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Sample records for adsorption measurements show

  1. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  2. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  3. Effective surface areas of coals measured by dye adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Spitzer, D.P.

    1988-01-01

    The primary interest has been to examine adsorption behavior especially at short contact times, ten minutes to an hour, to determine whether such measurements might give useful data on effective surface areas - i.e., the surface that would be accessible to reagents within times comparable to those typical of most coal processing. Accordingly, most of the emphasis is on the effect of time on adsorption, rather than on traditional adsorption isotherms. Although most literature on cationic dye adsorption (mostly on carbons) uses methylene blue, it happened that the authors originally used safranin O instead because this dye was reported to be useful in distinguishing oxidized coals from fresh coals. Many of their experiments were repeated using methylene blue (in water), with very similar results. It was noted early that swelling of coals in water was common, especially for more oxidized or lower rank coals, and adsorption experiments were also done in another solvent, namely methanol. This produced quite striking differences for some coals. Coal surfaces that are readily accessible to adsorption by safranin are found to correlate well with N/sub 2/ surface areas, with adsorption of 1.0 mg safranin per gram of coal corresponding to essentially a surface area of 1.0 m/sup 2//g. Highly oxidized coals were found to swell considerably in water, with correspondingly increased adsorption. Areas of such coals can be estimated by adsorption of safranin from methanol solutions.

  4. An assay for measurement of protein adsorption to glass vials.

    PubMed

    Varmette, Elizabeth; Strony, Brianne; Haines, Daniel; Redkar, Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Protein adsorption to primary packaging is one of the problems faced by biopharmaceutical drug companies. An assay was developed to quantify loss of proteins to glass vial surfaces. The assay involves the labeling of protein with a fluorescent dye, incubation of the labeled protein with the vial surface, elution of the adsorbed protein using a stripping buffer, and determination of fluorescence of the adsorbed protein using a fluorometer. The assay is simple to set up, accurate, sensitive, and flexible. The assay can be modified for indirect measurement of protein adsorption and offers an attractive alternative for researchers to quantify protein adsorption to glass vials and syringes.

  5. Kinetics of phosphate adsorption on goethite: comparing batch adsorption and ATR-IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina; Brigante, Maximiliano; Antelo, Juan; Avena, Marcelo

    2006-08-15

    The adsorption kinetics of phosphate on goethite has been studied by batch adsorption experiments and by in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy at different pH, initial phosphate concentrations and stirring rates. Batch adsorption results are very similar to those reported by several authors, and show a rather fast initial adsorption taking place in a few minutes followed by a slower process taking place in days or weeks. The adsorption kinetics could be also monitored by integrating the phosphate signals obtained in ATR-IR experiments, and a very good agreement between both techniques was found. At pH 4.5 two surface complexes, the bidentate nonprotonated (FeO)(2)PO(2) and the bidentate protonated (FeO)(2)(OH)PO complexes, are formed at the surface. There are small changes in the relative concentrations of these species as the reaction proceeds, and they seem to evolve in time rather independently. At pH 7.5 and 9 the dominating surface species is (FeO)(2)PO(2), which is accompanied by an extra unidentified species at low concentration. They also seem to evolve independently as the reaction proceeds. The results are consistent with a mechanism that involve a fast adsorption followed by a slow diffusion into pores, and are not consistent with surface precipitation of iron phosphate.

  6. Quantitative Measurements of Multilayer Physical Adsorption on Heterogeneous Surfaces from Nonlinear Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, B. F.; Wilson, K. R.; Robinson, J. M.

    1997-08-01

    We present measurements of equilibrium multilayer physical adsorption on porous, heterogeneous ice films using nonlinear light scattering. The dependence of scattering intensity on surface coverage is modeled using the adsorption theory of Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller, and an extension based on the Bragg-Williams formalism. We show that a complete equation of state for an adsorbed species can be experimentally determined within this simple framework.

  7. Hydrophobic dipeptide crystals: a promising Ag-free class of ultramicroporous materials showing argon/oxygen adsorption selectivity.

    PubMed

    Afonso, R; Mendes, A; Gales, L

    2014-09-28

    The adsorption isotherms of nitrogen, oxygen and argon in four VA-class hydrophobic dipeptides are presented. Isotherms were determined at 5, 20 and 35 °C, for a pressure range of 0-6 bar. Under these conditions, adsorption is still in the Henry region. For all materials and temperatures, the sequence of preferential adsorption is Ar > O2 > N2, a highly abnormal result. At 5 °C, the dipeptide with the smallest pores, VI, has Ar/O2 adsorption equilibrium selectivities up to 1.30, the highest ever measured in Ag-free adsorbents. Gas uptakes, at 1 bar and 20 °C, are ∼0.05 mol kg(-1), very low relative values that are partially explained by the low porosity of the solids (<10%). The significance of these results for the development of new materials for the process of O2 generation by pressure swing adsorption (PSA) is discussed. The results indicate some of the structural and chemical properties that prospective Ag-free adsorbents should have in order to have Ar/O2 selectivity, hydrophobic pores, less than 0.5 nm-wide, and porosity of, at least, 20%.

  8. Laser temperature jump relaxation measurements of adsorption/desorption kinetics at liquid/solid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, S.W.; Harris, J.M.; Holzwarth, J.F.

    1995-04-15

    The iodine laser temperature jump method is used to study adsorption/desorption kinetics at a methylated silica/solution interface. A suspension of C1-derivatized fumed silica is used for the kinetic measurements. The colloidal silica does not significantly change the attenuation of near-IR radiation from the iodine laser and allows the surface site concentration to be varied so that adsorption and desorption rates can be determined. The temperature jump relaxation method was used to investigate the effect of electrolyte on adsorption of a charged solute (ANS) on a C1 silica surface. Adsorption equilibrium conditions were optimized to observe a maximum relaxation signal. Without electrolyte, the relaxation signal is biexponential, which is also reflected in a broad chromatographic peak shape and a two-site sorption isotherm. When electrolyte is added, the relaxation signal is primarily single exponential, which agrees with the linear adsorption isotherm. The adsorption rate and equilibrium constant were found to increase significantly with added electrolyte, which showed that adsorption kinetics can influence both band broadening and retention. 28 refs., 7 figs., 4 tab.

  9. A compact low-temperature single crystal adsorption calorimetry setup for measuring coverage dependent heats of adsorption at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hörtz, Peter; Schäfer, Rolf

    2014-07-01

    Here we present the modification of an already existing Single Crystal Adsorption Calorimetry (SCAC) apparatus which has been extended by a compact cooling system to measure the coverage dependent heats of adsorption of gaseous compounds on thin metal substrates in a temperature range from 80 K to 430 K. The setup is characterized and its performance is tested by studying the adsorption of CO on Pt(111) at 150 K and 300 K. Coverage dependent sticking probabilities and heat of adsorption measurements are compared to previous experimental and theoretical studies proving the reliability of our compact low-temperature-SCAC setup.

  10. 49. INTERIOR VIEW OF HARDENER AREA SHOWING GAUGE THAT MEASURES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. INTERIOR VIEW OF HARDENER AREA SHOWING GAUGE THAT MEASURES HARDNESS, THE NAIL MUST BREAK IN THE CENTER RANGE OF THE CURVED BAR TO HAVE THE CORRECT HARDNESS (THE NAIL WILL BREAK TOO EASILY IF TOO HARD AND WILL BEND TOO MUCH IF TOO SOFT) - LaBelle Iron Works, Thirtieth & Wood Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  11. 10. DETAIL SHOWING THRUST MEASURING SYSTEM. Looking up from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL SHOWING THRUST MEASURING SYSTEM. Looking up from the test stand deck to east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. Lithium inclusion in indium metal-organic frameworks showing increased surface area and hydrogen adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, Mathieu; Zhang, Muwei; Feng, Dawei; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Xuan; Chen, Ying-Pin; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of counterion exchange in two anionic In-Metal-Organic Frameworks (In-MOFs) showed that partial replacement of disordered ammonium cations was achieved through the pre-synthetic addition of LiOH to the reaction mixture. This resulted in a surface area increase of over 1600% in (Li [In(1,3 − BDC){sub 2}]){sub n} and enhancement of the H{sub 2} uptake of approximately 275% at 80 000 Pa at 77 K. This method resulted in frameworks with permanent lithium content after repeated solvent exchange as confirmed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Lithium counterion replacement appears to increase porosity after activation through replacement of bulkier, softer counterions and demonstrates tuning of pore size and properties in MOFs.

  13. Measurement of Critical Adsorption of Nitrogen near Its Liquid-vapor Critical Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Moses

    2003-01-01

    The density profile of a critical fluid near a solid surface is expected to show an universal shape. This is known as critical adsorption. The measurement of this effect, especially close to the critical point, is often obscured by gravity. We were able to separate the gravitational effect from critical adsorption by using two capacitors, one with a large gap and one with a small gap of approximately 2 m. Within the uncertainty in the measurement, our data, which ranges between 10(exp -3) to 2 x 10(exp -6) in reduced temperatures, is consistent with the predicted power law dependence. This work is carried out in collaboration with Rafael Garcia, Sarah Scheidemantel and Klaus Knorr. It is funded by NASA's office of Biological and Physical Researchunder.

  14. Measurements and analysis of water adsorption and desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Monazam, E.R.; Shadle, L.J.; Schroeder, K.

    1996-02-01

    An investigation was carried out on the adsorption and desorption of moisture in chars of low rank coal. Equilibrium moisture sorptions of dry and moist chars were measured at room temperature and relative humidity of 30% and 80%. Based on these measurements, a novel mathematical model was developed to predict both the rate and the level of hydration for coals and chars. The formulation uses a shrinking core model which required only the measurement of the adsorbing material`s equilibrium moisture content at different temperatures and humidities. The model was validated against experimental and literature data. It accurately and reliably predicted both the rate and extent of hydration and dehydration for coals and char. Using this model, the effects of varying temperatures, relative humidities, and size of the particles and coal pile were simulated. The sensitivity study demonstrated that, as expected, relative humidity and temperature had strong effects on both the rate of hydration and-the equilibrium moisture of coal or char. The particle size dramatically influenced the rate of hydration, but had no affect on the equilibrium moisture content. This model can be used effectively to simulate the impact of moisture on drying, storage, and spontaneous combustion of coals and coal-derived chars.

  15. Measuring political polarization: Twitter shows the two sides of Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, A. J.; Borondo, J.; Losada, J. C.; Benito, R. M.

    2015-03-01

    We say that a population is perfectly polarized when divided in two groups of the same size and opposite opinions. In this paper, we propose a methodology to study and measure the emergence of polarization from social interactions. We begin by proposing a model to estimate opinions in which a minority of influential individuals propagate their opinions through a social network. The result of the model is an opinion probability density function. Next, we propose an index to quantify the extent to which the resulting distribution is polarized. Finally, we apply the proposed methodology to a Twitter conversation about the late Venezuelan president, Hugo Chávez, finding a good agreement between our results and offline data. Hence, we show that our methodology can detect different degrees of polarization, depending on the structure of the network.

  16. Measuring and modeling ammonium adsorption by calcareous soils.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, F; Jalali, M

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was assessment of ammonium (NH 4(+) ) adsorption isotherms in some agricultural calcareous soils and modeling of that by using the mechanistic exchange model. Ten surface soils (0-30 cm) were collected from areas covered with different land uses in Hamedan, western Iran. Isotherm experiments were carried out by concentrations of NH 4(+) prepared from NH4Cl salt (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 100, and 150 mg NH 4(+)  l(-1)) in presence of 0.01 M CaCl2 solution. The empirical models including simple adsorption isotherm and Freundlich equations were fitted well to the experimental data. The average amounts of adsorbed NH 4(+) in studied soils varied from 8.95 to 35.23 %. Adsorption percentage indicated positive correlation with pH, cation-exchange capacity (CEC), equivalent calcium carbonate, and clay content and had negative correlation with sand content. In order to predict and model NH 4(+) adsorption, cation-exchange model in PHREEQC program was used. The model could simulate the NH 4(+) adsorption very well in all studied soils. The values of CEC played the major role in modeling of NH 4(+) adsorption in this study indicating that cation-exchange process was the major mechanism controlling NH 4(+) adsorption in studied soils.

  17. Distribution of carbon nanotube sizes from adsorption measurements and computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Hołyst, Robert; Tanaka, Hideki; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2005-08-04

    The method for the evaluation of the distribution of carbon nanotube sizes from the static adsorption measurements and computer simulation of nitrogen at 77 K is developed. We obtain the condensation/evaporation pressure as a function of pore size of a cylindrical carbon tube using Gauge Cell Monte Carlo Simulation (Gauge Cell MC). To obtain the analytical form of the relationships mentioned above we use Derjaguin-Broekhoff-deBoer theory. Finally, the pore size distribution (PSD) of the single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) is determined from a single nitrogen adsorption isotherm measured at 77 K. We neglect the conical part of an isolated SWNH tube and assume a structureless wall of a carbon nanotube. We find that the distribution of SWNH sizes is broad (internal pore radii varied in the range 1.0-3.6 nm with the maximum at 1.3 nm). Our method can be used for the determination of the pore size distribution of the other tubular carbon materials, like, for example, multiwalled or double-walled carbon nanotubes. Besides the applicable aspect of the current work the deep insight into the problem of capillary condensation/evaporation in confined carbon cylindrical geometry is presented. As a result, the critical pore radius in structureless single-walled carbon tubes is determined as being equal to three nitrogen collision diameters. Below that size the adsorption-desorption isotherm is reversible (i.e., supercritical in nature). We show that the classical static adsorption measurements combined with the proper modeling of the capillary condensation/evaporation phenomena is a powerful method that can be applied for the determination of the distribution of nanotube sizes.

  18. Hydrogen Desorption and Adsorption Measurements on Graphite Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, C. C.; Ye, Y.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Witham, C. K.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Fultz, B.

    1998-01-01

    Graphite nanofibers were synthesized and their hydrogen desorption and adsorption properties are reported for 77 and 300 K. Catalysts were made by several different methods including chemical routes, mechanical alloying and gas condensation.

  19. A novel experimental setup for simultaneous adsorption and induced deformation measurements in microporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, L.; Plantier, F.; Grégoire, D.

    2017-03-01

    A new experimental setup is presented allowing the simultaneous measurement of adsorption isotherms and adsorption-induced deformations. It is composed of a manometric technique coupled with a digital image correlation setup for full-field displacement measurements. The manometric part is validated by comparing adsorption isotherms with those obtained by a gravimetric method. The principles and methods of both adsorption isotherm and induced deformation measurements are presented in detail. As a first application of this new apparatus, the coupling between adsorption and induced deformation is characterised for a microporous media (activated carbon) saturated by pure CO2 (318.15 K, [0-60] bars) and pure CH4 (303.15 K, [0-130] bars). For this very homogeneous porous material, the induced deformation is characteristic of a pure volumetric swelling but the full-field setup may allow the characterisation of the localised pattern of deformation for heterogenous or cracked microporous media.

  20. Trajectory Hunting: Analysis of UARS Measurements showing Rapid Chlorine Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M.Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.

    1998-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the AER photochemical box model. In this study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on 29 Dec 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Six air parcels that have been sampled twice were followed along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approximately 46 mb) and 585 K (approximately 22 mb) levels. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER. photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the following conclusions for the episode considered: (1) model results are in better agreement with UARS measurements at these levels if the UKMO temperature is decreased by at least 1-2 K; (2) the NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) PSC formation scheme produces results in better agreement with observations than the STS (supercooled ternary solution) scheme; (3) the model can explain the UARS measurements at 585 K, but under-estimates the ClO abundance at 465 K, suggesting some inconsistency between the UARS measurements at this level.

  1. Trajectory Hunting: Analysis of UARS Measurements Showing Rapid Chlorine Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.

    1998-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the AER photochemical box model. In this study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on 29 Dec. 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Six air parcels that have been sampled twice were followed along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 mb) and 585 K (approxi. 22 mb) levels. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the following conclusions for the episode considered: 1) model results are in better agreement with UARS measurements at these levels if the U.K. Meteorological Office (UKMO) temperature is decreased by at least 1-2 K; 2) the NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) PSC formation scheme produces results in better agreement with observations than the STS (supercooled ternary solution) scheme; 3) the model can explain the UARS measurements at 585 K, but under-estimates the ClO abundance at 465 K, suggesting some inconsistency between the UARS measurements at this level.

  2. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets.

