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Sample records for adsorption kinetic studies

  1. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of sulforaphane adsorption on macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Wu; Lei, Zhang; Jianwei, Mao; Shiwang, Liu; Jun, Huang; Yuru, You; Lehe, Mei

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of sulforaphane (SF) adsorption onto macroporous resin in aqueous phase were studied. The SP850 resin was screened as the appropriate resin for SF purification. From the equilibrium studies, the Redlich-Peterson model was found to be the best for description of the adsorption behavior of SF onto SP850 resin, followed by the Freundlich model and the Langmuir model. Batch equilibrium experiments demonstrated that, in the examined temperature range, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of SP850 resin decreased with increasing adsorption temperature. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of SF was a physical, exothermic, and spontaneous process. The adsorption kinetics revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was suitable to characterize the kinetics of adsorption of SF onto SP850. Finally, the intra-particle diffusion model demonstrated that SF diffused quickly into macropores, and that diffusion slowed down in the meso- and micropores. PMID:27391585

  2. Kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, H.; Suzuki, A.

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M.G. Rao and A.K. Gupta was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for both the cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} and 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 2}/s were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively.

  3. Kinetic Study of Lead Adsorption to Composite Biopolymer Adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Seki; Suzuki

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M. G. Rao and A. K. Gupta (Chem. Eng. J. 24, 181, 1982) was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for the both cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 x 10(-6) and 7 x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10049553

  4. Kinetic studies of the sucrose adsorption onto an alumina interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kaman; Mohan, Sudhanshu

    2004-01-01

    An account is given of an experimental kinetic study of adsorption of analar reagent sucrose (ARS) onto an alumina interface spectrometrically ( λmax=570 nm) at pH 8.0 and at room temperature. The adsorption isotherm is a typical Langmuirian isotherm (S-type) and adsorption parameters have been deduced according to the Langmuir's model. The adsorption coefficient evaluated from the Langmuir's equation was found to be 2.52×10 2 l mol -1. Adsorption mechanism has been interpreted on the basis of metal-saccharide interaction as found in organometallic compounds and interaction due to negatively charged ends on the disaccharide molecules and positively charge groups on the surface on alumina which depends on the pH value. The effects of variation in experimental conditions of the adsorption system have also been investigated. The adsorption exhibited a typical response to the pH effect and on going towards the PZC the net charge decreases and any reaction making dependence on charge and maximum adsorption (amount) was found near the isoelectric point of alumina (pH 9.0). The presence of ions like Cl -, SO 42- and PO 43- affect the adsorbed amount quantitatively and it seems that these anions compete with sucrose for the positively charged surface sites. The addition of similar concentration of cations was found to reduce the adsorbed amount. The temperature was found to have an inverse effect on adsorption. The additions of catonic and anionic detergents influence both the adsorbed amount and the adsorption rate. The thermodynamics of the titled adsorption model indicates the spontaneous and exothermic nature. The negative value of entropy is an indication of probability of favorable and complex nature of the adsorption.

  5. Kinetic Batch Soil Adsorption Studies of 2, 4-dinitroanisole (DNAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, J.; Mark, N. W.; Taylor, S.; Brusseau, M. L.; Dontsova, K.

    2014-12-01

    Currently the explosive 2, 4, 6- trinitrotoluene (TNT) is used as a main ingredient in munitions; however the compound has failed to meet sensitivity requirements. The replacement compound being tested is 2, 4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). DNAN is less sensitive to shock, high temperatures, and has good detonation characteristics. However, DNAN is more soluble than TNT, which can influence transport and fate behavior and thus bioavailability and exposure potential. DNAN has been shown to have some human and environmental toxicity. The objective of this study was to investigate the environmental fate of DNAN in soil, with a specific focus on sorption processes. Batch experiments were conducted using 11 soils collected from military installations located across the United States. The soils were characterized for pH, specific surface area, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, and organic carbon content. Adsorption kinetic data determined at room temperature were fitted using the first order kinetic equation. Adsorption isotherms were fitted with linear and Freundlich isotherm equations. The magnitudes of the linear adsorption coefficients ranged from 0.6 to 6 cm3/g. Results indicated that the adsorption of DNAN is strongly dependent on the amount of organic carbon present in the soil.

  6. Kinetic study of aluminum adsorption by aluminosilicate clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, W.J.; Cronan, C.S.; Patterson, H.H.

    1988-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics of Al/sup 3 +/ by montmorillonite, kaolinite, and vermiculite were investigated as a function of the initial Al concentration, the surface area of the clay, and H/sup +/ concentration, at 25/sup 0/, 18/sup 0/, and 10/sup 0/C. In order to minimize complicated side reactions the pH range was kept between 3.0 and 4.1. Results showed that the adsorption rate was first order with respect to both the initial Al concentration and the clay surface area. Changes in pH within this narrow range had virtually no effect on adsorption rate. This zero order reaction dependence suggested that the H/sup +/, compared to Al, has a weak affinity for the surface. The rates of adsorption decreased in the order of montmorillonite > kaolinite > vermiculite when compared on the basis of equal surface areas, but changed to kaolinite > montmorillonite > vermiculite when the clays were compared on an equal exchange capacity basis. The calculated apparent activation energies were < 32 kJ mol/sup -1/, indicating that over the temperature range of the study the adsorption process is only marginally temperature sensitive. The mechanism is governed by a simple electrostatic cation exchange involving outer sphere complexes between adsorbed Al and the clay surface. Vermiculite, may have a second reaction step governed by both electrostatic attraction and internal ion diffusion. Equilibrium constants for the formation of an adsorbed Al clay complex were also estimated and are 10/sup 5.34/, 10/sup 5.18/, and 10/sup 4.94/ for kaolinite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite, respectively, suggesting that these clays could play a significant role in controlling soil solutions Al concentrations.

  7. Mechanism of Cr(VI) adsorption by coir pith studied by ESR and adsorption kinetic.

    PubMed

    Suksabye, Parinda; Nakajima, Akira; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Baba, Yoshinari; Nakbanpote, Woranan

    2009-01-30

    The oxidation state of chromium in coir pith after Cr(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution was investigated using electron spin resonance (ESR). To elucidate the mechanism of chromium adsorption on coir pith, the adsorption studies of Cr(VI) onto lignin, alpha-cellulose and holocellulose extracted from coir pith were also studied. ESR signals of Cr(V) and Cr(III) were observed in coir pith adsorbed Cr(VI) at solution pH 2, while ESR spectra of lignin extracted from coir pith revealed only the Cr(III) signal. In addition, ESR signal of Cr(V) was observed in alpha-cellulose and holocellulose extracted from coir pith adsorbed Cr(VI). These results confirmed that lignin in coir pith reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) while alpha-cellulose and holocellulose extracted from coir pith reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(V). The Cr(V) signal exhibited in ESR of alpha-cellulose and holocellulose might be bound with glucose in cellulose part of coir pith. In addition, xylose which is main in pentosan part of coir pith, indicated that it is involved in form complex with Cr(V) on coir pith. The adsorption kinetic of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution on coir pith was also investigated and described well with pseudo second order model. ESR and desorption experiments confirmed that Cr(VI), Cr(V) and Cr(III), exist in coir pith after Cr(VI) adsorption. The desorption data indicated that the percentage of Cr(VI), Cr(V) and Cr(III) in coir pith were 15.63%, 12.89% and 71.48%, respectively. PMID:18513862

  8. Enhanced fluoride adsorption by nano crystalline γ-alumina: adsorption kinetics, isotherm modeling and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnakoti, Prathibha; Chunduri, Avinash L. A.; Vankayala, Ranganayakulu K.; Patnaik, Sandeep; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah

    2016-06-01

    Nano materials in particular nano oxides with enhanced surface area and an excellent catalytic surface serve as potential adsorbents for defluoridation of water. In the present study nano γ-alumina was synthesized through a simple and low cost, surfactant assisted solution combustion method. As synthesized material was characterized by XRD and FESEM for its phase, size and morphological characteristics. Surface properties have been investigated by BET method. Nano γ-alumina was further used for a detailed adsorption study to remove fluoride from water. Batches of experiments were performed at various experimental conditions such as solution pH, adsorbent dose, initial fluoride concentration and contact time to test the defluoridation ability of γ-alumina. Fluoride Adsorption by nano sized γ-alumina was rapid and reached equilibrium within two hours. The adsorption worked well at pH 4.0, where ˜96 % of fluoride was found to be adsorbed on adsorbent. It was possible to reduce fluoride levels to as low as 0.3 mg/L (within the safe limit of WHO: ≤1.5 mg/L) from an initial fluoride levels of 10 mg/L. This could be achieved using a very small quantity, 1 g/L of γ-alumina at pH 4 within 1 h of contact time. Defluoridation capacity of nano γ-alumina was further investigated by fitting the equilibrium data to various isotherm as well as kinetic models. The present study revealed that γ-alumina could be an efficient adsorbent for treating fluoride contaminated water.

  9. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of phenol onto graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Liu, Tonghao; Sun, Jiankun; Jiao, Yuqin; Xia, Yanzhi; Xia, Linhua; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of temperature on phenol adsorbed by graphene shows that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of phenol increases with the increase in temperature from 285 to 333 K. Increasing adsorption capacities with temperature indicates that the adsorption of phenol is controlled by an endothermic reaction. Highlights: ► The graphene has high phenol adsorption capacity. ► The graphene has a high specific surface area of 305 m{sup 2}/g. ► The adsorption capacity is high at acidic pH range. ► The graphene has rapid phenol adsorption rate. ► Phenol adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. -- Abstract: Graphene, a new member of carbon family, has been prepared, characterized and used as adsorbent to remove phenol from aqueous solution. The effect parameters including pH, dosage, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption properties of phenol onto graphene were investigated. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity can reach 28.26 mg/g at the conditions of initial phenol concentration of 50 mg/L, pH 6.3 and 285 K. Adsorption data were well described by both Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene fit the pseudo second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene was endothermic and spontaneous.

  10. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation. PMID:26683820

  11. Eriobotrya japonica seed biocomposite efficiency for copper adsorption: Isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamic and desorption studies.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mehwish; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Iqbal, Munawar; Noreen, Saima

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption techniques are widely used to remove pollutants from wastewater; however, composites are gaining more importance due to their excellent adsorption properties. Bentonite composite with Eriobotrya japonica seed was prepared and used for the adsorption of copper (Cu) metal from aqueous media. The process variables such as pH, Cu(II) ions initial concentration, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were optimized for maximum Cu(II) adsorption. At pH 5, adsorbent dose 0.1 g, contact time 45 min, Cu(II) ions initial concentration 75 mg/L and temperature 45 °C, maximum Cu(II) adsorption was achieved. Desorption studies revealed that biocomposite is recyclable. Langmuir, Freundlich and Harkins-Jura isotherms as well as pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order kinetics models were applied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0)) suggest that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm fitted well to the adsorption data. Results showed that biocomposite was more efficient for Cu(II) adsorption in comparison to individuals native Eriobotrya japonica seed biomass and Na-bentonite. PMID:27039361

  12. Removal Rate of Organic Matter Using Natural Cellulose via Adsorption Isotherm and Kinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Din, Mohd Fadhil Md; Ponraj, Mohanadoss; Low, Wen-Pei; Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali; Iwao, Kenzo; Songip, Ahmad Rahman; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Ismail, Zulhilmi; Jamal, Mohamad Hidayat

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) using coconut fiber (CF) and palm oil fiber (POF) was investigated. Preliminary analysis was performed using a jar test for the selection of optimal medium before the fabricated column model experiment. The equilibrium studies on isotherms and kinetic models for NOM adsorption were analyzed using linearized correlation coefficient. Results showed that the equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir isotherm model for both CF and POF. The most suitable adsorption model was the pseudo-first-order kinetic model for POF and pseudo-second-order kinetic model for CF. The adsorption capacities achieved by the CF and POF were 15.67 and 30.8 mg/g respectively. Based on this investigation, it can be concluded that the POF is the most suitable material for the removal of NOM in semi polluted river water. PMID:26803100

  13. Kafirin adsorption on ion-exchange resins: isotherm and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Lau, Pei Wen; Kale, Sandeep; Johnson, Stuart; Pareek, Vishnu; Utikar, Ranjeet; Lali, Arvind

    2014-08-22

    Kafirin is a natural, hydrophobic and celiac safe prolamin protein obtained from sorghum seeds. Today kafirin is found to be useful in designing delayed delivery systems and coatings of pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals where its purity is important and this can be obtained by adsorptive chromatography. This study is the first scientific insight into the isotherm and kinetic studies of kafirin adsorption on anion- and cation-exchange resins for practical applications in preparative scale chromatography. Adsorption isotherms of kafirin were determined for five anion- and two cation-exchange resins in batch systems. Isotherm parameters such as maximum binding capacity and dissociation constant were determined from Langmuir isotherm, and adsorptive capacity and affinity constant from Freundlich isotherm. Langmuir isotherm was found to fit the adsorption equilibrium data well. Batch uptake kinetics for kafirin adsorption on these resins was also carried out and critical parameters including the diffusion coefficient, film mass transfer coefficient, and Biot number for film-pore diffusion model were calculated. Both the isotherm and the kinetic parameters were considered for selection of appropriate resin for kafirin purification. UNOsphere Q (78.26 mg/ml) and Toyopearl SP-650M (57.4 mg/ml) were found to offer better kafirin binding capacities and interaction strength with excellent uptake kinetics under moderate operating conditions. With these adsorbents, film diffusion resistance was found to be major governing factor for adsorption (Bi<10 and δ<1). Based on designer objective function, UNOsphere Q was found be best adsorbent for binding of kafirin. The data presented is valuable for designing large scale preparative adsorptive chromatographic kafirin purification systems. PMID:25022481

  14. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of adsorptive removal of phenol onto eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Daraei, H; Mittal, A; Noorisepehr, M; Daraei, F

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present research is to develop economic, fast, and versatile method for the removal of toxic organic pollutant phenol from wastewater using eggshell. The batch experiments are conducted to evaluate the effect of pH, phenol concentration, dosage of adsorbent, and contact time on the removal of phenol. The paper includes in-depth kinetic studies of the ongoing adsorption process. Attempts have also been made to verify Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The morphology and characteristics of eggshell have also been studied using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray fluorescence analysis. At ambient temperature, the maximum adsorption of phenol onto eggshells has been achieved at pH 9 and the contact time, 90 min. The experimental data give best-fitted straight lines for pseudo-first-order as well as pseudo-second-order kinetic models. Furthermore, the adsorption process verifies Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and on the basis of mathematical expressions of these models, various necessary adsorption constants have been calculated. Using adsorption data, various thermodynamic parameters like change in enthalpy (∆H(0)), change in entropy (∆S(0)), and change in free energy ∆G(0) have also been evaluated. Results clearly reveal that the solid waste material eggshell acts as an effective adsorbent for the removal of phenol from aqueous solutions. PMID:23274804

  15. Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium study of nitrogen species onto radiata pine (Pinus radiata) sawdust.

    PubMed

    Harmayani, Kadek D; Faisal Anwar, A H M

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen species (NH3-N, NO3-N, and NO2-N) are found as one of the major dissolved constituents in wastewater or stormwater runoff. In this research, laboratory experiments were conducted to remove these pollutants from the water environment using radiata pine (Pinus radiata) sawdust. A series of batch tests was conducted by varying initial concentration, dosage, particle size, pH, and contact time to check the removal performance. Test results confirmed the effectiveness of radiata pine sawdust for removing these contaminants from the aqueous phase (100% removal of NO3-N, and NO2-N; 55% removal of NH3-N). The adsorbent dosage and initial concentration showed a significantly greater effect on the removal process over pH or particle sizes. The optimum dosage for contaminant removal on a laboratory scale was found to be 12 g. Next, the adsorption kinetics were studied using intraparticle diffusion, liquid-film diffusion, and a pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order model. The adsorption of all species followed a pseudo-second order model but NO2-N adsorption followed both models. In addition, the kinetics of NO2-N adsorption showed two-step adsorption following intraparticle diffusion and liquid-film diffusion. The isotherm study showed that NO3-N and NO2-N adsorption fitted slightly better with the Freundlich model but that NH3-N adsorption followed both Freundlich and Langmuir models. PMID:27438245

  16. Equilibrium and kinetics studies of arsenate adsorption by FePO(4).

    PubMed

    Hamayun, M; Mahmood, T; Naeem, A; Muska, M; Din, S U; Waseem, M

    2014-03-01

    The present work is focusing on removal of arsenate from aqueous solution using FePO4. The equilibrium study regarding the removal of arsenic by FePO4 was carried out at 298, 308, 318 and 328K. Langmuir parameters were found to increase with the increase in temperature indicating that the adsorption is favorable at high temperature. Kinetic study of arsenate adsorption on FePO4 was also carried out at different temperatures and at pH 6 and 8. Different kinetic models were used to the kinetic data amongst which pseudo second order model was best fitted. The mechanism of the adsorption kinetics was investigated by employing intraparticle diffusion and Richenberg models. The energy of activation (Ea) was found to be 30 and 35.52kJmol(-1) at pH 6 and pH 8, respectively, suggesting chemisorption nature of the adsorption process. The negative entropic values of activation signified the existence of entropy barrier while the positive ΔG(#) values indicated the existence of energy barrier to be crossed over for the occurrence of a chemical reaction. Both the spectroscopic studies and increase in equilibrium pH reveal the anion exchange removal of arsenate from aqueous solution to the solid surface. PMID:24280053

  17. Adsorption of surfactants on sand surface in enhanced oil recovery: Isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Achinta; Kumar, T.; Ojha, Keka; Mandal, Ajay

    2013-11-01

    Adsorption of surfactants onto reservoir rock surface may result in the loss and reduction of their concentrations in surfactant flooding, which may render them less efficient or ineffective in practical applications of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques. Surfactant flooding for EOR received attraction due to its ability to increase the displacement efficiency by lowering the interfacial tension between oil and water and mobilizing the residual oil. This article highlights the adsorption of surfactants onto sand surface with variation of different influencing factors. It has been experimentally found that adsorption of cationic surfactant on sand surface is more and less for anionic surfactant, while non-ionic surfactant shows intermediate behaviour. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study of clean sand particles has been made to determine the main component present in the sand particles. The interaction between sand particles and surfactant has been studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the sand particles before and after aging with surfactant. Salinity plays an important role in adsorption of anionic surfactant. Batch experiments were also performed to understand the effects of pH and adsorbent dose on the sorption efficiency. The sand particles exhibited high adsorption efficiency at low pH for anionic and nonionic surfactants. But opposite trend was found for cationic surfactant. Adsorption data were analyzed by fitting with Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Sips isotherm models. Results show that the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetics models suit the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption on sand surface. Thermodynamics feasibility of the adsorption process was also studied to verify the spontaneity of the process.

  18. Adsorption of metal ions onto Moroccan stevensite: kinetic and isotherm studies.

    PubMed

    Benhammou, A; Yaacoubi, A; Nibou, L; Tanouti, B

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this paper is to study the adsorption of the heavy metals (Cd(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II)) from aqueous solutions by a natural Moroccan stevensite called locally rhassoul. We carried out, first, a mineralogical and physicochemical characterization of stevensite. The surface area is 134 m2/g and the cation exchange capacity (CEC) is 76.5 meq/100 g. The chemical formula of stevensite is Si3.78Al0.22Mg2.92Fe0.09Na0.08K0.08O10(OH)2.4H2O. Adsorption tests of Cd(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) in batch reactors were carried out at ambient temperature and at constant pH. Two simplified models including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second- order were used to test the adsorption kinetics. The equilibrium time and adsorption rate of adsorption were determined. The increasing order of the adsorption rates follows the sequence Mn(II) > Pb(II) > Zn(II) > Cu(II) > Cd(II). The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R), Langmuir, and Redlich-Peterson (R-P) models were adopted to describe the adsorption isotherms. The maximal adsorption capacities at pH 4.0 determined from the D-R and Langmuir models vary in the following order: Cu(II) > Mn(II) > Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Pb(II). The equilibrium data fitted well with the three-parameter Redlich-Peterson model. The values of mean energy of adsorption show mainly an ion-exchange mechanism. Also, the influence of solution pH on the adsorption onto stevensite was studied in the pH range 1.5-7.0. PMID:15589536

  19. Adsorption removal of tetracycline from aqueous solution by anaerobic granular sludge: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Ji, Feng; Liu, Yuanlu; Tong, Zilin; Zhan, Xinmin; Hu, Zhenhu

    2013-01-01

    High concentration animal wastewater is often contaminated by tetracycline and an upflow anaerobic sludge bioreactor (UASB) with granular sludge is often used to treat the wastewater. The investigation of the adsorption process of tetracycline on anaerobic granular sludge during anaerobic digestion of animal wastewater will increase the understanding of antibiotics behavior in the UASB reactor. In this study, the effects of initial pH, humic acid concentration, and temperature on the removal of tetracycline by anaerobic granular sludge from aqueous solution were investigated using the batch adsorption technique in 100 mL flasks with 75 mL of work volume. The results show that the highest removal efficiency of 93.0% was achieved around pH 3.0 and the removal efficiency at the neutral pH range (pH 6.0-8.0) is about 91.5%. The thermodynamic analysis indicates that the adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order equation. The adsorption isotherms analysis indicates that the Langmuir model is better than the Freundlich model for the description of the adsorption process and confirms the result of thermodynamics analysis. The maximum adsorption capacities were 2.984, 4.108 and 4.618 mg/g at 25, 35 and 45 °C, respectively. These results provide useful information for understanding the fate and transformation of tetracycline in a UASB digestion system and improving the management of tetracycline contaminated animal wastewater. PMID:23552236

  20. Adsorption kinetics of phosphate and arsenate on goethite. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina; Brigante, Maximiliano; Avena, Marcelo

    2007-07-15

    The adsorption kinetics of phosphate and arsenate on goethite is studied and compared. Batch adsorption experiments were performed at different adsorbate concentrations, pH, temperatures and stirring rates. For both oxoanions the adsorption rate increases by increasing adsorbate concentration, decreasing pH and increasing temperature. It does not change by changing stirring rate. The adsorption takes place in two processes: a fast one that takes place in less than 5 min and a slow one that takes place in several hours or more. The rate of the slow process does not depend directly on the concentration of phosphate or arsenate in solution, but depends linearly on the amount of phosphate or arsenate that was adsorbed during the fast process. Apparent activation energies and absence of stirring rate effects suggest that the slow process is controlled by diffusion into pores, although the evidence is not conclusive. The similarities in the adsorption kinetics of phosphate and arsenate are quantitatively shown by using a three-parameters equation that takes into account both the fast and the slow processes. These similarities are in line with the similar reactivity that phosphate and arsenate have in general and may be important for theoretical and experimental studies of the fate of these oxoanions in the environment. PMID:17448491

  1. Dye adsorption of cotton fabric grafted with PPI dendrimers: Isotherm and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Salimpour Abkenar, Samera; Malek, Reza Mohammad Ali; Mazaheri, Firouzmehr

    2015-11-01

    In this research, the cotton fabrics grafted with two generations of the poly(propylene imine) dendrimers were applied to adsorb textile dyes from aqueous solutions. Direct Red 80 (anionic dye), Disperse Yellow 42 (nonionic dye) and Basic Blue 9 (cationic dye) were selected as model dyes. The effect of various experimental parameters such as initial concentration of dyes, charge of dyes molecule, salt and pH was investigated on the adsorption process. Furthermore, kinetics and equilibrium of the adsorption process on the grafted samples were studied. It was found that maximum adsorption of anionic and disperse dyes took place at around pH 3, while cationic dye could be adsorbed at around pH 11. The Langmuir equation was able to describe the mechanism of dyes adsorption. In addition, the second-order equation was found to be fit with the kinetics data. Interestingly, it seems that the dye adsorption of the grafted fabrics is strongly pH dependent. PMID:26292774

  2. Studies on adsorption, reaction mechanisms and kinetics for photocatalytic degradation of CHD, a pharmaceutical waste.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Santanu; Bhattacharjee, Chiranjib; Curcio, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHD), a disinfectant and topical antiseptic and adsorption of CHD catalyst surface in dark condition has been studied. Moreover, the value of kinetic parameters has been measured and the effect of adsorption on photocatalysis has been investigated here. Substantial removal was observed during the photocatalysis process, whereas 40% removal was possible through the adsorption route on TiO2 surface. The parametric variation has shown that alkaline pH, ambient temperature, low initial substrate concentration, high TiO2 loading were favourable, though at a certain concentration of TiO2 loading, photocatalytic degradation efficiency was found to be maximum. The adsorption study has shown good confirmation with Langmuir isotherm and during the reaction at initial stage, it followed pseudo-first-order reaction, after that Langmuir Hinshelwood model was found to be appropriate in describing the system. The present study also confirmed that there is a significant effect of adsorption on photocatalytic degradation. The possible mechanism for adsorption and photocatalysis has been shown here and process controlling step has been identified. The influences of pH and temperature have been explained with the help of surface charge distribution of reacting particles and thermodynamic point of view respectively. PMID:25956186

  3. Adsorption Properties of Tetracycline onto Graphene Oxide: Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghadim, Ehsan Ezzatpour; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Soleimani, Gholamreza; Hosseini, Hadi; Kimiagar, Salimeh; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticle is a high potential effective absorbent. Tetracycline (TC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic produced, indicated for use against many bacterial infections. In the present research, a systematic study of the adsorption and release process of tetracycline on GO was performed by varying pH, sorption time and temperature. The results of our studies showed that tetracycline strongly loads on the GO surface via π–π interaction and cation–π bonding. Investigation of TC adsorption kinetics showed that the equilibrium was reached within 15 min following the pseudo-second-order model with observed rate constants of k2 = 0.2742–0.5362 g/mg min (at different temperatures). The sorption data has interpreted by the Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption of 323 mg/g (298 K). The mean energy of adsorption was determined 1.83 kJ/mol (298 K) based on the Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) adsorption isotherm. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° values for the adsorption were estimated which indicated the endothermic and spontaneous nature of the sorption process. The electrochemistry approved an ideal reaction for the adsorption under electrodic process. Simulation of GO and TC was done by LAMMPS. Force studies in z direction showed that tetracycline comes close to GO sheet by C8 direction. Then it goes far and turns and again comes close from amine group to the GO sheet. PMID:24302989

  4. Hydrous ferric oxide doped alginate beads for fluoride removal: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujana, M. G.; Mishra, A.; Acharya, B. C.

    2013-04-01

    A new biopolymer beads, composite of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and alginate were synthesised, characterised and studied for its fluoride efficiency from water. The beads were characterised by chemical analysis, BET surface area, pHPZC and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The optimum conditions for fluoride removal were determined by studying operational variables viz. pH, contact time, initial F- concentration, bead dose and temperature. Presence of other anions like SO42-, PO43-, NO3-, Cl- and HCO3- effect on fluoride removal efficiency of prepared beads was also tested. The beads were 0.8-0.9 mm in size and contain 32-33% Fe (III) and showed specific surface area of 25.80 m2 g-1 and pHPZC of 5.15. Modified beads demonstrated Langmuir F- adsorption capacity of 8.90 mg g-1 at pH 7.0. The adsorption kinetics were best described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model followed by intra-particle diffusion as the rate determining step. It was found that about 80% of the adsorbed fluoride could be desorbed by using 0.05 M HCl. The FTIR, Raman and SEM-EDAX analysis were used to study the fluoride adsorption mechanisms on beads. Studies were also conducted to test the potential application of beads for F- removal from drinking water and the treated water quality.

  5. Adsorption of fluoride to UiO-66-NH2 in water: Stability, kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Liu, Yu-Ting; Chen, Shen-Yi

    2016-01-01

    To provide safe drinking water, fluoride in water must be removed and adsorption processes appear to be the most widely used method. Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) represent a new class of adsorbents that have been used in various adsorption applications. To study the adsorption mechanism of fluoride to MOFs in water and obtain related adsorption parameters, we synthesized a zirconium-based MOF with a primary amine group on its ligand, named UiO-66-NH2. The kinetics, adsorption isotherm and thermodynamics of fluoride adsorption to UiO-66-NH2 were investigated. The crystalline structure of UiO-66-NH2 remained intact and the local structure of zirconium in UiO-66-NH2 did not change significantly after being exposed to fluoride. The kinetics of the fluoride adsorption in UiO-66-NH2 could be well represented by the pseudo second order rate law. The enthalpy of the adsorption indicates that the F(-) adsorption to UiO-66-NH2 was classified as a physical adsorption. However, the comparison between the adsorption capacities of UiO-66-NH2 and UiO-66 suggests that the fluoride adsorption to UiO-66-NH2 might primarily involve a strong interaction between F(-) and the metal site. The fluoride adsorption capacity of UiO-66-NH2 was found to decrease when pH>7. While the presence of chloride/bromide ions did not noticeably change the adsorption capacity of UiO-66-NH2, the ionic surfactants slightly affected the adsorption capacity of UiO-66-NH2. These findings provide insights to further optimize the adsorption process for removal of fluoride using zirconium-based MOFs. PMID:26397913

  6. Adsorption of malachite green by polyaniline-nickel ferrite magnetic nanocomposite: an isotherm and kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Manohar R.; Shrivastava, V. S.

    2014-11-01

    This work deals with the development of an efficient method for the removal of a MG (malachite green) dye from aqueous solution using polyaniline (PANI)-Nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) magnetic nanocomposite. It is successfully synthesised in situ through self polymerisation of monomer aniline. Adsorptive removal studies are carried out for water soluble MG dye using PANI-Nickel ferrite magnetic nanocomposite in aqueous solution. Different parameters like dose of adsorbent, contact time, different initial conc., and pH have been studied to optimise reaction condition. It is concluded that adsorptive removal by PANI-Nickel ferrite magnetic nanocomposite is an efficient method for removing a MG dye from aqueous solution than work done before. The optimum conditions for the removal of the dye are initial concentration 30 mg l-1, adsorbent dose 5gm l-1 and pH 7. The adsorption capacity is found 4.09 mg g-1 at optimum condition 30 mg l-1. The adsorption followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. The experimental isotherm is found to fit with Langmuir equation. The prepared adsorbent is characterised by techniques SEM, EDS, XRD and VSM.

  7. Melanoidin Removal Mechanism in An Aqueous Adsorption System: An Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Study.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Diego L; Oliveira, Leandro S; Franca, Adriana S

    2015-01-01

    Melanoidins are colored products that can be found in food and drinks, formed by Maillard reactions. Sometimes these compounds are considered undesirable in certain food products, because they impart a brownish color and must be removed. An overview of recent patents related to melanoidin removal indicates that it can be performed by chemical/biological degradation or by adsorption processes. Therefore, in the present study, the adsorption mechanism for synthetic melanoidin removal from aqueous solutions was studied using different Raphanus sativus press-cake sorbents, with the precursor material being carbonized in a microwave oven, either with direct heating or after a chemical activation process with phosphoric acid, nitric acid or potassium hydroxide. Physical and chemical modifications were evaluated by FTIR, pHPZC, thermogravimetry and BET. The adsorption kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second order model for all activated carbons (ACs). Evaluation of the diffusion process showed dependence on the initial melanoidin concentration due to the wide range of sizes of the adsorbed molecules. The equilibrium data were best fitted by the Langmuir model for the acid-treated AC and by the Freundlich model for the base-treated and non-chemically treated ACs. Melanoidin adsorption was characterized as a spontaneous, favorable and endothermic process involving hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions between the adsorbents surfaces and the adsorbed molecules. PMID:26013772

  8. Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption study of Basic Yellow 28 and Basic Red 46 by a boron industry waste.

    PubMed

    Olgun, Asim; Atar, Necip

    2009-01-15

    In this study, the adsorption characteristics of Basic Yellow 28 (BY 28) and Basic Red 46 (BR 46) onto boron waste (BW), a waste produced from boron processing plant were investigated. The equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed by using various adsorption isotherm models and the results have shown that adsorption behavior of two dyes could be described reasonably well by a generalized isotherm. Kinetic studies indicated that the kinetics of the adsorption of BY 28 and BR 46 onto BW follows a pseudo-second-order model. The result showed that the BW exhibited high-adsorption capacity for basic dyes and the capacity slightly decreased with increasing temperature. The maximum adsorption capacities of BY 28 and BR 46 are reported at 75.00 and 74.73mgg(-1), respectively. The dye adsorption depended on the initial pH of the solution with maximum uptake occurring at about pH 9 and electrokinetic behavior of BW. Activation energy of 15.23kJ/mol for BY 28 and 18.15kJ/mol for BR 46 were determined confirming the nature of the physisorption onto BW. These results indicate that BW could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of the textile dyes from effluents. PMID:18434000

  9. Studies of adsorption equilibria and kinetics in the systems: Aqueous solution of dyes-mesoporous carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derylo-Marczewska, A.; Marczewski, A. W.; Winter, Sz.; Sternik, D.

    2010-06-01

    Two carbonaceous materials were synthesized by using the method of impregnation of mesoporous silicas obtained by applying the Pluronic copolymers as pore-creating agents. The isotherms of adsorption of methylene blue and methyl orange from aqueous solutions were measured by the static method. The profiles of adsorbate concentration change in time were obtained from the UV-vis spectra. The adsorption isotherms and kinetic dependence were discussed in the terms of theory of adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces.

  10. Kinetic Study of Adsorption Processes in Solution: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casado, Julio; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Background information, apparatus needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for a simple kinetic method for the monitoring of adsorption processes. The method, which involved adsorption of crystal violet onto activated carbon, is suitable for classroom and/or research purposes. (JN)

  11. Adsorption kinetics of surfactant mixtures from micellar solutions as studied by maximum bubble pressure technique.

    PubMed

    Frese, Ch; Ruppert, S; Sugár, M; Schmidt-Lewerkühne, H; Wittern, K P; Fainerman, V B; Eggers, R; Miller, R

    2003-11-15

    The adsorption kinetics of micellar solutions of anionic/cationic SDS/DATB mixtures with mixing ratios of 10/1 and 10/2, respectively, are studied experimentally by means of the maximum bubble pressure method. For long adsorption times the adsorption of the highly surface-active anionic/cationic complex leads to a decrease of dynamic surface tension in comparison to the single SDS system. However, the situation is the reverse for short adsorption times where the dynamic surface tension is increased by addition of the cationic surfactant, although the overall concentration is increased. This unexpected behavior is explained by partial solubilization of free SDS molecules into micelles formed by SDS/DTAB complexes. With increasing overall concentration, when eventually the CMC of SDS is reached, the anionic/cationic complex itself is solubilized by SDS micelles. Finally, no complex micelles, which for their part can solubilize an excess of SDS molecules, are present. Hence, the dynamic properties of the solution are no longer influenced by the depletion of SDS molecules and the mixture tends to behave like a pure SDS solution. PMID:14583225

  12. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies of cadmium (II) adsorption by modified agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Othman, Zeid A Al; Hashem, Ali; Habila, Mohamed A

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural wastes have great potential for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. The contamination of water by toxic heavy metals is a worldwide environmental problem. Unlike organic pollutants, the majority of which are susceptible to biological degradation, heavy metals do not degrade into harmless end products. Discharges containing cadmium, in particular, are strictly controlled because of the highly toxic nature of this element and its tendency to accumulate in the tissues of living organisms. This work aims to develop inexpensive, highly available, effective metal ion adsorbents from natural wastes as alternatives to existing commercial adsorbents. In particular, Tamrix articulata wastes were modified chemically by esterification with maleic acid to yield a carboxyl-rich adsorbent. The adsorption behavior of treated Tamrix articulata wastes toward cadmium ions in aqueous solutions in a batch system has been studied as a function of equilibration time, adsorbent dose, temperature and pH. Results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity was 195.5 mg/g in a pH 4 solution at 30 °C with a contact time of 120 min, an initial concentration of 400 mg/L and an adsorbent dose of 0.3 g/L. The kinetic data were analyzed using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. It was shown that the adsorption of cadmium could be described by a pseudo-second-order equation. The experimental data were also analyzed using the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° have been evaluated and it has been found that the sorption process was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. From all of our data, we conclude that the treated Tamrix articulata wastes investigated in this study showed good potential for cadmium removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:22173337

  13. Experimental and kinetic studies on methylene blue adsorption by coir pith carbon.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, D; Namasivayam, C

    2007-01-01

    Varying the parameters such as agitation time, dye concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and temperature carried out the potential feasibility of thermally activated coir pith carbon prepared from coconut husk for removal of methylene blue. Greater percentage of dye was removed with decrease in the initial concentration of dye and increase in amount of adsorbent used. Kinetic study showed that the adsorption of dye on coir pith carbon was a gradual process. Lagergren first-order, second-order, intra particle diffusion model and Bangham were used to fit the experimental data. Equilibrium isotherms were analysed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubnin-Radushkevich, and Tempkin isotherm. The adsorption capacity was found to be 5.87 mg/g by Langmuir isotherm for the particle size 250-500 microm. The equilibrium time was found to be 30 and 60 min for 10 and 20 mg/L and 100 min for 30, 40 mg/L dye concentrations, respectively. A maximum removal of 97% was obtained at natural pH 6.9 for an adsorbent dose of 100 mg/50 mL and 100% removal was obtained for an adsorbent dose of 600 mg/50 mL of 10 mg/L dye concentration. The pH effect and desorption studies suggest that chemisorption might be the major mode of the adsorption process. The change in entropy (DeltaS0) and heat of adsorption (DeltaH0) of coir pith carbon was estimated as 117.20 J/mol/K and 30.88 kJ/mol, respectively. The high negative value of change in Gibbs free energy indicates the feasible and spontaneous adsorption of methylene blue on coir pith carbon. PMID:16427273

  14. Adsorption of leather dye onto activated carbon prepared from bottle gourd: equilibrium, kinetic and mechanism studies.

    PubMed

    Foletto, Edson Luiz; Weber, Caroline Trevisan; Paz, Diego Silva; Mazutti, Marcio Antonio; Meili, Lucas; Bassaco, Mariana Moro; Collazzo, Gabriela Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbon prepared from bottle gourd has been used as adsorbent for removal of leather dye (Direct Black 38) from aqueous solution. The activated carbon obtained showed a mesoporous texture, with surface area of 556.16 m(2) g(-1), and a surface free of organic functional groups. The initial dye concentration, contact time and pH significantly influenced the adsorption capacity. In the acid region (pH 2.5) the adsorption of dye was more favorable. The adsorption equilibrium was attained after 60 min. Equilibrium data were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Temkin isotherm models. The equilibrium data were best described by the Langmuir isotherm, with maximum adsorption capacity of 94.9 mg g(-1). Adsorption kinetic data were fitted using the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models. The adsorption kinetic was best described by the second-order kinetic equation. The adsorption process was controlled by both external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion. Activated carbon prepared from bottle gourd was shown to be a promising material for adsorption of Direct Black 38 from aqueous solution. PMID:23128640

  15. Kinetic and isotherms studies of phosphorus adsorption onto natural riparian wetland sediments: linear and non-linear methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Du, Chao; Du, Yun; Xu, Meng; Chen, Shijian; Liu, Hongbin

    2015-06-01

    Riparian wetlands provide critical functions for the improvement of surface water quality and storage of nutrients. Correspondingly, investigation of the adsorption characteristic and capacity of nutrients onto its sediments is benefit for utilizing and protecting the ecosystem services provided by riparian areas. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and pseudo-second-order kinetic model were applied by using both linear least-squares and trial-and-error non-linear regression methods based on the batch experiments data. The results indicated that the transformations of non-linear isotherms to linear forms would affect the determination process significantly, but the non-linear regression method could prevent such errors. Non-linear Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms both fitted well with the phosphorus adsorption process (r (2) > 0.94). Moreover, the influences of temperature and ionic strength on the adsorption of phosphorus onto natural riparian wetland sediments were also studied. Higher temperatures were suitable for phosphorus uptake from aqueous solution using the present riparian wetland sediments. The adsorption capacity increased with the enhancement of ionic strength in agreement with the formation of inner-sphere complexes. The quick adsorption of phosphorus by the sediments mainly occurred within 10 min. The adsorption kinetic was well-fitted by pseudo-second-order kinetic model (r (2) > 0.99). The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectra analyses before and after phosphorus adsorption revealed the main adsorption mechanisms in the present system. PMID:26017810

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of adsorption of phosphate onto ZnCl2 activated coir pith carbon.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Sangeetha, D

    2004-12-15

    Phosphate removal from aqueous solution was investigated using ZnCl(2)-activated carbon developed from coir pith, an agricultural solid waste. Studies were conducted to delineate the effect of contact time, adsorbent dose, phosphate concentration, pH, and temperature. The adsorption equilibrium data followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Langmuir adsorption capacity was found to be 5.1 mg/g. Adsorption followed second-order kinetics. The removal was maximum in the pH range 3-10. pH effect and desorption studies showed that adsorption occurred by both ion exchange and chemisorption mechanisms. Adsorption was found to be spontaneous and endothermic. Effect of foreign ions on adsorption shows that perchlorate, sulfate, and selenite decreased the percent removal of phosphate. PMID:15533408

  17. Adsorption of cellulase Aspergillus niger on a commercial activated carbon: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Fatima Boukraa-Oulad; Kaddour, Samia; Sadoun, Tahar

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics of cellulase Aspergillus niger on a commercial activated carbon has been performed using a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of various experimental parameters such as initial enzyme concentration, contact time and temperature were investigated. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data which shows that the adsorption of the enzyme followed the pseudo-second-order rate expression and the rate constants were evaluated. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms, and the isotherm constants were determined. It was found that Langmuir model was more suitable for our data. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated for the adsorption of enzyme onto activated carbon. It was found 11.37 kJ mol(-1). Thermodynamic parameters Delta G(0), Delta H(0) and DeltaS(0) were calculated, indicating that this process can be spontaneous and endothermic. The adsorption enthalpy and entropy were found 11.12 kJ mol(-1) and 0.084 kJ mol(-1)K(-1), respectively. At 30 degrees C and at pH 4.8, 1g activated carbon adsorbed about 1565 mg of cellulase, with a retention of 70% of the native enzyme activity up to five cycles of repeated batch enzyme reactions. PMID:19744839

  18. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qingling; Deng, Yali; Li, Huishu; Liu, Jie; Hu, Hongqing; Chen, Shouwen; Sa, Tongmin

    2009-02-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L -1. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy ( ΔGmθr) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy ( ΔHmθr) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  19. Adsorption of Phenol from Aqueous Solution Using Lantana camara, Forest Waste: Kinetics, Isotherm, and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Girish, C. R.; Ramachandra Murty, V.

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigates the potential of Lantana camara, a forest waste, as an adsorbent for the phenol reduction in wastewater. Batch studies were conducted with adsorbent treated with HCl and KOH to determine the influence of various experimental parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and phenol concentration. The experimental conditions were optimized for the removal of phenol from wastewater. Equilibrium isotherms for the adsorption of phenol were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters like the Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°), and entropy (ΔS°) were also determined and they showed that the adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic in the temperature range of 298–328 K. The kinetic data were fitted with pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium data that followed Langmuir model with the monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 112.5 mg/g and 91.07 mg/g for adsorbent treated with HCl and KOH, respectively, for the concentration of phenol ranging from 25 to 250 mg/L. This indicates that the Lantana camara was a promising adsorbent for the removal of phenol from aqueous solutions. PMID:27350997

  20. Adsorption of reactive dyes from aqueous solutions by fly ash: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Dizge, N; Aydiner, C; Demirbas, E; Kobya, M; Kara, S

    2008-02-11

    Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium studies of three reactive dyes namely, Remazol Brillant Blue (RB), Remazol Red 133 (RR) and Rifacion Yellow HED (RY) from aqueous solutions at various initial dye concentration (100-500 mg/l), pH (2-8), particle size (45-112.5 microm) and temperature (293-323 K) on fly ash (FA) were studied in a batch mode operation. The adsorbent was characterized with using several methods such as SEM, XRD and FTIR. Adsorption of RB reactive dye was found to be pH dependent but both RR and RY reactive dyes were not. The result showed that the amount adsorbed of the reactive dyes increased with increasing initial dye concentration and contact time. Batch kinetic data from experimental investigations on the removal of reactive dyes from aqueous solutions using FA have been well described by external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion models. It was found that external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion had rate limiting affects on the removal process. This was attributed to the relatively simple macropore structure of FA particles. The adsorption data fitted well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The optimum conditions for removal of the reactive dyes were 100mg/l initial dye concentration, 0.6g/100ml adsorbent dose, temperature of 293 K, 45 microm particle size, pH 6 and agitation speed of 250 rpm, respectively. The values of Langmuir and Freundlich constants were found to increase with increasing temperature in the range 135-180 and 15-34 mg/g for RB, 47-86 and 1.9-3.7 mg/g for RR and 37-61 and 3.0-3.6 mg/g for RY reactive dyes, respectively. Different thermodynamic parameters viz., changes in standard free energy, enthalpy and entropy were evaluated and it was found that the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. PMID:17574338

  1. Equilibrium and kinetics study on the adsorption of perfluorooctanoic acid from aqueous solution onto powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yan; Zhang, Chaojie; Li, Fei; Bo, Xiaowen; Liu, Guangfu; Zhou, Qi

    2009-09-30

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) was applied to remove perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the aqueous PFOA solution in this study. Contact time, adsorbent dose and temperature were analyzed as the effect factors in the adsorption reaction. The contact time of maximum PFOA uptake was around 1h while the sorption removal efficiency increased with the PAC concentrations. And the process of adsorption increased from 303 K to 313 K and then decreased from 313 K to 323 K. Among four applied models, the experimental isotherm data were discovered to follow Langmuir isotherm model more closely. Thermodynamically, adsorption was endothermic because enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs constants were 198.5 kJ/mol, 0.709 kJ/mol/K and negative, respectively, which also indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and feasible. From kinetic analysis, the adsorption was suggested to be pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption of PFOA on the PAC was mainly controlled by particle diffusion. PMID:19395160

  2. Magnetic vinylphenyl boronic acid microparticles for Cr(VI) adsorption: kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ali; Demirbel, Emel; Tekin, Nalan; Osman, Bilgen; Beşirli, Necati

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic vinylphenyl boronic acid microparticles, poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate(EG)-vinylphenyl boronic acid(VPBA)) [m-poly(EG-VPBA)], produced by suspension polymerization and characterized, was found to be an efficient solid polymer for Cr(VI) adsorption. The m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were prepared by copolymerizing of ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EG) with 4-vinyl phenyl boronic acid (VPBA). The m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, electron spin resonance (ESR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and swelling studies. The m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were used at adsorbent/Cr(VI) ion ratios. The influence of pH, Cr(VI) initial concentration, temperature of the removal process was investigated. The maximum removal of Cr(VI) was observed at pH 2. Langmuir isotherm and Dubinin-Radushkvich isotherm were found to better fit the experiment data rather than Fruendlich isotherm. The kinetics of the adsorption process of Cr(VI) on the m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were investigated using the pseudo first-order, pseudo-second-order, Ritch-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models, results showed that the pseudo-second order equation model provided the best correlation with the experimental results. The thermodynamic parameters (free energy change, ΔG(0) enthalpy change, ΔH(0); and entropy change, ΔS(0)) for the adsorption have been evaluated. PMID:25666882

  3. CO2 adsorption using TiO2 composite polymeric membranes: A kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Sarah; Fan, X; Hussain, Arshad; Martín, C F

    2015-09-01

    CO2 is the main greenhouse gas which causes global climatic changes on larger scale. Many techniques have been utilised to capture CO2. Membrane gas separation is a fast growing CO2 capture technique, particularly gas separation by composite membranes. The separation of CO2 by a membrane is not just a process to physically sieve out of CO2 through the controlled membrane pore size. It mainly depends upon diffusion and solubility of gases, particularly for composite dense membranes. The blended components in composite membranes have a high capability to adsorb CO2. The adsorption kinetics of the gases may directly affect diffusion and solubility. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption behaviour of CO2 in pure and composite membranes to explore the complete understanding of diffusion and solubility of CO2 through membranes. Pure cellulose acetate (CA) and cellulose acetate-titania nanoparticle (CA-TiO2) composite membranes were fabricated and characterised using SEM and FTIR analysis. The results indicated that the blended CA-TiO2 membrane adsorbed more quantity of CO2 gas as compared to pure CA membrane. The high CO2 adsorption capacity may enhance the diffusion and solubility of CO2 in the CA-TiO2 composite membrane, which results in a better CO2 separation. The experimental data was modelled by Pseudo first-order, pseudo second order and intra particle diffusion models. According to correlation factor R(2), the Pseudo second order model was fitted well with experimental data. The intra particle diffusion model revealed that adsorption in dense membranes was not solely consisting of intra particle diffusion. PMID:26354705

  4. Protein nanoparticle interaction: A spectrophotometric approach for adsorption kinetics and binding studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishanav, Sandeep K.; Chandraker, Kumudini; Korram, Jyoti; Nagwanshi, Rekha; Ghosh, Kallol K.; Satnami, Manmohan L.

    2016-08-01

    Investigating the protein nanoparticle interaction is crucial to understand how to control the biological interactions of nanoparticles. In this work, Model protein Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used to evaluate the process of protein adsorption to the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) surface. The binding of a model protein (BSA) to GNPs was investigated through fluorescence quenching measurements. The strong affinities of BSA for GNPs were confirmed by the high value of binding constant (Ks) which was calculated to be 2.2 × 1011 L/mol. In this consequence, we also investigated the adsorption behavior of BSA on GNPs surface via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effect of various operational parameters such as pH, contact time, initial BSA concentration, and temperature on adsorption of BSA was investigated using batch adsorption experiments. Kinetics of adsorption was found to follow the pseudo-second order rate equation. The suitability of Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models to the equilibrium data was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption was well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity for BSA adsorbed on GNPs was 58.71 mg/g and equilibrium constant was 0.0058 calculated by the Langmuir model at 298 K and pH = 11.0. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of BSA onto GNPs was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic.

  5. Adsorption kinetics of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Burde, Jared T; Calbi, M Mercedes

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption dynamics of diatomic molecules on solid surfaces is examined by using a Kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm. Equilibration times at increasing loadings are obtained, and explained based on the elementary processes that lead to the formation of the adsorbed film. The ability of the molecules to change their orientation accelerates the overall uptake and leads to competitive kinetic behaviour between the different orientations. The dependence of the equilibration time on coverage follows the same decreasing trend obtained experimentally for ethane adsorption on closed-end carbon nanotube bundles. The exploration of molecule-molecule interaction effects on this trend provides relevant insights to understand the kinetic behaviour of other species, from simpler molecules to larger polyatomic molecules, adsorbing on surfaces with different binding strength. PMID:24654004

  6. Kinetic studies of adsorption of thiocyanate onto ZnCl2 activated carbon from coir pith, an agricultural solid waste.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Sangeetha, D

    2005-09-01

    The adsorption of thiocyanate onto ZnCl2 activated carbon developed from coir pith was investigated to assess the possible use of this adsorbent. The influence of various parameters such as agitation time, thiocyanate concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and temperature has been studied. Adsorption followed second-order rate kinetics. Two theoretical adsorption isotherms, namely, Langmuir and Freundlich were used to describe the experimental results. The Langmuir adsorption capacity (Q0) was found to be 16.2 mg g(-1) of the adsorbent. The per cent adsorption was maximum in the pH range 3.0-7.0. pH effect and desorption studies showed that ion exchange and chemisorption mechanism are involved in the adsorption process. Thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG0, DeltaH0 and DeltaS0 for the adsorption were evaluated. The negative values of DeltaH0 confirm the exothermic nature of adsorption. Effects of foreign ions on the adsorption of thiocyanate have been investigated. Removal of thiocyanate from ground water was also tested. PMID:16083768

  7. Kinetic studies of the liquid-phase adsorption of a reactive dye onto activated lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Petrolekas, P.D.; Maggenakis, G.

    2007-02-14

    The kinetics of batch adsorption of a commercial reactive dye onto activated lignite has been investigated at temperatures of 26, 40, and 55{sup o}C, using aqueous solutions with initial dye concentrations in the range of 15-60 mg/L. An empirical single parameter relationship of the adsorbent loading versus the square root of contact time was proposed, which was determined to provide a very good description of the batch adsorption transients up to equilibrium. The data were also examined by means of the Elovich equation. The effect of the temperature and the initial dye concentration on the adsorption kinetics was analyzed, and the results were discussed by considering that intraparticle diffusion is the dominant mechanism.

  8. Kinetics and equilibrium adsorption study of p-nitrophenol onto activated carbon derived from walnut peel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Fang; Bai, Song

    2015-01-01

    An original activated carbon prepared from walnut peel, which was activated by zinc chloride, was modified with ammonium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide in order to contrast the adsorption property of the three different activated carbons. The experiment used a static adsorption test for p-nitrophenol. The effects of parameters such as initial concentration, contact time and pH value on amount adsorbed and removal are discussed in depth. The thermodynamic data of adsorption were analyzed by Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic data of adsorption were measured by the pseudo-first-order kinetics and the pseudo-second-order kinetics models. The results indicated that the alkalized carbon samples derived from walnut peel had a better performance than the original activated carbon treated with zinc chloride. It was found that adsorption equilibrium time was 6 h. The maximum removal rate of activated carbon treated with zinc chloride for p-nitrophenol was 87.3% at pH 3,whereas the maximum removal rate of the two modified activated carbon materials was found to be 90.8% (alkalized with ammonium hydroxide) and 92.0% (alkalized with sodium hydroxide) at the same pH. The adsorption data of the zinc chloride activated carbon were fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model. The two alkalized activated carbon samples were fitted well to the Freundlich model. The pseudo-second-order dynamics equation provided better explanation of the adsorption dynamics data of the three activated carbons than the pseudo-first-order dynamics equation. PMID:26676011

  9. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Hg(II) adsorption onto MCM-41 modified by ZnCl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raji, Foad; Pakizeh, Majid

    2014-05-01

    Kinetics and thermodynamics of mercury ions sorption onto ZnCl2-MCM-41 sorbent were studied. Several rate models in the form of two main classes of mathematic kinetic models (adsorption reaction models and adsorption diffusion models) were investigated. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, film and intraparticle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic data. Results showed that the pseudo-second order model can well describe the adsorption kinetic data. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's free energy change (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy at temperature range of 20-55 °C, indicates the spontaneous nature of Hg(II) sorption by ZnCl2-MCM-41 sorbent. The adsorption capacity which was found to decrease with temperature showed the exothermic nature of the mercury sorption process (ΔH° = -49.4 kJ mol-1). The negative ΔS° value (-148.9 J mol-1 K-1) revealed a decrease in the randomness at the solid/solution interface and also indicated the fast adsorption of the Hg(II) onto active sites.

  10. Batch removal of malachite green from aqueous solutions by adsorption on oil palm trunk fibre: equilibrium isotherms and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Hameed, B H; El-Khaiary, M I

    2008-06-15

    Oil palm trunk fibre (OPTF)--an agricultural solid waste--was used as low-cost adsorbent to remove malachite green (MG) from aqueous solutions. The operating variables studied were contact time, initial dye concentration, and solution pH. Equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by three isotherms, namely the Freundlich isotherm, the Langmuir isotherm, and the multilayer adsorption isotherm. The best fit to the data was obtained with the multilayer adsorption. The monolayer adsorption capacity of OPTF was found to be 149.35 mg/g at 30 degrees C. Adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the Lagergren pseudo-first-order, Ho's pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. It was found that the Lagergren's model could be used for the prediction of the system's kinetics. The overall rate of dye uptake was found to be controlled by external mass transfer at the beginning of adsorption, then for initial MG concentrations of 25, 50, 100, 150, and 300 mg/L the rate-control changed to intraparticle diffusion at a later stage, but for initial MG concentrations 200 and 250 mg/L no evidence was found of intraparticle diffusion at any period of adsorption. It was found that with increasing the initial concentration of MG, the pore-diffusion coefficient increased while the film-diffusion coefficient decreased. PMID:18022316

  11. Study of intradrystalline diffusion in zeolites communication 3. Kinetics of adsorption of trans-2-butene by NaA and NaMgA zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Broddak, R.; Dubinin, M.M.; Falko, L.A.; Gorlov, V.A.; Kuhlmann, B.; Scholner, E.; Voloshchuk, A.M.

    1985-09-10

    This article studies the kinetics of adsorption of trans-2-butene by NaA zeolite with a varying crystal size, microcrystalline granulated NaA zeolite using granules of different sizes, and microcrystalline powdered Na/sub 8/Mg/sub 2/A zeolite. It is shown that the rate of adsorption is determined by the intracrystalline diffusion and that the effect of transfer in the transport pores and the final rate of dissipation of the heat of adsorption can be neglected. In adsorption of trans-2-butene by Na/sub 8/Mg/sub 2/A zeolite with a stepwise change in the pressure of the adsorbate, the kinetic curves are satisfactorily described by an internal diffusion equation for the kinetics of isothermal adsorption. The kinetics of adsorption were studied at 303 degrees K from the one-component vapor phase on a vacuum adsorption setup using quartz spring balance.

  12. Kinetic and calorimetric study of the adsorption of dyes on mesoporous activated carbon prepared from coconut coir dust.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Jeremias de Souza; da Costa Júnior, Nivan Bezerra; Almeida, Luis Eduardo; Vieira, Eunice Fragoso da Silva; Cestari, Antonio Reinaldo; Gimenez, Iara de Fátima; Villarreal Carreño, Neftali Lênin; Barreto, Ledjane Silva

    2006-06-15

    Mesoporous activated carbon has been prepared from coconut coir dust as support for adsorption of some model dye molecules from aqueous solutions. The methylene blue (MB) and remazol yellow (RY) molecules were chosen for study of the adsorption capacity of cationic and anionic dyes onto prepared activated carbon. The adsorption kinetics was studied with the Lagergren first- and pseudo-second-order kinetic models as well as the intraparticle diffusion model. The results for both dyes suggested a multimechanism sorption process. The adsorption mechanisms in the systems dyes/AC follow pseudo-second-order kinetics with a significant contribution of intraparticle diffusion. The samples simultaneously present acidic and basic sites able to act as anchoring sites for basic and acidic dyes, respectively. Calorimetric studies reveal that dyes/AC interaction forces are correlated with the pH of the solution, which can be related to the charge distribution on the AC surface. These AC samples also exhibited very short equilibrium times for the adsorption of both dyes, which is an economically favorable requisite for the activated carbon described in this work, in addition to the local abundance of the raw material. PMID:16497318

  13. Application of zeolite-activated carbon macrocomposite for the adsorption of Acid Orange 7: isotherm, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chi Kim; Bay, Hui Han; Neoh, Chin Hong; Aris, Azmi; Abdul Majid, Zaiton; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the adsorption behavior of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) from aqueous solution onto macrocomposite (MC) was investigated under various experimental conditions. The adsorbent, MC, which consists of a mixture of zeolite and activated carbon, was found to be effective in removing AO7. The MC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray, point of zero charge, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. A series of experiments were performed via batch adsorption technique to examine the effect of the process variables, namely, contact time, initial dye concentration, and solution pH. The dye equilibrium adsorption was investigated, and the equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, and Tempkin isotherm models. The Langmuir isotherm model fits the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm model. For the kinetic study, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion model were used to fit the experimental data. The adsorption kinetic was found to be well described by the pseudo-second-order model. Thermodynamic analysis indicated that the adsorption process is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectral and high performance liquid chromatography analysis were carried out before and after the adsorption process. For the phytotoxicity test, treated AO7 was found to be less toxic. Thus, the study indicated that MC has good potential use as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solution. PMID:23653315

  14. Simultaneous removal of potent cyanotoxins from water using magnetophoretic nanoparticle of polypyrrole: adsorption kinetic and isotherm study.

    PubMed

    Hena, S; Rozi, R; Tabassum, S; Huda, A

    2016-08-01

    Cyanotoxins, microcystins and cylindrospermopsin, are potent toxins produced by cyanobacteria in potable water supplies. This study investigated the removal of cyanotoxins from aqueous media by magnetophoretic nanoparticle of polypyrrole adsorbent. The adsorption process was pH dependent with maximum adsorption occurring at pH 7 for microcystin-LA, LR, and YR and at pH 9 for microcystin-RR and cylindrospermopsin (CYN). Kinetic studies and adsorption isotherms reflected better fit for pseudo-second-order rate and Langmuir isotherm model, respectively. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the cyanotoxin adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The regenerated adsorbent can be successfully reused without appreciable loss of its original capacity. PMID:27072032

  15. Adsorption kinetics of silicic acid on akaganeite.

    PubMed

    Naren, Gaowa; Ohashi, Hironori; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2013-06-01

    As part of a series of studies on the interaction between ferric ions and silicic acid in the hydrosphere, the adsorption of silicic acid on akaganeite was investigated kinetically at various pH values. The adsorption of silicic acid increased with increasing pH over an initial pH range of 4-11.5. In the kinetic experiment, the Cl(-) was released from akaganeite much faster than silicic acid was adsorbed. From this result, we concluded that chloride ions bound on the surface of akaganeite are released and Fe-OH or Fe-O(-) sites are formed, which then acts as an adsorption site for silicic acid. The uptake mechanism of silicic acid by akaganeite is significantly different from that by schwertmannite, despite the presence of the same tunnel structure. PMID:23538050

  16. Kinetic and isotherm studies of adsorption and biosorption processes in the removal of phenolic compounds from aqueous solutions: comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The phenolic compounds are known by their carcinogenicity and high toxicity as well as creating unpleasant taste and odor in water resources. The present study develops a cost-effective technology for the treatment of water contaminated with phenolic compounds, including Phenol (Ph), 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). So, two sorbents, rice bran ash (RBA) and biomass of brown algae, Cystoseiraindica, were used and results were compared with the commercially granular activated carbon (GAC). The phenolic compounds were determined using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) under batch equilibrium conditions. The effects of contact time, pH, initial adsorbate concentration, and adsorbent dosages on the removal efficiency were studied. The adsorption data were simulated by isotherm and kinetic models. Results indicated that RBA and GAC had the lowest efficiency for the removal of 2-CP, while the order of removal efficiency for C. indica biomass was as follows: 2-CP > 4-CP > phenol. The efficiency of GAC was higher than those of other adsorbents for all of the phenolic compounds. Furthermore, the adsorption capacity of RBA was found to be higher than that of C. indica biomass. The optimal initial pH for the removal of phenol, 2-CP and 4-CP was determined to be 5, 7, and 7 for RBA, GAC, and algal biomass, respectively. Kinetic studies suggested that the pseudo-second order best fitted the kinetic data. PMID:24355013

  17. Adsorption-desorption and leaching behavior of kresoxim-methyl in different soils of India: kinetics and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Sabale, Rupali P; Shabeer T P, Ahammed; Dasgupta, Soma; Utture, Sagar C; Banerjee, Kaushik; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Adsule, Pandurang G; Deshmukh, Madhukar B

    2015-07-01

    The sorption and leaching behavior of kresoxim-methyl was explored in four different soils, viz., clay, sandy loam, loamy sand, and sandy loam (saline), representing vegetables and fruits growing regions of India. Adsorption of kresoxim-methyl in all the soils reached equilibrium within 48 h. The rate constants for adsorption and desorption at two different temperatures were obtained from the Lindstrom model, which simultaneously evaluated adsorption and desorption kinetics. The data for rate constants, activation energies, enthalpy of activation, entropy of activation, and free energy indicated physical adsorption of kresoxim-methyl on soil. The relative adsorptivity of the test soils could be attributed to different organic matter and clay contents of the soils. A good fit to the linear and Freundlich isotherms was observed for both adsorption as well as desorption. The groundwater ubiquity score (GUS) for different soils varied between 0 and 2.26. The GUS and leaching study indicated moderately low leaching potential of kresoxim-methyl. The adsorption on four soil types largely depended on the soil physicochemical properties such as organic carbon content, cation-exchange capacity, and texture of the soil. PMID:26082423

  18. Parametric and adsorption kinetic studies of methylene blue removal from simulated textile water using durian (Durio zibethinus murray) skin.

