange membranes in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ammonium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, and ammonium bicarbonate. This stepwise approach, using four different ions in aqueous solution, was used to better understand how these specific ions affect ion transport in ion exchange membranes. Characterization of cation and anion exchange membrane permselectivity, using these ions, is discussed from the perspective of the difference in the physical chemistry of the hydrated ions, along with an accompanying re-derivation and examination of the basic equations that describe membrane potential. In general, permselectivity was highest in sodium chloride and lowest in ammonium bicarbonate solutions, and the nature of both the counter- and co-ions appeared to influence measured permselectivity. The counter-ion type influences the binding affinity between counter-ions and polymer fixed charge groups, and higher binding affinity between fixed charge sites and counter-ions within the membrane decreases the effective membrane charge density. As a result permselectivity decreases. The charge density and polarizability

  13. Influence of Inorganic Ions on Aggregation and Adsorption Behaviors of Human Adenovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we investigated the influence of inorganic ions on the aggregation and deposition (adsorption) behavior of human adenovirus (HAdV). Experiments were conducted to determine the surface charge and size of HAdV and viral adsorption capacity of sand in different salt c...

  14. Enhanced adsorption of mercury ions on thiol derivatized single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Narasimha Murthy; Reta, Nekane; Dalal, Habibullah; Ellis, Amanda V; Shapter, Joseph; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2013-10-15

    Thiol-derivatized single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT-SH) powders were synthesized by reacting acid-cut SWCNTs with cysteamine hydrochloride using carbodiimide coupling. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed the successful functionalization of the SWCNTs. SWCNT-SH powders exhibited a threefold higher adsorption capacity for Hg(II) ions compared to pristine SWCNTs, and a fourfold higher adsorption capacity compared to activated carbon. The influence of adsorption time, pH, initial metal concentration and adsorbent dose on Hg(II) ion removal was investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of the SWCNT-SH powders was estimated by using equilibrium isotherms, such as Freundlich and Langmuir, and the maximum adsorption capacity of the SWCNT-SH powder was found to be 131 mg/g. A first-order rate model was employed to describe the kinetic adsorption process of Hg(II) ions onto the SWCNT-SH powders. Desorption studies revealed that Hg(II) ions could be easily removed from the SWCNT-SH powders by altering the pH. Further, the adsorption efficiency of recovered SWCNT-SH powders was retained up to 91%, even after 5 adsorption/desorption cycles.

  15. Concentration profiles in heterogeneous ion-exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnova, N.M.; Glazkova, I.N.; Glukhova, L.P.; Murzinov, V.I.; Komarova, N.I.; Kvaratskheli, Yu.K.

    1982-05-10

    Concentration profiles of uranium and SO/sub 4//sup -2/ ions were determined in MKK-1 (based on KU-2 cation-exchange resin) and MAK-2 (based on AM anion-exchange resin) heterogeneous membranes in the course of diffusion and electrodialysis. The method employed for locating the position and determining the concentration of ions in a particular region of an ion-exchange material was local x-ray spectrochemical analysis with the aid of an electron probe. A solution containing 10g of U per liter and 0.5 N/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ was used as the ''transferring'' solution. Uranium is present in this solution in the form of UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ cations and (UO/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/)/sup 2 -/ and (UO/sub 2/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 3/)/sup 4 -/ anionic complexes, so that it is transported both through the cation-exchange and the anion-exchange membranes. The ''receiving'' solution was 0.1N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The REMP-2 electron probe microanalyzer was used for recording the concentration profiles. The uranium L..cap alpha../sub 1/ line (lambda = 9.1 x 10/sup -11/m) and the sulfur K..cap alpha../sub 1,2/ line (lambda = 53.7 x 10/sup -11/m) were used as the analytical lines. The membrane conductivities, and the amount of uranium sorbed were determined at the same time. This investigation confirmed that the method of local x-ray spectrochemical analysis in conjunction with physicochemical investigations of the properties of ion-exchange membranes is a promising, reliable, and rapid method for studying the mechanism of ion transport in comparison with the use of multiplet devices. It can make mathematical modelling of transport processes considerably easier and more precise, as introduction of various assumptions is obviated.

  16. 25th anniversary article: Ion exchange in colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shuchi; Kershaw, Stephen V; Rogach, Andrey L

    2013-12-23

    We review the progress in ion exchange in a variety of nanocrystal structures from the earliest accounts dating back over two decades ago to the present day. In recent years the number of groups using this method to form otherwise difficult or inaccessible nanoparticle shapes and morphologies has increased considerably and the field has experienced a resurgence of interest. Whilst most of the early work on cation exchange centered on II-VI materials, the methodology has been expanded to cover a far broader range of semiconductor nanocrystals including low toxicity I-III-VI materials and the much less facile III-V materials. The extent of exchange can be controlled leading to lightly doped nanoparticles, alloys, core-shells, segmented rods and dots-in-rods. Progress has been driven by a better understanding of the underlying principles of the exchange process - from thermodynamic factors (differences in cation solubilities); the interactions between ions and transfer agents (solvents, ligands, anions, co-dopants); ionic in-diffusion mechanisms and kinetics. More recent availability of very detailed electron microscopy coupled with image reconstruction techniques has been a valuable tool to investigate the resulting heterostructures and internal interfaces. We start by surveying the range of synthetic approaches most often used to carry out ion exchange, mainly focusing on cation replacement strategies, and then describe the rich variety of nanostructures these techniques can bring forth. We also describe some of the principles that are used to establish the relative ease of exchange and to systematically improve the process where the basic energetics are less favorable. To help further the understanding of the underlying fundamentals we have gathered together useful data from the literature on solubilities, cation and anion hardness, ligand and solvent Lewis acid or base strengths for a wide range of chemical species generally used. We offer a perspective on the

  17. Removal of aqueous cyanide with strongly basic ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Halis; Kobya, Mehmet; Khan, Eakalak; Bezbaruah, Achintya N

    2015-01-01

    The removal of cyanide (CN-) from aqueous solutions using a strongly basic ion-exchange resin, Purolite A-250, was investigated. The effects of contact time, initial CN- concentration, pH, temperature, resin dosage, agitation speed, and particle size distribution on the removal of CN- were examined. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted the Langmuir isotherm very well. The maximum CN- adsorption capacity of Purolite A-250 was found to be 44 mg CN- g(-1) resin. More than 90% CN- adsorption was achieved for most CN- solutions (50, 100, and 200 mg CN- L(-1)) with a resin dose of 2 g L(-1). The equilibrium time was ∼20 min, optimum pH was 10.0-10.5, and optimum agitation speed was 150 rpm. An increase in adsorption of CN- with increasing resin dosage was observed. Adsorption of CN- by the resin was marginally affected (maximum 4% variation) within an environmentally relevant temperature range of 20-50 °C. Fixed-bed column (20.5 mm internal diameters) experiments were performed to investigate the effects of resin bed depth and influent flow rate on breakthrough behaviour. Breakthrough occurred in 5 min for 0.60 cm bed depth while it was 340 min for 5.40 cm bed depth. Adsorption capacity was 25.5 mg CN- g(-1) for 5 mL min(-1) flow rate and 3.9 mg CN- g(-1) for 20 mL min(-1) flow rate. The research has established that the resin can be effectively used for CN- removal from aqueous solutions.

  18. Simulation model for overloaded monoclonal antibody variants separations in ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guélat, Bertrand; Ströhlein, Guido; Lattuada, Marco; Delegrange, Lydia; Valax, Pascal; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2012-08-31

    A model was developed for the design of a monoclonal antibody charge variants separation process based on ion-exchange chromatography. In order to account for a broad range of operating conditions in the simulations, an explicit pH and salt concentration dependence has been included in the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The reliability of this model was tested using experimental chromatographic retention times as well as information about the structural characteristics of the different charge variants, e.g. C-terminal lysine groups and deamidated groups. Next, overloaded isocratic elutions at various pH and salt concentrations have been performed to determine the saturation capacity of the ion-exchanger. Furthermore, the column simulation model was applied for the prediction of monoclonal antibody variants separations with both pH and salt gradient elutions. A good prediction of the elution times and peak shapes was observed, even though none of the model parameters was adjusted to fit the experimental data. The trends in the separation performance obtained through the simulations were generally sufficient to identify the most promising operating conditions. The predictive column simulation model thus developed in this work, including a set of parameters determined through specific independent experiments, was experimentally validated and offers a useful basis for a rational optimization of monoclonal antibody variants separation processes on ion-exchange chromatography.

  19. Equilibrium studies of copper ion adsorption onto palm kernel fibre.

    PubMed

    Ofomaja, Augustine E

    2010-07-01

    The equilibrium sorption of copper ions from aqueous solution using a new adsorbent, palm kernel fibre, has been studied. Palm kernel fibre is obtained in large amounts as a waste product of palm oil production. Batch equilibrium studies were carried out and system variables such as solution pH, sorbent dose, and sorption temperature were varied. The equilibrium sorption data was then analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Temkin isotherms. The fit of these isotherm models to the equilibrium sorption data was determined, using the linear coefficient of determination, r(2), and the non-linear Chi-square, chi(2) error analysis. The results revealed that sorption was pH dependent and increased with increasing solution pH above the pH(PZC) of the palm kernel fibre with an optimum dose of 10g/dm(3). The equilibrium data were found to fit the Langmuir isotherm model best, with a monolayer capacity of 3.17 x 10(-4)mol/g at 339K. The sorption equilibrium constant, K(a), increased with increasing temperature, indicating that bond strength between sorbate and sorbent increased with temperature and sorption was endothermic. This was confirmed by the increase in the values of the Temkin isotherm constant, B(1), with increasing temperature. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm parameter, free energy, E, was in the range of 15.7-16.7kJ/mol suggesting that the sorption mechanism was ion exchange. Desorption studies showed that a high percentage of the copper was desorbed from the adsorbent using acid solutions (HCl, HNO(3) and CH(3)COOH) and the desorption percentage increased with acid concentration. The thermodynamics of the copper ions/palm kernel fibre system indicate that the process is spontaneous and endothermic.

  20. Charge Exchange with Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Jeremy; Ferri, Kevin; Schmitt, Jaclyn; Hanson, Joshua; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    A detailed study of the physics of highly charged ions (HCIs) is critical for a deep understanding of observed phenomena resulting from interactions of HCIs with neutral atoms in astrophysical and fusion environments. Specifically the charge transfer rates and spectroscopy of the subsequent decay fluorescence are of great interest to these communities. Results from a laboratory based investigation of these rates will be presented. The experiment takes advantage of an energy and charge state selected beam of HCIs from the recently on-line Clemson University EBIT (CUEBIT). Progress towards an experimental apparatus for retrapping HCIs towards precision spectroscopy of HCIs will also be presented.

  1. High-resolution determination of 147Pm in urine using dynamic ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Elchuk, S; Lucy, C A; Burns, K I

    1992-10-15

    A procedure has been developed for measuring 147Pm in bioassay samples, based on the separation and preconcentration of 147Pm from the urine matrix by adsorption onto a conventional cation-exchange column with final separation and purification by HPLC using dynamic ion-exchange chromatography. The concentration of 147Pm is determined by collecting the appropriate HPLC fraction and measuring the 147Pm by liquid scintillation counting. The limit of detection is 0.1 Bq (3 fg) 147Pm based on a 500-mL sample of urine and a counting time of 30 min with a background of 100 cpm. Ten samples can be processed in 1.5-2 days.

  2. 21 CFR 173.25 - Ion-exchange resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ion-exchange resins. 173.25 Section 173.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer...

  3. Determination of boron in silicates after ion exchange separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, H.

    1955-01-01

    Existing methods for the determination of boron in silicates are not entirely satisfactory. Separation as the methyl ester is lengthy and frequently erratic. An accurate and rapid method applicable to glass, mineral, ore, and water samples uses ion exchange to remove interfering cations, and boron is determined titrimetrically in the presence of mannitol, using a pH meter to indicate the end point.

  4. Method and solvent composition for regenerating an ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Even, William R.; Irvin, David J.; Irvin, Jennifer A.; Tarver, Edward E.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Wang, James C. F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and composition for removing perchlorate from a highly selective ion exchange resin is disclosed. The disclosed approach comprises treating the resin in a solution of super critical or liquid carbon dioxide and one or more quaternary ammonium chloride surfactant compounds.

  5. EVALUATING ION EXCHANGE FOR REMOVING RADIUM FROM GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article, the second in a series, focuses on the results of bench- and pilot-scale studies of ion exchange processes for radium removal from groundwater in Lemont, Ill. Batch and column studies indicated a very high resin selectivity for radium compared with common cations. E...

  6. Copper Removal from A-01 Outfall by Ion Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.N.

    1999-02-17

    Chelex100, a commercially available ion exchange resin, has been identified in this study as having a significant affinity for copper and zinc in the A-01 outfall water. Removal of copper and zinc from A-01 outfall water will ensure that the outfall meets the state of South Carolina's limit on these heavy metals.

  7. Ion-exchanged glass waveguide amplifiers and lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, Antoine P.

    1998-04-01

    Planar devices made by ion-exchange provide efficient active or active/passive functions. Compact amplifiers with 24 dB single pass gain for a single 980 nm laser diode pumping are presented, as well as 1535 nm lasers with 27% slope efficiency.

  8. Cesium Ion Exchange Using Tank 241-AN-104 Supernate

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.

    2003-12-22

    The River Protection Project is to design and build a high level nuclear waste treatment facility. The waste treatment plant is to process millions of gallons of radioactive waste stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The high level nuclear waste treatment process includes various unit operations, such as ultrafiltration, precipitation, evaporation, ion exchange, and vitrification. Ion exchange is identified as the optimal treatment method for removal of cesium-137 and Tc-99 from the waste. Extensive ion exchange testing was performed using small-scale columns with actual waste samples. The objectives of this study were to: demonstrate SuperLig 644 ion exchange performance and process steps for the removal of cesium from actual AN-104 tank waste; pretreat actual AN-104 tank waste to reduce the concentration of cesium-137 in the waste below LAW vitrification limit; produce and characterize cesium eluate solutions for use in eluate evaporation tests. The experiments consisted of batch contact and small-scale column tests. The batch contact tests measured sorption partition coefficients Kds. The Kds were used to predict the effective resin capacity. The small-scale column tests, which closely mimic plant conditions, generated loading and elution profile data used to determine whether removal targets and design requirements were met.

  9. Thermal Analysis for Ion-Exchange Column System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si Y.; King, William D.

    2012-12-20

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of crystalline silicotitanate ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium either in a column configuration or distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the design and operation of a waste treatment process focused on treating dissolved, high-sodium salt waste solutions for the removal of specific radionuclides. The ion exchange column will be installed inside a high level waste storage tank at the Savannah River Site. After cesium loading, the ion exchange media may be transferred to the waste tank floor for interim storage. Models were used to predict temperature profiles in these areas of the system where the cesium-loaded media is expected to lead to localized regions of elevated temperature due to radiolytic decay. Normal operating conditions and accident scenarios (including loss of solution flow, inadvertent drainage, and loss of active cooling) were evaluated for the ion exchange column using bounding conditions to establish the design safety basis. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. In-tank modeling results revealed that an idealized hemispherical mound shape leads to the highest tank floor temperatures. In contrast, even large volumes of CST distributed in a flat layer with a cylindrical shape do not result in significant floor heating.

  10. A continuous heat regenerative adsorption refrigerator using spiral plate heat exchanger as adsorbers: improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.Z.; Wu, J.Y.; Xu, Y.X.

    1999-02-01

    Spiral plate heat exchangers as adsorbers have been proposed, and a prototype heat regenerative adsorption refrigerator using activated carbon-methanol pair has been developed and tested. Various improvements have been made, the authors get a specific cooling power for 2.6 kg-ice/day-kg adsorbent at the condition of generation temperature lower than 100 C. Discussions on the arrangements of thermal cycles and influences of design are shown.

  11. Adsorption of metal ions by pecan shell-based granular activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Bansode, R R; Losso, J N; Marshall, W E; Rao, R M; Portier, R J

    2003-09-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the adsorption effectiveness of pecan shell-based granular activated carbons (GACs) in removing metal ions (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+)) commonly found in municipal and industrial wastewater. Pecan shells were activated by phosphoric acid, steam or carbon dioxide activation methods. Metal ion adsorption of shell-based GACs was compared to the metal ion adsorption of a commercial carbon, namely, Calgon's Filtrasorb 200. Adsorption experiments were conducted using solutions containing all three metal ions in order to investigate the competitive effects of the metal ions as would occur in contaminated wastewater. The results obtained from this study showed that acid-activated pecan shell carbon adsorbed more lead ion and zinc ion than any of the other carbons, especially at carbon doses of 0.2-1.0%. However, steam-activated pecan shell carbon adsorbed more copper ion than the other carbons, particularly using carbon doses above 0.2%. In general, Filtrasorb 200 and carbon dioxide-activated pecan shell carbons were poor metal ion adsorbents. The results indicate that acid- and steam-activated pecan shell-based GACs are effective metal ion adsorbents and can potentially replace typical coal-based GACs in treatment of metal contaminated wastewater.

  12. Systematics of heavy-ion charge-exchange straggling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, P.; Schinner, A.

    2016-10-01

    The dependence of heavy-ion charge-exchange straggling on the beam energy has been studied theoretically for several ion-target combinations. Our previous work addressed ions up to krypton, while the present study focuses on heavier ions, especially uranium. Particular attention has been paid to a multiple-peak structure which has been predicted theoretically in our previous work. For high-Z1 and high-Z2 systems, exemplified by U in Au, we identify three maxima in the energy dependence of charge-exchange straggling, while the overall magnitude is comparable with that of collisional straggling. Conversely, for U in C, charge-exchange straggling dominates, but only two peaks lie in the energy range where we presently are able to produce credible predictions. For U-Al we find good agreement with experiment in the energy range around the high-energy maximum. The position of the high-energy peak - which is related to processes in the projectile K shell - is found to scale as Z12 , in contrast to the semi-empirical Z13/2 dependence proposed by Yang et al. Measurements for heavy ions in heavy targets are suggested in order to reconcile a major discrepancy between the present calculations and the frequently-used formula by Yang et al.

  13. A study of metal ion adsorption at low suspended-solid concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Cecily C.Y.; Davis, J.A.; Kuwabara, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure for conducting adsorption studies at low suspended solid concentrations in natural waters (<50 mg l-1) is described. Methodological complications previously associated with such experiments have been overcome. Adsorption of zinc ion onto synthetic colloidal titania (TiO2) was studied as a function of pH, supporting electrolyte (NaCl) concentration (0??1-0??002 m) and particle concentration (2-50 mg l-1). The lack of success of the Davis Leckie site bonding model in describing Zn(II) adsorption emphasizes the need for further studies of adsorption at low suspended-solid concentrations. ?? 1987.

  14. Ion-exchange behavior of alkali metals on treated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, G.; Hata, W.Y.; Tolan, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The ion-exchange behavior of trace quantities of the alkali-metal ions sodium and cesium, on activated carbon impregnated with zirconium phosphate (referred to here as ZrP), was studied. Impregnated carbon had twice as much ion-exchange activity as unimpregnated, oxidized carbon, and 10 times as much as commercial activated carbons. The distribution coefficient of sodium increased with increasing pH; the distribution coefficient of cesium decreased with increasing pH. Sodium and cesium were separated with an electrolytic solution of 0.1 M HCl. Preliminary studies indicated that 0.2 M potassium and cesium can also be separated. Distribution coefficients of the supported ZrP were determined by the elution technique and agreed within 20% of the values for pure ZrP calculated from the literature.

  15. Separation of americium from curium by oxidation and ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jonathan D; Shehee, Thomas C; Clearfield, Abraham; Hobbs, David T

    2012-08-21

    Nuclear energy has the potential to be a clean alternative to fossil fuels, but in order for it to play a major role in the US, many questions about the back end of the fuel cycle must be addressed. One of these questions is the difficult separation of americium from curium. Here, we report the oxidation of Am in two systems, perchloric acid and nitric acid and the affect of changing the acid has on the oxidation. K(d) values were observed and a direct separation factor was calculated and was seen to be as high as 20 for four metal(IV) pillared phosphate phosphonate inorganic organic hybrid ion exchange materials. These ion exchangers are characterized by very low selectivity for cations with low charge but extremely high uptake of ions of high charge.

  16. Graphene/Ionic Liquid Composite Films and Ion Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yufei; Wan, Yunfang; Chau, Alicia; Huang, Fuchuan

    2014-01-01

    Wettability of graphene is adjusted by the formation of various ionic surfaces combining ionic liquid (IL) self-assembly with ion exchange. The functionalized ILs were designed and synthesized with the goal of obtaining adjustable wettability. The wettability of the graphene surface bearing various anions was measured systematically. The effect of solvent systems on ion exchange ratios on the graphene surface has also been investigated. Meanwhile, the mechanical properties of the graphene/IL composite films were investigated on a nanometer scale. The elasticity and adhesion behavior of the thin film was determined with respected to the indentation deformation by colloid probe nanoindentation method. The results indicate that anions played an important role in determining graphene/IL composite film properties. In addition, surface wetting and mechanics can be quantitatively determined according to the counter-anions on the surface. This study might suggest an alternate way for quantity detection of surface ions by surface force. PMID:24970602

  17. Oxygen-isotope exchange rates for three isostructural polyoxometalate ions.

    PubMed

    Villa, Eric M; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H

    2010-04-14

    We compare oxygen-isotope exchange rates for all structural oxygens in three polyoxoniobate ions that differ by systematic metal substitutions of Ti(IV) --> Nb(V). The [H(x)Nb(10)O(28)]((6-x)-), [H(x)TiNb(9)O(28)]((7-x)-), and [H(x)Ti(2)Nb(8)O(28)]((8-x)-) ions are all isostructural yet have different Brønsted properties. Rates for sites within a particular molecule in the series differ by at least approximately 10(4), but the relative reactivities of the oxygen sites rank in nearly the same relative order for all ions in the series. Within a single ion, most structural oxygens exhibit rates of isotopic exchange that vary similarly with pH, indicating that each structure responds as a whole to changes in pH. Across the series of molecules, however, the pH dependencies for isotope exchanges and dissociation are distinctly different, reflecting different contributions from proton- or base-enhanced pathways. The proton-enhanced pathway for isotope exchange dominates at most pH conditions for the [H(x)Ti(2)Nb(8)O(28)]((8-x)-) ion, but the base-enhanced pathways are increasingly important for the [H(x)TiNb(9)O(28)]((7-x)-) and [H(x)Nb(10)O(28)]((6-x)-) structures at higher pH. The local effect of Ti(IV) substitution could be assessed by comparing rates for structurally similar oxygens on each side of the [H(x)TiNb(9)O(28)]((7-x)-) ion and is surprisingly small. Interestingly, these nanometer-size structures seem to manifest the same general averaged amphoteric chemistry that is familiar for other reactions affecting oxides in water, including interface dissolution by proton- and hydroxyl-enhanced pathways.

  18. Using ion exchange chromatography to purify a recombinantly expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Gabelli, Sandra B

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography (IEX) separates molecules by their surface charge, a property that can vary vastly between different proteins. There are two types of IEX, cation exhange and anion exchange chromatography. The protocol that follows was designed by the authors for anion exchange chromatography of a recombinantly expressed protein having a pI of 4.9 and containing two cysteine residues and one tryptophan residue, using an FPLC system. Prior to anion exchange, the protein had been salted out using ammonium sulfate precipitation and partially purified via hydrophobic interaction chromatography (see Salting out of proteins using ammonium sulfate precipitation and Use and Application of Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography for Protein Purification). Slight modifications to this protocol may be made to accommodate both the protein of interest and the availability of equipment.

  19. Preparation and copper ions adsorption properties of thiosemicarbazide chitosan from squid pens.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yue-Cheng; Wang, Hong-Peng; Gohar, Faryal; Ullah, Muhammad Haseeb; Zhang, Xiang; Xie, Dong-Fang; Fang, Hui; Huang, Jun; Yang, Jun-Xing

    2017-02-01

    Chitosan was prepared by alkaline N-deacetylation of β-chitin from squid pens. Thiosemicarbazide group was introduced to chitosan via formaldehyde-derived linkages, and thiosemicarbazide chitosan (TSFCS) with different degrees of substitution (DS) was synthesized. The DS values of TSFCS calculated by elemental analysis were 0.19, 0.36 and 0.63. The structure of the TSFCS was confirmed by elemental analysis, FTIR, XRD, TGA and SEM. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) ions by TSFCS showed good correlation with the DS and pH (pH range 2.2-5.8). The maximum Cu(II) ions adsorption capacity of all three TSFCS samples reached 134.0mgg(-1) at pH 3.6, but chitosan showed no adsorption at this pH. The adsorption equilibrium process of Cu(II) ions onto TSFCS was better described by the Langmuir model than the Freundlich isotherm model. Cu(II) ions adsorbed by TSFCS could be released using 0.01M Na2EDTA and the adsorption capacity could retain above 80% after five adsorption-desorption cycles. TSFCS exhibited good potential for heavy metal removal because of its high adsorption capacity at the low pH.

  20. Adsorption of chromate and cupric ions onto chitosan-coated cotton gauze.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Franco; Tonetti, Cinzia; Periolatto, Monica

    2014-09-22

    A chitosan-coated cotton gauze was prepared by UV-curing and tested as adsorbent to remove copper (II) and chromium (VI) ions from water solutions. The adsorbent characterization was carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy in Attenuated Total Reflection (FTIR-ATR). Adsorption of copper and chromium ions onto the gauze was tested in batch process at different experimental conditions. The effects of pH, temperature, contact time and metal ion concentration were investigated. The optimum adsorption took place at pH 3 for Cr(VI) and pH 5 for Cu(II) ions respectively, while the temperature did not affect the adsorption process. Pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models were used to investigate the adsorption kinetics which was found very fast and better described by the pseudo-second order model for both metal ions. The adsorption of Cr(VI) ions was satisfactory described by the Langmuir isotherm, while that of Cu(II) ions showed a better agreement with the Freundlich model.

  1. Highly sensitive determination of hydrazine ion by ion-exclusion chromatography with ion-exchange enhancement of conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Xu, Qun; Ikedo, Mikaru; Taoda, Hiroshi; Hu, Wenzhi

    2004-06-11

    An ion-exclusion chromatography method with ion-exchange enhancement of conductivity was developed for the selective separation and sensitive determination of hydrazine ion from alkali/alkaline earth metal cations and ammonium ion. Hydrazine ion was separated by ion-exclusion/penetration effect from other cations on a weakly basic anion-exchange column in the OH- form (TSKgel DEAE-5PW). Moreover, two different ion-exchange resin columns were inserted between the separating column and conductimetric detector in order to improve the sensitivity of hydrazine ion. The first enhancement column packed with a strongly basic anion-exchange resin in the SO4(2-) form (TSKgel SAX) for hydrazine ion can convert from N2H5OH to (N2H5)2SO4. Moreover, the second enhancement column packed with a strongly acidic cation-change resin in the H+ form (TSKgel SCX) can convert to H2SO4. As a result, the sensitivity of hydrazine ion using two conductivity enhancement columns could be 26.8-times greater than using the separating column alone. This method was effectiveness also for the enhancement of ammonium ion (6.1-times) and sodium ion (1.2-times). The calibration graph of hydrazine ion detected as H2SO4 was linear over the concentration range of 0.001-100 ppm (r2 = 0.9988). The detection limit of hydrazine ion in this system was 0.64 ppb. Therefore, hydrazine ion in real boiler water sample could be accurately determined, avoiding the interference of other cations.

  2. Studies on the solid-state ion exchange of nickel ions into zeolites using DRS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanjanchi, M. A.; Ebrahimian, A.

    2004-05-01

    The coordination of Ni 2+ ions in the dehydrated nickel-exchanged zeolites was investigated from the analysis of diffuse reflectance spectra. Solid-state ion exchange method was used to prepare nickel-containing mordenite, Y, L and mazzite zeolites. In the dehydrated mordenite and zeolite Y, nickel cations are presented in both forms of tetrahedral and distorted tetrahedral symmetries. The relative amount of tetrahedral and distorted tetrahedral nickel species are related to the heating temperature and heating time used for calcinations. In the dehydrated zeolite L and mazzite, Ni 2+ ions are mainly in the distorted octahedral symmetries.

  3. METHOD OF SEPARATING RARE EARTHS BY ION EXCHANGE

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Powell, J.E.

    1960-10-18

    A process is given for separating yttrium and rare earth values having atomic numbers of from 57 through 60 and 68 through 71 from an aqueous solution whose pH value can range from 1 to 9. All rare earths and yttrium are first adsorbed on a cation exchange resin, and they are then eluted with a solution of N-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) in the order of decreasing atomic number, yttrium behaving like element 61; the effluents are collected in fractions. The HEDTA is recovered by elution with ammonia solution and the resin is regenerated with sulfuric acid. Rare earths are precipitated from the various effluents with oxalic acid, and each supernatant is passed over cation exchange resin for adsorption of HEDTA and nonprecipitated rare earths: the oxalic acid is not retained by the resin.

  4. The effect of the adsorption of metal ions on the interfacial behavior of silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.; Fuerstenau, D.W.