  3. Milky Way a Swifter Spinner, More Massive, New Measurements Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    Fasten your seat belts -- we're faster, heavier, and more likely to collide than we thought. Astronomers making high-precision measurements of the Milky Way say our home Galaxy is rotating about 100,000 miles per hour faster than previously understood. That increase in speed, said Mark Reid, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, increases the Milky Way's mass by 50 percent, bringing it even with the Andromeda Galaxy. "No longer will we think of the Milky Way as the little sister of the Andromeda Galaxy in our Local Group family." Milky Way Artist's Conception of our Milky Way Galaxy: Blue, green dots indicate distance measurements. CREDIT: Robert Hurt, IPAC; Mark Reid, CfA, NRAO/AUI/NSF JPEG graphic with scale marks on sides PostScript graphic with scale marks on sides The larger mass, in turn, means a greater gravitational pull that increases the likelihood of collisions with the Andromeda galaxy or smaller nearby galaxies. Our Solar System is about 28,000 light-years from the Milky Way's center. At that distance, the new observations indicate, we're moving at about 600,000 miles per hour in our Galactic orbit, up from the previous estimate of 500,000 miles per hour. The scientists are using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope to remake the map of the Milky Way. Taking advantage of the VLBA's unparalleled ability to make extremely detailed images, the team is conducting a long-term program to measure distances and motions in our Galaxy. They reported their results at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Long Beach, California. The scientists observed regions of prolific star formation across the Galaxy. In areas within these regions, gas molecules are strengthening naturally-occuring radio emission in the same way that lasers strengthen light beams. These areas, called cosmic masers, serve as bright landmarks for the sharp radio vision of the VLBA. By observing these regions repeatedly at times

  4. Measuring and understanding radon adsorption in microporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Raymond; Busto, José

    2015-08-17

    The background from the radon decay chain is the strongest constraint for many experiments working at low energy and very low counting rate. A facility for studying the optimum radon capture by very selective porous materials was developed at CPPM in the context of the SuperNEM O project. In collaboration with Institut Jean Lamour, studies were carried out for better understanding radon adsorption in carbon adsorbents.

  5. Adsorption of acetaldehyde on ice as seen from computer simulation and infrared spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Darvas, Mária; Lasne, Jérôme; Laffon, Carine; Parent, Philippe; Picaud, Sylvain; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2012-03-06

    Detailed investigation of the adsorption of acetaldehyde on I(h) ice is performed under tropospheric conditions by means of grand canonical Monte Carlo computer simulations and compared to infrared spectroscopy measurements. The experimental and simulation results are in a clear accordance with each other. The simulations indicate that the adsorption process follows Langmuir behavior in the entire pressure range of the vapor phase of acetaldehyde. Further, it was found that the adsorption layer is strictly monomolecular, and the adsorbed acetaldehyde molecules are bound to the ice surface by only one hydrogen bond, typically formed with the dangling H atoms at the ice surface, in agreement with the experimental results. Besides this hydrogen bonding, at high surface coverages dipolar attraction between neighboring acetaldehyde molecules also contributes considerably to the energy gain of the adsorption. The acetaldehyde molecules adopt strongly tilted orientations relative to the ice surface, the tilt angle being scattered between 50° and 90° (i.e., perpendicular orientation). The range of the preferred tilt angles narrows, and the preference for perpendicular orientation becomes stronger upon saturation of the adsorption layer. The CH(3) group of the acetaldehyde molecules points as straight away from the ice surface within the constraint imposed by the tilt angle adopted by the molecule as possible. The heat of adsorption at infinitely low coverage is found to be -36 ± 2 kJ/mol from the infrared spectroscopy measurement, which is in excellent agreement with the computer simulation value of -34.1 kJ/mol.

  6. Measurements of VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics of typical interior building materials

    SciTech Connect

    An, Y.; Zhang, J.S.; Shaw, C.Y.

    2000-07-01

    The adsorption/desorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on interior building material surfaces (i.e., the sink effect) can affect the VOC concentrations in a building, and thus need to be accounted for an indoor air quality (IAQ) prediction model. In this study, the VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics (sink effect) were measured for four typical interior building materials including carpet, vinyl floor tile, painted drywall, and ceiling tile. The VOCs tested were ethylbenzene, cyclohexanone, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, benzaldehyde, and dodecane. These five VOCs were selected because they are representative of hydrocarbons, aromatics, ketones, aldehydes, and chlorine substituted compounds. The first order reversible adsorption/desorption model was based on the Langmuir isotherm was used to analyze the data and to determine the equilibrium constant of each VOC-material combination. It was found that the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, which is a measure of the sink capacity, increased linearly with the inverse of the VOC vapor pressure. For each compound, the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, and the adsorption rate constant differed significantly among the four materials tested. A detailed characterization of the material structure in the micro-scale would improve the understanding and modeling of the sink effect in the future. The results of this study can be used to estimate the impact of sink effect on the VOC concentrations in buildings.

  7. Visualization and Measurement of Adsorption/Desorption Process of Ethanol in Activated Carbon Adsorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hitoshi; Murata, Kenta; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yasushi

    Adsorption refrigerator is one of the efficient tools for waste heat recovery, because the system is driven by heat at relative low temperature. However, the coefficient of performance is low due to its batch operation and the heat capacity of the adsorber. In order to improve the performance, it is important to optimize the configuration to minimize the amount of driving heat, and to clarify adsorption/desorption phenomena in transient conditions. Neutron radiography was applied to visualize and measure the adsorption amount distribution in an adsorber. The visualization experiments had been performed at the neutron radiography facility of E-2 port of Kyoto University Research Reactor. Activated carbon and ethanol were used as the adsorbent and refrigerant. From the acquired radiographs, adsorption amount was quantitatively measured by applying the umbra method using a checkered neutron absorber with boron powder. Then, transient adsorption and desorption processes of a rectangular adsorber with 84 mm in width, 50 mm in height and 20 mm in depth were visualized. As the result, the effect of fins in the adsorbent layer on the adsorption amount distribution was clearly visualized.

  8. Protein adsorption on surfaces: dynamic contact-angle (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements.

    PubMed

    Stadler, H; Mondon, M; Ziegler, C

    2003-01-01

    Adsorption of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) on gold has been tested at various concentrations in aqueous solution by dynamic contact-angle analysis (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. With the Wilhelmy plate technique advancing and receding contact angles and the corresponding hysteresis were measured and correlated with the hydrophilicity and the homogeneity of the surface. With electrical admittance measurements of a gold-coated piezoelectrical quartz crystal, layer mass and viscoelastic contributions to the resonator's frequency shift during adsorption could be separated. A correlation was found between the adsorbed mass and the homogeneity and hydrophilicity of the adsorbed film.

  9. Direct calorimetric measurement of enthalpy of adsorption of carbon dioxide on CD-MOF-2, a green metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Gassensmith, Jeremiah J; Gouvêa, Douglas; Ushakov, Sergey; Stoddart, J Fraser; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-05-08

    The enthalpy of adsorption of CO2 on an environmentally friendly metal-organic framework, CD-MOF-2, has been determined directly for the first time using adsorption calorimetry at 25 °C. This calorimetric methodology provides a much more accurate and model-independent measurement of adsorption enthalpy than that obtained by calculation from the adsorption isotherms, especially for systems showing complex and strongly exothermic adsorption behavior. The differential enthalpy of CO2 adsorption shows enthalpy values in line with chemisorption behavior. At near-zero coverage, an irreversible binding event with an enthalpy of -113.5 kJ/mol CO2 is observed, which is followed by a reversible -65.4 kJ/mol binding event. These enthalpies are assigned to adsorption on more and less reactive hydroxyl groups, respectively. Further, a second plateau shows an enthalpy of -40.1 kJ/mol and is indicative of physisorbed CO2. The calorimetric data confirm the presence of at least two energetically distinct binding sites for chemisorbed CO2 on CD-MOF-2.

  10. Calorimetric measurement of adsorption and adhesion energies of Cu on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Trevor E.; Hemmingson, Stephanie L.; Sellers, Jason R. V.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2017-03-01

    The adsorption energies of submonolayer amounts of one metal on the surface of another metal have been measured for decades by temperature programmed desorption. However, that method fails for metals that alloy. We report here the first measurement of the adsorption energy for any such metal-on-metal combination that forms a bulk alloy. The adsorption and interfacial energetics of vapor deposited Cu onto Pt(111) at 300 K has been studied using single crystal adsorption calorimetry (SCAC) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Cu grows as 2D pseudomorphic islands in the first layer and its heat of adsorption decreased linearly from 358 to 339 kJ/mol. This is attributed to increasing lattice strain with island size, associated with the small lattice mismatch (8%). It adsorbs 2 kJ/mol more weakly in the 2nd layer than above 3 ML, where it reaches the bulk heat of sublimation of Cu(solid), 337 kJ/mol. The adhesion energy of multilayer Cu onto Pt(111) is 3.76 J/m2. The extra stability of the first Cu monolayer compared to bulk Cu measured here is 12 kJ/mol, compared to a difference of 83 kJ/mol for underpotential deposition of Cu on a Pt(111) electrode, with the difference attributed to stronger bonding of Cu to the solvent and double layer compared to Pt.

  11. Measuring δ(13)C values of atmospheric acetaldehyde via sodium bisulfite adsorption and cysteamine derivatisation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Songjun; Chen, Mei; Wen, Sheng; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2012-01-01

    δ(13)C values of gaseous acetaldehyde were measured by gas chromatograph-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-C-IRMS) via sodium bisulfite (NaHSO(3)) adsorption and cysteamine derivatisation. Gaseous acetaldehyde was collected via NaHSO(3)-coated Sep-Pak(®) silica gel cartridge, then derivatised with cysteamine, and then the δ(13)C value of the acetaldehyde-cysteamine derivative was measured by GC-C-IRMS. Using two acetaldehydes with different δ(13)C values, derivatisation experiments were carried out to cover concentrations between 0.009×10(-3) and 1.96×10(-3) mg·l(-1)) of atmospheric acetaldehyde, and then δ(13)C fractionation was evaluated in the derivatisation of acetaldehyde based on stoichiometric mass balance after measuring the δ(13)C values of acetaldehyde, cysteamine and the acetaldehyde-cysteamine derivative. δ(13)C measurements in the derivertisation process showed good reproducibility (<0.5 ‰) for gaseous acetaldehyde. The differences between predicted and measured δ(13)C values were 0.04-0.31 ‰ for acetaldehyde-cysteamine derivative, indicating that the derivatisation introduces no isotope fractionation for gaseous acetaldehyde, and obtained δ(13)C values of acetaldehyde in ambient air at the two sites were distinct (-34.00 ‰ at an urban site versus-31.00 ‰ at a forest site), implying potential application of the method to study atmospheric acetaldehyde.

  12. Simple fabrication of carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes showing dual functions with adsorption and photocatalytic decomposition of Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Im, Ji Hyuk; Yang, Seung Jae; Yun, Chang Hun; Park, Chong Rae

    2012-01-27

    Carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes were fabricated via a very simple electrospinning process and their dual functionalities of adsorptivity and photocatalytic activity were evaluated using Rhodamine B (RhB) as a model organic pollutant. A poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) aqueous solution was directly electrospun into a coagulation bath containing titanium (IV) tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) solution so that PVA-core/TiO2-shell composite nanofibers were formed through the in situ sol-gel reaction of TTIP. The carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes were then fabricated by heat treatment of composite nanofibers under nitrogen atmosphere. By using several characterization methods, we confirmed that the resultant nanotubes consisted of anatase TiO2 nanocrystallites embedded in a carbonaceous matrix. The prepared nanotubes exhibited fast adsorption of RhB with high capacity compared with a commercial porous carbon, and they also showed the photocatalytic decomposition activity for the dye molecules under UV irradiation comparable to the degradation by P-25 and ST-01 (commercial TiO2). Finally, the carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes exhibited several cycle performances of adsorption-photodegradation for RhB. This indicates that the composite nanotubes can adsorb and photodecompose organic pollutants repeatedly without additional activating processes.

  13. Simple fabrication of carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes showing dual functions with adsorption and photocatalytic decomposition of Rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Ji Hyuk; Yang, Seung Jae; Yun, Chang Hun; Park, Chong Rae

    2012-01-01

    Carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes were fabricated via a very simple electrospinning process and their dual functionalities of adsorptivity and photocatalytic activity were evaluated using Rhodamine B (RhB) as a model organic pollutant. A poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) aqueous solution was directly electrospun into a coagulation bath containing titanium (IV) tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) solution so that PVA-core/TiO2-shell composite nanofibers were formed through the in situ sol-gel reaction of TTIP. The carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes were then fabricated by heat treatment of composite nanofibers under nitrogen atmosphere. By using several characterization methods, we confirmed that the resultant nanotubes consisted of anatase TiO2 nanocrystallites embedded in a carbonaceous matrix. The prepared nanotubes exhibited fast adsorption of RhB with high capacity compared with a commercial porous carbon, and they also showed the photocatalytic decomposition activity for the dye molecules under UV irradiation comparable to the degradation by P-25 and ST-01 (commercial TiO2). Finally, the carbon/TiO2 composite nanotubes exhibited several cycle performances of adsorption-photodegradation for RhB. This indicates that the composite nanotubes can adsorb and photodecompose organic pollutants repeatedly without additional activating processes.

  14. Adsorption of tannic acid on polyelectrolyte monolayers determined in situ by streaming potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Oćwieja, M; Adamczyk, Z; Morga, M

    2015-01-15

    Physicochemical characteristics of tannic acid (tannin) suspensions comprising its stability for a wide range of ionic strength and pH were thoroughly investigated using UV-vis spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering and microelectrophoretic measurements. These studies allowed to determine the hydrodynamic diameter of the tannic acid that was 1.63 nm for the pH range 3.5-5.5. For pH above 6.0 the hydrodynamic diameter significantly decreased as a result of the tannin hydrolysis. The electrophoretic mobility measurements confirmed that tannic acid is negatively charged for these values of pH and ionic strength 10(-4)-10(-2) M. Therefore, in order to promote adsorption of tannin molecules on negatively charged mica, the poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) supporting monolayers were first adsorbed under diffusion transport conditions. The coverage of polyelectrolyte monolayers was regulated by changing bulk concentration of PAH and the adsorption time. The electrokinetic characteristics of bare and PAH-covered mica were determined using the streaming potential measurements. The zeta potential of these PAH monolayers was highly positive, equal to 46 mV for ionic strength of 10(-2) M. The kinetics of tannin adsorption on these PAH supporting monolayers was evaluated by the in situ the streaming potential measurements. The zeta potential of PAH monolayers abruptly decreases with the adsorption of tannin molecules that was quantitatively interpreted in terms of the three-dimensional electrokinetic model. The acid-base characteristics of tannin monolayers were acquired via the streaming potential measurements for a broad range of pH. The obtained results indicate that it is possible to control adsorption of tannin on positively charged surfaces in order to designed new multilayer structures of desirable electrokinetic properties and stability.

  15. Measurement uncertainty of adsorption testing of desiccant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C E; Pesaran, A A

    1988-12-01

    The technique of measurement uncertainty analysis as described in the current ANSI/ASME standard is applied to the testing of desiccant materials in SERI`s Sorption Test Facility. This paper estimates the elemental precision and systematic errors in these tests and propagates them separately to obtain the resulting uncertainty of the test parameters, including relative humidity ({plus_minus}.03) and sorption capacity ({plus_minus}.002 g/g). Errors generated by instrument calibration, data acquisition, and data reduction are considered. Measurement parameters that would improve the uncertainty of the results are identified. Using the uncertainty in the moisture capacity of a desiccant, the design engineer can estimate the uncertainty in performance of a dehumidifier for desiccant cooling systems with confidence. 6 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Decoupling mass adsorption from fluid viscosity and density in quartz crystal microbalance measurements using normalized conductance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Z.; Biet, C.; Zauscher, S.

    2013-08-01

    We describe the physical understanding of a method which differentiates between the frequency shift caused by fluid viscosity and density from that caused by mass adsorption in the resonance of a quartz crystal resonator. This method uses the normalized conductance of the crystal to determine a critical frequency at which the fluid mass and fluid loss compensate each other. Tracking the shift in this critical frequency allows us to determine purely mass adsorption on the crystal. We extended this method to Maxwellian fluids for understanding the mass adsorption in non-Newtonian fluids. We validate our approach by real-time mass adsorption measurements using glycerol and albumin solutions.

  17. Fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms at the gold substrate revealed by QCM-D measurements and RSA modeling.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Katarzyna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption kinetics of fibrinogen at a gold substrate at various pHs was thoroughly studied using the QCM-D method. The experimental were interpreted in terms of theoretical calculations performed according to the random sequential adsorption model (RSA). In this way, the hydration functions and water factors of fibrinogen monolayers were quantitatively evaluated at various pHs. It was revealed that for the lower range of fibrinogen coverage the hydration function were considerably lower than previously obtained for the silica sensor [33]. The lower hydration of fibrinogen monolayers on the gold sensor was attributed to its higher roughness. However, for higher fibrinogen coverage the hydration functions for both sensors became identical exhibiting an universal behavior. By using the hydration functions, the fibrinogen adsorption/desorption runs derived from QCM-D measurements were converted to the Γd vs. the time relationships. This allowed to precisely determine the maximum coverage that varied between 1.6mgm(-2) at pH 3.5 and 4.5mgm(-2) at pH 7.4 (for ionic strength of 0.15M). These results agree with theoretical eRSA modeling and previous experimental data derived by using ellipsometry, OWLS and TIRF. Various fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms were revealed by exploiting the maximum coverage data. These results allow one to develop a method for preparing fibrinogen monolayers of well-controlled coverage and molecule orientation.