    PubMed

    Anisuzzaman, S M; Joseph, Collin G; Krishnaiah, D; Bono, A; Ooi, L C

    2015-01-01

    In this study, durian (Durio zibethinus Murray) skin was examined for its ability to remove methylene blue (MB) dye from simulated textile wastewater. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of MB removal from aqueous solutions at different parametric conditions such as different initial concentrations (2-10 mg/L), biosorbent dosages (0.3-0.7 g) and pH solution (4-9) onto durian skin were studied using batch adsorption. The amount of MB adsorbed increased from 3.45 to 17.31 mg/g with the increase in initial concentration of MB dye; whereas biosorbent dosage increased from 1.08 to 2.47 mg/g. Maximum dye adsorption capacity of the durian skin was found to increase from 3.78 to 6.40 mg/g, with increasing solution pH. Equilibrium isotherm data were analyzed according to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The sorption equilibrium was best described by the Freundlich isotherm model with maximum adsorption capacity of 7.23 mg/g and this was due to the heterogeneous nature of the durian skin surface. Kinetic studies indicated that the sorption of MB dye tended to follow the pseudo second-order kinetic model with promising correlation of 0.9836 < R(2) < 0.9918. PMID:26360749

  19. Rapid Adsorption of Copper(II) and Lead(II) by Rice Straw/Fe3O4 Nanocomposite: Optimization, Equilibrium Isotherms, and Adsorption Kinetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B.; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:25815470

  20. Enhancing adsorption capacity of toxic malachite green dye through chemically modified breadnut peel: equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Hei Ing; Lim, Linda B L; Priyantha, Namal

    2015-01-01

    Breadnut skin, in both its unmodified (KS) and base-modified (BM-KS) forms, was investigated for its potential use as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of toxic dye, malachite green (MG). Characterization of the adsorbents was carried out using scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Batch adsorption experiments, carried out under optimized conditions, for the adsorption of MG were fitted using five isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin and Sips) and six error functions to determine the best-fit model. The adsorption capacity was greatly enhanced when breadnut skin was chemically modified with NaOH, leading to an adsorption capacity of 353.0 mg g(-1), that was far superior to most reported adsorbents for the removal of MG. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of MG was spontaneous on KS and BM-KS, and the reactions were endothermic and exothermic, respectively. Kinetics studies showed that both followed the pseudo-second order. Regeneration experiments on BM-KS indicated that its adsorption capacity was still maintained at>90% even after five cycles. It can be concluded that NaOH-modified breadfruit skin has great potential to be utilized in real-life application as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of MG in wastewater treatment. PMID:25409587

  1. Dye removal from textile industrial effluents by adsorption on exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Carvallho, Marilda N; da Silva, Karolyne S; Sales, Deivson C S; Freire, Eleonora M P L; Sobrinho, Maurício A M; Ghislandi, Marcos G

    2016-01-01

    The concept of physical adsorption was applied for the removal of direct and reactive blue textile dyes from industrial effluents. Commercial graphite nanoplatelets were used as substrate, and the quality of the material was characterized by atomic force and transmission electron microscopies. Dye/graphite nanoplatelets water solutions were prepared varying their pH and initial dye concentration. Exceptionally high values (beyond 100 mg/L) for adsorptive capacity of graphite nanoplatelets could be achieved without complicated chemical modifications, and equilibrium and kinetic experiments were performed. Our findings were compared with the state of the art, and compared with theoretical models. Agreement between them was satisfactory, and allowed us to propose novel considerations describing the interactions of the dyes and the graphene planar structure. The work highlights the important role of these interactions, which can govern the mobility of the dye molecules and the amount of layers that can be stacked on the graphite nanoplatelets surface. PMID:27148721

  2. Adsorption of Zn2+ ions onto NaA and NaX zeolites: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Nibou, D; Mekatel, H; Amokrane, S; Barkat, M; Trari, M

    2010-01-15

    The adsorption of Zn(2+) onto NaA and NaX zeolites was investigated. The samples were synthesized according to a hydrothermal crystallization using aluminium isopropoxide (Al[OCH(CH(3))(2)](3)) as a new alumina source. The effects of pH, initial concentration, solid/liquid ratio and temperature were studied in batch experiments. The Freundlich and the Langmuir models were applied and the adsorption equilibrium followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The uptake distribution coefficient (K(d)) indicated that the Zn(2+) removal was the highest at minimum concentration. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The negative values of standard enthalpy of adsorption revealed the exothermic nature of the adsorption process whereas the negative activation entropies reflected that no significant change occurs in the internal structure of the zeolites solid matrix during the sorption of Zn(2+). The negative values of Gibbs free energy were indicative of the spontaneity of the adsorption process. Analysis of the kinetic and rate data revealed that the pseudo second-order sorption mechanism is predominant and the intra particle diffusion was the determining step for the sorption of zinc ions. The obtained optimal parameters have been applied to wastewater from the industrial zone (Algeria) in order to remove the contained zinc effluents. PMID:19773115

  3. Kinetics and equilibrium studies of adsorption of chromium(VI) ion from industrial wastewater using Chrysophyllum albidum (Sapotaceae) seed shells.

    PubMed

    Amuda, O S; Adelowo, F E; Ologunde, M O

    2009-02-01

    A new biosorbent has been prepared by coating Chrysophyllum albidum (Sapotaceae) seed shells with chitosan and/or oxidizing agents such as sulfuric acid. This study investigated the technical feasibility of activated and modified activated C. albidum seed shells carbons for the adsorption of chromium(VI) from aqueous solution. The sorption process with respect to its equilibria and kinetics as well as the effects of pH, contact time, adsorbent mass, adsorbate concentration and particle size on adsorption was also studied. The most effective pH range was found to be between 4.5 and 5 for the sorption of the metal ion. The pseudo-first-order rate equation by Lagergren and pseudo-second-order rate equation were tested on the kinetic data, the adsorption process followed pseudo-second-order rate kinetics, also, isotherm data was analyzed for possible agreement with the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms, the Freundlich and Langmuir models for dynamics of metal ion uptake proposed in this work fitted the experimental data reasonably well. However, equilibrium sorption data were better represented by Langmuir model than Freundlich. The adsorption capacity calculated from Langmuir isotherm was 84.31, 76.23 and 59.63mgCr(VI)/g at initial pH of 3.0 at 30 degrees C for the particle size of 1.00-1.25mm with the use of 12.5, 16.5 and 2.1g/L of CACASC, CCASC and ACASC adsorbent mass, respectively. This readily available adsorbent is efficient in the uptake of Cr(VI) ion in aqueous solution, thus, it could be an excellent alternative for the removal of heavy metals and organic matter from water and wastewater. PMID:19022632

  4. Protein adsorption kinetics in different surface potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, A.; Mantz, H.; Jacobs, K.; Bellion, M.; Santen, L.

    2008-03-01

    We have studied the adsorption kinetics of the protein amylase at solid/liquid interfaces. Offering substrates with tailored properties, we are able to separate the impact of short- and long-range interactions. By means of a colloidal Monte Carlo approach including conformational changes of the adsorbed proteins induced by density fluctuations, we develop a scenario that is consistent with the experimentally observed three-step kinetics on specific substrates. Our observations show that not only the surface chemistry determines the properties of an adsorbed protein layer but also the van der Waals contributions of a composite substrate may lead to non-negligible effects.

  5. Kinetic studies of competitive adsorption processes related to automobile catalytic converters

    SciTech Connect

    Zaera, F.; Paffett, M.T.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project was to study the microscopic details for the adsorption of CO, NO, and O{sub 2} on transition metal surfaces under conditions resembling those present in automobile catalytic converters. Initial sticking coefficients were measured as a function of temperature on transition metal single crystals by using a method originally developed by King and Wells. These measurements were performed under conditions emulating those typical of competitive adsorption, namely, where the substrate is exposed to a mixture of two or more gases simultaneously, or where one molecule is adsorbed on the surface prior to exposure to the second gas. The experimental results were then analyzed by using Monte Carlo computer simulation algorithm in an attempt to better understand the relevant aspects of the adsorption process.

  6. Adsorption and kinetic studies of seven different organic dyes onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste and removal of them from wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas; Ahmadi, Mazaher

    2012-12-01

    Adsorption of seven different organic dyes from aqueous solutions onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste (MNLTW) was studied. MNLTW was prepared via a simple method and was fully characterized. The properties of this magnetic adsorbent were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Adsorption characteristics of the MNLTW adsorbent was examined using Janus green, methylene blue, thionine, crystal violet, Congo red, neutral red and reactive blue 19 as adsorbates. Dyes adsorption process was thoroughly studied from both kinetic and equilibrium points of view for all adsorbents. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Redlich-Peterson, Brouers-Sotolongo and Temkin isotherms. The results from Langmuir isotherm indicated that the capacity of MNLTW for the adsorption of cationic dyes was higher than that for anionic dyes. The adsorption kinetics was tested for the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models at different experimental conditions. PMID:23058993

  7. Adsorption and kinetic studies of seven different organic dyes onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste and removal of them from wastewater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas; Ahmadi, Mazaher

    2012-12-01

    Adsorption of seven different organic dyes from aqueous solutions onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste (MNLTW) was studied. MNLTW was prepared via a simple method and was fully characterized. The properties of this magnetic adsorbent were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Adsorption characteristics of the MNLTW adsorbent was examined using Janus green, methylene blue, thionine, crystal violet, Congo red, neutral red and reactive blue 19 as adsorbates. Dyes adsorption process was thoroughly studied from both kinetic and equilibrium points of view for all adsorbents. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Redlich-Peterson, Brouers-Sotolongo and Temkin isotherms. The results from Langmuir isotherm indicated that the capacity of MNLTW for the adsorption of cationic dyes was higher than that for anionic dyes. The adsorption kinetics was tested for the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models at different experimental conditions.

  8. Adsorption Kinetics and Binding Studies of Protein Quantum Dots Interaction: A Spectroscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Vaishanav, Sandeep K; Korram, Jyoti; Nagwanshi, Rekha; Ghosh, Kallol K; Satnami, Manmohan L

    2016-05-01

    Protein Quantum dots interaction is crucial to investigate for better understanding of the biological interactions of QDs. Here in, the model protein Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used to evaluate the process of protein QDs interaction and adsorption on QDs surface. The modified Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ka), number of binding sites (n) at different temperatures (298 308 and 318 K ± 1) and corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔG < 0, ΔH < 0, and ΔS > 0) were calculated. The quenching constant (Ks) and number of binding sites (n) is found to be inversely proportional to temperature. It signified that static quenching mechanism is dominant over dynamic quenching. The standard free energy change (ΔG < 0) implies that the binding process is spontaneous, while the enthalpy change (ΔH < 0) suggest that the binding of QDs to BSA is an enthalpy-driven process. The standard entropy change (ΔS > 0) suggest that hydrophobic force played a pivotal role in the interaction process. The adsorption process were assessed and evaluated by pseudofirst-order, pseudosecond-order kinetic model, and intraparticle diffusion model. PMID:26825079

  9. Adsorption of methylene blue onto activated carbon produced from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics studies*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-jie; Qin, Ye-bo; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Dong-dong; Xu, Ping; Hochstetter, Danielle; Wang, Yue-fei

    2013-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells, the main byproduct of the manufacture of tea seed oil, were used as precursors for the preparation of tea activated carbon (TAC) in the present study. A high yield (44.1%) of TAC was obtained from tea seed shells via a one-step chemical method using ZnCl2 as an agent. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the total pore volumes of the obtained TAC were found to be 1 530.67 mg2/g and 0.782 6 cm3/g, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption results were complied with Langmuir isotherm model and its maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 324.7 mg/g for methylene blue. Adsorption kinetics studies indicated that the pseudo-second-order model yielded the best fit for the kinetic data. An intraparticle diffusion model suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Thermodynamics studies revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process. These results indicate that tea seed shells could be utilized as a renewable resource to develop activated carbon which is a potential adsorbent for methylene blue. PMID:23825151

  10. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Study of Kinetics and Thermodynamics of IgG Adsorption on the Polystyrene Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bo; Feng, Xi; Xie, Xiaomei; Wang, Caiyun; Zhang, Mengxue; Zhang, Xiaoyun

    2015-03-01

    Polystyrene (PS) is a common substrate material for protein adsorption on biosensors and bioassays. By employing a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique, we studied the kinetics and thermodynamics of anti-HBeAg adsorption on this substrate in situ. First, a thin PS film was deposited on the interface between the liquid and the quartz crystal wafer. Second, a solution containing anti-HBeAg was introduced into the holding tank. Third, we measured the change in the oscillation frequency of the quartz that was induced by the antibody-PS binding, which in turn depended on macroscopic parameters, such as antibody concentration and solution temperature, as well as on microscopic parameters, such as the diffusion type and the change in Gibb's free energy. The adsorption rate and capacity of anti-HBeAg on the PS surface were quantified and fitted using the conventional Langmuir model. It was shown that this model was applicable to protein-PS interface system. Approximately 250 nm2 of the surface area was occupied by a single antibody molecule at 298 K when the concentration was 90 μg/mL. The adsorption process might have been controlled by both liquid film and particle diffusions.

  11. Kinetic aspects of the adsorption of xyloglucan onto cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Dammak, Abir; Capron, Isabelle; Cathala, Bernard

    2015-08-28

    In this work, the adsorption of a neutral flexible polysaccharide, xyloglucan (XG), onto thin cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) surfaces has been investigated to get more insight into the CNC-XG association. Gold-coated quartz crystals were spin-coated with one layer of CNC, and XG adsorption was monitored in situ using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The adsorption of XG under flow at different concentrations did not result in the same surface concentration, which evidenced a kinetically controlled process. In an attempt to describe the binding of XG to CNCs, adsorption data were fitted to a kinetic model comprising a contribution from XG adsorption onto uncovered CNC surfaces and a contribution from XG adsorption after rearrangement. Kinetic studies evidenced the presence of two adsorption regimes as a function of XG concentration. For low XG concentrations, the kinetic constant for chain rearrangement is comparable to the kinetic constant for adsorption. This fact implies a rearrangement and alignment of XG molecules on CNCs. Differently, for higher XG concentrations, the kinetic constant related to the conformational rearrangement decreases, indicating that XG molecules have no time to laterally rearrange before new XG molecules adsorb. PMID:26179417

  12. Adsorption of fibrinogen on a biomedical-grade stainless steel 316LVM surface: a PM-IRRAS study of the adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics and secondary structure changes.

    PubMed

    Desroches, Marie-Josee; Omanovic, Sasha

    2008-05-14

    Polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) was employed to investigate the interaction of serum protein fibrinogen with a biomedical-grade 316LVM stainless steel surface, in terms of the adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics and secondary structure changes of the protein. Apparent Gibbs energy of adsorption values indicated a highly spontaneous and strong adsorption of fibrinogen onto the surface. The kinetics of fibrinogen adsorption were successfully modeled using a pseudo first-order kinetic model. Deconvolution of the amide I bands indicated that the adsorption of fibrinogen on 316LVM results in significant changes in the protein's secondary structure that occur predominantly within the first minute of adsorption. Among the investigated structures, the alpha-helix structure undergoes the smallest changes, while the beta-sheet and beta-turns structures undergo significant changes. It was shown that lateral interactions between the adsorbed molecules do not play a role in controlling the secondary structure changes. An increase in temperature induced changes in the secondary structure of the protein, characterized by a loss of the alpha-helical content and its transformation into the beta-turns structure. PMID:18446250

  13. Adsorption of methyl orange from aqueous solution by aminated pumpkin seed powder: Kinetics, isotherms, and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Subbaiah, Munagapati Venkata; Kim, Dong-Su

    2016-06-01

    Present research discussed the utilization of aminated pumpkin seed powder (APSP) as an adsorbent for methyl orange (MO) removal from aqueous solution. Batch sorption experiments were carried to evaluate the influence of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time, and temperature. The APSP was characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The experimental equilibrium adsorption data were fitted using two two-parameter models (Langmuir and Freundlich) and two three-parameter models (Sips and Toth). Langmuir and Sips isotherms provided the best model for MO adsorption data. The maximum monolayer sorption capacity was found to be 200.3mg/g based on the Langmuir isotherm model. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model equations were used to analyze the kinetic data of the adsorption process and the data was fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model (R(2)>0.97). The calculated thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) from experimental data showed that the sorption of MO onto APSP was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in the temperature range 298-318 K. The FTIR results revealed that amine and carboxyl functional groups present on the surface of APSP. The SEM results show that APSP has an irregular and porous surface which is adequate morphology for dye adsorption. Desorption experiments were carried to explore the feasibility of adsorbent regeneration and the adsorbed MO from APSP was desorbed using 0.1M NaOH with an efficiency of 93.5%. Findings of the present study indicated that APSP can be successfully used for removal of MO from aqueous solution. PMID:26921544

  14. Kinetic studies on the adsorption of methylene blue onto vegetal fiber activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherifi, Hakima; Fatiha, Bentahar; Salah, Hanini

    2013-10-01

    The vegetable sponge of cylindrical loofa (CL), a natural product which grows in the north of Algeria, was used to prepare activated carbons. Two activated carbons, AC1 and AC2, by two physiochemical activation methods to be used for methylene blue removal from wastewater. The surface structure of AC1, AC2 and CL were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Adsorption isotherm of methylene blue onto the prepared activated carbons was determined by batch tests. The effects of various parameters such as contact time, initial concentration, pH, temperature, adsorbent dose and granulometry were investigated, at agitation rate 150 rpm. The results showed that the equilibrium uptake increased with increasing initial MB concentration. The maximum % removal of MB obtained was 99% at 50 °C for AC1 and 82% at 30 °C for AC2. The increase in initial pH in the ranges of 2-10 increases the yields removal of MB on AC2. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were applied to test the experimental data. The latter provided the best correlation of the experimental data compared to the pseudo-first-order model.

  15. Adsorption of methyl orange and salicylic acid on a nano-transition metal composite: Kinetics, thermodynamic and electrochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Arshadi, M; Mousavinia, F; Amiri, M J; Faraji, A R

    2016-12-01

    In this work synthesis of Mn-nanoparticles (MnNPs) supported on the Schiff base modified nano-sized SiO2Al2O3 mixed-oxides (Si/Al) and its implementation as an adsorbent for the removal of organic pollutions such as methyl orange (MO) and salicylic acid (SA) was investigated. Si/Al were functionalized by grafting Schiff base ligand and in the next step, MnNPs were prepared over the modified nano sol-gel Si/Al. Structures and adsorption characteristics of the obtained organometallic-modified SiO2/Al2O3 mixed oxide were studied by several methods such as elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), inductively coupled plasma (ICP-AES), Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). EPR data of the immobilized manganese ions resulted that the transition state of active sites in the nano-adsorbent are in the form of Mn(II) ions at the surface. The adsorption properties of heterogeneous Mn(II) ions showed that this nano-adsorbent has very good potential to remove MO and SA ions from aqueous solution. The removal efficiency of the SAPAS@MnNPs towards MO reached out to 89.3 and 29.1% and for SA approached to 54.6 and 18.9% at 150 and 500mg/dm(3) initial organic pollution concentrations, respectively. To investigate the adsorption kinetic of Mn(II) ions onto the nano-sized support, pseudo first and pseudo second order kinetics, and the Freundlich, Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm models have also been applied to the equilibrium adsorption data. The contact time to obtain equilibrium for maximum adsorption capacity was 45min. The adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature and it was well explained with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. No remarkable loss of removal capacity even after 8th times regeneration

  16. Adsorption kinetic and mechanistic studies for pharmaceutical spherical carbon adsorbents: comparison of a brand product and two generics.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Risa; Otsuka, Makoto

    2013-03-01

    The kinetic and mechanistic profiles of three pharmaceutical spherical carbon adsorbents, Kremezin as the brand product and two generics (Merckmezin and spherical carbon adsorbent "Mylan"), were compared. Five non-ionic active pharmaceutical ingredients with molecular weights of 136.1-424.1 Da were used as adsorbates. The results of Boehm titration, the standard method to qualify acidic or basic functional groups on a carbon surface, suggested distinctly different quantitative characteristics of each functional group among the three adsorbents. But those differences do not affect the adsorption to non-ionic adsorbates. The amount of theophylline adsorbed at equilibrium and surface area well correlated, suggesting that adsorptive ability was defined by surface area. In the tested molecular weight range, the order in terms of adsorption kinetics was spherical carbon adsorbent "Mylan">Kremezin>Merkmezin. The adsorption profile in the equilibrium and kinetic experiments, and the lack of an effect of pH on adsorption quantity suggested that the mechanism of adsorption for non-ionic substances to be Langmuir type monolayer adsorption. Kremezin and spherical carbon adsorbent "Mylan" are more likely to adsorb co-administered drugs than Merckmezin. PMID:23261577

  17. Anchored thiol smectite clay-kinetic and thermodynamic studies of divalent copper and cobalt adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra, Denis Lima Airoldi, Claudio

    2008-09-15

    A natural smectite clay sample from Serra de Maicuru, Para State, Brazil, had aluminum and zirconium polyoxycations inserted within the interlayer space. The precursor and pillarized smectites were organofunctionalized with the silyating agent 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane. The basal spacing of 1.47 nm for natural clay increased to 2.58 and 2.63 nm, for pillared aluminum, S{sub Al/SH}, and zirconium, S{sub Zr/SH}, and increases in the surface area from 44 to 583 and 585 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, respectively. These chemically immobilized clay samples adsorb divalent copper and cobalt cations from aqueous solutions of pH 5.0 at 298{+-}1 K. The Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson and Toth adsorption isotherm models have been applied to fit the experimental data with a nonlinear approach. From the cation/basic center interactions for each smectite at the solid-liquid interface, by using van't Hoff methodology, the equilibrium constant and exothermic thermal effects were calculated. By considering the net interactive number of moles for each cation and the equilibrium constant, the enthalpy, {delta}{sub int}H{sup 0} (-9.2{+-}0.2 to -10.2{+-}0.2 kJ mol{sup -1}) and negative Gibbs free energy, {delta}{sub int}G{sup 0} (-23.9{+-}0.1 to -28.7{+-}0.1 kJ mol{sup -1}) were calculated. These values enabled the positive entropy, {delta}{sub int}S{sup 0} (51.3{+-}0.3 to 55.0{+-}0.3 JK{sup -1} mol{sup -1}) determination. The cation-sulfur interactive process is spontaneous in nature, reflecting the favorable enthalpic and entropic results. The kinetics of adsorption demonstrated that the fit is in agreement with a second-order model reaction with rate constant k{sub 2}, varying from 4.8x10{sup -2} to 15.0x10{sup -2} and 3.9x10{sup -2} to 12.2x10{sup -2} mmol{sup -1} min{sup -1} for copper and cobalt, respectively. - Graphical abstract: A natural smectite clay sample from Serra de Maicuru, Para State, Brazil, had aluminum and zirconium polyoxycations inserted within the interlayer space. The

  18. Adsorption of chromium(VI) and Rhodamine B by surface modified tannery waste: kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Anandkumar, J; Mandal, B

    2011-02-28

    In this study, various activation methods have been employed to examine the potential reuse of tannery residual biomass (TRB) obtained from vegetable tanning process for the removal of Cr(VI) and Rhodamine B (RB) from aqueous solution. The maximum BET surface area (10.42 m(2)/g), honey comb pore distribution and uptake of both Cr(VI) and RB were achieved when only 3-fold volume of HCl was used to activate the biomass. The pH and temperature experiment showed that they have considerable impact on the adsorption capacity of the used adsorbent. The presence of other ions (Na(+), Ca(2+) and NH(4)(+)) significantly reduces the metal uptake but marginal enhancement in the dye removal was observed when Na(+) and NH(4)(+) ions were present in the solution. The equilibrium data fitted satisfactorily with the Langmuir model and monolayer sorption capacity obtained as 177-217 and 213-250 mg/g for Cr(VI) and RB at 30-50°C, respectively. The sorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The increase in adsorption capacity for both metal and dye with increase in temperature indicates that the uptake was endothermic in nature. The results indicate that the HCl modified TRB (A-TRB) could be employed as a low cost adsorbent for the removal of both Cr(VI) and RB from the aqueous solution including industrial wastewater. PMID:21168268

  19. Design of a new integrated chitosan-PAMAM dendrimer biosorbent for heavy metals removing and study of its adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Zarghami, Zabihullah; Akbari, Ahmad; Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Amani, Mohammad Ali

    2016-04-01

    In this research, different generations of PAMAM-grafted chitosan as integrated biosorbents were successfully synthesized via step by step divergent growth approach of dendrimer. The synthesized products were utilized as adsorbents for heavy metals (Pb(2+) in this study) removing from aqueous solution and their reactive Pb(2+) removal potential was evaluated. The results showed that as-synthesized products with higher generations of dendrimer, have more adsorption capacity compared to products with lower generations of dendrimer and sole chitosan. Adsorption capacity of as-prepared product with generation 3 of dendrimer is 18times more than sole chitosan. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies were performed for understanding equilibrium data of the uptake capacity and kinetic rate uptake, respectively. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies showed that Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo second order kinetic model are more compatible for describing equilibrium data of the uptake capacity and kinetic rate of the Pb(2+) uptake, respectively. PMID:26836608

  20. A Photochemical Reactor for the Study of Kinetics and Adsorption Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poce-Fatou, J. A.; Gil, M. L. A.; Alcantara, R.; Botella, C.; Martin, J.

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between light and matter is examined with the help of a photochemical experiment. This experiment is useful for the investigation of heterogeneous catalysis, semiconductor properties and adsorption phenomena.

  1. Volumetric interpretation of protein adsorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnthip, Naris

    Protein adsorption is believed to be a very important factor ultimately leading to a predictive basis for biomaterials design and improving biocompatibility. Standard adsorption theories are modified to accommodate experimental observations. Adsorption from single-protein solutions and competitive adsorption from binary solutions are mainly considered. The standard solution-depletion method of measuring protein adsorption is implemented with SDS-gel electrophoresis as a multiplexing, separation-and-quantification tool to measure protein adsorption to hydrophobic octyl sepharose (OS) adsorbent particles. Standard radiometric methods have also been used as a further check on the electrophoresis method mentioned above for purified-protein cases. Experimental results are interpreted in terms of an alternative kinetic model called volumetric interpretation of protein adsorption. A partitioning process between bulk solution and a three-dimensional interphase region that separates bulk solution from the physical adsorbent surface is the concept of the model. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into an inflating interphase that is spontaneously formed by bringing a protein solution into contact with a physical surface, then follows by rearrangement of proteins within this interphase to achieve the maximum interphase concentration (dictated by energetics of interphase dehydration) within the thinnest (lowest volume) interphase possible. An important role of water in protein adsorption is emphasized and supported by this model. The fundamental aspects including the reversibility/irreversibility of protein adsorption, the multilayer adsorption, the applicability of thermodynamic/computational models, the capacity of protein adsorption, and the mechanism of so called Vroman effect are discussed and compared to the conventional theories. Superhydrophobic effect on the adsorption of human serum albumin is also examined.

  2. Adsorption behavior of activated carbon derived from pyrolusite-modified sewage sludge: equilibrium modeling, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Jiang, Li; Ji, Xiujuan

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon was developed from sewage sludge using pyrolusite as an additive. It was demonstrated that the removal efficiency of two synthetic dyes (Tracid orange GS and Direct fast turquoise blue GL) by the produced adsorbent was up to 97.6%. The activated carbon with pyrolusite addition had 38.2% higher surface area, 43.8% larger micropore and 54.4% larger mesopore production than ordinary sludge-based activated carbons. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on dyes adsorption tests. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption, and the results fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data have been analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equation. The experimental data fitted very well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Activation energies for the adsorption processes ranged between 8.7 and 19.1 kJ mol 1. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (deltaG0), standard enthalpy (deltaH0) and standard entropy (deltaS0) were evaluated. The adsorption of these two dyes on the activated carbon was found to be a spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. PMID:22097045

  3. Liquid phase adsorptions of Rhodamine B dye onto raw and chitosan supported mesoporous adsorbents: isotherms and kinetics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inyinbor, A. A.; Adekola, F. A.; Olatunji, G. A.

    2016-04-01

    Irvingia gabonensis endocarp waste was charred (DNc) and subsequently coated with chitosan (CCDNc). Physicochemical characteristics of the two adsorbents were established, while Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area methods were further employed for characterization. Efficiencies of the prepared adsorbents in the uptake of Rhodamine B (RhB) from aqueous effluent were investigated and adsorption data were tested using four isotherms and four kinetics models. The BET surface areas of the prepared adsorbent were 0.0092 and 4.99 m2/g for DNc and CCDNc, respectively, and maximum adsorption was recorded at pH between 3 and 4, respectively. While monolayer adsorption dominates the uptake of RhB onto DNc, uptake of RhB onto CCDNc was onto heterogeneous surface. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities (q max) obtained from the Langmuir equation are 52.90 and 217.39 mg/g for DNc and CCDNc, respectively. Pseudo second order and Elovich kinetic models well described the kinetics of the two adsorption processes. The mean sorption energy (E) calculated from the D-R model and desorption efficiencies suggests that while the uptake of RhB onto DNc was physical in nature, for RhB-CCDNc system chemisorption dominates.

  4. Adsorption and decolorization kinetics of methyl orange by anaerobic sludge.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-05-01

    Adsorption and decolorization kinetics of methyl orange (MO) by anaerobic sludge in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors were investigated. The anaerobic sludge was found to have a saturated adsorption capacity of 36 ± 1 mg g MLSS(-1) to MO. UV/visible spectrophotometer and high-performance liquid chromatography analytical results indicated that the MO adsorption and decolorization occurred simultaneously in this system. This process at various substrate concentrations could be well simulated using a modified two-stage model with apparent pseudo first-order kinetics. Furthermore, a noncompetitive inhibition kinetic model was also developed to describe the MO decolorization process at high NaCl concentrations, and an inhibition constant of 3.67 g NaCl l(-1) was estimated. This study offers an insight into the adsorption and decolorization processes of azo dyes by anaerobic sludge and provides a better understanding of the anaerobic dye decolorization mechanisms. PMID:21279343

  5. Activated carbon derived from carbon residue from biomass gasification and its application for dye adsorption: Kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Maneerung, Thawatchai; Liew, Johan; Dai, Yanjun; Kawi, Sibudjing; Chong, Clive; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In this work, activated carbon (AC) as an effective and low-cost adsorbent was successfully prepared from carbon residue (or char, one of the by-products from woody biomass gasification) via physical activation. The surface area of char was significantly increased from 172.24 to 776.46m(2)/g after steam activation at 900°C. The obtained activated carbons were then employed for the adsorption of dye (Rhodamine B) and it was found that activated carbon obtained from steam activation exhibited the highest adsorption capability, which is mainly attributed to the higher surface area and the abundance of hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups on the activated carbon surface. Moreover, it was also found that the adsorption capability significantly increased under the basic condition, which can be attributed to the increased electrostatic interaction between the deprotonated (negatively charged) activated carbon and dye molecules. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted into different adsorption isotherms and found to fit well with Langmuir model (indicating that dye molecules form monolayer coverage on activated carbon) with a maximum monolayer adsorption capability of 189.83mg/g, whereas the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. PMID:26512858

  6. On the adsorption/photodegradation of amoxicillin in aqueous solutions by an integrated photocatalytic adsorbent (IPCA): experimental studies and kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Basha, Shaik; Barr, Colin; Keane, David; Nolan, Kieran; Morrissey, Anne; Oelgemöller, Michael; Tobin, John M

    2011-06-01

    Activated carbon-supported TiO(2) nanoparticles, termed integrated photocatalytic adsorbents (IPCAs), were prepared using an ultrasonic impregnation technique and investigated for the photocatalytic degradation of amoxicillin (AMO), a β-lactam antibiotic. The IPCAs had high adsorption affinity for AMO with the amount adsorbed proportional to the TiO(2) loading and the highest adsorption was at 10 wt% TiO(2) loading. A pseudo-second-order model was found to fit the experimental data and consistently predicted the amount of AMO adsorbed over the adsorption period. Equilibrium isotherm studies showed that the adsorption followed the Redlich-Peterson model with maximum adsorption capacity of 441.3 mg g(-1) for 10% IPCA, 23% higher than the pure activated carbon (AC). Kinetic studies on the photocatalytic degradation of AMO using non-linear regression analysis suggest that the degradation followed Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) kinetics. The adsorption rate constant (K(ad)) was considerably higher than the photocatalytic rate constant (k(L-H)), indicating that the photocatalysis of AMO is the rate-determining step during the adsorption/photocatalysis process. The 10% IPCA exhibited excellent stability and reusability over four photodegradation cycles. PMID:21380442

  7. Adsorption of heavy metal ions using hierarchical CaCO3-maltose meso/macroporous hybrid materials: adsorption isotherms and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoming; Li, Liping; Yang, Lin; Su, Caiyun; Wang, Kui; Yuan, Shibao; Zhou, Jianguo

    2012-03-30

    Highly ordered hierarchical calcium carbonate is an important phase and has technological interest in the development of functional materials. The work describes hierarchical CaCO(3)-maltose meso/macroporous hybrid materials were synthesized using a simple gas-diffusion method. The uniform hexagonal-shaped CaCO(3)-maltose hybrid materials are formed by the hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles. The pore structure analysis indicates that the sample possesses the macroporous structure of mesoporous framework. The distinguishing features of the hierarchical CaCO(3)-maltose materials in water treatment involve not only high removal capacities, but also decontamination of trace metal ions. Langmuir model fitted the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm. The maximum removal capacity of the CaCO(3)-maltose hybrid materials for Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Co(2+), Mn(2+) and Ni(2+) ions was 3242.48, 487.80, 628.93, 393.70, 558.66 and 769.23 mg/g, respectively. Adsorption data were modeled using the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion kinetics equations. The results indicate that pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and intra-particle diffusion model can better describe the adsorption kinetics. The adsorption and precipitation transformation mechanism can be considered due to hierarchical meso/macroporous structure, rich organic ligands of the CaCO(3)-maltose hybrid materials and the larger solubility product of CaCO(3). PMID:22326246

  8. Comparative evaluation of adsorption kinetics of diclofenac and isoproturon by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Torrellas, Silvia A; Rodriguez, Araceli R; Escudero, Gabriel O; Martín, José María G; Rodriguez, Juan G

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption mechanism of diclofenac and isoproturon onto activated carbon has been proposed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Adsorption capacity and optimum adsorption isotherms were predicted by nonlinear regression method. Different kinetic equations, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intraparticle diffusion model and Bangham kinetic model, were applied to study the adsorption kinetics of emerging contaminants on activated carbon in two aqueous matrices. PMID:26301850

  9. Adsorption Kinetics in Nanoscale Porous Coordination Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, Benard Peter; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Karri, Naveen; Alvine, Kyle J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2015-10-07

    Nanoscale porous coordination polymers were synthesized using simple wet chemical method. The effect of various polymer surfactants on colloidal stability and shape selectivity was investigated. Our results suggest that the nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved adsorption kinetics compared to bulk crystals due to decreased diffusion path lengths and preferred crystal plane interaction.

  10. Adsorption of Pb(II) ions onto biomass from Trifolium resupinatum: equilibrium and kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, Makshoof; Farooq, Umar; Aslam, Muhammad; Salman, M.

    2013-09-01

    The present study provides information about the binding of Pb(II) ions on an eco-friendly and easily available biodegradable biomass Trifolium resupinatum. The powdered biomass was characterized by FTIR, potentiometric titration and surface area analyses. The FTIR spectrum showed the presence of hydroxyl, carbonyl and amino functional groups and Pb(II) ions bound with the oxygen- and nitrogen-containing sites (hydroxyl and amino groups). The acidic groups were also confirmed by titrations. Effects of various environmental parameters (time, pH and concentration) have been studied. The biosorption process achieved equilibrium in a very short period of time (25 min). Non-linear approach for Langmuir and Freundlich models was used to study equilibrium process and root mean-square error was used as an indicator to decide the fitness of the mathematical model. The biosorption process was found to follow pseudo-second-order kinetics and was very fast. Thus, the biomass can be cost-effectively used for the binding of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions.

  11. Adsorption kinetic process of thiol ligands on gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Yang, Lina; Jiang, Yong; Huang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zhihu; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Tiandou; Pan, Zhiyun; Pan, Guoqiang; Yao, Tao; Bian, Qing; Wei, Shiqiang

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the kinetic mechanism during ligand adsorption on gold nanocrystals is important for designing and fine-tuning their properties and implications. Here, we report a kinetic study on the adsorption process of dodecanethiol ligands on Au nanocrystals of 3.3 nm by an in situ time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure technique. A two-step process of dodecanethiol adsorption on Au NC surfaces is proposed based on the obtained ligand coverage, which shows a quick increase from 0 to 0.40 within the first 20 min, followed by a much slower increase to the limiting value of 0.94. In-depth analysis suggests that the first stage involves the quick adsorption of dodecanethiol to the corner and edge sites of Au NCs surfaces, leading to remarkable surface Au-Au bond length relaxation (from 2.79 to 2.81 Å) and pronounced gold-to-ligand charge transfer. The second step that corresponds to the much slower adsorption process to the surface facets could be described by the Langmuir kinetics equation with an adsorption rate constant of 0.0132 min(-1) and an initial coverage of 0.41, in good agreement with the initially preferable adsorption of thiols to the most favorable sites. PMID:24122096

  12. Study on an effective industrial waste-based adsorbent for the adsorptive removal of phosphorus from wastewater: equilibrium and kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruzhen; Chen, Yao; Cheng, Ting; Lai, Yuguo; Jiang, Wenju; Yang, Zhishan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an effective adsorbent for removing phosphate from aqueous solution was developed from modifying industrial waste--lithium silica fume (LSF). The characterization of LSF before and after modification was investigated using an N2 adsorption-desorption technique (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Studies were conducted to investigate the effect of adsorbent dose, initial solution pH, contact time, phosphate concentration, and temperature on phosphate removal using this novel adsorbent. The specific surface area for modified LSF (LLSF) is 24.4024 m(2)/g, improved 69.8% compared with unmodified LSF. XRD result suggests that the lanthanum phosphate complex was formed on the surface of LLSF. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity was 24.096 mg P/g for LLSF, and phosphate removal was favored in the pH range of 3-8. The kinetic data fitted pseudo-second-order kinetic equation, intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate controlling step. The adsorption isotherm results illustrated that the Langmuir model provided the best fit for the equilibrium data. The change in free energy (△G(0)), enthalpy (△H(0)) and entropy (△S(0)) revealed that the adsorption of phosphate on LLSF was spontaneous and endothermic. It was concluded that by modifying with lanthanum, LSF can be turned to be a highly efficient adsorbent in phosphate removal. PMID:27120644

  13. Adsorption of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles within layer-by-layer films: a kinetic study carried out using quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Gustavo B; Paterno, Leonardo G; Afonso, André S; Faria, Ronaldo C; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A; Morais, Paulo C; Soler, Maria A G

    2011-12-28

    The paper reports on the successful use of the quartz crystal microbalance technique to assess accurate kinetics and equilibrium parameters regarding the investigation of in situ adsorption of nanosized cobalt ferrite particles (CoFe(2)O(4)--10.5 nm-diameter) onto two different surfaces. Firstly, a single layer of nanoparticles was deposited onto the surface provided by the gold-coated quartz resonator functionalized with sodium 3-mercapto propanesulfonate (3-MPS). Secondly, the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique was used to build multilayers in which the CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle-based layer alternates with the sodium sulfonated polystyrene (PSS) layer. The adsorption experiments were conducted by modulating the number of adsorbed CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS bilayers (n) and/or by changing the CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle concentration while suspended as a stable colloidal dispersion. Adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles onto the 3-MPS-functionalized surface follows perfectly a first order kinetic process in a wide range (two orders of magnitude) of nanoparticle concentrations. These data were used to assess the equilibrium constant and the adsorption free energy. Alternatively, the Langmuir adsorption constant was obtained while analyzing the isotherm data at the equilibrium. Adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles while growing multilayers of CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS was conducted using colloidal suspensions with CoFe(2)O(4) concentration in the range of 10(-8) to 10(-6) (moles of cobalt ferrite per litre) and for different numbers of cycles n = 1, 3, 5, and 10. We found the adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles within the CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS bilayers perfectly following a first order kinetic process, with the characteristic rate constant growing with the increase of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle concentration and decreasing with the rise of the number of LbL cycles (n). Additionally, atomic force microscopy was employed for assessing the LbL film roughness and thickness. We found the film

  14. Adsorption Kinetics at Silica Gel/Ionic Liquid Solution Interface.

    PubMed

    Flieger, Jolanta; Tatarczak-Michalewska, Małgorzata; Groszek, Anna; Blicharska, Eliza; Kocjan, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    A series of imidazolium and pyridinium ionic liquids with different anions (Cl(-), Br(-), BF₄(-), PF₆(-)) has been evaluated for their adsorption activity on silica gel. Quantification of the ionic liquids has been performed by the use of RP-HPLC with organic-aqueous eluents containing an acidic buffer and a chaotropic salt. Pseudo-second order kinetic models were applied to the experimental data in order to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption process. The experimental data showed good fitting with this model, confirmed by considerably high correlation coefficients. The adsorption kinetic parameters were determined and analyzed. The relative error between the calculated and experimental amount of ionic liquid adsorbed at equilibrium was within 7%. The effect of various factors such as initial ionic liquid concentration, temperature, kind of solvent, kind of ionic liquid anion and cation on adsorption efficiency were all examined in a lab-scale study. Consequently, silica gel showed better adsorptive characteristics for imidazolium-based ionic liquids with chaotropic anions from aqueous solutions in comparison to pyridinium ionic liquids. The adsorption was found to decrease with the addition of organic solvents (methanol, acetonitrile) but it was not sensitive to the change of temperature in the range of 5-40 °C. PMID:26690392

  15. Adsorption-Desorption Kinetics of Soft Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberg, Brendan; Nuebler, Johannes; Gerland, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Adsorption-desorption processes are ubiquitous in physics, chemistry, and biology. Models usually assume hard particles, but within the realm of soft matter physics the adsorbing particles are compressible. A minimal 1D model reveals that softness fundamentally changes the kinetics: Below the desorption time scale, a logarithmic increase of the particle density replaces the usual Rényi jamming plateau, and the subsequent relaxation to equilibrium can be nonmonotonic and much faster than for hard particles. These effects will impact the kinetics of self-assembly and reaction-diffusion processes.

  16. Effect of grain size on uranium(VI) surface complexation kinetics and adsorption additivity.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M

    2011-07-15

    The contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption was studied using a sediment from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.053-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (<0.053 mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch and flow-cell experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms and kinetic uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. One important implication of this study is that grain-size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location. PMID:21648458

  17. A novel polar-modified post-cross-linked resin and its enhanced adsorption to salicylic acid: Equilibrium, kinetics and breakthrough studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Guoqiang; Guo, Deping; Zhang, Yaling; Huang, Jianhan

    2016-05-15

    Improving the surface polarity is of significance for the post-cross-linked resins to enhance their adsorption to polar aromatic compounds. In the present study, we prepared a novel polar-modified post-cross-linked PDEpc_D by the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and the amination reaction, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume increased significantly after the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and the surface polarity improved greatly after the amination reaction. Batch adsorption showed that PDEpc_D possessed a much enhanced adsorption to salicylic acid as compared the precursors PDE and PDEpc as well as the non-polar post-cross-linked PDVBpc. The equilibrium data was characterized by the Freundlich model, π-π stacking, hydrogen bonding and static interaction were the possible driving forces. The adsorption was a fast process and the kinetic data obeyed the micropore diffusion model. Column adsorption-desorption experiments suggested that PDEpc_D was a potential candidate for adsorptive removal of salicylic acid from aqueous solution. PMID:26928058

  18. Water adsorption kinetics and contact angles of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Muster, Tim H; Prestidge, Clive A

    2005-04-01

    Water sorption kinetics and water contact angles have been characterized for a range of pharmaceutical powders: ambroxol hydrochloride, griseofulvin, N,n-octyl-D-gluconamide, paracetamol, sulfathiazole, and theophylline. The uptake of water by powder samples at saturated vapor pressure was modeled using a pseudo first-order kinetic relationship. Parameters from this model have been correlated with the concentration and reactivity of the active surface sites of the pharmaceutical powders and their contact angles. The study has shown that analysis of water adsorption kinetics can be a powerful technique for characterizing the surface chemistry and wettability of pharmaceutical powders, and is particularly sensitive to their surface modification through excipient adsorption: ethyl(hydroxyethyl)cellulose treatment of griseofulvin and butyryl chloride treatment of sulfathiazole are reported as case studies. PMID:15736196

  19. IMPACT OF OXYGEN MEDIATED OXIDATIVE COUPLING ON ADSORPTION KINETICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of molecular oxygen in the test environment promotes oxidative coupling (polymer formation) of phenolic compounds on the surface of granular activated carbon (GAC). Both adsorption equilibria and adsorption kinetics are affected by these chemical reactions. Lack of...

  20. Adsorption of toxic metal ion Cr(VI) from aqueous state by TiO2-MCM-41: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Parida, Kulamani; Mishra, Krushna Gopal; Dash, Suresh Kumar

    2012-11-30

    This paper deals with the immobilization of various weight percentage of TiO(2) on mesoporous MCM-41, characterization of the materials by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and evaluation of the adsorption capacity toward Cr(VI) removal. It is found that the MCM-41 structure retained after loading of TiO(2) but the surface area and pore diameter decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous state was investigated on TiO(2)-MCM-41 by changing various parameters such as pH, metal ion concentration, and the temperature. When TiO(2) loading was more than 20 wt.%, the adsorption activity (25)TiO(2)-MCM-41 reduced significantly due to considerable decrease in the surface area. It is also observed that TiO(2) and neat MCM-41 exhibits very less Cr(VI) adsorption compared to TiO(2)-MCM-41. The adsorption of Cr(VI) onto (20)TiO(2)-MCM-41 at pH~5.5 and temperature 323 K was 91% at 100mg/L Cr(VI) metal ion concentration in 80 min. The experimental data fitted well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on TiO(2)-MCM-41 followed a second order kinetics with higher values of intra-particle diffusion rate. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption process is endothermic in nature and desorption studies indicated a chemisorption mode. PMID:23092612

  1. Study of the kinetics and the adsorption isotherm of cadmium(II) from aqueous solution using green algae (Ulva lactuca) biomass.

    PubMed

    Asnaoui, H; Laaziri, A; Khalis, M

    2015-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption of hazardous cadmium onto low-cost algae biomass in aqueous solution with respect to concentration of adsorbate, adsorbent dosage, contact time, solution pH and temperature. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were determined. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated for the adsorption of cadmium onto Ulva lactuca biomass. Experimental data were tested in terms of biosorption kinetics using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The results showed that the biosorption processes of Cd(II) followed well pseudo-second-order kinetics. Langmuir and Freundlich models were applied to describe the biosorption isotherm of the metal ions by Ulva lactuca biomass. Langmuir model fitted the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm. The biosorption capacity of Ulva lactuca biomass for cadmium was found to be 3.02 mg/g at pH 5.60 min equilibrium time and 20 °C. The mean free energy which was calculated was 6.24 kJ/mol for Cd(II) biosorption, which shows that the adsorption is physical. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0) showed that the biosorption of Cd(II) onto Ulva lactuca biomass was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under examined conditions. The results indicate that algae Ulva lactuca could be employed as a low-cost material for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solution. PMID:26524441

  2. Adsorption of radium and barium on goethite and ferrihydrite: A kinetic and surface complexation modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajih, M.; Bryan, N. D.; Livens, F. R.; Vaughan, D. J.; Descostes, M.; Phrommavanh, V.; Nos, J.; Morris, K.

    2014-12-01

    Radium and barium uptake onto ferrihydrite and goethite have been studied in the concentration range 1 nM to 5 mM and from pH 4 to 10, to develop a model to predict radium behaviour in legacy uranium mining wastes. For ferrihydrite, uptake of Ra2+ at nM concentrations was strong at pH >7. At higher concentrations, Ba2+ sorption to ferrihydrite was slightly weaker than that of Ra2+. Experiments with goethite showed weaker binding for both metal ions in all systems. The interactions of radium with both ferrihydrite and goethite are fully reversible. The behaviour of radium during transformation of ferrihydrite to goethite has been studied, and no evidence for irreversible incorporation within the goethite lattice was found; radium uptake to goethite was the same, whether or not it was present during its formation. Calcium competed with radium for ferrihydrite sorption only at high calcium concentrations (>10 mM). Barium is a more effective competitor, and a concentration of 1 mM reduced radium sorption. Sediment samples from a legacy uranium mining site have been analysed, and the in situ Rd values are consistent with radium uptake by surface coatings of ferrihydrite or goethite like phases. Surface complexation models have been developed for radium sorption to ferrihydrite and goethite which simulate the experimental data successfully. In both cases, approaches based on a single surface functional group and tetradentate binding sites simulated the data successfully. These data could be used in underpinning the safety case for legacy mining sites.

  3. Kinetics of phosphate adsorption on goethite: comparing batch adsorption and ATR-IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina; Brigante, Maximiliano; Antelo, Juan; Avena, Marcelo

    2006-08-15

    The adsorption kinetics of phosphate on goethite has been studied by batch adsorption experiments and by in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy at different pH, initial phosphate concentrations and stirring rates. Batch adsorption results are very similar to those reported by several authors, and show a rather fast initial adsorption taking place in a few minutes followed by a slower process taking place in days or weeks. The adsorption kinetics could be also monitored by integrating the phosphate signals obtained in ATR-IR experiments, and a very good agreement between both techniques was found. At pH 4.5 two surface complexes, the bidentate nonprotonated (FeO)(2)PO(2) and the bidentate protonated (FeO)(2)(OH)PO complexes, are formed at the surface. There are small changes in the relative concentrations of these species as the reaction proceeds, and they seem to evolve in time rather independently. At pH 7.5 and 9 the dominating surface species is (FeO)(2)PO(2), which is accompanied by an extra unidentified species at low concentration. They also seem to evolve independently as the reaction proceeds. The results are consistent with a mechanism that involve a fast adsorption followed by a slow diffusion into pores, and are not consistent with surface precipitation of iron phosphate. PMID:16643942

  4. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamics and desorption studies for uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solution by novel microporous composite P(HEMA-EP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkaya, Recep; Akkaya, Birnur

    2013-03-01

    In this research, a novel composite, poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate-expanded perlite) [P(HEMA-EP)], was synthesized and its adsorptive features were investigated. P(HEMA-EP)'s adsorptive features were evaluated for UO22+ and Th4+ ions in terms of the dependency upon the ion concentration, pH, temperature, and time. P(HEMA-EP) was able to bind UO22+ and Th4+ ions with strong chemical affinity. The adsorption results were fitted to the classical Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) sorption models. P(HEMA-EP) was also used to study the removal of UO22+ and Th4+ ions from aqueous solutions in a batch system. The adsorption capacity (XL) of UO22+ and Th4+ ions was found to be 0.29 and 0.44 mol kg-1, respectively. The kinetic data corresponds well to the pseudo-second-order equation. Changes in the enthalpy and entropy values demonstrated that the overall adsorption process was spontaneous (ΔG < 0), endothermic (ΔH > 0), and had increased entropy (ΔS > 0), as expected. The reusability of the composites was confirmed for five sequential reuses.

  5. Adsorptive Removal and Adsorption Kinetics of Fluoroquinolone by Nano-Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yajun; Lan, Tao; Duan, Lunchao; Wang, Fenghe; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Shengtian; Wei, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Various kinds of antibiotics, especially fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FQs) have been widely used for the therapy of infectious diseases in human and livestock. For their poorly absorbed by living organisms, large-scale misuse or abuse of FQs will foster drug resistance among pathogenic bacteria, as well as a variety of environmental problems when they were released in the environment. In this work, the adsorption properties of two FQs, namely norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP), by nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HAP) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption curves of FQs by n-HAP were simulated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The results shown that NOR and CIP can be adsorbed effectively by the adsorbent of n-HAP, and the adsorption capacity of FQs increase with increasing dosage of n-HAP. The optimum dosage of n-HAP for FQs removal was 20 g·L-1, in which the removal efficiencies is 51.6% and 47.3%, and an adsorption equilibrium time is 20 min. The maximum removal efficiency occurred when pH is 6 for both FQs. The adsorption isotherm of FQs fits well for both Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The adsorption of both FQs by n-HAP follows second-order kinetics. PMID:26698573

  6. Adsorption kinetics of Rhodamine-B on used black tea leaves

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rhodamine B (Rh-B) is one of the most common pollutants in the effluents of textile industries effluents in developing countries. This study was carried out to evaluate the applicability of used black tea leaves (UBTL) for the adsorptive removal of Rh-B from aqueous system by investigating the adsorption kinetics in batch process. The effects of concentration and temperature on adsorption kinetics were examined. First-, second- and pseudo-second order kinetic equations were used to investigate the adsorption mechanism. The adsorption of Rh-B on UBTL followed pseudo-second order kinetics. The equilibrium amount adsorbed and the equilibrium concentration were calculated from pseudo-second-order kinetic plots for different initial concentrations of Rh-B to construct the adsorption isotherm. The adsorption isotherm was well expressed by Langmuir equation. The maximum adsorption capacity of UBTL to Rh-B was found to be 53.2 mg/g at pH = 2.0. The equilibrium amount adsorbed, calculated from pseudo-second-order kinetic plots, increased with temperature increase. The positive value of enthalpy of adsorption, ΔHads = 31.22 kJ/mol, suggested that the adsorption of Rh-B on UBTL at pH = 2.0 is an endothermic process. PMID:23369452

  7. Adsorption/desorption of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) using chemically modified orange peel: Equilibrium and kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasheen, Mohamed R.; Ammar, Nabila S.; Ibrahim, Hanan S.

    2012-02-01

    Waste materials from industries such as food processing may act as cost effective and efficient biosorbents to remove toxic contaminants from wastewater. This study aimed to establish an optimized condition and closed loop application of processed orange peel for metals removal. A comparative study of the adsorption capacity of the chemically modified orange peel was performed against environmentally problematic metal ions, namely, Cd 2+, Cu 2+ and Pb 2+, from aqueous solutions. Chemically modified orange peel (MOP) showed a significantly higher metal uptake capacity compared to original orange peel (OP). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectra of peel showed that the carboxylic group peak shifted from 1637 to 1644 cm -1 after Pb (II) ions binding, indicated the involvement of carboxyl groups in Pb(II) ions binding. The metals uptake by MOP was rapid and the equilibrium time was 30 min at constant temperature and pH. Sorption kinetics followed a second-order model. The mechanism of metal sorption by MOP gave good fits for Freundlich and Langmuir models. Desorption of metals and regeneration of the biosorbent was attained simultaneously by acid elution. Even after four cycles of adsorption-elution, the adsorption capacity was regained completely and adsorption efficiency of metal was maintained at around 90%.

  8. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2011-07-27

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  9. Adsorption dynamics of methyl violet onto granulated mesoporous carbon: Facile synthesis and adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yohan; Bae, Jiyeol; Park, Hosik; Suh, Jeong-Kwon; You, Young-Woo; Choi, Heechul

    2016-09-15

    A new and facile one-step synthesis method for preparing granulated mesoporous carbon (GMC) with three-dimensional spherical mesoporous symmetry is prepared to remove large molecular weight organic compounds in aqueous phase. GMC is synthesized in a single step using as-synthesized mesoporous carbon particles and organic binders through a simple and economical synthesis approach involving a simultaneous calcination and carbonization process. Characterization results obtained from SEM, XRD, as well as surface and porosity analysis indicate that the synthesized GMC has similar physical properties to those of the powdered mesoporous carbon and maintains the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume because the new synthesis method prevents the collapse of the pores during the granulation process. Batch adsorption experiments revealed GMC showed a substantial adsorption capacity (202.8 mg/g) for the removal of methyl violet as a target large molecular contaminant in aqueous phase. The mechanisms and dynamics modeling of GMC adsorption were also fully examined, which revealed that surface diffusion was rate limiting step on adsorption process of GMC. Adsorption kinetics of GMC enables 3 times faster than that of granular activated carbon in terms of surface diffusion coefficient. This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to synthesize GMC as an adsorbent for water purification by using facile granulation method and to investigate the adsorption kinetics and characteristics of GMC. This study introduces a new and simple method for the synthesis of GMC and reveals its adsorption characteristics for large molecular compounds in a water treatment. PMID:27262123

  10. Solvothermal synthesis of different phase N-TiO2 and their kinetics, isotherm and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of methyl orange.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jimin; Zhao, Zhihuan; Liu, Wenhui; Xue, Yongqiang; Yin, Shu

    2016-05-15

    The different crystal forms of nitrogen doped-titanium oxide (N-TiO2) with different particle sizes were produced by precipitation-solvothermal method and their adsorption mechanism were also investigated. The adsorption kinetics showed that rutile N-TiO2 displayed higher adsorption capacity than anatase for methyl orange (MO) and its adsorption behavior followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The equilibrium adsorption rate of N-TiO2 for MO was well fitted by the Langmuir isotherm model and the adsorption process was monolayer adsorption. The adsorption capacity decreased with increasing temperature. The average correlation coefficient was beyond 97%. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔaGm(ө), ΔaHm(ө), and ΔaSm(ө)) were calculated. It was found that anatase and rutile N-TiO2 had different adsorption enthalpy and entropy. The smaller the particle size, the greater the surface area and surface energy was, then ΔaGm(ө) decreased and the standard equilibrium constant increased at the same time. The adsorption process onto different crystalline phase N-TiO2 was exothermic and non-spontaneous. PMID:26945716

  11. Adsorption of Trametes versicolor laccase to soil iron and aluminum minerals: enzyme activity, kinetics and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Jiang, Ying; Jiao, Jiaguo; Liu, Manqiang; Hu, Feng; Griffiths, Bryan S; Li, Huixin

    2014-02-01

    Laccases play an important role in the degradation of soil phenol or phenol-like substance and can be potentially used in soil remediation through immobilization. Iron and aluminum minerals can adsorb extracellular enzymes in soil environment. In the present study, we investigated the adsorptive interaction of laccase, from the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor, with soil iron and aluminum minerals and characterized the properties of the enzyme after adsorption to minerals. Results showed that both soil iron and aluminum minerals adsorbed great amount of laccase, independent of the mineral specific surface areas. Adsorbed laccases retained 26-64% of the activity of the free enzyme. Compared to the free laccase, all adsorbed laccases showed higher Km values and lower Vmax values, indicating a reduced enzyme-substrate affinity and a lower rate of substrate conversion in reactions catalyzed by the adsorbed laccase. Adsorbed laccases exhibited increased catalytic activities compared to the free laccase at low pH, implying the suitable application of iron and aluminum mineral-adsorbed T. versicolor laccase in soil bioremediation, especially in acid soils. In terms of the thermal profiles, adsorbed laccases showed decreased thermal stability and higher temperature sensitivity relative to the free laccase. Moreover, adsorption improved the resistance of laccase to proteolysis and extended the lifespan of laccase. Our results implied that adsorbed T. versicolor laccase on soil iron and aluminum minerals had promising potential in soil remediation. PMID:24225344

  12. Modeling high adsorption capacity and kinetics of organic macromolecules on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Kurotobi, Ryuji; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The capacity to adsorb natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) on small particle-size activated carbon (super-powdered activated carbon, SPAC) is higher than that on larger particle-size activated carbon (powdered-activated carbon, PAC). Increased adsorption capacity is likely attributable to the larger external surface area because the NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle; they preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle. In this study, we propose a new isotherm equation, the Shell Adsorption Model (SAM), to explain the higher adsorption capacity on smaller adsorbent particles and to describe quantitatively adsorption isotherms of activated carbons of different particle sizes: PAC and SPAC. The SAM was verified with the experimental data of PSS adsorption kinetics as well as equilibrium. SAM successfully characterized PSS adsorption isotherm data for SPACs and PAC simultaneously with the same model parameters. When SAM was incorporated into an adsorption kinetic model, kinetic decay curves for PSSs adsorbing onto activated carbons of different particle sizes could be simultaneously described with a single kinetics parameter value. On the other hand, when SAM was not incorporated into such an adsorption kinetic model and instead isotherms were described by the Freundlich model, the kinetic decay curves were not well described. The success of the SAM further supports the adsorption mechanism of PSSs preferentially adsorbing near the outer surface of activated carbon particles. PMID:21172719

  13. Interactions of xanthines with activated carbon. I. Kinetics of the adsorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete Casas, R.; García Rodriguez, A.; Rey Bueno, F.; Espínola Lara, A.; Valenzuela Calahorro, C.; Navarrete Guijosa, A.

    2006-06-01

    Because of their pharmaceutical and industrial applications, we have studied the adsorption of xanthine derivates (caffeine and theophylline) by activated carbon. To this end, we examined kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic aspects of the process. This paper reports the kinetics results. The experimental results indicate that the process was first order in C and the overall process was assumed to involve a single, reversible adsorption-desorption process obeying a kinetic law postulated by us.

  14. Studies on silicon NMR characterization and kinetic modeling of the structural evolution of siloxane-based materials and their applications in drug delivery and adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambati, Jyothirmai

    This dissertation presents studies of the synthetic processes and applications of siloxane-based materials. Kinetic investigations of bridged organoalkoxysilanes that are precursors to organic-inorganic hybrid polysilsesquioxanes are a primary focus. Quick gelation despite extensive cyclization is found during the polymerization of bridged silane precursors except for silanes with certain short bridges. This work is an attempt to characterize and understand some of the distinct features of bridged silanes using experimental characterization, kinetic modeling and simulation. In addition to this, the dissertation shows how the properties of siloxane-materials can be engineered for drug delivery and adsorption. The phase behavior of polymerizing mixtures is first investigated to identify the solutions that favor kinetic characterization. Microphase separation is found to cause gradual loss of NMR signal for certain initial compositions. Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer 29Si NMR is employed to identify the products of polymerization of some short-bridged silanes under no signal loss conditions. This technique requires knowing indirect 29Si-1H scalar coupling constants which sometimes cannot be measured due to second-order effects. However, the B3LYP density functional method with 6-31G basis set is found to predict accurate 29Si- 1H coupling constants of organoalkoxysilanes and siloxanes. The scalar coupling constants thus estimated are employed to resolve non-trivial coupled NMR spectra and quantitative kinetic modeling is performed using the DEPT Si NMR transients. In order to investigate the role of the organic bridging group, the structural evolution of bridged and non-bridged silanes are compared using Monte Carlo simulations. Kinetic and simulation models suggest that cyclization plays a key role right from the onset of polymerization for bridged silanes even more than in non-bridged silanes. The simulations indicate that the carbosiloxane

  15. Adsorption of Cd(II) by Mg-Al-CO3- and magnetic Fe3O4/Mg-Al-CO3-layered double hydroxides: Kinetic, isothermal, thermodynamic and mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ran-ran; Yan, Liang-guo; Yang, Kun; Hao, Yuan-feng; Du, Bin

    2015-12-15

    Understanding the adsorption mechanisms of metal cations on the surfaces of solids is important for determining the fate of these metals in water and wastewater treatment. The adsorption kinetic, isothermal, thermodynamic and mechanistic properties of cadmium (Cd(II)) in an aqueous solution containing Mg-Al-CO3- and magnetic Fe3O4/Mg-Al-CO3-layered double hydroxide (LDH) were studied. The results demonstrated that the adsorption kinetic and isotherm data followed the pseudo-second-order model and the Langmuir equation, respectively. The adsorption process of Cd(II) was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in nature. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to explain the adsorption mechanisms. The characteristic XRD peaks and FTIR bands of CdCO3 emerged in the LDH spectra after Cd(II) adsorption, which indicated that the adsorption of Cd(II) by LDHs occurred mainly via CdCO3 precipitation, surface adsorption and surface complexation. Furthermore, the magnetic Fe3O4/Mg-Al-CO3-LDH can be quickly and easily separated using a magnet before and after the adsorption process. PMID:26073520

  16. Derivation of the Freundlich Adsorption Isotherm from Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skopp, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The Freundlich adsorption isotherm is a useful description of adsorption phenomena. It is frequently presented as an empirical equation with little theoretical basis. In fact, a variety of derivations exist. Here a new derivation is presented using the concepts of fractal reaction kinetics. This derivation provides an alternative basis for…

  17. Arsenate Adsorption On Ruthenium Oxides: A Spectroscopic And Kinetic Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate adsorption on amorphous (RuO2•1.1H2O) and crystalline (RuO2) ruthenium oxides was evaluated using spectroscopic and kinetic methods to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) was ...

  18. The influence of protein aggregation on adsorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovner, Joel; Roberts, Christopher; Furst, Eric; Hudson, Steven

    2015-03-01

    When proteins adsorb to an air-water interface they lower the surface tension and may form an age-dependent viscoelastic film. Protein adsorption to surfaces is relevant to both commercial uses and biological function. The rate at which the surface tension decreases depends strongly on temperature, solution pH, and protein structure. These kinetics also depend on the degree to which the protein is aggregated in solution. Here we explore these differences using Chymotrypsinogen as a model protein whose degree of aggregation is adjusted through controlled heat treatment and measured by chromatography. To study these effects we have used a micropipette tensiometer to produce a spherical-cap bubble whose interfacial pressure was controlled - either steady or oscillating. Short heat treatment produced small soluble aggregates, and these adsorbed faster than the original protein monomer. Longer heat treatment produced somewhat larger soluble aggregates which adsorbed more slowly. These results point to complex interactions during protein adsorption.