    1997-08-01

    Because of its importance in the fields of environmental and mineral engineering, the adsorption mechanism of metal ions on oxides has been studied rather extensively using such techniques as titration, adsorption isotherm determination, flotation and spectroscopy. However, limited work has been done to compare the behavior of hydrophilic silicates with those that are naturally hydrophobic. This investigation was undertaken to provide a better understanding of the adsorption mechanism of selected metal ions at the solid/liquid interface through simultaneous measurements of zeta potentials, adsorption densities and turbidity on colloidal suspension of two silicate minerals, as a function of pH, to delineate the effect of hydrophobicity and surface heterogeneity on these processes. In present investigation, quartz and talc are selected as model minerals and lead and cadmium are chosen as the metal ions to investigate because of their importance in industry application.

  5. Electrophoretic Mobility Study of the Adsorption of Alkyl Xanthate Ions on Galena and Sphalerite.

    PubMed

    Song, S.; Lopez-Valdivieso, A.; Ojeda-Escamilla, M. C.

    2001-05-01

    The adsorption of ethyl and amyl xanthate ions on galena and sphalerite fines has been studied using electrophoretic light-scattering (ELS) measurements. It was performed on galena and sphalerite (<2&mgr;m) in aqueous solution at different potassium ethyl xanthate (PEX) and potassium amyl xanthate (PAX) concentrations. It has been observed that the presence of PEX or PAX caused the isoelectric points (IEP) of galena and sphalerite fines to shift and the electrophoretic mobility to reverse in sign, indicating that the xanthate ions chemisorbed on galena and sphalerite surfaces. This adsorption markedly broadened the electrophoretic mobility distribution of the mineral fines, suggesting that the populations of the particles have quite different adsorption densities of xanthate ions, and therefore the particle hydrophobicity was different. This phenomenon might be attributable to the effect of the hemimicelle adsorption of the xanthate ions on the minerals, the nonuniform distribution of active sites and their degree of activity, the effect of particle size and shape, etc. The nonuniform adsorption has been found to increase with increasing PEX or PAX concentration, reaching a maximum at a medium concentration followed by a decline. Also, experimental results have demonstrated that the nonuniform adsorption of the xanthate ions is much stronger on sphalerite than on galena, which may explain why sphalerite has a worse flotation response than galena when alkyl xanthates are used as collectors in flotation systems. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. Mechanism of extracellular ion exchange and binding-site occlusion in a sodium/calcium exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jun; Marinelli, Fabrizio; Lee, Changkeun; Huang, Yihe; Faraldo-Gomez, Jose D.; Jiang, Youxing

    2016-05-16

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers utilize the Na+ electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane to extrude intracellular Ca2+, and play a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis. Here, we elucidate their mechanisms of extracellular ion recognition and exchange through a structural analysis of the exchanger from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX_Mj) bound to Na+, Ca2+ or Sr2+ in various occupancies and in an apo state. This analysis defines the binding mode and relative affinity of these ions, establishes the structural basis for the anticipated 3:1Na+/Ca2+ exchange stoichiometry, and reveals the conformational changes at the onset of the alternating-access transport mechanism. An independent analysis of the dynamics and conformational free-energy landscape of NCX_Mj in different ion-occupancy states, based on enhanced-sampling molecular-dynamics simulations, demonstrates that the crystal structures reflect mechanistically relevant, interconverting conformations. Lastly, these calculations also reveal the mechanism by which the outward-to-inward transition is controlled by the ion-occupancy state, thereby explaining the emergence of strictly-coupled Na+/Ca2+ antiport.

  7. Mechanism of extracellular ion exchange and binding-site occlusion in the sodium-calcium exchanger

    PubMed Central

    Lee, ChangKeun; Huang, Yihe; Faraldo-Gómez, José D.; Jiang, Youxing

    2016-01-01

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers utilize the Na+ electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane to extrude intracellular Ca2+, and play a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis. Here, we elucidate their mechanisms of extracellular ion recognition and exchange through a structural analysis of the exchanger from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX_Mj) bound to Na+, Ca2+ or Sr2+ in various occupancies and in an apo state. This analysis defines the binding mode and relative affinity of these ions, establishes the structural basis for the anticipated 3Na+:1Ca2+ exchange stoichiometry, and reveals the conformational changes at the onset of the alternating-access transport mechanism. An independent analysis of the dynamics and conformational free-energy landscape of NCX_Mj in different ion-occupancy states, based on enhanced-sampling molecular-dynamics simulations, demonstrates that the crystal structures reflect mechanistically relevant, interconverting conformations. These calculations also reveal the mechanism by which the outward-to-inward transition is controlled by the ion-occupancy state, thereby explaining the emergence of strictly-coupled Na+/Ca2+ antiport. PMID:27183196

  8. Mechanism of extracellular ion exchange and binding-site occlusion in a sodium/calcium exchanger

    DOE PAGES

    Liao, Jun; Marinelli, Fabrizio; Lee, Changkeun; ...

    2016-05-16

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers utilize the Na+ electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane to extrude intracellular Ca2+, and play a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis. Here, we elucidate their mechanisms of extracellular ion recognition and exchange through a structural analysis of the exchanger from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX_Mj) bound to Na+, Ca2+ or Sr2+ in various occupancies and in an apo state. This analysis defines the binding mode and relative affinity of these ions, establishes the structural basis for the anticipated 3:1Na+/Ca2+ exchange stoichiometry, and reveals the conformational changes at the onset of the alternating-access transport mechanism. An independent analysis of the dynamicsmore » and conformational free-energy landscape of NCX_Mj in different ion-occupancy states, based on enhanced-sampling molecular-dynamics simulations, demonstrates that the crystal structures reflect mechanistically relevant, interconverting conformations. Lastly, these calculations also reveal the mechanism by which the outward-to-inward transition is controlled by the ion-occupancy state, thereby explaining the emergence of strictly-coupled Na+/Ca2+ antiport.« less

  9. Field performance of GCL under ion exchange conditions

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.N.; Fullerton, D.; Drake, R.

    1997-10-01

    Five Victorian reservoirs of brick pillar and arch construction were renovated using geosynthetic clay liners (also called bentonite/geosynthetic composites) (GCL) as roof sealing materials. The GCL was predominantly sodium bentonite and contained some 2% of calcite. GCLs were laid on leveled, original puddled clay packed between and above the brick arches. There was an overlying gravel layer connected to a drainage system that, in turn, was covered with soil and seeded with grass. Leaks through roofs into stored potable water were discovered. Excavation and exposure of the GCL showed that they were finely cracked in many places. Samples of the GCL bentonite from several locations at each of five sites had a high moisture content. Also, the GCL had a much reduced exchangeable sodium and increased exchangeable calcium content when compared to the dry unused GCL. Laboratory experiments, lasting for a limited period, were carried out to simulate operating conditions of the GCL whereby water falling on the ground and reaching the GCL flowed across the GCL in the overlying gravel layer to collector drains. Similar but less extensive ion exchange, calcium for sodium, was found here also. The evidence demonstrates that calcium from calcite, contained in the GCL bentonite, exchanged with sodium and, in so doing, contributed to shrinkage and cracking. Supplementary sources of calcium for ion exchange probably came from overlying calcareous soil and water from firehoses used to field test the integrity of the GCL.

  10. Charge-exchange plasma generated by an ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    The use of high voltage solar arrays greatly reduces or eliminates power processing requirements in space electric propulsion systems. This use also requires substantial areas of solar array to be at high positive potential relative to space and most of the spacecraft. The charge exchange plasma conducts electrons from the ion beam to such positive surfaces, and thereby electrically load the high voltage solar array. To evaluate this problem, the charge-exchange plasma generated by an ion beam was investigated experimentally. Based upon the experimental data, a simple model was derived for the charge-exchange plasma. This model is conservative in the sense that both the electron/ion density and the electron current density should be equal to, or less than, the preducted value for all directions in the hemisphere upstream of the ion beam direction. Increasing the distance between a positive potential surface (such as a high voltage solar array) and the thruster is the simplest way to control interactions. Both densities and currents vary as the inverse square of this distance.

  11. Adsorption of ammonium ion by coconut shell-activated carbon from aqueous solution: kinetic, isotherm, and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, Ramasamy; Karthikeyan, Sekar; Mandal, Asit Baran; Sekaran, Ganesan

    2013-01-01

    Ammonium ions are one of the most encountered nitrogen species in polluted water bodies. High level of ammonium ion in aqueous solution imparts unpleasant taste and odor problems, which can interfere with the life of aquatics and human population when discharged. Many chemical methods are developed and being used for removal of ammonium ion from aqueous solution. Among various techniques, adsorption was found to be the most feasible and environmentally friendly with the use of natural-activated adsorbents. Hence, in this study, coconut shell-activated carbon (CSAC) was prepared and used for the removal of ammonium ion by adsorption techniques. Ammonium chloride (analytical grade) was purchased from Merck Chemicals for adsorption studies. The CSAC was used to adsorb ammonium ions under stirring at 100 rpm, using orbital shaker in batch experiments. The concentration of ammonium ion was estimated by ammonia distillate, using a Buchi distillation unit. The influence of process parameters such as pH, temperature, and contact time was studied for adsorption of ammonium ion, and kinetic, isotherm models were validated to understand the mechanism of adsorption of ammonium ion by CSAC. Thermodynamic properties such as ∆G, ∆H, and ∆S were determined for the ammonium adsorption, using van't Hoff equation. Further, the adsorption of ammonium ion was confirmed through instrumental analyses such as SEM, XRD, and FTIR. The optimum conditions for the effective adsorption of ammonium ion onto CSAC were found to be pH 9.0, temperature 283 K, and contact time 120 min. The experimental data was best followed by pseudosecond order equation, and the adsorption isotherm model obeyed the Freundlich isotherm. This explains the ammonium ion adsorption onto CSAC which was a multilayer adsorption with intraparticle diffusion. Negative enthalpy confirmed that this adsorption process was exothermic. The instrumental analyses confirmed the adsorption of ammonium ion onto CSAC.

  12. Demonstration of an Ion Exchange Resin Addition/Removal System with Superlig 659

    SciTech Connect

    Norato, M.A.

    2000-12-19

    A pilot facility was designed and built in the Thermal Fluids Laboratory at the Savannah River Technology Center to demonstrate the slurry transport of ion exchange resins in and out of ion exchange columns.

  13. Competitive adsorption of malachite green and Pb ions on natural zeolite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Ariyanto, Eko

    2007-10-01

    A natural zeolite was employed as adsorbent for removal of malachite green and Pb(2+) ions from aqueous solution. A batch system was applied to study the adsorption behaviour of the dye and heavy metal in single and binary systems on the natural zeolite. Kinetic studies indicate that malachite green and Pb(2+) adsorption on the natural zeolite in a single component system follows the first-order kinetics and the adsorption is diffusion process with single-stage for Pb(2+) and two-stage for malachite green. For the single system, malachite green adsorption isotherm follows the Langmuir model while Pb adsorption follows the Freundlich isotherm. The adsorption capacities of malachite green and Pb at 30 degrees C, pH 6 are 5x10(-5) and 10x10(-5)mol/g, respectively. In the binary system, malachite green and Pb(2+) exhibit competitive adsorption on the natural zeolite. The adsorption is reduced to 90 and 80% of single component of Pb(2+) and malachite green, respectively. However, the total adsorption is higher. In the binary system, Pb(2+) exhibits relative higher affinity and selectivity to be adsorbed on zeolite. The dynamic adsorption of malachite green and Pb(2+) still follows the first-order kinetics.

  14. Construction of adsorptive nanorods from polyoxometalates and ionic liquid and their adsorption properties for silver ion from AMD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huixin; Zhang, Jie; Cui, Manli; Jin, Xiu-Hong; Han, Xu; Wang, Youchen

    A new structure of hybrid nanorods adsorbent ([n-BBIM]9PW9O34) was synthesized by a simple molecular assembly of polyoxometalates with ionic liquids (ILs). The nanocomposite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis), scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffractometer. Adsorption of silver from acid mine drainage (AMD) was studied using batch experiments. The impact of several parameters, like ion concentration, pH, adsorbent dosage, and temperature was elucidated and optimization was carried out by single-factor experiment and response surface methodology. Analysis of variance of the quadratic model suggested that experimental data were excellently fitted to the quadratic model. Optimum conditions for removal of Ag(+) from AMD were determined to be an initial concentration 143 mg/L, adsorbent dosage 2.69 g/L, temperature 35 °C to achieve the maximum adsorption of Ag(+) 99.03%, which was very close to the predicted value (100%). The adsorption was confirmed as oxidation-reduction mechanism following a complexation process, and has been verified according to results from FT-IR and UV-vis spectra. The selective experiment suggested that the nanorods adsorbent could adsorb silver ions in AMD well. Based on the adsorption/desorption study result, the adsorbent can be efficiently recovered.

  15. Vanadium removal and recovery from bauxite residue leachates by ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helena I; Jones, Ashley; Rogerson, Mike; Burke, Ian T; Mayes, William M

    2016-11-01

    Bauxite residue is an important by-product of the alumina industry, and current management practices do not allow their full valorisation, especially with regard to the recovery of critical metals. This work aims to test the efficiency of ion exchange resins for vanadium (V) removal and recovery from bauxite residue leachates at alkaline pH (11.5 and 13). As an environmental pollutant, removal of V from leachates may be an obligation of bauxite residue disposal areas (BRDA) long-term management requirements. Vanadium removal from the leachate can be coupled with the recovery, and potentially can be used to offset long-term legacy treatment costs in legacy sites. Kinetics studies were performed to understand the adsorption process. The rate kinetics for the V adsorption was consistent with the pseudo-first-order kinetic model, with a higher adsorption rate for pH 11.5 (1.2 min(-1)). Adsorption isotherm data fitted better to Freundlich equations than to the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity (Langmuir value q max) was greatest for pH 13 (9.8 mg V g(-1) resin). In column tests, breakthrough was reached at 70 bed volumes with the red mud leachate at pH 13, while no breakthrough was achieved with the effluent at pH 11.5. In regeneration, 42 and 76 % of V were eluted from the resin with 2 M NaOH from the red mud leachate at pH 13 and 11.5, respectively. Further optimization will be needed to upscale the treatment.

  16. Characterization of magnetic ion-exchange composites for protein separation from biosuspensions.

    PubMed

    Käppler, Tobias E; Hickstein, Birgit; Peuker, Urs A; Posten, Clemens

    2008-06-01

    Downstream processing is a major issue in biotechnological production. A multitude of unit operations with nonsatisfying yield are often used to reach the desired product purity. Direct recovery technologies such as high-gradient magnetic fishing (HGMF) are advantageous because of their ability to separate the desired product in early stages from crude cultivation broths. However, the use of magnetic particles to capture valuable biotechnological products is often linked to the drawback that support particles are expensive and not available in greater quantities. This current work presents new composite magnetic particles that can be used in biotechnology. They are manufactured by a spray drying process. During this process, the nanosized magnetite particles as well as functional ion-exchange nanoparticles are integrated into one particle in which they are linked by a matrix polymer. The production procedure is flexible, scalable, and therefore economical. These particles have good adsorption capacities of up to 85 mg/g adsorbed protein and good binding kinetics. They are resistant to harsh conditions such as short ultrasonic treatment or extreme pHs. In order to test their usefulness in biosuspensions, model proteins were separated using these particles. The anion and cation exchanger particles separated lysozyme (LZ) or BSA from cultivation suspensions. The selectivity of recovery was dependent on other proteins present as is usual for ion-exchange binding mechanisms.

  17. Ion-Exchange Membranes Prepared Using Layer-by-Layer Polyelectrolyte Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanqing; Dotzauer, David M.; Bruening, Merlin L

    2010-01-01

    Layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte adsorption in porous polymeric membranes provides a simple way to create ion-exchange sites without greatly decreasing hydraulic permeability (<20% reduction in permeability). At 80% breakthrough, membranes coated with 3-bilayer poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS)/polyethyleneimine (PEI) films bind 37±6 mg of negatively charged Au colloids per mL of membrane volume. The binding capacity of membranes coated with 1-bilayer films decreases in the order PSS/PEI>PSS/poly(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride)>PSS/poly(allylamine hydrochloride). Films terminated with a polyanion present cation-exchange sites that bind lysozyme, and the lysozyme-binding capacities of (PSS/PEI)3/PSS films increase with the ionic strength of the solution from which the last PSS layer is deposited. Charge screening during deposition of the terminal PSS layer gives rise to a larger number of ion-exchange sites and lysozyme binding capacities as high as 16 mg per mL of membrane. At 10% breakthrough, a stack of 3 membranes binds 3 times as much lysozyme as a single membrane, showing that stacking is an effective way to increase capacity. PMID:20606722

  18. Ionic strength-dependent changes in tentacular ion exchangers with variable ligand density. I. Structural properties.

    PubMed

    Bhambure, Rahul; Gillespie, Christopher M; Phillips, Michael; Graalfs, Heiner; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-09-09

    The ligand density critically affects the performance of ion-exchange resins in such measures as the adsorption capacity and transport characteristics. However, for tentacular and other polymer-modified exchangers, the mechanistic basis of the effect of ligand density on performance is not yet fully understood. In this study we map the ionic strength-dependent structural changes in tentacular cation exchangers with variable ligand densities as the basis for subsequent investigation of effects on functional properties. Inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to assess the effect of ionic strength on the pore size and intraparticle architecture of resin variants with different ligand densities. Comparison of ISEC and cryo-SEM results shows a considerable reduction in average pore size with increasing ligand density; these methods also confirm an increase of average pore size at higher ionic strengths. SAXS analysis of ionic strength-dependent conformational changes in the grafted polyelectrolyte layer shows a characteristic ionomer peak at values of the scattering vector q (0.1-0.2Å(-1)) that depend on the ligand density and the ionic strength of the solution. This peak attribution reflects nanoscale changes in the structure of the grafted polyelectrolyte chains that can in turn be responsible for observed pore-size changes in the resins. Finally, salt breakthrough experiments confirm a stronger Donnan exclusion effect on pore accessibility for small ions in the high ligand density variant.

  19. Membrane consisting of polyquaternary amine ion exchange polymer network interpenetrating the chains of thermoplastic matrix polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Wallace, C. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An ion exchange membrane was formed from a solution containing dissolved matrix polymer and a set of monomers which are capable of reacting to form a polyquaternary ion exchange material; for example vinyl pyride and a dihalo hydrocarbon. After casting solution and evaporation of the volatile component's, a relatively strong ion exchange membrane was obtained which is capable of removing anions, such as nitrate or chromate from water. The ion exchange polymer forms an interpenetrating network with the chains of the matrix polymer.

  20. Adsorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution by carboxylated cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaolin; Tong, Shengrui; Ge, Maofa; Wu, Lingyan; Zuo, Junchao; Cao, Changyan; Song, Weiguo

    2013-05-01

    A novel nanoadsorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions is reported. Cotton was first hydrolyzed to obtain cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). CNCs were then chemically modified with succinic anhydride to obtain SCNCs. The sodic nanoadsorbent (NaSCNCs) was further prepared by treatment of SCNCs with saturated NaHCO3 aqueous solution. Batch experiments were carried out with SCNCs and NaSCNCs for the removal of Pb2+ and Cd2+. The effects of contact time, pH, initial adsorption concentration, coexisting ions and the regeneration performance were investigated. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption equilibrium time of Pb2+ and Cd2+ was reached within 150 min on SCNCs and 5 min on NaSCNCs. The adsorption capacities of Pb2+ and Cd2+ on SCNCs and NaSCNCs increased with increasing pH. The adsorption isotherm was well fitted by the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacities of SCNCs and NaSCNCs for Pb2+ and Cd2+ were 367.6 mg/g, 259.7 mg/g and 465.1 mg/g, 344.8 mg/g, respectively. SCNCs and NaSCNCs showed high selectivity and interference resistance from coexisting ions for the adsorption of Pb2+. NaSCNCs could be efficiently regenerated with a mild saturated NaCl solution with no loss of capacity after two recycles. The adsorption mechanisms of SCNCs and NaSCNCs were discussed.

  1. Enigmatic ion-exchange behavior of myo-inositol phosphates.

    PubMed

    Shelor, C Phillip; Liao, Hongzhu; Kadjo, Akinde Florence; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2015-05-05

    The separation of myo-inositol mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, pentakis-, and hexakisphosphate (InsP1, InsP2, InsP3, InsP4, InsP5, InsP6) was carried out using hydroxide eluent ion chromatography. Acid hydrolysis of InsP6 (phytate) was used to prepare a distribution of InsPs, ranging from InsP1 to InsP5's and including unhydrolyzed InsP6. Counting all possible positional isomers (many of which have stereoisomers that will not be separable by conventional ion exchange), 40 chromatographically separable peaks are possible; up to 22 were separated and identified by mass spectrometry. InsPs show unusual ion-exchange behavior in two respects: (a) the retention order is not monotonically related with the charge on the ion and (b) at the same hydroxide eluent concentration, retention is greatly dependent on the eluent metal cation. The retention of InsP3-InsP6 was determined to be controlled by steric factors while elution was influenced by eluent cation complexation. These highly phosphorylated InsPs have a much greater affinity for alkali metals (Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+)) than quaternary ammonium ions. This difference in cation affinity was exploited to improve separation through the use of a tetramethylammonium hydroxide-sodium hydroxide gradient.

  2. Ion exchange at the critical point of solution.

    PubMed

    Savoy, J D; Baird, J K; Lang, J R

    2016-03-11

    A mixture of isobutyric acid (IBA)+water has an upper critical point of solution at 26.7°C and an IBA concentration of 4.40M. We have determined the Langmuir isotherms for the hydroxide form of Amberlite IRN-78 resin in contact with mixtures of IBA+water at temperatures, 27.0, 29.0, 31.0 and 38.0°C, respectively. The Langmuir plot at 38.0°C forms a straight line. At the three lower temperatures, however, a peak in the Langmuir plot is observed for IBA concentrations in the vicinity of 4.40M. We regard this peak to be a critical effect not only because it is located close to 4.40M, but also because its height becomes more pronounced as the temperature of the isotherm approaches the critical temperature. For concentrations in the vicinity of the peak, the data indicate that the larger isobutyrate ion is rejected by the resin in favor of the smaller hydroxide ion. This reversal of the expected ion exchange reaction might be used to separate ions according to size. Using the Donnan theory of ion exchange equilibrium, we link the swelling pressure to the osmotic pressure. We show that the peak in the Langmuir plot is associated with a maximum in the "osmotic" energy. This maximum has its origin in the concentration derivative of the osmotic pressure, which goes to zero as the critical point is approached.

  3. Surface Adsorption from the Exchange-Hole Dipole Moment Dispersion Model.

    PubMed

    Christian, Matthew S; Otero-de-la-Roza, Alberto; Johnson, Erin R

    2016-07-12

    The accurate calculation of intermolecular interaction energies with density functional theory requires methods that include a treatment of long-range, nonlocal dispersion correlation. In this work, we explore the ability of the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) dispersion correction to model molecular surface adsorption. Adsorption energies are calculated for six small aromatic molecules (benzene, furan, pyridine, thiophene, thiophenol, and benzenediamine) and the four DNA nucleobases (adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine) on the (111) surfaces of the three coinage metals (copper, silver, and gold). For benzene, where the experimental reference data is most precise, the mean absolute error in the computed absorption energies is 0.04 eV. For the other aromatic molecules, the computed binding energies are found to be within 0.09 eV of the available reference data, on average, which is well below the expected experimental uncertainties for temperature-programmed desorption measurements. Unlike other dispersion-corrected functionals, adequate performance does not require changes to the canonical XDM implementation, and the good performance of XDM is explained in terms of the behavior of the exchange hole. Additionally, the base functional employed (B86bPBE) is also optimal for molecular studies, making B86bPBE-XDM an excellent candidate for studying chemistry on material surfaces. Finally, the noncovalent interaction (NCI) plot technique is shown to detect adsorption effects in real space on the order of tenths of an eV.

  4. Novel tetrazole-functionalized ion exchanger for weak cation-exchange chromatography of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lei, Genhu; Xiong, Xiaohu; Wei, Yinmao; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zheng, Jianbin

    2008-04-11

    A new type of weak cation exchanger, tetrazole-functionalized silica, was developed for bioseparation. It was prepared conveniently by modifying silica gel initially with gamma-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane, then with 3-hydroxypropionitrile and finally with ammonium-catalyzed (3+2) azide-nitrile cycloaddition, which is an element of click chemistry. The prepared stationary phase was characterized and evaluated for its separation performance, protein retention behavior, loading capacity, protein recovery and chemical stability. The results show that the stationary phase developed has excellent performance for protein separations with high mass recoveries, and has long-term stability. Some remarkable differences were observed between this new exchanger and a carboxylic methyl-functionalized ion exchanger, which is typically used in weak cation-exchange chromatography of proteins. The obtained column was also used for the purification of lysozyme from chicken egg white, and the purity and specific bioactivity of the obtained lysozyme were about 90% and 67 IU/mg, respectively.

  5. Adsorption characteristics of ammonium exchange by zeolite and the optimal application in the tertiary treatment of coking wastewater using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cui; Zheng, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Jing; Wen, Donghui; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    Natural zeolite is a favorable NH(4)(+)-ion exchanger in the tertiary wastewater treatment. In this study, a natural Chinese zeolite was anatomized using the mercury injection method, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron micrographs. The kinetic process of ammonium adsorption onto the zeolite was best described by the pseudo second order model; the adsorption equilibrium data fitted better to the Freundlich isotherm; and the exchange between ammonium and alkali/alkaline earth cations was in the order of Na(+) > Ca(2+) > K(+) > Mg(2+). Finally, the zeolite powder was applied for the tertiary treatment of coking wastewater, which still contained high concentration of ammonium after the secondary treatment by a sequencing batch reactor. The Box-Behnken design was used to design the experimental protocol, and the response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the optimization of adsorption factors. The RSM analysis showed the optimal adsorption factors as particle size, 0.03 mm; initial dosage of zeolite powder, 50.0 g/L; and contact time, 24 h. The highest ammonium removal rate was 75.0% predicted by the RMS. Considering settleability of the zeolite powder, the particle size of 0.25 mm was recommended in practice with a little loss of the ammonium removal: 70.9% as the RMS predicted.

  6. RECENT ADVANCES IN ION EXCHANGE MATERIALS AND PROCESSES FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this article was to summarize the recent advances in ion exchange technology for the metal finishing industry. Even though the ion exchange technology is mature and is widely employed in the industry, new applications, approaches and ion exchange materials are emergi...

  7. Breakthrough performance of linear-DNA on ion-exchange membrane columns.

    PubMed

    Ma Montesinos-Cisneros, Rosa; Ortega, Jaime; Guzmán, Roberto; Tejeda-Mansir, Armando

    2006-07-01

    Breakthrough performance of linear-DNA adsorption on ion-exchange membrane columns was theoretically and experimentally investigated using batch and fixed-bed systems. System dispersion curves showed the absence of flow non-idealities in the experimental arrangement. Breakthrough curves were not significantly affected by flow-rate or inlet solution concentration. In the theoretical analysis a model was integrated by the serial coupling of the membrane transport model and the system dispersion model. A transport model that considers finite kinetic rate and column dispersed flow was used in the study. A simplex optimization routine coupled to the solution of the partial differential model equations was employed to estimate the maximum adsorption capacity constant, the equilibrium desorption constant and the forward interaction rate-constant, which are the parameters of the membrane transport model. Through this approach a good prediction of the adsorption phenomena is obtained for inlet concentrations and flow rates greater than 0.2 mg/ml and 0.16 ml/min.

  8. ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION OF MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Long, R.S.; Bailes, R.H.

    1958-04-15

    A process for the recovery of certain metallic ions from aqueous solutions by ion exchange techniques is described. It is applicable to elements such as vanadium, chromium, nnanganese, and the like, which are capable of forming lower valent cations soluble in aqueous solutions and which also form ldgher valent anions soluble in aqueous acidic solutions. For example, small amounts of vanadium occurring in phosphoric acid prepared from phosphate rock may be recovered by reducing the vanadium to a trivalent cation adsorbing; the vanadium in a cationic exchange resin, then treating the resin with a suitable oxidizing agent to convert the adsorbed vanadium to a higher valent state, and finally eluting; the vanadium as an anion from the resin by means of an aqueous acidic solution.

  9. Radiation degradation in EPICOR-2 ion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Johnson, D.A.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1990-09-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data base Development -- EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating chemical and physical conditions for organic ion exchange resins contained in several EPICOR-II prefilters. Those prefilters were used during cleanup of contaminated water from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station after the March 1979 accident. The work was performed by EG G Idaho, Inc. at the Idaho Engineering Laboratory. This is the final report of this task and summarizes results and analyses of three samplings of ion exchange resins from prefilters PF-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated resins supplied by Epicor, Inc. to determine the extent of degradation due to the high internal radiation dose received by the organic resins. Results also are compared with those of other researchers. 18 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Hybrid metallic ion-exchanged waveguides for SPR biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bonnault, S.; Bucci, D.; Zermatten, P.. J.; Charette, P. G.; Broquin, J. E.