  18. Method and means for dynamic measurement of rates of adsorption from solutions

    DOEpatents

    Slomka, Bogdan J.; Buttermore, William H.

    1992-05-05

    A method and apparatus for dynamic measurement of rates of absorption from solutions. The method has the advantage of avoiding the use of solvent normally used to establish a baseline. The method involves pre-evacuating the adsorbent contained in an adsorbent cell and thereafter rapidly contacting the adsorbent with analytical solution, all without prior exposure of adsorbent to pure solvent. The result is a sharp characteristic adsorption line.

  19. Method and means for dynamic measurement of rates of adsorption from solutions

    DOEpatents

    Slomka, B.J.; Buttermore, W.H.

    1992-05-05

    A method and apparatus are described for the dynamic measurement of rates of absorption from solutions. The method has the advantage of avoiding the use of solvent normally used to establish a baseline. The method involves pre-evacuating the adsorbent contained in an adsorbent cell and thereafter rapidly contacting the adsorbent with analytical solution, all without prior exposure of adsorbent to pure solvent. The result is a sharp characteristic adsorption line. 5 figs.

  20. Apparatus to measure adsorption of condensable solvents on technical surfaces by photothermal deflection.

    PubMed

    Plimmer, M D; du Colombier, D; Iraqi Houssaini, N; Silvestri, Z; Pinot, P; Hannachi, R

    2012-11-01

    This article describes an instrument for the measurement of the mirage effect as a tool to determine the molar adsorption per unit surface area Y(1) of condensable solvents in the presence of a non-condensable carrier gas. The present apparatus is a much improved version of previous prototypes developed in our laboratory and elsewhere with a higher surface bake-out temperature (150 °C rather than 40 °C), lower residual vacuum (3 Pa versus 100 Pa), greater sample surface (40 mm diameter instead of 10 mm), more powerful optical pump beam (150 W cf. 50 W), and larger saturated vapour preparation volume (4 L instead of 1 L). The new set-up also includes the in situ monitoring of the surface via a reflected HeNe laser beam for the real-time detection of the onset of condensation. Here, we give a detailed description of the various components, outline the experimental procedure, show typical results, and suggest some straightforward improvements.

  1. Apparatus to measure adsorption of condensable solvents on technical surfaces by photothermal deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimmer, M. D.; du Colombier, D.; Iraqi Houssaini, N.; Silvestri, Z.; Pinot, P.; Hannachi, R.

    2012-11-01

    This article describes an instrument for the measurement of the mirage effect as a tool to determine the molar adsorption per unit surface area Y1 of condensable solvents in the presence of a non-condensable carrier gas. The present apparatus is a much improved version of previous prototypes developed in our laboratory and elsewhere with a higher surface bake-out temperature (150 °C rather than 40 °C), lower residual vacuum (3 Pa versus 100 Pa), greater sample surface (40 mm diameter instead of 10 mm), more powerful optical pump beam (150 W cf. 50 W), and larger saturated vapour preparation volume (4 L instead of 1 L). The new set-up also includes the in situ monitoring of the surface via a reflected HeNe laser beam for the real-time detection of the onset of condensation. Here, we give a detailed description of the various components, outline the experimental procedure, show typical results, and suggest some straightforward improvements.

  2. Recombinant albumin adsorption on mica studied by AFM and streaming potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Kujda, Marta; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Morga, Maria; Sofińska, Kamila

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) in monomeric state is widely used in pharmaceutical industry as a drug excipient and for preparing coatings for medical devices. In this work the adsorption process of rHSA on model mica surface at pH 3.5 was studied using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in situ streaming potential measurements. The kinetics of albumin adsorption was determined by a direct enumeration of single molecules over various substrate areas. These results were consistent with streaming potential measurements carried out for the parallel-plate channel flow and with theoretical predictions derived from the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. Desorption kinetics of albumin under flow conditions was also evaluated via the streaming potential measurements. In this way, the amount of irreversibly bound albumin was quantitatively evaluated to be 0.64 and 1.2 mg m(-2) for ionic strength of 0.01 and 0.15 M, respectively. This agrees with previous results obtained for HSA and theoretical calculations derived from the RSA model. Additionally, it was demonstrated that there existed a fraction of reversibly bound albumin that can be fully eluted within a few hours. The binding energy of these fraction of molecules was -18 kT that is consistent with the electrostatic controlled adsorption mechanism of albumin at this pH. It was concluded that the rHSA monolayers of well-defined coverage can find applications for quantitatively analyzing ligand binding and for performing efficient biomaterials and immunological tests.

  3. Adsorption of zwitterionic surfactant on limestone measured with high-performance liquid chromatography: micelle-vesicle influence.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Alvarez, David Aaron; Zamudio-Rivera, Luis S; Luna-Rojero, Erick E; Rodríguez-Otamendi, Dinora I; Marín-León, Adlaí; Hernández-Altamirano, Raúl; Mena-Cervantes, Violeta Y; Chávez-Miyauchi, Tomás Eduardo

    2014-10-21

    Herein is presented a new methodology to determine the static adsorption of a zwitterionic surfactant on limestone in three different aqueous media [high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) water, seawater, and connate water] with the use of HPLC at room temperature and 70 °C. The results showed that, in both HPLC water and seawater, the surfactant adsorption followed a monolayer Langmuir tendency. In contrast, for connate water, the surfactant presented a new adsorption profile, characterized by two regions: (i) At surfactant concentrations below 1500 mg L(-1), an increase of adsorption is observed as the amount of divalent cations increases in the aqueous media. (ii) At surfactant concentrations above 1500 mg L(-1), the adsorption decreases because the equilibrium, monomer ⇆ micelle ⇆ vesicle, is shifted to the formation of vesicles, giving as a result a decrease in the concentration of monomers, thus reducing the interaction between the surfactant and the rock, and therefore, lower adsorption values were obtained. The behavior of the surfactant adsorption under different concentrations of divalent cations was well-described by the use of a new modified Langmuir model: (dΓ/dt)ads = k(ads)c(Γ∞ - Γ) - k(cmc)(c - c(cmc))(n)ΓH(c - c(cmc)). It was also observed that, as the temperature increases, the adsorption is reduced because of the exothermic nature of the adsorption processes.

  4. Measurements of water sorption enthalpy on polymer surfaces and its effect on protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonyeong; Qian, Wei; Al-Saigh, Zeki Y.

    2011-02-01

    The molar enthalpy of sorption ( ΔHms`) of water vapor onto three polymer surfaces and its effect on nonspecific protein adsorption were investigated by inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The values of ΔHms measured by IGC were found to be -16.9 ± 1.2, -18.6 ± 1.3, and -29.9 ± 2.4 kJ/mole for polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), respectively, over a temperature range of 333-423 K. Protein adsorption to three polymer-coated substrates was conducted as a function of the bulk protein concentration using lysozyme, fibrinogen, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the amount of adsorbed protein was measured by the solution depletion method. For a given bulk protein concentration, a larger amount of protein is adsorbed on PS and PMMA surfaces which have greater ΔHms than that of PHEMA surfaces. Although ΔHms for PS and PMMA are close to each other, PS surfaces were found to exhibit a higher adsorption affinity than PMMA surfaces over the proteins and concentrations investigated. Our results indicate that the strength of water-polymer interactions and the functional groups on the polymer surface are important factors for controlling the amount of nonspecifically adsorbed protein.

  5. Estimation of adsorption energy for water molecules on a multi-walled carbon nanotube thin film by measuring electric resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokabu, Takuya; Inoue, Shuhei; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2016-11-01

    Gas sensors based on carbon nanotube (CNT) films have attracted attention owing to their low power consumption. For further development of these sensors, we need to understand the surface interaction of the films with gas molecules. In our previous research, we investigated the influence of water molecules on the electrical conductance of multi-walled CNT films and explained this phenomenon using a two-layer adsorption model. This work motivated us to measure the adsorption energy of CNT-H2O. In this study, we focused on the first-layer adsorption and investigated the sheet resistance to water vapor pressure at various temperatures using the transmission line method (TLM). The results were fitted to Langmuir adsorption model and the adsorption equilibrium constant was determined. The temperature dependence of the sheet resistance followed a model of fluctuation induced tunneling (FIT), in which the energy barrier at the CNT junction is regarded as the main factor influencing the electrical conductance of the CNT film. The sheet resistance and equilibrium constant decreased as temperature increased. This result was consistent with the adsorption phenomenon. Finally, the adsorption energy was determined to be 0.22-0.31 eV, which is larger than the previously calculated value. It was also reported that the adsorption energy of the gas molecules in the interstitial site between two carbon nanotubes was larger than that on the CNT surface. These results indicate that the CNT junction plays a key role in the detection of gas molecules.

  6. The Influence of Adsorption on PVT Measurements in the Gaseous Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, Y.; Zhelezny, V. P.; Yokozeki, A.

    1999-11-01

    PVT measurements of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (C2H2F4, HFC-134a) and its blend with octofluoropropane (C3F8, FC-218) have been performed in the gas phase near the dew curve. The experimental data were obtained by variable-volume and vibrating tube methods. Discrepancies in the behavior of isotherms from their classical behavior were experimentally observed. It was found that the phase transition does not go to completion at a single point of the thermodynamic surface but extends over a limited range of conditions. Obtained results are in accordance with a concept of adsorption of the vapor sample on the surface of the experimental cell. An increase in adsorption under the conditions close to condensation is caused by capillary condensation of the sample at the walls of the cell that initiates an early phase transition. The ranges of diffuse phase transitions were determined for 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane as well as for its mixture with octofluoropropane at different thermodynamic parameters. The influence of selective adsorption on the change in the conditions of phase transition of the 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane/octofluoropropane mixture was also experimentally studied.

  7. A simple method for measuring excess adsorption isotherms of organic eluent components on reversed-phase packing materials.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Junji; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2017-02-01

    A simple frontal analysis method has been developed for the reliable measurement of excess adsorption isotherms of an organic component on reversed-phase adsorbents in a series of programmed concentration steps. In the present method, a peak, which is produced by refractive index change in column eluate, is detected at 589 nm; it represents the elution volume of the boundary. The method is applied to the measurement of the excess adsorption isotherms of organic eluent components from water on commercially available reversed-phase stationary phases. The results are in good agreement with the previously reported isotherms. We also measure the excess adsorption isotherms of organic eluent components from solutions containing electrolytes. There are not any interference peaks on the elution traces. The method is thus reliably applicable to the evaluation of the excess adsorption of organic eluent components in practical systems.

  8. Mechanisms of fibrinogen adsorption at the silica substrate determined by QCM-D measurements.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Katarzyna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Wasilewska, Monika

    2015-11-01

    Adsorption kinetics of fibrinogen at a silica substrate was thoroughly studied in situ using the QCM-D method. Because of low dissipation, the Sauerbrey's equation was used for calculating the wet mass per unit area (wet coverage of the protein). Measurements were done for various bulk suspension concentrations, flow rates and pHs. These experimental data were compared with the theoretical dry coverage data derived from the solution of the mass transfer equation. In this way, the hydration functions and water factors of fibrinogen monolayers were quantitatively evaluated for various pHs. In the case of pH 7.4 and ionic strength of 0.15 M, the hydration function changed from 0.75 to 0.6 for the dry coverage Γ(d) equal to 0 and 4 mg m(-2), respectively. Interestingly, for pH 7.4 and 4.5 (ionic strength of 10(-2) M) a minimum of the hydration function appeared at Γ(d) ca. 2 mg m(-2). Analytical polynomial expressions were formulated for the interpolation of the experimental results. By using the hydration functions, the fibrinogen adsorption/desorption runs derived from QCM-D measurements were converted to the Γ(d) vs. the time relationships. This allowed to precisely determine the maximum coverage that varied between 1.2 mg m(-2) at pH 3.5 and 4.2 mg m(-2) at pH 7.4 for ionic strength of 0.15 M. These results agree with theoretical modeling and previous experimental data derived by using ellipsometry, OWLS and TIRF. Various fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms were revealed by exploiting the maximum coverage data whose validity was also confirmed by the dissipation vs. the dry mass relationships. Beside significance to basic science, these results enable to develop a robust technique, based on the QCM-D measurements, suitable for precisely determining the dry mass of protein monolayers adsorbed under various physicochemical conditions.

  9. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  10. Construction and measurements of a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    SciTech Connect

    Schnee, R. W.; Bunker, R.; Ghulam, G.; Jardin, D.; Kos, M.; Tenney, A. S.

    2013-08-08

    Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the {sup 222}Rn decay chain on (and near) detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay, and in screening detectors. In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto the wires of the Beta Cage during its assembly, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at Syracuse University using a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system. The radon filter shows ∼20× reduction at its output, from 7.47±0.56 to 0.37±0.12 Bq/m{sup 3}, and the cleanroom radon activity meets project requirements, with a lowest achieved value consistent with that of the filter, and levels consistently < 2 Bq/m{sup 3}.

  11. Simultaneous Online Measurement of H2O and CO2 in the Humid CO2 Adsorption/Desorption Process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qingni; Ye, Sha; Zhu, Jingke; Lei, Lecheng; Yang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    A dew point meter (DP) and an infrared (IR) CO2 analyzer were assembled in a humid CO2 adsorption/desorption system in series for simultaneous online measurements of H2O and CO2, respectively. The humidifier, by using surface-flushing on a saturated brine solution was self-made for the generation of humid air flow. It was found that by this method it became relatively easy to obtain a low H2O content in air flow and that its fluctuation could be reduced compared to the bubbling method. Water calibration for the DP-IR detector is necessary to be conducted for minimizing the measurement error of H2O. It demonstrated that the relative error (RA) for simultaneous online measurements H2O and CO2 in the desorption process is lower than 0.1%. The high RA in the adsorption of H2O is attributed to H2O adsorption on the transfer pipe and amplification of the measurement error. The high accuracy of simultaneous online measurements of H2O and CO2 is promising for investigating their co-adsorption/desorption behaviors, especially for direct CO2 capture from ambient air.

  12. Added value measures in education show genetic as well as environmental influence.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Claire M A; Asbury, Kathryn; Dale, Philip S; Plomin, Robert

    2011-02-02

    Does achievement independent of ability or previous attainment provide a purer measure of the added value of school? In a study of 4000 pairs of 12-year-old twins in the UK, we measured achievement with year-long teacher assessments as well as tests. Raw achievement shows moderate heritability (about 50%) and modest shared environmental influences (25%). Unexpectedly, we show that for indices of the added value of school, genetic influences remain moderate (around 50%), and the shared (school) environment is less important (about 12%). The pervasiveness of genetic influence in how and how much children learn is compatible with an active view of learning in which children create their own educational experiences in part on the basis of their genetic propensities.

  13. Adsorption Behavior of Heat Modified Soybean Oil via Boundary Lubrication Coefficient of Friction Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frictional behaviors of soybean oil and heat modified soybean oils with different Gardner scale viscosities as additives in hexadecane have been examined in a boundary lubrication test regime (steel contacts) using Langmuir adsorption model. The free energy of adsorption (delta-Gads) of various...

  14. Protein adsorption on dopamine-melanin films: role of electrostatic interactions inferred from zeta-potential measurements versus chemisorption.

    PubMed

    Bernsmann, Falk; Frisch, Benoît; Ringwald, Christian; Ball, Vincent

    2010-04-01

    We recently showed the possibility to build dopamine-melanin films of controlled thickness by successive immersions of a substrate in alkaline solutions of dopamine [F. Bernsmann, A. Ponche, C. Ringwald, J. Hemmerlé, J. Raya, B. Bechinger, J.-C. Voegel, P. Schaaf, V. Ball, J. Phys. Chem. C 113 (2009) 8234-8242]. In this work the structure and properties of such films are further explored. The zeta-potential of dopamine-melanin films is measured as a function of the total immersion time to build the film. It appears that the film bears a constant zeta-potential of (-39+/-3) mV after 12 immersion steps. These data are used to calculate the surface density of charged groups of the dopamine-melanin films at pH 8.5 that are mostly catechol or quinone imine chemical groups. Furthermore the zeta-potential is used to explain the adsorption of three model proteins (lysozyme, myoglobin, alpha-lactalbumin), which is monitored by quartz crystal microbalance. We come to the conclusion that protein adsorption on dopamine-melanin is not only determined by possible covalent binding between amino groups of the proteins and catechol groups of dopamine-melanin but that electrostatic interactions contribute to protein binding. Part of the adsorbed proteins can be desorbed by sodium dodecylsulfate solutions at the critical micellar concentration. The fraction of weakly bound proteins decreases with their isoelectric point. Additionally the number of available sites for covalent binding of amino groups on melanin grains is quantified.