  19. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies towards understanding the interaction between cross-linked alginate-guar gum matrix and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Woitovich Valetti, Nadia; Picó, Guillermo

    2016-02-15

    The adsorption kinetics of chymotrypsin, a pancreatic serine protease, onto an alginate-gum guar matrix cross-linked with epichlorohydrin has been performed using a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of various experimental parameters such as pH, salt presence, contact time and temperature were investigated. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data which shows that the adsorption of the enzyme followed the pseudo-second-order rate expression. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Hill adsorption isotherm models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms, and the isotherm constants were determined. It was found that Hill model was more suitable for our data because the isotherm data showed a sigmoidal behavior with the free enzyme concentration increasing in equilibrium. At 8°C and at pH 5.0, 1g hydrate matrix adsorbed about 7mg of chymotrypsin. In the desorption process 80% of the biological activity of chymotrypsin was recovered under the condition of 50mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.00-500mM NaCl. When successive cycles of adsorption/washing/desorption were performed, it was observed that the matrix remained functional until the fourth cycle of repeated batch enzyme adsorption. These results are important in terms of diminishing of cost and waste generation. PMID:26849187

  20. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solution onto untreated coffee grounds: equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Azouaou, N; Sadaoui, Z; Djaafri, A; Mokaddem, H

    2010-12-15

    Adsorption can be used as a cost effective and efficient technique for the removal of toxic heavy metals from wastewater. Waste materials with no further treatment such as coffee grounds from cafeterias may act as adsorbents for the removal of cadmium. Batch kinetic and equilibrium experiments were conducted to study the effects of contact time, adsorbent dose, initial pH, particle size, initial concentration of cadmium and temperature. Three adsorption isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich were used to analyse the equilibrium data. The Langmuir isotherm which provided the best correlation for Cd(2+) adsorption onto coffee grounds, shows that the adsorption was favourable and the adsorption capacity found was equal to 15.65 mg g(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and the adsorption was exothermic. The equilibrium was achieved less than 120 min. The adsorption kinetic data was fitted with first and second order kinetic models. Finally it was concluded that the cadmium adsorption kinetic onto coffee grounds was well fitted by second order kinetic model rather than first order model. The results suggest that coffee grounds have high possibility to be used as effective and economical adsorbent for Cd(2+) removal. PMID:20817346

  1. Kinetics and isotherms of Neutral Red adsorption on peanut husk.

    PubMed

    Han, Runping; Han, Pan; Cai, Zhaohui; Zhao, Zhenhui; Tang, Mingsheng

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption of Neutral Red (NR) onto peanut husk in aqueous solutions was investigated at 295 K. Experiments were carried out as function of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, and initial concentration. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich, and Toth isotherm models. The results indicated that the Toth and Langmuir models provided the best correlation of the experimental data. The adsorption capacity of peanut husk for the removal of NR was determined with the Langmuir and found to be 37.5 mg/g at 295 K. The adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic equations. It was seen that the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic equations could describe the adsorption kinetics. The intraparticle diffusion model was also used to express the adsorption process at the two-step stage. It was implied that peanut husk may be suitable as adsorbent material for adsorption of NR from aqueous solutions. PMID:19143308

  2. Equilibrium and kinetic data and process design for adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Emrah; Ozacar, Mahmut; Sengil, I Ayhan

    2008-06-15

    The adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite in a batch adsorber has been studied. Four kinetic models, the pseudo first- and second-order equations, the Elovich equation and the intraparticle diffusion equation, were selected to follow the adsorption process. Kinetic parameters; rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and correlation coefficients, for each kinetic equation were calculated and discussed. It was shown that the adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite could be described by the pseudo second-order equation. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin equations. Adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite followed the Langmuir isotherm. A single stage batch adsorber was designed for different adsorbent mass/treated effluent volume ratios using the Langmuir isotherm. PMID:18055111

  3. Exploring the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and the kinetics of protein adsorption: an in situ high-energy X-ray reflectivity study.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Shokuie, Kaveh; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Czeslik, Claus; Tolan, Metin

    2008-09-16

    The high energy X-ray reflectivity technique has been applied to study the interfacial structure of protein adsorbates and protein adsorption kinetics in situ. For this purpose, the adsorption of lysozyme at the hydrophilic silica-water interface has been chosen as a model system. The structure of adsorbed lysozyme layers was probed for various aqueous solution conditions. The effect of solution pH and lysozyme concentration on the interfacial structure was measured. Monolayer formation was observed for all cases except for the highest concentration. The adsorbed protein layers consist of adsorbed lysozyme molecules with side-on or end-on orientation. By means of time-dependent X-ray reflectivity scans, the time-evolution of adsorbed proteins was monitored as well. The results of this study demonstrate the capabilities of in situ X-ray reflectivity experiments on protein adsorbates. The great advantages of this method are the broad wave vector range available and the high time resolution. PMID:18715021

  4. Adsorption kinetics of benzotriazole and its derivatives by nano Zn-Al-O.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingbing; Qi, Fei; Wu, Fengchang; Xu, Qiujin; Chen, Zhonglin

    2014-09-01

    Benzotriazole and its derivatives are important industrial auxiliaries, which are serious pollution sources in the natural aquatic environment. Benzotriazole and its derivatives adsorption by a novel nano absorbent (nano Zn-Al-O binary metal oxide, named as ZAO) being explored as an effective water treatment method, was carried out in this study. Results showed that benzotriazole and its derivatives were all effectively adsorbed from water by ZAO. Removal efficiencies of benzotriazole, 5-methyl-benzotriazol and 5,6-dimethyl-benzotriazole with 5 g/L adsorbent dosage achieved 89%, 81% and 92%, respectively. The adsorption kinetics and isotherm models were used to express the adsorption process and discuss the adsorption mechanism. The adsorption kinetics well followed pseudo-second-order model, indicating that chemical adsorption dominated the adsorption. Adsorption isotherm was well expressed by Freundlich model. Structure characteristics of benzotriazole and its derivatives had great effect on their adsorption. Hydrogen-bond interaction was considered as the main mechanism for the surface adsorption. However, hydrophobic interactions played an important role in 5,6-dimethyl-benzotriazole adsorption due to its weak polarity. PMID:25924402

  5. Adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics of acid Bordeaux B from aqueous solution by graphene oxide/PAMAMs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; He, Shengfu; Zhang, Chen; Peng, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide/polyamidoamines dendrimers (GO/PAMAMs) composites were synthesized via modifying GO with 2.0 G PAMAM. The adsorption behavior of the GO/PAMAMs for acid Bordeaux B (ABB) was studied and the effects of media pH, adsorption time and initial ABB concentration on adsorption capacity of the adsorbent were investigated. The optimum pH value of the adsorption of ABB onto GO/PAMAMs was 2.5. The maximum adsorption capacity increased from 325.78 to 520.83 mg/g with the increase in temperature from 298 to 328 K. The equilibrium data followed the Langmuir isotherm model better than the Freundlich model. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of ABB onto GO/PAMAMs fit the pseudo-second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process was physisorption, and also an endothermic and spontaneous process. PMID:26398038

  6. Adsorption Isotherms and Surface Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, L. S.; Bernardo, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Explains an error that occurs in calculating the conditions for a maximum value of a rate expression for a bimolecular reaction. The rate expression is derived using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to relate gas pressures and corresponding surface coverages. (GS)

  7. pH-responsive diblock copolymer micelles at the silica/aqueous solution interface: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Smith, Emelyn G; Webber, Grant B; Schatz, Christophe; Wanless, Erica J; Bütün, Vural; Armes, Steven P; Biggs, Simon

    2006-08-01

    The adsorption behavior of two examples of a weakly basic diblock copolymer, poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMA-PDEA), at the silica/aqueous solution interface has been investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and an optical reflectometer. Dynamic and static light scattering measurements have also been carried out to assess aqueous solution properties of such pH-responsive copolymers. In alkaline solution, core-shell micelles are formed above the critical micelle concentration (cmc) by both copolymers, whereas the chains are molecularly dissolved (as unimers) at all concentrations in acidic solution. As a result, the adsorption behavior of PDMA-PDEA diblock copolymers on silica is strongly dependent on both the copolymer concentration and the solution pH. Below the cmc at pH 9, the cationic PDMA-PDEA copolymers adsorb as unimers and the conformation of the adsorbed polymer is essentially flat. At concentrations just above the cmc, the initial adsorption of copolymer onto the silica is dominated by the unimers due to their faster diffusion compared to the much larger micelles. Rearrangement of the adsorbed unimers and/or their subsequent displacement by micelles from solution is then observed during an equilibration period, and the final adsorbed mass is greater than that observed below the cmc. At concentrations well above the cmc, the much higher proportion of micelles in solution facilitates more effective competition for the surface at all stages of the adsorption process and no replacement of initially adsorbed unimers by micelles is evident. However, the adsorbed layer undergoes gradual rearrangement after initial adsorption. This relaxation is believed to result from a combination of further copolymer adsorption and swelling of the adsorbed layer. PMID:16869582

  8. Highly efficient ultrasonic-assisted removal of Hg(II) ions on graphene oxide modified with 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone: Adsorption isotherms and kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Tadjarodi, Azadeh; Moazen Ferdowsi, Somayeh; Zare-Dorabei, Rouholah; Barzin, Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    A novel adsorbent, based on modifying graphene oxide (GO) chemically with 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (2-PTSC) as ligand, was designed by facile process for removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solution. Characterization of the adsorbent was performed using various techniques, such as FT-IR, XRD, XPS, SEM and AFM analysis. The adsorption capacity was affected by variables such as adsorbent dosage, pH solution, Hg(2+) initial concentration and sonicating time. These variables were optimized by rotatable central composite design (CCD) under response surface methodology (RSM). The predictive model for Hg(II) adsorption was constructed and applied to find the best conditions at which the responses were maximized. In this conditions, the adsorption capacity of this adsorbent for Hg(2+) ions was calculated to be 309mgg(-1) that was higher than that of GO. Appling the ultrasound power combined with adsorption method was very efficient in shortening the removal time of Hg(2+) ions by enhancing the dispersion of adsorbent and metal ions in solution and effective interactions among them. The adsorption process was well described by second-order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm model in which the maximum adsorption capacity (Qm) was found to be 555mgg(-1) for adsorption of Hg(2+) ions over the obtained adsorbent. The performance of adsorbent was examined on the real wastewaters and confirmed the applicability of adsorbent for practical applications. PMID:27245963

  9. Combining an Optical Resonance Biosensor with Enzyme Activity Kinetics to Understand Protein Adsorption and Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kerry A.; Finch, Craig A.; Anderson, Phillip; Vollmer, Frank; Hickman, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding protein adsorption and resultant conformation changes on modified and unmodified silicon dioxide surfaces is a subject of keen interest in biosensors, microfluidic systems and for medical diagnostics. However, it has been proven difficult to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption process on these surfaces as well as understand the topic of the denaturation of proteins and its effect on enzyme activity. A highly sensitive optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator was used to study a catalytic enzyme’s adsorption processes on different silane modified glass substrates (plain glass control, DETA, 13F, and SiPEG). The WGM sensor was able to obtain high resolution kinetic data of glucose oxidase (GO) adsorption with sensitivity of adsorption better than that possible with SPR. The kinetic data, in combination with a functional assay of the enzyme activity, was used to test hypotheses on adsorption mechanisms. By fitting numerical models to the WGM sensograms for protein adsorption, and by confirming numerical predictions of enzyme activity in a separate assay, we were able to identify mechanisms for GO adsorption on different alkylsilanes and infer information about the adsorption of protein on nanostructured surfaces. PMID:25453976

  10. Adsorption-desorption kinetics of soft particles onto surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberg, Brendan; Gerland, Ulrich

    A broad range of physical, chemical, and biological systems feature processes in which particles randomly adsorb on a substrate. Theoretical models usually assume ``hard'' (mutually impenetrable) particles, but in soft matter physics the adsorbing particles can be effectively compressible, implying ``soft'' interaction potentials. We recently studied the kinetics of such soft particles adsorbing onto one-dimensional substrates, identifying three novel phenomena: (i) a gradual density increase, or ''cramming'', replaces the usual jamming behavior of hard particles, (ii) a density overshoot, can occur (only for soft particles) on a time scale set by the desorption rate, and (iii) relaxation rates of soft particles increase with particle size (on a lattice), while hard particles show the opposite trend. The latter occurs since unjamming requires desorption and many-bodied reorganization to equilibrate -a process that is generally very slow. Here we extend this analysis to a two-dimensional substrate, focusing on the question of whether the adsorption-desorption kinetics of particles in two dimensions is similarly enriched by the introduction of soft interactions. Application to experiments, for example the adsorption of fibrinogen on two-dimensional surfaces, will be discussed.

  11. Kinetic model of water vapour adsorption by gluten-free starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocieczek, Aneta; Kostek, Robert; Ruszkowska, Millena

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the kinetics of water vapour adsorption on the surface of starch molecules derived from wheat. The aim of the study was to determine an equation that would allow estimation of water content in tested material in any timepoint of the adsorption process aimed at settling a balance with the environment. An adsorption isotherm of water vapour on starch granules was drawn. The parameters of the Guggenheim, Anderson, and De Boer equation were determined by characterizing the tested product and adsorption process. The equation of kinetics of water vapour adsorption on the surface of starch was determined based on the Guggenheim, Anderson, and De Boer model describing the state of equilibrium and on the model of a first-order linear inert element describing the changes in water content over time.

  12. Metal adsorption by agricultural biosorbents: Adsorption isotherm, kinetic and biosorbents chemical structures.

    PubMed

    Sadeek, Sadeek A; Negm, Nabel A; Hefni, Hassan H H; Wahab, Mostafa M Abdel

    2015-11-01

    Biosorption of Cu(II), Co(II) and Fe(III) ions from aqueous solutions by rice husk, palm leaf and water hyacinth was investigated as a function of initial pH, initial heavy metal ions concentration and treatment time. The adsorption process was examined by two adsorption isotherms: Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The experimental data of biosorption process were analyzed using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order kinetic models. The equilibrium biosorption isotherms showed that the three studied biosorbents possess high affinity and sorption capacity for Cu(II), Co(II) and Fe(III) ions. Rice husk showed more efficiency than palm leaf and water hyacinth. Adsorption of Cu(II) and Co(II) was more efficient in alkaline medium (pH 9) than neutral medium due to the high solubility of metal ion complexes. The metal removal efficiency of each biosorbent was correlated to its chemical structure. DTA studies showed formation of metal complex between the biosorbents and the metal ions. The obtained results showed that the tested biosorbents are efficient and alternate low-cost biosorbent for removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous media. PMID:26282929

  13. Isotherm and kinetics study of malachite green adsorption onto copper nanowires loaded on activated carbon: artificial neural network modeling and genetic algorithm optimization.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Shojaeipour, E; Ghaedi, A M; Sahraei, Reza

    2015-05-01

    In this study, copper nanowires loaded on activated carbon (Cu-NWs-AC) was used as novel efficient adsorbent for the removal of malachite green (MG) from aqueous solution. This new material was synthesized through simple protocol and its surface properties such as surface area, pore volume and functional groups were characterized with different techniques such XRD, BET and FESEM analysis. The relation between removal percentages with variables such as solution pH, adsorbent dosage (0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02 and 0.1g), contact time (1-40min) and initial MG concentration (5, 10, 20, 70 and 100mg/L) was investigated and optimized. A three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was utilized to predict the malachite green dye removal (%) by Cu-NWs-AC following conduction of 248 experiments. When the training of the ANN was performed, the parameters of ANN model were as follows: linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer, Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), and a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) at the hidden layer with 11 neurons. The minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.0017 and coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.9658 were found for prediction and modeling of dye removal using testing data set. A good agreement between experimental data and predicted data using the ANN model was obtained. Fitting the experimental data on previously optimized condition confirm the suitability of Langmuir isotherm models for their explanation with maximum adsorption capacity of 434.8mg/g at 25°C. Kinetic studies at various adsorbent mass and initial MG concentration show that the MG maximum removal percentage was achieved within 20min. The adsorption of MG follows the pseudo-second-order with a combination of intraparticle diffusion model. PMID:25699703

  14. Isotherm and kinetics study of malachite green adsorption onto copper nanowires loaded on activated carbon: Artificial neural network modeling and genetic algorithm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Shojaeipour, E.; Ghaedi, A. M.; Sahraei, Reza

    2015-05-01

    In this study, copper nanowires loaded on activated carbon (Cu-NWs-AC) was used as novel efficient adsorbent for the removal of malachite green (MG) from aqueous solution. This new material was synthesized through simple protocol and its surface properties such as surface area, pore volume and functional groups were characterized with different techniques such XRD, BET and FESEM analysis. The relation between removal percentages with variables such as solution pH, adsorbent dosage (0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02 and 0.1 g), contact time (1-40 min) and initial MG concentration (5, 10, 20, 70 and 100 mg/L) was investigated and optimized. A three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was utilized to predict the malachite green dye removal (%) by Cu-NWs-AC following conduction of 248 experiments. When the training of the ANN was performed, the parameters of ANN model were as follows: linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer, Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), and a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) at the hidden layer with 11 neurons. The minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.0017 and coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.9658 were found for prediction and modeling of dye removal using testing data set. A good agreement between experimental data and predicted data using the ANN model was obtained. Fitting the experimental data on previously optimized condition confirm the suitability of Langmuir isotherm models for their explanation with maximum adsorption capacity of 434.8 mg/g at 25 °C. Kinetic studies at various adsorbent mass and initial MG concentration show that the MG maximum removal percentage was achieved within 20 min. The adsorption of MG follows the pseudo-second-order with a combination of intraparticle diffusion model.

  15. Atomistic simulations of surfactant adsorption kinetics at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrenova, Eugeniya; Patnaik, Soumya

    2014-03-01

    Heat transfer control and enhancement is an important and challenging problem in a variety of industrial and technological applications including aircraft thermal management. The role of additives in nucleate boiling and phase change in general has long been recognized and studied experimentally and modeled theoretically but in-depth description and atomistic understanding of the multiscale processes involved are still needed for better prediction and control of the heat transfer efficiency. Surfactant additives have been experimentally observed to either enhance or inhibit the boiling heat transfer depending on the surfactant concentration and chemistry and, on a molecular level, their addition leads to dynamic surface tension and changes in interfacial and transfer properties, thus contributing to the complexity of the problem. We present our atomistic modeling study of the interfacial adsorption kinetics of aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) systems at a range of concentrations at room and boiling temperatures. Classical molecular dynamics and Umbrella Sampling simulations were used to study the surfactant transport properties and estimate the adsorption and desorption rates at liquid-vacuum and liquid-solid interfaces. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from AFOSR Thermal Science Program and the Air Force Research Laboratory DoD Supercomputing Resource Center for computing time and resources.

  16. Adsorption kinetic character of copper ions onto a modified chitosan transparent thin membrane from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zihong; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Han, Mei; Ma, Wei

    2010-10-15

    A modified chitosan transparent thin membrane (MCTTM) was prepared and used as the adsorbent to investigate the adsorption kinetics due to excellent capacity of removing copper ions in water solution. The structure and morphology of MCTTM were characterized by SEM analysis and FTIR analysis. External mass transfer, intra particle diffusion, and pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models were used to describe the adsorption process. The results obtained from the study illustrated that the adsorption process could be described by the pseudo-second order model, which indicated adsorption process was a chemical adsorption behavior of chelation ion exchange proved by the FTIR and adsorption free energy analysis. External mass transfer and intra particle diffusion processes were the rate-controlling steps. PMID:20634000

  17. Influence of particle/solid surface zeta potential on particle adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Savaji, Kunal V; Niitsoo, Olivia; Couzis, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we attempt to understand monolayer formation of spherical particles on a solid surface immersed in a suspension and driven by electrostatic interaction force. The study focuses on the theoretical aspects of the particle adsorption and modeling work based on the random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach is done in order to describe the particle adsorption kinetics and the saturation coverage. The theoretical model is then compared with experimental data obtained under conditions similar to those of the modeling work. Studying the adsorption of polystyrene particles on a silicon wafer in an aqueous system was employed to experimentally validate the theoretical framework. It has been shown both theoretically and experimentally that the particle and solid surface zeta potential values do influence the adsorption kinetics but the effect is too negligible to be of any use in accelerating the kinetics. We have shown that the electrostatically driven particle adsorption is a transport limited process and the rate of transport is not a major function of the zeta potential values of the particle and the solid surface. The faster kinetics seen when the ionic concentration of the suspension is increased is because of the blocking effects and not due to faster approach of particles towards the solid surface. Finally, we have made an important addition to the existing models by incorporating the variation in the flux as a function of particle/solid surface zeta potentials, surface coverage and the randomized position of incidence of an incoming particle on the solid surface. PMID:24996026

  18. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  19. Thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors of trinitrotoluene adsorption on powdered activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.W.; Hwang, K.J.; Shim, W.G.; Moon, I.S.

    2006-07-01

    Regulations on the removal of trinitrotoluene (TNT) from wastewater have become increasingly more stringent, demanding faster, less expensive, and more efficient treatment. This study focuses on the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of TNT on powered activated carbons (PAC). Three types of PACs (i.e., wood based, coal based, and coconut-shell based) were studied as functions of temperature and pH. Thermodynamic properties including Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy, were evaluated by applying the Van't Hoff equation. In addition, the adsorption energy distribution functions which describe heterogeneous characteristics of porous solid sorbents were calculated by using the generalized nonlinear regularization method. Adsorption kinetic studies were carried out in batch adsorber under important conditions such as PAC types, temperature, pH, and concentration. We found that fast and efficient removal of TNT dissolved in water can be successfully achieved by PAC adsorption.

  20. The effects of surface chemistry of mesoporous silica materials and solution pH on kinetics of molsidomine adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinina, E.S.; Parfenyuk, E.V.

    2014-01-15

    Adsorption kinetics of molsidomine on mesoporous silica material (UMS), the phenyl- (PhMS) and mercaptopropyl-functionalized (MMS) derivatives from solution with different pH and 298 K was studied. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model for all studied silica materials and pH. Effects of surface functional groups and pH on adsorption efficiency and kinetic adsorption parameters were investigated. At all studied pH, the highest molsidomine amount is adsorbed on PhMS due to π–π interactions and hydrogen bonding between surface groups of PhMS and molsidomine molecules. An increase of pH results in a decrease of the amounts of adsorbed molsidomine onto the silica materials. Furthermore, the highest adsorption rate kinetically evaluated using a pseudo-second-order model, is observed onto UMS and it strongly depends on pH. The mechanism of the adsorption process was determined from the intraparticle diffusion and Boyd kinetic film–diffusion models. The results showed that the molsidomine adsorption on the silica materials is controlled by film diffusion. Effect of pH on the diffusion parameters is discussed. - Graphical abstract: The kinetic study showed that the k{sub 2} value, the rate constant of pseudo-second order kinetic model, is the highest for molsidomine adsorption on UMS and strongly depends on pH because it is determined by availability and accessibility of the reaction sites of the adsorbents molsidomine binding. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The adsorption capacities of UMS, PhMS and MMS were dependent on the pH. • At all studied pH, the highest molsidomine amount is adsorbed on PhMS. • The highest adsorption rate, k{sub 2}, is observed onto UMS and strongly depends on pH. • Film diffusion was the likely rate-limiting step in the adsorption process.

  1. Adsorption behaviour of direct yellow 50 onto cotton fiber: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic profile.

    PubMed

    Ismail, L F M; Sallam, H B; Abo Farha, S A; Gamal, A M; Mahmoud, G E A

    2014-10-15

    This study investigated the adsorption of direct yellow 50 onto cotton fiber from aqueous solution by using parameters, such as pH, temperature, contact time, initial dye concentration and the effect of sodium sulphate, tetrasodium edate and trisodium citrate. The extent of dye adsorption increased with increasing contact time, temperature and solution concentration. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. It was found that the Langmuir equation fit better than the Freundlich equation. The results show that the presence of SE and SC significantly enhance the dye adsorption onto cotton fiber. In addition, the adsorption data obtained at different temperatures of DY50 onto cotton fiber were applied to pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order and intraparticle diffusion models. The rates of adsorption were found to conform to pseudo second-order kinetics with good correlation. Also, free energy of adsorption (ΔG(#)), enthalpy (ΔH(#)), and entropy (ΔS(#)) changes were determined to predict the nature of adsorption. The positive value of the enthalpy change indicated that the adsorption is endothermic process. The activation energy, Ea, is ranged between 1.9 and 3.9kJmol(-1) indicated that the adsorption process is a physisorption. This low value of Ea generally indicates diffusion controlled process. PMID:24882703

  2. Polar modified post-cross-linked resin and its adsorption toward salicylic acid from aqueous solution: Equilibrium, kinetics and breakthrough studies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhenyu; He, Chunlian; Huang, Jianhan; Liu, You-Nian

    2015-08-01

    A novel polar modified post-cross-linked resin PDMPA was synthesized, characterized and evaluated for adsorption of salicylic acid from aqueous solution. PDMPA was prepared by a suspension polymerization of methyl acrylate (MA) and divinylbenzene (DVB), a Friedel-Crafts reaction and an amination reaction. After characterization of the chemical and pore structure of PDMPA, the adsorption behaviors of salicylic acid on PDMPA were determined in comparison with the precursor resins. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of salicylic acid on PDMPA was much larger than the precursor resins and the equilibrium data were correlated by both of the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The pseudo-second-order rate equation fitted the kinetic data better than the pseudo-first-order rate equation, and the micropore diffusion model could characterize the kinetic data very well. The dynamic experimental results showed that the breakthrough point and saturated point of salicylic acid on PDMPA were 40.3 and 92.4BV (1BV=10mL) at a feed concentration of 995.8mg/L and a flow rate of 1.4mL/min, and the resin column could be regenerated by 16.0BV of a mixture desorption solvent containing 0.01mol/L of NaOH (w/v) and 50% of ethanol (v/v). PMID:25863446

  3. Long-term adsorption kinetics of asphaltenes at the oil-water interface: a random sequential adsorption perspective.

    PubMed

    Pauchard, Vincent; Rane, Jayant P; Zarkar, Sharli; Couzis, Alexander; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2014-07-22

    Previous studies indicated that asphaltenes adsorbed as monomers on oil-water interfaces and the early stage kinetics of the process was controlled by diffusion and hence dependent on oil viscosity. By measuring interfacial tension (IFT) as a function of surface coverage during droplet expansions in pendant drop experiments, it was also concluded that the IFT data could be interpreted with a Langmuir equation of state (EoS), which was independent of oil viscosity, time of adsorption, and bulk asphaltenes concentration. The surface excess coverage was calculated to be ∼0.3 nm(2)/molecule, which suggested adsorption in face-on configuration of asphaltenes monomers at the interface and average PAH core per molecule of about 6 for the asphaltenes investigated, consistent with the Yen-Mullins model. The current study focuses on the kinetics of asphaltenes adsorption at longer times and higher interfacial coverage. Long-term IFT data have been measured by the pendant drop method for different asphaltenes concentrations and for different bulk viscosities of the oil phase (0.5-28 cP). The data indicate that when coverage reaches 35-40%, the adsorption rates slow down considerably compared to the diffusion-controlled rates at the very early stages. The surface pressure increase rate (or IFT decrease rate) at these higher coverages is now independent of oil viscosity but dependent upon both surface pressure itself and asphaltene monomer concentration. The long-term asymptotic behavior of surface coverage is found to be consistent with the predictions from surface diffusion-mediated random sequential adsorption (RSA) theory which indicates a linear dependency of surface coverage on 1/√t and an asymptotic limit very close to 2D random close packing of polydispersed disks (85%). From these observations RSA theory parameters were extracted that enabled description of adsorption kinetics for the range of conditions above surface coverage of 35%. PMID:24946262

  4. UV-induced photocatalytic degradation of aqueous acetaminophen: the role of adsorption and reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Basha, Shaik; Keane, David; Nolan, Kieran; Oelgemöller, Michael; Lawler, Jenny; Tobin, John M; Morrissey, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructured titania supported on activated carbon (AC), termed as integrated photocatalytic adsorbents (IPCAs), were prepared by ultrasonication and investigated for the photocatalytic degradation of acetaminophen (AMP), a common analgesic and antipyretic drug. The IPCAs showed high affinity towards AMP (in dark adsorption studies), with the amount adsorbed proportional to the TiO2 content; the highest adsorption was at 10 wt% TiO2. Equilibrium isotherm studies showed that the adsorption followed the Langmuir model, indicating the dependence of the reaction on an initial adsorption step, with maximum adsorption capacity of 28.4 mg/g for 10 % TiO2 IPCA. The effects of initial pH, catalyst amount and initial AMP concentration on the photocatalytic degradation rates were studied. Generally, the AMP photodegradation activity of the IPCAs was better than that of bare TiO2. Kinetic studies on the photocatalytic degradation of AMP under UV suggest that the degradation followed Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) kinetics, with an adsorption rate constant (K) that was considerably higher than the photocatalytic rate constant (k r), indicating that the photocatalysis of AMP is the rate-determining step during the adsorption/photocatalysis process. PMID:25173973

  5. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying; Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment.

  6. Experimental and theoretical study of the adsorption behavior and mass transfer kinetics of propranolol enantiomers on cellulase protein as the selector

    SciTech Connect

    Fornstedt, T.; Zhong, G.; Bensetiti, Z.; Guiochon, G. |

    1996-07-15

    The thermodynamics and mass transfer kinetics of the retention of the R and S enantiomers of propranolol were investigated on a system comprising an acetic acid buffer solution as mobile phase and the protein cellobiohydrolase I immobilized on silica as the stationary phase. The bi-Langmuir isotherm model fitted best to each set of single-component isotherm data. The monolayer capacity of the nonchiral type of adsorption sites was 22.9 mM. For the chiral type of sites, it was 0.24 mM for the R enantiomer and 0.64 nM for the S enantiomer. Peak tailing was observed, even at very low concentrations allowing operation of the low-capacity chiral sites under linear conditions. This tailing can be explained on the basis of heterogeneous mass transfer kinetics. At higher concentrations, which are often used in analytical applications, the isotherms on the chiral sites no longer have a linear behavior, and peak tailing is consequently more pronounced. Under those conditions, peak tailing originates from the combined effect of heterogeneous thermodynamics and heterogeneous mass transfer kinetics. These complex phenomena are explained and modeled using the transport-dispersive model with a solid film linear driving force model modified to account for heterogeneous mass transfer kinetics. The rate coefficient of the mass transfer kinetics was found to be concentration dependent. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Diffusion barriers in the kinetics of water vapor adsorption/desorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.W.; Foley, N.J.; Thomas, K.M.; Norman, P.R.; Francis, D.C.

    1998-07-07

    The adsorption of water vapor on a highly microporous coconut-shell-derived carbon and a mesoporous wood-derived carbon was studied. These carbons were chosen as they had markedly different porous structures. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of water vapor on the activated carbons were investigated over the relative pressure range p/p{degree} = 0--0.9 for temperatures in the range 285--313 K in a static water vapor system. The adsorption isotherms were analyzed using the Dubinin-Serpinski equation, and this provided an assessment of the polarity of the carbons. The kinetics of water vapor adsorption and desorption were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed water for set changes in pressure relative to the saturated vapor pressure (p/p{degree}). The adsorption kinetics for each relative pressure step were compared and used to calculate the activation energies for the vapor pressure increments. The kinetic results are discussed in relation to their relative position on the equilibrium isotherm and the adsorption mechanism of water vapor on activated carbons.

  8. Adsorption and dissociation kinetics of alkanes on CaO(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakradhar, A.; Liu, Y.; Schmidt, J.; Kadossov, E.; Burghaus, U.

    2011-08-01

    The adsorption kinetics of ethane, butane, pentane, and hexane on CaO(100) have been studied by multi-mass thermal desorption (TDS) spectroscopy. The sample cleanliness was checked by Auger electron spectroscopy. A molecular and dissociative adsorption pathway was evident for the alkanes, except for ethane, which does not undergo bond activation. Two TDS peaks appeared when recording the parent mass, which are assigned to different adsorption sites/configurations of the molecularly adsorbed alkanes. Bond activation leads to desorption of hydrogen and several alkane fragments assigned to methane and ethylene formation. Only one TDS feature is seen in this case. Formation of carbon residuals was absent.

  9. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reserpine Adsorption onto Strong Acidic Cationic Exchange Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhanjing; Liu, Xiongmin; Huang, Hongmiao

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption process of reserpine adsorbed onto the strong acidic cationic exchange fiber (SACEF) were studied by batch adsorption experiments. The adsorption capacity strongly depended on pH values, and the optimum reserpine adsorption onto the SACEF occurred at pH = 5 of reserpine solution. With the increase of temperature and initial concentration, the adsorption capacity increased. The equilibrium was attained within 20 mins. The adsorption process could be better described by the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm model. The calculated activation energy Ea was 4.35 kJ/mol. And the thermodynamic parameters were: 4.97<ΔH<7.44 kJ/mol, -15.29<ΔG<-11.87 kJ/mol and 41.97<ΔS<47.35 J/mol·K. The thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption was an endothermic, spontaneous and feasible process of physisorption within the temperature range between 283 K and 323 K and the initial concentration range between 100 mg/L and 300 mg/L. All the results showed that the SACEF had a good adsorption performance for the adsorption of reserpine from alcoholic solution. PMID:26422265

  10. Kinetics of Protein Adsorption at liquid/solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellion, Markus; Santen, Ludger; Nagel, Armin; Mantz, Hubert; Quinn, Anthony; Jacobs, Karin

    2006-03-01

    Protein adsorption processes are of crucial importance in many biomedical processes. From a physical point of view these processes raise a number of challenging questions, e.g.: How does the surface influence the conformation of proteins at the surface? What are the characteristics of the protein film at the liquid/solid interface? In this work we investigate the adsorption kinetics of salivary proteins on different kinds of surfaces in a liquid environment. The adsorbed protein layers are analyzed by means of ellipsometry, plasmon resonance, and SPM. It turns out that the adsorbed amount of proteins is sensitive to the long ranged interactions of the solid surface. The experimental data are compared to extensive Monte Carlo simulation of a colloidal protein model. The Monte Carlo results strongly suggest that induced conformal changes lead to the experimentally observed three step kinetics of amylase.

  11. Reversible Adsorption Kinetics of Near Surface Dimer Colloids.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Paul F; Hudson, Steven D

    2016-08-30

    We investigate the effect of shape on reversible adsorption kinetics using colloidal polystyrene dimers near a solid glass surface as a model system. The interaction between colloid and wall is tuned using electrostatic, depletion, and gravity forces to produce a double-well potential. The dwell time in each of the potential wells is measured from long duration particle trajectories. The height of each monomer relative to the glass surface is measured to a resolution of <20 nm by in-line holographic microscopy. The measured transition probability distributions are used in kinetic equations to describe the flux of particles to and from the surface. The dimers are compared to independent isolated monomers to determine the effects of shape on adsorption equilibria and kinetics. To elucidate these differences, we consider both mass and surface coverage and two definitions of surface coverage. The results show that dimers with single coverage produce slower adsorption, lower surface coverage, and higher mass coverage in comparison to those of monomers, while dimers with double coverage adsorb faster and result in higher surface coverage. PMID:27483023

  12. KINETIC STUDY OF ADSORPTION AND TRANSFORMATION OF MERCURY ON FLY ASH PARTICLES IN AN ENTRAINED FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experimental studies were performed to investigate the interactions of elemental mercury vapor with entrained fly ash particles from coal combustion in a flow reactor. The rate of transformation of elemental mercury on fly ash particles was evauated over the temperature range fro...

  13. Optimization, isotherm, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Pb(II) ions adsorption onto N-maleated chitosan-immobilized TiO₂ nanoparticles from aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Medhat A; Yakout, Amr A

    2016-02-01

    Chitosan, CS was chemically engineered by maleic anhydride via simple protocol to produce N-maleated chitosan, MCS which immobilized on anatase TiO2 to synthesize novel eco-friendly nanosorbent (51±3.8 nm), MCS@TiO2 for cost-effective and efficient removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous media. The chemical structure, surface properties and morphology of MCS@TiO2 were recognized by FTIR, (1)H NMR, XRD, TEM, DLS and zeta-potential techniques. The relations between %removal of Pb(II) and different analytical parameters such as solution acidity (pH), MCS@TiO2 dosage, time of contact and initial Pb(II) concentration were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design (BBD) statistical procedures. The fitting of the experimental data to four different isotherm models at optimized conditions was carried out by various statistical treatments including the correlation coefficient (r), coefficient of determination (r(2)) and non-linear Chi-square (χ(2)) test analyses which all confirm the suitability of Langmuir model to explain the adsorption isotherm data. Also, statistics predicted that the pseudo-second-order model is the optimum kinetic model among four applied kinetic models to closely describe the rate equation of the adsorption process. Thermodynamics viewed the adsorption as endothermic and feasible physical process. EDTA could release the sorbed Pb(II) ions from MCS@TiO2 with a recovery above 92% after three sorption-desorption cycles. The novel synthesized nanosorbent is evidenced to be an excellent solid phase extractor for Pb(II) ions from wastewaters. PMID:26520475

  14. Optimization, isotherm, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Pb(II) ions adsorption onto N-maleated chitosan-immobilized TiO2 nanoparticles from aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Medhat A.; Yakout, Amr A.

    2016-02-01

    Chitosan, CS was chemically engineered by maleic anhydride via simple protocol to produce N-maleated chitosan, MCS which immobilized on anatase TiO2 to synthesize novel eco-friendly nanosorbent (51 ± 3.8 nm), MCS@TiO2 for cost-effective and efficient removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous media. The chemical structure, surface properties and morphology of MCS@TiO2 were recognized by FTIR, 1H NMR, XRD, TEM, DLS and zeta-potential techniques. The relations between %removal of Pb(II) and different analytical parameters such as solution acidity (pH), MCS@TiO2 dosage, time of contact and initial Pb(II) concentration were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design (BBD) statistical procedures. The fitting of the experimental data to four different isotherm models at optimized conditions was carried out by various statistical treatments including the correlation coefficient (r), coefficient of determination (r2) and non-linear Chi-square (χ2) test analyses which all confirm the suitability of Langmuir model to explain the adsorption isotherm data. Also, statistics predicted that the pseudo-second-order model is the optimum kinetic model among four applied kinetic models to closely describe the rate equation of the adsorption process. Thermodynamics viewed the adsorption as endothermic and feasible physical process. EDTA could release the sorbed Pb(II) ions from MCS@TiO2 with a recovery above 92% after three sorption-desorption cycles. The novel synthesized nanosorbent is evidenced to be an excellent solid phase extractor for Pb(II) ions from wastewaters.

  15. Adsorption studies of methylene blue dye on tunisian activated lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, A.; Hamdi, N.; Srasra, E.

    2011-02-01

    Activated carbon prepared from natural lignin, providing from a geological deposit, was used as the adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) dye from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to evaluate various experimental parameters like pH and contact time for the removal of this dye. Effective pH for MB removal was 11. Kinetic study showed that the adsorption of dye was gradual process. Quasi equilibrium reached in 4 h. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order were used to fit the experimental data. Pseudo-second-order rate equation was able to provide realistic description of adsorption kinetics. The experimental isotherms data were also modelled by the Langmuir and Freundlich equation of adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 147 mg/g. Activated lignin was shown to be a promising material for adsorption of MB from aqueous solutions.

  16. Effect of Humic Acid on As Redox Transformation and Kinetic Adsorption onto Iron Oxide Based Adsorbent (IBA)

    PubMed Central

    Fakour, Hoda; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2014-01-01

    Due to the importance of adsorption kinetics and redox transformation of arsenic (As) during the adsorption process, the present study elucidated natural organic matter (NOM) effects on As adsorption-desorption kinetics and speciation transformation. The experimental procedures were conducted by examining interactions of arsenate and arsenite with different concentrations of humic acid (HA) as a model representative of NOM, in the presence of iron oxide based adsorbent (IBA), as a model solid surface in three environmentally relevant conditions, including the simultaneous adsorption of both As and HA onto IBA, HA adsorption onto As-presorbed IBA, and As adsorption onto HA-presorbed IBA. Experimental adsorption-desorption data were all fitted by original and modified Lagergren pseudo-first and -second order adsorption kinetic models, respectively. Weber’s intraparticle diffusion was also used to gain insight into the mechanisms and rate controlling steps, which the results suggested that intraparticle diffusion of As species onto IBA is the main rate-controlling step. Different concentrations of HA mediated the redox transformation of As species, with a higher oxidation ability than reduction. The overall results indicated the significant effect of organic matter on the adsorption kinetics and redox transformation of As species, and consequently, the fate, transport and mobility of As in different environmentally relevant conditions. PMID:25325357

  17. Equilibrium and Kinetic Adsorption of Bacteria on Alluvial Sand and Surface Thermodynamic Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gang; Rockhold, Mark L.; Strevett, Keith A.

    2003-05-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of Escherichia coli HB 101, E. coli JM 109, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas sp. on alluvial sand from the Canadian River alluvium (Norman, OK) was investigated through column experiments. Equilibrium adsorption of these five bacterial strains followed the Freundlich expression and was a function of zero energy points, an indication of the zero energy buffer zone. Among the microorganisms studied, P. putida had the greatest equilibrium adsorption (162.4 x 108 cell/g sediment with a microbial injectate concentration of 108 cell/mL), followed by Pseudomonas sp. (127.9 x 108 cell/g sediment), E. coli HB 101 (62.8 x 108 cell/g sediment), E. coli JM 109 (58.4 x 108 cell/g sediment), and P. fluorescens (42.6 x 108 cell/g sediment). The first-order kinetic adsorption rate coefficient was an exponential function of the total interaction free energy between bacteria and sediment evaluated at the primary minimum, (PM). E. coli HB 101 had the greatest kinetic adsorption rate coefficient on the sediment (5.10 h-1), followed by E. coli JM 109 (4.52 h-1), P. fluorescens (2.12 h-1), P. putida (2.04 h-1), and Pseudomonas sp. (1.34 h-1).

  18. Colloidal particle adsorption at liquid interfaces: capillary driven dynamics and thermally activated kinetics.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Amir M; Wang, Anna; Manoharan, Vinothan N; Colosqui, Carlos E

    2016-08-14

    The adsorption of single colloidal microparticles (0.5-1 μm radius) at a water-oil interface has been recently studied experimentally using digital holographic microscopy [Kaz et al., Nat. Mater., 2012, 11, 138-142]. An initially fast adsorption dynamics driven by capillary forces is followed by an unexpectedly slow relaxation to equilibrium that is logarithmic in time and can span hours or days. The slow relaxation kinetics has been attributed to the presence of surface "defects" with nanoscale dimensions (1-5 nm) that induce multiple metastable configurations of the contact line perimeter. A kinetic model considering thermally activated transitions between such metastable configurations has been proposed [Colosqui et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2013, 111, 028302] to predict both the relaxation rate and the crossover point to the slow logarithmic regime. However, the adsorption dynamics observed experimentally before the crossover point has remained unstudied. In this work, we propose a Langevin model that is able to describe the entire adsorption process of single colloidal particles by considering metastable states produced by surface defects and thermal motion of the particle and liquid interface. Invoking the fluctuation dissipation theorem, we introduce a drag term that considers significant dissipative forces induced by thermal fluctuations of the liquid interface. Langevin dynamics simulations based on the proposed adsorption model yield close agreement with experimental observations for different microparticles, capturing the crossover from (fast) capillary driven dynamics to (slow) thermally activated kinetics. PMID:27373956

  19. Removal of mercury(II) ions in aqueous solution using the peel biomass of Pachira aquatica Aubl: kinetics and adsorption equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Santana, Andrea J; Dos Santos, Walter N L; Silva, Laiana O B; das Virgens, Cesário F

    2016-05-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic substance that is a health hazard to humans. This study aims to investigate powders obtained from the peel of the fruit of Pachira aquatica Aubl, in its in natura and/or acidified form, as an adsorbent for the removal of mercury ions in aqueous solution. The materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The infrared spectra showed bands corresponding to the axial deformation of carbonyls from carboxylic acids, the most important functional group responsible for fixing the metal species to the adsorbent material. The thermograms displayed mass losses related to the decomposition of three major components, i.e., hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin. The adsorption process was evaluated using cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV AFS) and cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS). Three isotherm models were employed. The adsorption isotherm model, Langmuir-Freundlich, best represented the adsorption process, and the maximum adsorption capacity was predicted to be 0.71 and 0.58 mg g(-1) at 25 °C in nature and acidified, respectively. Adsorption efficiencies were further tested on real aqueous wastewater samples, and removal of Hg(II) was recorded as 69.6 % for biomass acidified and 76.3 % for biomass in nature. Results obtained from sorption experiments on real aqueous wastewater samples revealed that recovery of the target metal ions was very satisfactory. The pseudo-second-order model showed the best correlation to the experimental data. The current findings showed that the investigated materials are potential adsorbents for mercury(II) ion removal in aqueous solution, with acidified P. aquatica Aubl being the most efficient adsorbent. PMID:27084802

  20. Kinetics and mechanism studies of p-nitroaniline adsorption on activated carbon fibers prepared from cotton stalk by NH4H2PO4 activation and subsequent gasification with steam.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunquan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng

    2010-06-15

    Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were prepared for the removal of p-nitroaniline (PNA) from cotton stalk by chemical activation with NH(4)H(2)PO(4) and subsequent physical activation with steam. Surface properties of the prepared ACFs were performed using nitrogen adsorption, FTIR spectroscopy and SEM. The influence of contact time, solution temperature and surface property on PNA adsorption onto the prepared ACFs was investigated by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. The kinetic rates at different temperatures were modeled by using the Lagergren-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Morris's intraparticle diffusion and Boyd's film-diffusion models, respectively. It was found that the maximum adsorption of PNA on the ACFs was more than 510 mg/L, and over 60% adsorption occurred in first 25 min. The effect of temperature on the adsorption was related to the contacting time and the micropore structure of the adsorbents. And the increase of micropore surface area favored the adsorption process. Kinetic rates fitted the pseudo-second-order model very well. The pore diffusion played an important role in the entire adsorption period, and intraparticle diffusion was the rate-limiting step in the beginning 20 min. The Freundlich model provided a better data fitting as compared with the Langmuir model. The surface micrograph of the ACF after adsorption showed a distinct roughness with oval patterns. The results revealed that the adsorption was in part with multimolecular layers of coverage. PMID:20202747

  1. A Kinetic Monte Carlo Study of Fullerene Adsorption within a Pc-PBBA Covalent Organic Framework and Implications for Electron Transport.

    PubMed

    Koo, Brian T; Berard, Philip G; Clancy, Paulette

    2015-03-10

    Two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (COFs), with their predictable assembly into ordered porous crystalline materials, tunable composition, and high charge carrier mobility, offer the possibility of creating ordered bulk heterojunction solar cells given a suitable electron-transporting material to fill the pores. The photoconductive (hole-transporting) properties of many COFs have been reported, including the recent creation of a TT-COF/PCBM solar cell by Dogru et al. Although a prototype device has been fabricated, its poor solar efficiency suggests a potential issue with electron transport caused by the interior packing of the fullerenes. Such packing information is absent and cannot be obtained experimentally. In this paper, we use Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations to understand the dominant pore-filling mechanisms and packing configurations of C60 molecules in a Pc-PBBA COF that are similar to the COF fabricated experimentally. The KMC simulations thus offer more realistic filling conditions than our previously used Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. We found persistently large separation distances between C60 molecules that are absent in the more tractable MC simulations and which are likely to hinder electron transport significantly. We attribute the looser fullerene packing to the existence of stable motifs with pairwise distances that are mismatched with the underlying adsorption lattice of the COF. We conclude that larger pore COFs may be necessary to optimize electron transport and hence produce higher efficiency devices. PMID:26579766

  2. Adsorption of selected pharmaceuticals and an endocrine disrupting compound by granular activated carbon. 1. Adsorption capacity and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.; Peldszus, S.; Huck, P.M.

    2009-03-01

    The adsorption of two representative PhACs (naproxen and carbamazepine) and one EDC (nonylphenol) were evaluated on two granular activated carbons (GAC) namely coal-based Calgon Filtrasorb 400 and coconut shell-based PICA CTIF TE. The primary objective was to investigate preloading effects by natural organic matter (NOM) on adsorption capacity and kinetics under conditions and concentrations (i.e., ng/L) relevant for drinking water treatment. Isotherms demonstrated that all compounds were significantly negatively impacted by NOM fouling. Adsorption capacity reduction was most severe for the acidic naproxen, followed by the neutral carbamazepine and then the more hydrophobic nonylphenol. The GAC with the wider pore size distribution had considerably greater NOM loading, resulting in lower adsorption capacity. Different patterns for the change in Freundlich KF and 1/n with time revealed different competitive mechanisms for the different compounds. Mass transport coefficients determined by short fixed-bed (SFB) tests with virgin and preloaded GAC demonstrated that film diffusion primarily controls mass transfer on virgin and preloaded carbon. Naproxen suffered the greatest deteriorative effect on kinetic parameters due to preloading, followed by carbamazepine, and then nonylphenol. A type of surface NOM/biofilm, which appeared to add an additional mass transfer resistance layer and thus reduce film diffusion, was observed. In addition, electrostatic interactions between NOM/biofilm and the investigated compounds are proposed to contribute to the reduction of film diffusion. A companion paper building on this work describes treatability studies in pilot-scale GAC adsorbers and the effectiveness of a selected fixed-bed model. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Ni (II) adsorption onto Chrysanthemum indicum: Influencing factors, isotherms, kinetics, and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Vilvanathan, Sowmya; Shanthakumar, S

    2016-10-01

    The study explores the adsorption potential of Chrysanthemum indicum biomass for nickel ion removal from aqueous solution. C. indicum flowers in raw (CIF-I) and biochar (CIF-II) forms were used as adsorbents in this study. Batch experiments were conducted to ascertain the optimum conditions of solution pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, and temperature for varying initial Ni(II) ion concentrations. Surface area, surface morphology, and functionality of the adsorbents were characterized by Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Adsorption kinetics were modeled using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich, intraparticle diffusion, Bangham's, and Boyd's plot. The equilibrium data were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Experimental data provided the best fit to pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model for the adsorption of Ni(II) ion on both CIF-I and CIF-II with maximum adsorption capacities of 23.97 and 44.02 mg g(-1), respectively. Thermodynamic analysis of the data proved the process to be spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Desorption studies were conducted to evaluate the possibility of reusing the adsorbents. Findings of the present study provide substantial evidence for the use of C. indicum flower as an eco-friendly and potential adsorbent for the removal of Ni(II) ions from aqueous solution. PMID:27185382

  4. Kinetic models for the adsorption of lead ions by steel slag.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng-Yu; Gao, Jin; Qu, Bin; Yang, Yi-Jin; Xin, Xin

    2010-08-01

    Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the kinetics of adsorption of lead ions by steel slag on the basis of the external diffusion, intraparticle diffusion and adsorption reaction model (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order). The results showed that the controlling step for the adsorption kinetics changed with experimental parameters varied. When the particle size of steel slag was larger than 120 mesh, intraparticle diffusion of Pb(2+) was the controlling step; when the initial concentration of Pb(2+) was less than 150 mg L(-1) or the shaking rate was lower than 150 rpm, external diffusion of Pb(2+) was promoted. Contrary to the former experimental conditions, the adsorption reaction was the controlling step, and the adsorption followed second-order kinetics, with an adsorption rate constant of 13.26 g mg(-1) min(- 1). The adsorption isotherm of Pb(2+) with steel slag followed the Langmuir model, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. PMID:19808736

  5. The investigation of kinetic and isotherm of fluoride adsorption onto functionalize pumice stone.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Ghorban; Roshani, Babak; Ghanizadeh, Ghader

    2012-05-30

    In this research work, pumice that is functionalized by the cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA), is used as an adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from drinking water. This work was carried out in two parts. The effects of HDTMA loading, pH (3-10), reaction time (5-60 min) and the adsorbent dosage (0.15-2.5 g L(-1)) were investigated on the removal of fluoride as a target contaminate from water through the design of different experimental sets in the first part. The results from this first part revealed that surfactant-modified pumice (SMP) exhibited the best performance at dose 0.5 g L(-1), pH 6, and it adsorbs over 96% of fluoride from a solution containing 10 mg L(-1) fluoride after 30 min of mixing time. The four linear forms of the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms model were applied to determine the best fit of equilibrium expressions. Apart from the regression coefficient (R(2)), four error functions were used to validate the isotherm and kinetics data. The experimental adsorption isotherm complies with Langmuir equation model type 1. The maximum amount of adsorption (Q(max)) was 41 mg g(-1). The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of fluoride best fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic type 1. Thermodynamic parameters evaluation of fluoride adsorption on SMP showed that the adsorption process under the selected conditions was spontaneous and endothermic. The suitability of SMP in defluoridation at field condition was investigated with natural groundwater samples collected from a nearby fluoride endemic area in the second part of this study. Based on this study's results, SMP was shown to be an affordable and a promising option for the removal of fluoride in drinking water. PMID:22476092

  6. Kinetics of protein adsorption on gold nanoparticle with variable protein structure and nanoparticle size.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Gupta, A; Verma, N C; Nandi, C K

    2015-10-28

    The spontaneous protein adsorption on nanomaterial surfaces and the formation of a protein corona around nanoparticles are poorly understood physical phenomena, with high biological relevance. The complexity arises mainly due to the poor knowledge of the structural orientation of the adsorbed proteins onto the nanoparticle surface and difficulties in correlating the protein nanoparticle interaction to the protein corona in real time scale. Here, we provide quantitative insights into the kinetics, number, and binding orientation of a few common blood proteins when they interact with citrate and cetyltriethylammoniumbromide stabilized spherical gold nanoparticles with variable sizes. The kinetics of the protein adsorption was studied experimentally by monitoring the change in hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential of the nanoparticle-protein complex. To understand the competitive binding of human serum albumin and hemoglobin, time dependent fluorescence quenching was studied using dual fluorophore tags. We have performed molecular docking of three different proteins--human serum albumin, bovine serum albumin, and hemoglobin--on different nanoparticle surfaces to elucidate the possible structural orientation of the adsorbed protein. Our data show that the growth kinetics of a protein corona is exclusively dependent on both protein structure and surface chemistry of the nanoparticles. The study quantitatively suggests that a general physical law of protein adsorption is unlikely to exist as the interaction is unique and specific for a given pair. PMID:26520545

  7. Kinetics of protein adsorption on gold nanoparticle with variable protein structure and nanoparticle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S.; Gupta, A.; Verma, N. C.; Nandi, C. K.

    2015-10-01

    The spontaneous protein adsorption on nanomaterial surfaces and the formation of a protein corona around nanoparticles are poorly understood physical phenomena, with high biological relevance. The complexity arises mainly due to the poor knowledge of the structural orientation of the adsorbed proteins onto the nanoparticle surface and difficulties in correlating the protein nanoparticle interaction to the protein corona in real time scale. Here, we provide quantitative insights into the kinetics, number, and binding orientation of a few common blood proteins when they interact with citrate and cetyltriethylammoniumbromide stabilized spherical gold nanoparticles with variable sizes. The kinetics of the protein adsorption was studied experimentally by monitoring the change in hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential of the nanoparticle-protein complex. To understand the competitive binding of human serum albumin and hemoglobin, time dependent fluorescence quenching was studied using dual fluorophore tags. We have performed molecular docking of three different proteins—human serum albumin, bovine serum albumin, and hemoglobin—on different nanoparticle surfaces to elucidate the possible structural orientation of the adsorbed protein. Our data show that the growth kinetics of a protein corona is exclusively dependent on both protein structure and surface chemistry of the nanoparticles. The study quantitatively suggests that a general physical law of protein adsorption is unlikely to exist as the interaction is unique and specific for a given pair.

  8. Removal of water and iodine by solid sorbents: adsorption isotherms and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    2013-07-01

    Tritium and iodine-129 are two major radioactive elements that are present in off-gases from spent fuel reprocessing plants. Adsorption by solid sorbents is the state-of-the-art technique for removal of these species from off-gases. Modeling and simulating adsorption processes require accurate adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data to permit reasonable estimates of process parameters. We have developed a continuous flow single-pellet adsorption system to gather accurate adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data for adsorption of water by molecular sieve 3A and for adsorption of iodine by silver exchanged mordenite. In this paper, the design of the water and iodine adsorption experimental systems are briefly described and results of water adsorption experiments are presented and discussed. Water uptake curves are fitted with the linear-driving force (LDF) model and the shrinking-core model to determine kinetic parameters. It is shown that the kinetics of water adsorption on zeolite 3A under current experimental conditions is controlled by both the external film resistance and the macro-pore diffusion and can be predicted by both the LDF model and the shrinking-core model with the former one performing slightly better. Preliminary results from iodine adsorption experiments will be presented in the conference.

  9. Adsorption kinetics of plasma proteins on ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jansch, M; Stumpf, P; Graf, C; Rühl, E; Müller, R H

    2012-05-30

    In this study the kinetics of plasma protein adsorption onto ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles have been analyzed and compared to previously published kinetic studies on polystyrene particles (PS particles), oil-in-water nanoemulsions and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). SPIO and USPIO nanoparticles are commonly used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancers for tumor imaging as well as in drug delivery applications. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) has been used to determine the plasma protein adsorption onto the citrate/triethylene glycol-stabilized iron oxide surface. The results indicate that the existence of a Vroman effect, a displacement of previously adsorbed abundant proteins, such as albumin or fibrinogen, respectively, on USPIO particles has to be denied. Previously, identical findings have been reported for oil-in-water nanoemulsions. Furthermore, the protein adsorption kinetics differs dramatically from that of other solid drug delivery systems (PS, SLN). More relevant for the in vivo fate of long circulating particles is the protein corona after several minutes or even hours. Interestingly, the patterns received after an incubation time of 0.5 min to 240 min are found to be qualitatively and quantitatively similar. This leads to the assumption of a long-lived ("hard") protein corona around the iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:22342465

  10. Adsorption and removal kinetics of phosphonate from water using natural adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Anil; Velayudhan, K T; Ramachandran, V; Bhai, R Susheela; Unnikrishnan, G; Vasu, K

    2010-01-01

    The removal of phosphonate from water was studied using some natural adsorbents. Potassium phosphonate is a fungicide used for the control of Phytophthora capsici, which is prevalent in black pepper (Piper nigrum L.). Batch adsorption kinetic experiments were conducted on the adsorption of phosphonate onto the adsorbents. The concentration of phosphonate was measured on a high-performance liquid chromatograph fitted with a conductivity detector. The percentage removal of phosphonate by powdered laterite stone (PLS) from water was 40.4%, within a residence time of 15 minutes. The mechanisms of the rate of adsorption were analyzed and compared using the pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models. The experimental data was found to correlate well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating adsorption as a chemisorption process. A possible reaction in the phosphonate-PLS system also has been proposed. The PLS can be used as a low-cost natural adsorbent for phosphonate removal from water. PMID:20112539

  11. Effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yi Y; Gitiafroz, Roya; Acosta, Edgar; Policova, Zdenka; Cox, Peter N; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2005-11-01

    The in vitro adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces is affected by both the composition of the surfactant preparations and the conditions under which the assessment is conducted. Relevant experimental conditions are surfactant concentration, temperature, subphase pH, electrolyte concentration, humidity, and gas composition of the atmosphere exposed to the interface. The effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of a therapeutic lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), was studied by measuring the dynamic surface tension (DST). Axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) was used in conjunction with three different experimental methodologies, i.e., captive bubble (CB), pendant drop (PD), and constrained sessile drop (CSD), to measure the DST. The experimental results obtained from these three methodologies show that for 100% relative humidity (RH) at 37 degrees C the rate of adsorption of BLES at an air-water interface is substantially slower than for low humidity. It is also found that there is a difference in the rate of surface tension decrease measured from the PD and CB/CSD methods. These experimental results agree well with an adsorption model that considers the combined effects of entropic force, electrostatic interaction, and gravity. These findings have implications for the development and evaluation of new formulations for surfactant replacement therapy. PMID:16262325

  12. Role of electrostatic interactions in the adsorption kinetics of nanoparticles at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Muthukuru, Jyothi Sri; Mani, Ethayaraja; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2016-02-21

    The adsorption of particles to the fluid-fluid interface is a key factor for the stabilization of fluid-fluid interfaces such as those found in emulsions, foams and bijels. However, for the formation of stable particle-laden interfaces, the particles must migrate to the interface from the bulk. Recent studies show that the adsorption of particles to the interface formed during emulsification is influenced by the surface charge of the particles. To further investigate this phenomenon, we study the effect of the surface charge of the particle on the adsorption kinetics of particles to the oil-water interface. By suspending a drop of aqueous dispersion of charge stabilized nanoparticles in decane, the adsorption dynamics of particles to the decane-water interface is studied using the dynamic surface tension measurements. When the particles are highly charged (low salt), a negligible change in the interface tension is observed indicating that almost no particles are adsorbed. These results show that the charged particles experience an energy barrier when they approach the interface. But when the particle surface charge is screened by the addition of monovalent salt, a significant reduction in surface tension is observed indicating the migration and adsorption of particles to the decane-water interface. We estimate the effective diffusivity of particles to the interface by analyzing the initial decay in the measured surface tension by considering particle laden drops containing different amounts of salt using the modified Ward and Tordai theory. This effective diffusivity is used to calculate the energy barrier for the adsorption of particles to the interface. The energy barrier from the analysis of dynamic surface tension data agrees well with the concept of image charge repulsion which inhibits the adsorption of highly charged particles to the interface. By considering various types of relevant interactions, we derive an analytical expression that qualitatively

  13. Adsorption and desorption of arsenate on sandy sediments from contaminated and uncontaminated saturated zones: Kinetic and equilibrium modeling.

    PubMed

    Hafeznezami, Saeedreza; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G; Dunne, Aislinn; Tran, Tiffany; Yang, Chao; Lam, Jacquelyn R; Reynolds, Matthew D; Davis, James A; Jay, Jennifer A

    2016-08-01

    Application of empirical models to adsorption of contaminants on natural heterogeneous sorbents is often challenging due to the uncertainty associated with fitting experimental data and determining adjustable parameters. Sediment samples from contaminated and uncontaminated portions of a study site in Maine, USA were collected and investigated for adsorption of arsenate [As(V)]. Two kinetic models were used to describe the results of single solute batch adsorption experiments. Piecewise linear regression of data linearized to fit pseudo-first order kinetic model resulted in two distinct rates and a cutoff time point of 14-19 h delineating the biphasic behavior of solute adsorption. During the initial rapid adsorption stage, an average of 60-80% of the total adsorption took place. Pseudo-second order kinetic models provided the best fit to the experimental data (R(2) > 0.99) and were capable of describing the adsorption over the entire range of experiments. Both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms provided reasonable fits to the adsorption data at equilibrium. Langmuir-derived maximum adsorption capacity (St) of the studied sediments ranged between 29 and 97 mg/kg increasing from contaminated to uncontaminated sites. Solid phase As content of the sediments ranged from 3.8 to 10 mg/kg and the As/Fe ratios were highest in the amorphous phase. High-pH desorption experiments resulted in a greater percentage of solid phase As released into solution from experimentally-loaded sediments than from the unaltered samples suggesting that As(V) adsorption takes place on different reversible and irreversible surface sites. PMID:27218893

  14. Kinetics of Adsorption of Cationic Surfactants at Silica-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Biswas; Chattoraj

    1998-09-01

    The kinetics of adsorption of cationic surfactants (CTAB, MTAB and DTAB) at silica surface has been studied at various values of bulk surfactant concentration (Ct2), pH, ionic strength, and temperature and in presence of different electrolytes and urea. The adsorption process has been found to follow a two-step first-order kinetic rate equation with two different rate constants k1 and k2. From the variation of k1 and k2 with temperature, values of energies of activation Ea1 and Ea2 for both the kinetic steps have been evaluated. The corresponding values of enthalpies of activation (DeltaH1# and DeltaH2#), entropies of activation (DeltaS1# and DeltaS2#) have been evaluated using Eyring's equation for absolute reaction rate. It has been found that for both the kinetic steps, DeltaH1# < TavDeltaS1# and DeltaH2# < TavDeltaS2#, which means that activation reaction is largely entropy controlled. Again, for both kinetic steps, DeltaH# varies linearly with TavDeltaS#, and DeltaG1# and DeltaG2# vary between 70 and 88 kJ/mole of surfactant, respectively. Thus there is a entropy-enthalpy compensation effect in the adsorption process. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9710495

  15. Kinetic modeling of liquid-phase adsorption of Congo red dye using guava leaf-based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojedokun, Adedamola Titi; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2016-02-01

    Guava leaf, a waste material, was treated and activated to prepare adsorbent. The adsorbent was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques. The carbonaceous adsorbent prepared from guava leaf had appreciable carbon content (86.84 %). The adsorption of Congo red dye onto guava leaf-based activated carbon (GLAC) was studied in this research. Experimental data were analyzed by four different model equations: Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms and it was found to fit Freundlich equation most. Adsorption rate constants were determined using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion model equations. The results clearly showed that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Intraparticle diffusion was involved in the adsorption process. The mean energy of adsorption calculated from D-R isotherm confirmed the involvement of physical adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters were obtained and it was found that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC was an exothermic and spontaneous process at the temperatures under investigation. The maximum adsorption of CR dye by GLAC was found to be 47.62 mg/g. The study shows that GLAC is an effective adsorbent for the adsorption of CR dye from aqueous solution.