    2015-02-01

    Glass substrates have been used for decades to create biosensors due to their biocompatibility, low thermal conductivity, and limited fluorescence. Among the different types of sensors, those based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) allow exploitation of the sensing lightwave at the vicinity of the sensor surface where small entities such as DNA or proteins are located. In this paper, ion-exchanged waveguides and SPR are combined to create a multianalyte optical sensor integrated onto glass. First the principle of operation is introduced, then the theoretical analysis and design of the sensing element. Simulations have been carried out using the Aperiodic Fourier Modal Method (AFMM) and a custom software that handles ion-exchange index-profiles. Fabrication and characterization processes are also presented. Finally the first experimental spectra are displayed and discussed. The sensor presents a bulk sensibility of 5000nm/RIU.

  11. Closed cycle ion exchange method for regenerating acids, bases and salts

    DOEpatents

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    A method for conducting a chemical reaction in acidic, basic, or neutral solution as required and then regenerating the acid, base, or salt by means of ion exchange in a closed cycle reaction sequence which comprises contacting the spent acid, base, or salt with an ion exchanger, preferably a synthetic organic ion-exchange resin, so selected that the counter ions thereof are ions also produced as a by-product in the closed reaction cycle, and then regenerating the spent ion exchanger by contact with the by-product counter ions. The method is particularly applicable to closed cycle processes for the thermochemical production of hydrogen.

  12. Platelet adhesion and plasma protein adsorption control of collagen surfaces by He + ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurotobi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Suzuki, H.; Iwaki, M.

    2003-05-01

    He + ion implanted collagen-coated tubes with a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 were exhibited antithrombogenicity. To investigate the mechanisms of antithrombogenicity of these samples, plasma protein adsorption assay and platelet adhesion experiments were performed. The adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and von Willebrand factor (vWf) was minimum on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2. Platelet adhesion (using platelet rich plasma) was inhibited on the He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was accelerated on the untreated collagen and ion implanted collagen with fluences of 1 × 10 13, 1 × 10 15 and 1 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. Platelet activation with washed platelets was observed on untreated collagen and He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 and was inhibited with fluences of 1 × 10 13, 1 × 10 15 and 1 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. Generally, platelets can react with a specific ligand inside the collagen (GFOGER sequence). The results of platelets adhesion experiments using washed platelets indicated that there were no ligands such as GFOGER on the He + ion implanted collagen over a fluence of 1 × 10 13 ions/cm 2. On the 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 implanted collagen, no platelet activation was observed due to the influence of plasma proteins. From the above, it is concluded that the decrease of adsorbed Fg and vWf caused the antithrombogenicity of He + ion implanted collagen with a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 and that plasma protein adsorption took an important role repairing the graft surface.

  13. Tuning Hydrated Nanoceria Surfaces: Experimental/Theoretical Investigations of Ion Exchange and Implications in Organic and Inorganic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Abhilash; Inerbaev, Talgat M.; Babu, Suresh; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Self, William T.; Masunov, Artëm E.; Seal, Sudipta

    2010-01-01

    Long term stability and surface properties of colloidal nanoparticles have significance in many applications. Here, surface charge modified hydrated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, also known as nanoceria) are synthesized and their dynamic ion exchange interactions with the surrounding medium are investigated in detail. Time dependent Zeta (ζ) potential (ZP) variations of CNPs are demonstrated as a useful characteristic for optimizing their surface properties. The surface charge reversal of CNPs observed with respect to time, concentration, temperature and doping is correlated to the surface modification of CNPs in aqueous solution and the ion exchange reaction between the surface protons (H+) and the neighboring hydroxyls ions (OH−). Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have demonstrated that the adsorption of H+ ions on the CNP surface is kinetically more favorable while the adsorption of OH− ions on CNPs is thermodynamically more favorable. The importance of selecting CNPs with appropriate surface charges and the implications of dynamic surface charge variations are exemplified with applications in microelectronics and biomedical.\\ PMID:20131920

  14. Ion Exchange Strengthening of a Leucite-Reinforced Dental Ceramic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-28

    total number due to more rapid and efficient sintering . Firing time and temperature parameters also can affect the sizes of internal flaws (Jones, 1983...technique differs from subsequent techniques in that: 1) ion exchange is conducted at temperatures above the transition temperature of the glass, and 2) a...strength increases obtained were attributed to differences in glass transition temperatures (Tg), which in turn were attributed to differing chemical

  15. Integrated optic broadband duplexer made by ion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghibaudo, E.; Broquin, J.-E.; Benech, P.

    2003-02-01

    The development of optical amplification and bidirectional traffic in local and wide area networks requires broadband multiplexers which are able to treat the signal of an entire telecommunication window. A device made by ion exchange and answering to these needs is proposed in this letter. Its working principle, based on a leaky structure is first explained. An experimental result confirming a good broadband spectral behavior is then presented. Its spectral response displays two duplexing bands of at least 100 nm.

  16. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  17. Electrodeposition of microparticles on polarized ion exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Verbich, S.V.; Ponomarev, M.I.; Grebenyuk, V.D.; Dukhin, S.S.

    1986-11-01

    The use of ion exchange membranes to extract microparticles from an aqueous solution is considered. The efficiency of removing negatively charged aerosil particles depends substantially on the nature of the membrane located at the anode. It has been established that besides an increase in the electric field intensity the principal factor ensuring an increase in the efficiency of purifying a solution by electrodeposition of microparticles on a membrane surface is a reduction in the flowrate relative to the membrane surface.

  18. Momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions yield fragments (Delta-Z = + 1) whose longitudinal momentum distributions are downshifted by larger values than those associated with the remaining fragments (Delta-Z = 1, -2,...). Kinematics alone cannot account for the observed downshifts; therefore, an additional contribution from collision dynamics must be included. In this work, an optical model description of collision momentum transfer is used to estimate the additional dynamical momentum downshift. Good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data is obtained.

  19. Water Exchange Rates and Molecular Mechanism around Aqueous Halide Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-07-17

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to systematically study the water-exchange mechanism around aqueous chloride, bromide, and iodide ions. Transition state theory, Grote-Hynes theory, and the reactive flux method were employed to compute water exchange rates. We computed the pressure dependence of rate constants and the corresponding activation volumes to investigate the mechanism of the solvent exchange event. The activation volumes obtained using the transition state theory rate constants are negative for all the three anions, thus indicating an associative mechanism. Contrary to the transition state theory results, activation volumes obtained using rate constants from Grote-Hynes theory and the reactive flux method are positive, thus indicating a dissociative mechanism. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded this work. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  20. Titania-functionalized graphene oxide for an efficient adsorptive removal of phosphate ions.

    PubMed

    Sakulpaisan, Samita; Vongsetskul, Thammasit; Reamouppaturm, Sakultip; Luangkachao, Jakkrawut; Tantirungrotechai, Jonggol; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan

    2016-02-01

    Titania-functionalized graphene oxide (T-F GO), synthesized by a sol-gel process, was used as a highly efficient material to remove phosphate ions from the simulated wastewater. X-ray diffraction spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron micrographs of T-F GO confirmed that titania particles were successfully grown on graphene oxide (GO) surface. The phosphate ion adsorption capacities of GO, titania and T-F GO as a function of the contact time and the pH were investigated by a UV-visible spectrophotometer. Results showed that T-F GO could absorb phosphate ions better than titania and GO could. This indicated the synergistic effect between titania and GO in the phosphate ion adsorption. The pH increment lowered the absorption capacities due to increasing the repulsion between phosphate anions and the charges on the T-F GO surface, whereas the addition of sodium ions increased the adsorption capacities. Also, phosphate ions were absorbed by specific sites of T-F GO and formed a monolayer on its surface. Finally, the maximum adsorption capacity of T-F GO was 33.11 mg/g at pH 6, much higher than those of GO and titania. Therefore, T-F GO could be a promising material to remove phosphate ions from wastewater in the future.

  1. Ion exchange extraction of heavy metals from wastewater sludges.

    PubMed

    Al-Enezi, G; Hamoda, M F; Fawzi, N

    2004-01-01

    Heavy metals are common contaminants of some industrial wastewater. They find their way to municipal wastewaters due to industrial discharges into the sewerage system or through household chemicals. The most common heavy metals found in wastewaters are lead, copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, mercury, arsenic, and chromium. Such metals are toxic and pose serious threats to the environment and public health. In recent years, the ion exchange process has been increasingly used for the removal of heavy metals or the recovery of precious metals. It is a versatile separation process with the potential for broad applications in the water and wastewater treatment field. This article summarizes the results obtained from a laboratory study on the removal of heavy metals from municipal wastewater sludges obtained from Ardhiya plant in Kuwait. Data on heavy metal content of the wastewater and sludge samples collected from the plant are presented. The results obtained from laboratory experiments using a commercially available ion exchange resin to remove heavy metals from sludge were discussed. A technique was developed to solubilize such heavy metals from the sludge for subsequent treatment by the ion exchange process. The results showed high efficiency of extraction, almost 99.9%, of heavy metals in the concentration range bound in wastewater effluents and sludges. Selective removal of heavy metals from a contaminated wastewater/sludge combines the benefits of being economically prudent and providing the possibility of reuse/recycle of the treated wastewater effluents and sludges.

  2. Evaluation of Elution Parameters for Cesium Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Burgeson, Ingrid E.; Deschane, Jaquetta R.; Cook, Bryan J.; Blanchard, David L.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2006-08-28

    Cesium ion exchange is one of the planned processes for treating and disposing of waste at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Radioactive supernatant liquids from the waste tanks will undergo ultrafiltration, followed by cesium ion exchange using a regenerable organic ion exchange resin. Two resins, SuperLig?644 and a Resorcinol-formaldehyde resin are being evaluated for cesium removal and cesium elution characteristics. The main purpose of this study is to optimize the cesium elution to provide a resin which after undergoing elution would meet the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant processing and resin disposal criteria. Columns of each resin type were loaded to greater or equal to 90% breakthrough with a Hanford waste stimulant and eluted with nitric acid. The temperature, flow rate and nitric acid concentration were varied to determine the optimal elution conditions. Temperature and eluant flow rate were the most important elution parameters. As would be predicted based upon kinetic consideration alone, decreasing the eluant flow rate and increasing the temperature provided the optimal elution conditions. Varying the nitric acid concentration did not have a significant effect on the elution; however, elutions performed using both high acid concentration (1M) and elevated temperature (45 C) resulted in resin degradation, causing gas generation and resin bed disruption.

  3. Thermal analysis for ion-exchange column system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; King, W. D.

    2012-07-01

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silico-titanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. (authors)

  4. Characterisation of porous carbon electrode materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells via gas adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt-Smith, M. J.; Rigby, S. P.; Ralph, T. R.; Walsh, F. C.

    Porous carbon materials are typically used in both the substrate (typically carbon paper) and the electrocatalyst supports (often platinised carbon) within proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Gravimetric nitrogen adsorption has been studied at a carbon paper substrate, two different Pt-loaded carbon paper electrodes and three particulate carbon blacks. N 2 BET surface areas and surface fractal dimensions were determined using the fractal BET and Frenkel-Halsey-Hill models for all but one of the materials studied. The fractal dimensions of the carbon blacks obtained from gas adsorption were compared with those obtained independently by small angle X-ray scattering and showed good agreement. Density functional theory was used to characterise one of the carbon blacks, as the standard BET model was not applicable.

  5. Adsorption of charged protein residues on an inorganic nanosheet: Computer simulation of LDH interaction with ion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, Alexey A.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2016-08-01

    Quasi-two-dimensional and hybrid nanomaterials based on layered double hydroxides (LDH), cationic clays, layered oxyhydroxides and hydroxides of metals possess large specific surface area and strong electrostatic properties with permanent or pH-dependent electric charge. Such nanomaterials may impact cellular electrostatics, changing the ion balance, pH and membrane potential. Selective ion adsorption/exchange may alter the transmembrane electrochemical gradient, disrupting potential-dependent cellular processes. Cellular proteins as a rule have charged residues which can be effectively adsorbed on the surface of layered hydroxide based nanomaterials. The aim of this study is to attempt to shed some light on the possibility and mechanisms of protein "adhesion" an LDH nanosheet and to propose a new direction in anticancer medicine, based on physical impact and strong electrostatics. An unbiased molecular dynamics simulation was performed and the combined process free energy estimation (COPFEE) approach was used.

  6. Adsorption studies of cadmium ions on alginate-calcium carbonate composite beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Zahid; Amin, Athar; Zafar, Uzma; Raza, Muhammad Amir; Hafeez, Irfan; Akram, Adnan

    2015-07-01

    Alginate-calcium carbonate composite material was prepared in the form of beads and characterized using Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The adsorption of Cd2+ ions was studied through batch experiments. The adsorption parameters such as contact time (120 min), adsorbent dose (1.5 g), initial metal ion concentration(10 mg/L), pH (6) and agitation speed (150 rpm) were optimized at room temperature. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were applied to the data and it was noted that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions is better explained by Freundlich model. The kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions followed pseudo-first order kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters like ∆G 0, ∆H 0 and ∆S 0 were calculated and on the basis of these values it was established that the adsorption process is feasible and endothermic in nature. It was concluded from the study that the composite material of alginate and calcium carbonate can effectively be used to recover Cd2+ ions from wastewater.

  7. Kinetics and thermodynamics studies of silver ions adsorption onto coconut shell activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Silva-Medeiros, Flávia V; Consolin-Filho, Nelson; Xavier de Lima, Mateus; Bazzo, Fernando Previato; Barros, Maria Angélica S D; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Tavares, Célia R G

    2016-12-01

    The presence of silver in the natural water environment has been of great concern because of its toxicity, especially when it is in the free ion form (Ag(+)). This paper aims to study the adsorption kinetics of silver ions from an aqueous solution onto coconut shell activated carbon using batch methods. Batch kinetic data were fitted to the first-order model and the pseudo-second-order model, and this last equation fits correctly the experimental data. Equilibrium experiments were carried out at 30°C, 40°C, and 50°C. The adsorption isotherms were reasonably fit using Langmuir model, and the adsorption process was slightly influenced by changes in temperature. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH°, ΔG°, and ΔS°) were determined. The adsorption process seems to be non-favorable, exothermic, and have an increase in the orderness.

  8. Enhanced adsorption and recovery of uranyl ions by NikR mutant-displaying yeast.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ebisutani, Kazuki; Iida, Katsuya; Nishitani, Takashi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-04-11

    Uranium is one of the most important metal resources, and the technology for the recovery of uranyl ions (UO22+) from aqueous solutions is required to ensure a semi-permanent supply of uranium. The NikR protein is a Ni2+-dependent transcriptional repressor of the nickel-ion uptake system in Escherichia coli, but its mutant protein (NikRm) is able to selectively bind uranyl ions in the interface of the two monomers. In this study, NikRm protein with ability to adsorb uranyl ions was displayed on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To perform the binding of metal ions in the interface of the two monomers, two metal-binding domains (MBDs) of NikRm were tandemly fused via linker peptides and displayed on the yeast cell surface by fusion with the cell wall-anchoring domain of yeast α-agglutinin. The NikRm-MBD-displaying yeast cells with particular linker lengths showed the enhanced adsorption of uranyl ions in comparison to the control strain. By treating cells with citrate buffer (pH 4.3), the uranyl ions adsorbed on the cell surface were recovered. Our results indicate that the adsorption system by yeast cells displaying tandemly fused MBDs of NikRm is effective for simple and concentrated recovery of uranyl ions, as well as adsorption of uranyl ions.

  9. Enhanced Adsorption and Recovery of Uranyl Ions by NikR Mutant-Displaying Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ebisutani, Kazuki; Iida, Katsuya; Nishitani, Takashi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is one of the most important metal resources, and the technology for the recovery of uranyl ions (UO22+) from aqueous solutions is required to ensure a semi-permanent supply of uranium. The NikR protein is a Ni2+-dependent transcriptional repressor of the nickel-ion uptake system in Escherichia coli, but its mutant protein (NikRm) is able to selectively bind uranyl ions in the interface of the two monomers. In this study, NikRm protein with ability to adsorb uranyl ions was displayed on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To perform the binding of metal ions in the interface of the two monomers, two metal-binding domains (MBDs) of NikRm were tandemly fused via linker peptides and displayed on the yeast cell surface by fusion with the cell wall-anchoring domain of yeast α-agglutinin. The NikRm-MBD-displaying yeast cells with particular linker lengths showed the enhanced adsorption of uranyl ions in comparison to the control strain. By treating cells with citrate buffer (pH 4.3), the uranyl ions adsorbed on the cell surface were recovered. Our results indicate that the adsorption system by yeast cells displaying tandemly fused MBDs of NikRm is effective for simple and concentrated recovery of uranyl ions, as well as adsorption of uranyl ions. PMID:24970221

  10. Adsorptions of some heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions by acrylamide/maleic acid hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Saraydin, D.; Karadag, E.; Gueven, O.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, acrylamide-maleic acid (AAm/MA) hydrogels in the form of rod have been prepared by {gamma}-radiation. They have been used for adsorption of some heavy metal ions such as uranium, iron, and copper. For the hydrogel containing 40 mg of maleic acid and irradiated at 3.73 kGy, maximum and minimum swellings in the aqueous solutions of the heavy metal ions have been observed with water (1480%) and the aqueous solution of iron(III) nitrate (410%), respectively. Diffusions of water and heavy metal ions onto hydrogels have been found to be of the non-Fickian type of diffusion. In experiments of uranyl ions adsorption, Type II adsorption has been found. One gram of AAa/MA hydrogels sorbed 14-86 mg uranyl ions from solutions of uranyl acetate, 14-90 mg uranyl ions from solutions of uranyl nitrate, 16-39 mg iron ions from solutions of iron(IV) nitrate, and 28-81 mg copper ions from solutions of copper acetate, while acrylamide hydrogel did not sorb any heavy metals ions.

  11. The adsorption of Cd(II) ions on sulphuric acid-treated wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Ozer, A; Pirinççi, H B

    2006-09-21

    The adsorption of Cd(II) ions which is one of the most important toxic metals by using sulphuric acid-treated wheat bran (STWB) was investigated. The effects of solution pH and temperature, contact time and initial Cd(II) concentration on the adsorption yield were studied. The equilibrium time for the adsorption process was determined as 4 h. The adsorbent used in this study gave the highest adsorption capacity at around pH 5.4. At this pH, adsorption capacity for an initial Cd(II) ions concentration of 100 mg/L was found to be 43.1 mg/g at 25 degrees C for contact time of 4 h. The equilibrium data were analysed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models to calculate isotherm constants. The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) which is a Langmuir constant decreased from 101.0 to 62.5 mg/g with increasing temperature from 25 to 70 degrees C. Langmuir isotherm data were evaluated to determine the thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption process. The enthalpy change (deltaH(o)) for the process was found to be exothermic. The free energy change (deltaG(o)) showed that the process was feasible. The kinetic results indicated that the adsorption process of Cd(II) ions by STWB followed first-order rate expression and adsorption rate constant was calculated as 0.0081 l/min at 25 degrees C. It was observed that the desorption yield of Cd(II) was highly pH dependent.

  12. From surfactant adsorption kinetics to asymmetric nanomembrane mechanics: pendant drop experiments with subphase exchange.

    PubMed

    Ferri, James K; Kotsmar, Csaba; Miller, Reinhard

    2010-12-15

    Adsorption equilibrium is the state in which the chemical potential of each species in the interface and bulk is the same. Dynamic phenomena at fluid-fluid interfaces in the presence of surface active species are often probed by perturbing an interface or adjoining bulk phase from the equilibrium state. Many methods designed for studying kinetics at fluid-fluid interfaces focus on removing the system from equilibrium through dilation or compression of the interface. This modifies the surface excess concentration Γ(i) and allows the species distribution in the bulk C(i) to respond. There are only a few methods available for studying fluid-fluid interfaces which seek to control C(i) and allow the interface to respond with changes to Γ(i). Subphase exchange in pendant drops can be achieved by the injection and withdrawal of liquid into a drop at constant volumetric flow rate R(E) during which the interfacial area and drop volume V(D) are controlled to be approximately constant. This can be accomplished by forming a pendant drop at the tip of two coaxial capillary tubes. Although evolution of the subphase concentration C(i)(t) is dictated by extrinsic factors such as R(E) and V(D), complete subphase exchange can always be attained when a sufficient amount of liquid is used. This provides a means to tailor driving forces for adsorption and desorption in fluid-fluid systems and in some cases, fabricate interfacial materials of well-defined composition templated at these interfaces. The coaxial capillary pendant drop (CCPD) method opens a wide variety of experimental possibilities. Experiments and theoretical frameworks are reviewed for the study of surfactant exchange kinetics, macromolecular adsorption equilibrium and dynamics, as well as the fabrication of a wide range of soft surface materials and the characterization of their mechanics. Future directions for new experiments are also discussed.

  13. PARAFAC analysis of IBIL spectra from silver ion exchanged glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valotto, G.; Cattaruzza, E.; Mardegan, M.; Quaranta, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present for the first time an application of PARAllel FACtor (PARAFAC) analysis to the investigation of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) spectra of Ag+ ↔ Na+ ion exchanged silicate glasses, in order to check the possibility to obtain additional information on the formation of silver aggregates under ion irradiation by a proper statistical rearrangement of experimental spectra. We decomposed the data by PARAFAC taking into account both IBIL emission features and their evolution as a function of the time. Shape and trend under irradiation of the extracted components were correlated to silver concentration and aggregates in the investigated systems. Strength and weakness of this statistical approach applied to IBIL spectra recorded as a function of time were evidenced and discussed.

  14. Proton/calcium ion exchange behavior of calcite.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Jiménez, Adrián; Mucci, Alfonso; Paquette, Jeanne

    2009-10-21

    The characterization of the proton sorptive properties of calcite in aqueous solutions at 25 +/- 1 degrees C over a relatively wide range of chemical conditions (7.16 ions is consistently observed, greatly exceeding the theoretical number of reactive surface sites. These observations are interpreted as a fast proton/calcium exchange equilibrium between the solution and "exchangeable cation sites" (e.g., lattice positions) at and/or beneath the calcite surface (species identified by "(exc)"), , that leads to a transient, "apparent" incongruent dissolution regime and the formation of a stable calcium-deficient, proton-enriched layer within the calcite lattice under circum-neutral and alkaline regimes at standard conditions. The 2H(+)/Ca(2+) ion exchange is quantitatively described by the Langmuir-power exchange function under the Vanselow convention: where n = 1 and log(10)K(ex) = 13.0 +/- 0.3. This calcite behavior, never reported before, masks surface equilibria and directly impacts the aqueous speciation of carbonate-rock systems with poor CO(2)(g) ventilation (e.g., aquifers, pore and deep sea waters, industrial reactors) via the buffering of pH and calcite dissolution. In contrast, at fixed pCO(2) conditions, aqueous speciation remains unaffected upon CO(2)(g) sequestration resulting from ion exchange-induced calcite precipitation: ([triple bond]CaCO3)2(exc) + CO2(g) + H2O <==> [triple bond]Ca(HCO3)2(exc) + CaCO3(s). Accordingly, reliable predictions of aqueous speciation in natural or engineered calcite-containing systems at variable pCO(2) conditions must consider this exchange reaction and the associated K(ex). The postulated proton/calcium exchange may have far

  15. Adsorption of polyethylene-glycolated bovine serum albumin on macroporous and polymer-grafted anion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mimi; Carta, Giorgio

    2014-01-24

    The chromatographic and adsorptive properties of BSA and BSA conjugated with 10 and 30kDa PEG polymers are determined for a macroporous anion exchanger (UNOsphere™ Diol Q) and for a polymer-grafted material having the same backbone matrix (Nuvia Q™). Chromatographic retention, adsorption capacity, and adsorption kinetics are enhanced in the polymer-grafted resin for both BSA and 10kDa PEG-BSA as a result of interactions with the grafted polymers. However, the difference between the two resins diminishes for 30kDa PEG-BSA indicating that size exclusion effects strongly affect binding in the polymer-grafted material for this larger conjugate. Images of intraparticle concentration profiles obtained by confocal scanning laser microscopy show that the transport mechanisms of both BSA and PEGylated BSA are very different in the two resins. The protein binding kinetics are dominated by ordinary pore diffusion and are essentially independent of the direction of transport for UNOsphere Diol Q as a result of its large pore size. Thus, for this material, displacement of PEGylated BSA by BSA is clearly evident at the intraparticle scale. On the other hand, the protein binding kinetics in Nuvia Q are consistent with a solid diffusion mechanism driven by the adsorbed protein concentration. For this material, protein transport is very fast for one component or two-component co-adsorption of BSA and PEGylated BSA but slows down dramatically for sequential adsorption of these species as a result of heightened diffusional hindrance when the two components counterdiffuse within the resin.

  16. Adsorption of hydrated hydroxide and hydronium ions on Ag(1 1 1). A quantum mechanical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrito, E. M.; Paredes-Olivera, P.

    2003-03-01

    In this paper we have studied comparatively the adsorption of hydroxide and hydronium ions, extending our previous study on hydronium adsorption [J. Phys. Chem. B. 105 (2001) 7227] and emphasizing the adsorption of hydroxide. The calculations were performed on the 111 surface of silver using ab initio quantum mechanical methods (Hartree-Fock+Moller-Plesset second order perturbation theory). The adsorption was investigated for the bare and the hydrated ions (up to three water molecules). Binding energies, equilibrium structures and charge transfer processes were investigated. While the successive hydration of hydronium detaches the ion from the surface, the hydrated hydroxide anion remains specifically adsorbed. Charge transfer processes between the adsorbates and the surface were studied using electron density difference plots and effective charges obtained from Mulliken populations and from surface-dipole moment curves. The energetics of the surface reactions leading to the formation of the hydrated hydronium and hydroxide ions from the bare adsorbed ions and water molecules was also investigated. Both reactions are exothermic mainly due to the formation of strong hydrogen bonds. The effect of an external homogeneous electric field perpendicular to the surface on different adsorbate properties was investigated for the bare and hydrated hydroxide ion in order to model the environment of the electrical double layer. The electric field affects the orientation of the water molecules on the surface and the hydroxide surface distance.

  17. Donnan dialysis with ion-exchange membranes. 3: Diffusion coefficients using ions of different valence

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Hirofumi

    1999-01-01

    Donnan dialysis with ion-exchange membranes was studied under various kinds of experimental conditions using ions of different valences. The diffusion coefficients (D{sub d}) of various kinds of ions in the ion-exchange membrane were obtained by curve fitting an equation derived from the mass balance to three kinds of Donnan dialytic experiments. It was found that the value of D{sub d}/D{sub s} using D{sub d} of monovalent ions in Donnan dialysis with a set of monovalent feed ions and bivalent driving ions was 1/175, where D{sub s} represents a diffusion coefficient in solution. D{sub s} was calculated from the Nernst-Einstein equation substituted by the ionic conductance of ions at infinite dilution in water. Using D{sub d} of bivalent ions in Donnan dialysis with the same set led to a D{sub d}/D{sub s} value of 1/438. Moreover, using D{sub d} in Donnan dialysis with the same set, the value of D{sub d}/D{sub e} was kept constant at 0.4 (D{sub e} expresses the diffusion coefficient in the membrane when the valences of the feed and driving ions are equal). On the other hand, both D{sub d}/D{sub s} and D{sub d}/D{sub e} using D{sub d} in Donnan dialysis with a set of bivalent feed ions and monovalent driving ions were not constant.

  18. Preparation of aminated-polyacrylonitrile nanofiber membranes for the adsorption of metal ions: comparison with microfibers.

    PubMed

    Neghlani, Parvin Karimi; Rafizadeh, Mehdi; Taromi, Faramarz Afshar

    2011-02-15

    Polyacrylonitrile nanofibers (PAN-nFs) were produced using the electrospinning method. Subsequently, the electrospun fibers were modified by diethylenetriamine to produce aminated polyacrylonitrile (APAN) nanofibers. Finally, the adsorbability of copper ions on the surface of the nanofibers was examined in an aqueous solution. Attenuated total internal reflection (ATIR) analysis confirmed the surface amination of the produced PAN-nFs. The grafting yield was calculated by the gravimetric method. The optimum condition was determined to yield the maximum grafting of amine groups to PAN with no losses in sample flexibility. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to measure the copper ion concentration in the solution. Results indicate that the adsorption process in nanofibers is three times faster in comparison with microfibers. Moreover, the pH effect was studied based on the adsorption behavior of copper ions on the APAN nanofibers. In addition, thermodynamic parameters were calculated, revealing that the process was endothermic and demonstrating that randomness increased at the solid-solution interface during the process. The obtained enthalpy value indicates that the chelation of copper ions among the aminated polyacrylonitrile can be regarded as a chemical adsorption process. The adsorption data fit well with the Langmuir isotherm. The saturation adsorption capacity obtained from the Langmuir model for Cu(II) ions was 116.522 mg/g which is five times more than the reported value for APAN microfibers [S. Deng, R. Bai, J.P. Chen, Aminated polyacrylonitrile fibers for lead and copper removal, Langmuir,19 (2003)5058-5064]. Analysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that the surface roughness increased upon adsorption of the metal ion. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination demonstrated that there were no cracks or sign of degradation on the surface after amination.