  15. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  16. Study of adsorption of detergent-dispersion additives on solid particles dispersed in oil using the method of electrical conductivity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Waligora, B.; Buczak, H.; Olszewska, A.; Szeglowski, Z.

    1984-01-01

    By measuring electrical conductivity of paraffin oil solutions in isooctane (1:1 by volume) the variation in concentration of detergent-dispersant additives is studied; this variation is caused by their adsorption on solid particles (carbon black, aluminum powder). It is shown that dispersants have an improved ability to undergo adsorption, compared with detergents. Studies of adsorption of additives on model sorbents may be used to develop tests for evaluating additive properties. 7 references, 4 figures.

  17. DNA stickers promote polymer adsorption onto cellulose.

    PubMed

    Sato, Teruaki; Ali, Md Monsur; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2012-10-08

    Adsorption of oligonucleotides onto model cellulose surfaces was investigated by comparing the Boese and Breaker's cellulose binding oligonucleotide (CBO) with a nonspecific oligonucleotide control (NSO). Measurements using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technique confirmed that CBO adsorbed onto cellulose more than NSO, particularly at high ionic strengths (100 mM CaCl(2)). CBO showed a higher maximum adsorption on nanofibrillated and nanocrystalline cellulose than on regenerated cellulose, indicating a preference for the native cellulose I crystal structure under conditions that favored specific adsorption over calcium-mediated electrostatically driven adsorption. In addition, an anionic polyacrylamide (A-PAM) with grafted CBO also adsorbed onto the surface of cellulose in CaCl(2), whereas the unmodified A-PAM did not. This work shows that CBO performs as a "sticker", facilitating the adsorption of polyacrylamide onto cellulose, even under high ionic strength conditions where the adsorption of conventional polyelectrolytes is inhibited.

  18. Adsorption of Gemini surfactants onto clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Salako, O; Lo, C; Couzis, A; Somasundaran, P; Lee, J W

    2013-12-15

    This work addresses the adsorption of two Gemini surfactants at the cyclopentane (CP) hydrate-water interface. The Gemini surfactants investigated here are Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 that have two anionic head groups and one hydrophobic tail group. The adsorption of these surfactants was quantified using adsorption isotherms and the adsorption isotherms were determined using liquid-liquid titrations. Even if the Gemini surfactant adsorption isotherms show multi-layer adsorption, they possess the first Langmuir layer with the second adsorption layer only evident in the 2A1 adsorption isotherm. Zeta potentials of CP hydrate particles in the surfactant solution of various concentrations of Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were measured to further explain their adsorption behavior at the CP hydrate-water interface. Zeta potentials of alumina particles as a model particle system in different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were also measured to confirm the configuration of all the surfactants at the interface. The determination of the isotherms and zeta-potentials provides an understanding framework for the adsorption behavior of the two Gemini surfactants at the hydrate-water interface.

  19. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  20. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  1. GRACE, GLDAS and measured groundwater data products show water storage loss in Western Jilin, China.

    PubMed

    Moiwo, Juana Paul; Lu, Wenxi; Tao, Fulu

    2012-01-01

    Water storage depletion is a worsening hydrological problem that limits agricultural production in especially arid/semi-arid regions across the globe. Quantifying water storage dynamics is critical for developing water resources management strategies that are sustainable and protective of the environment. This study uses GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment), GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation System) and measured groundwater data products to quantify water storage in Western Jilin (a proxy for semi-arid wetland ecosystems) for the period from January 2002 to December 2009. Uncertainty/bias analysis shows that the data products have an average error <10% (p < 0.05). Comparisons of the storage variables show favorable agreements at various temporal cycles, with R(2) = 0.92 and RMSE = 7.43 mm at the average seasonal cycle. There is a narrowing soil moisture storage change, a widening groundwater storage loss, and an overall storage depletion of 0.85 mm/month in the region. There is possible soil-pore collapse, and land subsidence due to storage depletion in the study area. Invariably, storage depletion in this semi-arid region could have negative implications for agriculture, valuable/fragile wetland ecosystems and people's livelihoods. For sustainable restoration and preservation of wetland ecosystems in the region, it is critical to develop water resources management strategies that limit groundwater extraction rate to that of recharge rate.

  2. Applying zeta potential measurements to characterize the adsorption on montmorillonite of organic cations as monomers, micelles, or polymers.

    PubMed

    Zadaka, Dikla; Radian, Adi; Mishael, Yael G

    2010-12-01

    A systematic study was carried out to characterize the adsorption of organic cations as monomers, micelles, or polymers on montmorillonite by monitoring zeta potential (ξ) as a function of cation loading on the clay. In general, the clay's ξ became less negative as cation loading increased. A fairly good linear correlation between adsorption of organic cations on the clay, up to the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay, and ξ potential of the composites was fitted. However, when the adsorption of the larger cation exceeded the CEC, a nonlinear increase in ξ was measured. The degree of this increase corresponds to the cation size and affinity to the clay (in the order surfactantadsorption plot of the polycations reached a well-defined plateau which correlates to the zeta potential of the polycations. The effect of electrolytes on ξ of the crude clay was monitored, and as expected, the extent of the effect increased with valency (Na(+)

  3. The wildgeographer avatar shows how to measure soil erosion rates by means of a rainfall simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; González Pelayo, Óscar; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Iserloh, Thomas; Prosdocimi, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    This contribution to the immersed worlds wish to develop the avatar that will teach the students and other scientists how to develop measurements of soil erosion, surface runoff and wetting fronts by means of simulated rainfall experiments. Rainfall simulation is a well established and knows methodology to measure the soil erosion rates and soil hydrology under controlled conditions (Cerdà 1998a; Cerdà, 1998b; Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2011; Dunkerley, 2012; Iserloh et al., 2012; Iserloh et al., 2013; Ziadat and Taimeh, 2013; Butzen et al., 2014). However, is a method that requires a long training and expertise to avoid mismanagement and mistaken. To use and avatar can help in the teaching of the technique and the dissemination of the findings. This contribution will show to other avatars how to develop an experiment with simulated rainfall and will help to take the right decision in the design of the experiments. Following the main parts of the experiments and measurements the Wildgeographer avatar must develop: 1. Determine the objectives and decide which rainfall intensity and distribution, and which plot size to be used. Choose between a laboratory or a field rainfall simulation. 2. Design of the rainfall simulator to achieve the objectives: type of rainfall simulator (sprayer or drop former) and calibrate. 3. The experiments are carried out. 4. The results are show. Acknowledgements To the "Ministerio de Economía and Competitividad" of Spanish Government for finance the POSTFIRE project (CGL2013- 47862-C2-1-R). The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7-ENV-2013- supported this research. References Butzen, V., Seeger, M., Wirtz, S., Huemann, M., Mueller, C., Casper, M., Ries, J. B. 2014. Quantification of Hortonian overland flow generation and soil erosion in a Central European low mountain range using rainfall experiments. Catena, 113, 202-212. Cerdà, A

  4. Towards an accurate estimation of the isosteric heat of adsorption - A correlation with the potential theory.

    PubMed

    Askalany, Ahmed A; Saha, Bidyut B

    2017-03-15

    Accurate estimation of the isosteric heat of adsorption is mandatory for a good modeling of adsorption processes. In this paper a thermodynamic formalism on adsorbed phase volume which is a function of adsorption pressure and temperature has been proposed for the precise estimation of the isosteric heat of adsorption. The estimated isosteric heat of adsorption using the new correlation has been compared with measured values of prudently selected several adsorbent-refrigerant pairs from open literature. Results showed that the proposed isosteric heat of adsorption correlation fits the experimentally measured values better than the Clausius-Clapeyron equation.

  5. Multiple disadvantages among older citizens: what a multidimensional measure of poverty can show.

    PubMed

    Callander, Emily J; Schofield, Deborah J; Shrestha, Rupendra N

    2012-01-01

    Using the newly created Freedom Poverty Measure, a multidimensional measure of poverty, it can be seen that there were 534,700 individuals who were in freedom poverty, who had either poor health or poor education in addition to having low incomes. This multidimensional disadvantage would not normally be captured by single measures of poverty, such as income poverty measures. Men were significantly less likely to be in freedom poverty than women (OR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.54-0.74, p < .0001), and the proportion of individuals in freedom poverty increased with age, with those older than 85 being 2.3 times more likely to be in freedom poverty than those aged 65 to 69 years (95% CI: 1.73-3.11, p < .0001). Policy responses to address the marginalization of disadvantaged older people should take a multidisciplinary approach, addressing health inequalities in particular, not just low income.

  6. New Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Four Stardust Impact Crater Residues Show IDP-Like Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, C. J.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2015-07-01

    We have measured the oxygen isotope compositions of four Stardust impact crater residues. These analyses reveal compositions that are similar to those found in interplanetary dust particles, antarctic micrometeorites and CI chondrite components.

  7. Memory effects on adsorption tubes for mercury vapor measurement in ambient air: elucidation, quantification, and strategies for mitigation of analytical bias.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard J C; Kumar, Yarshini; Brown, Andrew S; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2011-09-15

    The short- and long-term memory effects associated with measurements of mercury vapor in air using gold-coated silica adsorption tubes have been described. Data are presented to quantify these effects and to determine their dependence on certain relevant measurement parameters, such as number of heating cycles used for each analysis, age of adsorption tube, mass of mercury on adsorption tube, and the length of time between analyses. The results suggest that the long-term memory effect is due to absorption of mercury within the bulk gold in the adsorption tube, which may only be fully liberated by allowing enough time for this mercury to diffuse to the gold surface. The implications of these effects for air quality networks making these measurements routinely has been discussed, and recommendations have been made to ensure any measurement bias is minimized.

  8. Study on adsorption mechanism of proteins onto synthetic calcium hydroxyapatites through ionic concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Kandori, K; Masunari, A; Ishikawa, T

    2005-03-01

    To clarify the adsorption mechanism of proteins onto calcium hydroxyapatite (Hap), the kinetic studies of dissolution and ion-exchange properties of synthetic Hap particles in the absence and presence of proteins were examined at 15 degrees C. In the absence of proteins, Hap particles slightly dissolved to give low amounts of calcium ([Ca(2+)] = 0.09-0.14 micromol m(-2)) and phosphate [PO(4) (3-)] = 0.01-0.08 micromol m(-2)) ions in KCl, CaCl(2), BaCl(2) and AlCl(3) solutions. The [Ca(2+)] increased with increase in the Ca/P ratio of Hap, while the [PO(4) (3-)] decreased. The[ Ca(2+)] and [ PO(4) (3-)] were independent of the ionic strength. Ba(2+) and AI(3+) ions were completely ion-exchanged with calcium ions in Hap lattice within 2 hr. The solution pH was increased by 1.1-1.8 after the dissolution of OH(-) ions on the Hap surface. In the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), the Hap particles dissolved slightly faster than the systems without protein. This fact was explained by a complexation of dissolved ions to functional groups of BSA. The adsorption of BSA induced a reduction of [Ca(2+)] and [ PO(4) (3-)] in the aqueous medium and minima appeared on [Ca(2+)] and [PO(4) (3-)] profiles before the BSA adsorption reached a saturation. This result suggests that the adsorption of BSA onto Hap is governed by [Ca(2+)] ions complexing to BSA molecules (binding effect) together with the operation of [Ca(2+)] ions exposing on the Hap surfaces by dissolution of OH(-) ions, so-called "C-sites". The addition of BaCl(2) and AlCl(3 )steeply increased the amounts of adsorbed BSA (n(BSA)) at the initial adsorption step by the strong binding effect of these di- and tri-valent cations between BSA and Hap. However, after eliminating these cations from the Hap surface by the ion-exchange reaction, the binding effects disappeared and n(BSA) decreased. Since the number of functional groups is small, the binding effect of the counter ions was only slightly detected for the systems

  9. Measurement and modelling of adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics and breakthrough curve of toluene at very low concentrations on to activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Réguer, Anne; Sochard, Sabine; Hort, Cécile; Platel, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Indoor air pollution, characterized by many pollutants at very low concentrations, is nowadays known as a worrying problem for human health. Among physical treatments, adsorption is a widely used process, since porous materials offer high capacity for volatile organic chemicals. However, there are few studies in the literature that deal with adsorption as an indoor air pollution treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the adsorption of toluene on to activated carbon at characteristic indoor air concentrations. Firstly, global kinetic parameters were determined by fitting Thomas's model to experimental data obtained with batch experiments. Then, these kinetic parameters led to the determination of Henry's coefficient, which was checked with experimental data of the adsorption isotherm. Secondly, we simulated a breakthrough curve made at an inlet concentration 10 times higher than the indoor air level. Even if the kinetic parameters in this experiment are different from those in batch experiments, it can be emphasized that the Henry coefficient stays the same.

  10. Assessment Measures Showing Institutional Effectiveness in Relation to External Stakeholder Expectations for Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clites, Mona Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges face a growing demand from a wide range of stakeholders for more transparent accountability but struggle to select appropriate measures and to use them in effective ways. The multiple demands of various stakeholders, and the calls to respond to those demands in effective and appropriate ways, are leading to a confusing array of…

  11. Integrated catchment modeling for nutrient reduction: scenarios showing impacts, potential, and cost of measures.

    PubMed

    Arheimer, Berit; Löwgren, Marianne; Pers, Bodil Charlotta; Rosberg, Jörgen

    2005-11-01

    A hydrological-based model (HBV-NP) was applied to a catchment (1900 km2) in the southern part of Sweden. Careful characterization of the present load situation and the potential for improved treatment or reduced soil leaching were analyzed. Several scenarios were modeled to find strategies to reach the Swedish environmental goals of reducing anthropogenic nitrogen load by 30% and phosphorus load by 20%. It was stated that the goals could be reached by different approaches that would affect different polluters and social sectors. However, no single measure was enough by itself. Instead, a combination of measures was necessary to achieve the goals. The nitrogen goal was the most difficult to attain. In order to be cost-effective, these measures should be applied to areas contributing the most to the net loading of the sea. This strategy could reduce the costs by 70%-80% when compared with implementing the measures in the entire catchment. Integrated catchment models may thus be helpful tools for reducing costs in environmental control programs.

  12. Characterization of biomaterials polar interactions in physiological conditions using liquid-liquid contact angle measurements: relation to fibronectin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Velzenberger, Elodie; El Kirat, Karim; Legeay, Gilbert; Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Pezron, Isabelle

    2009-02-01

    Wettability of biomaterials surfaces and protein-coated substrates is generally characterized with the sessile drop technique using polar and apolar liquids. This procedure is often performed in air, which does not reflect the physiological conditions. In this study, liquid/liquid contact angle measurements were carried out to be closer to cell culture conditions. This technique allowed us to evaluate the polar contribution to the work of adhesion between an aqueous medium and four selected biomaterials widely used in tissue culture applications: bacteriological grade polystyrene (PS), tissue culture polystyrene (tPS), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) film (PolyHEMA), and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose-carboxymethylcellulose bi-layered Petri dish (CEL). The contributions of polar interactions were also estimated on the same biomaterials after fibronectin (Fn) adsorption. The quantity of Fn adsorbed on PS, tPS, PolyHEMA and CEL surfaces was evaluated by using the fluorescein-labeled protein. PolyHEMA and CEL were found to be hydrophilic, tPS was moderately hydrophilic and PS was highly hydrophobic. After Fn adsorption on PS and tPS, a significant increase of the surface polar interaction was observed. On PolyHEMA and CEL, no significant adsorption of Fn was detected and the polar interactions remained unchanged. Finally, an inverse correlation between the polarity of the surfaces and the quantity of adsorbed Fn was established.

  13. Adsorption of water vapor by poly(styrenesulfonic acid), sodium salt: isothermal and isobaric adsorption equilibria.

    PubMed

    Toribio, F; Bellat, J P; Nguyen, P H; Dupont, M

    2004-12-15

    Air conditioning and dehumidifying systems based on sorption on solids are of great interest, especially in humid climates, because they allow reduction of thermal loads and use of chlorofluorocarbons. Previous studies have shown that hydrophilic polymers such as sulfonic polymers can have very high performance in water adsorption from air. The aim of this study was to characterize the water vapor adsorption properties of fully sulfonated and monosulfonated poly(styrenesulfonic acid), sodium salt, and to elucidate the mechanism of adsorption on these materials. Adsorption isotherms have been determined by TGA between 298 and 317 K for pressures ranging from 0.1 to 45 hPa. They have type II of the IUPAC classification and a small hysteresis loop between adsorption and desorption processes was observed only for the monosulfonated sample. Water content is up to 80% weight at 80% relative humidity. Adsorption isotherms have been well fitted with the FHH model. Adsorption-desorption isobars have been determined by TGA under 37 hPa in the temperature range 298-373 K. They show that these polymers can be completely regenerated by heating at 313 K under humidified air. No degradation of the adsorption properties has been observed after several regenerations. Adsorption enthalpies and entropies have been deduced from the Clapeyron equation and from DSC measurements. A good agreement was found. A mechanism of adsorption is proposed considering two kinds of adsorbate: bounded water in electrostatic interaction with functional groups and free water resulting from condensation.