  16. An eco-friendly dyeing of woolen yarn by Terminalia chebula extract with evaluations of kinetic and adsorption characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Shabbir, Mohd; Rather, Luqman Jameel; Shahid-ul-Islam; Bukhari, Mohd Nadeem; Shahid, Mohd; Ali Khan, Mohd; Mohammad, Faqeer

    2016-01-01

    In the present study Terminalia chebula was used as an eco-friendly natural colorant for sustainable textile coloration of woolen yarn with primary emphasis on thermodynamic and kinetic adsorption aspects of dyeing processes. Polyphenols and ellagitannins are the main coloring components of the dye extract. Assessment of the effect of pH on dye adsorption showed an increase in adsorption capacity with decreasing pH. Effect of temperature on dye adsorption showed 80 °C as optimum temperature for wool dyeing with T. chebula dye extract. Two kinetic equations, namely pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order equations, were employed to investigate the adsorption rates. Pseudo second-order model provided the best fit (R2 = 0.9908) to the experimental data. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted by Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The adsorption behavior accorded well (R2 = 0.9937) with Langmuir isotherm model. Variety of eco-friendly and sustainable shades were developed in combination with small amount of metallic mordants and assessed in terms of colorimetric (CIEL∗a∗b∗ and K/S) properties measured using spectrophotometer under D65 illuminant (10° standard observer). The fastness properties of dyed woolen yarn against light, washing, dry and wet rubbing were also evaluated. PMID:27222752

  17. An eco-friendly dyeing of woolen yarn by Terminalia chebula extract with evaluations of kinetic and adsorption characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shabbir, Mohd; Rather, Luqman Jameel; Shahid-Ul-Islam; Bukhari, Mohd Nadeem; Shahid, Mohd; Ali Khan, Mohd; Mohammad, Faqeer

    2016-05-01

    In the present study Terminalia chebula was used as an eco-friendly natural colorant for sustainable textile coloration of woolen yarn with primary emphasis on thermodynamic and kinetic adsorption aspects of dyeing processes. Polyphenols and ellagitannins are the main coloring components of the dye extract. Assessment of the effect of pH on dye adsorption showed an increase in adsorption capacity with decreasing pH. Effect of temperature on dye adsorption showed 80 °C as optimum temperature for wool dyeing with T. chebula dye extract. Two kinetic equations, namely pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order equations, were employed to investigate the adsorption rates. Pseudo second-order model provided the best fit (R (2) = 0.9908) to the experimental data. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted by Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The adsorption behavior accorded well (R (2) = 0.9937) with Langmuir isotherm model. Variety of eco-friendly and sustainable shades were developed in combination with small amount of metallic mordants and assessed in terms of colorimetric (CIEL(∗) a (∗) b (∗) and K/S) properties measured using spectrophotometer under D65 illuminant (10° standard observer). The fastness properties of dyed woolen yarn against light, washing, dry and wet rubbing were also evaluated. PMID:27222752

  18. Adsorption-uptake-metabolism kinetic model on the removal of BDE-47 by a Chlorella isolate.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dan; Tam, Nora F Y

    2016-05-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are persistent and toxic organic pollutants, causing hazardous to ecosystems and human health but are difficult to remove from contaminated environments. The mechanism and kinetics of a Chlorella isolate to remove BDE-47 were investigated. This species isolated from the influent of wastewater treatment plants in Hong Kong was PBDE tolerant. More than 80% of BDE-47 was removed in short- and long-term experiments lasting 1 h and 7 days, respectively. The dominant removal process was adsorption on cell surfaces, with 73% of the spiked BDE-47 removed within five minutes of exposure. As the exposure prolonged, the adsorption became saturated. BDE-47 on cell surfaces was then gradually taken up into cells. At the end of the 7-day exposure, 17% of the spiked BDE-47 was within cells, while 27% was metabolized. Four metabolites, including BDE-28, 6-OH- and 5-OH-BDE-47, and 6-MeO-BDE-47, were produced from the debromination, hydroxylation and methoxylation of BDE-47. The removal kinetics of BDE-47 by freshwater microalgae could be explained by the multi-compartmental adsorption-uptake-metabolism model developed in this study. PMID:26854698

  19. Arsenate adsorption and desorption kinetics on a Fe(III)-modified montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina; Puccia, Virginia; Avena, Marcelo

    2011-02-28

    The adsorption-desorption kinetics of arsenate on a Fe(III)-modified montmorillonite (Fe-M) was studied at different arsenate concentrations, pH and stirring rates. The synthesized solid was a porous sample with Fe(III) present as a mix of monomeric and polymeric Fe(III) species in the interlayer and on the external surface. Adsorption took place in a two-step mechanism, with an initial fast binding of arsenate to Fe(III) species at the external surface (half-lives of 1 min or shorter) followed by a slower binding to less accessible Fe(III) species in pores and the interlayer (half-lives of around 1 h). Desorption kinetics also reflected the presence of externally and internally adsorbed arsenate. At pH 6 the maximum adsorbed arsenate was 52 μmol/g, a value that is low as compared to adsorption on ferrihydrite (700 μmol/g) and goethite (192-220 μmol/g). However, since the Fe(III) content of Fe-M is much lower than that of ferrihydrite and goethite, Fe(III) species in Fe-M are more efficient in binding arsenate than in ferrihydrite or goethite (one As atom is attached every 8.95 iron atoms). This high binding efficiency indicates that Fe(III) species are well spread on montmorillonite, forming small oligomeric species or surface clusters containing just a few iron atoms. PMID:21242027

  20. Adsorption of reactive blue BF-5G dye by soybean hulls: kinetics, equilibrium and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Honorio, Jacqueline Ferandin; Veit, Márcia Teresinha; Gonçalves, Gilberto da Cunha; de Campos, Élvio Antonio; Fagundes-Klen, Márcia Regina

    2016-01-01

    The textile industry is known for the high use of chemicals, such as dyes, and large volumes of effluent that contaminate waters, a fact that has encouraged research and improved treatment techniques. In this study, we used unprocessed soybean hulls for the removal of reactive blue BF-5G dye. The point of zero charge of soybean hulls was 6.76. Regarding the speed of agitation in the adsorption process, the resistance to mass transfer that occurs in the boundary layer was eliminated at 100 rpm. Kinetics showed an experimental amount of dye adsorbed at equilibrium of 57.473 mg g(-1) obtained under the following conditions: dye initial concentration = 400 mg L(-1); diameter of particle = 0.725 mm; dosage = 6 g L(-1); pH 2; 100 rpm; temperature = 30 °C; and duration of 24 hours. The pseudo-second order best showed the dye removal kinetics. The adsorption isotherms performed at different temperatures (20, 30, 40 and 50 °C) showed little variation in the concentration range assessed, being properly adjusted by the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum capacity of dye adsorption was 72.427 mg g(-1) at 30 °C. Since soybean hull is a low-cost industrial byproduct, it proved to be a potential adsorbent for the removal of the textile dye assessed. PMID:26942540

  1. Chemistry of inorganic arsenic in soils: kinetics of arsenic adsorption-desorption.

    PubMed

    Smith, E; Naidu, R

    2009-04-01

    The influence of ionic strength, index cations and competing anions on arsenate (As(V)) adsorption-desorption kinetics was studied in an Alfisol soil. A flow-through reactor system similar to that developed by Carski and Sparks (Soil Sci Soc Am J 49:1114-1116, 1985) was constructed for the experiments. Arsenate adsorption kinetics for all the treatments were initially fast with 58-91% of As(V) adsorbed in the first 15 min. Beyond 15 min, As(V) adsorption continued at a slower rate for the observation period of the experiments. Changes in the solution composition had differing effects on the cumulative amount of As(V) adsorbed by the soil. Ionic strength and different index cations had little effect on the amount of As(V) adsorbed, while the presence of phosphate decreased the amount of As(V) adsorbed from 169 to 89 and 177 to 115 g As(V) microg(-1) in 0.03 M sodium nitrate and 0.01 M calcium nitrate, respectively. Considerably less As(V) was desorbed than was adsorbed, with only between 2 to 17% of the adsorbed As(V) desorbed. The presence of phosphate increased the amount of As(V) desorbed by 17%, but other changes in the solution ionic strength or index cation had little effect on the amount of As(V) desorbed. PMID:19101807

  2. Effect of the porous structure of activated carbon on the adsorption kinetics of gold(I) cyanide complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimova, P. I.; Grebennikov, S. F.; Gur'yanov, V. V.; Fedyukevich, V. A.; Vorob'ev-Desyatovskii, N. V.

    2014-06-01

    The effect the porous structure of activated carbons obtained from furfural and coconut shells has on the kinetics of [Au(CN)2]- ion adsorption is studied. Effective diffusion coefficients for [Au(CN)2]- anions in transport and adsorbing pores and mass transfer coefficients in a transport system of the pores and in microporous zones are calculated using the statistical moments of the kinetic curve.

  3. Removal of semivolatiles from soils by steam stripping. IV. Effects of adsorption/desorption kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Maroto, J.M.; Gomez-Lahoz, C.; Wilson, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    A mathematical model is developed for in-situ steam stripping of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in which the adsorption isotherm of the SVOCs on the soil is nonlinear and in which desorption kinetics may be rate limiting. Severe tailing, similar to that found with diffusion-limited steam stripping, is readily produced by the model, even under situations in which adsorption-desorption kinetics are rapid. The results also indicate that field experiments alone are not likely to be able to distinguish between limitations imposed on the rate of steam-stripping remediation by diffusion kinetics and those imposed by desorption kinetics.

  4. Modeling two-rate adsorption kinetics: Two-site, two-species, bilayer and rearrangement adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Sumit; Tabor, Rico F

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption kinetics of many systems show apparent two-rate processes, where there appears to be resolved fast and slow adsorption steps. Such non-standard adsorption processes cannot be accounted for by conventional modeling methods, motivating new approaches. In this work, we present four different models that can account for two-rate adsorption and are based upon physically realistic processes - two adsorbing species, two surface sites having different energies, bilayer formation and molecular rearrangement modes. Each model is tested using a range of conditions, and the characteristic behavior is explored and compared. In these models, the effects of mass transport and bulk concentration are also accounted for, making them applicable in systems which are transport-limited or attachment-limited, or intermediate between the two. The applicability of these models is demonstrated by fitting exemplar experimental data for each of the four models, selecting the model on the basis of the known physical behavior of the adsorption kinetics. These models can be applied in a wide range of systems, from stagnant adsorption in large volume water treatment to highly dynamic flow conditions relevant to printing, coating and processing applications. PMID:27209397

  5. Kinetics of CO adsorption on epitaxial (111)Cu on (111)Pd thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Oral, B.; Kothari, R.; Vook, R.W.

    1989-05-01

    CO adsorption has been studied on (111)Cu/Pd thin-film surfaces grown epitaxially on mica in UHV of base pressure 5 x 10/sup -11/ Torr. Auger electron spectroscopy investigations of the growth of Cu on (111)Pd films showed that layer growth occurred. The Kelvin probe, work function method was used to monitor the CO adsorption at 298 K as a function of Cu overlayer thickness. It was found that very thin Cu overlayers had a drastic effect on saturation CO coverage: one monolayer of copper reduced the saturation CO coverage by /similar to/95%. For the pure (111)Pd thin-film surface, the data showed that the rate of CO adsorption changes when the CO fractional coverage approaches /similar to/0.4. This result is most likely due to the previously reported change in CO superlattice structure that occurs with increasing coverage. The kinetic adsorption data for various bilayers were interpreted in terms of a first-order Kisliuk mobile precursor model.

  6. Studies of gas adsorption in flexible Metal-Organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Sarmishtha

    Flexible Metal-Organic frameworks that exhibit a gate-opening (GO) adsorption mechanism have potential for gas separations and gas storage. The GO phenomenon occurs when molecular gates in the structure expand/contract in response to the activation/de-activation of a system variable e.g. temperature, pressure or gas. Sharp discontinuities in the isotherm leading to S-shapes and large adsorption-desorption hysteresis are typical of this phenomenon. This study investigates the kinetics and thermodynamics of the GO behavior by combining adsorption measurements and analytical modeling of adsorption kinetics and capacity as a function of adsorbate, GO pressure, and temperature. Basic understanding of GO mechanism will help harness GO-MOF's as adsorbents for gas separations and storage. Experiments were performed on two precharacterized MOFs with verified GO behavior. These are (1) Zn2(bpdc)2(bpee), which expands from a relative amorphous to crystalline structure and (2) Cu[(dhbc) 2(4,4f-bpy)]H2O, a mutually interdigitated 2-D structure (bpdc = biphenyldicarboxylate, bpee = 1,2]bipyridylethene; DMF = N,N-dimethyl formamide, dhbc= 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, bpy=bipyridine). Both sub- and super-critical adsorption data were collected using three adsorption units: a standard low-pressure volumetric adsorption unit, a commercial high-pressure gravimetric analyzer and a custom-built high-pressure differential volumetric unit. Collected laboratory data were combined with published adsorption rate and isotherm data for analysis to broaden the range of data collection. The accuracy of the high-pressure differential unit was improved by over 300-fold by changing analytical methods of processing data to establish a reliable null correction. A pronounced effect of the allowed experimental time was found at cryogenic temperatures on (1). Tightening the stability criteria used by the adsorption equipment to determine equilibration increased the experimental time from the order of

  7. Adsorption behavior of direct red 80 and congo red onto activated carbon/surfactant: Process optimization, kinetics and equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengjun; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Xiao; Jiang, Xiaohui; Li, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Adsorptions of congo red and direct red 80 onto activated carbon/surfactant from aqueous solution were optimized. The Box-Behnken design (BBD) has been employed to analyze the effects of concentration of surfactant, temperature, pH, and initial concentration of the dye in the adsorption capacity. Their corresponding experimental data could be evaluated excellently by second order polynomial regression models and the two models were also examined based on the analysis of variance and t test statistics, respectively. The optimum conditions were obtained as follows: Cs = 34.10 μM, T = 50 °C, pH = 3.5, and CCR = 160 mg/L for the congo red system, and Cs = 34.10 μM, T = 50 °C, pH = 6.1, and CDR80 = 110 mg/L for the direct red 80 system. And in these conditions, the measured experimental maximum adsorption capacities for the congo red and direct red 80 removals were 769.48 mg/g and 519.90 mg/g, which were consistent with their corresponding predicted values, with small relative errors of -2.81% and -0.67%, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics for the two dye adsorptions onto AC/DDAC were also investigated. The experimental data were fitted by four isotherm models, and Langmuir model presented the best fit. The kinetic studies indicated that the kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order model.

  8. Dissociative adsorption of O2 on unreconstructed metal (100) surfaces: Pathways, energetics, and sticking kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2014-05-06

    An accurate description of oxygen dissociation pathways and kinetics for various local adlayer environments is key for an understanding not just of the coverage dependence of oxygen sticking, but also of reactive steady states in oxidation reactions. Density functional theory analysis for M(100) surfaces with M=Pd, Rh, and Ni, where O prefers the fourfold hollow adsorption site, does not support the traditional Brundle-Behm-Barker picture of dissociative adsorption onto second-nearest-neighbor hollow sites with an additional blocking constraint. Rather adsorption via neighboring vicinal bridge sites dominates, although other pathways can be active. The same conclusion also applies for M=Pt and Ir, where oxygen prefers the bridge adsorption site. Statistical mechanical analysis is performed based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of a multisite lattice-gas model consistent with our revised picture of adsorption. This analysis determines the coverage and temperature dependence of sticking for a realistic treatment of the oxygen adlayer structure.

  9. Amaranth proteins foaming properties: adsorption kinetics and foam formation--part 1.

    PubMed

    Bolontrade, Agustín J; Scilingo, Adriana A; Añón, María C

    2013-05-01

    This work has focused on the study of the relationships between the structural changes in proteins of amaranth under different conditions of pH and ionic strength and the ability to form foam, also taking into consideration the kinetics of adsorption of proteins at the interface. Results showed that treatment at pH 2.0 significantly improves the foaming properties of amaranth proteins. The structural studies performed indicate that amaranth proteins at acidic pH are denatured, dissociated and undergo partial hydrolysis due to the existence of an endoprotease. They also present a lower content of β-sheet and random coil secondary structures. Diffusion-adsorption studies of proteins at the air:water interface allowed to determine that the acidic pH favors adsorption thereof (higher values of kdiff and ka) and reduces the need for a rearrangement (higher values of γr). The interfacial behavior of amaranth proteins is a direct consequence of the structural changes they undergo at acidic pH, changes that also were reflected on the increased foaming capacity (higher vo) thus forming more dense and homogeneous foams. The behavior of the soluble proteins as surfactants was not altered by the presence of protein aggregates and insoluble proteins. PMID:23384694

  10. Lead removal kinetics from synthetic effluents using Algerian pine, beech and fir sawdust's: optimization and adsorption mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordine, N.; El Bahri, Z.; Sehil, H.; Fertout, R. I.; Rais, Z.; Bengharez, Z.

    2014-10-01

    The present paper exposes the lead adsorption from synthetic effluents using natural and available materials. Pine, beech and fir sawdust's were used and compared for their lead adsorption ability. To optimize the sorption phenomenon, some process parameters were studied namely temperature, pH, contact time, initial Pb(II) concentration, sawdust's dosage and granulometry, stirring speed and medium salinity. The materials were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and fluorescence. The results demonstrated that the pine sawdust gave the best level for lead adsorption (15.5 mg/g) in the following conditions and at 23 ± 2 °C of temperature : pH 5.45 ± 0.05, 100 mg/L of initial Pb(II) concentration and 10 g (per liter of solution) of pine sawdust composed from granules with mean diameter lower than 500 µm. As well, the adsorption kinetics seem to satisfy to Langmuir isotherm model.

  11. Study of char gasification in a reaction/adsorption apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.; Crowley, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    The reaction of an activated carbon (coconut char) with CO/sub 2/ was studied in a reaction/adsorption apparatus which allows successive reactivity and physical adsorption measurements to be made on the same solid sample. Reaction and surface area evolution data were obtained in the temperature range from 800 to 900/sup 0/C. All reaction rate trajectories obtained in this study showed a maximum in the reaction rate, 2-3 times higher than the initial rate, at about 85% conversion. There was no correlation between these results and the evolution of the internal surface area although the reaction appeared to take place initially in the kinetically controlled regime.

  12. Three-stage multilayer formation kinetics during adsorption of an anionic fluorinated surfactant onto germanium. 1. Concentration effect.

    PubMed

    Xing, Rong; Rankin, Stephen E

    2006-01-12

    The adsorption of tetraethylammonium perfluorooctylsulfonate (TEA-FOS) from aqueous solution onto hydroxylated germanium is studied using in situ polarized attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The adsorption is monitored at a series of bulk solution concentrations spanning from well below to above the critical micelle concentration (CMC; 1.0 mM). The kinetics of adsorption is followed by monitoring the intensity of the fluorocarbon bands. The orientation of the fluorocarbon director with respect to the germanium surface is determined by circular dichroism measurements of CF2 stretching bands. At bulk concentrations ranging from 10% of the CMC to at least 500% of the CMC, the adsorption occurs in an unusual sequence of three stages. Initially, rapid adsorption occurs within 200 min, leading to coverage of a monolayer or less. A long period of slow adsorption follows, during which we hypothesize that surfactant molecules form clusters, some of which serve as nuclei for multilayer growth. This stage concludes suddenly with an acceleration in the rate of adsorption, which eventually leads to multilayer formation. Because this is an anionic surfactant adsorbing onto a negatively charged surface at pH 6, the tetraethylammonium ions must mediate the interactions between the surfactant headgroups and the surface. The dichroism measurements show that TEA-FOS is initially oriented randomly or somewhat parallel to the surface, but over time adopts an orientation somewhat normal to the surface. This behavior is consistent with initial adsorption at isolated sites, followed by aggregation into isotropic admicelles, and finally growth into flattened admicelles. The sudden onset of accelerated adsorption can be explained either by autoaccelerating adsorption or nucleation and growth of a hydrophobic multilayer structure. PMID:16471536

  13. [Effect of SO2 volume fraction in flue gas on the adsorption behaviors adsorbed by ZL50 activated carbon and kinetic analysis].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ji-xian; Wang, Tie-feng; Wang, Jin-fu

    2010-05-01

    The influence of SO2 dynamic adsorption behaviors using ZL50 activated carbon for flue gas desulphurization and denitrification under different SO2 volume fraction was investigated experimentally, and the kinetic analysis was conducted by kinetic models. With the increase of SO2 volume fraction in flue gas, the SO2 removal ratio and the activity ratio of ZL50 activated carbon decreased, respectively, and SO2 adsorption rate and capacity increased correspondingly. The calculated results indicate that Bangham model has the best prediction effect, the chemisorption processes of SO2 was significantly affected by catalytic oxidative reaction. The adsorption rate constant of Lagergren's pseudo first order model increased with the increase of inlet SO, volume fraction, which indicated that catalytic oxidative reaction of SO2 adsorbed by ZL50 activated carbon may be the rate controlling step in earlier adsorption stage. The Lagergren's and Bangham's initial adsorption rate were deduced and defined, respectively. The Ho's and Elovich's initial adsorption rate were also deduced in this paper. The Bangham's initial adsorption rate values were defined in good agreement with those of experiments. The defined Bangham's adsorptive reaction kinetic model can describe the SO2 dynamic adsorption rate well. The studied results indicated that the SO2 partial order of initial reaction rate was one or adjacent to one, while the O2 and water vapor partial order of initial reaction rate were constants ranging from 0.15-0.20 and 0.45-0.50, respectively. PMID:20623845

  14. Mobility of pharmaceutical compounds in the terrestrial environment: Adsorption kinetics of the macrocyclic lactone eprinomectin in soils.

    PubMed

    Vassilis, Litskas D; George, Batzias C; Charalampos, Paraskevas G; Athina, Pavlatou-Ve; Xanthippos, Karamanlis N

    2016-02-01

    Avermectins, such as eprinomectin (EPM), are antiparasitic drugs widely and globally used. There is undisputed evidence that they could be a threat for the terrestrial ecosystem. Despite their global use, data for avermectins behaviour and fate in soils are scarce. The objectives of this research were to conduct adsorption experiments in the soil to determine kinetics and isotherms as well as to explore the EPM adsorption mechanism. Accordingly, various models were employed to study the adsorption behaviour and kinetics as well as the adsorption mechanism of EPM in soils. The results showed that the degree of EPM adsorption to soils is determined by the soils' physicochemical properties and the EPM initial concentration. It is possible that dissolved EPM concentration will be higher in soils that contain low amounts of clay minerals and organic matter, resulting in higher toxicity risk for the soil biota and shallow groundwater aquifers contamination. The results of this study are crucial for impact assessment of EPM and in the design of environmental fate or ecotoxicological studies. PMID:26469933

  15. Zinc adsorption effects on arsenite oxidation kinetics at the birnessite-water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, L.E.; Arai, Y.; Sparks, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    Arsenite is more toxic and mobile than As(V) in soil and sediment environments, and thus it is advantageous to explore factors that enhance oxidation of As(III) to As(V). Previous studies showed that manganese oxides, such as birnessite (??-MnO2), directly oxidized As(III). However, these studies did not explore the role that cation adsorption has on As(III) oxidation. Accordingly, the effects of adsorbed and nonadsorbed Zn on arsenite (As(III)) oxidation kinetics at the birnessite-water interface were investigated using batch adsorption experiments (0.1 g L-1; pH 4.5 and 6.0; I = 0.01 M NaCl). Divalent Zn adsorption on synthetic ??-MnO 2 in the absence of As(III) increased with increasing pH and caused positive shifts in electrophoretic mobility values at pH 4-6, indirectly suggesting inner-sphere Zn adsorption mechanisms. Arsenite was readily oxidized on birnessite in the absence of Zn. The initial As(III) oxidation rate constant decreased with increasing pH from 4.5 to 6.0 and initial As(III) concentrations from 100 to 300 ??M. Similar pH and initial As(III) concentration effects were observed in systems when Zn was present (i.e., presorbed Zn prior to As(III) addition and simultaneously added Zn-As(III) systems), but As(III) oxidation reactions were suppressed compared to the respective control systems. The suppression was more pronounced when Zn was presorbed on the ??-MnO 2 surfaces as opposed to added simultaneously with As(III). This study provides further understanding of As(III) oxidation reactions on manganese oxide surfaces under environmentally applicable conditions where metals compete for reactive sites.

  16. Adsorptive potential of cationic Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) dye onto natural untreated clay (NUC) from aqueous phase: Mass transfer analysis, kinetic and equilibrium profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, A.; Malkoc, E.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, natural untreated clay (NUC) was studied for the removal of Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) from aqueous solution in batch system. The effects of initial BY2 concentration, contact time, solution temperature and solution pH on BY2 adsorption were investigated. Nitrogen sorption measurements were employed to investigate the variation in surface and pore properties after dye adsorption. The adsorbent was characterized by means of FTIR, PSD, TEM, XRD and BET analysis. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Scatchard isotherm models. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 833.33 mg/g at 25 °C (at room temperature). The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental datas compared with pseudo-first-order kinetic adsorption models. To explain mass transfer mechanism of BY2 adsorption, obtained experimental datas were applied Weber and Morris model, Body and Frusawa and Smith models. The results show that the adsorption process is controlled by film diffusion. The thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were determined. Adsorption of BY2 on NUC is exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The calculated activation energy of adsorption was found to be 5.24 kJ/mol for BY2. This value indicates that the adsorption process is a physisorption.

  17. Removal of Anionic Dyes from Water by Potash Alum Doped Polyaniline: Investigation of Kinetics and Thermodynamic Parameters of Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Patra, Braja N; Majhi, Deola

    2015-06-25

    Polyaniline was synthesized by the oxidative polymerization method by using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant. The positive charge in the backbone of the polymer was generated by using Potash alum as a dopant. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used for characterization of doped polyaniline. The doped polyaniline can be used for selective adsorption of various dyes (selectively sulfonated dyes) from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies regarding the effect of contact time, initial dye concentration, pH, doses of adsorbent, and temperature on adsorption kinetics were investigated. The influence of other anions like Cl(-), NO3(-), and SO4(2-) on the adsorption density of dyes onto doped polyaniline was also explored. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics were found to be the most appropriate models to describe the removal of anionic dyes from water through adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)), and entropy (ΔS(0)) changes were also evaluated. The interaction of dyes with doped polyaniline was also investigated by FTIR and UV spectroscopy. PMID:26079693

  18. Kinetics and isotherm analysis of Tropaeoline 000 adsorption onto unsaturated polyester resin (UPR): a non-carbon adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajeev; Sharma, Pooja; Sikarwar, Shalini

    2013-03-01

    The presence of dyes in water is undesirable due to the toxicological impact of their entrance into the food chain. Owing to the recalcitrant nature of dyes to biological oxidation, a tertiary treatment like adsorption is required. In the present study, unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) has been used as a sorbent in the treatment of dye-contaminated water. Different concentrations of Tropaeoline 000 containing water were treated with UPR. The preliminary investigations were carried out by batch adsorption to examine the effects of pH, adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dosage, contact time, and temperature. A plausible mechanism for the ongoing adsorption process and thermodynamic parameters have also been obtained from Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameter showed that the sorption process of Tropaeoline 000 onto activated carbon (AC) and UPR were feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic under studied conditions. The estimated values for (ΔG) are -10.48 × 10(3) and -6.098 × 10(3) kJ mol(-1) over AC and UPR at 303 K (30 °C), indicating towards a spontaneous process. The adsorption process followed pseudo-first-order model. The mass transfer property of the sorption process was studied using Lagergren pseudo-first-order kinetic models. The values of % removal and k (ad) for dye systems were calculated at different temperatures (303-323 K). The mechanism of the adsorption process was determined from the intraparticle diffusion model. PMID:22689095

  19. Kinetics of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline adsorption and desorption on two acid soils.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Fernández-Sanjurjo, Maria J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to quantify retention/release of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline on two soils, paying attention to sorption kinetics and to implications of the adsorption/desorption processes on transfer of these pollutants to the various environmental compartments. We used the stirred flow chamber (SFC) procedure to achieve this goal. All three antibiotics showed high affinity for both soils, with greater adsorption intensity for soil 1, the one with the highest organic matter and Al and Fe oxides contents. Desorption was always <15%, exhibiting strong hysteresis in the adsorption/desorption processes. Adsorption was adequately modeled using a pseudo first-order equation with just one type of adsorption sites, whereas desorption was better adjusted considering both fast and slow sorption sites. The adsorption maximum (qmax) followed the sequence tetracycline > oxytetracycline > chlortetracycline in soil 1, with similar values for the three antibiotics and the sequence tetracycline > chlortetracycline > oxytetracycline in soil 2. The desorption sequences were oxytetracycline > tetracycline > chlortetracycline in soil 1 and oxytetracycline > chlortetracycline > tetracycline in soil 2. In conclusion, the SFC technique has yielded new kinetic data regarding tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline adsorption/desorption on soils, indicating that it can be used to shed further light on the retention and transport processes affecting antibiotics on soils and other media, thus increasing knowledge on the behavior and evolution of these pharmaceutical residues in the environment. PMID:25081007

  20. Hybrid materials from agro-waste and nanoparticles: implications on the kinetics of the adsorption of inorganic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Omorogie, Martins O; Babalola, Jonathan O; Unuabonah, Emmanuel I; Gong, Jian R

    2014-01-01

    This study is a first-hand report of the immobilization of Nauclea diderrichii seed waste biomass (ND) (an agro-waste) with eco-friendly mesoporous silica (MS) and graphene oxide-MS (GO + MS) nanoparticles, producing two new hybrid materials namely: MND adsorbent for agro-waste modified with MS and GND adsorbent for agro-waste modified with GO + MS nanoparticles showed improved surface area, pore size and pore volume over those of the agro-waste. The abstractive potential of the new hybrid materials was explored for uptake of Cr(III) and Pb(II) ions. Analysis of experimental data from these new hybrid materials showed increased initial sorption rate of Cr(III) and Pb(II) ions uptake. The amounts of Cr(III) and Pb(II) ions adsorbed by MND and GND adsorbents were greater than those of ND. Modification of N. diderrichii seed waste significantly improved its rate of adsorption and diffusion coefficient for Cr(III) and Pb(II) more than its adsorption capacity. The rate of adsorption of the heavy metal ions was higher with GO + MS nanoparticles than for other adsorbents. Kinetic data were found to fit well the pseudo-second-order and the diffusion-chemisorption kinetic models suggesting that the adsorption of Cr(III) and Pb(II) onto these adsorbents is mainly through chemisorption mechanism. Analysis of kinetic data with the homogeneous particle diffusion kinetic model suggests that particle diffusion (diffusion of ions through the adsorbent) is the rate-limiting step for the adsorption process. PMID:24645440

  1. Application of novel Polypyrrole/thiol-functionalized zeolite Beta/MCM-41 type mesoporous silica nanocomposite for adsorption of Hg2+ from aqueous solution and industrial wastewater: Kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadian, Hamedreza; Taghavi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical zeolite consists of both microporous and unordered mesoporous structures. A composite of Polypyrrole/thiol-functionalized Beta/MCM-41 (PPy/SH-Beta/MCM-41) was prepared, characterized by FE-SEM, FT-IR, XRD, TGA and BET analysis and applied in the investigation of its adsorption characteristics for the removal of Hg2+ ions from aqueous solutions. Thiol-functionalized Beta/MCM-41 (SH-Beta/MCM-41) was prepared by 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) in the presence of aerosil-200 as a silica source by two-step hydrothermal crystallization procedure. Batch mode experiments were conducted and three kinetic models were used to describe the adsorption process. The experimental data fitted very well with the Pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) revealed that the adsorption of Hg2+ onto PPy/SH-Beta/MCM-41 is an endothermic and spontaneous process. It was found that temperature has a positive effect on the removal efficiency and that PPy/SH-Beta/MCM-41 is potentially able to remove Hg2+ ions from aqueous solutions at even high concentrations (400 mg L-1). The recovery of Hg2+ from the PPy/SH-Beta/MCM-41 adsorbent was found to be more than 90% using 0.5 M H2SO4, and the ability of the absorbent to be reused for removal of Hg2+ was investigated.

  2. Surface chemistry of ferrihydrite: Part 2. Kinetics of arsenate adsorption and coprecipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Dadis, J.A.; Waychunas, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of As(V) adsorption by ferrihydrite was investigated in coprecipitation and postsynthesis adsorption experiments conducted in the pH range 7.5-9.0. In coprecipitation experiments, As(V) was present in solution during the hydrolysis and precipitation of iron. In adsorption experiments, a period of rapid (<5 min) As(V) uptake from solution was followed by continued uptake for at least eight days, as As(V) diffused to adsorption sites on ferrihydrite surfaces within aggregates of colloidal particles. The time dependence of As(V) adsorption is well described by a general model for diffusion into a sphere if a subset of surface sites located near the exterior of aggregates is assumed to attain adsorptive equilibrium rapidly. The kinetics of As(V) desorption after an increase in pH were also consistent with diffusion as a rate-limiting process. Aging of pure ferrihydrite prior to As(V) adsorption caused a decrease in adsorption sites on the precipitate owing to crystallite growth. In coprecipitation experiments, the initial As(V) uptake was significantly greater than in post-synthesis adsorption experiments, and the rate of uptake was not diffusion limited because As(V) was coordinated by surface sites before crystallite growth and coagulation processes could proceed. After the initial adsorption, As(V) was slowly released from coprecipitates for at least one month, as crystallite growth caused desorption of As(V). Adsorption densities as high as 0.7 mole As(V) per mole of Fe were measured in coprecipitates, in comparison to 0.25 mole As(V) per mole of Fe in post-synthesis adsorption experiments. Despite the high Concentration of As(V) in the precipitates, EXAFS spectroscopy (Waychunas et al., 1993) showed that neither ferric arsenate nor any other As-bearing surface precipitate or solid solution was formed. The high adsorption densities are possible because the ferrihydrite particles are extremely small, approaching the size of small dioctahedral chains at

  3. The effect of adsorption kinetics on the rate of surfactant-enhanced spreading.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, N M; Matar, O K; Craster, R V; Miller, R; Starov, V M

    2016-01-28

    A comparison of the kinetics of spreading of aqueous solutions of two different surfactants on an identical substrate and their short time adsorption kinetics at the water/air interface has shown that the surfactant which adsorbs slower provides a higher spreading rate. This observation indicates that Marangoni flow should be an important part of the spreading mechanism enabling surfactant solutions to spread much faster than pure liquids with comparable viscosities and surface tensions. PMID:26610693

  4. Kinetics of protein adsorption/desorption mediated by pH-responsive polymer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiao-Hang; Lei, Qun-Li; Ren, Chun-Lai

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new way of regulating protein adsorption by using a pH-responsive polymer. According to the theoretical results obtained from the molecular theory and kinetic approaches, both thermodynamics and kinetics of protein adsorption are verified to be well controlled by the solution pH. The kinetics and the amount of adsorbed proteins at equilibrium are greatly increased when the solution environment changes from acid to neutral. The reason is that the increased pH promotes the dissociation of the weak polyelectrolyte, resulting in more charged monomers and more stretched chains. Thus the steric repulsion within the polymer layer is weakened, which effectively lowers the barrier felt by the protein during the process of adsorption. Interestingly, we also find that the kinetics of protein desorption is almost unchanged with the variation of pH. It is because although the barrier formed by the polymer layer changes along with the change of pH, the potential at contact with the surface varies equally. Our results may provide useful insights into controllable protein adsorption/desorption in practical applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21274062, 11474155, and 91027040).

  5. Kinetics of adsorption with granular, powdered, and fibrous activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shmidt, J.L.; Pimenov, A.V.; Lieberman, A.I.; Cheh, H.Y.

    1997-08-01

    The properties of three different types of activated carbon, fibrous, powdered, and granular, were investigated theoretically and experimentally. The adsorption rate of the activated carbon fiber was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than that of the granular activated carbon, and one order of magnitude higher than that of the powdered activated carbon. Diffusion coefficients of methylene blue in the fibrous, powdered, and granular activated carbons were determined experimentally. A new method for estimating the meso- and macropore surface areas in these carbons was proposed.

  6. Response surface methodology approach for optimization of simultaneous dye and metal ion ultrasound-assisted adsorption onto Mn doped Fe3O4-NPs loaded on AC: kinetic and isothermal studies.

    PubMed

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Goudarzi, Alireza; Rajabi, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, the usefulness of ultrasonic power as a dispersion and mixing tool to accelerate the adsorption of Safranin O (SO), methylene blue (MB), Pb(2+) ions and Cr(3+) ions onto the novel composite Fe3O4-NPs-AC adsorbent was investigated. This new material was extensively characterized and analyzed by different techniques such as XRD, FESEM, Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR. Central composite design (CCD) based on designed runs revealed that adsorbent mass, sonication time, MB concentration, SO concentration, Pb(2+) ion and Cr(3+) ion concentration and some of their interactions have significant contributions to the target compounds removal percentages. A combination of response surface methodology and Design-Expert software was used to qualify and estimate the influence and magnitude of each terms contribution to the response. An optimization study using the following investigated increments of the effective variables, adsorbent mass (0.01-0.03 g), sonication time (2-6 min), initial dye concentration (5-25 mg L(-1)), and initial metal ion concentration (20-60 mg L(-1)), revealed that fixing the experimental variables at 0.025 g of Mn-Fe3O4-NPs-AC, with a 3 min sonication time, and 20 mg L(-1) of MB, 10 mg L(-1) of SO, 38 mg L(-1) of Pb(2+) ions and 42 mg L(-1) of Cr(3+) ions at room temperature lead to the achievement of the best characteristics and performance. Conduction of 32 experiments according to the limitations of CCD and a subsequent analysis of variance (ANOVA) gave useful information about the significant and also approximate contributions of each term (main and interaction of variables) in an empirical equation for the expected response. The results indicate that the R(2) values are more than 0.988 and the adjusted R(2) values are in reasonable agreement with R(2). Under the optimal conditions, the MB, SO, Pb(2+) ion and Cr(3+) ion removal efficiencies reached 99.54%, 98.87%, 80.25% and 99.54% after 3 min, while their equilibrium data with

  7. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm of anionic dyes onto organo-bentonite from single and multisolute systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dazhong; Fan, Jianxin; Zhou, Weizhi; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Kang, Qi

    2009-12-15

    The performances of polydiallydimethylammonium modified bentonite (PDADMA-bentonite) as an adsorbent to remove anionic dyes, namely Acid Scarlet GR (AS-GR), Acid Turquoise Blue 2G (ATB-2G) and Indigo Carmine (IC), were investigated in single, binary and ternary dye systems. In adsorption from single dye solutions with initial concentration of 100 micromol/L, the dosage of PDADMA-bentonite needed to remove 95% dye was 0.42, 0.68 and 0.75 g/L for AS-GR, ATB-2G and IC, respectively. The adsorption isotherms of the three dyes obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model with the equilibrium constants of 0.372, 0.629 and 4.31 L/micromol, the saturation adsorption amount of 176.3, 149.2 and 228.7 micromol/g for ATB-2G, IC and AS-GR, respectively. In adsorption from mixed dye solutions, the isotherm of each individual dye followed an expanded Langmuir isotherm model and the relationship between the total amount of dyes adsorbed and the total equilibrium dye concentration was interpreted well by Langmuir isotherm model. In the region of insufficient dosage of PDADMA-bentonite, the dye with a larger affinity was preferentially removed by adsorption. Desorption was observed in the kinetic curve of the dye with lower affinity on PDADMA-bentonite surface by the competitive adsorption. The kinetics in single dye solution and the total adsorption of dyes in binary and ternary dye systems nicely followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. PMID:19631461

  8. Kinetics and mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochars.

    PubMed

    Shang, Guofeng; Shen, Guoqing; Liu, Liang; Chen, Qin; Xu, Zhiwei

    2013-04-01

    Three different biochars as cost-effective substitutes for activated carbon (AC) were tested for their hydrogen sulfide (H2S) adsorption ability. The biochars were produced from camphor (SC), bamboo (SB), and rice hull (SR) at 400°C by oxygen-limited pyrolysis. The surface area (SA), pH, and Fourier transform infrared spectras of the biochars and AC were compared. The maximum removal rates and the saturation constants were obtained using the Michaelis-Menten-type equation. The three biochars were found to be alkaline, and the SAs of the biochars were much smaller than that of the AC. The H2S breakthrough capacity was related to the local pH within the pore system of the biochar. The order observed in terms of both biochar and AC adsorption capacity was SR>SB>SC>AC. SR efficiently removed H2S within the inlet concentration range of 10-50 μL/L. Biochars derived from agricultural/forestry wastes are a promising H2S adsorbent with distinctive properties. PMID:23455220

  9. A two-dimensional adsorption kinetic model for thermal hysteresis activity in antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Q Z; Yeh, Y; Liu, J J; Feeney, R E; Krishnan, V V

    2006-05-28

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), collectively abbreviated as AF(G)Ps, are synthesized by various organisms to enable their cells to survive in subzero environments. Although the AF(G)Ps are markedly diverse in structure, they all function by adsorbing to the surface of embryonic ice crystals to inhibit their growth. This adsorption results in a freezing temperature depression without an appreciable change in the melting temperature. The difference between the melting and freezing temperatures, termed thermal hysteresis (TH), is used to detect and quantify the antifreeze activity. Insights from crystallographic structures of a number of AFPs have led to a good understanding of the ice-protein interaction features. Computational studies have focused either on verifying a specific model of AFP-ice interaction or on understanding the protein-induced changes in the ice crystal morphology. In order to explain the origin of TH, we propose a novel two-dimensional adsorption kinetic model between AFPs and ice crystal surfaces. The validity of the model has been demonstrated by reproducing the TH curve on two different beta-helical AFPs upon increasing the protein concentration. In particular, this model is able to accommodate the change in the TH behavior observed experimentally when the size of the AFPs is increased systematically. Our results suggest that in addition to the specificity of the AFPs for the ice, the coverage of the AFPs on the ice surface is an equally necessary condition for their TH activity. PMID:16774359

  10. Adsorption kinetics of random copolymers with tunable monomer sequences onto flat surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhon, Young; Semler, James; Szleifer, Igal; Genzer, Jan

    2007-03-01

    We report on the adsorption kinetics of heteropolymers with adjustable monomer sequences (HAMS) on flat substrates. Poly(styrene-co-4-bromostyrene) (PBrxS) HAMS, where x denotes the mole fraction of 4-bromostyrene (4-BrS), have been prepared by brominating parent polystyrene chains. By adjusting the solvent quality during the bromination reaction a series of PBrxS HAMS has been prepared that posses random (good solvent) or random-blocky (poor solvent) distribution of 4-BrS units. We studied the adsorption of PBrxS HAMS from various solvents onto flat silica surfaces, where the 4-BrS units possess strong affinity towards silica while the interaction between styrene and the surface is nearly athermal. For a given solvent, the amount of PBrxS HAMS adsorbed onto the surface increases with increasing the 4-BrS content and the blockiness in the monomer distribution. Concurrently, the amount of PBrxS HAMS on the substrate also increases with decreasing the quality of the solvent from which the copolymer is adsorbed.

  11. Whispering Gallery Mode Biosensor Quantification of Fibronectin Adsorption Kinetics onto Alkylsilane Monolayers and Interpretation of Resultant Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kerry A.; Finch, Craig A.; Anderson, Phillip; Vollmer, Frank; Hickman, James J.

    2011-01-01

    A Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) biosensor was constructed to measure the adsorption of protein onto alkysilane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) at solution concentrations unattainable with other techniques. The high sensitivity was provided by a WGM resonance excited in a silica microsphere that was functionalized with alkylsilane SAMs and integrated in a microfluidic flow cell under laminar flow conditions. It was found that FN adsorbed at biologically relevant surface densities, however, the adsorption kinetics and concentration dependent saturation values varied significantly from work published utilizing alkanethiol SAMs. Mathematical models were applied to the experimental results to interpret the observed kinetics of FN adsorption. Embryonic hippocampal neurons and skeletal myoblasts were cultured on the modified surfaces, and a live-dead assay was used to determine the viability of the FN surfaces for cell culture, and major differences were noted in the biological response to the different SAMs. The high sensitivity and simplicity of the WGM biosensor, combined with its ability to quantify the adsorption of any dilute protein in a label-free assay, establishes the importance of this technology for the study of surface accretion and its effect on cellular function, which can affect biomaterials for both in vivo and in vitro applications. PMID:21983134

  12. Studies on Vapor Adsorption Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamsundar, N.; Ramotowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The project consisted of performing experiments on single and dual bed vapor adsorption systems, thermodynamic cycle optimization, and thermal modeling. The work was described in a technical paper that appeared in conference proceedings and a Master's thesis, which were previously submitted to NASA. The present report describes some additional thermal modeling work done subsequently, and includes listings of computer codes developed during the project. Recommendations for future work are provided.

  13. Adsorption of gases and vapors on nanoporous Ni2(4,4'-Bipyridine)3(NO3)4 metal-organic framework materials templated with methanol and ethanol: structural effects in adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Ashleigh J; Cussen, Edmund J; Bradshaw, Darren; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Thomas, K Mark

    2004-08-11

    Desolvation of Ni(2)(4,4'-bipyridine)(3)(NO(3))(4).2CH(3)OH and Ni(2)(4,4'-bipyridine)(3)(NO(3))(4).2C(2)H(5)OH give flexible metal-organic porous structures M and E, respectively, which have the same stoichiometry, but subtly different structures. This study combines measurements of the thermodynamics and kinetics of carbon dioxide, methanol, and ethanol sorption on adsorbents M and E over a range of temperatures with adsorbent structural characterization at different adsorbate (guest) loadings. The adsorption kinetics for methanol and ethanol adsorption on porous structure E obey a linear driving force (LDF) mass transfer model for adsorption at low surface coverage. The corresponding adsorption kinetics for porous structure M follow a double exponential (DE) model, which is consistent with two different barriers for diffusion through the windows and along the pores in the structure. The former is a high-energy barrier due to the opening of the windows in the structure, required to allow adsorption to occur, while the latter is a lower-energy barrier for diffusion in the pore cavities. X-ray diffraction studies at various methanol and ethanol loadings showed that the host porous structures E and M underwent different scissoring motions, leading to an increase in unit cell volume with the space group remaining unchanged during adsorption. The results are discussed in terms of reversible adsorbate/adsorbent (host/guest) structural changes and the adsorption mechanism involving hydrogen-bonding interactions with specific surface sites for methanol and ethanol adsorption in relation to pore size and extent of filling. This paper contains the first evidence for individual kinetic barriers to diffusion through windows and pore cavities in flexible porous coordination polymer frameworks. PMID:15291578

  14. Study the adsorption of phenol from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaili; Pan, Jiayong; Chen, Yiwei; Cheng, Rongming; Xu, Xuecheng

    2009-01-15

    In this study, the hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanopowders prepared by chemical precipitation method were used as the adsorbent, and the potential of HAp nanopowders for phenol adsorption from aqueous solution was studied. The effect of contact time, initial phenol concentration, pH, adsorbent dosage, solution temperature and adsorbent calcining temperature on the phenol adsorption, and the adsorption kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic parameters were investigated. The results showed that the HAp nanopowders possessed good adsorption ability to phenol. The adsorption process was fast, and it reached equilibrium in 2h of contact. The initial phenol concentration, pH and the adsorbent calcining temperature played obvious effects on the phenol adsorption capacity onto HAp nanopowders. Increase in the initial phenol concentration could effectively increase the phenol adsorption capacity. At the same time, increase in the pH to high-acidity or to high-alkalinity also resulted in the increase in the phenol adsorption capacity. Increase in the HAp dosage could effectively increase the phenol adsorption percent. However, the higher calcining temperature of HAp nanopowders could obviously decrease the adsorption capacity. The maximum phenol adsorption capacity was obtained as 10.33mg/g for 400mg/L initial phenol concentrations at pH 6.4 and 60 degrees C. The adsorption kinetic and the isotherm studies showed that the pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherm were the best choices to describe the adsorption behaviors. The thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption of phenol onto HAp was physisorption, spontaneous and endothermic in nature. PMID:18573599

  15. Particle-scale CO2 adsorption kinetics modeling considering three reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Dong-Myung; Sun, Xin

    2013-09-01

    In the presence of water (H2O), dry and wet adsorptions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and physical adsorption of H2O happen concurrently in a sorbent particle. The three reactions depend on each other and have a complicated, but important, effect on CO2 capturing via a solid sorbent. In this study, transport phenomena in the sorbent were modeled, including the tree reactions, and a numerical solving procedure for the model also was explained. The reaction variable distribution in the sorbent and their average values were calculated, and simulation results were compared with experimental data to validate the proposed model. Some differences, caused by thermodynamic parameters, were observed between them. However, the developed model reasonably simulated the adsorption behaviors of a sorbent. The weight gained by each adsorbed species, CO2 and H2O, is difficult to determine experimentally. It is known that more CO2 can be captured in the presence of water. Still, it is not yet known quantitatively how much more CO2 the sorbent can capture, nor is it known how much dry and wet adsorptions separately account for CO2 capture. This study addresses those questions by modeling CO2 adsorption in a particle and simulating the adsorption process using the model. As adsorption temperature changed into several values, the adsorbed amount of each species was calculated. The captured CO2 in the sorbent particle was compared quantitatively between dry and wet conditions. As the adsorption temperature decreased, wet adsorption increased. However, dry adsorption was reduced.

  16. Kinetic and Conformational Insights of Protein Adsorption onto Montmorillonite Revealed Using in Situ ATR-FTIR/2D-COS.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael P; Martínez, Carmen Enid

    2016-08-01

    Protein adsorption onto clay minerals is a process with wide-ranging impacts on the environmental cycling of nutrients and contaminants. This process is influenced by kinetic and conformational factors that are often challenging to probe in situ. This study represents an in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic investigation of the adsorption of a model protein (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) onto a clay mineral (montmorillonite) at four concentrations (1.50, 3.75, 7.50, and 15.0 μM) under environmentally relevant conditions. At all concentrations probed, FTIR spectra show that BSA readily adsorbs onto montmorillonite. Adsorption kinetics follow an Elovich model, suggesting that primary limitations on adsorption rates are surface-related heterogeneous energetic restrictions associated with protein rearrangement and lateral protein-protein interaction. BSA adsorption onto montmorillonite fits the Langmuir model, yielding K = 5.97 × 10(5) M(-1). Deconvolution and curve fitting of the amide I band at the end of the adsorption process (∼120 min) shows a large extent of BSA unfolding upon adsorption at 1.50 μM, with extended chains and turns increasing at the expense of α-helices. At higher concentrations/surface coverages, BSA unfolding is less pronounced and a more compact structure is assumed. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopic (2D-COS) analysis reveals three different pathways corresponding to adsorbed conformations. At 1.50 μM, adsorption increases extended chains, followed by a loss in α-helices and a subsequent increase in turns. At 3.75 μM, extended chains decrease and then aggregated strands increase and side chains decrease, followed by a decrease in turns. With 7.50 and 15.0 μM BSA, the loss of side-chain vibrations is followed by an increase in aggregated strands and a subsequent decrease in turns and extended chains. Overall, the BSA concentration and resultant surface coverage have a profound

  17. Enhanced adsorptive removal of Safranine T from aqueous solutions by waste sea buckthorn branch powder modified with dopamine: Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Bai, Bo; Wang, Honglun; Suo, Yourui

    2015-12-01

    Polydopamine coated sea buckthorn branch powder (PDA@SBP) was facilely synthesized via a one-pot bio-inspired dip-coating approach. The as-synthesized PDA@SBP was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adsorption progresses of Safranine T on the surface of PDA@SBP adsorbent were systematically investigated. More specifically, the effects of solution pH, contact time, initial concentration and temperature were evaluated, respectively. The experimental results showed the adsorption capacity of PDA@SBP at 293.15 K could reach up to 54.0 mg/g; the adsorption increased by 201.7% compared to that of native SBP (17.9 mg/g). Besides, kinetics studies showed that pseudo-second-order kinetic model adequately described the adsorption behavior. The adsorption experimental data could be fitted well a Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic analyses showed that the ST adsorption was a physisorption endothermic process. Regeneration of the spent PDA@SBP adsorbent was conducted with 0.1 M HCl without significant reduction in adsorption capacity. On the basis of these investigations, it is believed that the PDA@SBP adsorbent could have potential applications in sewage disposal areas because of their considerable adsorption capacities, brilliant regeneration capability, and cost-effective and eco-friendly preparation and use.

  18. Structure regulation of silica nanotubes and their adsorption behaviors for heavy metal ions: pH effect, kinetics, isotherms and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Du, Mingliang; Zhu, Han; Bao, Shiyong; Yang, Tingting; Zou, Meiling

    2015-04-01

    Silica nanotubes (SNTs) with controlled nanotubular structure were synthesized via an electrospinning and calcination process. In this regard, SNTs were found to be ideal adsorbents for Pb(II) removal with a higher adsorption capacity, and surface modification of the SNTs by sym-diphenylcarbazide (SD-SNTs) markedly enhanced the adsorption ability due to the chelating interaction between imino groups and Pb(II). The pH effect, kinetics, isotherms and adsorption mechanism of SNTs and SD-SNTs on Pb(II) adsorption were investigated and discussed detailedly. The adsorption capacity for Pb(II) removal was found to be significantly improved with the decrease of pH value. The Langmuir adsorption model agreed well with the experimental data. As for kinetic study, the adsorption onto SNTs and SD-SNTs could be fitted to pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model, respectively. In addition, the as-prepared SNTs and SD-SNTs also exhibit high adsorption ability for Cd(II) and Co(II). The experimental results demonstrate that the SNTs and SD-SNTs are potential adsorbents and can be used effectively for the treatment of heavy-metal-ions-containing wastewater. PMID:25615696

  19. Low-cost magnetic adsorbent for As(III) removal from water: adsorption kinetics and isotherms.

    PubMed

    Kango, Sarita; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles as adsorbent for arsenic (As) were coated on sand particles. The coated sand was used for the removal of highly toxic element 'As(III)' from drinking water. Here, batch experiments were performed with the variation of solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and initial arsenic concentration. The adsorbent showed significant removal efficiency around 99.6 % for As(III). Analysis of adsorption kinetics revealed that the adsorbent follows pseudo-second-order kinetics model showing R (2) = 0.999, whereas for pseudo-first-order kinetics model, the value of R (2) was 0.978. In the case of adsorption equilibrium, the data is well fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm model (R (2) > 0.99), indicating monolayer adsorption of As(III) on the surface of adsorbent. The existence of commonly present ions in water influences the removal efficiency of As(III) minutely in the following order PO4 (3-) > HCO3 (-) > Cl(-) > SO4 (2-). The obtained adsorbent can be used to overcome the problem of water filtration in rural areas. Moreover, as the nano-magnetite is coated on the sand, it avoids the problem of extraction of nanoparticles from treated water and can easily be removed by a simple filtration process. PMID:26711813

  20. Studies on Thorium Adsorption Characteristics upon Activated Titanium Hydroxide Prepared from Rosetta Ilmenite Concentrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gado, M Zaki, S

    2016-01-01

    The titanium hydroxide prepared from Rosetta ilmenite concentrate has been applied for Th (IV) adsorption from its acid aqueous solutions. The prepared hydroxide is first characterized by both Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum and thermogravimetric analysis. The relevant factors affecting the adsorption process have been studied. The obtained equilibrium data fits well with the Langmuir isotherm rather than Freundlich isotherm, while the adsorption kinetic data follow the pseudo-second order model. The different thermodynamic parameters have also been calculated and indicate that the adsorption process is spontaneous.

  1. Modeling Adsorption Kinetics (Bio-remediation of Heavy Metal Contaminated Water)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Chris

    My talk will focus on modeling the kinetics of the adsorption and filtering process using differential equations, stochastic methods, and recursive functions. The models have been developed in support of our interdisciplinary lab group which is conducting research into bio-remediation of heavy metal contaminated water via filtration through biomass such as spent tea leaves. The spent tea leaves are available in large quantities as a result of the industrial production of tea beverages. The heavy metals bond with the surfaces of the tea leaves (adsorption). Funding: CUNY Collaborative Incentive Research Grant.

  2. Isotherms and kinetic study of dihydrogen and hydrogen phosphate ions (H{2}PO{4}- and HPO{4}2-) adsorption onto crushed plant matter of the semi-arid zones of Morocco: Asphodelus microcarpus, Asparagus albus and Senecio anthophorbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiban, M.; Benhima, H.; Saadi, B.; Nounah, A.; Sinan, F.

    2005-03-01

    In the present work H{2}PO4- and HPO42- ions adsorption onto organic matter (OM) obtained from ground dried three plants growing in arid zones of Morocco has been studied. The adsorption process is affected by various parameters such as contact time, particle size and initial concentration of phosphate solution (Ci ≤ 30 mg/l). The uptake of both ions is increased by increasing the concentration of them selves. The retention of phosphate ions by Asphodelus microcarpus, Asparagus albus are well defined by several isotherms such as the Langmuir, Temkin and Freundlich.

  3. Studies of gas adsorption in flexible Metal-Organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircar, Sarmishtha

    Flexible Metal-Organic frameworks that exhibit a gate-opening (GO) adsorption mechanism have potential for gas separations and gas storage. The GO phenomenon occurs when molecular gates in the structure expand/contract in response to the activation/de-activation of a system variable e.g. temperature, pressure or gas. Sharp discontinuities in the isotherm leading to S-shapes and large adsorption-desorption hysteresis are typical of this phenomenon. This study investigates the kinetics and thermodynamics of the GO behavior by combining adsorption measurements and analytical modeling of adsorption kinetics and capacity as a function of adsorbate, GO pressure, and temperature. Basic understanding of GO mechanism will help harness GO-MOF's as adsorbents for gas separations and storage. Experiments were performed on two precharacterized MOFs with verified GO behavior. These are (1) Zn2(bpdc)2(bpee), which expands from a relative amorphous to crystalline structure and (2) Cu[(dhbc) 2(4,4f-bpy)]H2O, a mutually interdigitated 2-D structure (bpdc = biphenyldicarboxylate, bpee = 1,2]bipyridylethene; DMF = N,N-dimethyl formamide, dhbc= 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, bpy=bipyridine). Both sub- and super-critical adsorption data were collected using three adsorption units: a standard low-pressure volumetric adsorption unit, a commercial high-pressure gravimetric analyzer and a custom-built high-pressure differential volumetric unit. Collected laboratory data were combined with published adsorption rate and isotherm data for analysis to broaden the range of data collection. The accuracy of the high-pressure differential unit was improved by over 300-fold by changing analytical methods of processing data to establish a reliable null correction. A pronounced effect of the allowed experimental time was found at cryogenic temperatures on (1). Tightening the stability criteria used by the adsorption equipment to determine equilibration increased the experimental time from the order of

  4. On the Kinetics of Adsorption and Two-Dimensional Self-Assembly of Annexin A5 on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Ralf P.; Lai Kee Him, Joséphine; Tessier, Béatrice; Tessier, Céline; Brisson, Alain R.

    2005-01-01

    Annexin A5 is a protein that binds to membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids in a calcium-dependent manner. We previously found that annexin A5 self-assembles into two-dimensional (2D) crystals on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) formed on mica while a monolayer of disordered trimers is formed on SLBs on silica. Here, we investigated in detail and correlated the adsorption kinetics of annexin A5 on SLBs, supported on silica and on mica, with the protein's 2D self-assembly behavior. For this study, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and ellipsometry were combined with atomic force microscopy. We find, in agreement with previous studies, that the adsorption behavior is strongly dependent on the concentration of dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) in the SLB and the calcium concentration in solution. The adsorption kinetics of annexin A5 are similar on silica-SLBs and on mica-SLBs, when taking into account the difference in accessible DOPS between silica-SLBs and mica-SLBs. In contrast, 2D crystals of annexin A5 form readily on mica-SLBs, even at low protein coverage (≤10%), whereas they are not found on silica-SLBs, except in a narrow range close to maximal coverage. These results enable us to construct the phase diagram for the membrane binding and the states of 2D organization of annexin A5. The protein binds to the membrane in two different fractions, one reversible and the other irreversible, at a given calcium concentration. The adsorption is determined by the interaction of protein monomers with the membrane. We propose that the local membrane environment, as defined by the presence of DOPS, DOPC, and calcium ions, controls the adsorption and reversibility of protein binding. PMID:16085777

  5. On the kinetics of adsorption and two-dimensional self-assembly of annexin A5 on supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Richter, Ralf P; Him, Joséphine Lai Kee; Tessier, Béatrice; Tessier, Céline; Brisson, Alain R

    2005-11-01

    Annexin A5 is a protein that binds to membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids in a calcium-dependent manner. We previously found that annexin A5 self-assembles into two-dimensional (2D) crystals on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) formed on mica while a monolayer of disordered trimers is formed on SLBs on silica. Here, we investigated in detail and correlated the adsorption kinetics of annexin A5 on SLBs, supported on silica and on mica, with the protein's 2D self-assembly behavior. For this study, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and ellipsometry were combined with atomic force microscopy. We find, in agreement with previous studies, that the adsorption behavior is strongly dependent on the concentration of dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) in the SLB and the calcium concentration in solution. The adsorption kinetics of annexin A5 are similar on silica-SLBs and on mica-SLBs, when taking into account the difference in accessible DOPS between silica-SLBs and mica-SLBs. In contrast, 2D crystals of annexin A5 form readily on mica-SLBs, even at low protein coverage (< or =10%), whereas they are not found on silica-SLBs, except in a narrow range close to maximal coverage. These results enable us to construct the phase diagram for the membrane binding and the states of 2D organization of annexin A5. The protein binds to the membrane in two different fractions, one reversible and the other irreversible, at a given calcium concentration. The adsorption is determined by the interaction of protein monomers with the membrane. We propose that the local membrane environment, as defined by the presence of DOPS, DOPC, and calcium ions, controls the adsorption and reversibility of protein binding. PMID:16085777

  6. Comparing the removal of perchlorate when using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon: adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie C; Hsu, Yung S; Hsu, Kai L; Chou, Ming S; Han, Jia Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to remove perchlorate using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) or granular activated carbon (GAC). Dynamic and equilibrium adsorption experiments were performed to evaluate the thermodynamic behavior of perchlorate on SWCNTs and GAC. Key parameters affecting the adsorption, such as pH, ionic strength, and temperature were studied. The experimental results showed that the dynamic adsorption experiment achieved equilibrium in approximately eight hours. The adsorption capacity increased as the concentration of perchlorate increased or as the ionic strength decreased. The selected adsorption models were the modified Freundlich, the pseudo-1st-order, and the pseudo-2nd-order equations. The results showed that the modified Freundlich equation best described the kinetic adsorption processes. The maximal adsorption capacities of GAC and SWCNTs were 33.87-28.21 mg/g and 13.64 - 10.03 mg/g, respectively, at a constant temperature between 5°C and 45°C. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the equilibrium constant (K0 ), the standard free energy changes (ΔG°), the standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and the standard entropy change (ΔS°), were obtained. The results of the isothermal equilibrium adsorption experiment showed that low pH levels, low ionic strength, and low-temperature conditions facilitated the perchlorate adsorption, indicating that GAC and SWCNTs are potential absorbents for water treatment. PMID:24410681

  7. Investigation of molecule-adsorption kinetics by a pulsed laser desorption technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varakin, V. N.; Lozovskii, A. D.; Panesh, A. M.; Simonov, A. P.

    1987-02-01

    The laser thermal desorption technique is used to measure the adsorption kinetics of SO2 and CO molecules on stainless steel with the aim of investigating the initial stage of oxidation of the steel by adsorbed CO molecules. Attention is given to the dependence of the rate of establishment of the equilibrium concentration of adsorbed molecules on SO2-gas pressure; CO adsorption kinetics on stainless steel at a gas pressure of 9 x 10 to the -8th torr; and the dependence of the concentration of adsorbed CO molecules on exposure in the gas at a pressure of 9 x 10 to the -8th torr under irradiation by laser pulses with repetition periods of 1-2, 2-4, 3-6, and 4-8 min.

  8. Kinetics of the water adsorption driven structural transformationof ZnS nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Goodell, C.M.; Gilbert, B.; Weigand, S.J.; Banfield, J.F.

    2007-08-01

    Nanoparticles of certain materials can respond structurally to changes in their surface environments. We have previously shown that methanol, water adsorption, and aggregation-disaggregation can change the structure of 3 nm diameter zinc sulfide (ZnS). However, in prior observations of water-driven structure change, aggregation may also have taken place. Therefore, we investigated the structural consequences of water adsorption alone on anhydrous nanoparticles that were dried to minimize changes in aggregation. Using simultaneously collected small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) data, we show that water vapor adsorption alone drives a structural transformation in ZnS nanoparticles in the temperature range 22-40 C. The transition kinetics are strongly temperature dependent, with an activation energy of 58.1 {+-} 9.8 kJ/mol, consistent with atom displacement rather than bond breaking. At 50 C, aggregate restructuring occurred, increasing the transition kinetics beyond the rate expected for water adsorption alone. The observation of isosbestic points in the WAXS data suggests that the particles do not transform continuously between the initial and final structural state but rather undergo an abrupt change from a less ordered to a more ordered state.

  9. Protein adsorption onto nanoparticles induces conformational changes: Particle size dependency, kinetics, and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Satzer, Peter; Svec, Frantisek; Sekot, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials in bioapplications demands a detailed understanding of protein–nanoparticle interactions. Proteins can undergo conformational changes while adsorbing onto nanoparticles, but studies on the impact of particle size on conformational changes are scarce. We have shown that conformational changes happening upon adsorption of myoglobin and BSA are dependent on the size of the nanoparticle they are adsorbing to. Out of eight initially investigated model proteins, two (BSA and myoglobin) showed conformational changes, and in both cases this conformational change was dependent on the size of the nanoparticle. Nanoparticle sizes ranged from 30 to 1000 nm and, in contrast to previous studies, we attempted to use a continuous progression of sizes in the range found in live viruses, which is an interesting size of nanoparticles for the potential use as drug delivery vehicles. Conformational changes were only visible for particles of 200 nm and bigger. Using an optimized circular dichroism protocol allowed us to follow this conformational change with regard to the nanoparticle size and, thanks to the excellent temporal resolution also in time. We uncovered significant differences between the unfolding kinetics of myoglobin and BSA. In this study, we also evaluated the plausibility of commonly used explanations for the phenomenon of nanoparticle size‐dependent conformational change. Currently proposed mechanisms are mostly based on studies done with relatively small particles, and fall short in explaining the behavior seen in our studies.

  10. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of monomer-dimer monoclonal antibody mixtures on a cation exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jason M; Pabst, Timothy M; Hunter, Alan K; Wang, Xiangyang; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-07-10

    Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics are determined for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) monomer and dimer species, individually and in mixtures, on a macroporous cation exchange resin both under the dilute limit of salt gradient elution chromatography and at high protein loads and low salt based on batch adsorption equilibrium and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiments. In the dilute limit and weak binding conditions, the dimer/monomer selectivity in 10mM phosphate at pH 7 varies between 8.7 and 2.3 decreasing with salt concentration in the range of 170-230mM NaCl. At high protein loads and strong binding conditions (0-60mM NaCl), the selectivity in the same buffer is near unity with no NaCl added, but increases gradually with salt concentration reaching high values between 2 and 15 with 60mM added NaCl. For these conditions, the two-component adsorption kinetics is controlled by pore diffusion and is predicted approximately by a dual shrinking core model using parameters based on single component equilibrium and kinetics measurements. PMID:26028510

  11. Effect of cation type, alkyl chain length, adsorbate size on adsorption kinetics and isotherms of bromide ionic liquids from aqueous solutions onto microporous fabric and granulated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Safia; Duclaux, Laurent; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; Reinert, Laurence; Farooq, Amjad; Yasin, Tariq

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption from aqueous solution of imidazolium, pyrrolidinium and pyridinium based bromide ionic liquids (ILs) having different alkyl chain lengths was investigated on two types of microporous activated carbons: a fabric and a granulated one, well characterized in terms of surface chemistry by "Boehm" titrations and pH of point of zero charge measurements and of porosity by N2 adsorption at 77 K and CO2 adsorption at 273 K. The influence of cation type, alkyl chain length and adsorbate size on the adsorption properties was analyzed by studying kinetics and isotherms of eight different ILs using conductivity measurements. Equilibrium studies were carried out at different temperatures in the range [25-55 °C]. The incorporation of ILs on the AC porosity was studied by N2 adsorption-desorption measurements at 77 K. The experimental adsorption isotherms data showed a good correlation with the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of ILs onto activated carbons was an exothermic process, and that the removal efficiency increased with increase in alkyl chain length, due to the increase in hydrophobicity of long chain ILs cations determined with the evolution of the calculated octanol-water constant (Kow). The negative values of free energies indicated that adsorption of ILs with long chain lengths having hydrophobic cations was more spontaneous at the investigated temperatures. PMID:24929502

  12. Modeling arsenic(III) adsorption and heterogeneous oxidation kinetics in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, B.A.; Suarez, D.L.