  19. Effect of modulator sorption on gradient shape in ion-exchange chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velayudhan, A.; Ladisch, M. R.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Mobile phase additives, or modulators, are used in gradient elution chromatography to facilitate separation and reduce separation time. The modulators are usually assumed to be linearly adsorbed or unadsorbed. Here, the consequences of nonlinear modulator adsorption are examined for ion-exchange gradient elution through a series of simulations. Even when the buffer salt is identical to the modulator salt, gradient deformation is observed; the extent of deformation increases as the volume of the feed is increased. When the modulator salt is different from the buffer salt, unusual effects are observed, and the chromatograms are quite different from those predicted by classical gradient elution theory. In particular, local increases in the buffer concentration are found between feed bands, and serve to improve the separation. These effects become more pronounced as the feed volume increases, and could therefore prove valuable in preparative applications.

  20. Recent progress and applications of ion-exclusion/ion-exchange chromatography for simultaneous determination of inorganic anions and cations.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Nobutake; Kozaki, Daisuke; Mori, Masanobu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals of ion chromatography is to determine both anions and cations found in samples with a single chromatographic run. In the present article, recent progress in ion-exclusion/ion-exchange chromatography for the simultaneous determinations of inorganic anions and cations are reviewed. Firstly, the principle and the control for the simultaneous separation and detection of analyte ions using ion-exclusion/cation-exchange chromatography with a weakly acidic cation-exchange column are outlined. Then, advanced chromatographic techniques in terms of analytical time, selectively and sensitivity are summarized. As a related method, ion-exclusion/anion-exchange chromatography with an anion-exchange column could be used for the simultaneous determination of inorganic nitrogen species, such as ammonium, nitrite and nitrate ions. Their usefulness and applications to water-quality monitoring and related techniques are also described.

  1. Structural Insight into the Ion-Exchange Mechanism of the Sodium/Calcium Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jun; Li, Hua; Zeng, Weizhong; Sauer, David B.; Belmares, Ricardo; Jiang, Youxing

    2012-06-19

    Sodium/calcium (Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}) exchangers (NCX) are membrane transporters that play an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} for cell signaling. We demonstrated the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+}-exchange function of an NCX from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX{_}Mj) and report its 1.9 angstrom crystal structure in an outward-facing conformation. Containing 10 transmembrane helices, the two halves of NCX{_}Mj share a similar structure with opposite orientation. Four ion-binding sites cluster at the center of the protein: one specific for Ca{sup 2+} and three that likely bind Na{sup +}. Two passageways allow for Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} access to the central ion-binding sites from the extracellular side. Based on the symmetry of NCX{_}Mj and its ability to catalyze bidirectional ion-exchange reactions, we propose a structure model for the inward-facing NCX{_}Mj.

  2. Continuous ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    A pressurized continuous annular chromatograph (CAC) has been developed for truly continuous ion exchange preparative separations. This device utilizes a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material, fixed multiple feed points, and fixed withdrawal locations. Most of our investigations have been performed with a 28-cm-diam by 60-cm-long CAC, but a larger model has recently been designed and constructed. A detailed study has been made of the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a simulated carbonate leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Recent studies have investigated the ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium from a sulfate feed solution. Nuclear reactor-grade zirconium, containing < 0.01 wt % hafnium, and hafnium, containing < 1% zirconium, have been continuously prepared using cation exchange resin in the pressurized CAC. This device, because of its continuous feed and product withdrawal, its adaptability to largescale operations, and its ability to separate many components, is expected to make chromatography a more competitive process in the industrial sector.

  3. Nuclear quantum effects on adsorption of H2 and isotopologues on metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, Ievgeniia; Gu, Bing; Heine, Thomas; Jakowski, Jacek; Garashchuk, Sophya

    2017-02-01

    The nuclear quantum effects on the zero-point energy (ZPE), influencing adsorption of H2 and isotopologues on metal ions, are examined using normal mode analysis of ab initio electronic structure results for complexes with 17 metal cations. The lightest metallic nuclei, Li and Be, are found to be the most 'quantum'. The largest selectivity in adsorption is predicted for Cu, Ni and Co ions. Analysis of the nuclear wavepacket dynamics on the ground state electronic potential energy surfaces (PES) performed for complexes of Li+ and Cu+2 with H2/D2/HD shows that the PES anharmonicity changes the ZPE by up to 9%.

  4. Scaled-up separation of cellobiohydrolase1 from a cellulase mixture by ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhuoliang; Lane, Andrew N; Willing, Gerold A; Berson, R Eric

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose often involves cellulases produced by Trichoderma reesei, of which cellobiohydrolase1 (CBH1) is the most abundant (about 60% of total cellulases) and plays an important role in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A method for separating sufficient quantities from the bulk cellulase cocktail is highly desirable for many studies, such as those that aim to characterize binding and hydrolysis kinetics of CBH1. In this work, CBH1 was separated from other Spezyme CP cellulases by ion-exchange chromatography using an efficient modification of a smaller scale process. The ion-exchange column was connected to a vacuum manifold system to provide a steady flow through parallel columns and thus achieve scale-up for enzyme separation. With five 5-mL columns running in parallel, about 55 mg of CBH1 was separated from 145 mg of Spezyme CP in a single separation. Step elution was used to replace the continuous gradient used at smaller scale. The purified CBH1 was collected in the fraction eluted with a buffer containing 0.33 M salt and showed comparable purity and activity as the enzyme purified by a fast protein liquid chromatography system. The stability of separated CBH1 was studied for up to 2 days and good thermal stability was observed. Separated CBH1 also showed both high adsorption to bacterial microcrystalline cellulose with ~4 μmol/g maximum adsorption and a K(a) of 5.55 ± 2.34 μM(-1) , and good hydrolytic activity based on atomic force microscopy observations that show a reduction in fiber height.

  5. Biomineralization of hydroxyapatite in silver ion-exchanged nanocrystalline ZSM-5 zeolite using simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Balwinder; Srivastava, Rajendra; Satpati, Biswarup; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2015-11-01

    Silver ion-exchanged nanocrystalline zeolite (Ag-Nano-ZSM-5) and silver ion-exchanged conventional zeolite (Ag-ZSM-5) were synthesized. Zeolites were incubated in simulated body fluid at 310K for different time periods to grow hydroxyapatite in their matrixes. Significant large amount of hydroxyapatite was grown in Ag-Nano-ZSM-5 matrix after incubation in simulated body fluid when compared to Ag-ZSM-5. The resultant material was characterized using X-ray diffraction, N2-adsorption, scanning/transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and inductively coupled plasma analysis. Mechanical properties such as compressive modulus, compressive strength, and strain at failure of the parent materials were evaluated. Biocompatibility assays suggested that Ag-Nano-ZSM-5 and hydroxyapatite grown in Ag-Nano-ZSM-5 were compatible and did not impose any toxicity to RAW 264.7 cells macrophase and Caco2 cells suggesting considerable potential for biomedical applications such as bone implants.

  6. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of monomer-dimer monoclonal antibody mixtures on a cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jason M; Pabst, Timothy M; Hunter, Alan K; Wang, Xiangyang; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-07-10

    Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics are determined for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) monomer and dimer species, individually and in mixtures, on a macroporous cation exchange resin both under the dilute limit of salt gradient elution chromatography and at high protein loads and low salt based on batch adsorption equilibrium and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiments. In the dilute limit and weak binding conditions, the dimer/monomer selectivity in 10mM phosphate at pH 7 varies between 8.7 and 2.3 decreasing with salt concentration in the range of 170-230mM NaCl. At high protein loads and strong binding conditions (0-60mM NaCl), the selectivity in the same buffer is near unity with no NaCl added, but increases gradually with salt concentration reaching high values between 2 and 15 with 60mM added NaCl. For these conditions, the two-component adsorption kinetics is controlled by pore diffusion and is predicted approximately by a dual shrinking core model using parameters based on single component equilibrium and kinetics measurements.

  7. Treatment of chromium plating process effluents with ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Tenório, J A; Espinosa, D C

    2001-01-01

    The surface treatment industry deals with various heavy metals, including the elements Cr, Zn, Ni, Cd, and Cu. Conventional treatments of effluents generate class I solid residue. The aim of this investigation was to study the viability of ion exchange as an alternative process for treatment of rinse water and to determine the efficacy of two ion exchange systems, System 1: "strong" cationic resin-"strong" anionic resin and System 2: "strong" cationic resin-"weak" anionic resin. Commercial resins and solutions taken from rinse tanks of chromium plating companies were used in this investigation. A two-column system, one for the cationic resin and another for the anionic resin, both with 150 ml capacity was mounted. The solution was percolated at a rate of 10 ml/min. The following solutions were used for regeneration of the resins: 2% H2SO4 for the cationic and 4% NaOH for the anionic. The percolated solutions revealed chromium contents of less than 0.25 mg/l, independent of the system used. The "strong" cationic resin-"weak" anionic resin gave excellent regeneration results. The "strong" cationic-"strong" anionic resin presented problems during regeneration, and did not release the retained ions after percolation of 2000 ml of 4% NaOH solution. It is concluded that for this type of treatment, the system composed of "strong" cationic resin and "weak" anionic resin is more appropriate.

  8. Arsenic(V) removal using an amine-doped acrylic ion exchange fiber: Kinetic, equilibrium, and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Nam, Aram; Park, Seong-Jik; Do, Taegu; Choi, Ung-Su; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2017-03-05

    This study investigates As(V) removal from aqueous solutions using a novel amine-doped acrylic ion exchange fiber. The amine doping reaction was confirmed using FT-IR, and the surface of the fiber was characterized using FEG-SEM. The synthesis process was completed within 60min using an AlCl3·6H2O catalyst at 100°C, and the resulting in a fiber with an ion exchange capacity of 7.5meq/g. The removal efficiency of the A-60 fiber was affected by the solution pH, and the efficiency was optimum at pH 3.04. As(V) adsorption on the fiber was rapid in the first 20min and reached equilibrium in 60min. As(V) removal followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the Redlich-Peterson adsorption isotherm model provided the best fit of the equilibrium data. The fiber has an As(V) adsorption capacity (qe) of 205.32±3.57mg/g, which is considerably higher than literature values and commercial adsorbents. The removal efficiency of the fiber was above 83% of the initial value after nine regeneration cycles.

  9. The Hartree-Fock exchange effect on the CO adsorption by the boron nitride nanocage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessally, E.; Soleimani-Amiri, S.; Hosseinian, A.; Edjlali, L.; Bekhradnia, A.

    2017-03-01

    We studied the effect of Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange percentage of a density functional on the adsorption properties and electronic sensitivity of the B12N12 nanocluster to CO molecule. It was found that by an increase in the %HF, the LUMO level is nearly constant while the HOMO level is strongly stabilized, expanding the HOMO-LUMO gap (Eg). Also, the volume of the all structures decreased and the sensitivity of the B12N12 is slightly increased to CO molecule. For the pristine B12N12 cluster, the B66 and B64 bonds are about 1.43 and 1.49 Å at 10% HF, and 1.23 and 1.26 Å at 100% HF, respectively. The HF exchange between 10-20% may predict an accurate Eg for the B12N12 system. We concluded that functionals with a large %HF such as M06-HF, and M06-2X may significantly overestimate the Eg, and bond strength. We obtained a parabolic relationship between the %HF and the adsorption energy of CO molecule on the B12N12 cluster. Also, an increase in the %HF predicts a larger charge transfer from the CO molecule to the cage.

  10. The adsorption of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd on goethite from major ion seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balistrieri, L. S.; Murray, J. W.

    1982-07-01

    The adsorption of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd on goethite (αFeOOH) from NaNO 3 solutions and from major ion seawater was compared to assess the effect of the major ions of seawater (Na, Mg, Ca, K, Cl, and SO 4) on the adsorption behavior of the metals. Magnesium and sulphate are the principal seawater ions which enhance or inhibit adsorption relative to the inert system. Their effect, as determined from the site-binding model of Davis et al. (1978), was a combination of changing the electrostatic conditions at the interface and decreasing the available binding sites. The basic differences between the experimental system of major ion seawater and natural seawater were examined. It was concluded that: 1) although the experimental metal concentrations in major ion seawater were higher than those found in natural seawater, estimates of the binding energy of Cu, Zn, and Cd with αFeOOH for natural seawater concentrations could be made from the data, 2) Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd showed little or no competition for surface sites on goethite, and 3) the presence of carbonate, phosphate, and silicate had little or no effect on the adsorption of Zn and Cd on goethite.

  11. Breadboard wash water renovation system. [using ferric chloride and ion exchange resins to remove soap and dissolved salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A total wash water renovation system concept was developed for removing objectionable materials from spacecraft wash water in order to make the water reusable. The breadboard model system described provides for pretreatment with ferric chloride to remove soap by chemical precipitation, carbon adsorption to remove trace dissolved organics, and ion exchange for removal of dissolved salts. The entire system was put into continuous operation and carefully monitored to assess overall efficiency and equipment maintenance problems that could be expected in actual use. In addition, the capacity of the carbon adsorbers and the ion-exchange resin was calculated and taken into consideration in the final evaluation of the system adequacy. The product water produced was well within the Tentative Wash Water Standards with regard to total organic carbon, conductivity, urea content, sodium chloride content, color, odor, and clarity.

  12. Nitrate and Perchlorate removal from groundwater by ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Burge, S; Halden, R

    1999-09-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a small scale ion exchange unit (Krudico, Inc of Auborn, IA) for removal of nitrate and perchlorate from groundwater at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300. The unit was able to treat 3,600 gallons of Site 300 groundwater, at an average influent concentration of 100 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} before breakthrough occurred. The unit contained 2.5 ft{sup 3} of Sybron SR-7 resin. Seventy gallons of regeneration waste were generated (water treated to waste ratio of 51:1). The effluent concentration was about 20 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -}, which is equivalent to a treatment efficiency of at least 80%. There are several options for implementing this technology at Site 300. A target well, in the 817 area, has been selected. It has a 3 to 4 gpm flow rate, and concentrations of 90 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} and 40 {micro}g/L perchlorate. The different treatment options include ion exchange treatment of nitrate only, nitrate and perchlorate, or perchlorate only. Option 1: For the treatment of nitrate only, this unit will be able to treat 3,700 gallons of water before regeneration is required. If both columns of the ion exchange unit are used, 7,400 gallons could be treated before the columns will need to be regenerated (producing 140 gallons of waste, per cycle or every 1.5 days). The effluent nitrate concentration is expected to be about 17 mg/L. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.14 per gallon of water treated. Option 2: If only perchlorate is to be removed with ion exchange at the 817 area, a smaller unit should be considered. A 55 gallon canister filled with ion exchange resin should be able to reduce perchlorate concentrations in the groundwater from 40 {micro}g/L to non-detect levels for three years before the resin would need to be replaced. The contaminant-laden resin would be disposed of as hazardous waste. It is not practical to regenerate the resin because of the extreme difficulty of

  13. Ion-Exchange Chromatography: Basic Principles and Application.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Philip M; Rochfort, Keith D; O'Connor, Brendan F

    2017-01-01

    Ion-Exchange Chromatography (IEC) allows for the separation of ionizable molecules on the basis of differences in charge properties. Its large sample-handling capacity, broad applicability (particularly to proteins and enzymes), moderate cost, powerful resolving ability, and ease of scale-up and automation have led to it becoming one of the most versatile and widely used of all liquid chromatography (LC) techniques. In this chapter, we review the basic principles of IEC, as well as the broader criteria for selecting IEC conditions. By way of further illustration, we outline basic laboratory protocols to partially purify a soluble serine peptidase from bovine whole brain tissue, covering crude tissue extract preparation through to partial purification of the target enzyme using anion-exchange chromatography. Protocols for assaying total protein and enzyme activity in both pre- and post-IEC fractions are also described.

  14. Surface adsorption of Cs137 ions on quartz crystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antkiw, Stephen; Waesche, H.; Senftle, F.

    1954-01-01

    Adsorption tests were made on four large synthetic and three natural quartz crystals to see if surface defects might be detected by subsequent autoradiography techniques. The adsorbent used was radioactive Cs137 in a solution of Cs 137Cl. Natural quartz crystals adsorbed more cesium than the synthetic crystals. Certain surface defects were made evident by this method, but twinning features could not be detected.

  15. Ion-exchange equilibrium of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid on a strong anionic exchanger.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinglan; Ke, Xu; Zhang, Xudong; Zhuang, Wei; Zhou, Jingwei; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-09-15

    N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) is a high value-added product widely applied in the food industry. A suitable equilibrium model is required for purification of Neu5Ac based on ion-exchange chromatography. Hence, the equilibrium uptake of Neu5Ac on a strong anion exchanger, AD-1 was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The uptake of Neu5Ac by the hydroxyl form of the resin occurred primarily by a stoichiometric exchange of Neu5Ac(-) and OH(-). The experimental data showed that the selectivity coefficient for the exchange of Neu5Ac(-) with OH(-) was a non-constant quantity. Subsequently, the Saunders' model, which took into account the dissociation reactions of Neu5Ac and the condition of electroneutrality, was used to correlate the Neu5Ac sorption isotherms at various solution pHs and Neu5Ac concentrations. The model provided an excellent fit to the binary exchange data for Cl(-)/OH(-) and Neu5Ac(-)/OH(-), and an approximate prediction of equilibrium in the ternary system Cl(-)/Neu5Ac(-)/OH(-). This basic information combined with the general mass transfer model could lay the foundation for the prediction of dynamic behavior of fixed bed separation process afterwards.

  16. Adsorption of dichromate ions on the red mud surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhova, M. V.; Gorichev, I. G.; Lainer, Yu. A.; Artamonova, I. V.; Rusakova, S. M.

    2014-07-01

    The possibility of using a red mud (waste of alumina production) as a sorbent of dichromate ions from aqueous solutions is studied. A method for the activation of red mud by hydrochloric acid is proposed. The dependences of the amount adsorbed of dichromate ions on the pH and initial concentration of aqueous solutions are studied.

  17. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-06-11

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  18. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Jr., Thomas N.

    1994-08-01

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass.

  19. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2011-05-23

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature.

  20. Solid Phase Luminescence of Several Rare Earth Ions on Ion-Exchange Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Stephen P.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The development and characterization of a novel ion-exchange film for solid-phase fluorometry and phosphorimetry is reported. This new cation-exchange material is suitable for spectroscopic applications in the ultraviolet and visible regions. It is advantageous because it, as a single entity, is easily recovered from solution and mounted in the spectrofluorometers. After preconcentration on the film, the luminescence intensity of lanthanide ions is several orders of magnitude greater than that of the corresponding solution, depending on the volume of solution and the amount of film. This procedure allows emission spectral measurements and determination of lanthanide ions at solution concentrations of < 5 (micro)g/L. The film may be stored for subsequent reuse or as a permanent record of the analysis. The major drawback to the use of the film is slow uptake of analyte due to diffusion limitations.

  1. Molecular simulations of ion exchange in NaA zeolite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murad, S.; Jia, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2003-02-01

    Molecular simulations using the method of molecular dynamics have been carried out to determine the possibility of studying ion exchanges between electrolyte solutions (here an aqueous LiCl solution) and an ion-exchange membrane (NaA zeolite) using direct simulations of upto a nanosecond. Our results show that with appropriate driving forces, such ion-exchange processes can be clearly witnessed and investigated using molecular simulations. We have also attempted to understand the phenomenon at the molecular level. Our results have shown that the ion-exchange process is energetically driven and entropic forces are not playing any significant role in the exchanges observed.

  2. Ion exchange of ammonium in natural and synthesized zeolites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifei; Lin, Feng; Pang, Wenqin

    2008-12-30

    In this study, zeolite Na-P and Na-Y was prepared by hydrothermal treatment of the Chinese natural clinoptilolite with NaOH. The ion exchange of NH4+ into the three zeolites in the temperature range of 288-333K was also investigated, and the thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The selectivity sequence for NH4+ entering the sodium form of the three materials was Na-clinoptilolite>Na-Y>Na-P, as indicated by values of DeltaG degrees . The results demonstrated that the Si/Al molar ratio of zeolites determined the selectivity for NH4+.

  3. Ion-exchange polymer artificial muscle and actuating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Dominique; Tondu, Bertrand; Lopez, Pierre; Aurelle, Yves; Ricard, Alain

    1996-04-01

    Chemomechanical transformations are used to produce a mechanical force from a reversible chemical reaction in order to generate artificial muscular contraction, on the model of the biological muscle. The design and experimentation of an original artificial muscle using an ion-exchange polymer which reacts inside a soft envelope, derived from research on pneumatic artificial McKibben muscle, is presented. Then a chemomechanical actuator constituted of two artificial muscles has been conceived: first results are shown on position control in open-loop mode.

  4. Influence of natural organic matter on the adsorption of metal ion onto clay particles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, D.; Taylor, H.E.; Aiken, G.R.; Roth, D.A.; Frimmel, F.H.

    2002-01-01

    The influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of Al, Fe, Zn, and Pb onto clay minerals was investigated. Adsorption experiments were carried out at pH = 5 and pH = 7 in the presence and absence of NOM. In general, the presence of NOM decreased the adsorption of metal ions onto the clay particles. Al and Fe were strongly influenced by NOM, whereas Zn and Pb adsorption was only slightly altered. The interaction of the metal ions with the minerals and the influence of NOM on this interaction was investigated by coupling SdFFF with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS) or an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICPAES). Quantitative atomization of the clay particles in the ICP was confirmed by comparing elemental content determined by direct injection of the clay into the ICPMS with values from acid digestion. Particle sizes of the clays were found to be between 0.1 and 1 μm by sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) with UV detection. Aggregation of particles due to metal adsorption was observed using SdFFF-ICPMS measurements. This aggregation was dependent on the specific metal ion and decreased in the presence of NOM and at higher pH value.

  5. FDM study of ion exchange diffusion equation in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zigang; Yang, Yongjia; Wang, Qiang; Sun, Guangchun

    2009-05-01

    Ion-exchange technique in glass was developed to fabricate gradient refractive index optical devices. In this paper, the Finite Difference Method(FDM), which is used for the solution of ion-diffusion equation, is reported. This method transforms continual diffusion equation to separate difference equation. It unitizes the matrix of MATLAB program to solve the iteration process. The collation results under square boundary condition show that it gets a more accurate numerical solution. Compared to experiment data, the relative error is less than 0.2%. Furthermore, it has simply operation and kinds of output solutions. This method can provide better results for border-proliferation of the hexagonal and the channel devices too.

  6. Extraction and ion-exchange behavior of mendelevium (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Buklanov, G.V.; Pkhar, Z.Z.; Lebedev, I.A.; Katargin, N.V.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1988-09-01

    Medelevium-256 was obtained via multinucleon transfer reactions upon irradiation of /sup 249/Bk by /sup 22/Ne ions from the extracted beam of a U-300 cyclotron. In order to extract mendelevium and separate it from the products of nuclear reactions, an express ion-exchange method using one column with cationite and zinc amalgam in a solution of 1 mole/liter HCl as the eluent was developed. It was shown that under these conditions mendelevium is reduced and washes out as an alkaline earth element. On the basis of the location of the peaks of the elution curves of Sr/sup 2+/, Eu/sup 2+/, and Md/sup 2+/, the value of the ionic radium of Md/sup 2+/ is estimated and is used to estimate the heat of hydration.

  7. New Charge Exchange Calculations for Lowly-Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, P. C.

    2005-05-01

    The process of charge exchange, which occurs during the collision of an ion with a neutral species, is important in a variety of astrophysical and atmospheric environments. It can have an influence on the ionization and thermal balances of the plasma and may also contribute to the emission spectrum. The charge exchange of multiply-charged ions (q>2) usually proceeds at a fast rate with rate coefficients typically of 10-10 to 10-9 cm3s-1. Therefore, highly-charged ions, which are created in UV or x-ray ionized gas, quickly recombine to smaller charges. However, the rate coefficients for singly- and doubly-charged ions can vary over five orders of magnitude depending on the ion species, the neutral target, and the temperature. In particular, the rate coefficients depend sensitively on the dominant mechanism which may be due to radial, rotational, radiative, or spin-orbit coupling and the corresponding quasi-molecular curves can be very complicated. Measurements of such processes are complicated by metastable contamination and uncertainties in target purity and estimates of empirical values inferred from astrophysical modeling are typically suspect. Therefore, the state of knowledge of lowly-charged electron transfer processes is generally poor, but these reactions can be critical in determining the state of the plasma. If, for example, the rate coefficient for a q=2 ion is very small, the process would result in a bottle-neck in the recombination cascade from higer charges. In an effort to address these problems, quantum-mechanical calculations have been carried out for a number of singly- and doubly-charged ions and benchmarked to measurements when available. I will present a summary of these results which reveal significant differences from values adopted in rate coefficient compilations used by various modeling packages. This work was performed in collaboration with L. B. Zhao, C. Y. Lin, J. P. Gu, H. P. Liebermann, R. J. Buenker, and M. Kimura. Support from NASA

  8. Electron spin resonance and electron spin echo modulation studies of ion-exchanged NiH-SAPO-17 and NiH-SAPO-35 molecular sieves: Comparison with ion-exchanged NiH-SAPO-34 molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Djieugoue, M.A.; Prakash, A.M.; Zhu, Z.; Kevan, L.

    1999-08-26

    Erionite-like silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieve SAPO-17 and levyne-like SAPO-35, in which Ni ions were incorporated via solid-state ion-exchange into known extra framework sites, have been studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron spin echo modulation (ESEM). The Ni ion reducibility, location, and interaction with several adsorbates have been investigated. Among these adsorbates, the interaction with nitric oxide was emphasized and compared to that of Ni ion with NO in the previously studied chabazite-like SAPO-34. Room-temperature adsorption of C{sub 2}D{sub 4} on NiH-SAPO-17 after dehydration at 573 K, oxygen treatment at 823 K, evacuation, and subsequent hydrogen treatment at 573 K produces two Ni-ethylene complexes. Carbon monoxide adsorption gives rise to a Ni(I)-(CO){sub n} complex with unresolved {sup 13}C hyperfine lines. Following the kinetics of nitric oxide adsorption on NiH-SAPO-17 shows that initially, a Ni(I)-(NO){sup +} complex, a NO radical, and a new species which appears to be another NO species are generated. After a reaction time of 24 h, NO{sub 2} is observed. As the adsorption time further increases, NO{sub 2} becomes stronger while Ni(I)-(NO){sup +} decays, and after 5 days only NO{sub 2} remains. NO adsorption on NiH-SAPO-35 shows different features. Initially, two Ni(I)-(NO){sup +} complexes along with a NO radical are seen. As the adsorption time increases, one of the Ni(I)-(NO){sup +} complexes decreases in intensity while the other one increases, and after a few days only one Ni(I)-(NO){sup +} complex remains. Simulation of the {sup 31}P ESEM spectrum, supplemented by {sup 27}Al modulation, suggests that, upon dehydration, Ni ions in NiH-SAPO-17 migrate from the erioinite supercage to the smaller cancrinite cage. In dehydrated NiH-SAPO-17 migrate from the erionite supercage to the smaller cancrinite cage. In dehydrated NiH-SAPO-34 and NiH-SAPO-35, Ni ions remain in the large chabazite and levyne cages, respectively. As a

  9. Electron spin resonance and electron spin echo modulation studies of ion-exchanged NiH-SAPO-17 and NiH-SAPO-35 molecular sieves: Comparison with ion-exchanged NiH-SAPO-34 molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Djieugoue, M.A.; Prakash, A.M.; Zhu, Z.; Kevan, L. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1999-08-26

    Erionite-like silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieve SAPO-17 and levyne-like SAPO-35, in which Ni ions were incorporated via solid-state ion-exchange into known extra framework sites, have been studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electron spin echo modulation (ESEM). The Ni ion reducibility, location, and interaction with several adsorbates have been investigated. Among these adsorbates, the interaction with nitric oxide was emphasized and compared to that of Ni ion with NO in the previously studied chabazite-like SAPO-34. Room-temperature adsorption of C[sub 2]D[sub 4] on NiH-SAPO-17 after dehydration at 573 K, oxygen treatment at 823 K, evacuation, and subsequent hydrogen treatment at 573 K produces two Ni-ethylene complexes. Carbon monoxide adsorption gives rise to a Ni(I)-(CO)[sub n] complex with unresolved [sup 13]C hyperfine lines. Following the kinetics of nitric oxide adsorption on NiH-SAPO-17 shows that initially, a Ni(I)-(NO)[sup +] complex, a NO radical, and a new species which appears to be another NO species are generated. After a reaction time of 24 h, NO[sub 2] is observed. As the adsorption time further increases, NO[sub 2] becomes stronger while Ni(I)-(NO)[sup +] decays, and after 5 days only NO[sub 2] remains. NO adsorption on NiH-SAPO-35 shows different features. Initially, two Ni(I)-(NO)[sup +] complexes along with a NO radical are seen. As the adsorption time increases, one of the Ni(I)-(NO)[sup +] complexes decreases in intensity while the other one increases, and after a few days only one Ni(I)-(NO)[sup +] complex remains. Simulation of the [sup 31]P ESEM spectrum, supplemented by [sup 27]Al modulation, suggests that, upon dehydration, Ni ions in NiH-SAPO-17 migrate from the erioinite supercage to the smaller cancrinite cage. In dehydrated NiH-SAPO-17 migrate from the erionite supercage to the smaller cancrinite cage. In dehydrated NiH-SAPO-34 and NiH-SAPO-35, Ni ions remain in the large chabazite and levyne cages, respectively. As a

  10. Partitioning of mobile ions between ion exchange polymers and aqueous salt solutions: importance of counter-ion condensation.