  14. ATR-FTIR measurements of albumin and fibrinogen adsorption: Inert versus calcium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Boix, Marcel; Eslava, Salvador; Costa Machado, Gil; Gosselin, Emmanuel; Ni, Na; Saiz, Eduardo; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Arthritis, bone fracture, bone tumors and other musculoskeletal diseases affect millions of people across the world. Nowadays, inert and bioactive ceramics are used as bone substitutes or for bone regeneration. Their bioactivity is very much dictated by the way proteins adsorb on their surface. In this work, we compared the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen on inert and calcium phosphates ceramics (CaPs) using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to follow in situ protein adsorption on these materials. To this effect, we developed a sol-gel technique to control the surface chemistry of an ATR-FTIR detector. Hydroxyapatite adsorbed more albumin and β-tricalcium phosphate adsorbed more fibrinogen. Biphasic calcium phosphate presented the lowest adsorption among CaP for both proteins, illustrating the effect of surface heterogeneities. Inert ceramics adsorbed a lower amount of both proteins compared with bioactive ceramics. A significant change was observed in the conformation of the adsorbed protein versus the surface chemistry. Hydroxyapatite produced a larger loss of α-helix structure on albumin and biphasic calcium phosphate reduced β-sheet percentage on fibrinogen. Inert ceramics produced large α-helix loss on albumin and presented weak interaction with fibrinogen. Zirconia did not adsorb albumin and titanium dioxide promoted huge denaturalization of fibrinogen.

  15. Direct measurements show decreasing methane emissions from natural gas local distribution systems in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Brian K; Edburg, Steven L; Ferrara, Thomas W; Howard, Touché; Harrison, Matthew R; Kolb, Charles E; Townsend-Small, Amy; Dyck, Wesley; Possolo, Antonio; Whetstone, James R

    2015-04-21

    Fugitive losses from natural gas distribution systems are a significant source of anthropogenic methane. Here, we report on a national sampling program to measure methane emissions from 13 urban distribution systems across the U.S. Emission factors were derived from direct measurements at 230 underground pipeline leaks and 229 metering and regulating facilities using stratified random sampling. When these new emission factors are combined with estimates for customer meters, maintenance, and upsets, and current pipeline miles and numbers of facilities, the total estimate is 393 Gg/yr with a 95% upper confidence limit of 854 Gg/yr (0.10% to 0.22% of the methane delivered nationwide). This fraction includes emissions from city gates to the customer meter, but does not include other urban sources or those downstream of customer meters. The upper confidence limit accounts for the skewed distribution of measurements, where a few large emitters accounted for most of the emissions. This emission estimate is 36% to 70% less than the 2011 EPA inventory, (based largely on 1990s emission data), and reflects significant upgrades at metering and regulating stations, improvements in leak detection and maintenance activities, as well as potential effects from differences in methodologies between the two studies.

  16. The overview of the radon and environmental characteristics measurements in the Czech show caves.

    PubMed

    Thinová, L; Froňka, A; Rovenská, K

    2015-06-01

    This paper focuses on the measurement and assessment of absorbed doses of radiation in caves of the Czech Republic, some of which exhibit high activity concentration of radon in air. Presented is an analysis and recommendations based on measurement results obtained in the underground caves over the past 12 y. The most important results for cave environments were as follows: integral radon monitoring using RAMARN detectors can provide more consistent results for calculating the effective dose; no major differences were shown in the average radon activity concentration during working time as opposed to non-working time; the unattached fraction of radioactive particles in air ranged from 0.03 to 0.6, with arithmetical average fp = 0.13; the direct dependence between equilibrium factor F and the size of the unattached fraction fp was described using the Log-Power expression ln(1/fp) = a*ln(1/F)(b); the calculated values for coefficients a and b were 1.85 and -1.096, respectively. The individual cave factor for each investigated underground area was calculated.

  17. Cation location in microporous zeolite, SSZ-13, probed with xenon adsorption measurement and 129Xe NMR spectrum.

    PubMed

    Shin, Na Ra; Kim, Su Hyun; Shin, Hye Sun; Jang, Ik Jun; Cho, Sung June

    2013-06-01

    The location of metal ion, Ag2+, Ca2+, Cu2+ and Y3+ in the SSZ-13 has been investigated with xenon adsorption measurement and 129Xe NMR spectrum. It was referred that the location of the metal ion varies depending on the corresponding charge. The ion-exchanged Ag ion was located in the alpha-cage to interact directly with xenon. Others multivalent cation contributed little with xenon because these were present near the six membered rings where xenon cannot access.

  18. BSA adsorption on bimodal PEO brushes.

    PubMed

    Bosker, W T E; Iakovlev, P A; Norde, W; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2005-06-15

    BSA adsorption onto bimodal PEO brushes at a solid surface was measured using optical reflectometry. Bimodal brushes consist of long (N=770) and short (N=48) PEO chains and were prepared on PS surfaces, applying mixtures of PS(29)-PEO(48) and PS(37)-PEO(770) block copolymers and using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Pi-A isotherms of (mixtures of) the block copolymers were measured to establish the brush regime. The isotherms of PS(29)-PEO(48) show hysteresis between compression and expansion cycles, indicating aggregation of the PS(29)-PEO(48) upon compression. Mixtures of PS(29)-PEO(48) and PS(37)-PEO(770) demonstrate a similar hysteresis effect, which eventually vanishes when the ratio of PS(37)-PEO(770) to PS(29)-PEO(48) is increased. The adsorption of BSA was determined at brushes for which the grafting density of the long PEO chains was varied, while the total grafting density was kept constant. BSA adsorption onto monomodal PEO(48) and PEO(770) brushes was determined for comparison. The BSA adsorption behavior of the bimodal brushes is similar to the adsorption of BSA at PEO(770) monomodal brushes. The maximum of BSA adsorption at low grafting density of PEO(770) can be explained by ternary adsorption, implying an attraction between BSA and PEO. The contribution of primary adsorption to the total adsorbed amount is negligible.

  19. Optical volume and mass measurements show that mammalian cells swell during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz, Ewa; Monnier, Sylvain; Cappello, Giovanni; Le Berre, Mael; Piel, Matthieu

    2015-11-23

    The extent, mechanism, and function of cell volume changes during specific cellular events, such as cell migration and cell division, have been poorly studied, mostly because of a lack of adequate techniques. Here we unambiguously report that a large range of mammalian cell types display a significant increase in volume during mitosis (up to 30%). We further show that this increase in volume is tightly linked to the mitotic state of the cell and not to its spread or rounded shape and is independent of the presence of an intact actomyosin cortex. Importantly, this volume increase is not accompanied by an increase in dry mass and thus corresponds to a decrease in cell density. This mitotic swelling might have important consequences for mitotic progression: it might contribute to produce strong pushing forces, allowing mitotic cells to round up; it might also, by lowering cytoplasmic density, contribute to the large change of physicochemical properties observed in mitotic cells.

  20. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  1. Adsorption of modified dextrins to a hydrophobic surface: QCM-D studies, AFM imaging, and dynamic contact angle measurements.

    PubMed

    Sedeva, Iliana G; Fetzer, Renate; Fornasiero, Daniel; Ralston, John; Beattie, David A

    2010-05-15

    The adsorption of three dextrin-based polymers, regular wheat dextrin (Dextrin TY), phenyl succinate dextrin (PS Dextrin), and styrene oxide dextrin (SO Dextrin) on a model hydrophobic surface, consisting of a mixed alkanethiol layer on gold, has been characterized using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The three polymers exhibited varying affinities and capacity for adsorption on the hydrophobic substrate. Atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging of the polymer layers indicates that all three polymers fully cover the surface. The effect of the three polymers on the static contact angle of the surface was studied using captive bubble contact angle measurements. The three polymers were seen to reduce the receding contact angle by similar amounts (approximately 14°) in spite of having varying adsorbed amounts and differences in adsorbed layer water content. Although no differences were observed in the ability of the polymers to reduce the static contact angle, measurements of the dynamic contact angle between a rising air bubble and the polymer covered substrate yielded stark differences between the polymers, with one polymer (SO Dextrin) slowing the dewetting by an order of magnitude more than the other two polymers. The differences in dewetting behavior correlate with the adsorbed layer characteristics determined by QCM-D and AFM. The role of the dynamic and static contact angle in the performance of a polymer as depressant is discussed.

  2. Construction and measurements of an improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    SciTech Connect

    Street, J. Bunker, R.; Dunagan, C.; Loose, X.; Schnee, R. W.; Stark, M.; Sundarnath, K.; Tronstad, D.

    2015-08-17

    In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto detector surfaces, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. An improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system and cleanroom build upon a previous design implemented at Syracuse University that achieved radon levels of ∼0.2 Bq m{sup −3}. This improved system will employ a better pump and larger carbon beds feeding a redesigned cleanroom with an internal HVAC unit and aged water for humidification. With the rebuilt (original) radon mitigation system, the new low-radon cleanroom has already achieved a > 300× reduction from an input activity of 58.6 ± 0.7 Bq m{sup −3} to a cleanroom activity of 0.13 ± 0.06 Bq m{sup −3}.

  3. Energy of adhesion of human T cells to adsorption layers of monoclonal antibodies measured by a film trapping technique.

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, I B; Hadjiiski, A; Denkov, N D; Gurkov, T D; Kralchevsky, P A; Koyasu, S

    1998-01-01

    A novel method for studying the interaction of biological cells with interfaces (e.g., adsorption monolayers of antibodies) is developed. The method is called the film trapping technique because the cell is trapped within an aqueous film of equilibrium thickness smaller than the cell diameter. A liquid film of uneven thickness is formed around the trapped cell. When observed in reflected monochromatic light, this film exhibits an interference pattern of concentric bright and dark fringes. From the radii of the fringes one can restore the shape of interfaces and the cell. Furthermore, one can calculate the adhesive energy between the cell membrane and the aqueous film surface (which is covered by a layer of adsorbed proteins and/or specific ligands), as well as the disjoining pressure, representing the force of interaction per unit area of the latter film. The method is applied to two human T cell lines: Jurkat and its T cell receptor negative (TCR-) derivative. The interaction of these cells with monolayers of three different monoclonal antibodies adsorbed at a water-air interface is studied. The results show that the adhesive energy is considerable (above 0.5 mJ/m2) when the adsorption monolayer contains antibodies acting as specific ligands for the receptors expressed on the cell surface. In contrast, the adhesive energy is close to zero in the absence of such a specific ligand-receptor interaction. In principle, the method can be applied to the study of the interaction of a variety of biological cells (B cells, natural killer cells, red blood cells, etc.) with adsorption monolayers of various biologically active molecules. In particular, film trapping provides a tool for the gentle micromanipulation of cells and for monitoring of processes (say the activation of a T lymphocyte) occurring at the single-cell level. PMID:9649417

  4. Adsorption of oxygen on W/100/ - Adsorption kinetics and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, E.; Poppa, H.; Viswanath, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on W(100) single-crystal surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), flash desorption, low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and retarding-field work-function measurements. The AES results reveal stepwise changes in the sticking coefficients in the coverage range 0 to 1 and activated adsorption at higher coverages. Upon room-temperature adsorption, a series of complex LEED patterns is observed. In layers adsorbed at 1050 K and cooled to room temperature, the p(2 x 1) structure is the first ordered structure observed. This structure shows a reversible order-disorder transition between 700 and 1000 K and is characterized by a work function which is lower than that of the clean surface. Heating room-temperature adsorbates changes their structure irreversibly. At temperatures below 750 K, some new structures are observed.

  5. Characterization by optical measurements of the effects of some stages of champagne technology on the adsorption layer formed at the gas/wine interface.

    PubMed

    Saleh, K Abou; Aguié-Béghin, V; Foulon, L; Valade, M; Douillard, R

    2007-06-19

    This study analyzes the effects of some important factors of champagne technology on the ellipticity and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) of the air/champagne interface in view of using the optical properties of the adsorption layer of base wine to forecast the stability of the champagne bubble collar. Using standard, ultrafiltered, and ultraconcentrated wines it was observed that champagne can lose amphiphilic macromolecules which adsorb on the inner glass wall of the bottle during storage, particles such as dead yeasts can adhere to the adsorption layer, a weak increase of the ethanol content during bottle fermentation can reduce significantly the ellipticity of the adsorption layer, and CO2 has no significant effect on the properties of that layer. Surprisingly, no visible differences of the adsorption layer were noticed between the experimental champagnes of the 2004 vintage of three vine varieties (Chardonnay, Pinot noir, and Pinot meunier). From analysis of all samples it is proposed that the mean value and standard deviation of the ellipticity measured during 30 min after pouring the wine in a Petri dish are physical quantities which satisfactorily characterize the adsorption layer of champagne. When needed, further characterization of the adsorption layer may be obtained by a detailed analysis of the kinetics of ellipticity during the same period and inspection of the BAM images of the interface.

  6. Heavy metal adsorption changes of EAF steel slag after phosphorus adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Guanling; Cao, Lijing; Chen, Xiao; Hou, Wenhua; Wang, Qunhui

    2012-01-01

    A kind of electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag was phosphated, and its isothermal and dynamic adsorptions of copper, cadmium, and lead ions were measured to determine if heavy metal adsorption changes after phosphorus adsorption. The surface area increased greatly after the slag was phosphated. Isothermal adsorption experiments showed that the theoretical Q(max) of the EAF steel slag on Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) improved 59, 50, and 89% respectively after it was phosphated. Dynamic adsorption results showed that the greatest adsorption capacities of unit volume of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) were 2.2, 1.8, and 1.8 times that of the column packed with original EAF steel slag when the column was packed with phosphate EAF steel slag at the same heavy metal ion concentration. The breakthrough time, the exhaustion time and elution efficiency of the column also increased when the column was packed with phosphated EAF steel slag compared with that packed with original EAF steel slag. Phosphorus adsorption could further improve the heavy metal ion adsorption of the EAF steel slag.

  7. Measuring water adsorption on mineral surfaces in air, CO2, and supercritical CO2 with a quartz-crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, C. R.; Wells, R. K.; Burton, P. D.; Heath, J. E.; Dewers, T. A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon sequestration via underground storage in geologic formations is a proposed approach for reducing industrial CO2 emissions. However, current models for carbon injection and long-term storage of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) do not consider the development and stability of adsorbed water films at the scCO2-hydrophilic mineral interface. The thickness and properties of the water films control the surface tension and wettability of the mineral surface, and on the core scale, affect rock permeability, saturation, and capillary properties. The film thickness is strongly dependent upon the activity of water in the supercritical fluid, which will change as initially anhydrous scCO2 absorbs water from formation brine. As described in a companion paper by the coauthors, the thickness of the adsorbed water layer is controlled by the disjoining pressure; structural and van der Waals components dominate at low water activity, while electrostatic forces become more important with increasing film thickness (higher water activities). As scCO2 water activity and water layer thickness increase, concomitant changes in mineral surface properties and reservoir/caprock hydrologic properties will affect the mobility of the aqueous phase and of scCO2. Moreover, the development of a water layer may be critical to mineral dissolution reactions in scCO2. Here, we describe the use of a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) to monitor adsorption of water by mineral surfaces. QCMs utilize a piezoelectrically-stimulated quartz wafer to measure adsorbed or deposited mass via changes in vibrational frequency. When used to measure the mass of adsorbed liquid films, the frequency response of the crystal must be corrected for the viscoelastic, rather than elastic, response of the adsorbed layer. Results are presented for adsorption to silica in N2 and CO2 at one bar, and in scCO2. Additional data are presented for water uptake by clays deposited on a QCM wafer. In this case, water uptake occurs by the

  8. Simultaneous laboratory measurements of CO2 and H2O adsorption on palagonite: Implications for the Martian climate and volatile reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, A. P.; Quinn, R.

    1993-01-01

    We are measuring the simultaneous adsorption of H2O and CO2 on palagonite materials in order to improve the formulation of climate models for Mars. We report on the initial co-adsorption data. Models of the Martian climate and volatile inventory indicate that the regolith serves as one of the primary reservoirs of outgassed volatiles and that it exchanges H2O and CO2 with the atmosphere in response to changes in insolation associated with astronomical cycles. Physical adsorbate must exist on the surfaces of the cold particulates that constitute the regolith, and the size of that reservoir can be assessed through laboratory measurements of adsorption on terrestrial analogs. Many studies of the independent adsorption of H2O and CO2 on Mars analog were made and appear in the literature. Empirical expressions that relate the adsorptive coverage of each gas to the temperature of the soil and partial pressure have been derived based on the laboratory data. Numerical models incorporate these adsorption isotherms into climatic models, which predict how the adsorptive coverage of the regolith and hence, the pressure of each gas in the atmosphere will vary as the planet moves through its orbit. These models suggest that the regolith holds several tens to hundreds of millibars of CO2 and that during periods of high obliquity warming of the high-latitude regolith will result in desorption of the CO2, and a consequent increase in atmospheric pressure. At lower obliquities, the caps cool and the equator warms forcing the desorption of several tens of millibars of CO2, which is trapped into quasipermanent CO2 caps.