    2000-02-01

    Arsenite [As(III)] is a soluble and toxic species of arsenic that can be introduced into soil by geothermal waters, mining activities, irrigation practices, and disposal of industrial wastes. The authors determined the rates of As(III) adsorption, and subsequent oxidation to arsenate [As(V)] in aerobic soil-water suspensions using four California soils. The rate of As(III) adsorption on the soils was closely dependent on soil properties that reflect the reactivity of mineral surfaces including citrate-dithionite (CD) extractable metals, soil texture, specific surface area, and pH. Heterogeneous oxidation of As(III) to As(V) was observed in all soils studied. The recovery of As(V) from As(III)-treated soils was dependent on levels of oxalate-extractable Mn and soil texture. After derivation of rate equations to describe the changes in soluble and recoverable As(III) and As(V) in soil suspensions, soil property measurements were used to normalize the empirically derived rate constants for three soils. The fourth soil, which had substantially different soil properties from the other three soils, was used to independently test the derived soil property-normalized model. The soil property-normalized consecutive reaction model gave a satisfactory description of the trends seen in the experimental data for all four soils. Understanding the effects of soil properties on the kinetics of chemical reactions of As(III) and As(V) in soils will be essential to development of quantitative models for predicting the mobility of As in the field.

  13. Adsorption Kinetics of Ionic Surfactants with Detailed Account for the Electrostatic Interactions

    PubMed

    Vlahovska; Danov; Mehreteab; Broze

    1997-08-01

    The problem of diffusion-controlled adsorption from a non-micellar solution of an ionic surfactant in the absence of added electrolyte is solved analytically for the case of small deviations from equilibrium. For that purpose the electro-diffusion equations of the transport of surfactant ions and counterions are combined with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the electrical field. The resulting set of equations is linearized and Laplace transform is applied. Analytical expression for the Laplace image of the adsorption is obtained in terms of elementary functions. Simple formulae for the short-time and long-time asymptotics of adsorption and surface tension relaxation are derived. To illustrate the effect of the electrostatic interactions we calculated the theoretical dependence of the characteristic relaxation time on the bulk surfactant concentration and surface potential for aqueous surfactant solutions in contact with various non-aqueous phases (air, heptane, decane, petroleum ether) and two surfactants: SDS and DTAB. The general trend is that the electrostatic effects decelerate the process of adsorption, as it could be expected. The derived exact analytical expressions quantifying these effects can be directly applied for the interpretation of experimental data for the kinetics of ionic surfactant adsorption. The reliability of our approach is verified through a comparison with other available theories. PMID:9268559

  14. Kinetics and thermodynamics of adsorption of methylene blue by a magnetic graphene-carbon nanotube composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peifang; Cao, Muhan; Wang, Chao; Ao, Yanhui; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin

    2014-01-01

    A solvothermal method was employed to prepare a novel magnetic composite adsorbent composed of graphene, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The prepared adsorbents were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the particle size distribution of the samples before and after adsorption was also carried out. The performance of as-prepared composites was investigated by the adsorption of dye methylene blue. Results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity of the samples was up to 65.79 mg g-1, which was almost equal to the sum of magnetic graphene and magnetic MWCNTs. The effect of pH and temperature on the adsorption performance of methylene blue onto the magnetic adsorbents was investigated. The kinetic was well-described by pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion model, while the isotherm obeyed the Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, the as-prepared composites were found to be regenerative and reusable. The application in the treatment of an artificial dye wastewater and its cost estimation were also discussed. Therefore, the as-prepared magnetic composites can be severed as a potential adsorbent for removal of dye pollutant, owing to its high adsorption performance, magnetic separability and efficient recyclable property.

  15. Adsorption studies of Cu(II) on Boston fern (Nephrolepis exaltata Schott cv. Bostoniensis) leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Rifaqat Ali Khan; Khan, Umra

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption studies were done on Boston fern leaves for the effective removal of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution. It has been tested for the first time for heavy metal adsorption from aqueous solution. This promising material has shown remarkable adsorption capacity towards Cu(II) ions which confirm its novelty, ease of availability, non-toxic nature, cheapness, etc., and give the main innovation to the present study. The adsorbent was analyzed by FT-IR, SEM and EDS. The effect of pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on the adsorption was investigated using batch process to optimize conditions for maximum adsorption. The adsorption of Cu(II) was maximum (96 %) at pH 4. The experimental data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin isotherms. The kinetic studies of Cu(II)were carried out at room temperature (30 °C) in the concentration range 10-100 mg L-1. The data obtained fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The maximum adsorption capacity (q m) obtained from Langmuir adsorption isotherm was found to be 27.027 mg g-1 at 30 °C. The process was found to be exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The breakthrough and exhaustive capacities were found to be 12.5 and 37.5 mg g-1, respectively. Desorption studies showed that 93.3 % Cu(II) could be desorbed with 0.1 M HCl by continuous mode.

  16. Adsorption kinetics of asphaltenes at the oil-water interface and nanoaggregation in the bulk.

    PubMed

    Rane, Jayant P; Harbottle, David; Pauchard, Vincent; Couzis, Alexander; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2012-07-01

    Asphaltenes constitute high molecular weight constituents of crude oils that are insoluble in n-heptane and soluble in toluene. They contribute to the stabilization of the water-in-oil emulsions formed during crude oil recovery and hinder drop-drop coalescence. As a result, asphaltenes unfavorably impact water-oil separation processes and consequently oil production rates. In view of this there is a need to better understand the physicochemical effects of asphaltenes at water-oil interfaces. This study elucidates aspects of these effects based on new data on the interfacial tension in such systems from pendant drop experiments, supported by results from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies. The pendant drop experiments using different asphaltene concentrations (mass fractions) and solvent viscosities indicate that the interfacial tension reduction kinetics at short times are controlled by bulk diffusion of the fraction of asphaltenes present as monomer. At low mass fractions much of the asphaltenes appear to be present as monomers, but at mass fractions greater than about 80 ppm they appear to aggregate into larger structures, a finding consistent with the NMR and DLS results. At longer times interfacial tension reduction kinetics are slower and no longer diffusion controlled. To investigate the controlling mechanisms at this later stage the pendant drop experiment was made to function in a fashion similar to a Langmuir trough with interfacial tension being measured during expansion of a droplet aged in various conditions. The interfacial tension was observed to depend on surface coverage and not on time. All observations indicate the later stage transition is to an adsorption barrier-controlled regime rather than to a conformational relaxation regime. PMID:22680071

  17. Removal of azo dye by a highly graphitized and heteroatom doped carbon derived from fish waste: Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengang; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Tingting; Peng, Nana; Gai, Chao

    2016-11-01

    A highly graphitized and heteroatom doped porous carbon was prepared from fish waste in the present study. The morphology and chemical composition of the resultant porous carbon were characterized by SEM-EDS, TEM, BET, XRD and Raman measurement. The prepared porous carbon was employed as an adsorbent for acid orange 7, a typical azo dye, removal from aqueous solution. The results showed that the porous carbon had ultrahigh surface area of 2146 m(2)/g, a high degree of graphitization structure and naturally doped with nitrogen and phosphorous. The maximum adsorption capacity of acid orange 7 reached 285.71 mg/g due to unique property of the prepared porous carbon. In addition, acid orange 7 adsorption onto the porous carbon well followed pseudo-second-order kinetics model and acid orange 7 diffusion in micropores was the potential rate controlling step. PMID:27526082

  18. Kinetics of the adsorption of radionuclides on tuff from Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Rundberg, R.S.

    1984-12-31

    The sorption of simple cations in tuff is dominated by adsorption on aluminosilicates that have charged surfaces, such as zeolites and clays. The most significant sorbing minerals present in Nevada tuff are clinoptilolite, heulandite, mordenite, and montmorillonite. The kinetics of sorption on tuffs containing the minerals clinoptilolite and montmorillonite has been determined by studying the uptake of strontium, cesium, and barium on thin tuff wafers. The rate constants for uptake of these elements on tuff are consistent with a model of sorption that is diffusion limited but where diffusion occurs in two stages. First the cations diffuse into the rock through the water-filled pore space. Next, the cations must diffuse into the much narrower channels within the aluminosilicate crystals. After they are within the zeolite framework or between the clay planes, the cations may rapidly sorb on the negatively charged surfaces. The actinide elements have a time constant for the apparent sorption that is inconsistent with this model and may have a radically different mechanism of removal from solution. 12 references, 4 tables.

  19. Adsorption of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether on Granular Zeolites: Batch and Column Studies

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Lail, Laila; Bergendahl, John A.; Thompson, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) has been shown to be readily removed from water with powdered zeolites, but the passage of water through fixed beds of very small powdered zeolites produces high friction losses not encountered in flow through larger sized granular materials. In this study, equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of MTBE onto granular zeolites, a coconut shell granular activated carbon (CS-1240), and a commercial carbon adsorbent (CCA) sample was evaluated. In addition, the effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on MTBE adsorption was evaluated. Batch adsorption experiments determined that ZSM-5 was the most effective granular zeolite for MTBE adsorption. Further equilibrium and kinetic experiments verified that granular ZSM-5 is superior to CS-1240 and CCA in removing MTBE from water. No competitive-adsorption effects between NOM and MTBE were observed for adsorption to granular ZSM-5 or CS-1240, however there was competition between NOM and MTBE for adsorption onto the CCA granules. Fixed-bed adsorption experiments for longer run times were performed using granular ZSM-5. The bed depth service time model (BDST) was used to analyze the breakthrough data. PMID:20153106

  20. Modeling of arsenic adsorption kinetics of synthetic and contaminated groundwater on natural laterite.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Abhijit; Sharma, Himanshu; Basu, Jayanta Kumar; De, Sirshendu

    2009-12-30

    A simple shrinking core model is applied to predict the adsorption kinetics of arsenite and arsenate species onto natural laterite (NL) in a stirred tank adsorber. The proposed model is a two-resistance model, in which two unknown parameters, external mass transfer coefficient (K(f)) and pore diffusion coefficient (D(e)) are estimated by comparing the simulation concentration profile with the experimental data using a nonlinear optimization technique. The model is applied under various operating conditions, e.g., initial arsenic concentration, NL dose, NL particle size, temperature, stirring speed, etc. Estimated values of D(e) and K(f) are found to be in the range of 2.2-2.6 x 10(-11)m(2)/s and 1.0-1.4 x 10(-6)m/s at 305K for different operating conditions, respectively. D(e) and K(f) values are found to be increasing with temperature and stirrer speed, respectively. Calculated values of Biot numbers indicate that both external mass transfer and pore diffusion are important during the adsorption. The model is also applied satisfactorily to predict the arsenic adsorption kinetics of arsenic contaminated groundwater-NL system and can be used to scale up. PMID:19717233

  1. Effect of the adsorbate kinetic diameter on the accuracy of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for modeling adsorption of organic vapors on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Niknaddaf, Saeid; Hashisho, Zaher

    2012-11-30

    This paper investigates the effect of the kinetic diameter (KD) of the reference adsorbate on the accuracy of the Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation for predicting the adsorption isotherms of organic vapors on microporous activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms for 13 organic compounds on microporous beaded activated carbon were experimentally measured, and predicted using the D-R model and affinity coefficients. The affinity coefficients calculated based on molar volumes, molecular polarizabilities, and molecular parachors were used to predict the isotherms based on four reference compounds (4.3≤KD≤6.8 Å). The results show that the affinity coefficients are independent of the calculation method if the reference and test adsorbates are from the same organic group. Choosing a reference adsorbate with a KD similar to that of the test adsorbate results in better prediction of the adsorption isotherm. The relative error between the predicted and the measured adsorption isotherms increases as the absolute difference in the kinetic diameters of the reference and test adsorbates increases. Finally, the proposed hypothesis was used to explain reports of inconsistent findings among published articles. The results from this study are important because they allow a more accurate prediction of adsorption capacities of adsorbents which allow for better design of adsorption systems. PMID:23044198

  2. Species of dissolved Cu and Ni and their adsorption kinetics in turbid riverwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzl, V. M. C.; Millward, G. E.; Wollast, R.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2003-01-01

    Time-dependent sorption experiments have been carried out under controlled laboratory conditions, using filtered river water and particles from the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) of the Tamar Estuary (UK). Adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (ACSV) was used to determine ACSV labile and total dissolved Cu and Ni, without prior sample handling and/or pre-concentration. The ACSV metal lability is theoretically defined and is dependent upon the α-coefficient ( αMAL) of the added ACSV ligand. The fraction of labile dissolved Cu in the river water was in the range 28-41% of the total, while labile Ni was 80-90% of the total dissolved Ni. After 24 h incubation with the particles, the concentration of total dissolved Cu was reduced to half the original value and involved the removal of 40% of labile Cu and 70% of the non-labile Cu. Removal of total dissolved Ni after 24 h ranged from 40 to 60% and the uptake kinetics were dominated by adsorption of labile Ni. The kinetics of adsorption for the different chemical forms of Cu and Ni were interpreted by assuming a first-order reversible reaction between the dissolved components and the particulate phase. The chemical response time for the removal of labile Cu was 1.1 and 0.5 h for non-labile Cu. The chemical response time for labile Ni was in a range from 0.7 to 0.3 h. The results are interpreted in terms of the role played by chemical kinetics in determining the phase transport of metals in the reactive zones of estuaries.

  3. Kinetic and equilibrium characterization of uranium(VI) adsorption onto carboxylate-functionalized poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)-grafted lignocellulosics.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Divya, L; Suchithra, P S

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a new adsorbent prepared from coconut coir pith, CP (a coir industry-based lignocellulosic residue), for the removal of uranium [U(VI)] from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent (PGCP-COOH) having a carboxylate functional group at the chain end was synthesized by grafting poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) onto CP using potassium peroxydisulphate-sodium thiosulphite as a redox initiator and in the presence of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as a crosslinking agent. IR spectroscopy results confirm the graft copolymer formation and carboxylate functionalization. XRD studies confirm the decrease of crystallinity in PGCP-COOH compared to CP, and it favors the protrusion of the functional group into the aqueous medium. The thermal stability of the samples was studied using thermogravimetry (TG). Surface charge density of the samples as a function of pH was determined using potentiometric titration. The ability of PGCP-COOH to remove U(VI) from aqueous solutions was assessed using a batch adsorption technique. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed at the pH range 4.0-6.0. Maximum removal of 99.2% was observed for an initial concentration of 25mg/L at pH 6.0 and an adsorbent dose of 2g/L. Equilibrium was achieved in approximately 3h. The experimental kinetic data were analyzed using a first-order kinetic model. The temperature dependence indicates an endothermic process. U(VI) adsorption was found to decrease with an increase in ionic strength due to the formation of outer-sphere surface complexes on PGCP-COOH. Equilibrium data were best modeled by the Langmuir isotherm. The thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG(0), DeltaH(0) and DeltaS(0) were derived to predict the nature of adsorption. Adsorption experiments were also conducted using a commercial cation exchanger, Ceralite IRC-50, with carboxylate functionality for comparison. Utility of the adsorbent was tested by removing U(VI) from simulated nuclear industry wastewater

  4. Removal of ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine in aqueous solution onto natural clay: equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazri, Hassen; Ghorbel-Abid, Ibtissem; Kalfat, Rafik; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the adsorption of three pharmaceuticals compounds (ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine) onto natural clay on the basis of equilibrium parameters such as a function of time, effect of pH, varying of the concentration and the temperature. Adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the Lagergren's first-order and the pseudo-second-order kinetic equations. The kinetic results of adsorption are described better using the pseudo-second order model. The isotherm results were tested in the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. The thermodynamic parameters obtained indicate that the adsorption of pharmaceuticals on the clay is a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  5. Kinetics of adsorptive removal of DEClP and GB on impregnated Al2O3 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Amit; Srivastava, Avanish K; Singh, Beer; Gupta, Arvind K; Suryanarayana, Malladi V S; Pandey, Pratibha

    2010-03-15

    Nanoparticles of AP-Al(2)O(3) (aero-gel produced alumina) have been produced by an alkoxide based synthesis involving aluminum powder, methanol, toluene and water. Thus produced alumina nanoparticles were characterized and the data indicated the formation of nanoparticles of alumina in the size range of 2-30 nm with high surface area (375 m(2)/g). Thereafter, these nanoparticles were impregnated with reactive chemicals. Adsorptive removal kinetics for DEClP (diethylchlorophosphate) and GB (isopropylmethylphosphonofluoridate, sarin) was monitored by GC-FID (gas chromatograph coupled with flame ionization detector) technique and found to be following pseudo first order reaction kinetics. Among impregnated AP-Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles based sorbent systems AP-Al(2)O(3) impregnated with 9-molybdo-3-vanadophosphoric acid (10%, w/w) was found to be the most reactive with least half-life values of 7 and 30 min for the removal of DEClP and GB, respectively, whereas unimpregnated AP-Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles showed the best adsorption potential among all studied systems. In addition to this, hydrolysis reaction {identified using GC/MS (gas chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometer) technique} was found to be the route of degradation of DEClP and GB on impregnated alumina nanoparticles. PMID:19926215

  6. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of (60)Co and (137)Cs in fresh water rivers.

    PubMed

    Fiengo Pérez, Fabricio; Sweeck, Lieve; Bauwens, Willy; Van Hees, May; Elskens, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Radionuclides released in water systems--as well as heavy metals and organic toxicants--sorb to both the suspended solid particles and the bed sediments. Sorption is usually represented mathematically by the distribution coefficient. This approach implies equilibrium between phases and instantaneous fixation (release) of the pollutant onto (from) the surface of the soil particle. However, empirical evidence suggests that for some radionuclides the fixation is not achieved instantaneously and that the reversibility of the process can be slow. Here the adsorption/desorption kinetics of (60)Co and (137)Cs in fresh water environments were simulated experimentally and later on modelled mathematically, while the influence of the most relevant factors affecting the sorption were taken into account. The experimental results suggest that for adsorption and the desorption more than 24 h are needed to reach equilibrium, moreover, It was observed that the desorption rate constants for (60)Co and (137)Cs lie within ranges which are of two to three orders of magnitude lower than the adsorption rate constants. PMID:26218323

  7. [Study on treatment of methylene blue wastewater by fly ash adsorption-Fenton and thermal regeneration].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Ai-Li; Zhou, Ji-Ti

    2012-07-01

    The physicochemical properties of water-washed fly ash (FA) and acid modified fly ash (M-FA) were investigated. The adsorption of methylene blue by FA and M-FA were studied by batch experiments. Two methods, Fenton-drive oxidation regeneration and thermal regeneration, were used for regeneration of the used FA and M-FA. The result showed that the rate of adsorption process followed the second order kinetics and the adsorption followed Langmuir isotherms. The adsorption equilibrium time was 30 min, and the equilibrium adsorption capacity of FA and M-FA were 4.22 mg x g(-1) and 5.98 mg x g(-1) respectively. The adsorption capability of M-FA was higher than that of FA. In the range of pH 2-12, the adsorption capacity of M-FA increased with the increase of pH, whereas the adsorption capacity of FA decreased slowly until the pH 8 and then increased. Electrostatic adsorption was the major factor on the adsorption capacity. Around 61% and 55% percentage regeneration (PR) were obtained for FA and M-FA respectively when 78.4 mmol x L(-1) H2O2 and 0.72 mmol x L(-1) Fe2+ were used. When the condition of thermal regeneration was 400 degrees C and 2 h, a positive correlation can be found between the PRs of FA and regeneration times, the PRs were 102%, 104% and 107% in three cycles of adsorption-thermal regeneration process. However a negative correlation can be found between the PRs of M-FA and regeneration times, the PRs were 82%, 75% and 74% in three cycles of adsorption-thermal regeneration process. The PR of FA was higher than that of M-FA, and thermal regeneration was superior to Fenton-drive regeneration. PMID:23002621

  8. Adsorption isotherm special study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    The study was designed to identify methods to determine adsorption applicable to Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, and to determine how changes in aquifer conditions affect metal adsorption, resulting retardation factors, and estimated contaminant migration rates. EPA and ASTM procedures were used to estimate sediment sorption of U, As, and Mo under varying groundwater geochemical conditions. Aquifer matrix materials from three distinct locations at the DOE UMTRA Project site in Rifle, CO, were used as the adsorbents under different pH conditions; these conditions stimulated geochemical environments under the tailings, near the tailings, and downgradient from the tailings. Grain size, total surface area, bulk and clay mineralogy, and petrography of the sediments were characterized. U and Mo yielded linear isotherms, while As had nonlinear ones. U and Mo were adsorbed strongly on sediments acidified to levels similar to tailings leachate. Changes in pH had much less effect on As adsorption. Mo was adsorbed very little at pH 7-7.3, U was weakly sorbed, and As was moderately sorbed. Velocities were estimated for metal transport at different pHs. Results show that the aquifer materials must be characterized to estimate metal transport velocities in aquifers and to develop groundwater restoration strategies for the UMTRA project.

  9. Kinetic study on biomass gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Bingyan, X.; Chuangzhi, W.; Zhengfen, L.; Guang, Z.X. )

    1992-09-01

    An experimental apparatus, with the features of fast heating rate and continuous record of reaction parameters, was developed to study kinetics of fast pyrolysis. The temperature effects, at a range of 400 C to 900 C, on pyrolysis rate, products profile, gas quality and quantity, and so on, were studied and the results are listed and analyzed. The effect of secondary reaction of gas phase at 700 C was tested and the regression result is expressed in an experimental formula. Based on the experimental results, the three-stage-reaction mechanism module is suggested. The kinetic expression to calculate gas formation rate is concluded as: d{alpha}/dt = A exp({minus}E/RT)(1 {minus} {alpha}){sup n}. The kinetic parameters of A, E, and n at different temperatures are given in the paper.

  10. Kinetic studies of nitrate removal from aqueous solution using granular chitosan-Fe(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qili; Chen, Nan; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Weiwu; Lv, Long

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a granular chitosan-Fe(III) complex was prepared as a feasible adsorbent for the removal of nitrate from an aqueous solution. There was no significant change in terms of nitrate removal efficiency over a wide pH range of 3-11. Nitrate adsorption on the chitosan-Fe(III) complex followed the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model. In order to more accurately reflect adsorption and desorption behaviors at the solid/solution interface, kinetic model I and kinetic model II were proposed to simulate the interfacial process in a batch system. Nitrate adsorption on the chitosan-Fe(III) complex followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model and kinetic model I. The proposed half-time could provide useful information for optimizing process design. Adsorption and desorption rate constants obtained from kinetic model I and kinetic model II were beneficial to understanding the interfacial process and the extent of adsorption reaction. Kinetic model I and kinetic model II implied that nitrate uptake exponentially approaches a limiting value. PMID:26942545

  11. Kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic investigations of phosphate adsorption onto core-shell Fe₃O₄@LDHs composites with easy magnetic separation assistance.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang-guo; Yang, Kun; Shan, Ran-ran; Yan, Tao; Wei, Jing; Yu, Shu-jun; Yu, Hai-qin; Du, Bin

    2015-06-15

    In this study, three different magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs composites, Fe3O4@Zn-Al-, Fe3O4@Mg-Al-, and Fe3O4@Ni-Al-LDH were prepared via a rapid coprecipitation method for phosphate adsorptive removal. The composites were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM, VSM and BET analyses. Characterization results proved the successful synthesis of core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs composites with good superparamagnetisms. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption efficiency of phosphate. Optimal conditions for the phosphate adsorption were obtained: 0.05 g of adsorbent, solution pH of 3, and contact time of 60 min. Proposed mechanisms for the removal of phosphate species onto Fe3O4@LDHs composites at different initial solution pH were showed. The kinetic data were described better by the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and KASRA model. The adsorption isotherm curves showed a three-region behavior in the ARIAN model. It had a good fit with Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity followed the order of Fe3O4@Zn-Al-LDH>Fe3O4@Mg-Al-LDH>Fe3O4@Ni-Al-LDH. Thermodynamic analyses indicated that the phosphate adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The three Fe3O4@LDHs composites could be easily separated from aqueous solution by the external magnetic field in 10s. These novel magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@LDHs adsorbents may offer a simple single step adsorption treatment option to remove phosphate from water without the requirement of pre-/post-treatment for current industrial practice. PMID:25778739

  12. Kinetic Interpretation of Water Vapor Adsorption-Desorption Behavior of a Desiccant Rotor Showing S-shaped Adsorption Isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kumiko; Oshima, Kazunori; Takewaki, Takahiko; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor containing an iron aluminophosphate type zeolite FAM-Z01 (Functional Adsorbent Material Zeolite 01) was experimentally investigated for humidity swing. This rotor exhibited an S-shaped adsorption isotherm with its temperature dependence. Humidity swing, using a small piece of the rotor, could be usefully applied to interpret adsorption / desorption mechanisms by observing their rates. The most significant finding was that the adsorption / desorption rates in humidity swing could be described by the amount of adsorption, temperature and amplitude of the humidity swing, not by cycle time. Also, using the liner driving force (LDF) model, the overall mass transfer coefficient changed with the elapse of time or with the amount of adsorbed water. This implied that the LDF model, considering constant value of the overall mass transfer coefficient, was probably unable to explain the water adsorption / desorption behavior of FAM-Z01 desiccant rotor.

  13. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption of selected monoalkylbenzenes in H-ZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, R.; Karge, H.G.

    1999-03-04

    In this study, the authors present the first systematic investigation of the adsorption of n-propylbenzene, isopropylbenzene, and n-butylbenzene in H-ZSM-5. Both the sorption isotherms and the rate of sorption uptake were investigated at temperatures between 315 and 425 K. The adsorption isotherms are of type 1 and are reasonably well described by the Langmuir-Freundlich model. It is shown that the heat of adsorption of the longer sorbate molecules depends significantly on the concentration, thus indicating an increased influence of sorbate-sorbate interaction. The uptake rates are determined by Fickian diffusion. The activation energies for the diffusion process are identical for all systems (32--36 kJ/mol). The diffusivities are also in the same order of magnitude decreasing noticeably for sorbates with longer or more complex substituents. A tentative explanation based on a simple jump-rate model for intracrystalline diffusion is given.

  14. Adsorption studies of methylene blue and phenol onto vetiver roots activated carbon prepared by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Altenor, Sandro; Carene, Betty; Emmanuel, Evens; Lambert, Jacques; Ehrhardt, Jean-Jacques; Gaspard, Sarra

    2009-06-15

    Vetiver roots have been utilized for the preparation of activated carbon (AC) by chemical activation with different impregnation ratios of phosphoric acid, X(P) (gH(3)PO(4)/g precursor): 0.5:1; 1:1 and 1.5:1. Textural characterization, determined by nitrogen adsorption at 77K shows that mixed microporous and mesoporous structures activated carbons (ACs) with high surface area (>1000 m(2)/g) and high pore volume (up to 1.19 cm(3)/g) can be obtained. The surface chemical properties of these ACs were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Boehm titration. Their textural and chemical characteristics were compared to those of an AC sample obtained by steam activation of vetiver roots. Classical molecules used for characterizing liquid phase adsorption, phenol and methylene blue (MB), were used. Adsorption kinetics of MB and phenol have been studied using commonly used kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the intraparticle diffusion model and as well the fractal, BWS (Brouers, Weron and Sotolongo) kinetic equation. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) and the normalized standard deviation Deltaq (%) were determined showing globally, that the recently derived fractal kinetic equation could best describe the adsorption kinetics for the adsorbates tested here, indicating a complex adsorption mechanism. The experimental adsorption isotherms of these molecules on the activated carbon were as well analysed using four isotherms: the classical Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson equations, but as well the newly published deformed Weibull Brouers-Sotolongo isotherm. The results obtained from the application of the equations show that the best fits were achieved with the Brouers-Sotolongo equation and with the Redlich-Peterson equation. Influence of surface functional groups towards MB adsorption is as well studied using various ACs prepared from vetiver roots and sugar cane bagasse. Opposite effects governing MB

  15. CO{sub 2} adsorption: Experimental investigation with kinetics verification and CFD reactor model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, Ronald W,; Huckaby, Ernest D.; Shadle, Lawrence J; Spenik, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory is investigating a new process for CO{sub 2} capture from large sources such as utility power generation facilities as an alternative to liquid amine based absorption processes. Many, but not all of these advanced dry processes are based upon sorbents composed of supported polyamines. In this analysis, experiments have been conducted in a small facility at different temperatures and compared to CFD reactor predictions using kinetics obtained from TGA tests. This particular investigation compares the predicted performance and the experimental performance of one of these new class of sorbents in a fluidized bed reactor. In the experiment, the sorbent absorbs CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in a riser reactor, separates the carbonated particles from the de-carbonated flue gas in a cyclone and then regenerates the sorbent, creating a concentrated stream of pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. In this work, experimental measurements of adsorption are compared to predictions from a 3-dimensional non-isothermal reacting multiphase flow model. The effects of the gas flow rate and reactor temperature are explored. It is shown that the time duration for CO{sub 2} adsorption decreased for an increase in the gas flow. The details of the experimental facility and the model as well as the comparative analysis between the data and the simulation results are discussed.

  16. Adsorption kinetics of surfactants at liquid-solid and liquid-vapor interfaces from atomic-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrenova, Eugeniya K.; Patnaik, Soumya S.

    2012-02-01

    Nucleate pool boiling of pure liquid is a complex process involving different size- and time-scale phenomena. The appearance of the first nanobubble in the liquid at the bottom of a hot pan, the detachment of the bubble from the solid surface, its subsequent coalescence with other bubbles, all represent complex multiscale phenomena. Surfactants added to water increase the complexity of the process by contributing to the dynamic surface tension at the liquid-vapor and liquid-solid interfaces and thus affecting the heat and mass transfer at those interfaces. We apply molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption kinetics of anionic, cationic, and non-ionic surfactants at liquid/solid and liquid/vapor interfaces. The all-atom vs. united-atom approaches for the solid and surfactants are surveyed in view of their applicability at near boiling temperatures and a range of model water potentials is assessed for reproducing the thermal properties of water at boiling conditions.

  17. Adsorptive removal and kinetics of methylene blue from aqueous solution using NiO/MCM-41 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xuechun; Zhang, Fei; Feng, Zhipeng; Deng, Shaojuan; Wang, Yude

    2015-01-01

    Highly ordered mesoporous material MCM-41 was synthesized from tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as Si source and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as template. Well-dispersed NiO nanoparticles were introduced into the highly ordered mesoporous MCM-41 by chemical precipitation method to prepare the highly ordered mesoporous NiO/MCM-41 composite. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement were used to examine the morphology and the microstructure of the obtained composite. The morphological study clearly revealed that the synthesized NiO/MCM-41 composite has a highly ordered mesoporous structure with a specific surface area of 435.9 m2 g-1. A possible formation mechanism is preliminary proposed for the formation of the nanostructure. The adsorption performance of NiO/MCM-41 composite as an adsorbent was further demonstrated in the removal azo dyes of methyl orange (MO), Congo red (CR), methylene blue (MB) and rhodaming B (RB) under visible light irradiation and dark, respectively. The kinetics and mechanism of removal methylene blue were studied. The results show that NiO/MCM-41 composite has a good removal capacity for organic pollutant MB from the wastewater under the room temperature. Compared with MCM-41 and NiO nanoparticles, 54.2% and 100% higher removal rate were obtained by the NiO/MCM-41 composite.

  18. Adsorption and photodegradation kinetics of herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid with MgFeTi layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Kim Phuong; Beak, Min-wook; Huy, Bui The; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2016-03-01

    The calcined layered double hydroxides (cLDHs) Ti-doped and undoped MgFe for this study were prepared by co-precipitation method followed by calcination at 500 °C. The as-prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (DRS) techniques and tested for adsorption and photodegradation (including photocatalytic and photo-Fenton-like) of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) in aqueous solutions under visible light irradiation. In the range of studied operating conditions, the as-prepared samples exhibited excellent photo-Fenton-like activity, leading to more than 80-95% degradation of 2,4,5-T at initial concentration of 100 mg L(-1) with 4 g calcined LDHs per liter, was accomplished in 360 min, while 2,4,5-T half-life time was as short as 99-182 min. The kinetics of adsorption and photodegradation of 2,4,5-T were also discussed. These results offered a green, low cost and high efficiency photocatalyst for environmental remediation. PMID:26706931

  19. Adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamics of atrazine removal using a banana peel based sorbent.

    PubMed

    Chaparadza, Allen; Hossenlopp, Jeanne M

    2012-01-01

    Atrazine removal from water by treated banana peels was studied. The effect of pH, contact time, initial atrazine concentration, and temperature were investigated. Batch experiments demonstrated that 15 g L(-1) adsorbent dosage removed 90-99% of atrazine from 1-150 ppm aqueous solutions. The removal was both pH and temperature dependent with the most atrazine removed between pH 7 and 8.2 and increased with increasing temperature. Equilibrium data fitted well to the Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models in the concentration and temperature ranges investigated, with a maximum adsorption capacity of 14 mg g(-1). Simple mass transfer models were applied to the experimental data to examine the adsorption mechanism and it was found that both external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion played important roles in the adsorption mechanisms. The enthalpy of atrazine adsorption was evaluated to be 67.8 ± 6.3 kJ mol(-l) with a Gibbs free energy of -5.7 ± 1.2 kJ mol(-1). PMID:22339031

  20. Heavy Metal Adsorption onto Kappaphycus sp. from Aqueous Solutions: The Use of Error Functions for Validation of Isotherm and Kinetics Models.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Sayedur; Sathasivam, Kathiresan V

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption process is a promising technology for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastes and effluents using low-cost and effective biosorbents. In the present study, adsorption of Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) onto dried biomass of red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration, and temperature. The experimental data were evaluated by four isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich) and four kinetic models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models). The adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic in nature. Functional groups in the biomass involved in metal adsorption process were revealed as carboxylic and sulfonic acids and sulfonate by Fourier transform infrared analysis. A total of nine error functions were applied to validate the models. We strongly suggest the analysis of error functions for validating adsorption isotherm and kinetic models using linear methods. The present work shows that the red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. can be used as a potentially low-cost biosorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Further study is warranted to evaluate its feasibility for the removal of heavy metals from the real environment. PMID:26295032

  1. Heavy Metal Adsorption onto Kappaphycus sp. from Aqueous Solutions: The Use of Error Functions for Validation of Isotherm and Kinetics Models

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Sayedur; Sathasivam, Kathiresan V.

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption process is a promising technology for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastes and effluents using low-cost and effective biosorbents. In the present study, adsorption of Pb2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ onto dried biomass of red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration, and temperature. The experimental data were evaluated by four isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich) and four kinetic models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models). The adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic in nature. Functional groups in the biomass involved in metal adsorption process were revealed as carboxylic and sulfonic acids and sulfonate by Fourier transform infrared analysis. A total of nine error functions were applied to validate the models. We strongly suggest the analysis of error functions for validating adsorption isotherm and kinetic models using linear methods. The present work shows that the red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. can be used as a potentially low-cost biosorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Further study is warranted to evaluate its feasibility for the removal of heavy metals from the real environment. PMID:26295032

  2. Influence of adsorption kinetics on stress evolution in magnetron-sputtered SiO2 and SiNx films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingping; Fang, Ming; He, Hongbo; Shao, Jianda; Li, Zhaoyang

    2013-07-01

    An in situ multi-beam optical sensor system was used to monitor and analyze the force per unit width (F/w) and stress evolution during several stages in magnetron-sputtered SiO2 and SiNx films. Stress was observed to relieve quickly after interrupt and recover rapidly after growth resumption in both films. Stress relief was reversible in SiO2 film but partial reversible in SiNx film. Stress relief results from both physical and chemical adsorption. Stress recovery is caused by physical desorption. And chemical adsorption results in an irreversible stress relief component. No chemical adsorption occurs in SiO2 film because of the stable chemical structure. The relationship between adsorption kinetics and films' mechanical behavior is revealed.

  3. Conformation, Orientation, and Adsorption Kinetics of Dermaseptin B2 onto Synthetic Supports at Aqueous/Solid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Noinville, S.; Bruston, F.; El Amri, C.; Baron, D.; Nicolas, P.

    2003-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of cationic amphipathic peptides is due mainly to the adsorption of peptides onto target membranes, which can be modulated by such physicochemical parameters as charge and hydrophobicity. We investigated the structure of dermaseptin B2 (Drs B2) at the aqueous/synthetic solid support interface and its adsorption kinetics using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. We determined the conformation and affinity of Drs B2 adsorbed onto negatively charged (silica or dextran) and hydrophobic supports. Synthetic supports of differing hydrophobicity were obtained by modifying silica or gold with ω-functionalized alkylsilanes (bromo, vinyl, phenyl, methyl) or alkylthiols. The peptide molecules adsorbed onto negatively charged supports mostly had a β-type conformation. In contrast, a monolayer of Drs B2, mainly in the α-helical conformation, was adsorbed irreversibly onto the hydrophobic synthetic supports. The conformational changes during formation of the adsorbed monolayer were monitored by two-dimensional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy correlation; they showed the influence of peptide-peptide interactions on α-helix folding on the most hydrophobic support. The orientation of the α-helical Drs B2 with respect to the hydrophobic support was determined by polarized attenuated total reflection; it was around 15 ± 5°. This orientation was confirmed and illustrated by a molecular dynamics study. These combined data demonstrate that specific chemical environments influence the structure of Drs B2, which could explain the many functions of antimicrobial peptides. PMID:12885663

  4. Sonochemical assisted hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO: Cr nanoparticles loaded activated carbon for simultaneous ultrasound-assisted adsorption of ternary toxic organic dye: Derivative spectrophotometric, optimization, kinetic and isotherm study.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, M; Ghaedi, M; Dashtian, K; Hajati, S; Bazrafshan, A A

    2016-09-01

    Chromium doped zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO: Cr-NPs) was synthesized by ultrasonically assisted hydrothermal method and characterized by FE-SEM, XRD and TEM analysis. Subsequently, this composite ultrasonically assisted was deposited on activated carbon (ZnO: Cr-NPs-AC) and used for simultaneous ultrasound-assisted removal of three toxic organic dye namely of malachite green (MG), eosin yellow (EY) and Auramine O (AO). Dyes spectra overlap in mixture (major problem for simultaneous investigation) of this systems was extensively resolved by derivative spectrophotometric method. The magnitude of variables like initial dyes concentration, adsorbent mass and sonication time influence on dyes removal was optimized using small central composite design (CCD) combined with desirability function (DF) approach, while pH was studied by one-a-time approach. The maximized removal percentages at desirability of 0.9740 was set as follow: pH 6.0, 0.019g ZnO: Cr-NPs-AC, 3.9min sonication at 4.5, 4.8 and 4.7mgL(-1) of MG, EY and AO, respectively. Above optimized points lead to achievement of removal percentage of 98.36%, 97.24%, and 99.26% correspond to MG, EY and AO, respectively. ANOVA for each dyes based p-value less than (<0.0001) suggest highly efficiency of CCD model for prediction of data concern to simultaneous removal of these dyes within 95% confidence interval, while their F-value for MG, EY and AO is 935, 800.2, and 551.3, respectively, that confirm low participation of this them in signal. The value of multiple correlation coefficient R(2), adjusted and predicted R(2) for simultaneous removal of MG is 0.9982, 0.9972 and 0.9940, EY is 0.9979, 0.9967 and 0.9930 and for AO is 0.9970, 0.9952 and 0.9939. The adsorption rate well fitted by pseudo second-order and Langmuir model via high, economic and profitable adsorption capacity of 214.0, 189.7 and 211.6mgg(-1) for MG, EY and AO, respectively. PMID:27150752

  5. Adsorption studies of cadmium ions on alginate-calcium carbonate composite beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Zahid; Amin, Athar; Zafar, Uzma; Raza, Muhammad Amir; Hafeez, Irfan; Akram, Adnan

    2015-07-01

    Alginate-calcium carbonate composite material was prepared in the form of beads and characterized using Fourier transform infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The adsorption of Cd2+ ions was studied through batch experiments. The adsorption parameters such as contact time (120 min), adsorbent dose (1.5 g), initial metal ion concentration(10 mg/L), pH (6) and agitation speed (150 rpm) were optimized at room temperature. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were applied to the data and it was noted that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions is better explained by Freundlich model. The kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ ions followed pseudo-first order kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters like ∆G 0, ∆H 0 and ∆S 0 were calculated and on the basis of these values it was established that the adsorption process is feasible and endothermic in nature. It was concluded from the study that the composite material of alginate and calcium carbonate can effectively be used to recover Cd2+ ions from wastewater.

  6. Adsorption studies of chromium (VI) removal from water by lanthanum diethanolamine hybrid material.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sandip; Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Giri, Anil Kumar; Patel, Raj Kishore

    2014-01-01

    In the present research work, lanthanum diethanolamine hybrid material is synthesized by co-precipitation method and used for the removal of Cr(VI) from synthetic dichromate solution and hand pump water sample. The sorption experiments were carried out in batch mode to optimize various influencing parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, competitive anions and temperature. The characterization of the material and mechanism of Cr(VI) adsorption on the material was studied by using scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and thermogravimetric analysis-differential thermal analysis. Adsorption kinetics studies reveal that the adsorption process followed first-order kinetics and intraparticle diffusion model with correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. The adsorption data were best fitted to linearly transformed Langmuir isotherm with correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.997. The maximum removal of Cr(VI) is found to be 99.31% at optimal condition: pH = 5.6 of the solution, adsorbent dose of 8 g L(-1) with initial concentration of 10mgL(-1) of Cr(VI) solution and an equilibrium time of 50 min. The maximum adsorption capacity of the material is 357.1 mg g(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were evaluated to study the effect of temperature on the removal process. The study shows that the adsorption process is feasible and endothermic in nature. The value of E (260.6 kJ mol(-1)) indicates the chemisorption nature of the adsorption process. The material is difficult to be regenerated. The above studies indicate that the hybrid material is capable of removing Cr(VI) from water. PMID:24645464

  7. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters. PMID:26657085

  8. Studies on adsorption of formaldehyde in zirconium phosphate-glyphosates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuejuan; Yi, Jianjun; Xu, Qinghong

    2011-01-01

    In our previous work [22], a kind of layered compound of zirconium phosphate-glyphosate (ZrGP) was synthesized. Its large surface area (445 m 2/g) indicates this compound has possible application in adsorptions. In this paper, adsorption to formaldehyde in ZrGP and mechanisms of the adsorption were studied carefully. Balance time of adsorption (about 6 h) and largest adsorbed amount (7.8%) were found when adsorption temperature was at 40 °C and pH value of adsorption environment was about 3.0. H-bonds were found existing between molecules of formaldehyde and ZrGP, and formaldehyde molecules could exist in ZrGP stably.

  9. CO2 adsorption on diatomaceous earth modified with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and functionalized with tetraethylenepentamine: Optimization and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Pornaroonthama, Phuwadej; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich; Pongstabodee, Sangobtip

    2015-07-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbent diatomaceous earth (DE) was modified with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and functionalized with varying levels of tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). The CO2 absorption at atmospheric pressure was optimized by varying the TEPA-loading level (0-40% (w/w)), operating temperature (40-80 °C) and water vapor concentration (0-16% (v/v)) in a 10% (v/v) CO2 feed stream in helium balance using a full 2(3) factorial design. The TEPA/CTAB-DE adsorbents were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and thermogravimetric analyses. The CO2 adsorption capacity increased as each of these three factors increased. The TEPA loading level-water concentration interaction had a positive influence on the CO2 adsorption while the operating temperature-water concentration interaction was antagonistic. The optimal condition for CO2 adsorption on 40%TEPA/CTAB-DE, evaluated via a factorial design response surface method (RSM), was a temperature of 58-68 °C and a water vapor concentration of 9.5-14% (v/v), with a maximum CO2 adsorption capacity of 149.4 mg g(-1) at 63.5 °C and 12% (v/v) water vapor concentration in the feed. Validation and sensitivity tests revealed that the estimated CO2 adsorption capacity was within ±4% of the experimental values, suggesting that the RSM model was satisfied and acceptable. From three kinetic models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order model and Avrami's equation), assessed using an error function (Err) and the coefficient of determination (R(2)), Avrami's equation was the most appropriate to describe the kinetics of CO2 adsorption on the 40%TEPA/CTAB-DE adsorbent and suggested that more than one reaction pathway occurred in the CO2 adsorption. PMID:25910973

  10. Kinetic Adsorption Profile and Conformation Evolution at the DNA-Gold Nanoparticle Interface Probed by Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic adsorption profile at the DNA–gold nanoparticle (AuNP) interface is probed by following the binding and organization of thiolated linear DNA and aptamers of varying chain lengths (15, 30, 44, and 51 mer) to the surface of AuNPs (13.0 ± 1.0 nm diameter). A systematic investigation utilizing dynamic light scattering has been performed to directly measure the changes in particle size during the course of a typical aging-salting thiolated DNA/AuNP preparation procedure. We discuss the effect of DNA chain length, composition, salt concentration, and secondary structure on the kinetics and conformation at the DNA–AuNP interface. The adsorption kinetics are chain-length dependent, composition independent, and not diffusion rate limited for the conditions we report here. The kinetic data support a mechanism of stepwise adsorption of thiols to the surface of AuNPs and reorganization of the thiols at the interface. Very interestingly, the kinetic increases of the particle sizes are modeled accurately by the pseudo-second-order rate model, suggesting that DNA could possess the statistically well-defined conformational evolution. Together with other experimental evidence, we propose a dynamic inner-layer and outer-tail (DILOT) model to describe the evolution of the DNA conformation after the initial adsorption of a single oligonucleotide layer. According to this model, the length of the tails that extend from the surface of AuNPs, capable for hybridization or molecular recognition, can be conveniently calculated. Considering the wide applications of DNA/AuNPs, the results should have important implications in sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly. PMID:25222203

  11. Adsorption studies of Cu(II) onto biopolymer chitosan and its nanocomposite 5%bentonite/chitosan.

    PubMed

    Moussout, Hamou; Ahlafi, Hammou; Aazza, Mustapha; Zegaoui, Omar; El Akili, Charaf

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) and nanocomposite 5%bentonite/chitosan (5%Bt/CS) prepared from the natural biopolymer CS were tested to remove Cu(II) ions using a batch adsorption experiment at various temperatures (25, 35 and 45°C). X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) were used in CS and the nanocomposite characterisation. This confirmed the exfoliation of bentonite (Bt) to form the nanocomposite. The adsorption kinetics of copper on both solids was found to follow a pseudo-second-order law at each studied temperature. The Cu(II) adsorption capacity increased as the temperature increased from 25 to 45°C for nanocomposite adsorbent but slightly increased for CS. The data were confronted to the nonlinear Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson models. It was found that the experimental data fitted very well the Langmuir isotherm over the whole temperature and concentration ranges. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for the Cu(II) was 404-422 mg/g for CS and 282-337 mg/g for 5%Bt/CS at 25-45°C. The thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. The complexation of Cu(II) with NH(2) and C = O groups as active sites was found to be the main mechanism in the adsorption processes. PMID:27148722

  12. Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics investigation on the adsorption of lead(II) by coal-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhengji; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Mijia; Chen, Huilun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using activated coal-based activated carbon (CBAC) to adsorb Pb(II) from aqueous solutions through batch tests. Effects of contact time, pH, temperature and initial Pb(II) concentration on the Pb(II) adsorption were examined. The Pb(II) adsorption is strongly dependent on pH, but insensitive to temperature. The best pH for Pb(II) removal is in the range of 5.0-5.5 with more than 90 % of Pb(II) removed. The equilibrium time was found to be 60 min and the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Isotherm data followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 162.33 mg/g. The adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis suggested that CBAC possessed a porous structure and was rich in carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on its surface, which might play a major role in Pb(II) adsorption. These findings indicated that CBAC has great potential as an alternative adsorbent for Pb(II) removal. PMID:27504258

  13. Study of adsorption and degradation of dimethylphthalate on TiO2-based photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido Melián, E.; Henríquez-Cárdenes, E.; González Díaz, O.; Doña Rodríguez, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    This work studied the degradation and adsorption of dimethylphthalate (DMP) using various TiO2-based photocatalysts: TiO2 Aeroxide P25, Kronos vlp7000, Hombikat UV-100, Kemira 650 and a synthesized photocatalyst named SG750. As the photocatalysts with mixed anatase and rutile phases, P25 and SG750, showed greater activity than those of pure phase, an in-depth study was undertaken of these two catalysts in the adsorption and degradation of DMP. The degradation results were fitted with a high degree of correlation to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model and those for adsorption to the Freundlich model. The Freundlich constants showed good correlation with FTIR observations of the DMP-P25 and DMP-SG750 interactions. These two photocatalysts were additionally modified by photodeposition with Pt and Au (0.5-1.5 wt%) to study the effect of these metals on degradation and mineralization kinetics.

  14. Investigation of adsorption kinetics and isotherm of cellulase and B-Glucosidase on lignocellulosic substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clear understanding of enzyme adsorption during enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass is essential to enhance the cost-efficiency of hydrolysis. However, conclusions from literatures often contradicted each other because enzyme adsorption is enzyme, biomass/pretreatment and experimental co...

  15. Adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid on activated bleaching earth-chitosan-SDS composites: Optimization, kinetics, isotherms.

    PubMed

    Naowanat, Nitiya; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich; Pongstabodee, Sangobtip

    2016-03-15

    The adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid (MWF) on activated bleaching earth (BE)-chitosan-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) composites (BE/MCS) was investigated under a statistical design of experiments at a 95% confidence interval to identify the critical factors and to optimize the adsorption capacity. The BE/MCS adsorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle analysis (sessile drop technique) and their zeta potential. From the results of a full 2(5) factorial design with three center points, the adsorbent weight and initial pH of the MWF had a significant antagonistic effect on the adsorption capacity while the initial MWF concentration and BE:chitosan:SDS weight ratio had a synergistic influence. Temperature factor has no discernible effect on the capacity. From the FCCC-RSM design, the optimal capacity range of 2840-2922.5 mg g(-1) was achieved at sorbent weight of 1.6-1.9 g, pH of 5.5-6.5, initial MWF concentration of 52-55 g l(-1) and BE:chitosan:SDS (w/w/w) ratio of 4.7:1:1-6.2:1:1. To test the validation and sensitivity of RSM model, the results showed that the estimated adsorption capacity was close to the experimental capacity within an error range of ±3%, suggesting that the RSM model was acceptable and satisfied. From three kinetics models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order model and Avrami's equation) and two adsorption isotherms (Langmuir model and Freundlich model), assessed using an error function (Err) and the coefficient of determination (R(2)), Avrami's equation and Freundlich isotherm model provided a good fitting for the data, suggesting the presence of more than one reaction pathway in the MWF adsorption process and the heterogeneous surface adsorption of the BC/ABE-5.5 composite. PMID:26731309

  16. A study on the adsorption of methylene blue onto gum ghatti/TiO2 nanoparticles-based hydrogel nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Hemant; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work was to study the isotherm and kinetic models for the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto a TiO2 nanoparticle (TiO2NP)-containing hydrogel nanocomposite (HNC) of polyacrylamide-grafted gum ghatti (PAAm-g-Gg). The grafting of PAAm onto Gg was conducted using N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (MBA) as a crosslinker, and different weight percentages of TiO2NPs were incorporated into the hydrogel matrix during the grafting reaction. The graft co-polymerization and the formation of the HNC were confirmed using FTIR, XRD, BET, SEM, TEM and EDS analyses. The adsorption of MB was studied in batch mode and it was found to be highly dependent on solution pH, ionic strength temperature and adsorbent loading. The MB-adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order rate model and Langmuir adsorption isotherm with a maximum adsorption capacity of 1305.5mgg(-1). Thermodynamic studies revealed that the adsorption of MB onto the HNC surface was spontaneous, endothermic and through a process of physisorption. The results also showed that the HNC was much more effective for the adsorption of cationic dyes than anionic dyes, and it retained its original adsorption capacity for five successive cycles of adsorption-desorption. In conclusion, the hydrogel nanocomposite showed huge potential for remediating industrial wastewater polluted by toxic cationic dyes. PMID:26997239

  17. Adsorption of atrazine on soils: model study.

    PubMed

    Kovaios, Ilias D; Paraskeva, Christakis A; Koutsoukos, Petros G; Payatakes, Alkiviades Ch

    2006-07-01

    The adsorption of the widely used herbicide atrazine onto three model inorganic soil components (silica gel, gamma-alumina, and calcite (CaCO(3)) was investigated in a series of batch experiments in which the aqueous phase equilibrated with the solid, under different solution conditions. Atrazine did not show discernible adsorption on gamma-alumina (theta=25 degrees C, 3.8adsorption from solutions was found for silica gel suspensions. The adsorption isotherms obtained for atrazine uptake on silica gel particles were best fitted with the Freundlich model. An increase of the ionic strength of the electrolytic solution induced an increase of the surface concentration of atrazine on silica gel, indicating significant electrostatic interactions between atrazine and silica gel particles, possibly through interaction with the surface silanol groups of the solid substrate. Increase of the pH value of the electrolyte solution from 6 to 9 considerably decreased the amount of atrazine adsorbed on the silica gel substrate. Decrease of the solution pH from 6 to 3 had only a slight effect on the surface concentration of the adsorbed atrazine. The adsorption of atrazine on silica gel increased when the temperature was decreased from 40 to 25 degrees C, an indication that the adsorption is exothermic. The calculated enthalpy of adsorption ( approximately 10 kJ/mol) indicates that the uptake at the solid-liquid equilibrium pH (6.1) was largely due to physisorption. PMID:16556447

  18. Response surface methodology approach for optimization of adsorption of Janus Green B from aqueous solution onto ZnO/Zn(OH)2-NP-AC: Kinetic and isotherm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Khafri, H. Zare; Asfaram, A.; Goudarzi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The Janus Green B (JGB) adsorption onto homemade ZnO/Zn(OH)2 nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (AC) which characterized by FESEM and XRD analysis has been reported. Combination of response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) has been employed to model and optimize variables using STATISTICA 10.0 software. The influence of parameters over pH (2.0-8.0), adsorbent (0.004-0.012 g), sonication time (4-8 min) and JGB concentration (3-21 mg L-1) on JGB removal percentage was investigated and their main and interaction contribution was examined. It was revealed that 21 mg L-1 JGB, 0.012 g ZnO/Zn(OH)2-NP-AC at pH 7.0 and 7 min sonication time permit to achieve removal percentage more than 99%. Finally, a good agreement between experimental and predicted values after 7 min was achieved using pseudo-second-order rate equation. The Langmuir adsorption is appropriate for correlation of equilibrium data. The small amount of adsorbent (0.008-0.015 g) is applicable for successful removal of JGB (RE > 99%) in short time (7 min) with high adsorption capacity (81.3-98.03 mg g-1).

  19. Sorption kinetic studies of ammonium from aqueous solution on different inorganic and organic media.

    PubMed

    Kucić, Dajana; Cosić, Ivana; Vuković, Marija; Briski, Felicita

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the sorption of ammonium from aqueous solution onto activated carbon, natural zeolite, peat and potting soil was studied by performing batch kinetic sorption experiments. The activated carbon wasn't efficiently removing ammonium at concentrations higher than 50 mg L(-1). Sorption isotherms of ammonium on zeolite, peat and potting soil were determined at 25 degrees C and 200 rpm with the initial concentration of 50-7000 mg L(-1). Equilibrium data were fitted by Freundlich, Langmuir and Temkin isotherm and parameters were evaluated according these models. Langmuir model gives better fit to experimental data than Freundlich and Temkin models. Maximum adsorption capacities were for activated carbon 0.631 mg g(-1), zeolite 58 mg g(-1), peat 595 mg g(-1) and for potting soil 575 mg g(-1). The equilibrium kinetic data were analyzed using adsorption kinetic models: the pseudo-first and second-order equations and were found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. A comparison between linear and non-linear regression method for estimating the adsorption and kinetics parameters was examined. The obtained results showed that non-linear method may be a better way to determine the kinetic parameters. Thermodynamic studies showed exothermic and endothermic nature of the adsorption of NH4(+) on inorganic and organic adsorbents, respectively. From present results it can be seen that zeolite, peat and potting soil are good adsorbents for removal ammonium from aqueous solution. PMID:23841339

  20. Control of Uniform and Interconnected Macroporous Structure in PolyHIPE for Enhanced CO2 Adsorption/Desorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanyong; Liu, Yao; Chen, Jian; Du, Zhongjie; Mi, Jianguo

    2016-07-19

    The highly uniform and interconnected macroporous polymer materials were prepared within the high internal phase hydrosol-in-oil emulsions (HIPEs). Impregnated with polyethylenimine (PEI), the polyHIPEs were then employed as solid adsorbents for CO2 capture. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests were performed with pure CO2, 10% CO2/N2, and moist CO2, respectively. It has shown that the polyHIPE with suitable surface area and PEI impregnation exhibits high CO2 adsorption capacity, remarkable CO2/N2 selectivity, excellent adsorption/desorption kinetics, enhanced efficiency in the presence of water, and admirable stability in capture and release cycles. The results demonstrate the superior comprehensive performance of the present PEI-impregnated polyHIPE for CO2 capture from the postcombustion flue gas. PMID:27322734

  1. A comparative examination of the adsorption mechanism of an anionic textile dye (RBY 3GL) onto the powdered activated carbon (PAC) using various the isotherm models and kinetics equations with linear and non-linear methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Açıkyıldız, Metin; Gürses, Ahmet; Güneş, Kübra; Yalvaç, Duygu

    2015-11-01

    The present study was designed to compare the linear and non-linear methods used to check the compliance of the experimental data corresponding to the isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson) and kinetics equations (pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order). In this context, adsorption experiments were carried out to remove an anionic dye, Remazol Brillant Yellow 3GL (RBY), from its aqueous solutions using a commercial activated carbon as a sorbent. The effects of contact time, initial RBY concentration, and temperature onto adsorbed amount were investigated. The amount of dye adsorbed increased with increased adsorption time and the adsorption equilibrium was attained after 240 min. The amount of dye adsorbed enhanced with increased temperature, suggesting that the adsorption process is endothermic. The experimental data was analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson isotherm equations in order to predict adsorption isotherm. It was determined that the isotherm data were fitted to the Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherms. The adsorption process was also found to follow a pseudo second-order kinetic model. According to the kinetic and isotherm data, it was found that the determination coefficients obtained from linear method were higher than those obtained from non-linear method.

  2. Functionalized mesoporous silica materials for molsidomine adsorption: Thermodynamic study

    SciTech Connect

    Alyoshina, Nonna A.; Parfenyuk, Elena V.

    2013-09-15

    A series of unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials was prepared. The unmodified mesoporous silica was synthesized via sol–gel synthesis in the presence of D-glucose as pore-forming agent. The functionalized by phenyl, aminopropyl and mercaptopropyl groups silica materials were prepared via grafting. The fabricated adsorbent materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and elemental analysis methods. Then their adsorption properties for mesoionic dug molsidomine were investigated at 290–313 K and physiological pH value. Thermodynamic parameters of molsidomine adsorption on the synthesized materials have been calculated. The obtained results showed that the adsorption process of molsidomine on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. The unmodified and mercaptopropyl modified silica materials exhibit significantly higher adsorption capacities and energies for molsidomine than the aminopropyl modified sample. The effects are discussed from the viewpoint of nature of specific interactions responsible for the adsorption. - Graphical abstract: Comparative analysis of the thermodynamic characteristics of molsidomine adsorption showed that the adsorption process on mesoporous silica materials is controlled by chemical nature of surface functional groups. Molsidomine adsorption on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. Taking into account ambiguous nature of mesoionic compounds, it was found that molsidomine is rather aromatic than dipolar. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials were prepared. • Molsidomine adsorption on the silica materials was studied. • Phenyl modified silica shows the highest adsorption capacity and favorable energy. • Molsidomine exhibits the lowest affinity to aminopropyl modified silica.

  3. Study of malachite green adsorption by organically modified clay using a batch method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano-Cárdenas, Sofía; López-Cortez, Socorro; Cornejo-Mazón, Maribel; Mares-Gutiérrez, Juan Carlos

    2013-09-01

    The adsorption of toxic dye malachite green from aqueous effluents by organically modified clay was studied in a batch system. The organoclay (OC) used was prepared by the intercalation of cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide in a Mexican montmorillonite. The effects of initial dye concentration, temperature, pH, and contact time were investigated. The OC showed a high dye removal (99.6%) from an initial dye concentration of 60 mg L-1 at pH 6 and 25 °C. The adsorption capacity was independent of pH and increased with the temperature. Equilibrium data were well fitted by Langmuir adsorption model. The rate of sorption was adjusted to a pseudo second-order kinetic model.

  4. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this program has been to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. During the present program, the interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2 (Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma (TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied. The interaction of low pressure hydrogen with gamma titanium aluminide and beryllium was found to be relatively weak. Weak in the sense that adsorption leads to a low surface concentration of dissociated hydrogen, i.e., the chemisorption process is reversible at room temperature (300 K) for gamma titanium aluminide and the sticking coefficient for chemisorption is extremely small for beryllium. Hydrogen was found to interact readily with alpha-2 titanium aluminide to form a stable surface hydride at 300 K. These results correlate well with other recent studies which show that the mechanical properties for alpha-2 titanium aluminide are readily degraded in hydrogen while gamma titanium aluminide exhibits less degradation and beryllium essentially no degradation. The interaction of oxygen with the surface of several of these materials was studied. More recently, preliminary hydrogen permeation studies were completed for three high temperature alloys, Incoloy 909, Mo-47.5Re (wt. %), and this past year, Haynes 188.