    PubMed

    Kamcev, Jovan; Galizia, Michele; Benedetti, Francesco M; Jang, Eui-Soung; Paul, Donald R; Freeman, Benny D; Manning, Gerald S

    2016-02-17

    Equilibrium partitioning of ions between a membrane and a contiguous external solution strongly influences transport properties of polymeric membranes used for water purification and energy generation applications. This study presents a theoretical framework to quantitatively predict ion sorption from aqueous electrolytes (e.g., NaCl, MgCl2) into charged (i.e., ion exchange) polymers. The model was compared with experimental NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2 sorption data in commercial cation and anion exchange membranes. Ion sorption in charged polymers was modeled using a thermodynamic approach based on Donnan theory coupled with Manning's counter-ion condensation theory to describe non-ideal behavior of ions in the membrane. Ion activity coefficients in solution were calculated using the Pitzer model. The resulting model, with no adjustable parameters, provides remarkably good agreement with experimental values of membrane mobile salt concentration. The generality of the model was further demonstrated using literature data for ion sorption of various electrolytes in charged polymers, including HCl sorption in Nafion.

  11. Adsorption of phosphate ions from an aqueous solution by calcined nickel-cobalt binary hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Fumihiko; Ueta, Erimi; Toda, Megumu; Otani, Masashi; Kawasaki, Naohito

    2017-01-01

    Different molar ratios of a Ni/Co binary hydroxide (NiCo82, NiCo91, and Ni100) were prepared and calcined at 270 °C (NiCo82-270, NiCo91-270, and Ni100-270). The properties of the adsorbents and the amount of adsorbed phosphate ions were evaluated. The adsorbents calcined at 270 °C had a nickel oxide structure. The amount of adsorbed phosphate ions, the amount of hydroxyl groups, and the specific surface area of the calcined adsorbents at 270 °C were greater than those of the uncalcined adsorbents. The amount of adsorbed phosphate ions was related to the amount of hydroxyl groups and the specific surface area; the correlation coefficients were 0.966 and 0.953, respectively. The adsorption isotherm data for NiCo91 and NiCo91-270 were fit to both the Freundlich and Langmuir equations. The amount of adsorbed phosphate ions increased with increasing temperature. The experimental data fit the pseudo-second-order model better than the pseudo-first-order model. A neutral pH was optimal for phosphate ion adsorption. In addition, the phosphate ions that were adsorbed onto NiCo91-270 could be recovered using sodium hydroxide, and the adsorbent was useful for the repetitive adsorption/desorption of phosphate ions. Collectively, these results suggest that NiCo91-270 is prospectively useful for the adsorption of phosphate ions from aqueous solutions.

  12. Adsorption intrinsic kinetics and isotherms of lead ions on steel slag.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng-Yu; Gao, Jin; Yang, Yi-Jin; Yang, Ying-Chun; Ye, Zhi-Xiang

    2010-01-15

    Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the kinetics of adsorption of lead ions by steel slag on the basis of the external diffusion, intra-particle diffusion and adsorption reaction model (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order). The results showed that the controlling step for the adsorption kinetics changed with the varying experimental parameters. When the particle size of steel slag was larger than 120 mesh, intra-particle diffusion of Pb(2+) was the controlling step, and when the initial concentration of Pb(2+) was less than 150 m gL(-1) or the shaking rate was lower than 150 rpm, external diffusion of Pb(2+) was promoted. Contrary to the former experimental conditions the adsorption reaction was the controlling step, and the adsorption followed second-order kinetics, with an adsorption rate constant of 13.26 g mg(-1)min(-1). The adsorption isotherm of Pb(2+) with steel slag followed the Langmuir model, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99.

  13. Adsorption character for removal Cu(II) by magnetic Cu(II) ion imprinted composite adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yueming; Wei, Xizhu; Zhang, Milin

    2008-10-01

    A novel magnetic Cu(II) ion imprinted composite adsorbent (Cu(II)-MICA) was synthesized, characterized and applied for the selective removal Cu(II) from aqueous solution in the batch system. The adsorption-desorption and selectivity characteristics were investigated. The maximum adsorption occurred at pH 5-6. The equilibrium time was 6.0h, and a pseudo-second-order model could best describe adsorption kinetics. The adsorption equilibrium data fit Langmuir isotherm equation well with a maximum adsorption capacity of 46.25mg/g and Langmuir adsorption equilibrium constant of 0.0956L/mg at 298K. Thermodynamic parameters analysis predicted an exothermic nature of adsorption and a spontaneous and favourable process that could be mainly governed by physisorption mechanism. The relative selectivity coefficients of Cu(II)-MICA for Cu(II)/Zn(II) and Cu(II)/Ni(II) were 2.31, 2.66 times greater than the magnetic non-imprinted composite adsorbent (MNICA). Results suggested that Cu(II)-MICA was a material of efficient, low-cost, convenient separation under magnetic field and could be reused five times with about 14% regeneration loss.

  14. Preparation of the porphyrin-functionalized cotton fiber for the chromogenic detection and efficient adsorption of Cd(2+) ions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changkun; Liang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Ji'an; Lei, Xiaobin; Zhao, Xinzhen

    2017-02-15

    In this study, a porphyrin functionalized cotton fiber was prepared and investigated for the visual detection and efficient adsorption of cadmium (Cd(2+)) ions in aqueous solutions. The pristine cotton fiber was first grafted with poly (3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt) (PSMP) via the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP), and subsequently immobilized with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methy-4-pyridinio)porphyrin tetra(p-toluenesulfonate) (TMPyP), to form the CPT (Cotton-PSMP-TMPyP) material. The CPT was characterized by SEM, FTIR, XPS and elemental analysis, and examined for the detection and adsorption of cadmium ions. The influencing factors such as pH and the initial cadmium ion concentrations on the adsorption performances were investigated. Results showed that the cadmium ion adsorption isotherm was best fitted with the Langmuir isotherm model, with the derived maximum adsorption capacity of 0.8638mmol/g. The thermodynamic study showed the endothermic nature of the adsorption process. In addition, the adsorption kinetics was fast with over 90% of the total cadmium ions adsorbed within 2min. Furthermore, the distinctive color response of the CPT to the cadmium ions in aqueous solutions was clearly displayed. A linear relationship between the light absorbance of CPT-Cd (CPT adsorbed with cadmium ions) and the initial concentrations of cadmium ions was successfully established, which could be used for the fast determination of the cadmium ion concentrations in aqueous solutions.

  15. Adsorption Processes of Lead Ions on the Mixture Surface of Bentonite and Bottom Sediments.

    PubMed

    Hegedűsová, Alžbeta; Hegedűs, Ondrej; Tóth, Tomáš; Vollmannová, Alena; Andrejiová, Alena; Šlosár, Miroslav; Mezeyová, Ivana; Pernyeszi, Tímea

    2016-12-01

    The adsorption of contaminants plays an important role in the process of their elimination from a polluted environment. This work describes the issue of loading environment with lead Pb(II) and the resulting negative impact it has on plants and living organisms. It also focuses on bentonite as a natural adsorbent and on the adsorption process of Pb(II) ions on the mixture of bentonite and bottom sediment from the water reservoir in Kolíňany (SR). The equilibrium and kinetic experimental data were evaluated using Langmuir isotherm kinetic pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order rate equations the intraparticle and surface diffusion models. Langmuir isotherm model was successfully used to characterize the lead ions adsorption equilibrium on the mixture of bentonite and bottom sediment. The pseudo second-order model, the intraparticle and surface (film) diffusion models could be simultaneously fitted the experimental kinetic data.

  16. Highly enhanced adsorption for decontamination of lead ions from battery wastewaters using chitosan functionalized with xanthate.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Divya; Sankararamakrishnan, Nalini

    2008-12-01

    Decontamination of lead ions from aqueous media has been investigated using cross linked xanthated chitosan (CMC) as an adsorbent. Various physico-chemical parameters such as contact time, amount of adsorbent, concentration of adsorbate were optimized to simulate the best conditions which can be used to decontaminate lead from aqueous media using CMC as an adsorbent. The atomic absorption spectrometric technique was used to determine the distribution of lead. Maximum adsorption was observed at both pH 4 and 5. The adsorption data followed both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Langmuir isotherm gave a saturated capacity of 322.6+/-1.2mg/g at pH 4. From the FTIR spectra analysis, it was concluded that xanthate and amino group participate in the adsorption process. The developed procedure was successfully applied for the removal of lead ions from real battery wastewater samples.

  17. Vacancy ion-exclusion chromatography of haloacetic acids on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Helaleh, Murad I H; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Mori, Masanobu; Xu, Qun; Taoda, Hiroshi; Ding, Ming-Yu; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Haddad, Paul R

    2003-05-16

    A new and simple approach is described for the determination of the haloacetic acids (such as mono-, di- and trichloroacetic acids) usually found in drinking water as chlorination by-products after disinfection processes and acetic acid. The new approach, termed vacancy ion-exclusion chromatography, is based on an ion-exclusion mechanism but using the sample solution as the mobile phase, pure water as the injected sample, and a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column (TSKgel OApak-A) as the stationary phase. The addition of sulfuric acid to the mobile phase results in highly sensitive conductivity detection with sharp and well-shaped peaks, leading to excellent and efficient separations. The elution order was sulfuric acid, dichloroacetic acid, monochloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, and acetic acid. The separation of these acids depends on their pKa values. Acids with lower pKa values were eluted earlier than those with higher pKa, except for trichloroacetic acid due to a hydrophobic-adsorption effect occurring as a side-effect of vacancy ion-exclusion chromatography. The detection limits of these acids in the present study with conductivity detection were 3.4 microM for monochloroacetic acid, 0.86 microM for dichloroacetic acid and 0.15 microM for trichloroacetic acid.

  18. Comparison of adsorption equilibrium models for the study of CL-, NO3- and SO4(2-) removal from aqueous solutions by an anion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Dron, Julien; Dodi, Alain

    2011-06-15

    The removal of chloride, nitrate and sulfate ions from aqueous solutions by a macroporous resin is studied through the ion exchange systems OH(-)/Cl(-), OH(-)/NO(3)(-), OH(-)/SO(4)(2-), and HCO(3)(-)/Cl(-), Cl(-)/NO(3)(-), Cl(-)/SO(4)(2-). They are investigated by means of Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevitch (D-R) and Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A) single-component adsorption isotherms. The sorption parameters and the fitting of the models are determined by nonlinear regression and discussed. The Langmuir model provides a fair estimation of the sorption capacity whatever the system under study, on the contrary to Freundlich and D-R models. The adsorption energies deduced from Dubinin and Langmuir isotherms are in good agreement, and the surface parameter of the D-A isotherm appears consistent. All models agree on the order of affinity OH(-)ion exchange processes under study among other adsorption isotherms. The nonlinear regression results are also compared with linear regressions. While the parameter values are not affected, the evaluation of the best fitting model is biased by linearization.

  19. Anion selective membrane. [ion exchange resins and ion exchange membrane electrolytes for electrolytic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S. S.; Geoffroy, R. R.; Hodgdon, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental anion permselective membranes were prepared and tested for their suitability as cell separators in a chemical redox power storage system being developed at NASA-Lewis Research Center. The goals of long-term (1000 hr) oxidative and thermal stability at 80 C in FeCl3 and CrCl3 electrolytes were met by most of the weak base and strong base amino exchange groups considered in the program. Good stability is exhibited by several of the membrane substrate resins. These are 'styrene' divinylbenzene copolymer and PVC film. At least four membrane systems produce strong flexible films with electrochemical properties (resistivity, cation transfer) superior to those of the 103QZL, the most promising commercial membrane. The physical and chemical properties of the resins are listed.

  20. COLUMBIC OXIDE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM IONS

    DOEpatents

    Beaton, R.H.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for separating plutonium ions from a solution of neutron irradiated uranium in which columbic oxide is used as an adsorbert. According to the invention the plutonium ion is selectively adsorbed by Passing a solution containing the plutonium in a valence state not higher than 4 through a porous bed or column of granules of hydrated columbic oxide. The adsorbed plutonium is then desorbed by elution with 3 N nitric acid.

  1. Evaluation of Ion Exchange Materials in K Basin Floor Sludge and Potential Solvents for PCB Extraction from Ion Exchange Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.J.; Klinger, G.S.; Bredt, P.R.

    1999-04-10

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. These small amounts are significant from a regulatory standpoint. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). Chemical pretreatment is required to address criticality issues and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Eleven technologies have been evaluated (Papp 1997) as potential pretreatment methods. Based on the evaluations and engineering studies and limited testing, Fluor Daniel Hanford recommended solvent washing of the K Basin sludge, followed by nitric acid dissolution and, potentially, peroxide addition (FDH 1997). The solvent washing (extraction) and peroxide addition would be used to facilitate PCB removal and destruction. Following solvent extraction, the PCBs could be distilled and concentrated for disposal as a low-level waste. The purpose of the work reported here was to continue investigating solvent extraction, first by better identifying the ion exchange materials in the actual sludge samples and then evaluating various solvents for removing the PCBs or possibly dissolving the resins. This report documents some of the process knowledge on ion exchange materials used and spilled in the K Basins and describes the materials identified from wet sieving KE Basin floor and canister sludge and the results of other analyses. Several photographs are included to compare materials and illustrate material behavior. A summary of previous tests on

  2. Radiation stability of sodium titanate ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kenna, B.T.

    1980-02-01

    Sodium titanate and sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin are being considered as ion exchangers to remove /sup 90/Sr and actinides from the large volume of defense waste stored at Hanford Site in Washington. Preliminary studies to determine the radiation effect on Sr/sup +2/ and I/sup -/ capacity of these ion-exchange materials were conducted. Samples of sodium titanate powder, sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin, as well as the nitrate form of macroreticular anion resin were irradiated with up to 2 x 10/sup 9/ Rads of /sup 60/Co gamma rays. Sodium titanate cation capacity decreased about 50% while the sodium titanate loaded macroeticular resin displayed a dramatic decrease in cation capacity when irradiated with 10/sup 8/-10/sup 9/ Rad. The latter decrease is tentatively ascribed to radiation damage to the organic portion which subsequently inhibits interaction with the contained sodium titanate. The anion capacity of both macroreticular resin and sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin exhibited significant decreases with increasing radiation exposure. These results suggest that consideration should be given to the potential effects of radiation degradation if column regeneration is to be used. 5 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Ion exchangers in radioactive waste management: natural Iranian zeolites.

    PubMed

    Nilchi, A; Maalek, B; Khanchi, A; Ghanadi Maragheh, M; Bagheri, A; Savoji, K

    2006-01-01

    Five samples of natural zeolites from different parts of Iran were chosen for this study. In order to characterize and determine their structures, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectrometry were carried out for each sample. The selective absorption properties of each zeolite were found by calculating the distribution coefficient (K(d)) of various simulated wastes which were prepared by spiking the radionuclides with (131)I, (99)Mo, (153)Sm, (140)La and (147)Nd. All the zeolite samples used in this study had extremely high absorption value towards (140)La; clinoptolite from Mianeh and analsite from Ghalehkhargoshi showed good absorption for (147)Nd; clinoptolite from Semnan and clinoptolite from Firozkoh showed high absorption for (153)Sm; mesolite from Arababad Tabas showed good absorption for (99)Mo; and finally mesolite from Arababad Tabas, clinoptolite from Semnan and clinoptolite from Firozkoh could be used to selectively absorb (131)I from the stimulated waste which was prepared. The natural zeolites chosen for these studies show a similar pattern to those synthetic ion exchangers in the literature and in some cases an extremely high selectivity towards certain radioactive elements. Hence the binary separation of radioactive elements could easily be carried out. Furthermore, these zeolites, which are naturally occurring ion exchangers, are viable economically and extremely useful alternatives in this industry.

  4. Ion exchange at TNX using the SKID unit

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.L.; Bibler, J.P.

    1993-10-21

    An ion exchange unit has been manufactured for WSRC by British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. This unit consists of three columns, ancillary valving, pumps, lines, and computer controls. It has been delivered to TNX for use in testing a cesium-specific ion exchange resin, developed at WSRC as a potential second generation process for the decontamination of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) supernate. This resin also has Department of Energy applications at both Oak Ridge and Hanford. Oak Ridge is interested in decontaminating the Melton Valley storage tank supernate, while Hanford is interested in decontaminating the 101-AW and 101-SY supernate streams. Another potential developmental interest is the Savannah River Site (SRS) DWPF recycle stream. The three primary waste streams of interest are the Oak Ridge, Hanford, and SRS, SWPF supernate streams. For these three waste streams, the cesium decontamination factor (DF) will be measured for a non-radioactive, simulated, high-level waste solution. The test objectives, process outlines, and broad characterization of the waste streams are described.

  5. Investigation of phosphate removal using sulphate-coated zeolite for ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Woo; Hong, Seok-Won; Kim, Dong-Ju; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2012-01-01

    Sulphate-coated zeolite (SCZ) was characterized and employed for the removal of phosphate from aqueous solutions using both batch and column tests. Batch experiments were conducted to assess the sulphate dilution ratio, reaction time for coating, surface washing and calcination temperature during the synthesis of SCZ. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-first-order models were suitable to explain the sorption characteristics of phosphate onto the SCZ. Equilibrium tests showed that SCZ was capable of removing phosphate, with a maximum binding energy beta = 30.2 mg g(-1), compared to other adsorbents, such as activated alumina and ion exchange resin. The Thomas model was applied to the adsorption of phosphate to predict the breakthrough curves and the parameters of a column test. The model was found to be suitable for describing the adsorption process of the dynamic behaviour of the SCZ column. The total adsorbed quantity and equilibrium uptake ofphosphate related to the effluent volumes were determined by evaluating the breakthrough curves obtained under the allowed conditions. The results of batch and column experiments, as well as the low cost of the adsorbent, suggested that SCZ could be used as an adsorbent for the efficient and cost-effective removal of phosphate from aqueous solution.

  6. Breakthrough performance of plasmid DNA on ion-exchange membrane columns.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Cisneros, Rosa Ma; Olivas, Jonathan de la Vega; Ortega, Jaime; Guzmán, Roberto; Tejeda-Mansir, Armando

    2007-01-01

    Breakthrough performance of plasmid DNA adsorption on ion-exchange membrane columns was theoretically and experimentally investigated using batch and fixed-bed systems. System dispersion curves showed the absence of flow non-idealities in the experimental arrangement. Breakthrough curves (BTC) were significantly affected by inlet flow rate and solute concentration. In the theoretical analysis, a model was integrated by the serial coupling of the membrane transport model and the system dispersion model. A transport model that considers finite kinetic rate and column dispersed flow was used in the study. A simplex optimization routine, coupled to the solution of the partial differential model equations, was employed to estimate the maximum adsorption capacity constant, the equilibrium desorption constant, and the forward interaction rate constant, which are the parameters of the membrane transport model. The analysis shows that as inlet concentration or flow rate increases, the deviation of the model from the experimental behavior decreases. The BTCs displacement as inlet concentration increases was explained in terms of a greater degree of column saturation reached and more efficient operation accomplished. The degree of column saturation was not influenced by inlet flow rate. It was necessary to consider in the column model the slight variation in the BTC produced by the axial dispersion, in order to accomplish the experimental curve dispersion. Consequently, the design criteria that for Pe > 40 the column axial dispersion can be neglected should be taken with precaution.

  7. Time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis of protein adsorption on a polyvinylidene difluoride surface modified by ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Okuji, Shigeto; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the effects of nanoscopic surface modification of polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) by plasma-based ion implantation on protein adsorption with time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) analysis. The chemical composition of the LDPE and PVDF surfaces was changed by ion irradiation. In particular, irradiation substantially decreased the number of CH and CF bonds on the PVDF surface, but only slightly decreased that of CH bonds for LDPE. These decreases may reflect a higher hydrogen recombination rate of the LDPE than the PVDF surface. An increase in oxygen was observed on both the LDPE and PVDF surfaces following ion irradiation, but was saturated after irradiation of 1×10(15)cm(-2) on the PVDF surface. The hydrophilicity of the ion-irradiated LDPE surface was promoted with an increase of the total ion fluence. Ion irradiation also changed the surface properties of PVDF to become more hydrophilic, but the variation did not correlate with the total ion fluence presumably due to the presence of fluorine atoms and the saturation of oxidation. Both bovine serum albumin (BSA) and collagen adsorption were suppressed on the LDPE surface by ion irradiation, which may have resulted from a decrease of the hydrophobic interaction. By contrast, ion irradiation increased protein adsorption on the PVDF surface, and BSA was adsorbed more than collagen, whereas there was no difference in the adsorption between BSA and collagen on the ion-irradiated LDPE surface. Moreover, the adsorption of BSA decreased on the oxygen- and fluorine-rich PVDF surface. These results indicate that the nanoscopic composition changes on the PVDF surface affect the adsorption behavior of BSA. Specifically, ferroelectric property on the PVDF surface was changed by ion irradiation and the nanoscopic change in polarity presumably affected the protein adsorption. Our findings suggest that selective adsorption control of protein can be

  8. Enhanced DOC removal using anion and cation ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Arias-Paic, Miguel; Cawley, Kaelin M; Byg, Steve; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Hardness and DOC removal in a single ion exchange unit operation allows for less infrastructure, is advantageous for process operation and depending on the water source, could enhance anion exchange resin removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Simultaneous application of cationic (Plus) and anionic (MIEX) ion exchange resin in a single contact vessel was tested at pilot and bench scales, under multiple regeneration cycles. Hardness removal correlated with theoretical predictions; where measured hardness was between 88 and 98% of the predicted value. Comparing bench scale DOC removal of solely treating water with MIEX compared to Plus and MIEX treated water showed an enhanced DOC removal, where removal was increased from 0.5 to 1.25 mg/L for the simultaneous resin application compared to solely applying MIEX resin. A full scale MIEX treatment plant (14.5 MGD) reduced raw water DOC from 13.7 mg/L to 4.90 mg/L in the treated effluent at a bed volume (BV) treatment rate of 800, where a parallel operation of a simultaneous MIEX and Plus resin pilot (10 gpm) measured effluent DOC concentrations of no greater than 3.4 mg/L, even at bed volumes of treatment 37.5% greater than the full scale plant. MIEX effluent compared to simultaneous Plus and MIEX effluent resulted in differences in fluorescence intensity that correlated to decreases in DOC concentration. The simultaneous treatment of Plus and MIEX resin produced water with predominantly microbial character, indicating the enhanced DOC removal was principally due to increased removal of terrestrially derived organic matter. The addition of Plus resin to a process train with MIEX resin allows for one treatment process to remove both DOC and hardness, where a single brine waste stream can be sent to sewer at a full-scale plant, completely removing lime chemical addition and sludge waste disposal for precipitative softening processes.

  9. On the influence of ion exchange on the local structure of the titanosilicate ETS-10.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Claudiu C; Zibrowius, Bodo; Löffler, Elke; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2007-07-14

    The effect of ion exchange with different monovalent cations (NH(4)(+), K(+), Na(+) and Cs(+)) on the local structure of the titanosilicate ETS-10 has been studied by (29)Si MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopy. Although X-ray diffraction shows no significant influence of ion exchange on the long range order, ammonium exchange is found to result in substantial damage to the local structure. Ion exchange experiments with alkali cations under significantly more acidic conditions clearly show that the structural damage brought about by ammonium exchange is not caused by the low pH of the exchange solution. The exchange with potassium and caesium ions also leads to significant changes in the (29)Si NMR and Raman spectra. However, these changes can largely be reversed by sodium back-exchange.

  10. Adsorption of indium(III) ions from aqueous solution using chitosan-coated bentonite beads.

    PubMed

    Calagui, Mary Jane C; Senoro, Delia B; Kan, Chi-Chuan; Salvacion, Jonathan W L; Futalan, Cybelle Morales; Wan, Meng-Wei

    2014-07-30

    Batch adsorption study was utilized in evaluating the potential suitability of chitosan-coated bentonite (CCB) as an adsorbent in the removal of indium ions from aqueous solution. The percentage (%) removal and adsorption capacity of indium(III) were examined as a function of solution pH, initial concentration, adsorbent dosage and temperature. The experimental data were fitted with several isotherm models, where the equilibrium data was best described by Langmuir isotherm. The mean energy (E) value was found in the range of 1-8kJ/mol, indicating that the governing type of adsorption of indium(III) onto CCB is essentially physical. Thermodynamic parameters, including Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy indicated that the indium(III) ions adsorption onto CCB was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in the temperature range of 278-318K. The kinetics was evaluated utilizing the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order model. The adsorption kinetics of indium(III) best fits the pseudo-second order (R(2)>0.99), which implies that chemical sorption as the rate-limiting step.

  11. Adsorption of silver ions on polypyrrole embedded electrospun nanofibrous polyethersulfone membranes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Hsiu-Wen; You, Jiann-Hwa; Kau, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2014-04-15

    In this study we developed polypyrrole embedded electrospun nanofibrous polyethersulfone nanofibrous membranes for the removal of silver ions. Polypyrrole and polyethersulfone dissolved in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) were electrospun into nanofibrous membranes via an electrospinning process. The morphology of as-spun polypyrrole/polyethersulfone nanofibers was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The average diameter of electrospun nanofibers ranged from 410 nm to 540 nm. The adsorption capability of nanofibrous polypyrrole/polyethersulfone membranes was measured and compared with that of bulk polypyrrole. The influence of various process conditions on adsorption efficiency was also examined. The experimental results suggested that the electrospun nanofibrous membranes exhibited good silver ion uptake capabilities. The metal uptake of nanofibrous membranes increased with the initial metal ion concentrations and the pH value, while decreased with the temperature and the filtering rate of the solutions. Furthermore, the electrospun membrane could be reused after the recovery process.

  12. Diffusional analysis of the adsorption of methyl iodide on silver exchanged mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.; Counce, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The removal of organic iodides from off-gas streams is an important step in controlling the release of radioactive iodine to the environment during the treatment of radioactive wastes or the processing of some irradiated materials. Nine-well accepted mass transfer models were evaluated for their ability to adequately explain the observed CH{sub 3}I uptake behavior onto the Ag{degrees}Z. Linear and multidimensional regression techniques were used to estimate the diffusion constants and other model parameters, which then permitted the selection of an appropriate mass transfer model. Although a number of studies have been conducted to evaluate the loading of both elemental and methyl iodide on silver-exchanged mordenite, these studies focused primarily on the macro scale (deep bed) while evaluating the material under a broad range of process conditions and contaminants for total bed loading at the time of breakthrough. A few studies evaluated equilibrium or maximum loading. Thus, to date, only bulk loading data exist for the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z. Hence this is believed to be the first study to quantify the controlling mass transfer mechanisms of this process, It can be concluded from the analysis of the experimental data obtained by the {open_quotes}single-pellet{close_quotes} type experiments and for the process conditions used in this study that the overall mass transfer rate associated with the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z is affected by both micropore and macropore diffusion. The macropore diffusion rate was significantly faster than the micropore diffusion, resulting in a two-step adsorption behavior which was adequately modeled by a bimodal pore distribution model. The micropore diffusivity was determined to be on the order of 2 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s. The system was also shown to be isothermal under all conditions of this study. 21 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Speciation study of aluminium in beverages by Competitive Ligand Exchange-Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Magnier, A; Fekete, V; Van Loco, J; Bolle, F; Elskens, M

    2014-05-01

    Competitive Ligand Exchange-Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry (CLE-AdSV) was used for determining the speciation of aluminium in commonly consumed beverages (water, tea, infusion, coffee, orange juice, tomato juice, beer and red wine). Aluminium determination involves the adsorption of Al-complexes with the ligand cupferron onto a hanging mercury drop electrode. All samples were studied at pH 6.5 with an accumulation step at -0.60 V (all potential values in the paper are given versus the Ag/AgCl, [KCl]=3 M reference electrode) during 60 s, and a final cupferron concentration of 4 × 10(-4)M. These conditions were used to establish (i) the concentration of electro-labile aluminium, (ii) the range of ligand concentrations and (iii) the conditional stability constants of beverage samples using titration procedures. The results based on Ruzic plots were compared to computer simulation with Visual MINTEQ. This comparison suggests that labile monomeric Al-forms and soluble organic complexes of low molecular weight can be quantified by the CLE-AdSV procedure. Overall the relative uncertainties on the determination of the electro-active Al fraction and the complexing parameters, i.e., concentration and conditional stability constant of natural ligands in the samples, are less than 15%. Thanks to these results, information on Al bioavailability in beverages was collected and discussed. This study also illustrates the value of computer simulations when complex, time-consuming voltammetric techniques are applied.