  9. Adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene on carboxylated porous polystyrene microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhengfang; Meng, Qingqiang; Lu, Shengtao

    2012-02-01

    Large-pore-size (150 nm) polystyrene (PSt) microspheres were carboxylated with phthalic anhydride (PA) through Friedel-Crafts acetylation to study the adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on this material from aqueous solution. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and mercury porosimetry measurements (MPM) of the microspheres showed that the pore structure was unchanged during the reaction. High adsorption capacity (11.2 mg g-1 of suction-dried adsorbent) and adsorption rate (33.9 mg g-1 h-1) for TNT were observed during the study. As shown by the adsorption isotherm, the adsorption of TNT on PA-PSt can be described by the Freundlich adsorption equation, indicating heterogeneous adsorption process. On-column adsorption of TNT on PA-PSt and elution indicated that TNT can be completely removed from aqueous solution and condensed into acetone.

  10. Bovine serum albumin adsorption onto colloidal Al2O3 particles: a new model based on zeta potential and UV-vis measurements.

    PubMed

    Rezwan, Kurosch; Meier, Lorenz P; Rezwan, Mandana; Vörös, Janos; Textor, Marcus; Gauckler, Ludwig J

    2004-11-09

    We investigated the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on colloidal Al2O3 particles in an aqueous environment. Changes in the zeta potential of the Al2O3 particles upon the adsorption of BSA were measured using an electro-acoustic technique. The mass of protein adsorbed was determined by using UV-vis spectroscopy. The change of the isoelectric point of the Al2O3 powder-protein suspension was found to be a function of adsorbed protein mass. It was shown that approximately one monolayer of BSA was needed to fully mask the surface and to compromise the charge of Al2O3. From titration experiments it follows that about 30-36% of the negatively charged groups of the protein form bonds with the protonated and charged Al2O3 surface. On the basis of our observations we introduced a new adsorption model for BSA on Al2O3 particles.

  11. Adsorption of nisin and pediocin on nanoclays.

    PubMed

    Meira, Stela Maris Meister; Jardim, Arthur Izé; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-01

    Three different nanoclays (bentonite, octadecylamine-modified montmorillonite and halloysite) were studied as potential carriers for the antimicrobial peptides nisin and pediocin. Adsorption occurred from peptide solutions in contact with nanoclays at room temperature. Higher adsorption of nisin and pediocin was obtained on bentonite. The antimicrobial activity of the resultant bacteriocin-nanoclay systems was analyzed using skimmed milk agar as food simulant and the largest inhibition zones were observed against Gram-positive bacteria for halloysite samples. Bacteriocins were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonites as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) assay. Infrared spectroscopy suggested non-electrostatic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding between siloxane groups from clays and peptide molecules. Transmission electron microscopy did not show any alteration in morphologies after adsorption of antimicrobial peptides on bentonite and halloysite. These results indicate that nanoclays, especially halloysite, are suitable nanocarriers for nisin and pediocin adsorption.

  12. Adsorption/Desorption Measurements of Nitroglycerin and Dinitrotoluene in Camp Edwards, Massachusetts Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    100 and 800 g/L. 3.2.3 Ion Chromatography Anion concentrations, principally chloride, were measured on a Dionex ICS-3000 ion chromatograph using... chromatography ................................................................................................19 3.2.3 Ion chromatography ...17 3.2.1 High performance liquid chromatography ...............................................................17 3.2.2 Gas

  13. Measuring adsorption, diffusion and flow in chemical engineering: applications of magnetic resonance to porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, Lynn F.; Mitchell, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques are increasingly used to improve our understanding of the multi-component, multi-phase processes encountered in chemical engineering. This review brings together many of the MR techniques used, and often developed specifically, to study chemical engineering systems and, in particular, processes occurring within porous media. Pulse sequences for relaxometry, pulsed field gradient measurements of diffusion, imaging and velocimetry measurements are described. Recent applications of these MR pulse sequences to microporous, mesoporous and macroporous structures are then reviewed. Considering the microporous and mesoporous systems, we focus attention on studies of rock cores, manufactured materials such as cement and gypsum plaster, and catalysts. When considering macroporous structures, the transport through packed beds of particles typical of fixed-bed catalytic reactors is reviewed; a brief overview of the increasing research interest in gas-solid fluidized beds is also presented. We highlight the field of sparse k-space sampling as an area that is in its infancy and suggest that, combined with Bayesian methods, it will offer new opportunities in both extending the application of high-field MR techniques to chemical engineering and increasing the range of measurements that can be carried out using low-field hardware.

  14. Adsorption of oxygen molecule in NaA zeolite: Isotherms and infrared measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soussen-Jacob, Janine; Tsakiris, Jean; Cohen De Lara, Evelyne

    1989-08-01

    Isotherm and infrared induced band of O2 have been studied in the temperature range 93-193 K. At low temperature and low coverage, two components of the fundamental vibrational band appear on both sides of the gas frequency. Their intensities with respect to T and to the number of adsorbed molecules have been measured in order to understand the interaction of O2 with NaA zeolite. The frequency shift of each component has been related to the orientation of the molecule, from considerations about the interaction potential.

  15. Fluorescence-based measurement of cystine uptake through xCT shows requirement for ROS detoxification in activated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Siska, Peter J; Kim, Bumki; Ji, Xiangming; Hoeksema, Megan D; Massion, Pierre P; Beckermann, Kathryn E; Wu, Jianli; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Hong, Jiyong; Rathmell, Jeffrey C

    2016-11-01

    T and B lymphocytes undergo metabolic re-programming upon activation that is essential to allow bioenergetics, cell survival, and intermediates for cell proliferation and function. To support changes in the activity of signaling pathways and to provide sufficient and necessary intracellular metabolites, uptake of extracellular nutrients increases sharply with metabolic re-programming. One result of increased metabolic activity can be reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can be toxic when accumulated in excess. Uptake of cystine allows accumulation of cysteine that is necessary for glutathione synthesis and ROS detoxification. Cystine uptake is required for T cell activation and function but measurements based on radioactive labeling do not allow analysis on single cell level. Here we show the critical role for cystine uptake in T cells using a method for measurement of cystine uptake using a novel CystineFITC probe. T cell receptor stimulation lead to upregulation of the cystine transporter xCT (SLC7a11) and increased cystine uptake in CD4+ and CD8+ human T cells. Similarly, lipopolysaccharide stimulation increased cystine uptake in human B cells. The CystineFITC probe was not toxic and could be metabolized to prevent cystine starvation induced cell death. Furthermore, blockade of xCT or competition with natural cystine decreased uptake of CystineFITC. CystineFITC is thus a versatile tool that allows measurement of cystine uptake on single cell level and shows the critical role for cystine uptake for T cell ROS regulation and activation.

  16. OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE II SUPPLEMENTAL TESTING REPORT URANIUM ADSORPTION AND SHELF-LIFE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D

    2008-01-01

    The DOE Office of Waste Processing recently funded supplemental Phase II testing to further investigate the uranium affinity and shelf-life of modified monosodium titanate (mMST). Testing results confirmed earlier findings that the mMST exhibits much lower affinity for uranium than the baseline monosodium titanate (MST) material. The loading of uranium onto the mMST sample measured more than an order of magnitude lower than that of the MST. This finding indicates that the use of mMST provides a significant advantage over MST in that the mMST will not concentrate enriched uranium to the degree that MST does. The reduced affinity of mMST for uranium allows more operational flexibility in treating waste solutions from a nuclear criticality safety perspective. Testing results also indicate that the mMST exhibits good shelf-life with no measurable loss in plutonium and neptunium removal upon storage of samples at ambient laboratory temperatures for up to 30-months. Testing did exhibit a change in strontium removal performance for both the mMST and MST samples at the most recent testing event. However, the decrease in strontium removal performance proved lower for the mMST than the MST sample. Given these positive findings SRNL recommends continued development of mMST as a replacement for MST in pretreatment facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  17. Adsorption of pesticides on resins.

    PubMed

    Kyriakopoulos, Grigorios; Hourdakis, Adamadia; Doulia, Danae

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the capability of organic hydrophobic polymeric resins Amberlite XAD-4 and XAD-7 to remove the pesticides alachlor and amitrole from water. The pesticides adsorption on the two different adsorbents was measured by batch equilibrium technique and isotherm types and parameters were estimated. Two theoretical models were applied based on a Freundlich and a Langmuir isotherms. The effect of pesticides chemical composition and structure as well as the nature of solid surface on the efficiency of adsorption was evaluated. The influence of pH also was studied. In low pH solutions adsorption of amitrole was higher upon the nonionic aliphatic acrylic ester copolymer XAD-7 in comparison to the nonionic, crosslinked macroreticular copolymer of styrene divinylbenzene XAD-4. In neutral and intermediate pH solutions the polar acrylic ester copolymer XAD-7 was more effective to the retention of alachlor. The acrylic ester copolymer showed at pH 3 the lower effectiveness in alachlor removal from water. The data of the adsorption isotherms of pesticides upon the examined polymeric resins seemed to conform to both the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherm models.

  18. Adsorption characteristics of brilliant green dye on kaolin.

    PubMed

    Nandi, B K; Goswami, A; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-15

    Experimental investigations were carried out to adsorb toxic brilliant green dye from aqueous medium using kaolin as an adsorbent. Characterization of kaolin is done by measuring: (i) particle size distribution using particle size analyzer, (ii) BET surface area using BET surface analyzer, and (iii) structural analysis using X-ray diffractometer. The effects of initial dye concentration, contact time, kaolin dose, stirring speed, pH and temperature were studied for the adsorption of brilliant green in batch mode. Adsorption experiments indicate that the extent of adsorption is strongly dependent on pH of solution. Free energy of adsorption (DeltaG0), enthalpy (DeltaH0) and entropy (DeltaS0) changes are calculated to know the nature of adsorption. The calculated values of DeltaG0 at 299K and 323K indicate that the adsorption process is spontaneous. The estimated values of DeltaH0 and DeltaS0 both show the negative sign, which indicate that the adsorption process is exothermic and the dye molecules are organized on the kaolin surface in less randomly fashion than in solution. The adsorption kinetic has been described by first-order, pseudo-second-order and intra-particle-diffusion models. It was observed that the rate of dye adsorption follows pseudo-second-order model for the dye concentration range studied in the present case. Standard adsorption isotherms were used to fit the experimental equilibrium data. It was found that the adsorption of brilliant green on kaolin follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  19. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that the GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.

  20. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; ...

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that themore » GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.« less

  1. A model free method for estimation of complicated adsorption isotherms in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Forssén, Patrik; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-08-28

    Here we show that even extremely small variations in the adsorption isotherm can have a tremendous effect on the shape of the overloaded elution profiles and that the earlier in the adsorption isotherms the variation take place, the larger its impact on the shape of the elution profile. These variations are so small that they can be "hidden" by the discretization and in the general experimental noise when using traditional experimental methods, such as frontal analysis, to measure adsorption isotherms. But as the effects of these variations are more clearly visible in the elution profiles, the Inverse Method (IM) of adsorption isotherm estimation is an option. However, IM usually requires that one selects an adsorption isotherm model prior to the estimation process. Here we show that even complicated models might not be able to estimate the adsorption isotherms with multiple inflection points that small variations might give rise to. We therefore developed a modified IM that, instead of fixed adsorption isotherm models, uses monotone piecewise interpolation. We first validated the method with synthetic data and showed that it can be used to estimate an adsorption isotherm, which accurately predicts an extremely "strange" elution profile. For this case it was impossible to estimate the adsorption isotherm using IM with a fixed adsorption model. Finally, we will give an example of a real chromatographic system where adsorption isotherm with inflection points is estimated by the modified IM.

  2. Field and controlled environment measurements show strong seasonal acclimation in photosynthesis and respiration potential in boreal Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Kolari, Pasi; Chan, Tommy; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Bäck, Jaana; Nikinmaa, Eero; Juurola, Eija

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the seasonality of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees and its control by the environment requires separation of the instantaneous and slow responses, as well as the dynamics of light reactions, carbon reactions, and respiration. We determined the seasonality of photosynthetic light response and respiration parameters of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in the field in southern Finland and in controlled laboratory conditions. CO2 exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured in the field using a continuously operated automated chamber setup and fluorescence monitoring systems. We also carried out monthly measurements of photosynthetic light, CO2 and temperature responses in standard conditions with a portable IRGA and fluorometer instrument. The field and response measurements indicated strong seasonal variability in the state of the photosynthetic machinery with a deep downregulation during winter. Despite the downregulation, the photosynthetic machinery retained a significant capacity during winter, which was not visible in the field measurements. Light-saturated photosynthesis (P sat) and the initial slope of the photosynthetic light response (α) obtained in standard conditions were up to 20% of their respective summertime values. Respiration also showed seasonal acclimation with peak values of respiration in standard temperature in spring and decline in autumn. Spring recovery of all photosynthetic parameters could be predicted with temperature history. On the other hand, the operating quantum yield of photosystem II and the initial slope of photosynthetic light response stayed almost at the summertime level until late autumn while at the same time P sat decreased following the prevailing temperature. Comparison of photosynthetic parameters with the environmental drivers suggests that light and minimum temperature are also decisive factors in the seasonal acclimation of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees.

  3. Nisin adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces coated with the PEO–PPO–PEO triblock surfactant Pluronic® F108

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Yuan-Ching; Joshi, Pranav; McGuire, Joseph; Neff, Jennifer A.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and elution of the antimicrobial peptide nisin at hydrophobic, silanized silica surfaces coated with the poly(ethylene oxide)–poly(propylene oxide)–poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant Pluronic® F108 were measured in situ, with ellipsometry. While such layers are known to inhibit protein adsorption, nisin was observed to adsorb in multilayer quantities, to an extent similar to its adsorption at uncoated, hydrophobic surfaces. The rates of nisin adsorption and elution were generally slower at F108-coated surfaces. And, the sequential adsorption of nisin, including two adsorption–elution cycles at each surface, showed greater differences in adsorption rates between the first and second adsorption cycles, when evaluated at identical mass density, for uncoated relative to F108-coated surfaces. These results indicate that nisin adsorption occurs via “entrapment” within the PEO brush layer at F108-coated surfaces, in this way slowing adsorption and spontaneous elution, and inhibiting post-adsorptive molecular rearrangements by reducing the lateral mobility of nisin. While F108-coated layers rejected adsorption of serum albumin, sequential adsorption experiments carried out with nisin and albumin showed a low level of albumin adsorption when nisin was present at the interface. PMID:18359037

  4. Competitive surfactant adsorption of AOT and Tween 20 on gold measured using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation.

    PubMed

    Thavorn, Jakkrit; Hamon, Joshua J; Kitiyanan, Boonyarach; Striolo, Alberto; Grady, Brian P

    2014-09-23

    Competitive surfactant adsorption of anionic surfactant AOT and nonionic surfactant Tween 20 on gold was investigated by using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) at 25 °C. The adsorption isotherm of pure AOT did not reach a plateau at the CMC, but rather adsorption continued to increase gradually at concentrations higher than the CMC before reaching a plateau. This behavior is evidence of competitive adsorption between AOT and impurities. The adsorbed layer of AOT on gold became more viscoelastic as the concentration of AOT increased. Tween 20 reached the plateau adsorption on gold before its concentration reached the CMC, suggesting that the attraction between Tween 20 and gold is very strong. The Tween 20 adsorbed layer was rigid when compared to the AOT adsorbed layer, as indicated by low dissipation. The addition of Tween 20 to a surface covered by AOT resulted in an increase in adsorbed mass, suggestive of the insertion of Tween 20 into the AOT adsorbed layer as expected because Tween 20 is able to separate the repulsive headgroups of AOT. When AOT was added to a preformed Tween 20 layer, a drop in the adsorbed amount was found between 0 and 0.1 CMC, and then no change was observed until the CMC of AOT was reached; the adsorbed amount then increased, reaching a final adsorption greater than that of pure AOT. All data support the formation of mixed surfactant layers on the surface. Although a two-step model fit both AOT and Tween 20 adsorption kinetic data well, AOT was found to adsorb much more slowly than Tween 20.