  5. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1991-01-01

    The goal was to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. Although hydrogen degradation of metallic materials is believed to result from dissolved protonic hydrogen, the heterogeneous hydrogen interface transport processes often dominate the kinetics of the degradation process. The initial step in the interface transport process is the dissociative chemisorption of the molecular species at the metal surface followed by hydrogen absorption into and transport through the bulk. Modern advanced aerospace applications often require the use of structural materials in high pressure hydrogen environments at temperatures which range from low cryogenic temperatures to very high temperatures (1300 K and greater). Materials proposed for these applications, such as the titanium aluminides, beta-titanium alloys, nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys, molybdenum-rhenium alloys, beryllium, and various beryllides, need to possess a high degree of immunity from hydrogen induced degradation of mechanical properties. In the present program, the interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2 (Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma (TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied. The interaction of low pressure hydrogen with gamma titanium aluminide and beryllium was found to be relatively weak, in the sense that adsorption leads to a low surface concentration of dissociated hydrogen, i.e., the chemisorption process is reversible at room temperature (300 K) for gamma titanium aluminide and the sticking coefficient for chemisorption is extremely small for beryllium. Hydrogen was found to interact readily with alpha-2 titanium aluminide to form a stable surface hydride at 300 K. These results correlate well with other recent studies which show that the mechanical properties for alpha-2 titanium aluminide are readily degraded in

  6. Adsorption edge study about cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc adsorption by variable charge soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, J. C.; Mouta, E. R.; Soares, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    The improper discharge of industrial and urban residues and the inadvertent use of fertilizers and pesticides can result in soil and water pollution and improve the potential of trace metals to enter in the human food chain. Adsorption reactions occur at the solid/liquid interface and are the most important mechanisms for controlling the activity of metal ions in soil solution. In a complex system with amphoteric behavior, the comprehension of the mobility, availability and fate of pollutants in the soil system is crucial for the prediction of the environmental consequences and for development of prevention/remediation strategies. A comparative study of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) adsorption by highly weathered soils was carried out. Surface (0-0.2m) and subsoil (B horizon) samples were taken from a Rhodic Kandiudalf (RH), an Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox (XA) and an Anionic "Rhodic" Acrudox (RA), located in brazilian humid tropical area. As the pH and the ionic strength are important environmental factors influencing the solution chemistry of heavy metals in variable charge systems, adsorption envelopes, in a batch adsorption experiment, were elaborated by reacting, for 24 h, soil samples with individual 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 aqueous solutions containing nitrate salts of the adsorptive heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) at the initial concentration of 5 mg L-1, with an increasing pH value from 3.0 to 8.0. pH50-100%, the difference between the pH of 100 and 50 percent metal adsorption was determined. A sharp increase of adsorption density (adsorption edge) was observed within a very narrow pH range, usually less than two pH units. Commonly, the relative affinity of a soil for a metal cation increases with the tendency of the cation to form inner-sphere surface complexes. This may be caused by differences in extent of hydrolysis of Cu ions and in affinity of adsorption sites for Cu. In general, subsurface samples showed low pH50

  7. Illite spatial distribution controls Cr(VI) adsorption capacity and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, L.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    In the natural surbsurface, clays typically are the major sorbing minerals for contaminants. Clays are known to distribute unevenly with low permeability 'clay' zones, which can have significant impacts on the sorption of contaminants. In this work, the effects of illite spatial distribution on Cr(VI) adsorption was examined using column experiments and reactive transport modeling. Three columns were set up with the same volume fraction of illite (10%). The Mixed column has illite evenly distributed within a quartz matrix; the Flow-transverse column has illite distributed in one horizontal zone in the direction that is perpendicular to the main flow; the Flow-parallel column has illite distributed in one cylindrical zone in the direction parallel to the main flow direction. Cr(VI) adsorption experiments were carried out under flow velocities of 0.58, 2.93, and 14.67 m/day. Two-dimensional reactive transport modeling was used to understand the role of illite distribution in determining Cr(VI) sorption capacity and kinetics. The result showed that illite spatial distribution strongly influence Cr(VI) sorption, the extent of which depend on the flow conditions . The Cr(VI) sorption kinectics was influenced by the permeability contrast and the preferential flow paths were taken place in high permeability zones. Under the flow rate of 0.58 m/day, the Cr(VI) adsorption in the Mixed and Flow-transverse columns was very similar, showing similar breakthrough time and sorption capacity. In contrast, an early breakthrough and an extended of Cr(VI) occured in the Flow-parallel column. The 2D reactive transport model showed that the inlet fluids flow through the quartz zone and bypass the lower permeability illite zone. Cr(VI) was first adsorbed on the illite-quartz interface early on and gradually diffuse into the illite zone over time. At the flow velocity of 2.93 m/day, the difference among the three columns was similar to the difference at the flow rate of 0.58 m/day. At

  8. Adsorption of quantum dots onto polymer and Gemini surfactant films: a quartz crystal microbalance study.

    PubMed

    Alejo, T; Merchán, M D; Velázquez, M M

    2014-08-26

    We used quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation to study the mechanical properties, the kinetics of adsorption, and the amount of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) adsorbed onto a SiO2 sensor, referred as bare sensor, onto the sensor modified with a film of the polymer poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene), PMAO, or with a film of the Gemini surfactant ethyl-bis(dimethyl octadecyl ammonium bromide), abbreviated as 18-2-18. Results showed that when the sensor is coated with polymer or surfactant molecules, the coverage increases compared with that obtained for the bare sensor. On the other hand, rheological properties and kinetics of adsorption of QDs are driven by QD nanoparticles. Thus, the QD films present elastic behavior, and the elasticity values are independent of the molecule used as coating and similar to the elasticity value obtained for QDs films on the bare sensor. The QD adsorption is a two-step mechanism in which the fastest process is attributed to the QD adsorption onto the solid substrate and the slowest one is ascribed to rearrangement movements of the nanoparticles adsorbed at the surface. PMID:25093530

  9. Arsenic (III) adsorption on iron acetate coated activated alumina: thermodynamic, kinetics and equilibrium approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption potential of iron acetate coated activated alumina (IACAA) for removal of arsenic [As (III)] as arsenite by batch sorption technique is described. IACAA was characterized by XRD, FTIR, EDAX and SEM instruments. Percentage adsorption on IACAA was determined as a function of pH, contact time and adsorbent dose. The study revealed that the removal of As (III) was best achieved at pH =7.4. The initial As (III) concentration (0.45 mg/L) came down to less than 0.01 mg/L at contact time 90 min with adsorbent dose of 1 g/100 mL. The sorption was reasonably explained with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and E a were calculated in order to understand the nature of sorption process. The sorption process was found to be controlled by pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. PMID:24359995

  10. Comparative study on adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) by different adsorbents in water.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Volchek, Konstantin; Brown, Carl E; Robinson, Adam; Obal, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are emerging environmental pollutants. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are the two primary PFC contaminants that are widely found in water, particularly in groundwater. This study compared the adsorption behaviors of PFOS and PFOA on several commercially available adsorbents in water. The tested adsorbents include granular activated carbon (GAC: Filtrasorb 400), powdered activated carbon, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCN), double-walled carbon nanotube, anion-exchange resin (AER: IRA67), non-ion-exchange polymer, alumina, and silica. The study demonstrated that adsorption is an effective technique for the removal of PFOS/PFOA from aqueous solutions. The kinetic tests showed that the adsorption onto AER reaches equilibrium rapidly (2 h), while it takes approximately 4 and 24 h to reach equilibrium for MCN and GAC, respectively. In terms of adsorption capacity, AER and GAC were identified as the most effective adsorbents to remove PFOS/PFOA from water. Furthermore, MCN, AER, and GAC proved to have high PFOS/PFOA removal efficiencies (≥98%). AER (IRA67) and GAC (Filtrasorb 400) were thus identified as the most promising adsorbents for treating PFOS/PFOA-contaminated groundwater at mg L(-1) level based on their equilibrium times, adsorption capacities, removal efficiencies, and associated costs. PMID:25521134

  11. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND INFRARED REACTIVATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of removing trace organic contaminants and surrogates from drinking water by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The effect of multiple reactivations of spent GAC was also evaluated. Results indicated that reactivated GAC eff...

  12. Maghemite nanosorbcats for methylene blue adsorption and subsequent catalytic thermo-oxidative decomposition: Computational modeling and thermodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    El-Qanni, Amjad; Nassar, Nashaat N; Vitale, Gerardo; Hassan, Azfar

    2016-01-01

    In this study methylene blue (MB) has been investigated for its adsorption and subsequent catalytic thermo-oxidative decomposition on surface of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles. The experimental adsorption isotherm fit well to the Freundlich model, indicating multi-sites adsorption. Computational modeling of the interaction between the MB molecule and γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle surface was carried out to get more insights into its adsorption behavior. Adsorption energies of MB molecules on the surface indicated that there are different adsorption sites on the surface of γ-Fe2O3 confirming the findings regarding the adsorption isotherm. The catalytic activity of the γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles toward MB thermo-oxidative decomposition has been confirmed by subjecting the adsorbed MB to a thermo oxidation process up to 600 °C in a thermogravimetric analyzer. The experimental results showed a catalytic activity for post adsorption oxidation. The oxidation kinetics were studied using the Ozawa-Flyn-Wall (OFW) corrected method. The most probable mechanism functions were fifth and third orders for virgin MB and MB adsorbed onto γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, respectively. Moreover, the results of thermodynamic transition state parameters, namely changes in Gibbs free energy of activation (ΔG(‡)), enthalpy of activation (ΔH(‡)), and entropy of activation (ΔS(‡)), emphasized the catalytic activity of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles toward MB oxidation. PMID:26414422

  13. Modeling studies: Adsorption of aniline blue by using Prosopis Juliflora carbon/Ca/alginate polymer composite beads.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M; Tamilarasan, R

    2013-02-15

    The research article describes the experimental and modeling study for the adsorptive removal of aniline blue dye (AB dye) from aqueous matrices using a Prosopis Juliflora modified carbon/Ca/alginate polymer bead as a low cost and eco-friendly adsorbent. The rate of adsorption was investigated under various experimental parameters such as contact time, adsorbent dose, dye concentration, pH and temperature. The kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies were assessed to find out the efficiency of the adsorption process. The equilibrium uptake capacity of the adsorption process was found with Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherm equations and it was evaluated by dimensionless separation factor (R(L)). The dynamics of adsorption was predicted by pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order Lagergren's equation and intra particle diffusion model. Adsorption feasibility was assessed with thermodynamic parameters such as isosteric heat of adsorption (ΔH°), standard entropy (ΔS°) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG°) using VantHoff plot. The alginate bead was characterized with FTIR spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). PMID:23399273

  14. A Density Functional Theory Study of Formaldehyde Adsorption on Ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Deskins, N. Aaron; Dupuis, Michel

    2007-11-01

    Molecular adsorption of formaldehyde on the stoichiometric CeO2(111) and CeO2(110) surfaces was studied using periodic density functional theory. Two adsorption modes (strong chemisorbed and weak physisorbed) were identified on both surfaces. This is consistent with recent experimental observations. On the (111) surface, formaldehyde strongly chemisorbs with an adsorption energy of 0.86 eV to form a dioxymethylene-like structure, in which a surface O lifts from the surface to bind with the C of formaldehyde. A weak physisorbed state with adsorption energy of 0.28 eV was found with the O of formaldehyde interacting with a surface Ce. On the (110) surface, dioxymethyelene formation was also observed, with an adsorption energy of 1.31 eV. The weakly adsorbed state of formaldehyde on the (110) surface was energetically comparable to the weak adsorption state on the (111) surface, but adsorption occurred through a formaldehyde C and surface O interaction. Analysis of the local density of states and charge density differences after adsorption shows that strong covalent bonding occurs between the C of formaldehyde and surface O when dioxymethylene forms. Calculated vibrational frequencies also confirm dioxymethylene formation. Our results also show that as the coverage increases, the adsorption of formaldehyde on the (111) surface becomes weak, but is nearly unaffected on the (110) surface. This work was supported by a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The computations were performed using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which is a U.S. Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at PNNL in Richland, Washington. Computing time was made under a Computational Grand Challenge “Computational Catalysis”. Part of the computing time was also granted by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing

  15. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol removal using superfine powdered activated carbon: shell adsorption and branched-pore kinetic model analysis and optimal particle size.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku

    2013-05-15

    2-Methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin are naturally occurring compounds responsible for musty-earthy taste and odor in public drinking-water supplies, a severe problem faced by many utilities throughout the world. In this study, we investigated adsorptive removal of these compounds by superfine powdered activation carbon (SPAC, particle size <1 μm) produced by novel micro-grinding of powdered activated carbon; we also discuss the optimization of carbon particle size to efficiently enhance the adsorptive removal. After grinding, the absorptive capacity remained unchanged for a 2007 carbon sample and was increased for a 2010 carbon sample; the capacity increase was quantitatively described by the shell adsorption model, in which MIB and geosmin adsorbed more in the exterior of a carbon particle than in the center. The extremely high uptake rates of MIB and geosmin by SPAC were simulated well by a combination of the branched-pore kinetic model and the shell adsorption model, in which intraparticle diffusion through macropores was followed by diffusion from macropore to micropore. Simulations suggested that D40 was on the whole the best characteristic diameter to represent a size-disperse group of adsorbent particles; D40 is the diameter through which 40% of the particles by volume pass. Therefore, D40 can be used as an index for evaluating the improvement of adsorptive removal that resulted from pulverization. The dose required for a certain percentage removal of MIB or geosmin decreased linearly with carbon particle size (D40), but the dose reduction became less effective as the activated carbon was ground down to smaller sizes around a critical value of D40. For a 60-min contact time, critical D40 was 2-2.5 μm for MIB and 0.4-0.5 μm for geosmin. The smaller critical D40 was when the shorter the carbon-water contact time was or the slower the intraparticle mass transfer rate of an adsorbate was. PMID:23528781

  16. Adsorption study of Ammonia Nitrogen by watermelon rind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, A.; Yusof, L.; Beddu, N. S.; Galasin, N.; Lee, P. Y.; Lee, R. N. S.; Zahrim, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The utilization of fruit waste for low-cost adsorbents as a replacement for costly conventional methods of removing ammonia nitrogen from wastewater has been reviewed. The adsorption studies were conducted as a function of contact time and adsorbent dosage and it were carried out on four different adsorbents; fresh watermelon rind and modified watermelon rind with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4). Adsorbents were tested for characterization by using zeta potential test and all samples shows negative values thus makes it favourable for the adsorption process. The batch experimental result showed that adsorption process is rapid and equilibrium was established within 40 minutes of contact time. The ammonia nitrogen removal rate amounted in range of 96% to 99%, and the adsorption capacities were in range of 1.21 to 1.24 mg/g for all four different types of adsorbents used.

  17. Nonlinear optical property of hemicyanine self-assembled monolayers on gold and its adsorption kinetics probed by optical second-harmonic generation and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraoka, Ryo; Kaise, Go; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Okawa, Haruki; Ikezawa, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Kazuhiko

    2002-08-01

    We have prepared the organosulfur self-assembled monolayer (SAM) containing hemicyanine on gold. It shows a large second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χzzz=58 pm/V. The adsorption kinetics of the SAM on gold was also probed by the in situ real time measurements of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. While the SHG kinetics was saturated immediately after the immersion of the gold substrate in the solution, the SPR kinetics showed additional slow adsorption for more than 20 000 s. This means that rapid formation of the well-ordered hemicyanine SAM is followed by gradual physisorption where the molecules are disordered.

  18. Process development for removal and recovery of cadmium from wastewater by a low-cost adsorbent: Adsorption rates and equilibrium studies

    SciTech Connect

    Periasamy, K.; Namasivayam, C. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1994-02-01

    Activated carbon prepared from peanut hulls (PHC), an agricultural waste by-product, has been used for the adsorption of Cd(II) from synthetic wastewater. The adsorption data fit better with the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The applicability of the Lagergren kinetic model has also been investigated. An almost quantitative removal of 20 mg/L Cd(II) by 0.7 g of PHC/L of aqueous solution was observed in the pH range 3.5--9.5. A comparative study with a commercial granular activated carbon (CAC) showed that the adsorption capacity (K[sub f]) of PHC was 31 times larger than that of CAC.

  19. Physical Adsorption of Gases on Heterogeneous Solids and Equilibrium Studies of the Pressure Swing Adsorption Process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochun

    1990-01-01

    -parameter isotherm equation based on benzene adsorption isotherms. We extended further the TVFM to derive thermodynamic functions, such as the adsorption entropy, the adsorption enthalpy, and the adsorption energy distribution, and constructed these functions for various adsorption systems based on their adsorption isotherms. To explore the energetic heterogeneity of the adsorbent, we used two approaches. First, we used the overall integral isotherm equation to obtain the Langmuir -Freundlich isotherm; and second, we used the Gibb's relation to obtain an exponential isotherm equation. The adsorption energy-distribution function can be obtained from these isotherm equations. The pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process was studied based on Shandalman and Mitchell's equilibrium theory for a PSA system with a linear isotherm. This theory was extended to a PSA system with a non-linear isotherm. Relationships were established between the isotherms and process parameters, such as the enrichment factor, the critical recycle ratio, and the extent of the recovery.

  20. Adsorption study of low-cost and locally available organic substances and a soil to remove pesticides from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Raquel; Morillo, José; Usero, José; Vanderlinden, Eva; El Bakouri, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of chlorfenvinphos, chlorpyrifos, simazine and trifluralin on sunflower seed shells, rice husk, composted sewage sludge and an agricultural soil was studied. Film diffusion and sorption pointed to be related with pesticide physicochemical characteristics. Trifluralin and chlorpyrifos were the pesticides which showed the fastest sorption kinetics and the best sorption capacities when sorbed on all organic wastes. Rice husk revealed as the best adsorbent for simazine. Chlorfenvinphos showed comparable adsorption levels for all sorbents. Koc and Kf values suggested that not only the organic matter content but also the nature of the organic matter and other factors, such as physicochemical characteristics of the surface could be play a significant role in pesticide adsorption. Low desorption percentages were detected; nevertheless Kfd and H values reveal a weak and reversible adsorption. The studied organic residues can be used as an effective and alternative adsorbent for removing pesticides, because of their high adsorption capacity, being natural and economic.

  1. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-02-12

    Rates of contaminant U(VI) release from individual size fractions of a composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through batch reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. Variability in equilibrium adsorption among the various size fractions was determined in static batch reactors and analyzed using the surface complexation modeling approach. The estimated stoichiometric coefficients of U(VI) surface complexation reactions with respect to pH and carbonate concentrations varied with size fractions. This source of variability significantly increased the uncertainty in U(VI) conditional equilibrium constants over that estimated from experimental errors alone. A minimum difference between conditional equilibrium constants was established in order to evaluate statistically significant differences between sediment adsorption properties. A set of equilibrium and kinetic expressions for cation exchange, calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration, and silica dissolution were incorporated in a reaction-rate model to describe the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through batch experiments. Parameters in the reaction-rate model, calibrated using experimental data for select size fractions, predicted the changes in solute concentrations for the bulk, <2 mm, sediment sample. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multi-rate surface complexation model with an assumed lognormal distribution for the rate constants. The estimated mean and standard deviation were the same for all < 2mm size fractions, but differed in the 2-8mm size fraction. Micropore volumes in the varied size fractions were also similar as assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data. These findings provide further support for the link between microporosity and particle-scale mass transfer rates controlling kinetic U(VI) adsorption/desorption and for the utility of N2 desorption

  2. On fast reactor kinetics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A.; Matveenko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.; Raskach, K. F.

    2012-07-01

    The results and the program of fast reactor core time and space kinetics experiments performed and planned to be performed at the IPPE critical facility is presented. The TIMER code was taken as computation support of the experimental work, which allows transient equations to be solved in 3-D geometry with multi-group diffusion approximation. The number of delayed neutron groups varies from 6 to 8. The code implements the solution of both transient neutron transfer problems: a direct one, where neutron flux density and its derivatives, such as reactor power, etc, are determined at each time step, and an inverse one for the point kinetics equation form, where such a parameter as reactivity is determined with a well-known reactor power time variation function. (authors)

  3. Kinetic studies of ICF implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Grigory; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. -H.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Svyatsky, D.; Baalrud, S. D.; Daligault, J. O.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Albright, B. J.; Taitano, W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Huang, C. -K.; McDevitt, C. J.; Chacon, L.; Srinivasan, B.; McEvoy, A. M.; Joshi, T. R.; Adams, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    Here, kinetic effects on inertial confinement fusion have been investigated. In particular, inter-ion-species diffusion and suprathermal ion distribution have been analyzed. The former drives separation of the fuel constituents in the hot reacting core and governs mix at the shell/fuel interface. The latter underlie measurements obtained with nuclear diagnostics, including the fusion yield and inferred ion burn temperatures. Basic mechanisms behind and practical consequences from these effects are discussed.

  4. Kinetic studies of ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Grigory; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.-H.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Svyatsky, D.; Baalrud, S. D.; Daligault, J. O.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Albright, B. J.; Taitano, W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Huang, C.-K.; McDevitt, C. J.; Chacon, L.; Srinivasan, B.; McEvoy, A. M.; Joshi, T. R.; Adams, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetic effects on inertial confinement fusion have been investigated. In particular, inter-ion-species diffusion and suprathermal ion distribution have been analyzed. The former drives separation of the fuel constituents in the hot reacting core and governs mix at the shell/fuel interface. The latter underlie measurements obtained with nuclear diagnostics, including the fusion yield and inferred ion burn temperatures. Basic mechanisms behind and practical consequences from these effects are discussed.

  5. A rapid kinetic dye test to predict the adsorption of 2-methylisoborneol onto granular activated carbons and to identify the influence of pore volume distributions.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Michael J; Redding, Adam M; Cannon, Fred S

    2015-01-01

    The authors have developed a kinetic dye test protocol that aims to predict the competitive adsorption of 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) to granular activated carbons (GACs). The kinetic dye test takes about two hours to perform, and produces a quantitative result, fitted to a model to yield an Intraparticle Diffusion Constant (IDC) during the earlier times of dye sorption. The dye xylenol orange was probed into six coconut-based GACs and five bituminous-based GACs that hosted varied pore distributions. Correlations between xylenol orange IDCs and breakthrough of MIB at 4 ppt in rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs) were found with R²s of 0.85 and 0.95 for coconut carbons that processed waters with total organic carbon (TOCs) of 1.9 and 2.2 ppm, respectively, and with an R² of 0.94 for bituminous carbons that processed waters with a TOC of 2.5 ppm. The author sought to study the influence of the pore sizes, which provide the adsorption sites and the diffusion conduits that are necessary for the removal of those compounds. For coconut carbons, a linear correlation was established between the xylenol orange IDCs and the volume of pores in the range of 23.4-31.8 Å widths (R² = 0.98). For bituminous carbons, best correlation was to pores ranging from 74 to 93 Å widths (R² = 0.94). The differences in adsorption between coconut carbons and bituminous carbons have been attributed to the inherently dissimilar graphene layering resulting from the parent materials and the activation processes. When fluorescein dye was employed in the kinetic dye tests, the correlations to RSSCT-MIB performance were not as high as when xylenol orange was used. Intriguingly, it was the same pore size ranges that exhibited the strongest correlation for MIB RSSCT's, xylenol orange kinetics, and fluoroscein kinetics. When methylene blue dye was used, sorption occurred so rapidly as to be out of the scope of the IDC model. PMID:25462782

  6. Dynamic surface tension and adsorption kinetics of a siloxane dicephalic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dianlong; Qu, Wenshan; Li, Zhe

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic surface tension (DST) of a siloxane dicephalic surfactant was measured by using the maximum bubble pressure method. By using the classical Ward and Tordai equation, the diffusion coefficient for each bulk surfactant concentration was calculated. The results show that at the initial adsorption stage and at the end of the adsorption process, the dynamic surface tension data were all consistent with this diffusion-controlled mechanism. Their diffusion coefficient was slightly lower than that for conventional hydrocarbon surfactants.

  7. Tetracycline-loaded biomimetic apatite: an adsorption study.

    PubMed

    Cazalbou, Sophie; Bertrand, Ghislaine; Drouet, Christophe

    2015-02-19

    Biomimetic apatites are appealing compounds for the elaboration of bioactive bone-repair scaffolds due to their intrinsic similarity to bone mineral. Bone surgeries are however often heavy procedures, and the infiltration of pathogens may not be totally avoided. To prevent their development, systemic antibiotic prophylaxis is widespread but does not specifically target surgical sites and involves doses not always optimized. A relevant alternative is a preliminary functionalization by an infection-fighting agent. In this work, we investigated from a physicochemical viewpoint the association of a wide-spectrum antibiotic, tetracycline (TC), and a biomimetic nanocrystalline apatite previously characterized. TC adsorption kinetics and isotherm were thoroughly explored. Kinetic data were fitted to various models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, general kinetic model of order n, Elovich, double-exponential, and purely diffusive models). The best fit was found for a double-exponential kinetic model or with a decimal reaction order of 1.4, highlighting a complex process with such TC molecules which do not expose high-affinity end groups for the surface of apatite. The adsorption isotherm was perfectly fitted to the Sips (Langmuir-Freundlich) model, while other models failed to describe it, and the Sips exponent greater than unity (1.08) suggested a joint impact of surface heterogeneity and positive cooperativity between adsorbed molecules. Finally, preliminary insights on TC release from pelletized nanocrystalline apatite, in aqueous medium and neutral pH, were obtained using a recirculation cell, indicating a release profile mainly following a Higuchi-like diffusion-limited rate. This work is intended to shed more light on the interaction between polar molecules not exhibiting high-affinity end groups and biomimetic apatites and is a starting point in view of the elaboration of biomimetic apatite-based bone scaffolds functionalized with polar organic drugs for a

  8. Adsorptive desulphurization study of liquid fuels using Tin (Sn) impregnated activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Sikandar; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Ahmad, Waqas

    2016-03-01

    Keeping in view the growing concern regarding desulphurization of petroleum products, the present study was under taken to investigate the efficiency of tin impregnated activated charcoal (Sn-AC) as a potential adsorbent for the desulphurization of model and real commercial straight run kerosene and diesel oil samples. The adsorbent Sn-AC was prepared by wet impregnation process in the laboratory and characterized by SEM, EDX and surface area analysis. Initial experiments were carried out using model oil, which was prepared by dissolving dibenzothiophene (DBT) in cyclohexane, the optimum conditions for desulfurization were found to be, 60°C temperature, 1h contact time and adsorbent dosage of 0.8g, under which about 99.4% of DBT removal was attained. Under optimized conditions the desulfurization of real oil i.e., kerosene and diesel oil was also investigated. Kinetic studies revealed that DBT adsorption followed pseudo second order kinetics and the data best fits in the Langmuir adsorption isotherm as compared to Freundlich adsorption isotherm model. The adsorbent could be easily regenerated simply by washing with toluene for a multiple cycles and reused without losing its efficiency. PMID:26551224

  9. Adsorptive separation of ethylene/ethane mixtures using carbon nanotubes: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xingling; Wang, Zhigang; Yang, Zaixing; Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Bo

    2013-10-01

    Ethylene/ethane separation is a very important process in the chemical industry. Traditionally, this process is achieved by cryodistillation, which is extremely energy-intensive. The adsorptive separation is an energy-saving and environmentally benign alternative. In this study, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the competitive adsorption of an equimolar mixture of gaseous ethane and ethylene inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) of different diameters at room temperature. We find that for narrow SWNTs, i.e. the (6, 6) and (7, 7) SWNTs, the selectivities towards ethane, fselec, can reach values of 3.1 and 3.7, respectively. Such high selectivities are contrary to the opinion of many researchers that the adsorptive separation of an ethylene/ethane mixture by means of dispersion interaction is difficult due to the same carbon number of ethane and ethylene. The key for our observation is that the role of dispersion interaction of ethane's additional two hydrogen atoms with the SWNT becomes significant under extreme confinement. Interestingly, the (8, 8) SWNT prefers ethylene to ethane with fselec = 0.6. For wider SWNTs, fselec converges to ∼1. The mechanisms behind these observations, as well as the kinetics of single-file nanopore filling and kinetics of confined gas molecules are discussed. Our findings suggest that efficient ethane/ethylene separation can be achieved by using bundles/membranes of SWNTs with appropriate diameters.

  10. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, Paula A.; Morrill, Mike; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Silcox, Geoffrey D.

    2009-06-15

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  11. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  12. Kinetics and thermodynamic studies for removal of acid blue 129 from aqueous solution by almond shell

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Efficiency and performance of Almond shell (AS) adsorbent for the removal and recovery of Acid Blue 129 (AB129) from wastewater is presented in this report. The influence of variables including pH, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage, particle size, contact time and temperature on the dye removal have been investigated in batch method by one at a time optimization method. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by four widely used isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D–R). It was found that adsorption of AB129 on AS well with the Langmuir isotherm model, implying monolayer coverage of dye molecules onto the surface of the adsorbent. More than 98% removal efficiency was obtained within 14 min at adsorbent dose of 0.4 g for initial dye concentration of 40 mg/L at pH 2. Kinetics of the adsorption process was tested by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics, and intraparticle diffusion mechanism. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided a better correlation for the experimental data studied in comparison to the pseudo-first-order model. Calculation of various thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibb’s free energy, entropy and enthalpy of the on-going adsorption process indicate feasibility and endothermic nature of AB129 adsorption on all adsorbents. This work can be used in design of adsorption columns for dyes removal. PMID:24620822

  13. A Study of Adsorptive Characteristics of Australian Coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Y. P.; Tsai, L. L.

    2012-04-01

    Ever since the Kyoto Protocol, controlling carbon dioxide emission and reducing its content in atmosphere are very important environmental issues up to today. One of the effective methods for permanent sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 is to inject CO2 into deep, unminable coal seams and recover coal bed methane at the same time. CO2-ECBM technology had been proved to be very promising to meet the needs of both environment and energy. Beside other external environment factors, capacity of CO2 adsorption and CH4 desorption are the most influencing factors in selection of sites for the geological storage of CO2. Therefore, the objective of this study is to understand the relationship between gas adsorption and CO2 sequestration, by various experiments for the characterization of Australian of coals. Generally speaking, coal seam gas comprises mostly of CH4, CO2, C2H6, and N2. However, some of the Australian coals were reported with significant amount of CO2 up to 90%, which might strongly affect their capacity of CO2 capture and storage (CCS). High to medium volatile bituminous coals from Sydney Basin and Bowen Basin, southeast Australia were selected in this study. Experiments include maceral composition and vitrinite reflectance measurements, petrographic analysis, Proximate analysis, Ultimate analysis, specific surface area analysis as well as CO2 and CH4 adsorption experiments were performed. Parameters for difference adsorption functions (Langmuir, BET, D-R and D-A) were then calculated to fit their adsorption isotherms the best fitting curve can then be found. Among these adsorption functions, Langmuir is the most basic and commonly used function theory. The results of all experiments were synthesized to discuss the relations among each other, so as to establish the relationship between gas adsorption and coal characteristics.

  14. Facile approach to synthesize chitosan based composite--Characterization and cadmium(II) ion adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sadanand; Tiwari, Stuti

    2015-12-10

    In this present study, the physicochemical properties, nature and morphology of prepared composite materials involving Activated Eskom fly ash (A-FA) and biopolymer-chitosan (Ch) for two components composite materials were investigated. The nature, morphology, elemental characterizations of these materials were carried out by means of modern analytical methods such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), UV-vis spectroscopy (UV-vis), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Other physicochemical characterizations undertaken were carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen (CNH) analysis, and ash content. The precursors and composite materials were then applied to the sorption of cadmium (Cd(2+)) from aqueous water. Maximum Cd(2+) adsorption capacity (Qmax) was recorded to be 87.72 mg/g at pH 8. The adsorption kinetics of the composite materials fitted well with the pseudo second-order kinetic model while the adsorption isotherm data could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm model. PMID:26428168

  15. Arsenic Removal: Adsorptive Media and Coagulation/Filtration Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides information on the results of three case studies from USEPA arsenic demonstration program. The first case study presented is on the Rimrock, AZ project that used an adsorptive media technology (E33 media) to remove arsenic. The second case study is on...

  16. Kinetic limitations in measuring stabilities of metal complexes by competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive stripping voltammetry (CLE-AdSV).

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, Herman P; Town, Raewyn M

    2005-09-15

    The kinetic limitations of Competitive Ligand Exchange-Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry, CLE-AdSV, for the determination of very stable metal complexes are explained in detail. For a given type of metal, from a certain lower limit of the complex stability constant, K, the usual simple equilibrium interpretation of CLE-AdSV measurements is not generally valid. By critical assessment of data for natural waters we show that in many cases the reported stability constants appearto derive from nonequilibrium conditions in the bulk sample and hence overestimate the real values. Fe(II) is a special case due to the particular kinetic features of hydroxide as a ligand. Our results call for validation of such data by analysis on the basis of the kinetics involved and/or by independent kinetic-free experimental approaches. Earlier speculations from CLE-AdSV results on very strong ligands and derived features such as the potential bioavailability of trace metals in natural waters require reconsideration. PMID:16201651

  17. Stabilizing and destabilizing protein surfactant-based foams in the presence of a chemical surfactant: Effect of adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Li, Huazhen; Le Brun, Anton P; Agyei, Dominic; Shen, Wei; Middelberg, Anton P J; He, Lizhong

    2016-01-15

    Stimuli-responsive protein surfactants promise alternative foaming materials that can be made from renewable sources. However, the cost of protein surfactants is still higher than their chemical counterparts. In order to reduce the required amount of protein surfactant for foaming, we investigated the foaming and adsorption properties of the protein surfactant, DAMP4, with addition of low concentrations of the chemical surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). The results show that the small addition of SDS can enhance foaming functions of DAMP4 at a lowered protein concentration. Dynamic surface tension measurements suggest that there is a synergy between DAMP4 and SDS which enhances adsorption kinetics of DAMP4 at the initial stage of adsorption (first 60s), which in turn stabilizes protein foams. Further interfacial properties were revealed by X-ray reflectometry measurements, showing that there is a re-arrangement of adsorbed protein-surfactant layer over a long period of 1h. Importantly, the foaming switchability of DAMP4 by metal ions is not affected by the presence of SDS, and foams can be switched off by the addition of zinc ions at permissive pH. This work provides fundamental knowledge to guide formulation using a mixture of protein and chemical surfactants towards a high performance of foaming at a low cost. PMID:26433478

  18. Adsorption of Rhodamine B on two novel polar-modified post-cross-linked resins: Equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiangfu; Huang, Jianhan

    2016-04-01

    We employed two polar monomers, triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) and butyl acrylate (BA), to copolymerize with divinylbenzene (DVB), and synthesized two starting copolymers labeled PDT and PDB. Then, the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction was performed for the two starting copolymers, and the residual pendent vinyl groups were consumed, and hence we obtained two novel polar-modified post-cross-linked resins PDTpc and PDBpc. The surface polarity greatly improved due to introduction of the polar monomers, and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and pore volume significantly increased after the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction. Compared with the starting copolymers, the non-polar post-cross-linked resin PDVBpc and some other adsorbents in the references, PDTpc and PDBpc possessed a much enhanced adsorption to Rhodamine B, and the equilibrium capacity reached 578.2mg/g and 328.7mg/g, respectively, at an equilibrium concentration of 100mg/L, and the Freundlich model characterized the equilibrium data very well. The adsorption was a fast process and the kinetic data obeyed the micropore diffusion model. These results confirmed that PDTpc and PDBpc had the potential superiority in adsorptive removal of Rhodamine B from aqueous solution. PMID:26803602

  19. Tunable Rare Earth fcu-MOF Platform: Access to Adsorption Kinetics Driven Gas/Vapor Separations via Pore Size Contraction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong-Xu; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Shekhah, Osama; Jiang, Hao; Adil, Karim; Cairns, Amy J; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-04-22

    Reticular chemistry approach was successfully employed to deliberately construct new rare-earth (RE, i.e., Eu(3+), Tb(3+), and Y(3+)) fcu metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with restricted window apertures. Controlled and selective access to the resultant contracted fcu-MOF pores permits the achievement of the requisite sorbate cutoff, ideal for selective adsorption kinetics based separation and/or molecular sieving of gases and vapors. Predetermined reaction conditions that permitted the formation in situ of the 12-connected RE hexanuclear molecular building block (MBB) and the establishment of the first RE-fcu-MOF platform, especially in the presence of 2-fluorobenzoic acid (2-FBA) as a modulator and a structure directing agent, were used to synthesize isostructural RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOFs based on a relatively bulkier 2-connected bridging ligand, namely 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate (1,4-NDC). The subsequent RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOF structural features, contracted windows/pores and high concentration of open metal sites combined with exceptional hydrothermal and chemical stabilities, yielded notable gas/solvent separation properties, driven mostly by adsorption kinetics as exemplified in this work for n-butane/methane, butanol/methanol, and butanol/water pair systems. PMID:25825923

  20. Calcium-mediated DNA adsorption to yeast cells and kinetics of cell transformation by electroporation.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, E; Kakorin, S; Tsoneva, I; Nikolova, B; Tomov, T

    1996-01-01

    Detailed kinetic data suggest that the direct transfer of plasmid DNA (YEp 351, 5.6 kbp, supercoiled, Mr approximately 3.5 x 10(6)) by membrane electroporation of yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, strain AH 215) is mainly due to electrodiffusive processes. The rate-limiting step for the cell transformation, however, is a bimolecular DNA-binding interaction in the cell interior. Both the adsorption of DNA, directly measured with [32P]dCTP DNA, and the number of transformants are collinearly enhanced with increasing total concentrations [Dt] and [Cat] of DNA and of calcium, respectively. At [Cat] = 1 mM, the half-saturation or equilibrium constant is KD = 15 +/- 1 nM at 293 K (20 degrees C). The optimal transformation frequency is TFopt = 4.1 +/- 0.4 X 10(-5) if a single exponential pulse of initial field strength E0 = 4 kV cm-1 and decay time constant tauE = 45 ms is applied at [Dt] = 2.7 nM and 10(8) cells in 0.1 ml. The dependence of TF on [Cat] yields the equilibrium constants KCazero = 1.8 +/- 0.2 mM (in the absence of DNA) and K'Ca (at 2.7 nM DNA), comparable with and derived from electrophoresis data. In yeast cells, too, the appearance of a DNA molecule in its whole length in the cell interior is clearly an after-field event. At Eo = 4.0 kV cm-1 and T = 293 K, the flow coefficient of DNA through the porous membrane patches is Kto = 7.0 +/- 0.7 x 10(3)S-1 and the electrodiffusion of DNA is approximately 10 times more effective than simple diffusion: D/D0 approximately 10.3. The mean radius of these pores is rp = 0.39 +/- 0.05 nm, and the mean number of pores per cell (of size ø approximately 5.5 microns) is Np = 2.2 +/- 0.2 x 10(4). The maximal membrane area that is involved in the electrodiffusive penetration of adsorbed DNA into the outer surface of the electroporated cell membrane patches is only 0.023% of the total cell surface. The surface penetration is followed either by additional electrodiffusive or by passive (after-field) diffusive

  1. Interfacial adsorption of fibrinogen and its inhibition by RGD peptide: a combined physical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Johanna; Salacinski, Henryk J.; Mu, Qingshan; Seifalian, Alex M.; Peel, Louise; Freeman, Neville; Holt, Cathy M.; Lu, Jian R.

    2004-07-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide sequence is known as a cell recognition site for numerous adhesive proteins present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and in blood. Whilst surface immobilized RGD groups enhance cell attachment, RGD components present in solution can effectively inhibit cell attachment by competing with endogenous ligands for the same recognition site. In contrast to the widely reported binding to cell integrin, this study demonstrates a new RGD feature: its inhibitive effect on fibrinogen adsorption. Through a combined analysis of spectroscopic ellipsometry, neutron reflection and dual polarization interferometry, we show that the kinetic process of fibrinogen adsorption as a model pro-coagulant at the silica/solution interface and in the absence of any cells can be substantially reduced by the addition of RGD in solution and that the extent of the reduction is dependent on the relative concentration of RGD.

  2. Molecular structure-adsorption study on current textile dyes.

    PubMed

    Örücü, E; Tugcu, G; Saçan, M T

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the adsorption of a diverse set of textile dyes onto granulated activated carbon (GAC). The adsorption experiments were carried out in a batch system. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to experimental data and the isotherm constants were calculated for 33 anthraquinone and azo dyes. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted more adequately to the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model. Added to a qualitative analysis of experimental results, multiple linear regression (MLR), support vector regression (SVR) and back propagation neural network (BPNN) methods were used to develop quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models with the novel adsorption data. The data were divided randomly into training and test sets. The predictive ability of all models was evaluated using the test set. Descriptors were selected with a genetic algorithm (GA) using QSARINS software. Results related to QSPR models on the adsorption capacity of GAC showed that molecular structure of dyes was represented by ionization potential based on two-dimensional topological distances, chromophoric features and a property filter index. Comparison of the performance of the models demonstrated the superiority of the BPNN over GA-MLR and SVR models. PMID:25529487

  3. 2, 4 dichlorophenol (2, 4-DCP) sorption from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon and polymeric adsorbents and studies on effect of temperature on activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ghatbandhe, A S; Yenkie, M K N

    2008-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), one of the most commonly used chlorophenol, onto bituminous coal based Filtrasorb-400 grade granular activated carbon, were studied in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to temperature. Uptake capacity of activated carbon found to increase with temperature. Langmuir isotherm models were applied to experimental equilibrium data of 2, 4-DCP adsorption and competitive studies with respect to XAD resin were carried out. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir equilibrium model. Adsorbent monolayer capacity 'Q0, Langmuir constant 'b' and adsorption rate constant 'k(a)' were evaluated at different temperatures for activated carbon adsorption. This data was then used to calculate the energy of activation of adsorption and also the thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy of adsorption, deltaG0, enthalpy of adsorption, deltaH0 and the entropy of adsorption deltaS0. The obtained results showed that the monolayer capacity increases with the increase in temperatures. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters showed that adsorption of 2,4 DCP is an endothermic process. Synthetic resin was not found efficient to adsorb 2,4 DCP compared to activated carbon. The order of adsorption efficiencies of three resins used in the study found as XAD7HP > XAD4 > XAD1180. PMID:19295102

  4. Removal of tetracycline from wastewater using pumice stone: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Guler, Ulker Asli; Sarioglu, Meltem

    2014-01-01

    In this study, pumice stone was used for the removal of tetracyline (TC) from aqueous solutions. It was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM and BET analyses. Cation exchange capacity of pumice stone was found to be 9.9 meq/100 g. Effect of various parameters such as solution pH (2-11), adsorbent dosage (0.5-10 g/L), contact time (2.5-120 min), initial TC concentration (5-300 mg/L) and temperature (20-50°C) on TC adsorption onto pumice was investigated. Also the adsorption of TC on pumice stone was studied as a function of Na(+) and Cu(2+) cations changing pH from 2 to 11 using batch experiments. The best removal efficiency performance was exhibited at adsorbent dosage 10 g/L, pH 3, contact time 120 min. Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models were applied to the equilibrium data. The result has shown that the adsorption was favorable, physicochemical in nature and agrees well with Langmuir and Freundlich models. The maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity was found to be 20.02 mg/g. The adsorption behavior of TC on pumices stone was fitted well in the pseudo-second order kinetics model. Thermodynamic parameters calculated from the adsorption data at different temperature showed that the adsorption reaction was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic. PMID:24936305

  5. Removal of tetracycline from wastewater using pumice stone: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, pumice stone was used for the removal of tetracyline (TC) from aqueous solutions. It was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM and BET analyses. Cation exchange capacity of pumice stone was found to be 9.9 meq/100 g. Effect of various parameters such as solution pH (2–11), adsorbent dosage (0.5-10 g/L), contact time (2.5-120 min), initial TC concentration (5–300 mg/L) and temperature (20–50°C) on TC adsorption onto pumice was investigated. Also the adsorption of TC on pumice stone was studied as a function of Na+ and Cu2+ cations changing pH from 2 to 11 using batch experiments. The best removal efficiency performance was exhibited at adsorbent dosage 10 g/L, pH 3, contact time 120 min. Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models were applied to the equilibrium data. The result has shown that the adsorption was favorable, physicochemical in nature and agrees well with Langmuir and Freundlich models. The maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity was found to be 20.02 mg/g. The adsorption behavior of TC on pumices stone was fitted well in the pseudo-second order kinetics model. Thermodynamic parameters calculated from the adsorption data at different temperature showed that the adsorption reaction was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic. PMID:24936305

  6. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2014-05-01

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  7. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Scherwitzl, Boris Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2014-05-14

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  8. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO2

    PubMed Central

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2015-01-01

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer des orption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. PMID:24832297

  9. Adsorption of silver dimer on graphene - A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2014-04-24

    We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of silver dimer (Ag{sub 2}) on graphene using SIESTA (Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms) package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Ag2-graphene system are calculated. The minimum energy configuration for a silver dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms directly above the centre of carbon-carbon bond. The negligible charge transfer between the dimer and the surface is also indicative of a weak bond. The methodology demonstrated in this paper may be applied to larger silver clusters on graphene sheet.

  10. Preparation of modified semi-coke by microwave heating and adsorption kinetics of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Peng, Jin-Hui; Duan, Xin-Hui; Srinivasakannan, Chandrasekar

    2013-01-01

    Preparation of modified semi-coke has been achieved, using phosphoric acid as the modifying agent, by microwave heating from virgin semi-coke. Process optimization using a Central Composite Design (CCD) design of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) technique for the preparation of modifies semi-coke is presented in this paper. The optimum conditions for producing modified semi-coke were: concentration of phosphoric acid 2.04, heating time 20 minutes and temperature 587 degrees C, with the optimum iodine of 862 mg/g and yield of 47.48%. The textural characteristics of modified semi-coke were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The BET surface area of modified semi-coke was estimated to be 989.60 m2/g, with the pore volume of 0.74 cm3/g and a pore diameter of 3.009 nm, with micro-pore volume contributing to 62.44%. The Methylene Blue monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be mg/g at K. The adsorption capacity of the modified semi-coke highlights its suitability for liquid phase adsorption application with a potential usage in waste water treatment. PMID:24779145

  11. Cempedak durian as a potential biosorbent for the removal of Brilliant Green dye from aqueous solution: equilibrium, thermodynamics and kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Dahri, Muhammad Khairud; Lim, Linda B L; Mei, Chan Chin

    2015-08-01

    Cempedak durian peel (CDP) was used to remove Brilliant Green (BG) dye from aqueous solution. The adsorption of BG onto CDP was studied as functions of contact time, pH, temperature, ionic strength and initial concentration. In order to understand the adsorption process and its mechanisms, adsorption isotherm and kinetics models were used. The experiments were done under optimized 2-h contact time and ambient pH. Adsorption study showed that the Langmuir model best fitted with experimental data, and the maximum adsorption capacity was determined as 0.203 mmol g(-1) (97.995 mg g(-1)). Adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo 2nd order model, and intraparticle diffusion is involved but not as the rate-limiting step while Boyd model suggests that film diffusion might be in control of the adsorption process. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis showed that OH, C=O, C=C and NH functional groups might be involved in the adsorption of BG onto CDP. Thermodynamic study suggested that the adsorption of BG onto CDP is endothermic with ΔH (o) value of 12 kJ mol(-1) and adsorption is feasible. Regeneration of CDP's ability to remove BG was also studied using three different washing solutions. NaOH (0.1 M) was not only sufficient to be used to regenerate CDP's ability to remove BG but also improved its adsorption capability. PMID:26231977

  12. A one-dimensional stochastic approach to the study of cyclic voltammetry with adsorption effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samin, Adib J.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a one-dimensional stochastic model based on the random walk approach is used to simulate cyclic voltammetry. The model takes into account mass transport, kinetics of the redox reactions, adsorption effects and changes in the morphology of the electrode. The model is shown to display the expected behavior. Furthermore, the model shows consistent qualitative agreement with a finite difference solution. This approach allows for an understanding of phenomena on a microscopic level and may be useful for analyzing qualitative features observed in experimentally recorded signals.

  13. Recombinant albumin adsorption on mica studied by AFM and streaming potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Kujda, Marta; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Morga, Maria; Sofińska, Kamila

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) in monomeric state is widely used in pharmaceutical industry as a drug excipient and for preparing coatings for medical devices. In this work the adsorption process of rHSA on model mica surface at pH 3.5 was studied using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in situ streaming potential measurements. The kinetics of albumin adsorption was determined by a direct enumeration of single molecules over various substrate areas. These results were consistent with streaming potential measurements carried out for the parallel-plate channel flow and with theoretical predictions derived from the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. Desorption kinetics of albumin under flow conditions was also evaluated via the streaming potential measurements. In this way, the amount of irreversibly bound albumin was quantitatively evaluated to be 0.64 and 1.2 mg m(-2) for ionic strength of 0.01 and 0.15 M, respectively. This agrees with previous results obtained for HSA and theoretical calculations derived from the RSA model. Additionally, it was demonstrated that there existed a fraction of reversibly bound albumin that can be fully eluted within a few hours. The binding energy of these fraction of molecules was -18 kT that is consistent with the electrostatic controlled adsorption mechanism of albumin at this pH. It was concluded that the rHSA monolayers of well-defined coverage can find applications for quantitatively analyzing ligand binding and for performing efficient biomaterials and immunological tests. PMID:25679491

  14. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Phosphorus Adsorption in Soils from Diverse Ecological Zones in the Source Area of a Drinking-Water Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Loáiciga, Hugo A; Xu, Meng; Du, Chao; Du, Yun

    2015-11-01

    On-site soils are increasingly used in the treatment and restoration of ecosystems to harmonize with the local landscape and minimize costs. Eight natural soils from diverse ecological zones in the source area of a drinking-water reservoir in central China are used as adsorbents for the uptake of phosphorus from aqueous solutions. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometric and BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) tests and the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectral analyses are carried out to investigate the soils' chemical properties and their potential changes with adsorbed phosphorous from aqueous solutions. The intra-particle diffusion, pseudo-first-order, and pseudo-second-order kinetic models describe the adsorption kinetic processes. Our results indicate that the adsorption processes of phosphorus in soils occurred in three stages and that the rate-controlling steps are not solely dependent on intra-particle diffusion. A quantitative comparison of two kinetics models based on their linear and non-linear representations, and using the chi-square (χ2) test and the coefficient of determination (r2), indicates that the adsorptive properties of the soils are best described by the non-linear pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption characteristics of aqueous phosphorous are determined along with the essential kinetic parameters. PMID:26569278

  15. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Phosphorus Adsorption in Soils from Diverse Ecological Zones in the Source Area of a Drinking-Water Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Loáiciga, Hugo A.; Xu, Meng; Du, Chao; Du, Yun

    2015-01-01

    On-site soils are increasingly used in the treatment and restoration of ecosystems to harmonize with the local landscape and minimize costs. Eight natural soils from diverse ecological zones in the source area of a drinking-water reservoir in central China are used as adsorbents for the uptake of phosphorus from aqueous solutions. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometric and BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) tests and the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectral analyses are carried out to investigate the soils’ chemical properties and their potential changes with adsorbed phosphorous from aqueous solutions. The intra-particle diffusion, pseudo-first-order, and pseudo-second-order kinetic models describe the adsorption kinetic processes. Our results indicate that the adsorption processes of phosphorus in soils occurred in three stages and that the rate-controlling steps are not solely dependent on intra-particle diffusion. A quantitative comparison of two kinetics models based on their linear and non-linear representations, and using the chi-square (χ2) test and the coefficient of determination (r2), indicates that the adsorptive properties of the soils are best described by the non-linear pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption characteristics of aqueous phosphorous are determined along with the essential kinetic parameters. PMID:26569278

  16. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on boroxol-ring-doped zigzag boron nitride nanotube: Electronic study via DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Ehsan; Yari, Maryam; Bahmanpour, Hooman

    2016-04-01

    Previous works have already demonstrated that reactivity and sensitivity of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) toward gas molecules can be modified by impurity. In this work, three nitrogen atoms of BNNT (7,0) are replaced with oxygen to study the adsorption of CO molecule through the surface of boroxol ring with different adsorption patterns, including side-on and end-on. All calculations have been done using the DFT-B3LYP/6-31G * level of theory, and their electronic energies are corrected by gCP and D3 correction terms. The calculated binding energies are large, which indicates that CO molecule undergoes chemical adsorption. NBO results showed that the charge transfer occurs from the tube to the gas molecule, which can slightly change the electronic properties of the tube. Density of state (DOS) and partial DOS (PDOS) analysis revealed that adsorption of CO molecule on the boroxol ring position is covalent in nature. The Laplacian of electron density, Lagrangian kinetic energy density, Hamiltonian kinetic energy density, and potential energy density at bond critical points between the tube and CO indicate that the interaction between the tube and CO molecule is covalent in nature. Topological analysis of the electron localization function shows that electrons in the new formed bonds are approximately localized, meaning that the nature of the adsorption process is chemical covalent.

  17. A model for the adsorption kinetics of CO2 on amine-impregnated mesoporous sorbents in the presence of water

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.; Mebane, D.; Fauth, D.; Miller, D.

    2011-01-01

    A simple model for the adsorption kinetics carbon dioxide onto an amine-impregnated mesoporous sorbent, NETL-32D, was developed. The model was developed based on the mechanistic pathways believed to be responsible for the uptake of CO2 by the sorbent, including interactions with H2O. The model consists of quasi-ideal expressions to describe the kinetics of three reactions responsible for the uptake of CO2 and H2O by the sorbent. The model was fitted to experimental data obtained from thermogravimetric analysis and found to be a reasonable representation of the observed equilibrium and kinetics. The model is able to predict the increased uptake due to the interaction between CO2 and H2O in the sorbent. The heat of reaction predicted by the model for the uptake of CO2 in dry conditions of -65 kJ/mol compares well to the value of -67 kJ/mol obtained via calorimetry for similar sorbents.

  18. Isotherm study of reactive Blue 19 adsorption by an alum sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khim, Ong Keat; Nor, Mohd Asri Md; Mohamad, Syuriya; Nasaruddin, Nas Aulia Ahmad; Jamari, Nor Laili-Azua; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 using dewatered alum sludge. The dewatered alum sludge was a sludge produced from drinking water treatment plant. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism of the dye adsorption. The adsorption was rapid at its initial stage but the rate decreased as it approached equilibrium. The adsorption data were evaluated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models but was best described by the Langmuir isotherm model as it gave the highest correlation.

  19. Adsorption of azo dyes using peanut hull and orange peel: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Graziele Elisandra; Duarte, Marta Maria Menezes Bezerra; Campos, Natália Ferreira; da Rocha, Otidene Rossiter Sá; da Silva, Valdinete Lins

    2014-01-01

    This work proposes the use of agro-industrial wastes, specifically peanut hull (HP) and orange peel (OP), as adsorbents for dyes, such as Remazol Golden Yellow RNL-150% (RYG), Gray Reactive BF-2R (RG) and Reactive Turquoise Q-G125 (RT). Characterization by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller indicates that the adsorbents are mesoporous, with pHzpc values of 5.0 for HP and 4.0 for OP. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy identified carbonyl and sulphonic groups. The initial pH of the best-adsorbing solution of the three colours was 2.0. Increasing the concentration of the adsorbent promoted an increase in the percentage of removal until saturation of the adsorbent. In a factorial design, the largest value of q was obtained with 0.25 g of the adsorbent, with a particle size of < 0.4 mm and a stirring speed of 300 rpm. Such conditions were used in kinetic studies and studies of adsorption equilibrium. The evolution kinetics were rapid in the first few minutes, and after 180 min the system reached equilibrium. The kinetic model that best fit the experimental data to a 95% confidence level for the F test was the pseudo-second-order model for RYG/HP, RG/OP and RT/OP. There was no significant difference between the kinetic models as evaluated by the F test for RYG/OP, RG/HP and RT/HP. The experimental results indicated favourable dye adsorption characteristics for the adsorbents studied. The results of the F test showed that for RYG and RG, there was no significant difference between the two evaluated models. This study suggests that HP and OP are viable alternatives for the treatment of effluents containing RYG, RG and RT dyes. PMID:24701942

  20. Experimental study of neptunyl adsorption onto Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman-Lewis, D.; Fein, J. B.; Soderholm, L.; Jensen, M. P.; Chiang, M.-H.

    2005-10-01

    The subsurface mobility of Np is difficult to predict in part due to uncertainties associated with its sorption behavior in geologic systems. In this study, we measured Np adsorption onto a common gram-positive soil bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. We performed batch adsorption experiments with Np(V) solutions as a function of pH, from 2.5 to 8, as a function of total Np concentration from 1.29 × 10 -5 M to 2.57 × 10 -4 M, and as a function of ionic strength from 0.001 to 0.5 M NaClO 4. Under most pH conditions, Np adsorption is reversible and exhibits an inverse relationship with ionic strength, with adsorption increasing with increasing pH. At low pH in the 0.1 M ionic strength systems, we observed irreversible adsorption, which is consistent with reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV). We model the adsorption reaction using a nonelectrostatic surface complexation approach to yield ionic strength dependent NpO 2+-bacterial surface stability constants. The data require two bacterial surface complexation reactions to account for the observed adsorption behavior: R-L 1- + NpO 2+ ↔ R-L 1-NpO 2° and R-L 2- + NpO 2+ ↔ R-L 2-NpO 2°, where R represents the bacterium to which each functional group is attached, and L 1 and L 2 represent the first and second of four discrete site types on the bacterial surface. Stability constants (log K values) for the L 1 and L 2 reactions in the 0.001 M system are 2.3 ± 0.3 and 2.3 ± 0.2, and in the 0.1 M system the values are 1.7 ± 0.2 and 1.6 ± 0.2, respectively. The calculated neptunyl-bacterial surface stability constants are not consistent with values predicted using the linear free energy correlation approach from Fein et al. (2001), suggesting that possible unfavorable steric interactions and the low charge of NpO 2+ affects Np-bacterial adsorption.

  1. Phosphate Adsorption using Modified Iron Oxide-based Sorbents in Lake Water: Kinetics, Equilibrium, and Column Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption behavior of Bayoxide ® E33 (E33) and three E33-modified sorbents for the removal of phosphate from lake water was investigated in this study. E33-modified sorbents were synthesized by coating with manganese (E33/Mn) and silver (E33/AgI and E33/AgII) nanoparticles. Adso...

  2. CO adsorption and kinetics on well-characterized Pd films on Pt(111) in alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Arenz, M.; Stamenkovic, V.; Wandelt, K.; Ross, P.N.; Markovic, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemistry of CO on a bare Pt(111) electrode as well as a Pt(111) electrode modified with pseudomorphic thin palladium films has been studied in alkaline solution by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. First Pd films were prepared and well characterized in UHV and subsequently transferred into the electrochemical cell for the registration of the voltammetric profiles. The charge corresponding to the formation of underpotentially deposited hydrogen (H{sub upd}) on these Pt(111)-xPd surfaces was established in sulfuric acid solution as a function of x (0 {le} x {le} 1 Pd monolayer (ML)). All subsequent measurements were then performed on electrochemically deposited palladium films using the above H{sub upd}-charge vs. Pd coverage relationship to evaluate the amount of electrochemically deposited palladium. FTIR spectra for CO adsorbed on one monolayer and a submonolayer coverage are compared to those of the unmodified Pt(111) surface, all surfaces having identical 2D lattice structures. Infrared absorption bands of CO bound on either Pt(111) or Pt(111)-1ML Pd are clearly distinguished. Spectra of CO adsorbed on Pd submonolayers show characteristic features of both CO bound to Pt and to Pd, indicating that on Pt(111)-xPd surfaces there is no coupling between Pt-CO{sub ad} and Pd-CO{sub ad} molecules. The kinetics of CO oxidation on these surfaces is determined either by rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements or by FTIR spectroscopy, monitoring the CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} production. The oxidation of CO{sub ad} on Pt(111) and on Pd modified platinum surfaces starts at the same potential, ca. at 0.2 V. The oxidation rate is, however, considerably lower on the Pt(111)-xPd surfaces than on the Pt(111) surface. The kinetics of CO oxidation appears to be determined by the nature of adsorbed hydroxyl anions (OH{sub ad}), which are more strongly (less active) adsorbed on the highly oxophilic Pd atoms.

  3. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  4. Random sequential adsorption of tetramers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał

    2013-07-01

    Adsorption of a tetramer built of four identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Tetramers were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Two different models of the adsorbate were investigated: a rhomboid and a square one; monomer centres were put on vertices of rhomboids and squares, respectively. Numerical simulations allow us to establish the maximal random coverage ratio as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining kinetics of the adsorption process. These results were compared with data obtained experimentally for KfrA plasmid adsorption. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured.

  5. Equilibrium and kinetic models on the adsorption of Reactive Black 5 from aqueous solution using Eichhornia crassipes/chitosan composite.

    PubMed

    El-Zawahry, Manal M; Abdelghaffar, Fatma; Abdelghaffar, Rehab A; Hassabo, Ahmed G

    2016-01-20

    New natural biopolymer composite was prepared using extracted cellulose from an environmentally problematic water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes (EC). The extracted cellulose was functionalized by chitosan and TiO2 nanoparticles to form EC/Chitosan (EC/Cs) composite network. Surface characterization of EC/Cs natural biopolymer composite was examined by spectrum analysis FT-IR, specific surface area, micropore volume, pore width and SEM. Furthermore, the sorption experiments were carried out as a function of pH, various initial dye concentration and contact time. Experiment results showed that the EC/Cs composite have high ability to remove C.I. Reactive Black 5 from its dye-bath effluent. The equilibrium sorption evaluation of RB5 conformed and fitted well to Langmuir adsorption isotherm models and the maximum sorption capacity was 0.606 mg/g. The kinetic adsorption models followed pseudo-second order model and the dye intra-particle diffusion may suggesting a chemical reaction mechanism. Further, it was obvious from the investigation that this composite could be applied as a promising low cost adsorbent for anionic dye removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:26572382

  6. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Li, Zhenjun; Chen, Long; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-07-17

    The adsorption, desorption, and displacement kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110) are investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and molecular beam techniques. The TPD spectra for both H2O and CO2 have well-resolved peaks corresponding to desorption from bridge-bonded oxygen (BBO), Ti, and oxygen vacancies (VO) sites in order of increasing peak temperature. Analysis of the saturated monolayer peak for both species reveals that the corresponding adsorption energies on all sites are greater for H2O and for CO2. Sequential dosing of H2O and CO2 reveals that, independent of the dose order, H2O molecules will displace CO2 in order to occupy the highest energy binding sites available. Isothermal experiments show that the displacement of CO2 by H2O occurs between 75 and 80 K. Further analysis shows that a ratio of 4 H2O to 3 CO2 molecules is needed to displace CO2 from the TiO2(110) surface.

  7. Supramolecular polymer transformation: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Baram, Jonathan; Weissman, Haim; Rybtchinski, Boris

    2014-10-16

    Investigation of supramolecular kinetics is essential for elucidating self-assembly mechanisms. Recently, we reported on a noncovalent system involving a bolaamphiphilic perylene diimide dimer that is kinetically trapped in water but can rearrange into a different, more ordered assembly in water/THF mixtures ( Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014 , 53 , 4123 ). Here we present a kinetic mechanistic study of this process by employing UV-vis spectroscopy. The transformation exhibits a rapid decrease in the red-shifted absorption band, which is monitored in order to track the kinetics at different temperatures (15-50 °C) and concentrations. Fitting the data with the 1D KJMA (Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami) model affords the activation parameters. The latter as well as seeding experiments indicates that the transformation occurs without the detachment of covalent units, and that hydration dynamics plays a significant role in nucleation, with entropic factors being dominant. Switching off the transformation, and the formation of off-pathway intermediates were observed upon heating to temperatures above 55 °C. These insights into kinetically controlled supramolecular polymer transformations provide mechanistic information that is needed for a fundamental understanding of noncovalent processes, and the rational design of noncovalent materials. PMID:25238603

  8. Kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of adsorption of 2-biphenylamine and dibenzylamine from aqueous solutions by Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasheghani F., B.; Rajabi, F. H.; Omidi, M. H.; Shabanian, S.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite is synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. Experimental data are modelled by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm model fitted the equilibrium data for the dibenzylamine (DBA) and 2-biphenylamine (BPA) respectively, compared to the other isotherm models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, Δ G°, Δ H°, and Δ S° showed that the DBA and BPA adsorption on bentonite nanocomposite is spontaneous and endothermic under examined conditions. Experimental data were also modeled using the adsorption kinetic models. The results show that the adsorption processes of DBA and BPA followed well the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Results indicated that Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite could be an alternative for more costly adsorbents used for organic toxicants removal.

  9. Interfacial adsorption of antifreeze proteins: a neutron reflection study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hai; Perumal, Shiamalee; Zhao, Xiubo; Du, Ning; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Jia, Zongchao; Lu, Jian R

    2008-06-01

    Interfacial adsorption from two antifreeze proteins (AFP) from ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus, type III AFP, AFP III, or maAFP) and spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana, isoform 501, or cfAFP) were studied by neutron reflection. Hydrophilic silicon oxide was used as model substrate to facilitate the solid/liquid interfacial measurement so that the structural features from AFP adsorption can be examined. All adsorbed layers from AFP III could be modeled into uniform layer distribution assuming that the protein molecules were adsorbed with their ice-binding surface in direct contact with the SiO(2) substrate. The layer thickness of 32 A was consistent with the height of the molecule in its crystalline form. With the concentration decreasing from 2 mg/ml to 0.01 mg/ml, the volume fraction of the protein packed in the monolayer decreased steadily from 0.4 to 0.1, consistent with the concentration-dependent inhibition of ice growth observed over the range. In comparison, insect cfAFP showed stronger adsorption over the same concentration range. Below 0.1 mg/ml, uniform layers were formed. But above 1 mg/ml, the adsorbed layers were characterized by a dense middle layer and two outer diffuse layers, with a total thickness around 100 A. The structural transition indicated the responsive changes of conformational orientation to increasing surface packing density. As the higher interfacial adsorption of cfAFP was strongly correlated with the greater thermal hysteresis of spruce budworm, our results indicated the important relation between protein adsorption and antifreeze activity. PMID:18234809

  10. Oxidation and hydrolysis kinetic studies on UN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, G. A. Rama; Mukerjee, S. K.; Vaidya, V. N.; Venugopal, V.; Sood, D. D.

    1991-11-01

    The reaction of oxygen and water vapour with UN microspheres containing 0.78 and 10.9 mol% UO 2 as impurity was studied under non-isothermal heating conditions in a thermobalance under different partial pressures of oxygen, a fixed pressure of water vapour in argon, and in air. Uranium mononitride was ultimately converted to U 3O 8, with the formation of UO 2 and U 2N 3 as intermediates. The end product of pyrohydrolysis was UO 2. The kinetic parameters were evaluated and the mechanism of the reaction was suggested. Different kinetic models were used to explain the oxidation behaviour of UN.

  11. Adsorption of Roxarsone onto Drinking Water Treatment Residuals: Preliminary Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, J.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Sharma, S.

    2006-05-01

    Roxarsone (3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenyl-arsonic acid) is an organo-arsenical compound, commonly used as a feed additive in the broiler poultry industry to control coccidial intestinal parasites. Roxarsone is not toxic to the birds not only because of the low dose, and also because it most likely does not convert to toxic inorganic arsenic (As) in their systems. However, upon excretion, roxarsone may undergo transformation to inorganic As, posing a serious risk of contaminating the agricultural land and water bodies via surface runoff or leaching. The use of poultry litter as fertilizer results in As accumulation rates of up to 50 metric tons per year in agricultural lands. The immediate challenge, as identified by the various regulatory bodies in recent years is to develop an efficient, yet cost-effective and environmentally sound approach to cleaning up such As- contaminated soils. Recent studies conducted by our group have suggested that the drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) can effectively retain As, thereby decreasing its mobility in the environment. The WTRs are byproducts of drinking water treatment processes and are typically composed of amorphous Fe/Al oxides, activated C and cationic polymers. They can be obtained free-of-cost from water treatment plants. It is well demonstrated that the environmental mobility of As is controlled by adsorption/desorption reactions onto mineral surfaces. Hence, knowledge of adsorption and desorption of As onto the WTRs is of environmental relevance. The reported study examined the adsorption and desorption characteristics of As using two types of WTRs, namely the Fe-WTRs (byproduct of Fe salt treatment), and the Al-WTRs (byproduct of Al salt treatment). All adsorption experiments were carried out in batch and As retention on the WTRs was investigated as a function of solid/solution ratio (1:5, 1:10, 1:25 and 1:50), equilibration time (10 min - 48 hr), pH (2 - 10) and initial As load (100, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg As/L). The

  12. Comparative studies on adsorptive removal of heavy metal ions by biosorbent, bio-char and activated carbon obtained from low cost agro-residue.