  14. Model-based prediction of monoclonal antibody retention in ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guélat, Bertrand; Delegrange, Lydia; Valax, Pascal; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-07-12

    In order to support a model-based process design in ion-exchange chromatography, an adsorption equilibrium model was adapted to predict the protein retention behavior from the amino acid sequence and from structural information on the resin. It is based on the computation of protein-resin interactions with a colloidal model and accounts for the contribution of each ionizable amino acid to the protein charge. As a verification of the protein charge model, the experimental titration curve of a monoclonal antibody was compared to its predicted net charge. Using this protein charge model in the computation of the protein-resin interactions, it is possible to predict the adsorption equilibrium constant (i.e. retention factor or Henry constant) with an explicit pH and salt dependence. The application of the model-based predictions for an in silico screening of the protein retention on various stationary phases or, alternatively, for the comparison of various monoclonal antibodies on a given cation-exchanger was demonstrated. Furthermore, considering the structural differences between charge variants of a monoclonal antibody, it was possible to predict their individual retention times. The selectivity between the side variants and the main isoform of the monoclonal antibody were computed. The comparison with the experimental data showed that the model was reliable with respect to the identification of the operating conditions maximizing the selectivity, i.e. the most promising conditions for a monoclonal antibody variant separation. Such predictions can be useful in reducing the experimental effort to identify the parameter space.

  15. Adsorption of copper ions from aqueous solution by citric acid modified soybean straw.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were to convert soybean straw to a metal ion adsorbent and further to investigate the potential of using the adsorbent for the removal of Cu(2+) from aqueous solution. The soybean straw was water or base washed and citric acid (CA) modified to enhance its nature adsorption capacity. The morphological and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent were evaluated by spectroscopy and N(2)-adsorption techniques. The porous structure, as well as high amounts of introduced free carboxyl groups of CA modified soybean straw makes the adsorbent be good to retain Cu(2+). The adsorption capacities increased when the solution pH increased from 2 to 6 and reached the maximum value at pH 6 (0.64 mmol g(-1) for the base washed, CA modified soybean straw (CA-BWSS)). The Cu(2+) uptake increased and percentage adsorption of the Cu(2+) decreased with the increase in initial Cu(2+) concentration from 1 mM to 20 mM. Both the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were tested, and the Freundlich model fited much better than the Langmuir model. It was found that CA-BWSS have the highest adsorption capacity of the four kinds of pretreated soybean straw.

  16. Adsorption studies of Dichloromethane on some commercially available GACs: Effect of kinetics, thermodynamics and competitive ions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Moonis Ali; Kim, Seong-wook; Rao, Rifaqat Ali Khan; Abou-Shanab, R A I; Bhatnagar, Amit; Song, Hocheol; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2010-06-15

    The objective of this work was to compare the effectiveness of four commercially available granular activated carbons (GACs); coconut (CGAC), wood (WGAC), lignite (LGAC) and bituminous (BGAC) for the removal of dichloromethane (DCM) from aqueous solution by batch process. Various parameters such as thermodynamics, kinetics, pH, concentration of adsorbate, dosages of adsorbent and competitive ions effect on DCM adsorption were investigated. Maximum adsorption capacity (45.5mg/g for CGAC) was observed at pH 6.0-8.0. The kinetics data indicate better applicability of pseudo-second-order kinetics model at 25 and 35 degrees C. Freundlich model was better obeyed on CGAC, WGAC, and BGAC, while LGAC followed Langmuir model. The adsorption process for 100mg/L initial DCM concentration on CGAC was exothermic in nature. The adsorption of DCM on various adsorbents involves physical adsorption process. The adsorption of DCM over a large range of initial concentration on CGAC and LGAC is effective even in presence of ionic salts.

  17. Divalent ion encapsulated nano titania on Ti metal as a bioactive surface with enhanced protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Anbazhagan, Esaitamil; Rajendran, Archana; Natarajan, Duraipandy; Kiran, M S; Pattanayak, Deepak K

    2016-07-01

    A novel approach on incorporation of divalent species such as Mg, Ca and Sr into the titania nanostructures formed on Ti metal surface and their comparative study on enhancement of bioactivity, protein adsorption and cell compatibility is reported. When treated with hydrogen peroxide, Ti metal forms hydrogen titanate. On subsequent treatment with Mg or Ca or Sr nitrate solutions, respective ions are incorporated into hydrogen titanate layer, and heat treatment leads to titania decorated with these ions. The resultant heat-treated samples when soaked in simulated body fluid form bone-like apatite which indicates the present surface modification enhances the bioactivity. Further, enhanced protein adsorption in bovine serum albumin is an indication of suitability of these divalent species to form chelate compounds with amino acids, and Ca containing titania nanostructure favours more protein adsorption compared to the others. Cytocompatibility studies using MG-63, human osteosarcoma cell lines shows these divalent ion containing titania nanostructure favours the cell attachment and did not show any cytotoxicity. Bioactivity, enhanced protein adsorption along with cytocompatibility clearly indicates such surface modification approach to be useful to design hard tissue replacement materials in orthopaedic and dental field.

  18. Adsorptive removal of emerging polyfluoroalky substances F-53B and PFOS by anion-exchange resin: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanxin; Deng, Shubo; Du, Ziwen; Liu, Kai; Yu, Gang

    2017-02-05

    Chrome plating is an important emission source of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) industrial uses in China, where two commercial products potassium 2-(6-chloro-1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6-dodecafluorohexyloxy) (F-53B) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are applied as mist suppressant, causing non-negligible environmental risk. In this paper, anion-exchange resin IRA67 was evaluated for F-53B and PFOS removal from simulated and actual wastewater. Adsorption kinetics exhibited higher adsorption velocity and capacity of IRA67 for PFOS than F-53B due to their difference in molecular structures. Adsorption isotherms demonstrated the adsorption capacity of F-53B and PFOS on IRA67 was 4.2mmol/g and 5.5mmol/g, respectively. Because of the deprotonating of amine groups, solution pH had significant effect on IRA67 at pH>10. The results indicated that besides anion exchange other interactions including hydrophobic interaction and the formation of micelles or hemi-micelles were all involved in adsorption process. Coexisting sulfate and chromate in wastewater decreased adsorption capacities of F-53B and PFOS. The spent resin could be regenerated by the NaCl/NaOH and methanol mixed solution. In the mixed system and actual wastewater IRA67 can simultaneously remove F-53B and PFOS without obvious preference but the removal percent can be affected by competitive effect.

  19. Ion Exchange Column Tests Supporting Technetium Removal Resin Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; McCabe, D.; Hamm, L.; Smith, F.; Morse, M.

    2013-12-20

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, currently under construction. The baseline plan for this facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW). Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed on site. There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Due to the soluble properties of pertechnetate and long half-life of 99Tc, effective management of 99Tc is important. Options are being explored to immobilize the supplemental LAW portion of the tank waste, as well as to examine the volatility of 99Tc during the vitrification process. Removal of 99Tc, followed by off-site disposal has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. A conceptual flow sheets for supplemental LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal will specifically examine removing 99Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. SuperLig® 639 is an elutable ion exchange resin. In the tank waste, 99Tc is predominantly found in the tank supernate as pertechnetate (TcO4-). Perrhenate (ReO4-) has been shown to be a good non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in laboratory testing for this ion exchange resin. This report contains results of experimental ion exchange distribution coefficient and column resin maturation kinetics testing using the resin SuperLig® 639a to selectively remove perrhenate from simulated LAW. This revision includes results from testing to determine effective resin operating temperature range. Loading tests were performed at 45°C, and the computer modeling was updated to include the temperature effects. Equilibrium contact testing indicated that this batch of

  20. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-07-02

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  1. Small Column Ion Exchange Design and Safety Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, T.; Rios-Armstrong, M.; Edwards, R.; Herman, D.

    2011-02-07

    Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) is a transformational technology originally developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM-30) office and is now being deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to significantly increase overall salt processing capacity and accelerate the Liquid Waste System life-cycle. The process combines strontium and actinide removal using Monosodium Titanate (MST), Rotary Microfiltration, and cesium removal using Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST, specifically UOP IONSIV{reg_sign}IE-911 ion exchanger) to create a low level waste stream to be disposed in grout and a high level waste stream to be vitrified. The process also includes preparation of the streams for disposal, e.g., grinding of the loaded CST material. These waste processing components are technically mature and flowsheet integration studies are being performed including glass formulations studies, application specific thermal modeling, and mixing studies. The deployment program includes design and fabrication of the Rotary Microfilter (RMF) assembly, ion-exchange columns (IXCs), and grinder module, utilizing an integrated system safety design approach. The design concept is to install the process inside an existing waste tank, Tank 41H. The process consists of a feed pump with a set of four RMFs, two IXCs, a media grinder, three Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), and all supporting infrastructure including media receipt and preparation facilities. The design addresses MST mixing to achieve the required strontium and actinide removal and to prevent future retrieval problems. CST achieves very high cesium loadings (up to 1,100 curies per gallon (Ci/gal) bed volume). The design addresses the hazards associated with this material including heat management (in column and in-tank), as detailed in the thermal modeling. The CST must be size reduced for compatibility with downstream processes. The design addresses material transport into and out of the grinder and

  2. Adsorption characteristics and the kinetics of the cation exchange of rhodamine-6G with Na+-montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Gemeay, Ali H

    2002-07-15

    The adsorption and the kinetics of the cation exchange of rhodamine-6G (Rh-6G) with Na(+)-montmorillonite (Na(+)-MMT) have been studied. The binding parameters of Rh-6G have been determined by applying Freundlich and D-R isotherms. The enthalpy and the entropy of adsorption have been determined. The isosteric heat of adsorption has also been determined and decreases with increasing the concentration of Rh-6G. Increasing the concentration of Rh-6G led to a decrease in the adsorption capacity, which attributed to the formation of Rh-6G aggregates. Kinetic measurements of the cation exchange were followed up using a stopped-flow electrical conductivity detection unit. The cation-exchange process exhibited first-order kinetics with respect to the dye concentration and inversely proportional to the clay concentration. The measurements were accomplished at different temperatures and the activation parameters were determined. Increasing the Na(+)-MMT concentration led to a decrease in the rate constant. The latter is also affected by changing the exchangeable cation.

  3. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  4. Determination of effective capacities of ion-exchangeable materials by measuring the equilibrium conductivity.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    The effective ion-exchange capacities of ion-exchange materials were determined by measuring the change in the equilibrium conductivity of a column packed with analyte. The developed instrumental method can provide effective ion-exchange capacities for both cation and anion exchangers with simple operations. The cation-exchange capacity of a weak-acid cation-exchange resin (TSKgel SuperIC-Cation column) depended on the conditioning pH and the molar concentration of the conditioning agent. Plots of effective cation-exchange capacities over the conditioning pH exhibited three inflection points, suggesting the presence of two carboxy groups and one phenolic OH group in the resin, probably due to the inherent base polymer. This method was applied to several commercial analytical columns for ion chromatography, and could provide scientifically useful results for characterizing the resin properties.

  5. Designated drivers: the differing roles of divalent metal ions in surfactant adsorption at the oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ellen J; Beaman, Daniel K; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2013-12-17

    Divalent metal ions play numerous roles in biological, technological, and environmental systems. This study examines the role of a variety of ions, Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+), in the adsorption of sodium decanoate at the carbon tetrachloride-water interface. For all ions studied, the ions drive the adsorption of the surfactant to the interface. Using vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy and the carboxylic acid vibrational modes as a signature for metal ion binding, each metal salt is found to play a distinctly different role in the molecular characteristics of surfactant adsorption at the interface. Additional spectroscopic studies of the methyl and methylene vibrations are monitored to track the ordering of the alkyl chains when metal salts are added to solution. How the metal-surfactant binding impacts the surfactant structure, orientation, and solvation is explored. How these spectroscopic measurements compare with the degree of adsorption as measured by interfacial tension data is presented.

  6. Fabrication of porous zeolite/chitosan monoliths and their applications for drug release and metal ions adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongli; Yan, Weiwei; Sun, Zhiming; Pan, Cheng; Mi, Xue; Zhao, Gang; Gao, Jianping

    2015-03-06

    Ordered porous zeolite/chitosan (Zel/Chi) monoliths were prepared by a unidirectional freeze-drying method, and their properties and structures were characterized by various instrumental methods. The metal ion adsorption and the drug release performance of the porous Zel/Chi monoliths were also studied. The release rate of cefalexin from drug-loaded Zel/Chi monoliths depended on the composition and porous structure of the monoliths. The metal ion adsorption capacity of the Zel/Chi monoliths was related to the concentration of the metal ions, the adsorption time and the Zel/Chi ratio. An experimentally maximum adsorption of 89 mg/g was achieved for Cu(2+) ions. The Zel/Chi monoliths with adsorbed Cu(2+) ions effectively catalyzed the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and had good recyclability. They were easily recovered by simply removing them from the reaction system and rinsing them with water.

  7. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    SciTech Connect

    Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. There is considerable interest in developing processes that remove or destroy the nitrate wastes. Electrodialysis-Ion Exchange (EDIX) is a possible process that should be more cost effective in treating aqueous waste steams. This report describes the EDIX process.

  8. Recovery of very dilute acetic acid using ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Cloete, F.L.D.; Marais, A.P.

    1995-07-01

    Acetic and related acids occur in many industrial wastewaters, often mixed with several other classes of organic compounds. Acetic acid can be recovered from 1% solutions using weakly basic ion exchange resins. The acid is adsorbed by the free-base form of the resin, which can then be eluted using a slurry of lime to give a solution of calcium acetate. This solution could either be evaporated to crystallize calcium acetate or reacted with sulfuric acid to form acetic acid and gypsum. Laboratory tests of the proposed process gave product solutions of 15--20% acetic acid using pure 1% acetic acid as feed. Some measurements using a typical industrial effluent gave similar recoveries and showed that there was no initial fouling of the resins.

  9. Advanced integrated solvent extraction and ion exchange systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, P.

    1996-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction (SX) and ion exchange (IX) systems are a series of novel SX and IX processes that extract and recover uranium and transuranics (TRUs) (neptunium, plutonium, americium) and fission products {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 137}Cs from acidic high-level liquid waste and that sorb and recover {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 137}Cs from alkaline supernatant high-level waste. Each system is based on the use of new selective liquid extractants or chromatographic materials. The purpose of the integrated SX and IX processes is to minimize the quantity of waste that must be vitrified and buried in a deep geologic repository by producing raffinates (from SX) and effluent streams (from IX) that will meet the specifications of Class A low-level waste.

  10. Ion Exchange Resin Bead Decoupled High-Pressure Electroosmotic Pump

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bingcheng; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Liu, Shaorong

    2009-01-01

    We describe an electroosmotic pump (EOP) that utilizes a cation exchange resin bead as the electric field decoupler. The resin bead serves as a electrical grounding joint without fluid leakage, thus eliminating electrolytic gas interference from the flow channels. The arrangement is easy to practice from readily available components, displays a very low electrical resistance, and is capable of bearing high backpressure (at least 3200 psi). We use a silica xerogel column as the EOP element to pump water and demonstrate a complete capillary ion chromatograph (CIC), which uses a similar bead based microelectrodialytic generator (μ-EDG) to generate a KOH eluent from the pumped water. We observed good operational stability of the complete arrangement over long periods. PMID:19449862

  11. Surface activated carbon nanospheres for fast adsorption of silver ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Song, Xianghua; Gunawan, Poernomo; Jiang, Rongrong; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Wang, Kean; Xu, Rong

    2011-10-30

    We report the synthesis and activation of colloidal carbon nanospheres (CNS) for adsorption of Ag(I) ions from aqueous solutions. CNS (400-500 nm in diameter) was synthesized via simple hydrothermal treatment of glucose solution. The surface of nonporous CNS after being activated by NaOH was enriched with -OH and -COO(-) functional groups. Despite the low surface area (<15m(2)/g), the activated CNS exhibited a high adsorption capacity of 152 mg silver/g. Under batch conditions, all Ag(I) ions can be completely adsorbed in less than 6 min with the initial Ag(I) concentrations lower than 2 ppm. This can be attributed to the minimum mass transfer resistance as Ag(I) ions were all deposited and reduced as Ag(0) nanoparticles on the external surface of CNS. The kinetic data can be well fitted to the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The adsorbed silver can be easily recovered by dilute acid solutions and the CNS can be reactivated by the same treatment with NaOH solution. The excellent adsorption performance and reusability have also been demonstrated in a continuous mode. The NaOH activated CNS reported here could represent a new type of low-cost and efficient adsorbent nanomaterials for removal of trace Ag(I) ions for drinking water production.

  12. Peptide Orientation Affects Selectivity in Ion-Exchange Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Andrew J.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Kangas, Lars J.; Smith, R. D.; Mechtler, Karl; Mitulovic, Goran; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J.

    2010-06-15

    Here we demonstrate that separation of proteolytic peptides, having the same net charge and one basic residue, is affected by their specific orientation toward the stationary phase in ion-exchange chromatography. In electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) with an anion-exchange material, the C-terminus of the peptides is, on average, oriented toward the stationary phase. In cation exchange, the average peptide orientation is the opposite. Data with synthetic peptides, serving as orientation probes, indicate that in tryptic/ Lys-C peptides the C-terminal carboxyl group appears to be in a zwitterionic bond with the side chain of the C-terminal Lys/Arg residue. In effect, the side chain is then less basic than the N-terminus, accounting for the specific orientation of tryptic and Lys-C peptides. Analyses of larger sets of peptides, generated from lysates by either Lys-N, Lys-C, or trypsin, reveal that specific peptide orientation affects the ability of charged side chains, such as phosphate residues, to influence retention. Phosphorylated residues that are remote in the sequence from the binding site affect retention less than those that are closer. When a peptide contains multiple charged sites, then orientation is observed to be less rigid and retention tends to be governed by the peptide’s net charge rather than its sequence. These general observations could be of value in confirming a peptide’s identification and, in particular, phosphosite assignments in proteomics analyses. More generally, orientation accounts for the ability of chromatography to separate peptides of the same composition but different sequence.

  13. Peptide Orientation Affects Selectivity in Ion-Exchange Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Andrew J.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Kangas, Lars J.; Smith, Richard D.; Mechtler, Karl; Mitulovic, Goran; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J.

    2010-06-15

    Here we demonstrate that separation of proteolytic peptides, having the same net charge and one basic residue, is affected by their specific orientation toward the stationary phase in ion-exchange chromatography. In electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) with an anion-exchange material, the C-terminus of the peptides is, on average, oriented toward the stationary phase. In cation exchange, the average peptide orientation is the opposite. Data with synthetic peptides, serving as orientation probes, indicate that in tryptic/Lys-C peptides the C-terminal carboxyl group appears to be in a zwitterionic bond with the side chain of the C-terminal Lys/Arg residue. In effect, the side chain is then less basic than the N-terminus, accounting for the specific orientation of tryptic and Lys-C peptides. Analyses of larger sets of peptides, generated from lysates by either Lys-N, Lys-C, or trypsin, reveal that specific peptide orientation affects the ability of harged side chains, such as phosphate residues, to influence retention. Phosphorylated residues that are remote in the sequence from the binding site affect retention less than those that are closer. When a peptide contains multiple charged sites, then orientation is observed to be less rigid and retention tends to be governed by the peptide’s net charge rather than its sequence. These general observations could be of value in confirming a peptide’s identification and, in particular, phosphosite assignments in proteomics analyses. More generally, orientation accounts for the ability of chromatography to separate peptides of the same compositionbut different sequence.

  14. Adsorption of Iodine and Potassium on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ Investigated by Low Energy Alkali Ion Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, G.D.; Gann, R.D.; Cao, J.X.; Wu, R.Q.; Wen, J.; Xu, Z.; Gu, G.D.; Yarmoff, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of K and I on the surface of the high-T{sub c} cuprate BSCCO-2212 is investigated with low-energy (0.8 to 2 keV) Na{sup +} ion scattering and density functional theory (DFT). Samples were cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum and charge-resolved spectra of the scattered ions were collected with time-of-flight. The spectra contain a single peak representing Na scattered from Bi, as the clean surfaces are terminated by BiO. The neutralization of scattered Na depends on the local potential above the target site, and the angular dependence indicates that the clean surface has an inhomogeneous potential. Neutralization is dependent on the coverage of I, but independent of K adsorption. DFT suggests high-symmetry sites for the adsorption of both I and K, and that the potential above the Bi sites is altered by I by an amount consistent with the experimental findings, while the potential is not affected by K adsorption. DFT also enables an experimental determination of the 'freezing distance,' which is the effective point beyond which charge exchange does not occur, to be 1.6 {+-} 0.1 {angstrom} from the outermost Bi layer.

  15. Adsorption and diffusion of mono, di, and trivalent ions on two-dimensional TiS2.

    PubMed

    Samad, Abdus; Shafique, Aamir; Shin, Young-Han

    2017-04-28

    A comparative study of the monovalent (Li, Na, and K) and multivalent (Be, Mg, Ca, and Al) metal ion adsorption and diffusion on an electronically semi-metallic two-dimensional nanosheet of 1T structured TiS2 is presented here to contribute to the search for abundant, cheap, and nontoxic ingredients for efficient rechargeable metal ion batteries. The total formation energy of the metal ion adsorption and the Bader charge analysis show that the divalent Mg and Ca ions can have a charge storage density double that of the monovalent Li, Na, and K ions, while the Be and Al ions form metallic clusters even at a low adsorption density because of their high bulk energies. The adsorption of Mg ions shows the lowest averaged open circuit voltage (0.13 V). The activation energy barriers for the diffusion of metal ions on the surface of the monolayer successively decrease from Li to K and Be to Ca. Mg and Ca, being divalent, are capable of storing a higher power density than Li while K and Na have a higher rate capability than the Li ions. Therefore, rechargeable Li ion batteries can be totally or partially replaceable by Mg ion batteries, where high power density and high cell voltage are required, while the abundant, cheap, and fast Na ions can be used for green grid applications.

  16. Application of the Nernst-Planck approach to lead ion exchange in Ca-loaded Pelvetia canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana F de Sá S; Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; da Silva, Eduardo A B; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2010-07-01

    Ca-loaded Pelvetia canaliculata biomass was used to remove Pb(2+) in aqueous solution from batch and continuous systems. The physicochemical characterization of algae Pelvetia particles by potentiometric titration and FTIR analysis has shown a gel structure with two major binding groups - carboxylic (2.8 mmol g(-1)) and hydroxyl (0.8 mmol g(-1)), with an affinity constant distribution for hydrogen ions well described by a Quasi-Gaussian distribution. Equilibrium adsorption (pH 3 and 5) and desorption (eluents: HNO(3) and CaCl(2)) experiments were performed, showing that the biosorption mechanism was attributed to ion exchange among calcium, lead and hydrogen ions with stoichiometry 1:1 (Ca:Pb) and 1:2 (Ca:H and Pb:H). The uptake capacity of lead ions decreased with pH, suggesting that there is a competition between H(+) and Pb(2+) for the same binding sites. A mass action law for the ternary mixture was able to predict the equilibrium data, with the selectivity constants alpha(Ca)(H)=9+/-1 and alpha(Ca)(Pb)=44+/-5, revealing a higher affinity of the biomass towards lead ions. Adsorption (initial solution pH 4.5 and 2.5) and desorption (0.3M HNO(3)) kinetics were performed in batch and continuous systems. A mass transfer model using the Nernst-Planck approximation for the ionic flux of each counter-ion was used for the prediction of the ions profiles in batch systems and packed bed columns. The intraparticle effective diffusion constants were determined as 3.73x10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for H(+), 7.56x10(-8)cm(2)s(-1) for Pb(2+) and 6.37x10(-8)cm(2)s(-1) for Ca(2+).

  17. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Ion Adsorption to the Basal Surfaces of Kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Bunker, Bruce A.; Cygan, Randall T.

    2008-06-06

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to study the mechanisms involved in the adsorption of various ions to the basal surfaces of kaolinite. Analysis of simulation data indicates that cations and anions adsorb preferably on the siloxane and gibbsite surfaces of kaolinite, respectively. Strong inner-sphere adsorption of chlorine at aluminum vacancies on the gibbsite surface and the occurrence of chlorine-driven inner-sphere adsorption of cesium and sodium on the gibbsite surface for high ionic strengths are observed. Cesium ions form strong inner-sphere complexes at ditrigonal cavities on the siloxane surface. Outer-sphere cesium is highly mobile and only weak adsorption may occur. A small amount of sodium adsorbs on the siloxane surface as inner-sphere complexes at less clearly defined sites. Like cesium, sodium only forms very weak outer-sphere complexes on this surface. Inner-sphere complexes of cadmium and lead do not occur on either surface. Relatively strong outer-sphere cadmium and lead complexes are present on the siloxane surface at ditrigonal cavities.

  18. Using computer simulation to assist in the robustness analysis of an ion-exchange chromatography step.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Niklas; Karlsson, David; Axelsson, Jan Peter; Zacchi, Guido; Nilsson, Bernt

    2005-01-21

    This paper presents a methodology to gain process knowledge and assist in the robustness analysis of an ion-exchange step in a protein purification process using a model-based approach. Factorial experimental design is common practice in industry today to obtain robustness characterization of unit operations with respect to variations in process parameters. This work aims at providing a better insight into what process variations affect quality and to further reduce the experimental work to the regions of process variation that are of most interest. This methodology also greatly increases the ability to predict process performance and promotes process understanding. The model calibration part of the methodology involves three consecutive steps to calibrate a steric mass action (SMA) ion-exchange chromatography model. Firstly, a number of gradient elution experiments are performed. Secondly, experimental breakthrough curves have to be generated for the proteins if the adsorption capacity of the medium for each component is not known. Thirdly, a multi-component loading experiment is performed to calibrate the multi-component effects that cannot be determined from the single-component experiments. The separation process studied in this work is the separation of polyclonal IgG from a mixture containing IgG, myoglobin and BSA. The calibrated model is used to simulate six process variations in a full factorial experiment. The results of the simulations provide information about the importance of the different process variations and the simulations are also used to determine the crucial points for the process parameter variations. The methodology can be used to assist in the robustness analysis normally performed in the pharmaceutical industry today as it is able to predict the impact on process performance resulting from variations in salt concentration, column load, protein concentration and flow rate.

  19. Nuclear quantum effects on adsorption of H2 and isotopologues on metal ions

    DOE PAGES

    Savchenko, Ievgeniia; Gu, Bing; Heine, Thomas; ...

    2017-01-03

    The nuclear quantum effects on the zero-point energy (ZPE), influencing adsorption of Hmore » $$_2$$ and isotopologues on metal ions, are examined in this study using normal mode analysis of ab initio electronic structure results for complexes with 17 metal cations. To estimate for the anharmonicity, a nuclear wavepacket dynamics on the ground state electronic potential energy surfaces (PES) have been employed for complexes of Li$^+$ and Cu$$^{+2}$$ with H$$_2$$, D$$_2$$, HD. The dynamics analysis shows that incorporation of the PES anharmonicity changes the ZPE by up to 9%. Finally, the lightest metallic nuclei, Li and Be, are found to be the most 'quantum'. The largest selectivity in adsorption is predicted for Cu, Ni and Co ions.« less

  20. Environmental remediation of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution through hydrogel adsorption: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Muya, Francis Ntumba; Sunday, Christopher Edoze; Baker, Priscilla; Iwuoha, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal ions such as Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+), and Hg(2+) from industrial waste water constitute a major cause of pollution for ground water sources. These ions are toxic to man and aquatic life as well, and should be removed from wastewater before disposal. Various treatment technologies have been reported to remediate the potential toxic elements from aqueous media, such as adsorption, precipitation and coagulation. Most of these technologies are associated with some shortcomings, and challenges in terms of applicability, effectiveness and cost. However, adsorption techniques have the capability of effectively removing heavy metals at very low concentration (1-100 mg/L). Various adsorbents have been reported in the literature for this purpose, including, to a lesser extent, the use of hydrogel adsorbents for heavy metal removal in aqueous phase. Here, we provide an in-depth perspective on the design, application and efficiency of hydrogel systems as adsorbents.

  1. Preparation and adsorption properties of nano magnetite chitosan films for heavy metal ions from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lasheen, M.R.; El-Sherif, Iman Y.; Tawfik, Magda E.; El-Wakeel, S.T.; El-Shahat, M.F.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Nano magnetite–chitosan films were prepared by casting method. • The efficiency of the prepared films for removing heavy metals was investigated. • The adsorption mechanism was studied using different isotherm and kinetic models. • Films reuse and metals recovery were studied. - Abstract: Nano magnetite chitosan (NMag–CS) film was prepared and characterized with different analytical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed the formation of a pure magnetite structure and NMag–CS nanocomposite. TEM image of the film, revealed the uniform dispersion of magnetite nanoparticles inside chitosan matrix. The adsorption properties of the prepared film for copper, lead, cadmium, chromium and nickel metal ions were evaluated. Different factors affecting the uptake behavior by the composite films such as time, initial pH and film dose were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium attained using 2 g/L of the film after 120 min of reaction. The equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich models. The adsorption kinetics followed the mechanism of the pseudo-second-order equation for all metals. The metals regenerated from films with an efficiency greater than 95% using 0.1 M ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and films were successfully reused for adsorption.

  2. Adsorption and catalytic properties of sulfated aluminum oxide modified with cobalt ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanin, S. N.; Bannykh, A. A.; Vlasenko, E. V.; Krotova, I. N.; Obrezkov, O. N.; Shilina, M. I.