  5. Adsorption calorimetry during metal vapor deposition on single crystal surfaces: Increased flux, reduced optical radiation, and real-time flux and reflectivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Jason R. V.; James, Trevor E.; Hemmingson, Stephanie L.; Farmer, Jason A.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2013-12-01

    Thin films of metals and other materials are often grown by physical vapor deposition. To understand such processes, it is desirable to measure the adsorption energy of the deposited species as the film grows, especially when grown on single crystal substrates where the structure of the adsorbed species, evolving interface, and thin film are more homogeneous and well-defined in structure. Our group previously described in this journal an adsorption calorimeter capable of such measurements on single-crystal surfaces under the clean conditions of ultrahigh vacuum [J. T. Stuckless, N. A. Frei, and C. T. Campbell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 2427 (1998)]. Here we describe several improvements to that original design that allow for heat measurements with ˜18-fold smaller standard deviation, greater absolute accuracy in energy calibration, and, most importantly, measurements of the adsorption of lower vapor-pressure materials which would have previously been impossible. These improvements are accomplished by: (1) using an electron beam evaporator instead of a Knudsen cell to generate the metal vapor at the source of the pulsed atomic beam, (2) changing the atomic beam design to decrease the relative amount of optical radiation that accompanies evaporation, (3) adding an off-axis quartz crystal microbalance for real-time measurement of the flux of the atomic beam during calorimetry experiments, and (4) adding capabilities for in situ relative diffuse optical reflectivity determinations (necessary for heat signal calibration). These improvements are not limited to adsorption calorimetry during metal deposition, but also could be applied to better study film growth of other elements and even molecular adsorbates.

  6. Adsorption calorimetry during metal vapor deposition on single crystal surfaces: Increased flux, reduced optical radiation, and real-time flux and reflectivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, Jason R. V.; James, Trevor E.; Hemmingson, Stephanie L.; Farmer, Jason A.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2013-12-15

    Thin films of metals and other materials are often grown by physical vapor deposition. To understand such processes, it is desirable to measure the adsorption energy of the deposited species as the film grows, especially when grown on single crystal substrates where the structure of the adsorbed species, evolving interface, and thin film are more homogeneous and well-defined in structure. Our group previously described in this journal an adsorption calorimeter capable of such measurements on single-crystal surfaces under the clean conditions of ultrahigh vacuum [J. T. Stuckless, N. A. Frei, and C. T. Campbell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69, 2427 (1998)]. Here we describe several improvements to that original design that allow for heat measurements with ∼18-fold smaller standard deviation, greater absolute accuracy in energy calibration, and, most importantly, measurements of the adsorption of lower vapor-pressure materials which would have previously been impossible. These improvements are accomplished by: (1) using an electron beam evaporator instead of a Knudsen cell to generate the metal vapor at the source of the pulsed atomic beam, (2) changing the atomic beam design to decrease the relative amount of optical radiation that accompanies evaporation, (3) adding an off-axis quartz crystal microbalance for real-time measurement of the flux of the atomic beam during calorimetry experiments, and (4) adding capabilities for in situ relative diffuse optical reflectivity determinations (necessary for heat signal calibration). These improvements are not limited to adsorption calorimetry during metal deposition, but also could be applied to better study film growth of other elements and even molecular adsorbates.

  7. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; ...

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challengingmore » due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.« less

  8. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, A.; Bi, X. T.

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challenging due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.

  9. Field measures show methanotroph sensitivity to soil moisture follows precipitation regime of the grassland sites across the US Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, A.; Webb, C. T.; Johnson, N. G.; Brewer, P. E.; von Fischer, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Methane uptake rates are known to have temporal variation in response to changing soil moisture levels. However, the relative importance of soil diffusivity vs. methanotroph physiology has not been disentangled to date. Testing methanotroph physiology in the laboratory can lead to misleading results due to changes in the fine-scale habitat where methanotrophs reside. To assay the soil moisture sensitivity of methanotrophs under field conditions, we studied 22 field plots scattered across eight Great Plains grassland sites that differed in precipitation regime and soil moisture, making ca. bi-weekly measures during the growing seasons over three years. Quantification of methanotroph activity was achieved from chamber-based measures of methane uptake coincident with SF6-derived soil diffusivity, and interpretation in a reaction-diffusion model. At each plot, we also measured soil water content (SWC), soil temperature and inorganic nitrogen (N) contents. We also assessed methanotroph community composition via 454 sequencing of the pmoA gene. Statistical analyses showed that methanotroph activity had a parabolic response with SWC (concave down), and significant differences in the shape of this response among sites. Moreover, we found that the SWC at peak methanotroph activity was strongly correlated with mean annual precipitation (MAP) of the site. The sequence data revealed distinct composition patterns, with structure that was associated with variation in MAP and soil texture. These results suggest that local precipitation regime shapes methanotroph community composition, which in turn lead to unique sensitivity of methane uptake rates with soil moisture. Our findings suggest that methanotroph activity may be more accurately modeled when the biological and environmental responses are explicitly described.

  10. Adsorption Device Based on a Langatate Crystal Microbalance for High Temperature High Pressure Gas Adsorption in Zeolite H-ZSM-5

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wenjin; Baracchini, Giulia; Klumpp, Michael; Schwieger, Wilhelm; Dittmeyer, Roland

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-temperature and high-pressure gas adsorption measurement device based on a high-frequency oscillating microbalance (5 MHz langatate crystal microbalance, LCM) and its use for gas adsorption measurements in zeolite H-ZSM-5. Prior to the adsorption measurements, zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals were synthesized on the gold electrode in the center of the LCM, without covering the connection points of the gold electrodes to the oscillator, by the steam-assisted crystallization (SAC) method, so that the zeolite crystals remain attached to the oscillating microbalance while keeping good electroconductivity of the LCM during the adsorption measurements. Compared to a conventional quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) which is limited to temperatures below 80 °C, the LCM can realize the adsorption measurements in principle at temperatures as high as 200-300 °C (i.e., at or close to the reaction temperature of the target application of one-stage DME synthesis from the synthesis gas), owing to the absence of crystalline-phase transitions up to its melting point (1,470 °C). The system was applied to investigate the adsorption of CO2, H2O, methanol and dimethyl ether (DME), each in the gas phase, on zeolite H-ZSM-5 in the temperature and pressure range of 50-150 °C and 0-18 bar, respectively. The results showed that the adsorption isotherms of these gases in H-ZSM-5 can be well fitted by Langmuir-type adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, the determined adsorption parameters, i.e., adsorption capacities, adsorption enthalpies, and adsorption entropies, compare well to literature data. In this work, the results for CO2 are shown as an example. PMID:27585356

  11. Adsorption Device Based on a Langatate Crystal Microbalance for High Temperature High Pressure Gas Adsorption in Zeolite H-ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenjin; Baracchini, Giulia; Klumpp, Michael; Schwieger, Wilhelm; Dittmeyer, Roland

    2016-08-25

    We present a high-temperature and high-pressure gas adsorption measurement device based on a high-frequency oscillating microbalance (5 MHz langatate crystal microbalance, LCM) and its use for gas adsorption measurements in zeolite H-ZSM-5. Prior to the adsorption measurements, zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals were synthesized on the gold electrode in the center of the LCM, without covering the connection points of the gold electrodes to the oscillator, by the steam-assisted crystallization (SAC) method, so that the zeolite crystals remain attached to the oscillating microbalance while keeping good electroconductivity of the LCM during the adsorption measurements. Compared to a conventional quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) which is limited to temperatures below 80 °C, the LCM can realize the adsorption measurements in principle at temperatures as high as 200-300 °C (i.e., at or close to the reaction temperature of the target application of one-stage DME synthesis from the synthesis gas), owing to the absence of crystalline-phase transitions up to its melting point (1,470 °C). The system was applied to investigate the adsorption of CO2, H2O, methanol and dimethyl ether (DME), each in the gas phase, on zeolite H-ZSM-5 in the temperature and pressure range of 50-150 °C and 0-18 bar, respectively. The results showed that the adsorption isotherms of these gases in H-ZSM-5 can be well fitted by Langmuir-type adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, the determined adsorption parameters, i.e., adsorption capacities, adsorption enthalpies, and adsorption entropies, compare well to literature data. In this work, the results for CO2 are shown as an example.

  12. Generalized random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarjus, G.; Schaaf, P.; Talbot, J.

    1990-12-01

    Adsorption of hard spherical particles onto a flat uniform surface is analyzed by using generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) models. These models are defined by releasing the condition of immobility present in the usual RSA rules to allow for desorption or surface diffusion. Contrary to the simple RSA case, generalized RSA processes are no longer irreversible and the system formed by the adsorbed particles on the surface may reach an equilibrium state. We show by using a distribution function approach that the kinetics of such processes can be described by means of an exact infinite hierarchy of equations reminiscent of the Kirkwood-Salsburg hierarchy for systems at equilibrium. We illustrate the way in which the systems produced by adsorption/desorption and by adsorption/diffusion evolve between the two limits represented by ``simple RSA'' and ``equilibrium'' by considering approximate solutions in terms of truncated density expansions.

  13. Development of adsorbent from Teflon waste by radiation induced grafting: equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of dyes.

    PubMed

    Goel, N K; Kumar, Virendra; Pahan, S; Bhardwaj, Y K; Sabharwal, S

    2011-10-15

    Mutual radiation grafting technique was employed to graft polyacrylic acid (PAA) onto Polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) scrap using high energy gamma radiation. Polyacrylic acid-g-Teflon (PAA-g-Teflon) adsorbent was characterized by grafting extent measurement, FTIR spectroscopy, SEM and wet ability & surface energy analysis. The PAA-g-Teflon adsorbent was studied for dye adsorption from aqueous solution of basic dyes, namely, Basic red 29 (BR29) and Basic yellow 11 (BY11). The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models, whereas, adsorption kinetics was analyzed using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models. Equilibrium adsorption of BR29 was better explained by Langmuir adsorption model, while that of BY11 by Freundlich adsorption model. The adsorption capacity for BY11 was more than for BR29. Separation factor (R(L)) was found to be in the range 0 < R(L) < 1, indicating favorable adsorption of dyes. Higher coefficient of determination (r(2) > 0.99) and better agreement between the q(e,cal) and q(e,exp) values suggested that pseudo-second order kinetic model better represents the kinetic adsorption data. The non-linearity obtained for intra-particle diffusion plot indicated, more than one process is involved in the adsorption of basic dyes. The desorption studies showed that ~95% of the adsorbed dye could be eluted in suitable eluent.

  14. Arctic organic aerosol measurements show particles from mixed combustion in spring haze and from frost flowers in winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, P. M.; Russell, L. M.; Jefferson, A.; Quinn, P. K.

    2010-05-01

    Submicron atmospheric aerosol particles were collected between 1 March 2008 and 1 March 2009 at Barrow, Alaska, to characterize the organic mass (OM) in the Arctic aerosol. Organic functional group concentrations and trace metals were measured with FTIR on submicron particles collected on Teflon filters. The OM varied from 0.07 μg m-3 in summer to 0.43 μg m-3 in winter, and 0.35 μg m-3 in spring, showing a transition in OM composition between spring and winter. Most of the OM in spring could be attributed to anthropogenic sources, consisting primarily of alkane and carboxylic acid functional groups and correlated to elemental tracers of industrial pollution, biomass burning, and shipping emissions. PMF analysis associated OM with two factors, a Mixed Combustion factor (MCF) and an Ocean-derived factor (ODF). Back trajectory analysis revealed that the highest fractions of the MCF were associated with air masses that had originated from northeastern Asia and the shipping lanes south of the Bering Straits. The ODF consisted of organic hydroxyl groups and correlated with organic and inorganic seawater components. The ODF accounted for more than 55% of OM in winter when the sampled air masses originated along the coastal and lake regions of the Northwest Territories of Canada. Frost flowers with organic-salt coatings that arise by brine rejection during sea ice formation may account for this large source of carbohydrate-like OM during the ice-covered winter season. While the anthropogenic sources contributed more than 0.3 μg m-3 of the springtime haze OM, ocean-derived particles provided comparable OM sources in winter.

  15. Macroscopic experimental and modeling evaluation of selenite and selenate adsorption mechanisms on gibbsite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenite Se(IV) and selenate Se(VI) selenium adsorption behavior was investigated on gibbsite as a function of solution pH and solution ionic strength. Adsorption of both Se redox states decreased with increasing solution pH. Electrophoretic mobility measurements showed downward shifts in point of...

  16. Macroscopic experimental and modeling evaluation of selenite and selenate adsorption mechanisms on gibbsite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenite Se(IV) and selenate Se(VI) adsorption behavior was investigated on gibbsite as a function of solution pH and solution ionic strength. Adsorption of both Se redox states decreased with increasing solution pH. Electrophoretic mobility measurements showed downward shifts in point of zero cha...

  17. Measurement of Cu and Zn adsorption onto surficial sediment components: new evidence for less importance of clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Yu

    2011-05-30

    Clay minerals in surficial sediment samples, collected from the Songhua River in China, were separated via sedimentation after removal of Fe/Mn oxides and organic materials; Cu and Zn adsorption onto the sediment components was then evaluated. Clay minerals were examined via X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Clay minerals were found to consist mainly of illite, kaolinite, chlorite and an illite/smectite mixed layer. Non-clay minerals were dominated by quartz and orthoclase. The retention of Cu and Zn by clay minerals was 1.6 and 2.5 times, respectively, greater than that of the whole, untreated surficial sediment. Compared to the other critical components in sediments related to metal sorption (Mn oxides, Fe oxides and organic materials), the adsorption capacity of clay minerals was found to be relatively lower on a unit mass basis. These data suggest that, although clay minerals may be important in the adsorption of heavy metals to aquatic sediments, their role is less significant than Fe/Mn oxides and organic materials.

  18. Adsorption of aqueous copper on peanut hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kanika Octavia

    A method was established for measuring the adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution to unmodified and modified peanut hulls at constant temperature and pH. Modification of the hulls was performed by oxidation with alkaline hydrogen peroxide. During the modification process, the hydrogen peroxide solubilizes the lignin component, making the surface more porous which increases the availability of binding sites, while simultaneously oxidizing the cellulose. The oxidation of alcohol groups creates more binding sites by creating functional groups such as COO-, which increases chelation to metal ions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms delignification of the peanut hulls by the disappearance of carboxyl peaks of the modified hulls, which were originally produced from the lignin content. Although, oxidation is not fully confirmed, it is not ruled out because the expected carboxylate peak (1680 cm-1) maybe overshadowed by a broad peak due to OH bending of water adsorbed to the hulls. Hulls adsorbed copper from solutions in the concentration range of 50-1000 ppm of CuCl2. Concentrations of pre- and post-adsorption solutions were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms were fit to known two and three-parameter models, evaluated and the binding mechanism was inferred. Maximum surface coverage was 3.5 +/- 0.6 mg Cu2+ /g hull for unmodified hulls and 11 +/- 1 mg Cu2+/g hull for modified hulls. The adsorption for the hulls is best described by the Langmuir model, suggesting monolayer, homogeneous adsorption. With a free energy of adsorption of 10.5 +/- 0.9 kJ/mol for unmodified hulls and 14.5 +/-0.4 kJ/mol for modified hulls, the process is categorized as chemisorption for both types of hulls. The adsorption for both hulls is also described by the Redlich-Peterson model, giving beta nearer to 1 than 0, which further suggests homogeneous adsorption described by the Langmuir model. After rinsing the hulls

  19. Modification of a magnetic carbon composite for ciprofloxacin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haixin; Wang, Shikui; Lin, Jian-Ying; Wang, Zengshuang; Ren, Jun

    2016-11-01

    A magnetic carbon composite, Fe3O4/C composite, was fabricated by one-step hydrothermal synthesis, modified by heat treatment under an inert atmosphere (N2), and then used as an adsorbent for ciprofloxacin (CIP) removal. Conditions for the modification were optimized according to the rate of CIP removal. The adsorbent was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction measurements, vibrating-sample magnetometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm measurements. The results indicate that the modified adsorbent has substantial magnetism and has a large specific area, which favor CIP adsorption. The effects of solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial CIP concentration, ion strength, humic acid and solution temperature on CIP removal were also studied. Our results show that all of the above factors influence CIP removal. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm fits the adsorption process well, with the pseudo second-order model describing the adsorption kinetics accurately. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that adsorption is mainly physical adsorption. Recycling experiments revealed that the behavior of adsorbent is maintained after recycling for five times. Overall, the modified magnetic carbon composite is an efficient adsorbent for wastewater treatment.