    PubMed

    Kırbıyık, Çisem; Pütün, Ayşe Eren; Pütün, Ersan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Fe(III) and Cr(III) metal ion adsorption processes were carried out with three adsorbents in batch experiments and their adsorption performance was compared. These adsorbents were sesame stalk without pretreatment, bio-char derived from thermal decomposition of biomass, and activated carbon which was obtained from chemical activation of biomass. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared techniques were used for characterization of adsorbents. The optimum conditions for the adsorption process were obtained by observing the influences of solution pH, adsorbent dosage, initial solution concentration, contact time and temperature. The optimum adsorption efficiencies were determined at pH 2.8 and pH 4.0 for Fe(III) and Cr(III) metal ion solutions, respectively. The experimental data were modelled by different isotherm models and the equilibriums were well described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetic, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich models were applied to analyze the kinetic data and to evaluate rate constants. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model gave a better fit than the others. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy change ΔG°, standard enthalpy change ΔH° and standard entropy change ΔS° were evaluated. The thermodynamic study showed the adsorption was a spontaneous endothermic process. PMID:26819399

  13. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics of activated carbons produced from coals of different ranks.

    PubMed

    Purevsuren, B; Lin, Chin-Jung; Davaajav, Y; Ariunaa, A; Batbileg, S; Avid, B; Jargalmaa, S; Huang, Yu; Liou, Sofia Ya-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) from six coals, ranging from low-rank lignite brown coal to high-rank stone coal, were utilized as adsorbents to remove basic methylene blue (MB) from an aqueous solution. The surface properties of the obtained ACs were characterized via thermal analysis, N2 isothermal sorption, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Boehm titration. As coal rank decreased, an increase in the heterogeneity of the pore structures and abundance of oxygen-containing functional groups increased MB coverage on its surface. The equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model, and adsorption capacity of MB ranged from 51.8 to 344.8 mg g⁻¹. Good correlation coefficients were obtained using the intra-particle diffusion model, indicating that the adsorption of MB onto ACs is diffusion controlled. The values of the effective diffusion coefficient ranged from 0.61 × 10⁻¹⁰ to 7.1 × 10⁻¹⁰ m² s⁻¹, indicating that ACs from lower-rank coals have higher effective diffusivities. Among all the ACs obtained from selected coals, the AC from low-rank lignite brown coal was the most effective in removing MB from an aqueous solution. PMID:25909729

  14. Adsorption kinetics dictate monolayer self-assembly for both lipid-in and lipid-out approaches to droplet interface bilayer formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Venkatesan, Guru A.; Lee, Joonho; Farimani, Amir Barati; Heiranian, Mohammad; Collier, C. Patrick; Narayana, Aluru; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-11-10

    The droplet interface bilayer (DIB) is a method to assemble planar lipid bilayer membranes between lipid-coated aqueous droplets and has gained popularity among researchers in many fields. Well-packed lipid monolayer on aqueous droplet–oil interfaces is a prerequisite for successfully assembling DIBs. Such monolayers can be achieved by two different techniques: “lipid-in”, in which phospholipids in the form of liposomes are placed in water, and “lipid-out”, in which phospholipids are placed in oil as inverse micelles. While both approaches are capable of monolayer assembly needed for bilayer formation, droplet pairs assembled with these two techniques require significantly different incubation periods andmore » exhibit different success rates for bilayer formation. In our study, we combine experimental interfacial tension measurements with molecular dynamics simulations of phospholipids (DPhPC and DOPC) assembled from water and oil origins to understand the differences in kinetics of monolayer formation. With the results from simulations and by using a simplified model to analyze dynamic interfacial tensions, we conclude that, at high lipid concentrations common to DIBs, monolayer formation is simple adsorption controlled for lipid-in technique, whereas it is predominantly adsorption-barrier controlled for the lipid-out technique due to the interaction of interface-bound lipids with lipid structures in the subsurface. The adsorption barrier established in lipid-out technique leads to a prolonged incubation time and lower bilayer formation success rate, proving a good correlation between interfacial tension measurements and bilayer formation. Also, we clarify that advective flow expedites monolayer formation and improves bilayer formation success rate by disrupting lipid structures, rather than enhancing diffusion, in the subsurface and at the interface for lipid-out technique. Additionally, electrical properties of DIBs formed with varying lipid

  15. Adsorption kinetics dictate monolayer self-assembly for both lipid-in and lipid-out approaches to droplet interface bilayer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesan, Guru A.; Lee, Joonho; Farimani, Amir Barati; Heiranian, Mohammad; Collier, C. Patrick; Narayana, Aluru; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-11-10

    The droplet interface bilayer (DIB) is a method to assemble planar lipid bilayer membranes between lipid-coated aqueous droplets and has gained popularity among researchers in many fields. Well-packed lipid monolayer on aqueous droplet–oil interfaces is a prerequisite for successfully assembling DIBs. Such monolayers can be achieved by two different techniques: “lipid-in”, in which phospholipids in the form of liposomes are placed in water, and “lipid-out”, in which phospholipids are placed in oil as inverse micelles. While both approaches are capable of monolayer assembly needed for bilayer formation, droplet pairs assembled with these two techniques require significantly different incubation periods and exhibit different success rates for bilayer formation. In our study, we combine experimental interfacial tension measurements with molecular dynamics simulations of phospholipids (DPhPC and DOPC) assembled from water and oil origins to understand the differences in kinetics of monolayer formation. With the results from simulations and by using a simplified model to analyze dynamic interfacial tensions, we conclude that, at high lipid concentrations common to DIBs, monolayer formation is simple adsorption controlled for lipid-in technique, whereas it is predominantly adsorption-barrier controlled for the lipid-out technique due to the interaction of interface-bound lipids with lipid structures in the subsurface. The adsorption barrier established in lipid-out technique leads to a prolonged incubation time and lower bilayer formation success rate, proving a good correlation between interfacial tension measurements and bilayer formation. Also, we clarify that advective flow expedites monolayer formation and improves bilayer formation success rate by disrupting lipid structures, rather than enhancing diffusion, in the subsurface and at the interface for lipid-out technique. Additionally, electrical properties of DIBs formed with varying lipid placement and

  16. Simultaneous monitoring of protein adsorption kinetics using a quartz crystal microbalance and field-effect transistor integrated device.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Miyahara, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We developed an integrated device comprising a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and a field-effect transistor (FET) with a single common gold electrode in a flow chamber. An alternating current inducing oscillations in the piezoelectric quartz of the QCM sensor is electrically independent of the circuit for the FET output so that the two sensors in different detection mechanisms simultaneously record binding kinetics from a single protein solution on the same electrode. A conjunction of adsorbed mass from QCM with electric nature of bound protein from FET provided deeper understanding on a complex process of nonspecific protein adsorption and subsequent conformational changes at a solid/liquid interface. Lower apparent k(on) values obtained by FET than those obtained by QCM on hydrophobic surfaces are interpreted as preferred binding of protein molecules facing uncharged domains to the electrode surface, whereas higher k(off) values by FET than those by QCM imply active macromolecular rearrangements on the surfaces mainly driven by hydrophobic association in an aqueous medium. The advanced features of the combined sensor including in situ, label-free, and real-time monitoring provide information on structural dynamics, beyond measurements of affinities and kinetics in biological binding reactions. PMID:22861174

  17. Uranium removal from aqueous solution by coir pith: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Parab, Harshala; Joshi, Shreeram; Shenoy, Niyoti; Verma, Rakesh; Lali, Arvind; Sudersanan, M

    2005-07-01

    Basic aspects of uranium adsorption by coir pith have been investigated by batch equilibration. The influence of different experimental parameters such as final solution pH, adsorbent dosage, sorption time, temperature and various concentrations of uranium on uptake were evaluated. Maximum uranium adsorption was observed in the pH range 4.0-6.0. The Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the adsorption equilibrium. The equilibrium data fitted well to both the equilibrium models in the studied concentration range of uranium (200-800 mg/l) and temperatures (305-336 K). The coir pith exhibited the highest uptake capacity for uranium at 317 K, at the final solution pH value of 4.3 and at the initial uranium concentration of 800 mg/l. The kinetics of the adsorption process followed a second-order adsorption. The adsorbent used proved to be suitable for removal of uranium from aqueous solutions. 0.2 N HCl was effective in uranium desorption. The results indicated that the naturally abundant coir pith of otherwise nuisance value exhibited considerable potential for application in removal of uranium from aqueous solution. PMID:15734311

  18. Adsorption studies of divalent, dinuclear coordination complexes as molecular spacers on SWCNTs.

    PubMed

    Alston, Jeffrey R; Banks, David J; McNeill, Chauncey X; Mitchell, James B; Popov, Leonid D; Shcherbakov, Igor N; Poler, J C

    2015-11-28

    In order to enhance the electrical energy storage capabilities of nanostructured carbon materials, inter-particle spacer strategies are needed to maintain ion-accessible surface area between the nanoparticles. This paper presents a comparison between different classes of divalent, dinuclear coordination complexes which both show strong adsorption to SWCNTs and have molecular spacer properties that maintain electrochemical activity. We find that a novel, dinuclear zinc hydrazone complex binds as an ion-pair at very high loading while not inducing significant aggregation as compared to our previously studies of dinuclear ruthenium complexes. These conclusions are supported by conductivity and dispersion stability data. Moreover, since zinc is an earth abundant metal, these complexes can be used as components in sustainable energy storage materials. Binding kinetics and binding equilibrium data are presented. Modeling of the adsorption isotherm is best fit with the BET model. Kinetics data support an independent binding model. Preliminary capacitance and membrane resistance data are consistent with the complexes acting as molecular spacers between the SWCNTs in a condensed thin film. PMID:26457656

  19. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics of methylene blue on a low-cost adsorbent recovered from a spent catalyst of vinyl acetate synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengyong; Zhang, Zebiao; Fernández, Y.; Menéndez, J. A.; Niu, Hao; Peng, Jinhui; Zhang, Libo; Guo, Shenghui

    2010-02-01

    A regenerated activated carbon used as catalyst support in the synthesis of vinyl acetate has been tested as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of dyes. After a thorough textural characterization of the regenerated activated carbon, its adsorption isotherms and kinetics were determined using methylene blue as model compound at different initial concentrations. Both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were developed and then compared. It was found that the equilibrium data were best represented by the Langmuir isotherm model. The kinetic data were fitted to pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models, and it was found that the best fitting corresponded to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results showed that this novel adsorbent had a high adsorption capacity, making it suitable for use in the treatment of methylene blue enriched wastewater.

  20. Biosorption of zinc from aqueous solution using Azadirachta indica bark: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    King, P; Anuradha, K; Lahari, S Beena; Prasanna Kumar, Y; Prasad, V S R K

    2008-03-21

    The removal of zinc ions from aqueous solutions on the biomass of Azadirachta indica bark has been studied by using batch adsorption technique. The biosorption studies were determined as a function of contact time, pH, initial metal ion concentration, average biosorbent size and biosorbent dosage. The equilibrium metal uptake was increased and percentage biosorption was decreased with an increase in the initial concentration and particle size of biosorbent. The maximum zinc biosorption occurred at pH 6 and percentage biosorption increases with increase in the biosorbent dosage. Experimental data obtained were tested with the adsorption models like Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson isotherms. Biosorption isothermal data were well interpreted by Langmuir model with maximum biosorption capacity of 33.49mg/g of zinc ions on A. indica bark biomass and kinetic data were properly fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. PMID:17681426

  1. Study on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Xinfang; Luo, Wei; Yang, Hang; He, Yanlan; Liu, Yixing; Zhang, Xueao; Peng, Gang

    2015-12-01

    The gas sensor based on pristine graphene with conductance type was studied theoretically and experimentally. The time response of conductance measurements showed a quickly and largely increased conductivity when the sensor was exposed to ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water. However, the desorption process in vacuum took more than 1 h which indicated that there was a larger number of transferred carriers and a strong adsorption force between ammonia and graphene. The desorption time could be greatly shortened down to about 2 min by adding the flow of water-vapor-enriched air at the beginning of the recovery stage which had been confirmed as a rapid and high-efficiency desorption process. Moreover, the optimum geometries, adsorption energies, and the charge transfer number of the composite systems were studied with first-principle calculations. However, the theoretical results showed that the adsorption energy between NH3 and graphene was too small to fit for the experimental phenomenon, and there were few charges transferred between graphene and NH3 molecules, which was completely different from the experiment measurement. The adsorption energy between NH4 and graphene increased stage by stage which showed NH4 was a strong donor. The calculation suggested that H2O molecule could help a quick desorption of NH4 from graphene by converting NH4 to NH3 or (NH3)n(H2O)m groups, which was consistent with the experimental results. This study demonstrates that the ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water is mainly ammonium groups of NH3 and NH4, and the NH4 moleculars are ideal candidates for the molecular doping of graphene while the interaction between graphene and the NH3 moleculars is weak. PMID:26377212

  2. Study on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Xinfang; Luo, Wei; Yang, Hang; He, Yanlan; Liu, Yixing; Zhang, Xueao; Peng, Gang

    2015-09-01

    The gas sensor based on pristine graphene with conductance type was studied theoretically and experimentally. The time response of conductance measurements showed a quickly and largely increased conductivity when the sensor was exposed to ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water. However, the desorption process in vacuum took more than 1 h which indicated that there was a larger number of transferred carriers and a strong adsorption force between ammonia and graphene. The desorption time could be greatly shortened down to about 2 min by adding the flow of water-vapor-enriched air at the beginning of the recovery stage which had been confirmed as a rapid and high-efficiency desorption process. Moreover, the optimum geometries, adsorption energies, and the charge transfer number of the composite systems were studied with first-principle calculations. However, the theoretical results showed that the adsorption energy between NH3 and graphene was too small to fit for the experimental phenomenon, and there were few charges transferred between graphene and NH3 molecules, which was completely different from the experiment measurement. The adsorption energy between NH4 and graphene increased stage by stage which showed NH4 was a strong donor. The calculation suggested that H2O molecule could help a quick desorption of NH4 from graphene by converting NH4 to NH3 or (NH3)n(H2O)m groups, which was consistent with the experimental results. This study demonstrates that the ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water is mainly ammonium groups of NH3 and NH4, and the NH4 moleculars are ideal candidates for the molecular doping of graphene while the interaction between graphene and the NH3 moleculars is weak.

  3. Microcalorimetric study of protein adsorption onto calcium hydroxyapatites.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Kazuhiko; Murata, Kanae; Ishikawa, Tatsuo

    2007-02-13

    To clarify the adsorption mechanism of proteins onto calcium hydroxyapatite (Hap), the present study measured adsorption (DeltaHads) and desorption (DeltaHdes) enthalpies of bovine serum albumin (BSA; isoelectric point (iep) 4.7, molecular mass (Ms) 67,200 Da, acidic protein), myoglobin (MGB; iep=7.0, Ms=17,800 Da, neutral protein), and lysozyme (LSZ; iep=11.1, Ms=14,600 Da, basic protein) onto Hap by a flow microcalorimeter (FMC). Five kinds of large platelike particles of CaHPO4.2H2O (DCPD) after hydrolyzing at room temperature with different concentrations of NaOH aqueous solution ([NaOH]) for 1 h were used. DCPD converted completely to Hap after treatment at [NaOH]>or=2%, and the crystallinity of Hap was increased with an increase in [NaOH] up to 10%. The amounts of protein adsorbed (Deltanads) and desorbed (Deltandes) were measured simultaneously by monitoring the protein concentration downstream from the FMC with a UV detector. The Deltanads values were also measured statically by a batch method in each system. The Deltanads values measured by the FMC and static measurements fairly agreed with each other. Results revealed that DeltaHBSAads was decreased with an increase in [NaOH]; in other words, DeltaHBSAads was decreased with the improvement of Hap's crystallinity, suggesting that the BSA adsorption readily proceeded onto Hap. This fact indicated a high affinity of Hap to protein. This affinity was further recognized by DeltaHBSAdes because its positive value was increased by increasing [NaOH]. These opposite tendencies in DeltaHBSAads and DeltaHBSAdes revealed that Hap possessed a high adsorption affinity to BSA (i.e., enthalpy facilitated protein adsorption but hindered its desorption). The fraction of BSA desorption was also decreased with an increase in [NaOH], confirming the high affinity of Hap to protein. Similar results were observed on the LSZ system, though the enthalpy values were smaller than those of BSA. In the case of neutral MGB, Delta

  4. Nitrotyrosine adsorption on defective graphene: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, R.; Karami, A. R.

    2015-06-01

    We have applied density functional theory to study adsorption of nitrotyrosine on perfect and defective graphene sheets. The graphene sheets with Stone-Wales (SW) defect, pentagon-nonagon (5-9) single vacancy, and pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) double vacancy were considered. The calculations of adsorption energy showed that nitrotyrosine presents a more strong interaction with defective graphene rather than with perfect graphene sheet. The order of interaction strength is: SW>5-9>5-8-5>perfect graphene. It is found that the electronic properties of perfect and defective graphene are sensitive to the presence of nitrotyrosine. Hence, graphene sheets can be considered as a good sensor for detection of nitrotyrosine molecule which is observed in connection with several human disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Graphene oxide and adsorption of chloroform: A density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuisma, Elena; Hansson, C. Fredrik; Lindberg, Th. Benjamin; Gillberg, Christoffer A.; Idh, Sebastian; Schröder, Elsebeth

    2016-05-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds are of environmental concerns, since they are toxic to humans and other mammals, and are widespread, and exposure is hard to avoid. Understanding and improving methods to reduce the amount of the substances are important. We present an atomic-scale calculational study of the adsorption of chlorine-based substance chloroform (CHCl3) on graphene oxide, as a step in estimating the capacity of graphene oxide for filtering out such substances, e.g., from drinking water. The calculations are based on density functional theory, and the recently developed consistent-exchange functional for the van der Waals density-functional method is employed. We obtain values of the chloroform adsorption energy varying from roughly 0.2 to 0.4 eV per molecule. This is comparable to previously found results for chloroform adsorbed directly on clean graphene, using similar calculations. In a wet environment, like filters for drinking water, the graphene will not stay clean and will likely oxidize, and thus adsorption onto graphene oxide, rather than clean graphene, is a more relevant process to study.

  6. Graphene oxide and adsorption of chloroform: A density functional study.

    PubMed

    Kuisma, Elena; Hansson, C Fredrik; Lindberg, Th Benjamin; Gillberg, Christoffer A; Idh, Sebastian; Schröder, Elsebeth

    2016-05-14

    Chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds are of environmental concerns, since they are toxic to humans and other mammals, and are widespread, and exposure is hard to avoid. Understanding and improving methods to reduce the amount of the substances are important. We present an atomic-scale calculational study of the adsorption of chlorine-based substance chloroform (CHCl3) on graphene oxide, as a step in estimating the capacity of graphene oxide for filtering out such substances, e.g., from drinking water. The calculations are based on density functional theory, and the recently developed consistent-exchange functional for the van der Waals density-functional method is employed. We obtain values of the chloroform adsorption energy varying from roughly 0.2 to 0.4 eV per molecule. This is comparable to previously found results for chloroform adsorbed directly on clean graphene, using similar calculations. In a wet environment, like filters for drinking water, the graphene will not stay clean and will likely oxidize, and thus adsorption onto graphene oxide, rather than clean graphene, is a more relevant process to study. PMID:27179497

  7. Dye adsorption behavior of Luffa cylindrica fibers.

    PubMed

    Demir, H; Top, A; Balköse, D; Ulkü, S

    2008-05-01

    Using natural Luffa cylindrica fibers as adsorbent removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solutions at different temperatures and dye concentrations was investigated in this study. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were also investigated. The adsorption isotherms could be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters of methylene blue (MB) adsorption indicated that the adsorption is exothermic and spontaneous. The average MB adsorption capacity was found out as 49 mg/g and average BET surface area of fibers was calculated as 123 m(2)/g. PMID:17919814

  8. Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat as effective sorbent for the removal of estrogens: kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fei-Fei; Cao, Yang; Wang, Min; Rong, Fei; Xu, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat was prepared via electrospinning for the removal of three estrogens, namely, diethylstilbestrol (DES), dienestrol (DS), and hexestrol (HEX) from aqueous solution. Static adsorption as well as the dynamic adsorption was evaluated by means of batch and dynamic disk flow mode, respectively. The kinetic study indicated that the adsorption of the target compounds could be well fitted by the pseudo-second-order equation, suggesting the intra-particle/membrane diffusion process as the rate-limiting step of the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data were all fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm models, with a maximum adsorption capacity values in the range of 97.71 to 208.95 mg/g, which can be compared to or moderately higher than other sorbents published in the literatures. The dynamic disk mode studies indicated that the mean removal yields of three model estrogens were over 95% with a notable smaller amount of adsorbent (4 mg). Thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity can remain up to 80% after seven times usage. It was suggested that Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat has great potential as a novel effective sorbent material for estrogens removal. PMID:25114645

  9. Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat as effective sorbent for the removal of estrogens: kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fei-Fei; Cao, Yang; Wang, Min; Rong, Fei; Xu, Qian

    2014-07-01

    Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat was prepared via electrospinning for the removal of three estrogens, namely, diethylstilbestrol (DES), dienestrol (DS), and hexestrol (HEX) from aqueous solution. Static adsorption as well as the dynamic adsorption was evaluated by means of batch and dynamic disk flow mode, respectively. The kinetic study indicated that the adsorption of the target compounds could be well fitted by the pseudo-second-order equation, suggesting the intra-particle/membrane diffusion process as the rate-limiting step of the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data were all fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm models, with a maximum adsorption capacity values in the range of 97.71 to 208.95 mg/g, which can be compared to or moderately higher than other sorbents published in the literatures. The dynamic disk mode studies indicated that the mean removal yields of three model estrogens were over 95% with a notable smaller amount of adsorbent (4 mg). Thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity can remain up to 80% after seven times usage. It was suggested that Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat has great potential as a novel effective sorbent material for estrogens removal.

  10. Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat as effective sorbent for the removal of estrogens: kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat was prepared via electrospinning for the removal of three estrogens, namely, diethylstilbestrol (DES), dienestrol (DS), and hexestrol (HEX) from aqueous solution. Static adsorption as well as the dynamic adsorption was evaluated by means of batch and dynamic disk flow mode, respectively. The kinetic study indicated that the adsorption of the target compounds could be well fitted by the pseudo-second-order equation, suggesting the intra-particle/membrane diffusion process as the rate-limiting step of the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data were all fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm models, with a maximum adsorption capacity values in the range of 97.71 to 208.95 mg/g, which can be compared to or moderately higher than other sorbents published in the literatures. The dynamic disk mode studies indicated that the mean removal yields of three model estrogens were over 95% with a notable smaller amount of adsorbent (4 mg). Thermodynamic study revealed that the adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. Desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity can remain up to 80% after seven times usage. It was suggested that Nylon 6 electrospun nanofibers mat has great potential as a novel effective sorbent material for estrogens removal. PMID:25114645

  11. Theoretical study of the adsorption of benzene on coinage metals

    PubMed Central

    Reckien, Werner; Eggers, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Summary The adsorption of benzene on the M(111), M(100) and M(110) surfaces of the coinage metals copper (M = Cu), silver (M = Ag) and gold (M = Au) is studied on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations with an empirical dispersion correction (D3). Variants of the Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof functionals (PBE, RPBE and RevPBE) in combination with different versions of the dispersion correction (D3 and D3(BJ)) are compared. PBE-D3, PBE-D3(BJ) and RPBE-D3 give similar results which exhibit a good agreement with experimental data. RevPBE-D3 and RevPBE-D3(BJ) tend to overestimate adsorption energies. The inclusion of three-center terms (PBE-D3(ABC)) leads to a slightly better agreement with the experiment in most cases. Vertical adsorbate–substrate distances are calculated and compared to previous theoretical results. The observed trends for the surfaces and metals are consistent with the calculated adsorption energies. PMID:25161736

  12. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of U(VI) release from individual dry-sieved size fractions of a field-aggregated, field-contaminated composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. The principal source of variability in equilibrium U(VI) adsorption properties of the various size fractions was the impact of variable chemistry on adsorption. This source of variability was represented using surface complexation models (SCMs) with different stoichiometric coefficients with respect to hydrogen ion and carbonate concentrations for the different size fractions. A reactive transport model incorporating equilibrium expressions for cation exchange and calcite dissolution, along with rate expressions for aerobic respiration and silica dissolution, described the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through reactor experiments. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multirate SCM with an assumed lognormal distribution for the mass-transfer rate coefficients. The estimated mean and standard deviation of the rate coefficients were the same for all <2 mm size fractions but differed for the 2–8 mm size fraction. Micropore volumes, assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data, were also the same for all dry-sieved <2 mm size fractions, indicating a link between micropore volumes and mass-transfer rate properties. Pore volumes for dry-sieved size fractions exceeded values for the corresponding wet-sieved fractions. We hypothesize that repeated field wetting and drying cycles lead to the formation of aggregates and/or coatings containing (micro)pore networks which provided an additional mass-transfer resistance over that associated with individual particles. The 2–8 mm fraction exhibited a larger average and standard deviation in the distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients, possibly caused by the abundance of

  13. Characterization of biochars derived from agriculture wastes and their adsorptive removal of atrazine from aqueous solution: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Charrua, Alberto Bento; Weng, Chih-Huang; Yuan, Xiaoling; Ding, Feng

    2015-12-01

    The physicochemical properties of biochars produced from soybeans (SBB), corn stalks (CSB), rice stalks (RSB), poultry manure (PMB), cattle manure (CMB), and pig manure (PgMB) and their adsorption characteristics of atrazine were investigated. The adsorption capacity increased with the increase of temperature and initial atrazine concentration. More atrazine was removed from basic solutions than acidic solutions, due to the effects of adsorption and hydrolysis. The Freundlich isotherm adsorption parameters indicated that the adsorption capacity decreased in the order SBB>RSB>CMB>CSB>PMB>PgMB, which is associated to the pore volume of biochars. The total pore volume and biochar pH were concluded to play important roles in determining the adsorption capacity, and they may have contributed to physical adsorption mechanisms dominating the overall adsorption process (the low activation energy for all of the biochars). Modified Freundlich and intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetics of the adsorption process. PMID:26364228

  14. Applicability of random sequential adsorption algorithm for simulation of surface plasma polishing kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minárik, Stanislav; Vaňa, Dušan

    2015-11-01

    Applicability of random sequential adsorption (RSA) model for the material removal during a surface plasma polishing is discussed. The mechanical nature of plasma polishing process is taken into consideration in modified version of RSA model. During the plasma polishing the surface layer is aligned such that molecules of material are removed from the surface mechanically as a consequence of the surface deformation induced by plasma particles impact. We propose modification of RSA technique to describe the reduction of material on the surface provided that sequential character of molecules release from the surface is maintained throughout the polishing process. This empirical model is able to estimate depth profile of material density on the surface during the plasma polishing. We have shown that preliminary results obtained from this model are in good agreement with experimental results. We believe that molecular dynamics simulation of the polishing process, possibly also other types of surface treatment, can be based on this model. However influence of material parameters and processing conditions (including plasma characteristics) must be taken into account using appropriate model variables.

  15. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto lecithin studied by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tantipolphan, R; Rades, T; McQuillan, A J; Medlicott, N J

    2007-06-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to lecithin was investigated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Lecithin films were prepared by casting aliquots of 3.2 microg lecithin in methanol onto ZnSe ATR prisms. Surface morphology and the thickness of the films were investigated by laser scanning confocal electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy and the thickness of the films used for adsorption studies was estimated to be 40 A. The dependency of the CO peak area on the lecithin mass in the calibration curve confirms that the thickness of the film is below the penetration depth of the infrared evanescent wave. Size exclusion HPLC and fluorescence spectroscopy show that BSA conformation in up to 1M NaCl and CaCl(2) solutions is similar to that in water with no aggregation or changes in protein conformation seen over 4h. The kinetics of BSA adsorption on the lecithin film from water, NaCl and CaCl(2) solutions demonstrates that ions promote the protein adsorption. BSA bound more in the presence of NaCl compared to CaCl(2) at equivalent concentrations. The adsorption appeared greatest at a 0.1M concentration for both NaCl and CaCl(2). The results are explained in terms of absorptive reactivity of BSA and lecithin surfaces upon salt addition. PMID:17240095

  16. Adsorption kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their equimolar mixture on coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Naney, M.T.; Blencoe, J.G.; Cole, D.R.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150????m, 1-2??mm, and 5-10??mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40????C and 35????C over a pressure range of 1.4-6.9??MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150????m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Adsorption Kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their Equimolar Mixture on Coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Naney, Michael {Mike} T; Blencoe, James {Jim} G; Cole, David R; Pashin, Jack C.; Carroll, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150 m, 1-2 mm, and 5-10 mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40 C and 35 C over a pressure range of 1.4 6.9 MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150 m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions.

  18. Experimental and kinetic studies for phycoremediation and dye removal by Chlorella pyrenoidosa from textile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Vinayak V; Kothari, Richa; Chopra, A K; Singh, D P

    2015-11-01

    Potential of Chlorella pyrenoidosa was experimentally investigated for phycoremediation and dye removal from textile wastewater (TWW) in batch cultures. Growth of alga was observed at various concentration of textile wastewater (25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) and was found in a range of 8.1-14 μg ml(-1) day(-1). Growth study revealed that alga potentially grows up to 75% concentrated textile wastewater and reduces phosphate, nitrate and BOD by 87%, 82% and 63% respectively. Methylene blue dye (MB) removal was also observed by using dry and wet algal biomass harvested after phycoremediation. Adsorption isotherms (Langmuir and Freundlich) and kinetic models (pseudo first and second order) were applied on adsorption process. Dry algal biomass (DAB) was found more efficient biosorbent with large surface area and showed high binding affinity for MB dye in compare to wet algal biomass (WAB). The RL value for both biosorbent showed feasible adsorption process as the obtained value was between 0 and 1. Pseudo second order kinetic model with high degree of correlation coefficient and low sum of error squares (SSE %) value was found more suitable for representation of adsorption process in case of both biosorbents, however pseudo first order also showed high degree of correlation for both biosorbents. PMID:26349408

  19. Adsorption and desorption kinetics in ZrO2 TiO2 by photoacoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto Neto, A.; Moura, D.; Kuranaga, C.; Silva, M. D.; Miranda, L. C. M.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper we report on the photoacoustic (PA) characterization of ZrO2-TiO2 ceramic wafers as a sensing element for solvent adulteration evaluation. The experiments consisted of photoacoustic time dependent monitoring of the sorption and desorption of a droplet of a solvent deposited on the outer face of a ceramic wafer. The used solvents were isopropanol and chloroform. For the polar isopropanol molecule the results shown diffusion into the sample, with a characteristic diffusion time τ_1, accompanied by the evaporation at a rate with a time constant τ_2. Indeed, for the non polar chloroform, wetting-drying kinetics is adequately described by a simple diffusion-evaporation.

  20. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation.

    PubMed

    Zaazaa, Hala E; Abdelrahman, Maha M; Ali, Nouruddin W; Magdy, Maimana A; Abdelkawy, M

    2014-11-11

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol. PMID:24892546

  1. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Abdelrahman, Maha M.; Ali, Nouruddin W.; Magdy, Maimana A.; Abdelkawy, M.

    2014-11-01

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol.

  2. Catalytic deactivation on methane steam reforming catalysts. 2. Kinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.E.; Ponzi, E.N.; Yeramian, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    The kinetics of methane steam reforming reaction over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst was investigated at a temperature range of 640-740/sup 0/C in a flow reactor at atmospheric pressure. The experiments were performed varying the inlet concentration of methane, hydrogen, and water. A kinetic scheme of the Houghen-Watson type was satisfactorily proposed assuming the dissociative adsorption of CH/sub 4/ as the rate-limiting step, but this kinetic scheme can be easily replaced by a first-order kinetics (r/sub CH/4/sub / = kapparho/sub CH/4/sub /) for engineering purposes. Catalyst activation with H/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ mixtures or with the reactant mixture results in the same extent of reaction.

  3. Study of Gas Adsorption on Biphasic Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nader, Rami; Hamieh, Tayssir; Villieras, Frédéric; Angelina. Razafitianamaharav; Toufaily, Joumana; Mcheik, Ali S.; Thomas, Fabien

    This work has carried out on grafted nanoparticles oxide silica to determine the possible existence of "nanoeffect". The textural properties and heterogeneity of surface of the samples were studied at the interface solid-gas. The Geometric properties were discussed in terms of the surface area while the energy properties were discussed in terms of the reactive sites of the surface.In the framework of this study, firstly, the sample was used in the non-grafted state and then in the grafted state using a hydrophilic molecule and a hydrophobic molecule. Several techniques have been used: Infrared spectroscopy, X ray diffraction, the point by point volumetric technique, which enable us to study the interactions between the adsorbate and the solid surface. Finally we have determined the size and electro thermal mobility using zestasizer (Nano ZS). The results obtained show that there are two types of groups silanols and siloxanes on the silica OX5 giving a composite hydrophilic-hydrophobic. This character causes a singular behavior in adsorptive material, the presence of hydrophilic groups, strongly polarized, and is detected by infrared spectroscopy. These groups cause significant differences depending on the polarizability of the probe molecules, and the adsorption of argon shows no heterogeneity of the surface, while nitrogen is adsorbed on the polar sites at low relative pressure, While the volumetric continues to adsorption of argon and nitrogen on combustion silica to obtain and to highlight sites of high energy and polar surface sites. The combustion silica which has been used as adsorbent in this study has an amorphous surface, virtually free of impurities indicates that the sample is not micro porous and grafting of the molecules makes a decrease in high energy sites or to a relative increase in surface low energy.

  4. Kinetics, thermodynamics and mechanistic studies of carbofuran removal using biochars from tea waste and rice husks.

    PubMed

    Vithanage, Meththika; Mayakaduwa, S S; Herath, Indika; Ok, Yong Sik; Mohan, Dinesh

    2016-05-01

    This study reports the thermodynamic application and non-linear kinetic models in order to postulate the mechanisms and compare the carbofuran adsorption behavior onto rice husk and tea waste derived biochars. Locally available rice husk and infused tea waste biochars were produced at 700 °C. Biochars were characterized by using proximate, ultimate and surface characterization methods. Batch experiments were conducted at 25, 35, and 45 °C for a series of carbofuran solutions ranging from 5 to 100 mg L(-1) with a biochar dose of 1 g L(-1) at pH 5.0 with acetate buffer. Molar O/C ratios indicated that rice husk biochar (RHBC700) is more hydrophilic than tea waste biochar (TWBC700). Negative ΔG (Gibbs free energy change) values indicated the feasibility of carbofuran adsorption on biochar. Increasing ΔG values with the rise in temperature indicated high favorability at higher temperatures for both RHBC and TWBC. Enthalpy values suggested the involvement of physisorption type interactions. Kinetic data modeling exhibited contribution of both physisorption, via pore diffusion, π*-π electron donor-acceptor interaction, H-bonding, and van der Waals dispersion forces and chemisorption via chemical bonding with phenolic, and amine groups. Equilibrium adsorption capacities of RHBC and TWBC determined by pseudo second order kinetic model were 25.2 and 10.2 mg g(-1), respectively. PMID:26607239

  5. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this program was to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. Although hydrogen degradation of metallic materials is believed to result from dissolved protonic hydrogen, the heterogeneous hydrogen interface transport processes often dominate the kinetics of degradation. The initial step in the interface transport process is the dissociative chemisorption of the molecular species at the metal surface followed by hydrogen absorption into and transport through the bulk. The interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2(Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma(TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied.

  6. Recycling agriculture wastes of ramie stalk as bioadsorbents for Cd(2+) removal: a kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Gong, X F; Zou, H L; Liu, C Y; Chen, C L; Zeng, X X

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we exhibit the recycling of agriculture wastes of ramie stalk as bioadsorbents for Cd(2+) removal. Based on our experimental results, it is realized that Cd(2+) adsorption to ramie stalk is highly pH sensitive, indicating the adsorption is driven by surface complexation reaction. The high adsorption capacity of ramie stalk toward Cd(2+) (qm = 10.33 mg g(-1), 0.09 mol-Cd g(-1)), which corresponds to around 21.95% of active adsorption sites available of ramie stalk, is believed to be closely related to its high cellulose and lignin content. The inhomogeneous surface of ramie stalk due to the high cellulose and lignin content also accounts for the observation that the adsorption kinetic is described well by the pseudo second order kinetic model. Results from thermodynamic studies suggest that the adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous. All these properties demonstrate the potential of ramie stalk as a low cost bioadsorbent for the application of heavy metal removal. PMID:26819396

  7. Removal of zearalenone toxin from synthetics gastric and body fluids using talc and diatomite: a batch kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Sprynskyy, Myroslav; Gadzała-Kopciuch, Renata; Nowak, Karolina; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2012-06-01

    Adsorption kinetics of zearalenone (ZEA) toxin from synthetic gastric fluid (SGF) and synthetic body fluid (SBF) by talc and diatomite was studied in the batch experiments. Chemical composition, morphology and structure of the used adsorbents were examined by scanning electron microscopy, FTIR spectroscopy and low-temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption method. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was used for ZEA determining. The study results showed that ZEA is more effectively adsorbed on the talc (73% and 54% from SGF and SBF respectively). The efficiency on the diatomite was lower (53% and 42% from SGF and SBF respectively). The first order kinetics model was applied to describe the adsorption process. Rate of the ZEA adsorption from SGF is very rapid initially with about 95% of amount of the toxin adsorbed during first 5 min, while ZEA is adsorbed from SBF in two steps. The values of determined Gibbs free energy of adsorption (from -13 to -17 kJ/mol) indicated that adsorption of ZEA toxin by the both adsorbents are spontaneous and exothermic. PMID:22326340

  8. Surface interactions and quantum kinetic molecular sleving for H-2 and D-2 adsorption on a mixed metal-organic framework material

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Banglin; Zhao, Xuebo; Putkham, Apipong; Hong, Kunlun; Lobkovsky, Emil B.; Hurtado, Eric J; Fletcher, Ashleigh J; Thomas, K Mark

    2008-01-01

    A rational strategy has been used to immobilize open metal sites in ultramicroporosity for stronger binding of multiple H2 molecules per unsaturated metal site for H2 storage applications. The synthesis and structure of a mixed zinc/copper metal-organic framework material Zn3(BDC)3[Cu(Pyen)] (DMF)5(H2O)5 (H2BDC ) 1,4 benzenedicarboxylic acid and PyenH2 ) 5-methyl-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-pyridine-3-carbaldehyde) is reported. Desolvation provides a bimodal porous structure Zn3(BDC)3[Cu(Pyen)] (M MOF 1) with narrow porosity (<0.56 nm) and an array of pores in the bc crystallographic plane where the adsorbate adsorbent interactions are maximized by both the presence of open copper centers and overlap of the potential energy fields from pore walls. The H2 and D2 adsorption isotherms for M MOF 1 at 77.3 and 87.3 K were reversible with virtually no hysteresis. Methods for determination of the isosteric enthalpies of H2 and D2 adsorption were compared. A virial model gave the best agreement (average deviation <1 standard deviation) with the isotherm data. This was used in conjunction with the van t Hoff isochore giving isosteric enthalpies at zero surface coverage of 12.29 ( 0.53 and 12.44 ( 0.50 kJ mol-1 for H2 and D2 adsorption, respectively. This is the highest value so far observed for hydrogen adsorption on a porous material. The enthalpy of adsorption, decreases with increasing amount adsorbed to 9.5 kJ mol-1 at 1.9 mmol g-1 (2 H2 or D2 molecules per Cu corresponding to adsorption on both sides of planar Cu open centers) and is virtually unchanged in the range 1.9-3.6 mmol g-1. Virial analysis of isotherms at 87.3 K is also consistent with two H2 or D2 molecules being bound to each open Cu center. The adsorption kinetics follow a double exponential model, corresponding to diffusion along two types of pores, a slow component with high activation energy (13.35 ( 0.59 kJ mol-1) for the narrow pores and a faster component with low activation energy (8.56 ( 0.41 kJ mol-1). The

  9. Methanol adsorption on the clean CeO₂(111) surface: A density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Deskins, N. Aaron; Dupuis, Michel; Ge, Qingfeng

    2007-07-19

    Molecular and dissociative adsorption of methanol at various sites on the stoichiometric CeO₂(111) surface have been studied using density functional theory periodic calculations. At 0.25 monolayer (ML) coverage, the dissociative adsorption with an adsorption energy of 0.55 eV is slightly favored. The most stable state is the dissociative adsorption of methanol via C-H bond breaking, forming a coadsorbed hydroxymethyl group and hydrogen adatom on two separate O₃C surface sites. The strongest molecular adsorption occurs through an O-Ce₇subC connection with an adsorption energy of 0.48 eV. At methanol coverage of 0.5 ML, the dissociative adsorption and the molecular adsorption became competitive. The adsorption energy per methanol molecule for both adsorption modes falls into a narrow range of 0.46-0.55 eV. As methanol coverage increases beyond 0.5 ML, the molecular adsorption becomes more energetically favorable than the dissociative adsorption because of the attractive hydrogen bonding between coadsorbed methanol molecules. At full monolayer, the adsorption energy of molecular adsorption is 0.40 eV per molecule while the adsorption energy for total dissociative adsorption of methanol is only 0.17 eV. The results at different methanol coverages indicate that methanol can adsorb on a defect-free CeO₂(111) surface, which are also consistent with experimental observations. This research was performed using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which is a U.S. Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. Computing time was made available under a Computational Grand Challenge “Computational Catalysis”. This work also financially supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project of PNNL.

  10. Ethanol adsorption on the Si (111) surface: First principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilenko, Alexander V.; Bonner, Carl E.; Gavrilenko, Vladimir I.

    2012-03-01

    Equilibrium atomic configurations and electron energy structure of ethanol adsorbed on the Si (111) surface are studied by the first principles density functional theory. Geometry optimization is performed by the total energy minimization method. Equilibrium atomic geometries of ethanol, both undissociated and dissociated, on the Si (111) surface are found and analysed. Reaction pathways and predicted transition states are discussed in comparison with available experimental data in terms of the feasibility of the reactions occurring. Analysis of atom and orbital resolved projected density of states indicates substantial modifications of the Si surface valence and conduction electron bands due to the adsorption of ethanol affecting the electronic properties of the surface.

  11. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, D.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  12. A comparative adsorption study: 17β-estradiol onto aerobic granular sludge and activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-ying; He, Yu-jie; Chen, Wei; Wang, Ming-yang; Cao, Su-lan; Ni, Ming; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption plays a significant role in removing hydrophobic 17β-estradiol (E2) from wastewater. Batch experiments were conducted to compare the adsorption of E2 onto activated aerobic granular sludge (AGS) and activated sludge (AS), and features evaluated included the adsorption kinetics, thermodynamics, and influence of other environmental factors. By using a non-chemical wet-heat technique, both AGS and AS were treated to inactivated status. Then, after loading E2, the adsorption equilibrium capacity of the AGS was found to be greater than that of the AS at the same initial concentration of E2. Moreover, both the adsorption processes corresponded to a pseudo-second-order kinetic model; the adsorption rate constant of AGS was found to be higher and the half-adsorption time was shorter than that of AS. Next, evaluations of adsorption isotherms and thermodynamics indicated that the adsorption process was mainly a physical process. Lower temperatures facilitated a higher equilibrium adsorption capacity. However, the adsorption binding sites of AGS were distributed more uniformly at higher temperature, in contrast to the distribution found for AS. Finally, acidic conditions and an appropriate ionic strength (0.4 mol/L) were found to be particularly conducive to the adsorption process. Overall, the results showed that AGS has the potential to adsorb E2 with significant efficiency, thereby offering a new and more efficient means of treating E2 and trace oestrogens in wastewater. PMID:26209151

  13. Sorption Kinetics Of Selected Heavy Metals Adsorption To Natural And Fe(III) Modified Zeolite Tuff Containing Clinoptilolite Mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirotiak, Maroš; Lipovský, Marek; Bartošová, Alica

    2015-06-01

    In the research described in this paper, studied was sorption capacity of natural and ferric modification of zeolite tuff containing mineral clinoptilolite from the Nižný Hrabovec deposit to remove potentially toxic metals (ionic forms of chromium, nickel, copper and aluminium) from their water solutions. We reported that the Fe (III) zeolite has an enhanced ability to sorption of Cu (II), and a slight improvement occurs in the case of Cr (VI) and Ni (II). On the other hand, the deterioration was observed in the case of Al (III) adsorption.

  14. Evaluation of Fuller's earth for the adsorption of mercury from aqueous solutions: a comparative study with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Oubagaranadin, John U Kennedy; Sathyamurthy, N; Murthy, Z V P

    2007-04-01

    Fuller's earth (FE) has been used as an adsorbent in this work to remove mercury from aqueous solutions. For the purpose of comparison, simultaneous experiments using activated carbon (AC) have also been done. The aim of the work is to test how best FE can be used as an adsorbent for mercury. Equilibrium isotherms, such as Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubinin-Redushkevich, Temkin, Harkins-Jura, Halsey and Henderson have been tested. Kinetic studies based on Lagergren first-order, pseudo-second-order rate expressions and intra-particle diffusion studies have been done. The batch experiments were conducted at room temperature (30 degrees C) and at the normal pH (6.7+/-0.2) of the solution. It has been observed that Hg(II) removal rate is better for FE than AC, due to large dosage requirement, whereas the adsorption capacity of AC is found to be much better than FE. Hence, although FE can be used as an adsorbent, a high dosage is required, when compared to AC. Hybrid fractional error function analysis shows that the best-fit for the adsorption equilibrium data is represented by Freundlich isotherm. Kinetic and film diffusion studies show that the adsorption of mercury on FE and AC is both intra-particle diffusion and film diffusion controlled. PMID:16987602

  15. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of biosorption of iron and manganese from aqueous medium using rice husk ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekola, F. A.; Hodonou, D. S. S.; Adegoke, H. I.

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption behavior of rice husk ash with respect to manganese and iron has been studied by batch methods to consider its application for water and waste water treatment. The optimum conditions of adsorption were determined by investigating the effect of initial metal ion concentration, contact time, adsorbent dose, pH value of aqueous solution and temperature. Adsorption equilibrium time was observed at 120 min. The adsorption efficiencies were found to be pH dependent. The equilibrium adsorption experimental data were found to fit the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms for iron, but fitted only Langmuir isotherm for manganese. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was found to describe the manganese and iron kinetics more effectively. The thermodynamic experiment revealed that the adsorption processes involving both metals were exothermic. The adsorbent was finally applied to typical raw water with initial manganese and iron concentrations of 3.38 mg/l for Fe and 6.28 mg/l, respectively, and the removal efficiency was 100 % for Mn and 70 % for Fe. The metal ions were desorbed from the adsorbent using 0.01 M HCl, it was found to quantitatively remove 67 and 86 % of Mn and Fe, respectively, within 2 h. The results revealed that manganese and iron are considerably adsorbed on the adsorbent and could be an economic method for the removal of these metals from aqueous solutions.

  16. Phenothiazine-modified electrodes: a useful platform for protein adsorption study.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Bo-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chong Mou

    2014-02-18

    Using glucose oxidase (GOx) as a target protein, we studied the adsorption of protein on the phenothiazine-modified electrodes and assessed the potential of using the electrodes in biochemical applications. Experiment results showed that thionine chloride (TC) and its structural analogues, such as toluidine blue and methylene blue, fluoresced under photochemical excitation after being immobilized on indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes fabricated using either diazotization-reduction or oxidative polymerization. The surface-bound phenothiazines exhibited substantial binding affinities to the protein. At a pH > 5, the adsorbate showed no sign of desorption even the electrodes were electrically biased with voltages between ±0.3 V vs SCE. Thus, emission decay occurred while GOx was injected over the electrodes, which was consistent with the observations made using conductive-mode atomic force microscopy (CM-AFM). Under a quiescent condition, the protein interacted with the immobilized TC via a pseudo-first-order kinetic mechanism. The reaction reached a maximum rate at a pH > 5, at which the rate constant was approximately 7 × 10(-8) L/(U s). Under this condition, the adsorption rate increased as the level of the protein increased, regardless of pH, revealing application potential for GOx quantitation. The adsorption rate, however, decreased with a decrease in pH if the pH < 5. We concluded that static interactions played a crucial role. By monitoring Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) taking place at the TC-modified electrodes in pH 7 solutions, we observed that the adsorption of GOx imposed impedance on Fe(CN)6(3-/4-). The resulting charge-transfer resistance (RCT) increased as the amount of the protein increased, leading to a conclusion that the protein could reach the maximum surface coverage when its concentrations were greater than 100 U/mL. The protein molecules were likely repel each other as approaching the TC sites. Despite this, they maintained the native bioactivity after

  17. An investigation of the effect of surface impurities on the adsorption kinetics of hydrogen chemisorbed onto iron. Annual status report, 1 January-31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Shanabarger, M.R.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of this program has been to develop an understanding of heterogeneous kinetic processes for those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. During the present program, the interaction of hydrogen with the surfaces of alpha-2 (Ti3Al) titanium aluminide, gamma (TiAl) titanium aluminide, and beryllium were studied. The interaction of low pressure hydrogen with gamma titanium aluminide and beryllium was found to be relatively weak. Weak in the sense that adsorption leads to a low surface concentration of dissociated hydrogen, i.e., the chemisorption process is reversible at room temperature (300 K) for gamma titanium aluminide and the sticking coefficient for chemisorption is extremely small for beryllium. Hydrogen was found to interact readily with alpha-2 titanium aluminide to form a stable surface hydride at 300 K. These results correlate well with other recent studies which show that the mechanical properties for alpha-2 titanium aluminide are readily degraded in hydrogen while gamma titanium aluminide exhibits less degradation and beryllium essentially no degradation. The interaction of oxygen with the surface of several of these materials was studied. More recently, preliminary hydrogen permeation studies were completed for three high temperature alloys, Incoloy 909, Mo-47.5Re (wt. %), and this past year, Haynes 188.

  18. Dynamics and kinetics of monolayer CH4 on MgO(001) studied by helium-atom scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, David R.; Cui, Jinhe; Frankl, Daniel R.

    1991-05-01

    The structure, vibrational excitations, and adsorption and desorption kinetics of monolayer CH4 on MgO have been investigated using several techniques of helium scattering. Structural information is presented in the form of high-order diffraction-peak intensities. A vibrational excitation of 7.5 meV measured by time-of-flight methods shows no dispersion. This excitation energy is used in an analysis of the Debye-Waller effect for the [00] and [1¯0] beams. Studies of adsorption and desorption rates exploiting the He-methane diffuse-scattering cross section indicate an island-growth mode and allow determination of the desorption activation energy. Differences between the low-coverage adsorption rates for adsorption on fresh versus previously exposed surfaces suggest that higher-binding-energy sites are present after the desorption of a methane monolayer.

  19. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by a waste mud from copper mine industry: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Kemer, Baris; Duran, Celal; Senturk, Hasan Basri; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-07-30

    The objective of this study was to assess the adsorption potential of a waste mud (WM) for the removal of lead (Pb(II)) ions from aqueous solutions. The WM was activated with NaOH in order to increase its adsorption capacity. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch system as a function of solution pH, contact time, initial Pb(II) concentration, activated-waste mud (a-WM) concentration, temperature, etc. Optimum pH was specified as 4.0. The adsorption kinetic studies indicated that the overall adsorption process was best described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of a-WM was obtained by using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and both models fitted well. Adsorption capacity for Pb(II) was found to be 24.4 mg g(-1) for 10 g L(-1) of a-WM concentration. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (Delta G degrees), enthalpy (Delta H degrees), and entropy (DeltaS degrees) indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) ions on the a-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic, at temperature range of 0-40 degrees C. Desorption studies were carried out successfully with diluted HCl solutions. The results indicate that a-WM can be used as an effective and no-cost adsorbent for the treatment of industrial wastewaters contaminated with Pb(II) ions. PMID:19167162

  20. Defluoridation using biomimetically synthesized nano zirconium chitosan composite: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit; Amin, Yesha; Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal

    2014-07-15

    The present study reports a novel approach for synthesis of Zr nanoparticles using aqueous extract of Aloe vera. Resulting nanoparticles were embedded into chitosan biopolymer and termed as CNZr composite. The composite was subjected to detailed adsorption studies for removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. The synthesized Zr nanoparticles showed UV-vis absorption peak at 420nm. TEM result showed the formation of polydispersed, nanoparticles ranging from 18nm to 42nm. SAED and XRD analysis suggested an fcc (face centered cubic) Zr crystallites. EDAX analysis suggested that Zr was an integral component of synthesized nanoparticles. FT-IR study indicated that functional group like NH, CO, CN and CC were involved in particle formation. The adsorption of fluoride on to CNZr composite worked well at pH 7.0, where ∼99% of fluoride was found to be adsorbed on adsorbent. Langmuir isotherm model best fitted the equilibrium data since it presented higher R(2) value than Freundlich model. In comparison to pseudo-first order kinetic model, the pseudo-second order model could explain adsorption kinetic behavior of F(-) onto CNZr composite satisfactorily with a good correlation coefficient. The present study revealed that CNZr composite may work as an effective tool for removal of fluoride from contaminated water. PMID:24887125

  1. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed and Entrained-Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, Paula A.; Morrill, Mike; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Silcox, Geoffrey D.

    2009-06-01

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  2. Adsorption and desorption studies of cesium on sapphire surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, K.R.; Ing, J.L.

    1993-12-01

    Adsorption/desorption were studied using combined surface analytical techniques. An approximate initial sticking coefficient for Cs on sapphire was measured using reflection mass spectrometry and found to be 0.9. Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometry (TDMS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) were used to verify that a significant decrease in sticking coefficient occurs as the Cs coverage reaches a critical submonolayer value. TDMS analysis demonstrates that Cs is stabilized on a clean sapphire surface at temperatures (1200 K) in excess of the temperatures experienced by sapphire in a TOPAZ-2 thermionic fuel element (TFE). Surface contaminants on sapphire can enhance Cs adsorption relative to the clean surface. C contamination eliminates the high temperature state of Cs desorption found on clean sapphire but shifts the bulk of the C desorption from 400 to 620 K. Surface C is a difficult contaminant to remove from sapphire, requiring annealing above 1400 K. Whether Cs is stabilized on sapphire in a TFE environment will most likely depend on relation between surface contamination and surface structure.

  3. Iodine adsorption on Ni(111): STM and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, N. S.; Pavlova, T. V.; Andryushechkin, B. V.

    2016-09-01

    Iodine adsorption on the Ni(111) surface has been studied in ultra-high vacuum conditions with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. At the first stage of adsorption, iodine was found to form a simple commensurate (√{ 3 } ×√{ 3 }) R 30∘ structure at the coverage of 0.33 ML. According to DFT calculations, all iodine atoms in the (√{ 3 } ×√{ 3 }) R 30∘ structure occupy fcc hollow sites. Increase of the coverage in the range of (0.333 ML <θ < 0.364 ML) results in the uniaxial compression of the iodine lattice and the formation of the high-order commensurate structure (11 ×√{ 3 } R 30∘). The mechanism of compression involves the formation and the development of the striped super-heavy domain wall network. Further iodine dosing gives rise to nucleation and growth of flat 2D islands of surface nickel iodide. Atomic resolution STM images of iodide islands, in addition to atomic modulation, exhibit clear visible moiré-like superstructures with a period about 26 Å. The origin of the moiré-patterns was explained by the incommensurability of lattices of the surface nickel iodide and underlying Ni(111).

  4. Plant cytosolic pyruvate kinase: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Podestá, F E; Plaxton, W C

    1992-11-20

    The kinetic properties of cytosolic pyruvate kinase (PKc) from germinating castor oil seeds (COS) have been investigated. From experiments in which the free Mg2+ concentration was varied at constant levels of either the complexed or free forms of the substrates it was determined that the true substrates are the free forms of both phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ADP. This conclusion is corroborated by the quenching of intrinsic PKC tryptophan fluorescence by free PEP and ADP. Mg2+ is bound as the free bivalent cation but is likely released as MgATP. The fluorescence data, substrate interaction kinetics, and pattern of inhibition by products and substrate analogues (adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) for ADP and phenyl phosphate for PEP) are compatible with a sequential, compulsory-ordered, Tri-Bi type kinetic reaction mechanism. PEP is the leading substrate, and pyruvate the last product to abandon the enzyme. The dissociation constant and limiting Km for free PEP (8.2 to 22 and 38 microM, respectively) and the limiting Km for free ADP (2.9 microM) are considerably lower than those reported for the non-plant enzyme. The results indicate that COS PKc exists naturally in an activated state, similar to the fructose 1,6-bisphosphate-activated yeast enzyme. This deduction is consistent with a previous study (F.E. Podestá and W.C. Plaxton (1991) Biochem. J. 279, 495-501) that failed to identify any allosteric activators for the COS PKc, but which proposed a regulatory mechanism based upon ATP levels and pH-dependent alterations in the enzyme's response to various metabolite inhibitors. As plant phosphofructokinases display potent inhibition by PEP, the overall rate of glycolytic flux from hexose 6-phosphate to pyruvate in the plant cytosol will ultimately depend upon variations in PEP levels brought about by the regulation of PKc. PMID:1445948

  5. Random sequential adsorption on fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-01

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  6. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions. PMID:22852643

  7. Adsorption studies of cationic, anionic and azo-dyes via monodispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Saharan, Priya; Kumar, Arun; Mehta, S K; Mor, Suman; Umar, Ahmad

    2013-05-01

    The present paper reports the applicability of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as an adsorbent for the removal of three dyes viz. Acridine orange (cationic dye), Comassie Brilliant Blue R-250 (anionic dye) and Congo red (azo dye) from their aqueous solution. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via simple chemical precipitation method using CTAB, as surfactant. The as-prepared nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their morphological, structural and optical properties by using transmission electron microscopy X-ray diffraction and UV-visible spectroscopic measurements. The dye removal efficiency of Fe3O4 NPs have been determined by investigating several factors such as effect of pH, amount of adsorbent dose and effect of contact time on different dye concentrations. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms have also been studied to explain the interaction of dyes. The experimental data indicate that the adsorption rate follows pseudo- second-order kinetics for the removal of all the three dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles and the adsorbed dyes were desorbed. The identities of recovered nanoparticles as well as the three dyes have been found, as same and were reused. PMID:23858837

  8. A comparative study and evaluation of sulfamethoxazole adsorption onto organo-montmorillonites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Laifu; Gao, Manglai; Gu, Zheng; Yang, Senfeng; Liu, Yuening

    2014-12-01

    Three organo-montmorillonites were prepared using surfactants, and their adsorption behaviors toward sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were investigated. The surfactants used were cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTMAB), 3-(N,N-dimethylhexadecylammonio) propane sulfonate (HDAPS) and 1,3-bis(hexadecyldimethylammonio)-propane dibromide (BHDAP). The properties of the organo-montmorillonites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements. Results showed that the interlayer spacing of montmorillonite was increased and the surface area as well as the morphology were changed. Batch adsorption experiments showed that the surfactant loading amount had a great effect on the adsorption of SMX. The adsorption process was pH dependent and the maximum adsorption capacity was obtained at pH3 for HDAPS-Mt, while CTMAB-Mt and BHDAP-Mt showed a high removal efficiency at 3-11. The adsorption capacity increased with the initial SMX concentration and contact time but decreased with increasing solution ionic strength. Kinetic data were best described by the pseudo second-order model. Equilibrium data were best represented by the Langmuir model, and the Freundlich constant (n) indicated a favorable adsorption process. The maximum adsorption capacity of SMX was 235.29 mg/g for CTMAB-Mt, 155.28 mg/g for HDAPS-Mt and 242.72 mg/g for BHDAP-Mt. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated to evaluate the spontaneity and endothermic or exothermic nature. The adsorption mechanism was found to be dominated by electrostatic interaction, while hydrophobic interaction played a secondary role. PMID:25499502

  9. Temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactant molecules and associated crystallization kinetics of noncentrosymmetric Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} nanorods in microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kass, Moustafa; Ladj, Rachid; Mugnier, Yannick; Le Dantec, Ronan; Hadji, Rachid; Marty, Jean-Christophe; Rouxel, Didier; Durand, Christiane; Fontvieille, Dominique; Rogalska, Ewa; and others

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Crystallization of Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} in microemulsions probed by hyper-Rayleigh scattering. • A faster growth and a better shape control of nanorods are obtained at 80 °C. • Different persistent cell deformations are related to the crystallization kinetics. • A temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactants on nanorods is suggested. - Abstract: Aggregation-induced crystallization of iron iodate nanorods within organic–inorganic aggregates of primary amorphous precursors is probed by time-dependent hyper-Rayleigh scattering measurements in Triton X-100 based-microemulsions. In the context of a growing interest of noncentrosymmetric oxide nanomaterials in multi-photon bioimaging, we demonstrate by a combination of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy that an increase in the synthesis of temperature results in faster crystallization kinetics and in a better shape-control of the final Fe(IO{sub 3}){sub 3} nanorods. For initial microemulsions of fixed composition, room-temperature synthesis leads to bundles of 1–3 μm long nanorods, whereas shorter individual nanorods are obtained when the temperature is increased. Results are interpreted in terms of kinetically unfavorable mesoscale transformations due to the strong binding interactions with Triton molecules. The interplay between the nanorod crystallization kinetics and their corresponding unit cell deformation, evidenced by lattice parameter refinements, is attributed to a temperature-dependent adsorption of surfactants molecules at the organic–inorganic interface.

  10. Sorption of basic dyes onto granulated pillared clays: thermodynamic and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Cheknane, B; Zermane, F; Baudu, M; Bouras, O; Basly, J P

    2012-09-01

    Effect of the granulation process onto the thermodynamic and kinetic sorption parameters of two basic dyes (Basic Yellow 28-BY 28 and Basic Green 4-BG 4) was evaluated in the present work. The charge surface properties of the surfactant-modified aluminium-pillared clay (CTAB-Al-Mont-PILC) particles were not modified, and the isoelectric point remains constant after high shear wet granulation. The Gibbs free energy of both BY 28 and BG 4 sorption was negative and decreased with the granulation; the endothermic nature of the sorption process was confirmed by the positive values of ΔH°. Adsorption kinetics of the two dyes, studied at pH 6 and 150 mg L(-1), follow the pseudo-first order kinetic model with observed rate constants of 2.5-4.2×10(-2) min(-1). The intraparticle diffusion model, proposed by Weber and Morris, was applied, and the intraparticle plots revealed three distinct sections representing external mass transfer, intraparticle diffusion and adsorption/desorption equilibrium. Diffusion coefficients, calculated from the Boyd kinetic equation, increased with the granulation and the particle size. Pseudo-first order kinetic constants, intraparticle diffusion rate constants and diffusion coefficients were determined for two other initial concentrations (50 and 100 mg L(-1)) and include in a statistical study to evaluate the impact of granulation and initial concentration on the kinetic parameters. Kruskal-Wallis tests, Spearman's rank order correlation and factor analysis revealed a correlation between (i) the diffusion coefficients and granulation, and between (ii) the intraparticle diffusion rate constants and initial concentration. PMID:22721789

  11. Application of activated carbon derived from scrap tires for adsorption of Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Shuangxi; Zhu, Tan

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon derived from solid hazardous waste scrap tires was evaluated as a potential adsorbent for cationic dye removal. The adsorption process with respect to operating parameters was investigated to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of the activated pyrolytic tire char (APTC) for Rhodamine B (RhB). Systematic research including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic studies was performed. The results showed that APTC was a potential adsorbent for RhB with a higher adsorption capacity than most adsorbents. Solution pH and temperature exert significant influence while ionic strength showed little effect on the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data obey Langmuir isotherm and the kinetic data were well described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process followed intra-particle diffusion model with more than one process affecting the adsorption process. Thermodynamic study confirmed that the adsorption was a physisorption process with spontaneous, endothermic and random characteristics. PMID:21179969

  12. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 2: Kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2009-10-30

    The application of several monosolute equilibrium models has previously shown that Bromacil adsorption on SA-UF (Norit) powdered activated carbon (PAC) is probably effective on two types of sites. High reactivity sites were found to be 10-20 less present in a carbon surface than lower reactivity sites, according to the q(m) values calculated by isotherm models. The aims of this work were trying, primarily, to identify the kinetic-determinant stage of the sorption of Bromacil at a wide range of initial pesticide concentrations (approximately 5 to approximately 500 microg L(-1) at pH 7.8), and secondly, to specify the rate constants and other useful design parameters for the application in water treatment. It was therefore not possible to specify a priori whether the diffusion or surface reaction is the key step. It shows that many of the tested models which describe the stage of distribution or the surface reaction are correctly applied. However, the diffusivity values (D and D(0)) were found to be constant only constants for some specific experimental concentrations. The HSDM model of surface diffusion in pores was also applied but the values of the diffusion coefficient of surface (D(s)) were widely scattered and reduce significantly with the initial concentration or the equilibrium concentration in Bromacil. The model of surface reaction of pseudo-second order fitted particularly well and led to constant values which are independent of the equilibrium concentration, except for the low concentrations where the constants become significantly more important. This last observation confirms perfectly the hypothesis based on two types of sites as concluded by the equilibrium data (part 1). PMID:19560269

  13. Random sequential adsorption of trimers and hexamers.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-12-01

    Adsorption of trimers and hexamers built of identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Particles were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Numerical simulations allowed us to determine the maximal random coverage ratio, RSA kinetics as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining the kinetics of the adsorption process obtained experimentally. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured. All the results were compared with previous results obtained for spheres, dimers and tetramers. PMID:24193213

  14. Aqueous phase adsorption of cephalexin by walnut shell-based activated carbon: A fixed-bed column study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Ghadir; Abolghasemi, Hossein; Esmaieli, Mohamad; Sadeghi Pouya, Ehsan

    2016-07-01

    The walnut shell was used as a low cost adsorbent to produce activated carbon (AC) for the removal of cephalexin (CFX) from aqueous solution. A fixed-bed column adsorption was carried out using the walnut shell AC. The effect of various parameters like bed height (1.5, 2 and 2.5 cm), flow rate (4.5, 6 and 7.5 mL/min) and initial CFX concentration (50, 100 and 150 mg/L) on the breakthrough characteristics of the adsorption system was investigated at optimum pH 6.5. The highest bed capacity of 211.78 mg/g was obtained using 100 mg/L inlet drug concentration, 2 cm bed height and 4.5 mL/min flow rate. Three kinetic models, namely Adam's-Bohart, Thomas and Yoon-Nelson were applied for analysis of experimental data. The Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models were appropriate for walnut shell AC column design under various conditions. The experimental adsorption capacity values were fitted to the Bangham and intra-particle diffusion models in order to propose adsorption mechanisms. The effect of temperature on the degradation of CFX was also studied.