    2017-01-01

    The adsorption properties of sulfated aluminum oxide (9% SO 4 2- /γ-Al2O3) and a cobalt-containing composite (0.5%Co/SO 4 2- /γ-Al2O3) based on it are studied via dynamic sorption. The adsorption isotherms of such test adsorbates as n-hydrocarbons (C6-C8), benzene, ethylbenzene, chloroform, and diethyl ether are measured, and their isosteric heats of adsorption are calculated. It is shown that the surface sulfation of aluminum oxide substantially improves its electron-accepting properties, and so the catalytic activity of SO 4 2- /γ-Al2O3 in the liquid-phase alkylation of benzene with octene-1 at temperatures of 25-120°C is one order of magnitude higher than for the initial aluminum oxide. It is established that additional modification of sulfated aluminum oxide with cobalt ions increases the activity of this catalyst by 2-4 times. It is shown that adsorption sites capable of strong specific adsorption with both donating (aromatics, diethyl ether chemosorption) and accepting molecules (chloroform) form on the surface of sulfated γ-Al2O3 promoted by cobalt salt.

  3. Adsorption characteristics of sol gel-derived zirconia for cesium ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Yakout, Sobhy M; Hassan, Hisham S

    2014-07-01

    Zirconia powder was synthesized via a sol gel method and placed in a batch reactor for cesium removal investigation. X-ray analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized for the evaluation of the developed adsorbent. The adsorption process has been investigated as a function of pH, contact time and temperature. The adsorption is strongly dependent on the pH of the medium whereby the removal efficiency increases as the pH turns to the alkaline range. The process was initially very fast and the maximum adsorption was attained within 60 min of contact. A pseudo-second-order model and homogeneous particle diffusion model (HPDM) were found to be the best to correlate the diffusion of cesium into the zirconia particles. Furthermore, adsorption thermodynamic parameters, namely the standard enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy, were calculated. The results indicate that cesium adsorption by zirconia is an endothermic (ΔH>0) process and good affinity of cesium ions towards the sorbent (ΔS>0) was observed.

  4. Study on adsorption properties of QCS/PS-G8-2-8 anion exchange membrane for Rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Jilin; Wang, Lulu; Feng, Ruijiang; Zhang, Fan

    2015-06-01

    A series of novel anion exchange composite membrane (QCS/PS-G8-2-8) were synthesized based on the quaternized chitosan (QCS, DQ = 89.20 (±3.50)%) blended with block polymer of polystyrene (PS) and G8-2-8 (maleic acid diethyl brace base pairs [octyl dimethyl chloride/ammonium bromide]). Then the QCS was cross-linked by glutaraldehyde (GA). The parameters including adsorption time (t), pH, and initial concentration of Rhodamine B (C0), temperature (T), the mass fraction of G8-2-8 and GA (WGA) on the adsorption were investigated to determine the optimum condition for the removal of RB. The kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the adsorption process were also discussed. The optimum adsorption condition was that the adsorption time was 100 min, pH was 4, the initial concentration of RB was 100 mg L-1, the mass fraction of G8-2-8 was 5.0 wt%, the mass fraction of GA was 2.0 wt%, the temperature was 40 °C. Thus, RB optimum adsorption capacity (q) of the composite membrane QCS/PS-G8-2-8 (5.0%) (G8-2-8 mass content (wt.%) was 5.0%) was 17.04 mg g-1. The adsorption isotherm of the RB on the composite membrane can be well fitted with the Temkin equation. The adsorption kinetics can be well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The values of ΔG, ΔH and ΔS indicated that the adsorption of RB onto QCS/PS-G8-2-8 was spontaneous and exothermic.

  5. On the Structure-Property Relationships of Cation-Exchanged ZK-5 Zeolites for CO2 Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong D; Hudson, Matthew R; Brown, Craig M; Lobo, Raul F

    2017-03-09

    The CO2 adsorption properties of cation-exchanged Li-, Na-, K-, and Mg-ZK-5 zeolites were correlated to the molecular structures determined by Rietveld refinements of synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction patterns. Li-, K-, and Na-ZK-5 all exhibited high isosteric heats of adsorption (Qst ) at low CO2 coverage, with Na-ZK-5 having the highest Qst (ca. 49 kJ mol(-1) ). Mg(2+) was located at the center of the zeolite hexagonal prism with the cation inaccessible to CO2 , leading to a much lower Qst (ca. 30 kJ mol(-1) ) and lower overall uptake capacity. Multiple CO2 adsorption sites were identified at a given CO2 loading amount for all four cation-exchanged ZK-5 adsorbents. Site A at the flat eight-membered ring windows and site B/B* in the γ-cages were the primary adsorption sites in Li- and Na-ZK-5 zeolites. Relatively strong dual-cation adsorption sites contributed significantly to an enhanced electrostatic interaction for CO2 in all ZK-5 samples. This interaction gives rise to a migration of Li(+) and Mg(2+) cations from their original locations at the center of the hexagonal prisms toward the α-cages, in which they interact more strongly with the adsorbed CO2 .

  6. Modeling of Crystalline Silicotitanate Ion Exchange Columns Using Experimental Data from SRS Simulated Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1999-03-15

    Non-elutable ion exchange using crystalline silicotitanate is being considered for removing cesium from Savannah River Site radioactive waste. The construction cost of this process depends strongly on the size of the ion exchange column required to meet product specifications.

  7. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  8. Lanthanide ion exchange properties of a coordination polymer consisting of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid and trivalent metal ions (Ce3+, Fe3+, or Al3+).

    PubMed

    Ooi, Kenta; Tasaki-Handa, Yuiko; Abe, Yukie; Wakisaka, Akihiko

    2014-03-28

    Three kinds of coordination polymers ([M(dehp)3], M = Ce, Fe, or Al) were prepared by mixing the sodium form (Na(dehp)) of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid and MCl3 in an ethanol-water binary mixture. They have monoclinic crystalline structure with similar lattice parameters. The lanthanide ion (Ln(3+) = La(3+), Sm(3+), Dy(3+), or Yb(3+)) exchange properties were studied in a 20 : 80 vol% ethanol-water binary mixture containing 2 mM Ln(NO3)3 at room temperature. The rate of Ln(3+) adsorption is relatively slow; it requires over 3 weeks to reach equilibrium. [M(dehp)3] has different Ln(3+) affinities depending on the kind of central metal ions: the affinity order at 3 week adsorption is Yb(3+) < La(3+) < Dy(3+) < Sm(3+) for [Ce(dehp)3], La(3+) < Sm(3+) < Dy(3+) < Yb(3+) for [Fe(dehp)3], and La(3+) < Sm(3+), Dy(3+), Yb(3+) for [Al(dehp)3]. The difference in affinity order can be explained by two factors: the coordination preference and steric strain caused by the polymeric structure. The chemical and structural analyses suggested that the Ln(3+) adsorption progresses first by the central M(3+)/Ln(3+) exchange, followed by a morphological change to a rod-like or fibrous form by a solid phase reaction. In the case of [Fe(dehp)3], the eluted Fe(3+) may be hydrolyzed and precipitated as amorphous iron hydroxide.

  9. Adsorption and Assembly of Ions and Organic Molecules at Electrochemical Interfaces: Nanoscale Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Soichiro; Itaya, Kingo

    2013-06-01

    We describe the history of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and advances made in this field during the past 20 years. In situ STM allows one to monitor various electrode processes, such as the underpotential deposition of copper and silver ions; the specific adsorption of iodine and sulfate/bisulfate ions; electrochemical dissolution processes of silicon and gold single-crystal surfaces in electrolyte solutions; and the molecular assembly of metalloporphyrins, metallophthalocyanines, and fullerenes, at atomic and/or molecular resolution. Furthermore, a laser confocal microscope, combined with a differential interference contrast microscope, enables investigation of the dynamics of electrochemical processes at atomic resolution.

  10. Adsorption and assembly of ions and organic molecules at electrochemical interfaces: nanoscale aspects.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Soichiro; Itaya, Kingo

    2013-01-01

    We describe the history of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and advances made in this field during the past 20 years. In situ STM allows one to monitor various electrode processes, such as the underpotential deposition of copper and silver ions; the specific adsorption of iodine and sulfate/bisulfate ions; electrochemical dissolution processes of silicon and gold single-crystal surfaces in electrolyte solutions; and the molecular assembly of metalloporphyrins, metallophthalocyanines, and fullerenes, at atomic and/or molecular resolution. Furthermore, a laser confocal microscope, combined with a differential interference contrast microscope, enables investigation of the dynamics of electrochemical processes at atomic resolution.

  11. Synthesis of diethylaminoethyl dextran hydrogel and its heavy metal ion adsorption characteristics.

    PubMed

    Demirbilek, Celile; Dinç, Cemile Özdemir

    2012-10-01

    Epichlorohydrin-crosslinked diethylaminoethyl dextran (DEAE-D/ECH) hydrogel was synthesized by intermolecular side-chain reaction of DEAE-D hydroxyl groups with monomeric crosslinking agent, ECH. Swelling ability, adsorption capacity and metal removal of the hydrogel were profoundly determined and some structural parameters for the hydrogel such as volume of non-swollen gel, percentages of gellation, swelling ratio and equilibrium water content were evaluated in this study. The ability of removing heavy metal ions from Orontes River by the synthesized hydrogel, thoroughly characterized by photometric spectrometer and the adsorption characteristics of metal ions, was investigated as well as surface morphologies of the hydrogel before and after metal adsorption were examined by SEM. Structure of DEAE-D/ECH gel was analyzed by FTIR, TGA, and DSC. Gellation point of binary system reaction between DEAE-D and ECH was determined via monitoring viscosity changes during reaction. The order of affinity based on amount of metal ion uptake was found as follows: Zn(2+)>Mn(2+)>Pb(2+)>Cd(2+).

  12. Ion-exchange selectivities of periderm and cuticular membranes toward alkali cations

    SciTech Connect

    Ersoz, M.; Duncan, H.J.

    1994-08-01

    The ion-exchange selectivities of lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium on isolated potato periderm (Solanum tuberosum) and pear fruit cuticular membranes were investigated; the general order of preference both for cation selectivities and ion-exchange capacities was lithium > sodium > potassium > cesium. The potato periderm and pear fruit cuticular membranes exhibited a behavior typical of ion-exchange resins of the weak acid type. At constant pH 7, the ion-exchange capacities of periderm and cuticular membranes increased with hydrated ionic radius, and also with increasing pH and neutral salt concentration, and decreased with crystal ionic radius. Counterion selectivities also exhibited the same behavior. The ion-exchange properties are discussed in terms of the structure and function of potato periderm and pear fruit cuticular membranes.

  13. Effect of ionic strength on the adsorption of copper and chromium ions by vermiculite pure clay mineral.

    PubMed

    El-Bayaa, A A; Badawy, N A; Alkhalik, E Abd

    2009-10-30

    It is important to assess the effects of ionic strength when studying adsorption of metal ions on clay mineral because the background salt may complex metals and compete for adsorption sites. The sorption behavior of vermiculite pure clay mineral has been studied with respect to copper and chromium as a function of ionic strength in single metal ion solutions. Background electrolytes used in these experiments were KCl, NaCl and NH4Cl. The studies were conducted by a batch method at temperature 25 degrees C. The adsorption capacity and adsorption energy for each metal ion were calculated from the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Also the competitive adsorption behavior of some heavy metal ions such as Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) by vermiculite pure clay mineral was studied. The result shows the competition between coexisting heavy metal cations for the same adsorption sites of an adsorbent. However, when trivalent metal was added to the solution it competitively replaced divalent ions that had been previously adsorbed onto the vermiculite pure clay mineral, resulting in the desorption of these metals into the solution.

  14. Fabrication of interfacial functionalized porous polymer monolith and its adsorption properties of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiaxi; Du, Zhongjie; Zou, Wei; Li, Hangquan; Zhang, Chen

    2014-07-15

    The interfacial functionalized poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) porous monolith was fabricated and applied as a novel porous adsorbent for copper ions (Cu(2+)). PGMA porous material with highly interconnected pore network was prepared by concentrated emulsion polymerization template. Then polyacrylic acid (PAA) was grafted onto the interface of the porous monolith by the reaction between the epoxy group on PGMA and a carboxyl group on PAA. Finally, the porous monolith was interfacial functionalized by rich amount of carboxyl groups and could adsorb copper ions effectively. The chemical structure and porous morphology of the porous monolith were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, the effects of pore size distribution, pH value, co-existing ions, contacting time, and initial concentrations of copper ions on the adsorption capacity of the porous adsorbents were studied.

  15. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 1. Peptides to Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, Gregory C.; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  16. Ion mobility spectrometry-hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry of anions: part 1. Peptides to proteins.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  17. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of ion-adsorption type REE mineralization in Phuket, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanematsu, Kenzo; Kon, Yoshiaki; Imai, Akira; Watanabe, Koichiro; Watanabe, Yasushi

    2013-04-01

    Geochemical and mineralogical studies were conducted on the 12-m-thick weathering profile of the Kata Beach granite in Phuket, Thailand, in order to reveal the transport and adsorption of rare earth elements (REE) related to the ion-adsorption type mineralization. The parent rock is ilmenite-series biotite granite with transitional characteristics from I type to S type, abundant in REE (592 ppm). REE are contained dominantly in fluorocarbonate as well as in allanite, titanite, apatite, and zircon. The chondrite-normalized REE pattern of the parent granite indicates enrichment of LREE relative to HREE and no significant Ce anomaly. The upper part of the weathering profile from the surface to 4.5 m depth is mostly characterized by positive Ce anomaly, showing lower REE contents ranging from 174 to 548 ppm and lower percentages of adsorbed REE from 34% to 68% compared with the parent granite. In contrast, the lower part of the profile from 4.5 to 12 m depth is characterized by negative Ce anomaly, showing higher REE contents ranging from 578 to 1,084 ppm and higher percentages from 53% to 85%. The negative Ce anomaly and enrichment of REE in the lower part of the profile suggest that acidic soil water in an oxidizing condition in the upper part mostly immobilized Ce4+ as CeO2 and transported REE3+ downward to the lower part of the profile. The transported REE3+ were adsorbed onto weathering products or distributed to secondary minerals such as rhabdophane. The immobilization of REE results from the increase of pH due to the contact with higher pH groundwater. Since the majority of REE in the weathered granite are present in the ion-adsorption fraction with negative Ce anomaly, the percentages of adsorbed REE are positively correlated with the whole-rock negative Ce anomaly. The result of this study suggests that the ion-adsorption type REE mineralization is identified by the occurrence of easily soluble REE fluorocarbonate and whole-rock negative Ce anomaly of

  18. Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J

    2006-04-11

    This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients

  19. The effect of electron beam irradiation on silver-sodium ion exchange in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, Alexander I.; Prosnikov, Mikhail A.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown experimentally that electron irradiation of sodium-silicate glasses makes possible the control of the subsequent ion exchange Ag+ ↔ Na+ process in a salt melt. The reason of this effect is the negatively charged regions formation in a glass volume during electron irradiation. The electric field, produced by these regions in glass volume, results in positive Na+ ions field migration into them. The spatial redistribution of Na+ ions results in the decrease of the ion exchange efficiency, or the ion exchange can be even blocked. This led to the decrease of the luminescence intensity of neutral silver molecular clusters in the irradiated zone, and effect on the silver nanoparticles formation during the subsequent thermal treatment. The observed effects can be used for the control of ion exchange processes during integrated optics devices fabrication, and for the electron-beam recording of optical information.

  20. Iminodiacetic acid functionalized cation exchange resin for adsorptive removal of Cr(VI), Cd(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II) from their aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Misra, R K; Jain, S K; Khatri, P K

    2011-01-30

    Iminodiacetic acid functionality has been introduced on styrene-divinyl benzene co-polymeric beads and characterized by FT-IR in order to develop weak acid based cation exchange resin. This resin was evaluated for the removal of different heavy metal ions namely Cd(II), Cr(VI), Ni(II) and Pb(II) from their aqueous solutions. The results showed greater affinity of resin towards Cr(VI) for which 99.7% removal achieved in optimal conditions following the order Ni(II)>Pb(II)>Cd(II) with 65%, 59% and 28% removal. Experiments were also directed towards kinetic studies of adsorption and found to follow first order reversible kinetic model with the overall rate constants 0.3250, 0.2393, 0.4290 and 0.2968 for Cr(VI), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal respectively. Detailed studies of Cr(VI) removal has been carried out to see the effect of pH, resin dose and metal ion concentration on adsorption and concluded that complexation enhanced the chromium removal efficacy of resin drastically, which is strongly pH dependent. The findings were also supported by the comparison of FT-IR spectra of neat resin with the chromium-adsorbed resin.

  1. Adsorption of nickel ions by oleate-modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Magnet, Cécilia; Lomenech, Claire; Hurel, Charlotte; Reilhac, Pierre; Giulieri, Françoise; Chaze, Anne-Marie; Persello, Jacques; Kuzhir, Pavel

    2017-01-20

    In this work, magnetic nanoparticles of iron oxide (MNPs) were synthesized, and then the surface was recovered with an oleate double layer in order to investigate the ability of this material to adsorb nickel ions. First, the solution chemistry of oleate ions was investigated in order to determine the critical micellar concentration (CMC) value and the arrangements of ions above the CMC. Then, the synthesized oleate-modified MNP was characterized (TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR, zeta potential, magnetometry). Finally, adsorption experiments were carried out as a function of pH and as a function of nickel concentration in 0.1 g L(-1) suspensions of oleate-modified MNP. The results show that CMC of oleate ranges from 1 to 2.5∙10(-3) mol L(-1). Above CMC, arrangement of oleate ions as droplets, vesicles, or micelles depends on pH and influences the average size and solution absorbance. Potentiometric titrations allowed determining a pKa value of 7.8 for sodium oleate. The high stability in aqueous suspensions and characterization of oleate-modified MNP confirm that oleate ions are arranged as a bilayer coating at the surface of MNP. Retention of nickel was found to be highly dependent on pH, with a maximum adsorption (90%) beginning from pH = 7.5. The sorption isotherms were well fitted with the Langmuir model and the maximum nickel adsorption capacities were found to be 44 and 80 mg g(-1) for pH = 6.8 and 7.2, respectively. The efficient removal of nickel combined with the magnetic properties of the NMP make the oleate-modified MNP an interesting water purification tool.

  2. Lead Removal From Synthetic Leachate Matrices by a Novel Ion-Exchange Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Hovanitz, Edward S.; Chi, Sulan

    2002-01-01

    This report discusses the application of a novel polyacrylate-based ion-exchange material (IEM) for the removal of lead (Pb) ions from water. Preliminary testing includes the establishment of the operating pH range, capacity information, and the effect of calcium and anions in the matrix. Batch testing with powder indicates slightly different optimal operational conditions from those used for column testing. The ion exchanger is excellent for removing lead from aqueous solutions.

  3. Charge-exchange collisions of C 60z+ : a probe of the ion charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Douglas B.; Parks, Joel H.

    1997-06-01

    We present Paul trap measurements of charge-exchange collisions of Li, Cs and C 60 with C 60z+ ions ( z = 1-3) at thermal energies. Surprisingly, the measured charge-exchange rates for each neutral species are not proportional to the ion charge z as would be expected for Langevin collisions involving a uniformly charged ion. The relative rates can be reproduced by a model based on a symmetric distribution of point charges that are free to move on the ion surface during the neutral trajectory. Such behavior can be attributed to static and possibly dynamic Jahn-Teller effects in C 60z+ ions.

  4. Optimization and adsorption kinetic studies of aqueous manganese ion removal using chitin extracted from shells of edible Philippine crabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quimque, Mark Tristan J.; Jimenez, Marvin C.; Acas, Meg Ina S.; Indoc, Danrelle Keth L.; Gomez, Enjelyn C.; Tabuñag, Jenny Syl D.

    2017-01-01

    Manganese is a common contaminant in drinking water along with other metal pollutants. This paper investigates the use of chitin, extracted from crab shells obtained as restaurant throwaway, as an adsorbent in removing manganese ions from aqueous medium. In particular, this aims to optimize the adsorption parameters and look into the kinetics of the process. The adsorption experiments done in this study employed the batch equilibration method. In the optimization, the following parameters were considered: pH and concentration of Mn (II) sorbate solution, particle size and dosage of adsorbent chitin, and adsorbent-adsorbate contact time. At the optimal condition, the order of the adsorption reaction was estimated using kinetic models which describes the process best. It was found out that the adsorption of aqueous Mn (II) ions onto chitin obeys the pseudo-second order model. This model assumes that the adsorption occurred via chemisorption

  5. Competitive adsorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) ions by chitosan crosslinked with epichlorohydrin-triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Laus, Rogério; de Fávere, Valfredo Tadeu

    2011-10-01

    In this study, chitosan (CTS) was crosslinked with both epichlorohydrin (ECH) and triphosphate (TPP), by covalent and ionic crosslinking reactions, respectively. The resulting adsorbent (CTS-ECH-TPP) was characterized by SEM, CHN, EDS, FT-IR and TGA analyses, and tested for metal adsorption. The adsorbent was used in batch experiments to evaluate the adsorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) ions in single and binary metal solutions. In single metal solutions the maximum adsorption capacities for Cu(II) and Cd(II) ions, obtained by Langmuir model, were 130.72 and 83.75 mg g⁻¹, respectively. Adsorption isotherms for binary solutions showed that the presence of Cu(II) decreased Cd(II) adsorption due to a significant competition effect, that is, the adsorbent was selective towards Cu(II) rather than Cd(II).

  6. Protein-surface interaction maps for ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alexander S; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-04-05

    In this paper, protein-surface interaction maps were generated by performing coarse-grained protein-surface calculations. This approach allowed for the rapid determination of the protein-surface interaction energies at a range of orientations and distances. Interaction maps of lysozyme indicated that there was a contiguous series of orientations corresponding to several adjacent preferred binding regions on the protein surface. Examination of these orientations provided insight into the residues involved in surface interactions, which qualitatively agreed with the retention data for single-site mutants. Interaction maps of lysozyme single-site mutants were also generated and provided significant insight into why these variants exhibited significant differences in their chromatographic behavior. This approach was also employed to study the binding behavior of CspB and related mutants. The results indicated that, in addition to describing general trends in the data, these maps provided significant insight into retention data of the single-site mutants. In particular, subtle retention trends observed with the K12 and K13 mutants were well-described using this interaction map approach. Finally, the number of interaction points with energies stronger than -2 kcal/mol was shown to be able to semi-quantitatively predict the behavior of most of the mutants. This rapid approach for calculating protein-surface interaction maps is expected to facilitate future method development for separating closely related protein variants in ion-exchange systems.

  7. Ion-exchange chromatography for the characterization of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Beck, Alain; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2015-09-10

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEX) is a historical technique widely used for the detailed characterization of therapeutic proteins and can be considered as a reference and powerful technique for the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of charge heterogeneity. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of theoretical and practical aspects of modern IEX applied for the characterization of therapeutic proteins including monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) and antibody drug conjugates (ADCs). The section on method development describes how to select a suitable stationary phase chemistry and dimensions, the mobile phase conditions (pH, nature and concentration of salt), as well as the temperature and flow rate, considering proteins isoelectric point (pI). In addition, both salt-gradient and pH-gradient approaches were critically reviewed and benefits as well as limitations of these two strategies were provided. Finally, several applications, mostly from pharmaceutical industries, illustrate the potential of IEX for the characterization of charge variants of various types of biopharmaceutical products.

  8. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picart, S.; Parant, P.; Caisso, M.; Remy, E.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Bayle, J. P.; Martin, C. L.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-07-01

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of flowability for the filling of compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 °C and temperature rate lower than 2 °C/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density (TD) and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner.

  9. Interaction of metal ions and amino acids - Possible mechanisms for the adsorption of amino acids on homoionic smectite clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Loew, G. H.; Lawless, J.

    1983-01-01

    A semiempirical molecular orbital method is used to characterize the binding of amino acids to hexahydrated Cu(2+) and Ni(2+), a process presumed to occur when they are adsorbed in the interlamellar space of homoionic smectite clays. Five alpha-amino acids, beta-alanine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid were used to investigate the metal ion and amino acid specificity in binding. It was assumed that the alpha, beta, and gamma-amino acids would bind as bidentate anionic ligands, forming either 1:1 or 1:2 six-coordinated five, six, and seven-membered-ring chelate complexes, respectively. Energies of complex formation, optimized geometries, and electron and spin distribution were determined; and steric constraints of binding of the amino acids to the ion-exchanged cations in the interlamellar spacing of a clay were examined. Results indicate that hexahydrated Cu(2+) forms more stable complexes than hexahydrated Ni(2+) with all the amino acids studied. However, among these amino acids, complex formation does not favor the adsorption of the biological subset. Calculated energetics of complex formation and steric constraints are shown to predict that 1:1 rather than 1:2 metal-amino acid complexes are generally favored in the clay.

  10. A comprehensive molecular dynamics approach to protein retention modeling in ion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lang, Katharina M H; Kittelmann, Jörg; Dürr, Cathrin; Osberghaus, Anna; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-02-13

    In downstream processing, the underlying adsorption mechanism of biomolecules to adsorbent material are still subject of extensive research. One approach to more mechanistic understanding is simulating this adsorption process and hereby the possibility to identify the parameters with strongest impact. So far this method was applied with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of two model proteins on one cation exchanger. In this work we developed a molecular dynamics tool to simulate protein-adsorber interaction for various proteins on an anion exchanger and ran gradient elution experiments to relate the simulation results to experimental data. We were able to show that simulation results yield similar results as experimental data regarding retention behavior as well as binding orientation. We could identify arginines in case of cation exchangers and aspartic acids in case of anion exchangers as major contributors to binding.

  11. Assessment of some ion-exchangers for the treatment of low-level radioactive liquid waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sourougy, M.R.; El-Dessouky, M.I.; Aly, H.F.

    1994-12-31

    Demineralization of potable water, as representative of LLLW was carried out using 8-different cationic and anionic ion-exchangers. The cationic exchangers used are: KY-2, Dowex50W-X8, Amberlite IR-120 and Chelex-100. The anionic exchangers are: AN-31, Amberlite IRA-900, Permutit and Dowex-3. Ion-exchanger dynamic capacity was calculated in terms of g.equivalent/kg of ion-exchanger. Different regeneration regimes were investigated and evaluated.

  12. Ions-induced nanostructuration: effect of specific ionic adsorption on hydrophobic polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Siretanu, Igor; Chapel, Jean-Paul; Bastos-González, Delfi; Drummond, Carlos

    2013-06-06

    The effect of surface charges on the ionic distribution in close proximity to an interface has been extensively studied. On the contrary, the influence of ions (from dissolved salts) on deformable interfaces has been barely investigated. Ions can adsorb from aqueous solutions on hydrophobic surfaces, generating forces that can induce long-lasting deformation of glassy polymer films, a process called ion-induced polymer nanostructuration, IPN. We have found that this process is ion-specific; larger surface modifications are observed in the presence of water ions and hydrophobic and amphiphilic ions. Surface structuration is also observed in the presence of certain salts of lithium. We have used streaming potential and atomic force microscopy to study the effect of dissolved ions on the surface properties of polystyrene films, finding a good correlation between ionic adsorption and IPN. Our results also suggest that the presence of strongly hydrated lithium promotes the interaction of anions with polystyrene surfaces and more generally with hydrophobic polymer surfaces, triggering then the IPN process.

  13. Selective adsorption behavior of Cd(II) ion imprinted polymers synthesized by microwave-assisted inverse emulsion polymerization: Adsorption performance and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fang; Li, Luwei; Xing, Junde

    2017-01-05

    Microwave-assisted inverse emulsion polymerization method was used to prepare Cd(II) imprinted polymer (IIP) by using β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and acrylamide (AM) as functional monomer, epichlorohydrin (ECH) as crossing-linking agent, ammonium persulfate as initiator. The Cd(II) imprinted polymer was characterized by SEM, FTIR and TGA. The influences of initial concentration of Cd(II), pH values, temperature, time and competitive ions on adsorption capacity and recognition properties are investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the adsorption capacity could reach 107mg/g. Furthermore, pseudo first order kinetic model, pseudo second order kinetic model and intra-particular diffusion model were used to describe the adsorption kinetic behavior. Results showed that the pseudo-second-order model (R(2) 0.9928-0.9961) had the best agreement with the experimental data. Langmuir adsorption isotherm model described the experimental data well, which indicated that adsorption was mainly monolayer absorption. Moreover, the study of adsorption thermodynamics (ΔG(0)<0, ΔH(0)>0, ΔS(0)>0) suggested that the adsorption process was a spontaneous and endothermic process. Competitive selectivity experiment revealed that imprinted polymer could selectively recognize Cd(II). It provides a new idea for removing Cd(II) from aqueous solution.