  15. Monitoring N3 dye adsorption and desorption on TiO2 surfaces: a combined QCM-D and XPS study.

    PubMed

    Wayment-Steele, Hannah K; Johnson, Lewis E; Tian, Fangyuan; Dixon, Matthew C; Benz, Lauren; Johal, Malkiat S

    2014-06-25

    Understanding the kinetics of dye adsorption and desorption on semiconductors is crucial for optimizing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) measures adsorbed mass in real time, allowing determination of binding kinetics. In this work, we characterize adsorption of the common RuBipy dye N3 to the native oxide layer of a planar, sputter-coated titanium surface, simulating the TiO2 substrate of a DSSC. We report adsorption equilibrium constants consistent with prior optical measurements of N3 adsorption. Dye binding and surface integrity were also verified by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We further study desorption of the dye from the native oxide layer on the QCM sensors using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH), a commonly used industrial desorbant. We find that using TBAOH as a desorbant does not fully regenerate the surface, though little ruthenium or nitrogen is observed by XPS after desorption, suggesting that carboxyl moieties of N3 remain bound. We demonstrate the native oxide layer of a titanium sensor as a valid and readily available planar TiO2 morphology to study dye adsorption and desorption and begin to investigate the mechanism of dye desorption in DSSCs, a system that requires further study. PMID:24848580

  16. A study of metal ion adsorption at low suspended-solid concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Cecily C.Y.; Davis, J.A.; Kuwabara, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure for conducting adsorption studies at low suspended solid concentrations in natural waters (<50 mg l-1) is described. Methodological complications previously associated with such experiments have been overcome. Adsorption of zinc ion onto synthetic colloidal titania (TiO2) was studied as a function of pH, supporting electrolyte (NaCl) concentration (0??1-0??002 m) and particle concentration (2-50 mg l-1). The lack of success of the Davis Leckie site bonding model in describing Zn(II) adsorption emphasizes the need for further studies of adsorption at low suspended-solid concentrations. ?? 1987.

  17. Oxygen adsorption on single layer graphyne: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Baotao; Liu, Hongguang; Lee, Jin Yong

    2014-01-21

    Graphyne is a rising two-dimensional (2D) carbon allotrope with excellent electronic properties. In this paper, theoretical calculations were performed to study the corresponding electronic properties of the oxygenated graphyne. Atomic oxygen when bound to the carbon atom of graphyne forms a stable oxide, with a much larger binding energy compared to that on graphene. Owing to the oxygen adsorption, the α- and β-graphyne change from a zero-band-gap material to a semiconductor as indicated in the band structure calculations. Moreover, spin splitting was observed from the band structure of the oxygenated γ-graphyne. These electronic properties are tunable by altering the oxygen coverage through changing the supercell size. Our results based on the first-principles calculations imply that oxygenation is a promising method to functionalize graphyne to achieve designated properties. PMID:24281199

  18. Adsorption of water on porous Vycor glass studied by ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Herrero, A; Heredero, R L; Bernabeu, E; Levy, D

    2001-02-01

    The variation of the optical properties of porous Vycor glass (Corning, Model 7930) under different relative-humidity conditions was studied. The adsorption of water into the glass pores was investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. The change of the refractive index was Deltan approximately 0.04 between 5% and 90% relative humidity. A linear relation between the ellipsometer parameter tan Psi, the amount of water adsorbed in the glass pores, and information about the pore-size distributions was established. The results are in accord with the values obtained from N2 isotherms, transmission electron microscope micrographs, and the manufacturer's specifications (radius of approximately 20 A). The possibility of using this material as a transducer for implementation in a fiber-optic sensor to measure humidity was evaluated. PMID:18357027

  19. Theoretical study of xenon adsorption in UO2 nanoporous matrices.

    PubMed

    Colbert, Mehdi; Tréglia, Guy; Ribeiro, Fabienne

    2014-12-01

    We present a theoretical study of xenon incorporation in UO2 nanocavities, by means of Grand Canonical Monte Carlo calculations based on semi-empirical potentials. We first characterize the reconstruction of the matrix around an empty cavity which leads to a stoechiometry change from UO2 to UO in this region. Then, we determine xenon adsorption isotherms which exhibit an abrupt transition from a dilute phase to a dense one and an increase in the density of the latter phase as a function of temperature. This last result is attributed to a vibrational entropy effect by means of a mean field analysis. Finally, the pressure calculation inside the bubble proves the limitations of the usual mesoscopic models based on gas state behaviour. PMID:25388362

  20. Adsorption of caffeic acid on titanium dioxide: A spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, Wagner José; Ando, Rômulo A.; Estevão, Bianca Martins; Zanoni, Kassio Papi da Silva

    2012-06-01

    Caffeic acid is an ortho-phenol found in vegetable tissues presenting important properties such as carcinogenesis inhibitor, anti-oxidant, anti-viral, anti-inflammatory and anti-rheumatic actions. It was observed that caffeic acid was not degraded in daylight during the adsorption on TiO2 at pH 4.8. The adsorption fit very well to a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller isotherm equation with a monolayer coverage of 68.15 mg gTiO-1 and saturation coverage of 195.4 mg gTiO-1. A strong adsorption of caffeic acid was verified on TiO2 for the dry solid obtained from the mixture. The Raman and IR spectroscopies revealed that the adsorption should occur through the interaction of the diphenol oxygens with contribution of CC double bond of the acrylic group, however, the carboxylic acid group did not have participation in the adsorption.

  1. Experimental study of water adsorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Salame, I.I.; Bandosz, T.J. |

    1999-01-19

    Two carbons of different origins (wood and coal) were oxidized with nitric acid. The materials were characterized using sorption of nitrogen. Boehm titration, and potentiometric titration. The water adsorption isotherms were measured at various temperatures close to ambient (relative pressure from 0.001 to 0.3). From these isotherms heats of adsorption were calculated using virial equation. The results showed that the isosteric heats of water adsorption are affected by surface chemical heterogeneity only at low surface coverage. The shapes of heats obtained indicate strong water-water interactions as a result of adsorption on secondary sites and cluster formation. In all cases the limiting heat of adsorption equal to the heat of water condensation (45 kJ/mol) was obtained.

  2. Study of polyethyleneimine- and amidoxime-functionalized hybrid biomass of Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis for adsorption of uranium (VI) ion.

    PubMed

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Akbulut, Aydin; Arica, M Yakup

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the potential application of the polyethyleneimine- (PEI) and amidoxime-modified Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis biomasses for the removal of uranium ion in batch mode using the native biomass as a control system. The uranium ion adsorption was also characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra, zeta potential analysis, and surface area measurement studies. The effects of pH, biomass amount, contact time, initial uranium ion concentration, and ionic strength were evaluated by using native and modified algal biomass preparations. The uranium ion removal was rapid, with more than 70% of total adsorption taking place in 40 min, and equilibrium was established within 60 min. From the experimental data, it was found that the amount of adsorption uranium ion on the algal preparations decreased in the following series: amidoxime-modified algal biomass > PEI-modified algal biomass > native algal biomass. Maximum adsorption capacities of amidoxime- and PEI-modified, and native algal biomasses were found to be 366.8, 279.5, and 194.6 mg/g, respectively, in batchwise studies. The adsorption rate of U(VI) ion by amidoxime-modified algal biomass was higher than those of the native and PEI-modified counterparts. The adsorption processes on all the algal biomass preparations followed by the Dubinin-Radushkevitch (D-R) and Temkin isotherms and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The thermodynamic parameters were determined at four different temperatures (i.e., 15, 25, 35, and 45 °C) using the thermodynamics constant of the Temkin isotherm model. The ΔH° and ΔG° values of U(VI) ion adsorption on algal preparations show endothermic heat of adsorption; higher temperatures favor the process. The native and modified algal biomass preparations were regenerated using 10 mM HNO3. These results show that amidoxime-modified algal biomass can be a potential candidate for effective removal of U(VI) ion from

  3. [Study on Kinetic of Hg2+ from Wastewater Absorbed by Lemon Residues].

    PubMed

    Shen, Wang-qing; Wang, Miao; Yang, Ting

    2016-03-01

    With low price and its superior adsorption performance after modification, currently agricultural waste is used as adsorbent of heavy metals in wastewater, which has become a hot research topic. To study on Hg2+ from wastewater absorbed by lemon residues that has been modified by 15% concentration of sulphuric acid. The pore volume, pore size and other properties of the adsorbent were test. The samples were characterized by differential thermal analysis, IR, electron microscopy and spectroscopy. The result showed that the adsorption rate was controlled by membrane diffusion kinetics that was viewed as the first order kinetics equation of the Lagergren, which was physically absorbed. The adsorption properties of modified lemon residues were improved greatly, and the pore size distribution mainly was medium. There were three losses-weight process. There was a endothermic peak around 66 degrees C and two exotherm near 316 degrees C and 494 degrees C. Basic framework of Lemon residues was not changed and structure of Lemon residues was amorphous; the surface of modified lemon residues loosen and many pores formed, and Hg2+ have been adsorbed effectively. PMID:27400525

  4. Adsorption behavior of EE2 (17 alpha-ethinylestradiol) onto the inactivated sewage sludge: kinetics, thermodynamics and influence factors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yujie; Zhang, Zhaohan; Gao, Peng; Su, Hui; Yu, Yanling; Ren, Nanqi

    2010-03-15

    The adsorption behavior of 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE(2)) onto inactivated sludge was investigated to assess the function of adsorption on EE(2) removal in activated sludge system. The adsorption equilibrium of EE(2) can be achieved in 5.0 h at the research temperature and the adsorption process could be well described by pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium data at different temperatures were fitted by a linear regression. The thermodynamics analysis revealed that EE(2) adsorption onto inactivated sludge was spontaneous (Delta G=-15.18 to -16.35 kJ/mol), enthalpy-driven (Delta H=-27.2 kJ/mol), entropy-retarded (DeltaS=-39.18 J/(mol K)), and mainly physical adsorption. Effects of pH, ionic strength and coexisting organic matters (methanol and bisphenol A) on EE(2) adsorption onto inactivated sludge were also examined. The amounts of EE(2) equilibrium adsorption ability were unchanged as the pH values increasing from 2.0 to 6.0, but decreased from 2.14 to 1.43 mg/g MLSS when the initial EE(2) concentration was 5.0mg/L as pH above 6.0. The adsorption capacities were first increased from 2.19 to 2.50mg/g MLSS, then sharply decreased and stabilized at 1.12 mg/g MLSS during the ionic strength was adjusted from 0 to 1 mol/L. Methanol (0.4-5%, v/v) and bisphenol A (0-200mg/L) in the mixed liquor can decrease the adsorption capacity of EE(2) from 2.19 to 1.39 and 0.75 mg/g MLSS, respectively. PMID:19945220

  5. Removal of phenol from aqueous solutions by adsorption.

    PubMed

    Roostaei, Nadia; Tezel, F Handan

    2004-02-01

    Experiments have been conducted to examine the liquid-phase adsorption of phenol from water by silica gel, HiSiv 3000, activated alumina, activated carbon, Filtrasorb-400, and HiSiv 1000. Experiments were carried out for the analysis of adsorption equilibrium capacities and kinetics. The adsorption isotherm model of the Langmuir-Freundlich type was the best to describe adsorption equilibrium data for phenol for the adsorbents studied. Results of kinetic experiments indicated that HiSiv 1000 had the highest rate of adsorption among the adsorbents studied and therefore more detailed studies were carried out with this adsorbent. The influence of particle size, temperature, and thermal regeneration on adsorption of phenol by HiSiv 1000 was evaluated. From particle size experiments it appeared that adsorption capacity of HiSiv 1000 did not change by changing the particle size, but the rate of adsorption decreased considerably by increasing the particle size. The effect of temperature on adsorption was studied by determining equilibrium isotherms for HiSiv 1000 at 25, 40, and 55 degrees C. The results showed that adsorption capacity decreased with increasing temperature. Thermal regeneration of HiSiv 1000 was performed at 360 degrees C. It was observed that adsorption capacity of HiSiv 1000 did not change after 14 regeneration cycles. Equilibrium experiments showed that the adsorption capacities of activated carbon and Filtrasorb-400 were several times higher than that of HiSiv 1000. PMID:15160741

  6. Novel tannin-based adsorbent in removing cationic dye (Methylene Blue) from aqueous solution. Kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, J; González-Velasco, M; Beltrán-Heredia, J; Gragera-Carvajal, J; Salguero-Fernández, J

    2010-02-15

    Natural tannin-based adsorbent has been prepared on the basis of the gelification of Quebracho bark extract. The resulting product, Quebracho Tannin Gel (QTG) was tested as cationic dye adsorbent with Methylene Blue (MB). Kinetics of adsorption process were studied out and a period of 15 days was determined for reaching equilibrium. The influences of pH and temperature were evaluated. As pH or temperature raise q capacity of QTG increases. Theoretical modelization of dye-QTG adsorption was carried out by multiparametric adjustment according to Langmuir's hypothesis. Values of the k(l1), k(l2) and activation energies were calculated. PMID:19782466

  7. Geosorption of As(III) from aqueous solution by red clays: kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Hernández, José R; Green-Ruiz, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    The geosorption of As(III) on red clays from aqueous solution under different environmental conditions (i.e. initial concentration, pH and temperature) was studied. This process reached its equilibrium quickly (<120 min). A decrease of the percentage of adsorption was caused when the initial concentration was increased (0.1-10 mg As(III) L(-1)), in all the experimental pH levels (4-10). The optimal pH value for adsorption on red clays at 0.1 mg As(III) L(-1) was 10, while for 10 mg As(III) L(-1) was 4. There wasn't a significant effect of temperature on the As(III) adsorption. The kinetic pseudo-second order and the isothermal Langmuir were the models that best described the experimental data, suggesting an adsorption process in multistep. Likewise, there are not interactions between neighbor active sites on the red clay surface. PMID:24549918

  8. Density functional study of the cysteine adsorption on Au nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, L. A.; López-Lozano, X.; Garzón, I. L.

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption of the cysteine amino acid (H-SCβH2-CαH-NH2-COOH) on the Au55 cluster is investigated through density functional theory calculations. Two isomers, with icosahedral (Ih) and chiral (C1) geometries, of the Au55 cluster are used to calculate the adsorption energy of the cysteine on different facets of these isomers. Results, only involving the S(thiolate)-Au bonding show that the higher adsorption energies are obtained when the sulfur atom is bonded to an asymmetrical bridge site at the facet containing Au atoms with the lowest coordination of the C1 cluster isomer.

  9. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on Forsterite, Mg2SiO4(011)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Li, Zhenjun; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-12-18

    We have examined the adsorbate-substrate interaction kinetics of CO2 and H2O on a natural forsterite crystal surface, Mg2SiO4(011), with 10-15% of substitutional Fe2+. We use temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and molecular beam techniques to determine the adsorption, desorption, and displacement kinetics for H2O and CO2. Neither CO2 nor H2O has distinct sub-monolayer desorption peaks but instead both have a broad continuous desorption feature that evolve smoothly into multilayer desorption. Inversion of the monolayer coverage spectra for both molecules reveals that the corresponding binding energies for H2O are greater than that for CO2 on all sites. The relative strength of these interactions is the dominant factor in the competitive adsorption/displacement kinetics. In experiments where the two adsorbates are co-dosed, H2O always binds to the highest energy binding sites available and displaces CO2. The onset of CO2 displacement by H2O occurs between 65 and 75 K.

  10. Role of adsorption kinetics in the low-temperature Si growth by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy: In situ observations and detailed modeling of the growth

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Hideki; Tsukidate, Yoshikazu; Suemitsu, Maki

    2001-08-06

    The growth rate and surface hydrogen coverage during Si gas-source molecular beam epitaxy using disilane have been obtained as functions of both the growth temperature and the source-gas pressure. The activation energy of the low-temperature (<600{sup o}C) growth rate was found to increase with the source-gas pressure, indicating a contribution by the adsorption process in these low-temperature growth kinetics. Several growth models have been constructed based on the results, among which the two-site/four-site-adsorption model [M. Suemitsu Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 236, L625 (1997)] showed the best fit to both the growth rate and the hydrogen coverage. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Facile preparation of hierarchical hollow structure gamma alumina and a study of its adsorption capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Shi; Guo, Na; Liu, Lu; Wu, Xiaomin; Li, Linlin; Gan, Shucai

    2013-10-01

    The hierarchical shell and hollow core structure gamma alumina (γ-Al2O3) with high adsorption affinity toward organic pollutants was fabricated via a facile homogeneous precipitation method. The microstructure, morphology, and functional groups of the as-synthesized γ-Al2O3 were characterized in detail. The N2 adsorption-desorption measurement (BET) experimental result showed the surface area of γ-Al2O3 (Al90-600) is 320.6 m2/g and the average pore size is 17.8 nm. The effects of reaction parameters on the synthesis of hierarchical hollow structure were systematically investigated. The dye removal ability of this adsorbent was determined by batch adsorption procedure. The isotherms and kinetics of adsorption process were determined and analyzed in detail, which were found to obey the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order for both the Congo red (CR) and Methyl orange (MO). The maximum adsorption capacity of γ-Al2O3 for CR is 835.0 mg/g, which is higher than that of many other previously reported hierarchical structured adsorbents. This facile synthetic approach is a very promising way for the design and synthesis of the typical hierarchical hollow structure materials with powerful adsorption capacity for the removal of organic contaminants from wastewater.

  12. Temperature-dependent infrared and calorimetric studies on arsenicals adsorption from solution to hematite nanoparticles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To address the lack of systematic and surface sensitive studies on the adsorption energetics of arsenic compounds on metal (oxyhydr)oxides, we conducted temperature-dependent ATR-FTIR studies for the adsorption of arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid on hematite nanoparticles a...

  13. [Comparison study on adsorption of middle molecular substances with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Li, Guifeng; Wan, Jianxin; Huang, Xiangqian; Zeng, Qiao; Tang, Jing

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs) are very favorable to the adsorption of middle molecular substances in the hemoperfusion because of their multiporous structure, large surface area and high reactivity, which are beneficial to the excellent absorption properties. The purpose of this study was to study the MWCTs on the adsorption capacity of the middle molecular substances. Vitamin B12 (VB12) was selected as a model of the middle molecular substances. The morphologies of MWCTs and activated carbon from commercial "carbon kidney" were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption behavior of VB12 was compared to each other with UV-visible absorption spectra. The MWCTs formed a sophistaicate gap structure, and compared to the activated carbon, MWCTs had a larger surface area. By Langmuir equation and Freundlich equation fitting analysis, VB12 adsorption on MWCTs is fit for multi-molecular layer adsorption, and the adsorption type of activated carbon is more inclined to the model corresponding to Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The adsorption rate of MWCTs is faster than that of the activated carbon and the adsorption capacity is greater, which could be expected to become the new adsorbent in the hemoperfusion. PMID:21936376

  14. Efficient adsorption of phenanthrene by simply synthesized hydrophobic MCM-41 molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yun; He, Yinyun; Wang, Xiaowen; Wei, Chaohai

    2014-08-01

    Hydrophobic molecular sieve MCM-41 including surfactant template was synthesized by a simple method. The adsorption properties of this material toward phenanthrene were studied. The effects of adsorbent dose and pH value on the adsorption process as well as the adsorption mechanism and reuse performance were investigated. The template-containing MCM-41 showed a significant adsorption for phenanthrene, due to its hydrophobicity created by the surfactant template in MCM-41. The solution pH had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The adsorption kinetic could be fitted well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption equilibrium was fitted well by the linear model, and the adsorption process followed the liquid/solid phase distribution mechanism. The thermodynamic results indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process.

  15. Bridging in grafted layers : Statics and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johner, A.

    We discuss bridging between a grafted layer and an opposing plate which adsorbs the polymer. The case of end adsorption is considered, as well as the case where all monomers adsorb. We predict that with increasing adsorption an exclusion zone grows in the vicinity of the adsorbing plate, this slows down the kinetics. For end adsorption we study the kinetics and argue that two main processes are involved: the exploration of the brush by a free end and its adsorption through the exclusion zone.

  16. Macro kinetic studies for photocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid in immobilized systems.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Kanheya; Yablonsky, Gregory S; Ray, Ajay K

    2005-09-01

    Semiconductor photocatalytic process has been studied extensively in recent years due to its intriguing advantages in environmental remediation. In this study, a two-phase swirl-flow monolithic-type reactor is used to study the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid in immobilized systems. Transport contributions into the observed degradation rates were determined when catalyst is immobilized. Intrinsic kinetic rate constants and its dependence on light intensity and catalyst layer thickness, values of adsorption equilibrium constant, internal as well as external mass transfer parameters were determined. The simultaneous effect of catalyst loading and light intensity and optimum catalyst layer thickness were also determined experimentally. Reaction rate constants and overall observed degradation rates were compared with slurry systems. PMID:16054912

  17. Coulometric study of ethanol adsorption at a polycrystalline platinum electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Sol

    2012-01-01

    For the first time, use of a novel pre-conditioning sequence and measurements of hydrogen blockage during fast cathodic scans has enabled the determination of rates of accumulation of ethanolic species on the surface of a platinum electrode under well-controlled conditions of surface cleanliness/activity and mass transport. For dilute solutions of ethanol in 1 N perchloric acid (HClO4), oxidative adsorption rates maximize at 0.3 V, drop off at more cathodic potentials due to competition with adsorbed hydrogen and drop off at more anodic potentials due to oxidative processes that produce products released to the electrolyte. The time and concentration dependence of adsorption follows relationships that are common for adsorption on a heterogeneous surface. Some evidence are presented supporting a mechanism for production of soluble products that does not involve the adsorbed species that are detected through the measurement of blockage of hydrogen adsorption sites.

  18. Study of Adsorption of Copper Species onto Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functionalized CNTs have improved adsorptive capacities over pristine CNTs. These can be used for sensors, membranes, filters and matrix composite enhancements made possible because of their nano-size.

  19. A new chitosan biopolymer derivative as metal-complexing agent: synthesis, characterization, and metal(II) ion adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Krishnapriya, K R; Kandaswamy, M

    2010-09-23

    In this study, a new chitosan biopolymer derivative (CTSL) has been synthesized by anchoring a new vanillin-based complexing agent or ligand, namely 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-5-[(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)methyl] benzaldehyde, (L) with chitosan (CTS) by means of condensation. The new material was characterized by elemental (CHN), spectral (FTIR and solid state (13)C NMR), thermal (TG-DTA and DSC), structural (powder XRD), and morphological (SEM) analyses. The CTSL was employed to study the equilibrium adsorption of various metal ions, namely, Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II), as functions of pH of the solutions. Its kinetics of adsorption was evaluated utilizing the pseudo first order and pseudo second order equation models and the equilibrium data were analyzed by Langmuir isotherm model. The CTSL shows good adsorption capacity for metal ions studied in the order Cu(II)>Ni(II)>Cd(II)> or =Co> or =Mn(II)>Fe(II)>Pb(II) in all studied pH ranges due to the presence of many coordinating moieties present in it. PMID:20708730

  20. KINETIC STUDIES OF SIMULATED POLLUTED ATMOSPHERES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics and reaction mechanisms of several important atmospheric contaminants - SO2, formaldehyde, nitrous acid, and the nitrosamines - were assessed to help quantify some key aspects of the chemistry of polluted atmospheres. The reactions and lifetimes of excited sulfur dio...

  1. Batch and column studies of adsorption of Li, Ni and Br by a reference sand for contaminant transport experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Seigel, M.D.; Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R.

    1995-09-01

    A processed quartz sand (Wedron 510), mined from the St. Peter sandstone, has been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical methods for use as a reference porous media in transport model validation experiments. Wedron 510 sand was used in an intermediate-scale experiment involving migration of Ni, Li and Br through a 6-m high x 3-m diameter caisson. Ni and Li adsorption/desorption, and Li/Ni site-competition experiments yielded information on the importance of the trace mineral phases to adsorption of Li and Ni by the sand. The presence of an iron hydroxide coating similar to goethite on the sand grains is suggested by visual observation and leaching experiments. Kaolinite was identified by SEM and XRD as a significant trace mineral phase in the sand and occurs as small particles coating the sand grains. Quartz, the predominant constituent of the sand by weight, does not appear to contribute significantly to the adsorption properties of the sand. Qualitatively, the adsorption properties of the sand can be adequately modeled as a two-mineral system (goethite and kaolinite). The studies described in this report should provide a basis for understanding transport of Ni, Li and Br through porous media similar to the reference sand. Techniques were developed for obtaining parameter values for surface complexation and kinetic adsorption models for the sand and its mineral components. These constants can be used directly in coupled hydrogeochemical transport codes. The techniques should be useful for characterization of other natural materials and elements in high-level nuclear waste in support of coupled hydrogeochemical transport calculations for Yucca Mountain.

  2. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC. PMID:26871732

  3. Microcolumn studies of dye adsorption onto manganese oxides modified diatomite.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouti, M A; Khraisheh, M A M; Ahmad, M N; Allen, S J

    2007-07-19

    The method described here cannot fully replace the analysis of large columns by small test columns (microcolumns). The procedure, however, is suitable for speeding up the determination of adsorption parameters of dye onto the adsorbent and for speeding up the initial screening of a large adsorbent collection that can be tedious if a several adsorbents and adsorption conditions must be tested. The performance of methylene blue (MB), a basic dye, Cibacron reactive black (RB) and Cibacron reactive yellow (RY) was predicted in this way and the influence of initial dye concentration and other adsorption conditions on the adsorption behaviour were demonstrated. On the basis of the experimental results, it can be concluded that the adsorption of RY onto manganese oxides modified diatomite (MOMD) exhibited a characteristic "S" shape and can be simulated effectively by the Thomas model. It is shown that the adsorption capacity increased as the initial dye concentration increased. The increase in the dye uptake capacity with the increase of the adsorbent mass in the column was due to the increase in the surface area of adsorbent, which provided more binding sites for the adsorption. It is shown that the use of high flow rates reduced the time that RY in the solution is in contact with the MOMD, thus allowing less time for adsorption to occur, leading to an early breakthrough of RY. A rapid decrease in the column adsorption capacity with an increase in particle size with an average 56% reduction in capacity resulting from an increase in the particle size from 106-250 microm to 250-500 microm. The experimental data correlated well with calculated data using the Thomas equation and the bed depth-service time (BDST) equation. Therefore, it might be concluded that the Thomas equation and the BDST equations can produce accurate predication for variation of dye concentration, mass of the adsorbent, flow rate and particle size. In general, the values of adsorption isotherm capacity

  4. Kinetic study of antibody adhesion on a silicon wafer by laser reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Bibiana D.; Valverde, Juana R.; Rasia, Rodolfo J.

    2003-05-01

    Antibody adhesion kinetic in real time has been studied by laser reflectometry technique. An ellipsometer is used to measure the light intensity reflected by a silicon wafer. Light intensity reflected by the wafer presents a minimum at the pseudo-Brewster angle. Then, the reflectance increases as the antibodies (monoclonal anti- AB) adhere on interface. Mathematical analysis of reflectance curves versus time verifies that the antibody adhesion at the interface follows Langmuir kinetics (Prog. Biomed. Opt. Imaging 1(5) (2000) 19) for low antibody concentrations. Parameters obtained allow to carry out a detailed study of the antibody adsorption and the antigen-antibody interaction. This conduces to development of an optical immunosensor for detection and quantification of soluble antigens, and a novel method for commercial antiserum quality control. This technique does not require labeled antibodies, being also independent of cellular factors. Also, this technique is quicker and sensible than the conventional immunohematology methods.

  5. Studies On The Influence Of Soil Components On Adsorption-Desorption Of Hazardous Organics And Their Insitu Biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Z.

    2003-12-01

    Currently approximately 155 cubic yards of soil is contaminated with hazardous organics at Patancheru Industrial area (Hyderabad, India). These hazardous organic contaminants are frequently part of hazardous waste disposed on land and the study of waste site interaction is the key to assess the potential for offsite and onsite contamination. In the present study the authors report the results on the adsorption, soil leaching potential and persistence of phenol, p-nitrophenol,2,4-dichlorophenol and 4,chloro-2,nitrophenol which are the common constituents of the hazardous waste generated. The role of soil components like organic matter, clay, iron and aluminium oxides in the adsorption capacity has been studied. Desorption isotherms of soil adsorbed hazardous organics exhibited hysterisis at high initial concentration indicating the degree of irreversibility of adsorption-deesorption process. Leaching potential of the hazardous organics decreases with their increasing hydrophobicity and soil organic matter content while their persistence in terms of half life time (DT50) increases. Insitu biodegradation has been carried out by developing mixed culture systems which can degrade the phenols to complete mineralisation by utilizing them as the sole source of carbon and their corresponding biodegradation kinetic constants were evaluated. Based on the above data generated preparation of hazardous waste dumpsites with suitable soil surface having high holding capacity for organics and their insitu biodegradation by mixing with specific bacterial cultures enriched from different soils can be exploited as a cost effective technology for reclamation of contaminated sites.

  6. Optical luminescence studies of the ethyl xanthate adsorption layer on the surface of sphalerite minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, R.; Todoran, D.; Szakács, Zs.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose optical luminescence measurements as a method to evaluate the kinetics of adsorption processes. Measurement of the intensity of the integral optical radiation obtained from the mineral-xanthate interface layer, stimulated with a monochromatic pulsating optical signal, as a function of time were made. The luminescence radiation was obtained from the thin interface layer formed at the separation surface between the sphalerite natural mineral and potassium ethyl xanthate solution, for different solution concentrations and pH-es at the constant industry standard temperature. This method enabled us to determine the time to achieve dynamic equilibrium in the formation of the interface layer of approximately 20 min, gaining information on the adsorption kinetics in the case of xanthate on mineral surface and leading to the optimization of the industrial froth flotation process.

  7. Optical luminescence studies of the ethyl xanthate adsorption layer on the surface of sphalerite minerals.

    PubMed

    Todoran, R; Todoran, D; Szakács, Zs

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose optical luminescence measurements as a method to evaluate the kinetics of adsorption processes. Measurement of the intensity of the integral optical radiation obtained from the mineral-xanthate interface layer, stimulated with a monochromatic pulsating optical signal, as a function of time were made. The luminescence radiation was obtained from the thin interface layer formed at the separation surface between the sphalerite natural mineral and potassium ethyl xanthate solution, for different solution concentrations and pH-es at the constant industry standard temperature. This method enabled us to determine the time to achieve dynamic equilibrium in the formation of the interface layer of approximately 20min, gaining information on the adsorption kinetics in the case of xanthate on mineral surface and leading to the optimization of the industrial froth flotation process. PMID:25619858

  8. Chemical kinetic studies on dry sorbents. Final report. [Sodium bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.T.; Keener, T.C.

    1982-02-15

    The scope of this research investigation has included a review of potential additives suitable for dry flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) and a bench scale laboratory study to determine the chemical kinetics for the reaction of five different sorbents with sulfur dioxide. The sorbents chosen included sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO/sub 3/), soda ash (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/), trona, lime (CaO) and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). This study has shown that: (1) The reaction rate increases with temperature for soda ash and calcium oxide. The reaction temperature has an inverse effect on sodium bicarbonate and trona due, primarily, to the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. The calcium hydroxide-SO/sub 2/ reaction increased up to 550/sup 0/F, and then decreased, due to uneven gas flow distribution. (2) The reaction rates for soda ash, calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were increased by decreasing their particle size. This effect was not confirmed for sodium bicarbonate and trona where reaction temperature was the most important reaction parameter. (3) Reaction with soda ash was found to be limited by the presence of an impervious ash layer which prevented interparticle gaseous diffusion. Calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were found to be limited by a slow chemical reaction rate. Results on the rate-limiting steps for sodium bicarbonate and trona were inconclusive because of the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. (4) The effect of thermal activation was to increase the reaction rate for sodium bicarbonate and trona at lower temperatures. This effect was less pronounced at higher temperatures. (5) Results obtained for nitric oxide show limited adsorption for the five sorbents tested as compared to the finding for sulfur dioxide.

  9. Diethyl phthalate removal from aqueous phase using poly(EGDMA-MATrp) beads: kinetic, isothermal and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Özer, Elif Tümay; Osman, Bilgen; Kara, Ali; Demirbel, Emel; Beşirli, Necati; Güçer, Şeref

    2015-01-01

    In this study, poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-tryptophan methyl ester) [poly(EGDMA-MATrp)] beads (average diameter=106-300 µm), which were synthesized by co-polymerizing of N-methacryloyl-L-tryptophan methyl ester (MATrp) with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), were used for diethyl phthalate (DEP) adsorption. The various factors affecting the adsorption of DEP from aqueous solutions such as pH, initial concentration, contact time and temperature were analysed. Adsorption behaviour of DEP on the poly(EGDMA-MATrp) beads was investigated by varying pH values of solution, contact time, initial concentration and temperature. An optimum adsorption capacity of 590.7 mg/g for DEP was obtained at 25 °C. The present adsorption process obeyed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. All the isotherm data can be fitted with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters ΔH=7.745 kJ/mol, ΔS=81.92 J/K/mol and ΔG=-16.69 kJ/mol to -18.31 kJ/mol with the rise in temperature from 25 °C to 45 °C indicated that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous. PMID:25629452

  10. Study the adsorption of sulfates by high cross-linked polystyrene divinylbenzene anion-exchange resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, Mahmoud; Moghny, Th. Abdel; Awadallah, Ahmed E.; El-Bellihi, Abdel-Hameed A.-A.

    2014-11-01

    In response to rising concerns about the effect of sulfate on water quality, human health, and agriculture, many jurisdictions around the world are imposing tighter regulations for sulfate discharge. This is driving the need for environmental compliance in industries like mining, metal processing, pulp and paper, sewage treatment, and chemical manufacturing. The sulfate removal from synthetic water by high cross-linked polystyrene divinylbenzene resin was studied at batch experiments in this study. The effect of pH, contact time, sulfates concentration, and adsorbent dose on the sulfate sequestration was investigated. The optimum conditions were studied on Saline water as a case study. The results showed that with increasing of the absorbent amount; contact time, and pH improve the efficiency of sulfate removal. The maximum sulfates uptake was obtained in pH and contact time 3.0 and 120 min, respectively. Also, with increasing initial concentration of sulfates in water, the efficiency of sulfate removal decreased. The obtained results in this study were matched with Freundlich isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic. The maximum adsorption capacity (Qm) and constant rate were found 0.318 (mg/g) and 0.21 (mg/g.min), respectively. This study also showed that in the optimum conditions, the sulfate removal efficiency from Saline water by 0.1 mg/L sulfates was 65.64 %. Eventually, high cross-linked polystyrene divinylbenzene resin is recommended as a suitable and low cost absorbent to sulfate removal from aqueous solutions.

  11. Absorption of calcium ions on oxidized graphene sheets and study its dynamic behavior by kinetic and isothermal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, Mahmoud; Abdel Moghny, Th.; Mousa, Mahmoud Ahmed; El-Bellihi, Abdel-Hameed A.-A.; Awadallah, Ahmed E.

    2016-07-01

    Sorption of calcium ion from the hard underground water using novel oxidized graphene (GO) sheets was studied in this paper. Physicochemical properties and microstructure of graphene sheets were investigated using Raman spectrometer, thermogravimetry analyzer, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope. The kinetics adsorption of calcium on graphene oxide sheets was examined using Lagergren first and second orders. The results show that the Lagergren second-order was the best-fit model that suggests the conception process of calcium ion adsorption on the Go sheets. For isothermal studies, the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were used at temperatures ranging between 283 and 313 K. Thermodynamic parameters resolved at 283, 298 and 313 K indicating that the GO adsorption was exothermic spontaneous process. Finally, the graphene sheets show high partiality toward calcium particles and it will be useful in softening and treatment of hard water.

  12. Systematic DFT-GGA study of hydrogen adsorption on transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasić, D.; Ristanović, Z.; Pašti, I.; Mentus, S.

    2011-12-01

    Computational study of hydrogen adsorption on (111) surface of transition metals with face centered cubic (fcc) lattice is reported and the results are compared with available experimental and theoretical data. In addition, dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on Pt(111), Pt(100) and Pt(110) is studied in the range of coverage from 0.25 to 1 monolayer. In the case of Pt(111) preferential adsorption site was found to be three-coordinated fcc-hollow site, while on Pt(100) and Pt(110) surface hydrogen settles on two-coordinated bridge and short bridge site, respectively. Hydrogen adsorption energy was found to decrease with the increasing coverage. Structural changes of studied Pt surfaces upon hydrogen adsorption have been compared with the experimental data existing in the literature and good qualitative agreement has been obtained.

  13. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  14. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of acid Orange 52 dye biosorption by Paulownia tomentosa Steud. leaf powder as a low-cost natural biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Fatih; Saygideger, Saadet D

    2010-07-01

    The biosorption of Acid Orange 52 onto the leaf powder of Paulownia tomentosa Steud. was studied in a batch adsorption system to estimate the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters as a function of solution pH, biosorbent concentration, dye concentration, biosorbent size, temperature and contact time. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used for modeling the biosorption equilibrium. The experimental equilibrium data could be well interpreted by the Temkin and Langmuir isotherms with maximum adsorption capacity of 10.5 mg g(-1). In order to state the sorption kinetics, the fits of pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were investigated. It was obtained that the biosorption process followed the pseudo-second order rate kinetics. Thermodynamic studies indicated that this system was exothermic process. The results revealed that P. tomentosa leaf powder could be an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of wastewater containing Acid Orange 52. PMID:20194017

  15. DFT studies of the phenol adsorption on boron nitride sheets.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Jose Mario Galicia; Cocoletzi, Gregorio Hernández; Anota, Ernesto Chigo

    2012-01-01

    We perform first principles total energy calculations to investigate the atomic structures of the adsorption of phenol (C(6)H(5)OH) on hexagonal boron nitride (BN) sheets. Calculations are done within the density functional theory as implemented in the DMOL code. Electron-ion interactions are modeled according to the local-spin-density-approximation (LSDA) method with the Perdew-Wang parametrization. Our studies take into account the hexagonal h-BN sheets and the modified by defects d-BN sheets. The d-BN sheets are composed of one hexagon, three pentagons and three heptagons. Five different atomic structures are investigated: parallel to the sheet, perpendicular to the sheet at the B site, perpendicular to the sheet at the N site, perpendicular to the central hexagon and perpendicular to the B-N bond (bridge site). To determine the structural stability we apply the criteria of minimum energy and vibration frequency. After the structural relaxation phenol molecules adsorb on both h-BN and d-BN sheets. Results of the binding energies indicate that phenol is chemisorbed. The polarity of the system increases as a consequence of the defects presence which induces transformation from an ionic to covalent bonding. The elastic properties on the BN structure present similar behavior to those reported in the literature for graphene. PMID:21523546

  16. Investigation of equilibrium and kinetics of Cr(VI) adsorption by dried Bacillus cereus using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) based on three-variable-five-level central composite rotatable design was used to analyze the effects of combined and individual operating parameters (biomass dose, initial concentration of Cr(VI) and pH) on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of dried Bacillus cereus. A quadratic polynomial equation was obtained to predict the adsorbed Cr(VI) amount. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of biomass dose was the key factor in the removal of Cr(VI). The maximum adsorbed Cr(VI) amount (30.93 mg g(-1)) was found at 165.30 mg L(-1), 2.96, and 3.01 g L(-1) for initial Cr(VI) concentration, pH, and biosorbent dosage, respectively. The surface chemical functional groups and microstructure of unloaded and Cr(VI)-loaded dried Bacillus cereus were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Besides, the results gained from these studies indicated that Langmuir isotherm and the second-order rate expression were suitable for the removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater. The results revealed RSM was an effective method for optimizing biosorption process, and dried Bacillus cereus had a remarkable performance on the removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater. PMID:26877045

  17. Adsorption of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) by amphiphilic polypropylene nonwoven from aqueous solution: the study of hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Wei, Junfu; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Kai; Wang, Han

    2014-05-30

    A kind of amphiphilic polypropylene nonwoven with hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain was prepared through electron beam induced graft polymerization and subsequent ring opening reaction and then utilized in the adsorption of phthalic acid esters (PAEs). To elucidate the superiority of such amphiphilic microdomain, a unique structure without hydrophilic part was constructed as comparison. In addition, the adsorption behaviors including adsorption kinetics, isotherms and pH effect were systematically investigated. The result indicated that the amphiphilic structure and the synergy between hydrophilic and hydrophobic microdomain could considerably improve the adsorption capacities, rate and affinity. Particularly the existence of hydrophilic microdomain could reduce the diffusion resistance and energy barrier in the adsorption process. These adsorption results showed that the amphiphilic PP nonwoven have the potential to be used in environmental application. PMID:24721695

  18. Experimental studies on irreversibility of electrostatic adsorption of silica nanoparticles at solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Niitsoo, Olivia; Couzis, Alexander

    2014-04-15

    Adsorption of colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) at solid-liquid interface is a scientifically interesting and technologically important phenomenon due to its fundamental importance in many industrial, environmental, and biological processes, such as wastewater treatment, printing, coating of surfaces, chromatography, papermaking, or biocompatibility. The process is well understood theoretically by the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model, based on the assumption of irreversible adsorption. Irreversible adsorption is defined as a process in which, once adsorbed, a particle can neither desorb, nor to move laterally on the surface. However, published experimental data that verifies the irreversibility of particle adsorption are very limited. In this study, we demonstrate the irreversibility of electrostatically driven nanoparticle adsorption utilizing a carefully selected set of experiments. A simple method was employed by uniquely introducing Ag@SiO2 core/shell NPs to perform exchange adsorptions experiments. Stöber SiO2 NPs with a diameter of 50-80 nm were initially electrostatically adsorbed onto amino-functionalized silicon wafer substrates followed by the subsequent adsorption of Ag@SiO2 NPs. The Ag@SiO2 NPs have the same surface chemistry as the neat SiO2 NPs. For the second step the adsorption time was varied from 1 min to 1 week so as to get a thorough understanding of the process irreversibility. Surface coverage quantification has shown that the surface coverage of the initially adsorbed SiO2 NPs stays the same independent of the duration of the second step adsorption using the Ag@SiO2 core/shell NPs. This observation directly confirms the irreversibility of electrostatic adsorption of NPs. PMID:24559699

  19. Alkaline assisted thermal oil recovery: Kinetic and displacement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Saneie, S.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1993-06-01

    This report deals with two major issues of chemical assisted flooding - the interaction of caustic, one of the proposed additives to steam flood, with the reservoir rock, and the displacement of oil by a chemical flood at elevated temperatures. A mathematical model simulating the kinetics of silica dissolution and hydroxyl ion consumption in a typical alkaline flooding environment is first developed. The model is based on the premise that dissolution occurs via hydrolysis of active sites through the formation of an intermediate complex, which is in equilibrium with the silicic acid in solution. Both static (batch) and dynamic (core flood) processes are simulated to examine the sensitivity of caustic consumption and silica dissolution to process parameters, and to determine rates of propagation of pH values. The model presented provides a quantitative description of the quartz-alkali interaction in terms of pH, salinity, ion exchange properties, temperature and contact time, which are of significant importance in the design of soluble silicate flooding processes. The modeling of an adiabatic hot waterflood assisted by the simultaneous injection of a chemical additive is next presented. The model is also applicable to the hot alkaline flooding under conditions of negligible adsorption of the generated anionic surfactant and of hydroxide adsorption being Langmuirian. The theory of generalized simple waves (coherence ) is used to develop solutions for the temperature, concentration, and oil saturation profiles, as well as the oil recovery curves. It is shown that, for Langmuir adsorption kinetics, the chemical resides in the heated region of the reservoir if its injection concentration is below a critical value, and in the unheated region if its concentration exceeds this critical value. Results for a chemical slug injection in a tertiary recovery process indicate recovery performance is maximized when chemical resides in the heated region of the reservior.

  20. Surface Interaction and Quantum Kinetic Molecular Sieving for H2 and D2 Adsorption on a Mixed-Metal-Organic Framework Material

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Banglin; Zhaou, Xuebo; Putkham, Apipong; Hong, Kunlun; Labkovsky, Emil B; Hurtado, Eric J; Fletcher, Ashleigh J; Thomas, K Mark

    2008-01-01

    A rational strategy has been used to immobilize open metal sites in ultramicroporosity for stronger binding of multiple H{sub 2} molecules per unsaturated metal site for H{sub 2} storage applications. The synthesis and structure of a mixed zinc/copper metal/organic framework material Zn{sub 3}(BDC){sub 3}[Cu(Pyen)] {center_dot} (DMF){sub 5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} (H{sub 2}BDC = 1,4 benzenedicarboxylic acid and PyenH{sub 2} = 5-methyl-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-pyridine-3-carbaldehyde) is reported. Desolvation provides a bimodal porous structure Zn{sub 3}(BDC){sub 3}[Cu(Pyen)] (M{prime}MOF 1) with narrow porosity (<0.56 nm) and an array of pores in the bc crystallographic plane where the adsorbate-adsorbent interactions are maximized by both the presence of open copper centers and overlap of the potential energy fields from pore walls. The H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} adsorption isotherms for M{prime}MOF 1 at 77.3 and 87.3 K were reversible with virtually no hysteresis. Methods for determination of the isosteric enthalpies of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} adsorption were compared. A virial model gave the best agreement (average deviation <1 standard deviation) with the isotherm data. This was used in conjunction with the van't Hoff isochore giving isosteric enthalpies at zero surface coverage of 12.29 {+-} 0.53 and 12.44{+-} 0.50 kJ mol{sup -1} for H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} adsorption, respectively. This is the highest value so far observed for hydrogen adsorption on a porous material. The enthalpy of adsorption, decreases with increasing amount adsorbed to 9.5 kJ mol{sup -1} at {approx} 1.9 mmol g{sup -1} (2 H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} molecules per Cu corresponding to adsorption on both sides of planar Cu open centers) and is virtually unchanged in the range 1.9-3.6 mmol g{sup -1}. Virial analysis of isotherms at 87.3 K is also consistent with two H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} molecules being bound to each open Cu center. The adsorption kinetics follow a double exponential model, corresponding to diffusion along

  1. Biosorption of aquatic copper (II) by mushroom biomass Pleurotus eryngii: kinetic and isotherm studies.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shi-Hong; Sun, Bai-Ye; Xu, Fang; Song, Qi-Xue; Zhang, Sui-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption is an effective method for removing heavy metals from effluent. This work mainly aimed to evaluate the adsorption performance of the widely cultivated novel mushroom, Pleurotus eryngii, for the removal of Cu(II) from single aqueous solutions. Kinetics and equilibria were obtained using a batch technique. The sorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order model, whereas the adsorption equilibria are best described by the Langmuir model. The adsorption process is exothermic because both the Langmuir-estimated biosorption capacity and the heat of adsorption estimated from the Temkin model decreased with increasing tested temperature. Based on the adsorption intensity estimated by the Freundlich model and the mean adsorption free energy estimated by the Dubinin-Radushkevich model, the type of adsorption is defined as physical adsorption. The biomass of the macro-fungus P. eryngii has the potential to remove Cu(II) from a large-scale wastewater contaminated by heavy metals, because of its favorable adsorption, short biosorption equilibrium time of 20 min and remarkable biosorption capacity (15.19 mg g⁻¹ as calculated by the Langmuir model). The adsorbed metal-enriched mushroom is a high-quality bio-ore by the virtue of its high metal content of industrial mining grade and easy metal extractability. PMID:25633953

  2. Oxygen adsorption on the Al₉Co₂(001) surface: first-principles and STM study.

    PubMed

    Villaseca, S Alarcón; Loli, L N Serkovic; Ledieu, J; Fournée, V; Gille, P; Dubois, J-M; Gaudry, E

    2013-09-01

    Atomic oxygen adsorption on a pure aluminum terminated Al9Co2(001) surface is studied by first-principle calculations coupled with STM measurements. Relative adsorption energies of oxygen atoms have been calculated on different surface sites along with the associated STM images. The local electronic structure of the most favourable adsorption site is described. The preferential adsorption site is identified as a 'bridge' type site between the cluster entities exposed at the (001) surface termination. The Al-O bonding between the adsorbate and the substrate presents a covalent character, with s-p hybridization occurring between the states of the adsorbed oxygen atom and the aluminum atoms of the surface. The simulated STM image of the preferential adsorption site is in agreement with experimental observations. This work shows that oxygen adsorption generates important atomic relaxations of the topmost surface layer and that sub-surface cobalt atoms strongly influence the values of the adsorption energies. The calculated Al-O distances are in agreement with those reported in Al2O and Al2O3 oxides and for oxygen adsorption on Al(111). PMID:23883551

  3. Self-consistent van der Waals density functional study of benzene adsorption on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yuji; Hamada, Ikutaro; Inagaki, Kouji; Morikawa, Yoshitada

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption of benzene on the Si(100) surface is studied theoretically using the self-consistent van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) method. The adsorption energies of two competing adsorption structures, butterfly (BF) and tight-bridge (TB) structures, are calculated with several vdW-DFs at saturation coverage. Our results show that recently proposed vdW-DFs with high accuracy all prefer TB to BF, in accord with more accurate calculations based on exact exchange and correlation within the random-phase approximation. Detailed analyses reveal the important roles played by the molecule-surface interaction and molecular deformation upon adsorption, and we suggest that their precise description is a prerequisite for accurate prediction of the most stable adsorption structure of organic molecules on semiconductor surfaces.

  4. Adsorption of 2-propanol on MgO surface: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuente, Silvia A.; Ferretti, Cristián A.; Domancich, Nicolás F.; Díez, Verónica K.; Apesteguía, Carlos R.; Di Cosimo, J. Isabel; Ferullo, Ricardo M.; Castellani, Norberto J.

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of 2-propanol (or isopropanol) on MgO was studied using infrared (IR) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) simulations. The analysis of IR spectra indicates that the molecule can adsorb either molecularly or dissociatively. DFT calculations show that the adsorption mode depends on the active site of the catalyst. While on perfect terrace it adsorbs non-dissociatively, on edge and on threefold coordinated O anion (O-corner sites) the adsorption occurs dissociatively by breaking the Osbnd H bond without activation barrier giving 2-propoxide and a surface hydroxyl group. Calculations also suggest that vacant oxygen centers on terrace, edge and corner are also possible sites for non-dissociative adsorption. On Mg ions located at corners the adsorption is strong but non-dissociative, while on a Mg vacancy at the same position the molecule easily dissociates. Frequency modes are also calculated and compared in detail with experimental IR spectra.

  5. Fundamental studies of methyl iodide adsorption in DABCO impregnated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Herdes, Carmelo; Prosenjak, Claudia; Román, Silvia; Müller, Erich A

    2013-06-11

    Methyl iodide capture from a water vapor stream using 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO)-impregnated activated carbons is, for the first time, fundamentally described here on the atomic level by means of both molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. A molecular dynamics annealing strategy was adopted to mimic the DABCO experimental impregnation procedure in a selected slitlike carbon pore. Predictions, restricted to the micropore region, are made about the adsorption isotherms of methyl iodide, water, and nitrogen on both impregnated and bare activated carbon models. Experimental and simulated nitrogen adsorption isotherms are compared for the validation of the impregnation strategy. Selectivity analyses of the preferential adsorption toward methyl iodide over water are also reported. These simulated adsorption isotherms sum up to previous experimental studies to provide an enhanced picture for this adsorption system of widespread use at nuclear plant HVAC facilities for the capture of radioactive iodine compounds. PMID:23679202

  6. An Investigation of the Effect of Surface Impurities on the Adsorption Kinetics of Hydrogen Chemisorbed onto Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    The original goal of this program was to investigate the effect surface impurities have on the heterogeneous kinetic processes of those molecular species which produce gaseous hydrogen degradation of the mechanical properties of metallic structural materials. However, shortly after the initiation of the original program, the program's NASA Technical Monitor, Dr. Howard Nelson, requested that the effort supported by this Co-operative Agreement be redirected to study more pressing materials issues associated to the development of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The results of these efforts are outlined in this report. Detailed discussions of specific work, including experimental techniques and procedures, will be found in the publications listed with the subsection discussing that specific work as well and in Section 5. No inventions were generated or disclosed within this Agreement.

  7. Kinetic studies of stress-corrosion cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Use of time-to-failure curves for stress-corrosion cracking processes may lead to incorrect estimates of structural life, if material is strongly dependent upon prestress levels. Technique characterizes kinetics of crackgrowth rates and intermediate arrest times by load-level changes.

  8. Adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 and Congo Red dye from aqueous solution by amino-functionalized Fe3O4 particles: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ting-guo; Wang, Li-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic adsorbent was synthesized by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modification of Fe(3)O(4) particles using a two-step process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and vibration sample magnetometry were used to characterize the obtained magnetic adsorbent. EDS and XPS showed that APTES polymer was successfully introduced onto the as-prepared Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particle surfaces. The saturation magnetization of the magnetic adsorbent was around 65 emu g(-1), which indicated that the dye can be removed fast and efficiently from aqueous solution with an external magnetic field. The maximum adsorption capacities of Fe(3)O(4)/APTES for C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) were 51.4 and 118.8 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) on Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particles corresponded well to the Langmuir model and the Freundlich model, respectively. The adsorption processes for RR 228 and CR followed the pseudo-second-order model. The Boyd's film-diffusion model showed that film diffusion also played a major role in the studied adsorption processes for both dyes. Thermodynamic study indicated that both of the adsorption processes of the two dyes are spontaneous exothermic. PMID:24552735

  9. An in vitro Study of Protein Adsorption to Biocompatible Coatings.

    PubMed

    Seeberg, Trine M; Austad, Hanne O; Clausen, Ingelin; Cederkvist, Henning; Bjørås, Magnar; Johansen, Rune Forstrøm

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for these experiments was to investigate the amount and type of protein adsorption on surfaces that can be used as protective coatings on membrane based in vivo devices. Adsorption of proteins to a selection of biocompatible coatings (titanium oxide, diamond-like carbon, parylene C) and typical construction materials for Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (silicon, silicon nitride), were investigated during in vitro tests. The samples were incubated in human liver extract and bovine serum albumin (BSA) for up to 12 hours. The amount of protein adsorption was found to be low for all surfaces. Measurements of bound Iodine-125 labeled BSA, showed a protein adsorption of up to 0.2 μg BSA/cm2. The specific proteins adsorbed to the surfaces after incubation in human liver extract were identified using mass spectrometry. Most of the identified adsorbed proteins were intracellular, but plasma proteins like Immunoglobulin (Ig) and serum albumin as well as hemoglobin were also identified. PMID:25980864

  10. Studies of NO-char reaction kinetics obtained from drop-tube furnace and thermogravimetric experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shaozeng Sun; Juwei Zhang; Xidong Hu; Shaohua Wu; Jiancheng Yang; Yang Wang; Yukun Qin

    2009-01-15

    Four coal chars were prepared in a flat flame flow reactor (FFR), which can simulate the temperature and gas composition of a real pulverized coal combustion environment. The pore structure of chars was measured by mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption, and the Hg and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas were obtained. The kinetics of NO-char was studied in a drop-tube furnace (DTF) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). In the TGA experiments, the random pore model (RPM) was applied to describe the NO-char reactions and obtain the intrinsic kinetics. By presenting the data of DTF and TGA experiments on the same Arrhenius plot, it can be concluded that TGA is an available tool to study the kinetics of a high-temperature NO-char reaction. With respect to the DTF experiments, in comparison to the BET surface area, the Hg surface area is a better basis for normalizing the reactivity of different coal chars because of less scatter in the measured values, better agreement with TGA experimental data, and more stable values during the process of reaction. Moreover, by comparing the Hg surface area of chars before and after reactions, it is believed that the Hg surface area basis is more appropriate for high-rank coal chars. The determined kinetic rate constants are in good agreement with other data in the literature, and a new rate constant expression is proposed. 30 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Fouling of an anion exchange chromatography operation in a monoclonal antibody process: Visualization and kinetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Close, Edward J; Salm, Jeffrey R; Iskra, Timothy; Sørensen, Eva; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2013-01-01

    Fouling of chromatographic resins over their operational lifetimes can be a significant problem for commercial bioseparations. In this article, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), batch uptake experiments, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and small-scale column studies were applied to characterize a case study where fouling had been observed during process development. The fouling was found to occur on an anion exchange (AEX) polishing step following a protein A affinity capture step in a process for the purification of a monoclonal antibody. Fouled resin samples analyzed by SEM and batch uptake experiments indicated that after successive batch cycles, significant blockage of the pores at the resin surface occurred, thereby decreasing the protein uptake rate. Further studies were performed using CLSM to allow temporal and spatial measurements of protein adsorption within the resin, for clean, partially fouled and extensively fouled resin samples. These samples were packed within a miniaturized flowcell and challenged with fluorescently labeled albumin that enabled in situ measurements. The results indicated that the foulant has a significant impact on the kinetics of adsorption, severely decreasing the protein uptake rate, but only results in a minimal decrease in saturation capacity. The impact of the foulant on the kinetics of adsorption was further investigated by loading BSA onto fouled resin over an extended range of flow rates. By decreasing the flow rate during BSA loading, the capacity of the resin was recovered. These data support the hypothesis that the foulant is located on the particle surface, only penetrating the particle to a limited degree. The increased understanding into the nature of the fouling can help in the continued process development of this industrial example. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), batch uptake experiments, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and small-scale column experiments were applied to characterize a

  12. Applications of SXPS for studying surface structure, reaction mechanisms and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, D.R.; Huntley, D.R.; Overbury, S.H.

    1994-12-31

    Soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) from the S 2p core level has been used to study adsorbate induced reconstruction, identify reaction intermediates and study reaction kinetics on the Ni(111) surface. The S 2p binding energy is affected by the nature of the surface adsorption site. It has been determined from the number of S 2p states and their relative binding energies that adsorbed S induces a reconstruction of the Ni(111) surface and that the S adsorbs in fourfold sites on terraces and in troughs. S 2p SXPS has also been used to identify adsorbed species during the thermal decomposition of methanethiol on Ni(111). CH{sub 3}SH adsorbs as CH{sub 3}S{minus} at low temperatures. Above 200 K, the CH{sub 3}S{minus} changes adsorption site and the C-S bond begins to cleave. The relative concentrations of CH{sub 3}S{minus} in the two different sites and of atomic S have been monitored as a function of temperature and initial coverage. As a result of the sensitivity and resolution available in SXPS, reaction rates and kinetic parameters have been obtained for the decomposition of benzenethiol on Ni(111) by monitoring the changes in the surface composition continuously as a function of temperature and time.

  13. Polypyrrole-coated magnetic nanoparticles as an efficient adsorbent for RB19 synthetic textile dye: Removal and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Shanehsaz, Maryam; Seidi, Shahram; Ghorbani, Yousefali; Shoja, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Rouhani, Shohre

    2015-10-01

    The present work deals with the first attempt to study the removal of synthetic textile dye, reactive blue 19 (RB19), using the magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles modified by pyrrole (PPy@Fe3O4 MNPs) as an efficient adsorbent. The nanoadsorbent was synthesized using chemical co-precipitation. Scanning electron microscopy and FT-IR were used to characterize nanoparticles. Factors affecting the dye adsorption including the pH of the dye solution, amount of adsorbent and contact time were also further investigated. Sorption of the RB19 on PPy@Fe3O4 MNPs reached to equilibrium at contact time less than 10 min and fitted well to the Langmuir adsorption model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 112.36 mg g(-1). Experiments for adsorption kinetic were carried out and the data fitted well according to a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Moreover, the MNPs were recovered with over than 90% efficiency using methanol as elution agent. PMID:25978015

  14. Adsorption of oxazole and isoxazole on BNNT surface: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasleen; Singla, Preeti; Goel, Neetu

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption behavior of oxazole and isoxazole heterocycles over the (6,0) zigzag and (5,5) armchair boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has been studied within the formalism of density functional theory (DFT). The adsorption energies, the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) analysis and the structural changes at the adsorption site are indicative of covalent adsorption on the zigzag BNNT surface, while the adsorption is physical in nature on the armchair BNNT surface. The role of solvent in improving the adsorption properties over the BNNT surface is elucidated by reoptimizing the structures in aqueous phase. The solvation energy is indicative of remarkable increase in the solubility of BNNTs after adsorption of heterocyclic rings. The Density of states (DOS) Plots, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the quantum molecular descriptors (QMD) are witness to the substantial changes in the electronic properties of the BNNT systems following the attachment of these heterocycles with the tube surface. The study envisages the functionalization of the BNNT as well as its applicability as carrier of the drugs containing heterocyclic rings oxazole and isoxazole with marked sensitivity to the type of adsorbate and the adsorbent.

  15. Adsorption of sugars on Al- and Ga-doped boron nitride surfaces: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Ahmed A.; Fadlallah, Mohamed M.; Badawi, Ashraf; Maarouf, Ahmed A.

    2016-07-01

    Molecular adsorption on surfaces is a key element for many applications, including sensing and catalysis. Non-invasive sugar sensing has been an active area of research due to its importance to diabetes care. The adsorption of sugars on a template surface study is at the heart of matter. Here, we study doped hexagonal boron nitride sheets (h-BNNs) as adsorbing and sensing template for glucose and glucosamine. Using first principles calculations, we find that the adsorption of glucose and glucosamine on h-BNNs is significantly enhanced by the substitutional doping of the sheet with Al and Ga. Including long range van der Waals corrections gives adsorption energies of about 2 eV. In addition to the charge transfer occurring between glucose and the Al/Ga-doped BN sheets, the adsorption alters the size of the band gap, allowing for optical detection of adsorption. We also find that Al-doped boron nitride sheet is better than Ga-doped boron nitride sheet to enhance the adsorption energy of glucose and glucosamine. The results of our work can be potentially utilized when designing support templates for glucose and glucosamine.

  16. Theoretical study of adsorption and dissociation of NH3 on pentanuclear Fe(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwiandono, G.; Triyono; Wijaya, K.

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical study regarding the adsorption and dissociation of NH3 molecule on Fe(111) surface has been carried out. The method used was DFT-B3LYP, and the basis sets used were ECP and 6-311G**. This research aimed at giving the theoretical understanding of adsorption and dissociation of NH3 molecule on Fe(111) surface. The adsorption and dissociation were studied based on the energetic parameter, bond length, electron population, vibration and orbital interaction. The result of theoretical calculation revealed that the on top position is the interaction position with the minimum energy for the adsorption of NH3 molecule on Fe(111) surface. The analysis of electron population of the two composing molecular orbitals indicated that the transfer of electron has an important role in the mechanism of adsorption. The visualization of molecular orbital showed that the transfer of electron occurred in the electron pairs of the interacting orbital. Relating to the adsorption mechanism and the overlapping of interaction orbitals, NH3 molecule provides the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) as the interaction pair for the Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (LUMO) on Fe surface. The insignificant difference between the oxidation state of N and H atoms as well as the higher hemolytic N-H bond dissociation energy (compared to heterolytic dissociation) cause the adsorption mechanism of NH3 on Fe(111) model to occur through homolytic-dissociative chemisorption.

  17. Insights into Coupled Folding and Binding Mechanisms from Kinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Shammas, Sarah L; Crabtree, Michael D; Dahal, Liza; Wicky, Basile I M; Clarke, Jane

    2016-03-25

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by a lack of persistent structure. Since their identification more than a decade ago, many questions regarding their functional relevance and interaction mechanisms remain unanswered. Although most experiments have taken equilibrium and structural perspectives, fewer studies have investigated the kinetics of their interactions. Here we review and highlight the type of information that can be gained from kinetic studies. In particular, we show how kinetic studies of coupled folding and binding reactions, an important class of signaling event, are needed to determine mechanisms. PMID:26851275

  18. Adsorptive removal of 2-chlorophenol by low-cost coir pith carbon.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Kavitha, D

    2003-03-17

    Adsorption of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) by coir pith carbon was carried out by varying the parameters such as agitation time, 2-CP concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and temperature. Adsorption equilibrium reached at 40, 60, 80 and 100 min for 2-CP concentration of 10, 20, 30 and 40 mg/l, respectively. Adsorption followed second-order kinetics. The adsorption equilibrium data obeyed Freundlich isotherm. Acidic pH was favorable for the adsorption of 2-CP. Desorption studies showed that chemisorption plays a major role in the adsorption process. PMID:12628792

  19. Surface Characterization and in situ Protein Adsorption Studies on Carbene-Modified Polymers.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Geoffrey W; Parker, Emily M; Singh, Kulveer; Blanford, Christopher F; Moloney, Mark G; Foord, John S

    2015-10-13

    Polystyrene thin films were functionalized using a facile two-step chemical protocol involving carbene insertion followed by azo-coupling, permitting the introduction of a range of chemical functional groups, including aniline, hexyl, amine, carboxyl, phenyl, phosphonate diester, and ethylene glycol. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the success of the two-step chemical modification with a grafting density of at least 1/10th of the typical loading density (10(14)-10(15)) of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). In situ, real-time quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) studies show that the dynamics of binding of bovine serum albumin (BSA) are different at each modified surface. Mass, viscoelastic, and kinetic data were analyzed, and compared to cheminformatic descriptors (i.e., c log P, pol