  14. Experiments and Modeling of Uranium Adsorption in the Presence of Other Ions in Simulated Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Ladshaw, Austin; Das, Sadananda; Liao, Wei-Po; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Janke, Christopher James; Mayes, Richard T.; Dai, Sheng; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-11-19

    Seawater contains uranium at an average concentration of 3.3 ppb, as well as a variety of other ions at either overwhelmingly higher or similar concentrations, which complicate the recovery of uranium. This report describes an investigation of the effects of various factors such as uranium speciation and presence of salts including sodium, calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate, as well as trace elements such as vanadium on uranium adsorption kinetics in laboratory experiments. Adsorption models are also developed to describe the experimental data of uranium extraction from seawater. Results show that the presence of calcium and magnesium significantly slows down the uranium adsorption kinetics. Vanadium can replace uranium from amidoxime-based adsorbent in the presence of sodium in the solution. Results also show that bicarbonate in the solution strongly competes with amidoxime for binding uranium, and thus slows down the uranium adsorption kinetics. Developed on the basis of the experimental findings, the model is capable of describing the effects of pH, ionic strength, temperature, and concentration of various species. The results of this work are useful in the understanding of the important factors that control the adsorbent capacity and kinetics of uranium uptake by amidoxime-based adsorbents.

  15. Experiments and Modeling of Uranium Adsorption in the Presence of Other Ions in Simulated Seawater

    DOE PAGES

    Ladshaw, Austin; Das, Sadananda; Liao, Wei-Po; ...

    2015-11-19

    Seawater contains uranium at an average concentration of 3.3 ppb, as well as a variety of other ions at either overwhelmingly higher or similar concentrations, which complicate the recovery of uranium. This report describes an investigation of the effects of various factors such as uranium speciation and presence of salts including sodium, calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate, as well as trace elements such as vanadium on uranium adsorption kinetics in laboratory experiments. Adsorption models are also developed to describe the experimental data of uranium extraction from seawater. Results show that the presence of calcium and magnesium significantly slows down the uraniummore » adsorption kinetics. Vanadium can replace uranium from amidoxime-based adsorbent in the presence of sodium in the solution. Results also show that bicarbonate in the solution strongly competes with amidoxime for binding uranium, and thus slows down the uranium adsorption kinetics. Developed on the basis of the experimental findings, the model is capable of describing the effects of pH, ionic strength, temperature, and concentration of various species. The results of this work are useful in the understanding of the important factors that control the adsorbent capacity and kinetics of uranium uptake by amidoxime-based adsorbents.« less

  16. Adsorption of metal ions on polyaminated highly porous chitosan chelating resin

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Yoshihide; Mitsuhashi, Masaki; Tanibe, Hiroaki ); Yoshida, Hiroyuki )

    1993-02-01

    Highly porous chelating resin was fabricated from the natural polysaccharide chitosan. The adsorption capacity was increased by polyamination with poly(ethylene imine) (MW = 10,000). The capacity was about 1-2 times larger than that of commercial chelate resins. The selectivity for adsorption of metal ions on the resin, which was determined for a single solute at pH [approx equal] 7, was Hg(II) > UO[sub 2](II) > Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Cu(II) > Ni(II). Mg(II), Ca(II), Ga(III), As(III), and Sr(II) were not adsorbed on the resin at all. The selectivity depended on the pH of each metal solution. The equilibrium isotherms for adsorption of HgCl[sub 2] were correlated by the Langmuir equation. The saturation capacities were close to the concentration of amino group fixed on the resin. When HCl or NaCl coexisted in HgCl[sub 2] solution and their concentrations were lower than 100 mol/m[sup 3], the saturation capacity of HgCl[sub 2] was little affected by them. When 500 mol/m[sup 3] H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] coexisted in HgCl[sub 2] solution, extremely low pH inhibited the adsorption of Hg(II) at all.

  17. Stabilization of copper nanoparticles with volume- and surface-distribution inside ion-exchange matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, T. A.; Sakardina, E. A.; Kalinichev, A. I.; Zolotukhina, E. V.

    2015-09-01

    Nanocomposites characterized by the surface and volume distributions of deposited copper nanoparticles are obtained via the chemical deposition of copper onto sulfonic acid and carboxylic cation exchanger and strongly basic anion exchanger matrices. The electrode behavior of the synthesized composites in CuSO4 solution is studied by open-circuit chronopotentiometry. The effect the nature of the fixed centers of the ion-exchange matrix has on the initial state of metallic particles and the processes that occur in solutions of their metal ions is established from the deviation of the nanocomposites' electrode potential from the potential of a compact electrode and the nature of its change over time. It is shown that the mechanism behind the interaction of the matrix and metal ions (ion exchange, non-exchange absorption, complexation) determines not only the initial size and distribution of metal particles, but also the rate at which they achieve aggregative stability.

  18. Extraction of Carbon Dioxide From Seawater by Ion Exchange Resin. Part 2. Using Strong Base Anion Exchange Resin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-29

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6180--09-9211 Extraction of Carbon Dioxide from Sea water by Ion Exchange Resin Part...STRONG BASE ANION EXCHANGE RESIN 1.0 BACKGROUND The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) process converts solar thermal energy absorbed by the ocean...into electrical power [1,2]. During the OTEC process dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) in ocean water is liberated as a gas. Since CO2 is implicated in

  19. Adsorption of copper (II), chromium (III), nickel (II) and lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions by meranti sawdust.

    PubMed

    Rafatullah, M; Sulaiman, O; Hashim, R; Ahmad, A

    2009-10-30

    The present study proposed the use of meranti sawdust in the removal of Cu(II), Cr(III), Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions from synthetic aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies showed that meranti sawdust was able to adsorb Cu(II), Cr(III), Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions in the concentration range 1-200mg/L. The adsorption was favoured with maximum adsorption at pH 6, whereas the adsorption starts at pH 1 for all metal ions. The effects of contact time, initial concentration of metal ions, adsorbent dosage and temperature have been reported. The applicability of Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm was tried for the system to completely understand the adsorption isotherm processes. The adsorption kinetics tested with pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models yielded high R(2) values from 0.850 to 0.932 and from 0.991 to 0.999, respectively. The meranti sawdust was found to be cost effective and has good efficiency to remove these toxic metal ions from aqueous solution.

  20. Use of petroleum reside for production of ion exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Pokonova, Y.V.

    1995-03-10

    Weakly acidic commercial cation exchangers with a static exchange capacity of 4.8-6.7 meq{center_dot}{sup -1} and a mechanical strength of 90% have been synthesized from petroleum asphaltites, resorcinol, and furfural.

  1. Kinetics of sorption of niobium ions by anion-exchangers from mixed chloride-fluoride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rychkov, V.N.; Pakholkov, V.S.; Kuznetsova, L.D.

    1987-08-10

    The authors showed earlier on the basis of experimental and calculated data obtained in studies of ion-exchange equilibrium that the sorbability and composition of sorbed niobium ions are determined by the content of hydrofluoric acid in mixed chloride-fluoride solutions. Variation of the ionic state of niobium in these solutions should also influence the rate of ion exchange. In this communication they examine the results of a study of the kinetics of exchange of niobium ions on AV-17 x 8, EDE-10P, and AN-2F anion-exchange resins in fluoride-containing solutions. Kinetic curves for sorption of niobium ions and the results of their evaluation are presented.

  2. Custom-tailored adsorbers: A molecular dynamics study on optimal design of ion exchange chromatography material.

    PubMed

    Lang, Katharina M H; Kittelmann, Jörg; Pilgram, Florian; Osberghaus, Anna; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-09-25

    The performance of functionalized materials, e.g., ion exchange resins, depends on multiple resin characteristics, such as type of ligand, ligand density, the pore accessibility for a molecule, and backbone characteristics. Therefore, the screening and identification process for optimal resin characteristics for separation is very time and material consuming. Previous studies on the influence of resin characteristics have focused on an experimental approach and to a lesser extent on the mechanistic understanding of the adsorption mechanism. In this in silico study, a previously developed molecular dynamics (MD) tool is used, which simulates any given biomolecule on resins with varying ligand densities. We describe a set of simulations and experiments with four proteins and six resins varying in ligand density, and show that simulations and experiments correlate well in a wide range of ligand density. With this new approach simulations can be used as pre-experimental screening for optimal adsorber characteristics, reducing the actual number of screening experiments, which results in a faster and more knowledge-based development of custom-tailored adsorbers.

  3. Mechanical compaction of smectite clays increases ion exchange selectivity for cesium.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Luc R; Glaus, Martin A

    2008-03-01

    A key discussion in radioactive waste disposal is the question of whether adsorption behavior of radionuclides in dispersed and in highly compacted materials is similar. It is common practice to measure sorption data on dispersed systems and to use these data to predict the sorption in compacted systems. The latter represent the situation in a real, deep geological repository system. The discussions focus mainly on items such as the effect of compaction on the accessibility of sorption sites, that is, on sterical effects, and not on the effect of compaction on the thermodynamics of the sorption processes. Here we show that in the case of sorption of cesium on sodium bentonite, material compaction indeed affects the thermodynamics of the sorption process such that sorption increases. This increase is due to a reduction of the interlayer space, leading to a lower ability of the interlayer water for cation hydration. Cations with a low hydration tendency, such as cesium, therefore accumulate in the interlayer space, whereas highly hydrated cations such as sodium tends to accumulate in the bulk water where water is easily available for hydration. The fact that mechanical compaction affects the thermodynamics of ion exchange processes in clay is an important finding and brings in a new aspect in the discussion on the transferability of thermodynamic data from diluted to compacted systems. The common practice of applying chemical and thermodynamic concepts valid for diluted systems to compacted systems must be basically scrutinized.

  4. Orientation and electronic structure of ion exchanged dye molecules on mica: An X-ray absorption study

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.; Caseri, W.R.; Haehner, G.

    1998-02-15

    Dye molecules are frequently used to determine the specific surface area and the ion exchange capacity of high-surface-area materials such as mica. The organic molecules are often considered to be planar and to adsorb in a flat orientation. In the present study the authors have investigated the orientation and electronic structure of crystal violet (CV) and malachite green (MG) on muscovite mica, prepared by immersing the substrates for extended periods into aqueous solutions of the dyes of various concentrations. The K{sup +} ions of the mica surface are replaced by the organic cations via ion exchange. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that only one amino group is involved in the interaction of CV and MG with the muscovite surface, i.e., certain resonance structures are abolished upon adsorption. With near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy a significant tilt angle with respect to the surface was found for all investigated species. A flat orientation, as has often been proposed before, can effectively be ruled out. Hence, results are in marked contrast to the often quoted orientation and suggest that the specific surface areas determined with dyes may, in general, be overestimated.

  5. Charge-exchange plasma environment for an ion drive spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A model was reviewed which describes the propagation of the mercury charge-exchange plasma and extended to describe the flow of the molybdenum component of the charge-exchange plasma. The uncertainties in the models for various conditions are discussed. Such topics as current drain to the solar array, charge-exchange plasma material deposition, and the effects of space plasma on the charge-exchange plasma propagation are addressed.

  6. A comparative study of ion exchange kinetics in zinc/lead-modified zeolite-clinoptilolite systems.

    PubMed

    Trgo, M; Perić, J; Medvidović, N Vukojević

    2006-08-25

    The kinetics of zinc and lead ions removal by modified zeolite-clinoptilolite has been investigated. The rate of the ion exchange process for lead ions is faster than for zinc ions, as well as the time needed to reach the equilibrium. The ion exchange capacity of zeolite of lead ions is doubly higher than that of zinc ions. Diffusion models according to the Vermeulen's approximation, the parabolic diffusion model and the homogeneous diffusion model have been tested with the experimental data of ion exchange for zinc and lead. For both systems examined, the best fit of the models proposed with the experimental data was shown by the Vermeulen's approximation and the homogeneous diffusion model with t-->t(infinity). The diffusion coefficients are calculated from kinetic models of lead ions they are of the order of 10(-6)cm(2)/min, constant for all examined initial concentrations and not dependent on time. The diffusion coefficients in the system of zinc ions is of the order of 10(-8)cm(2)/min, also independent of initial concentrations, but decreasing with time from the beginning of ion exchange to the equilibrium.

  7. Ion exchange induced removal of Pb(ii) by MOF-derived magnetic inorganic sorbents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dezhi; Shen, Weisong; Wu, Shaolin; Chen, Caiqin; Luo, Xubiao; Guo, Lin

    2016-04-07

    Nanoporous adsorbents of ZnO/ZnFe2O4/C were synthesized by using a metal organic framework (Fe(III)-modified MOF-5) as both the precursor and the self-sacrificing template. The adsorption properties of ZnO/ZnFe2O4/C toward Pb(ii) ions were investigated, including the pH effect, adsorption equilibrium and adsorption kinetics. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics were well described by using the Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo-second-order model, respectively. The MOF-derived inorganic adsorbents exhibited high absorption performance with a maximum adsorption capacity of 344.83 mg g(-1). X-ray powder diffraction and high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggest that Zn(ii) was substituted by a significant portion of Pb(ii) on the surface of ZnO nanocrystals. Microscopic observations also demonstrate the effect of Pb(ii) ions on ZnO crystals as reflected by the considerably reduced average particle size and defective outer layer. Quantitative measurement of the released Zn(ii) ions and the adsorbed Pb(ii) ions indicated a nearly linear relationship (R(2) = 0.977). Moreover, Pb-containing ZnO/ZnFe2O4/C adsorbents are strongly magnetic allowing their separation from the water environment by an external magnet.

  8. ION-EXCHANGE METHOD FOR SEPARATING RADIUM FROM RADIUM-BARIUM MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Fuentevilla, M.E.

    1959-06-30

    An improved process is presented for separating radium from an aqueous feed solution containing radium and barium values and a complexing agent for these metals. In this process a feed solutlon containing radium and barium ions and a complexing agent for said ions ls cycled through an exchange zone in resins. The radiumenriched resin is then stripped of radium values to form a regeneration liquid, a portion of which is collected as an enriched product, the remaining portion being recycled to the exchange zone to further enrich the ion exchange resin in radium.

  9. Ion exchange in the atomic energy industry with particular reference to actinide and fission product separation

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, I.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviewed are some of the uses of ion exchange processes used by the nuclear industry for the period April, 1978 to April, 1983. The topics dealt with are: thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, cesium and actinide-lanthanide separations; the higher actinides - Cm, Bk, Cf, Es and Fm; fission products; ion exchange in the geological disposal of radioactive waste. Consideration is given to safety in the use of ion exchangers and in safe methods of disposal of such materials. Full scale and pilot plant process descriptions are included as well as summaries of laboratory studies. 130 references.

  10. Analysis of selected ionic liquid cations by ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Stepnowski, Piotr; Mrozik, Wojciech

    2005-02-01

    The chromatographic behavior of 8 ionic liquids - 7 homologues of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium and 4-methyl-N-butylpyridinium - has been investigated with a strong cation exchange adsorbent. In particular, the dependence of the retention properties of these solutes on mobile phase composition, pH, and buffer concentration was evaluated with the aim of optimizing and improving the selectivity and retention of solute separation. While using the SCX stationary phase, several interactions occurred with varying strengths, depending on the mobile phase composition. Cation exchange, nonspecific hydrophobic interactions, and adsorption chromatography behavior were observed. Reversed phase chromatography occurred at low concentrations of acetonitrile, electrostatic and adsorption interactions at higher organic modifier concentrations. Elevated buffer concentrations lowered the retention factors without affecting the selectivity of ionic liquids. Obtained results were further compared to the chromatographic behaviour of ionic liquids in the reversed phase system. All analyzed ionic liquids follow reversed-phase behavior while being separated. Much lower selectivity in the range of highly hydrophilic compounds is obtained. This suggests preferred use of ion chromatography for separation and analysis of compounds below 4 carbon atoms in the alkyl side chain.

  11. Adsorption of divalent lead ions by zeolites and activated carbon: effects of pH, temperature, and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Payne, Kelly B; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M

    2004-01-01

    Lead alloy bullets used at the 2600 military small arm ranges and 9000 nonmilitary outdoor shooting ranges in the United States are a source of mobilized lead ions under conditions of low pH, significant changes in ionic strength, changes in the reduction oxidation potential (redox), and through binding metal ions to soil organic matter. Once mobile, these lead ions can contaminate adjacent soil and water. Batch adsorption kinetic and isotherm studies were conducted to compare and evaluate different types of adsorbents for lead ion removal from aqueous media. The effects on lead ion absorption from pH changes, competing ions, and temperature increases were also investigated. Adsorbent materials such as activated carbon and naturally occurring zeolites (clinoptilolite and chabazite) were selected because of their relative low cost and because the zeolites are potential point-of-use materials for mitigating wastewater runoff. Molecular sieves, Faujasite (13X) and Linde type A (5A) were selected because they provide a basis for comparison with previous studies and represent well-characterized materials. The relative rate for lead ion adsorption was: 13X > chabazite > clinoptilolite > 5A > activated carbon. Modeling lead ion adsorption by these adsorbents using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm expressions determined the adsorbents' capacity for lead ion removal from aqueous media. 13X, 5A, and activated carbon best fit the Langmuir isotherm expression; chabazite and clinoptilolite best fit the Freundlich isotherm. Applications of chabazite would require pH values between 4 and 11, clinoptilolite between 3 and 11, while activated carbon would operate at a pH above 7. Ionic competition reduced lead ion removal by the zeolites, but enhanced activated carbon performance. Increasing temperature improved adsorption performance for the zeolites; activated carbon lead ion adsorption was temperature independent.

  12. Batch adsorption of cadmium ions from aqueous solution by means of olive cake.

    PubMed

    Al-Anber, Zaid Ahmed; Matouq, Mohammed Abu Dayeh

    2008-02-28

    The use of natural adsorbent such as olive cake to replace expensive imported synthetic adsorbent is particularly appropriate for developing countries such as Jordan. In this study, batch adsorption experiments were carried out for the removal of cadmium ions from its aqueous solution using olive cake as adsorbent. Parameters effects such as temperature, pH and adsorbent dose on the adsorption process were studied. The adsorbent used in this study exhibited as good sorption at approximately pH 6 at temperatures 28, 35 and 45 degrees C. The removal efficiency was found to be 66% at pH 6 and temperature 28 degrees C. The equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models to calculate isotherm constants. The experimental results were in a good agreement with these models. Results show that when an increasing in temperature from 28 to 45 degrees C, the maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) is decreased from 65.4 to 44.4 mg/g and Freundlich constant (Kf) decreased from 19.9 to 15.7. The thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption process data were evaluated using Langmuir isotherm. The free energy change (DeltaG degrees) and the enthalpy change (DeltaH degrees) showed that the process was feasible and exothermic, respectively. The dynamic data fitted to the first order, Lagergren-first order and pseudo second-order kinetic models. The experimental results indicated that the pseudo second-order reaction model provided the best description for these data with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. The adsorption rate constant was calculated as 8.4x10(-3) g mg(-1) min(-1) at 28 degrees C.

  13. Adsorption of hydrated halide ions on charged electrodes: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosli, James N.; Philpott, Michael R.

    1993-04-01

    Constant temperature molecular dynamics has been used to simulate the adsorption of hydrated halide ion X(-) = F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-), and lithium ion Li(+) on a flat uniformly charged surfaces. The simulations were done with either 214 water molecules and two ions (Li(+) and X(-)) in a box 2.362 nm deep or with 430 water molecules and the two ions in a box 4.320 nm deep. The boxes were periodically replicated in the xy directions. The magnitude of the surface charge on the box end was + or - 0.11 c/nm(sup 2), corresponding to an electric field of 2 x 10(exp 7) V/cm. The lateral dimensions of the simulation cell were 1.862 nm x 1.862 nm (x times y) in each case. All of the water molecules and ions interacted with the end walls via a weak 9 - 3 potential. The ST2 water model and parameters optimized for alkali halides interacting with the model ST2 water molecule were used in the calculations. Common practices of truncating the interactions at a finite distance (0.82 nm) and switching off Coulomb interactions at small distances were followed. The temperature was set at T = 2.411 kJ/mole (290 K). Some of the properties calculated were: distribution density profiles for ions and water across the gap important for comparisons iwth Gouy-Chapman theory, adsorbed ion-water pair correlation functions, the number of water molecules in the first and second hydration shells of the ions as a function of time. The time spent by a water molecule in the hydration shell was calculated to be approximately ten times longer for lithium than any other ion. The correlation between distance from the electrode and hydration number was studied and generally found to be pronounced for the larger anions.

  14. Lithium ion adsorption and diffusion on black phosphorene nanotube: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jin; Shi, Jing; Hu, Yinquan; Wu, Musheng; Ouyang, Chuying; Xu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Li ion storage performance of the single-walled black phosphorene nanotube (PNT), which is considered as potential anode materials for high-performance Li-ion batteries (LIBs), is studied from first-principles calculations. The Li ion adsorption, diffusion and structural evolution of the one-dimensional armchair type PNT (aPNT) upon Li intercalation on the inside (in-PNT) and outside (out-PNT) surfaces were explored, comparing with that of the two-dimensional phosphorene (Psheet). A maximum Li storage capacity (at the intercalated state of Li22P44) is evaluated to be 432 mAh/g. It is also shown that the in-PNT system has higher adsorption energy and lower Li diffusion energy barrier compared with that of the Psheet and the out-PNT systems. The reason on why the better Li storage performance of the in-PNT is also studied from charge distribution and transfer analysis. These results suggest that PNT can be served as potential anode material for LIBs.

  15. Metal cation/anion adsorption on calcium carbonate: Implications to metal ion concentrations in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Resch, C.T.

    1990-05-01

    This chapter evaluates the sorption behavior of metallic ions on specimen calcite as a basis for determining the importance of calcite relative to other subsurface sorbents, such as layer silicates and oxides, in controlling metal ion concentration in calcareous groundwaters. A review of the literature shows the sorption of both metallic cations and anions on calcite over ranges in pH and CO{sub 2} partial pressure to be consistent with a surface-exchange process where cations exchange with surface Ca and anions exchange with surface CO{sub 3}. A general surface-exchange model was developed to account for the effects of Ca and CO{sub 3} concentrations, pH, and calcite surface area on cation and anion sorption onto calcite. The model was applied to recently developed experimental sorption data of Zn and SeO{sub 3} on specimen calcite in equilibrium CaCO{sub 3}(aq) suspensions. The surface-exchange model was able to describe the effects of pH on both cation and anion sorption, and provided good predictions of the effects of variable CO{sub 2}(g) pressure on Zn sorption and of PO{sub 4} on SeO{sub 3} sorption. The surface-exchange model, combined with sorption constants for other phases, was used to calculate Cd sorption to a hypothetical aquifer material containing a mixture of sorbents. The sorbent concentrations were fixed to those expected in groundwater zones. The multi-sorbent calculation documented the importance of calcite as a sorbent for metallic ions in groundwater.93 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Adsorption of Cu2+ ions using chitosan-modified magnetic Mn ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yuying; Chen, Deyang; Sun, Yitao; Jiao, Dongling; Zeng, Dechang; Liu, Zhongwu

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-modified Mn ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a one-step microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. These Mn ferrite magnetic composite nanoparticles were employed to absorb Cu2+ ions in water. XRD verified the spinel structure of the MnFe2O4 nanoparticles. Chitosan modification does not result in any phase change of MnFe2O4. FTIR and zeta potentials curves for all samples suggest that chitosan can be successfully coated on the Mn ferrites. TEM characterization showed that the modified MnFe2O4 nanoparticles have a cubic shape with a mean diameter of ∼100 nm. For adsorption behavior, the effects of experiment parameters such as solution pH value, contact time and initial Cu2+ ions concentration on the adsorption efficiency were systematically investigated. The results showed that increasing solution pH value and extending contact time are favorable for improving adsorption efficiency. Especially, adsorption efficiency can reach up to 100% and 96.7% after 500 min adsorption at pH 6.5 for the solutions with initial Cu2+ ions concentration of 50 mg/L and 100 mg/L. Adsorption data fits well with the Langmuir isotherm models with a maximum adsorption capacity (qm) and a Langmuir adsorption equilibrium constant (K) of 65.1 mg/g and 0.090 L/mg, respectively. The adsorption kinetic agrees well with pseudo second order model with the pseudo second rate constants (K2) of 0.0468 and 0.00189 g/mg/min for solutions with initial Cu2+ ions of 50 and 100 mg/L, respectively.

  17. Adsorption of hydrated halide ions on charged electrodes. Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosli, James N.; Philpott, Michael R.

    1993-06-01

    Constant temperature molecular dynamics has been used to simulate the adsorption of hydrated halide ions X-=F-, Cl-, Br- and I-, and lithium ion Li+ on flat uniformly charged surfaces. The simulations were done with either 214 water molecules and two ions (Li+ and X-) in a box 2.362 nm deep or with 430 water molecules and the two ions in a box 4.320 nm deep. The boxes were periodically replicated in the xy directions. The magnitude of the surface charge on the box ends was ±0.11 e/(nm)2, corresponding to an electric field of 2×107 V/cm. The lateral dimensions of the simulation cell were 1.862 nm×1.862 nm (x×y) in each case. All of the water molecules and ions interacted with the end walls via a weak 9-3 potential. The Stillinger ST2 water model and parameters optimized for alkali halides interacting with the model ST2 water molecule were used in the calculations. Common particles of truncating the interactions at a finite distance (0.82 nm) and switching off Coulomb interactions at small distances were followed. The temperature was set at T=2.411 kJ/mol (290 K). Some of the properties calculated were distribution density profiles for ions and water across the gap important for comparisons with Gouy-Chapman theory, adsorbed ion-water pair correlation functions, and the number of water molecules in the first and second hydration shells of the ions as a function of time. The time spent by a water molecule in the hydration shell was calculated to be approximately ten times longer for lithium than any other ion. The correlation between distance from the electrode and hydration number was studied and generally found to be pronounced for the larger anions. Comparison of the dynamics of the common ion Li+ for different anions revealed the subtle influence of a transcell interaction in the 2.362 nm thick film. In the given field, the smallest ions Li+ and F- remained fully solvated at all times. Chloride behaved quite differently. Part of the time this ion was far

  18. Adsorption of the complex ion Au(CN)2- onto sulfur-impregnated activated carbon in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Muñiz, Kardia; Song, Shaoxian; Berber-Mendoza, Selene; Tong, Shitang

    2010-09-15

    The adsorption of the gold-cyanide complex ion (Au(CN)(2)(-)) on sulfur-impregnated activated carbon in aqueous solution has been studied in order to find a better adsorbent for the gold cyanidation process for extracting gold from ores. This study was performed using sulfur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC 8.0) made from high-sulfur petroleum coke and an artificial aqueous solution of Au(CN)(2)(-). The experimental results have shown that Au(CN)(2)(-) strongly adsorbed onto the SIAC 8.0, leading the gold adsorption capacity of the SIAC 8.0 to be 2.25x that on conventional activated carbon. It has been also found that the adsorption fit the Langmuir isotherm well, and the adsorption density of Au(CN)(2)(-) on the SIAC 8.0 in aqueous solution increased with increasing temperature, suggesting chemical adsorption. The chemical adsorption might be attributed to the formation of S-Au-CN on SIAC 8.0 surfaces through the covalent bond between the gold atom of the ion and the sulfur in the molecular structure of the SIAC 8.0. In addition, the desorption test has demonstrated that the majority of the adsorption was irreversible, which depended on the density of the adsorption sites on the SIAC.

  19. Tramadol loading, release and iontophoretic characteristics of ion-exchange fiber.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanan; Yuan, Jing; Liu, Hongzhuo; Yang, Yang; Hou, Yanlong; Li, Sanming

    2014-04-25

    The objective of this study was to investigate the drug loading, release and iontophoretic characteristics of strong acidic ion-exchange fiber, using tramadol hydrochloride as a model drug. The complex of charged model drug and ion-exchange fiber was studied as a new approach to achieve controlled drug delivery. Structural characterization of the fiber was elucidated through different approaches including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). And the mechanism of drug binding into ion-exchange fibers was validated to be ion-exchange. The drug loading into and release from ion-exchange fiber were affected by the concentration, volume and valence of the counter-ions in the external solution. Iontophoresis could significantly increase the delivery rate and amount of transdermal drug, and the iontophoretic dose could be easily controlled by adjusting the current intensity and the amount of release medium. The tramadol could be steadily released both from the drug-loaded fiber and drug solution when applied the iontophoretic method, which was in disagreement with the previous publications. As a drug reservoir, ion-exchange fiber has good regularity of drug loading, release and iontophoretic characteristics.

  20. Enhanced capacity and stability for the separation of cesium in electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Tawfic, A.F.; Dickson, S.E.; Kim, Y.; Mekky, W.

    2015-03-15

    Electrically switched ion exchange (ESIX) can be used to separate ionic contaminants from industrial wastewater, including that generated by the nuclear industry. The ESIX method involves sequential application of reduction and oxidation potentials to an ion exchange film to induce the respective loading and unloading of cesium. This technology is superior to conventional methods (e.g electrodialysis reversal or reverse osmosis) as it requires very little energy for ionic separation. In previous studies, ESIX films have demonstrated relatively low ion exchange capacities and limited film stabilities over repeated potential applications. In this study, the methodology for the deposition of electro-active films (nickel hexacyanoferrate) on nickel electrodes was modified to improve the ion exchange capacity for cesium removal using ESIX. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the ion exchange capacity and stability. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the modified film surfaces. Additionally, the films were examined for the separation of cesium ions. This modified film preparation technique enhanced the ion exchange capacity and improves the film stability compared to previous methods for the deposition of ESIX films. (authors)