  20. Measured and Estimated Sodium-Adsorption Ratios for Tongue River and its Tributaries, Montana and Wyoming, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, M.R.; Nimick, David A.; Cleasby, Thomas E.; Kinsey, Stacy M.; Lambing, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The Tongue River drains an area of about 5,400 square miles and flows northward from its headwaters in the Bighorn National Forest of northeastern Wyoming to join the Yellowstone River at Miles City, Montana. Water from the Tongue River and its tributaries is extensively used for irrigation in both Wyoming and Montana. The Tongue River watershed contains vast coal deposits that are extracted at several surface mines. In some areas of the watershed, the coal beds also contain methane gas (coal-bed methane or natural gas), which has become the focus of intense exploration and development. Production of coal-bed methane requires the pumping of large volumes of ground water from the coal beds to reduce water pressure within the formation and release the stored gas. Water from the coal beds typically is high in sodium and low in calcium and magnesium, resulting in a high sodium-adsorption ratio (SAR). Disposal of ground water with high sodium concentrations into the Tongue River has the potential to increase salinity and SAR of water in the river, and potentially reduce the quality of water for irrigation purposes. This report documents SAR values measured in water samples collected at 12 monitoring sites in the Tongue River watershed and presents regression relations between specific conductance (SC) and SAR at each site for the years 2004-06. SAR in water samples was determined from laboratory-measured concentrations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium. The results of regression analysis indicated that SC and SAR were significantly related (p-values < 0.05) at most sites. The regression relations developed for most monitoring sites in the Tongue River watershed were used with continuous SC data to estimate daily SAR during the 2004 and 2005 irrigation seasons and to estimate 2006 provisional SAR values, which were displayed on the Web in real-time. Water samples were collected and analyzed from seven sites on the main stem of the Tongue River located at: (1) Monarch

  1. pH dependence of tailing in reversed-phase chromatography of a cationic dye: measurement of the strong adsorption site surface density.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emily A; Wirth, Mary J

    2004-12-10

    A question that has interested Dr. J.J. Kirkland is addressed: what is the nature of the silanols that cause tailing to persist at low pH in reversed-phase chromatography? Chromatograms for a cationic dye, 1,1'-didodecyl-3,3,3'3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), were studied at varying pH using an Agilent SB-C8 column and 80% ACN/water for six DiI concentrations ranging from 0.9 to 316 microM. The chromatograms showed increased retention and tailing from pH 1 to 5, as expected. Simulations of the chromatograms agreed well with experiment for a bi-Langmuir isotherm with weak (C8) and strong (silica) adsorption sites. The simulation parameters revealed that the number of strong adsorption sites decreases by 40% from pH 1 to 5, which indicates that the silanols causing tailing are in the SiOH, not the SiO-, form. This seems paradoxical because tailing increases with increasing pH. The simulation parameters reveal that this increased tailing from pH 1 to 5 owes to doubling of the partition coefficient for DiI to the strong adsorption site, which more than compensates for the decreasing number of sites. We attribute this increased partition coefficient to increased long-range coulombic interactions with the increasingly abundant SiO- groups at higher pH, which boosts DiI's partition coefficient for both the C8 and SiOH sites. The picture thus emerges that for DiI, higher pH causes increased tailing because the SiO- groups exacerbate tailing that actually originates from adsorption to SiOH groups.

  2. Adsorption and activity of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces measured with dual polarization interferometry (DPI) and confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Andreas W; Callisen, Thomas H; Brismar, Hjalmar; Elofsson, Ulla M

    2008-02-15

    The adsorption and activity of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TLL) was measured with dual polarization interferometry (DPI) and confocal microscopy at a hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface. In the adsorption isotherms, it was evident that TLL both had higher affinity for the hydrophobic surface and adsorbed to a higher adsorbed amount (1.90 mg/m(2)) compared to the hydrophilic surface (1.40-1.50mg/m(2)). The thickness of the adsorbed layer was constant (approximately 3.5 nm) on both surfaces at an adsorbed amount >1.0mg/m(2), but decreased on the hydrophilic surface at lower surface coverage, which might be explained by partially unfolding of the TLL structure. However, a linear dependence of the refractive index of the adsorbed layer on adsorbed amount of TLL on C18 surfaces indicated that the structure of TLL was similar at low and high surface coverage. The activity of adsorbed TLL was measured towards carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) in solution, which upon lipase activity formed a fluorescent product. The surface fluorescence intensity increase was measured in a confocal microscope as a function of time after lipase adsorption. It was evident that TLL was more active on the hydrophilic surface, which suggested that a larger fraction of adsorbed TLL molecules were oriented with the active site facing the solution compared to the hydrophobic surface. Moreover, most of the activity remained when the TLL surface coverage decreased. Earlier reports on TLL surface mobility on the same surfaces have found that the lateral diffusion was highest on hydrophilic surfaces and at low surface coverage of TLL. Hence, a high lateral mobility might lead to a longer exposure time of the active site towards solution, thereby increasing the activity against a water-soluble substrate.

  3. Tetraethylenepentamine embedded zeolite A for carbon dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Mo, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Jun; You, Hyo-Sang; Yi, Chang-Keun; Park, Young Cheol; Park, Sang-Eon

    2013-04-01

    Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) embedded zeolite A crystals were synthesized by using TEPA and the preformed zeolite A precursor under the microwave irradiation. The presence of TEPA in zeolite A crystal was confirmed by TG analysis and FTIR, Raman spectra. The CO2 adsorptive behavior of TEPA embedded zeolite A samples was investigated by CO2 isotherms measured at 25 degrees C comparing with zeolite A. The optimum CO2 sorption capacity was found in the case of 7.5% TEPA embedded zeolite A, which showed 3.75 mmol g(-1) where as the zeolite A showed less CO2 adsorption capacity of 2.88 mmol g(-1). The adsorption capacity of TEPA embedded Zeolite A was sustained up to 90% during 4 cycles of temperature swing adsorption (TSA) from 40 degrees C to 140 degrees C, indicating that the TEPA embedded Zeolite A was found to be useful as one of the application to solid amine adsorbent for CO2.

  4. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the…

  5. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab

    PubMed Central

    Luberda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab’s learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab’s scientific process. Third, the lab’s exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom’s taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects. PMID:27513927

  6. Measure, Then Show: Grasping Human Evolution Through an Inquiry-Based, Data-driven Hominin Skulls Lab.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Chris N; Luberda, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Incomprehension and denial of the theory of evolution among high school students has been observed to also occur when teachers are not equipped to deliver a compelling case also for human evolution based on fossil evidence. This paper assesses the outcomes of a novel inquiry-based paleoanthropology lab teaching human evolution to high-school students. The inquiry-based Be a Paleoanthropologist for a Day lab placed a dozen hominin skulls into the hands of high-school students. Upon measuring three variables of human evolution, students explain what they have observed and discuss findings. In the 2013/14 school year, 11 biology classes in 7 schools in the Greater New Orleans area participated in this lab. The interviewed teacher cohort unanimously agreed that the lab featuring hominin skull replicas and stimulating student inquiry was a pedagogically excellent method of delivering the subject of human evolution. First, the lab's learning path of transforming facts to data, information to knowledge, and knowledge to acceptance empowered students to themselves execute part of the science that underpins our understanding of deep time hominin evolution. Second, although challenging, the hands-on format of the lab was accessible to high-school students, most of whom were readily able to engage the lab's scientific process. Third, the lab's exciting and compelling pedagogy unlocked higher order thinking skills, effectively activating the cognitive, psychomotor and affected learning domains as defined in Bloom's taxonomy. Lastly, the lab afforded students a formative experience with a high degree of retention and epistemic depth. Further study is warranted to gauge the degree of these effects.

  7. Hydrogen and oxygen adsorption stoichiometries on silica supported ruthenium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Berthoud, Romain; Delichere, Pierre; Gajan, David; Lukens, Wayne; Pelzer, Katrin; Basset, Jean-Marie; Candy, Jean-Pierre; Coperet, Christophe

    2008-12-01

    Treatment under H{sub 2} at 300 C of Ru(COD)(COT) dispersed on silica yields 2 nm ruthenium nanoparticles, [Ru{sub p}/SiO{sub 2}], according to EXAFS, HRTEM and XPS. H{sub 2} adsorption measurements on [Ru{sub p}/SiO{sub 2}] in the absence of O{sub 2} show that Ru particles adsorb up to ca. 2 H per surface ruthenium atoms (2H/Ru{sub s}) on various samples; this technique can therefore be used to measure the dispersion of Ru particles. In contrast, O{sub 2} adsorption on [Ru{sub p}/SiO{sub 2}] leads to a partial oxidation of the bulk at 25 C, to RuO{sub 2} at 200 C and to sintering upon further reduction under H{sub 2}, showing that O{sub 2} adsorption cannot be used to measure the dispersion of Ru particles.

  8. Variability of mitomycin C adsorption by activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    Shah, I A; Lindup, W E; McCulloch, P G

    1998-03-01

    A saline suspension of mitomycin C adsorbed on activated charcoal and administered intraperitoneally has been reported to be safe and effective in the treatment of gastric carcinoma. Activated charcoal specifically targets tumour and lymph-node tissues and the sustained higher local drug concentration is thought to be beneficial. The charcoal particles used in these suspensions have varied in size from > 147 microm to < 20 nm in diameter, but no data have been published to show how this might affect drug adsorption and delivery. Any variability in drug adsorption could pose a serious clinical risk for drugs with a narrow therapeutic index. We have, therefore, investigated the adsorption of mitomycin C on activated charcoal in-vitro. Activated charcoal was ground and sieved to yield four size-fractions between 180 and 53 microm. Adsorption isotherms (n > or = 3) were constructed and applied to the Freundlich model with 0-l00 microg mL(-1) mitomycin C measured by HPLC with detection at 365 nm. Adsorption of mitomycin C by activated charcoal varied by a factor of three under identical conditions at room temperature (21 degrees C) and at 37 degrees C. The specific adsorption (microg mitomycin C (mg activated charcoal)(-1)) was generally higher at 37 degrees C than at room temperature. The variability of mitomycin C adsorption was greatly reduced by addition of the surface-active agent polyvinylpyrollidone, used to determine that adsorption of mitomycin C was independent of activated charcoal particle size. The characteristics of adsorption of mitomycin C by activated charcoal are complex and should be thoroughly investigated to discover the critical controlling factors before submitting the suspensions for further clinical evaluation.

  9. [Adsorption kinetic and thermodynamic studies of lead onto activated carbons from cotton stalk].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-quan; Zheng, Zheng; Jiang, Jian-chun; Zhang, Ji-biao

    2010-05-01

    Low-cost high surface area microporous carbons were prepared from cotton stalk and cotton stalk fiber by H3PO4 activation. The adsorption of lead ions on the carbons was investigated by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. The influence of solution pH value, contact time and temperature was investigated. The adsorption kinetics, thermodynamic behavior and mechanism were also discussed. The surface area and pore structure of the activated carbons were analyzed by BET equation, BJH method and H-K method according to the data from nitrogen adsorption at 77K. Boehm titration, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), the point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) measurement and elemental analysis were used to characterize the surface properties. The results show that the carbons from cotton stalk and cotton stalk fiber have high surface area of 1570 and 1731 m2 x g(-1), and high content of oxygen-containing functional groups of 1.43 and 0.83 mmol x g(-1). The adsorption experiments show that the carbons have high adsorption capacity for lead, and the maximum adsorption equilibrium amount was found to be 120 mg x g(-1). The adsorption amount increased with contact time, and almost 80% of the adsorption occurred in the first 5 min. The pseudo-second-order model describes the adsorption kinetics most effectively. The Freundlich isotherm was found to the best explanation for experimental data. The negative change in free energy (delta G0) and positive change in enthalpy (delta H0) indicate that the adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process, and the adsorption of lead ions onto the carbons might be involved in an ion-exchange mechanism.

  10. Assessing the adsorption properties of shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Ronny

    2015-04-01

    applied, where these measures are simultaneously evaluated through a graphical method. The density of the adsorbed phase is estimated and compared to data reported in the literature; the latter is key to disclose gas-reserves and/or potential storage capacity estimates. The comparison with engineered materials highlights the complexity of the adsorption process in rocks. In fact, when evaluated against classic adsorbent materials, these preliminary data show that the adsorption mechanism in shales is further complicated by the presence of resident fluids (such as oil) that can additionally contribute to their total uptake capacity. This further highlights the need of improving our current understanding of the fundamental mechanisms controlling the uptake and release of fluids from these materials, and provides substantial research opportunities under the common goal of providing an efficient and sustainable use of unconventional resources.

  11. Mechanism and kinetics of Pb(II) adsorption on ultrathin nanocrystalline titania coatings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheng-peng; Zhang, Chun-jing

    2009-12-30

    Pb(II) is a highly toxic substance, exposure to which can cause various diseases. To better understand the application of titania as an adsorbent for removing Pb(II) from wastewater, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique was employed to investigate the adsorption behavior of Pb(II) on ultrathin nanocrystalline titania coatings. The present study focused on the mechanism and kinetics of Pb(II) adsorption. The obtained results show that the driving force of Pb(II) adsorption on titania coatings is electrostatic interaction, and that Pb(II) is adsorbed onto titania coatings by Pb(II) ions coordinating with hydroxyl groups of titania surface. In terms of the in situ frequency measurements of QCM, the adsorption kinetic parameter is estimated to be 4.12x10(5)L/mol. QCM measurement provides a useful method for monitoring the adsorption process of Pb(II) on titania coatings.

  12. Predicting neopentane isosteric enthalpy of adsorption at zero coverage in MCM-41.

    PubMed

    Herdes, Carmelo; Ferreiro-Rangel, Carlos Augusto; Düren, Tina

    2011-06-07

    The isosteric enthalpy of adsorption for neopentane at relative pressures down to 3 × 10(-8) in MCM-41 was predicted for the temperature range from -15 to 0 °C. At such low pressures and temperatures, experimental measurements become problematic for this system. We used an atomistic model for MCM-41 obtained by means of a kinetic Monte Carlo method mimicking the synthesis of the material. The model was parametrized to represent experimental nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The simulated isosteric enthalpy of adsorption shows very good agreement with available experimental data, demonstrating that GCMC simulations can predict heats of adsorption for conditions that are challenging for experimental measurements. Additional insights into the adsorption mechanisms, derived from energetic analysis at the molecular level, are also presented.

  13. Measurement of the half-life of {sup 198}Au in a nonmetal: High-precision measurement shows no host-material dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, J. R.; Nica, N.; Iacob, V. E.; Dibidad, A.; Hardy, J. C.

    2010-10-15

    We have measured the half-life of the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 198}Au to be 2.6948(9) d, with the nuclide sited in an insulating environment. Comparing this result with the half-life we measured previously with a metallic environment, we find the half-lives in both environments to be the same within 0.04%, thus contradicting a prediction that screening from a ''plasma'' of quasifree electrons in a metal increases the half-life by as much as 7%.

  14. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA.

  15. Cobalt nanoparticles-embedded magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon for highly effective adsorption of rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lin; Cai, Ye; Yang, Guide; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Yaoyu; Li, Sisi; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Sheng; Fang, Yan; He, Yibin

    2014-09-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles-embedded magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon (Co/OMC), prepared through a simple method involving infusing and calcination, was used as a highly effective adsorbent for rhodamine B (Rh B) removal. Several techniques, including SEM, HRTEM, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, XRD, Raman spectra, EDX, zeta potential and VSM measurement, were applied to characterize the adsorbent. Batch tests were conducted to investigate the adsorption performance. The adsorption capacity of the resultant adsorbent was relatively high compared with raw ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) and reached an equilibrium value of 468 mg/g at 200 mg/L initial Rh B concentration. Removal efficiency even reached 96% within 25 min at 100 mg/L initial Rh B concentration. Besides, the adsorption amount increased with the increase of solution pH, adsorbent dose and initial Rh B concentration. Kinetics study showed that the adsorption agreed well with pseudo-second-order model (R2 = 0.999) and had a significant correlation with intra-particle diffusion model in the both two adsorption periods. Furthermore, thermodynamics research indicated that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The adsorption isotherms fitted well with Langmuir model, demonstrating the formation of mono-molecular layer on the surface of Co/OMC during adsorption process. The results confirmed that Co/OMC has the potential superiority in removal of Rh B from aqueous solution.

  16. Protein nanoparticle interaction: A spectrophotometric approach for adsorption kinetics and binding studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishanav, Sandeep K.; Chandraker, Kumudini; Korram, Jyoti; Nagwanshi, Rekha; Ghosh, Kallol K.; Satnami, Manmohan L.

    2016-08-01

    Investigating the protein nanoparticle interaction is crucial to understand how to control the biological interactions of nanoparticles. In this work, Model protein Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used to evaluate the process of protein adsorption to the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) surface. The binding of a model protein (BSA) to GNPs was investigated through fluorescence quenching measurements. The strong affinities of BSA for GNPs were confirmed by the high value of binding constant (Ks) which was calculated to be 2.2 × 1011 L/mol. In this consequence, we also investigated the adsorption behavior of BSA on GNPs surface via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effect of various operational parameters such as pH, contact time, initial BSA concentration, and temperature on adsorption of BSA was investigated using batch adsorption experiments. Kinetics of adsorption was found to follow the pseudo-second order rate equation. The suitability of Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models to the equilibrium data was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption was well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity for BSA adsorbed on GNPs was 58.71 mg/g and equilibrium constant was 0.0058 calculated by the Langmuir model at 298 K and pH = 11.0. Thermodynamic parameters showed that the adsorption of BSA onto GNPs was feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic.

  17. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-Won; Leckie, J.O.; Siegel, M.D.

    1995-09-01

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption.

  18. Zinc modulates thrombin adsorption to fibrin

    SciTech Connect

    Hopmeier, P.; Halbmayer, M.; Fischer, M.; Marx, G. )

    1990-05-01

    Human thrombin with high affinity to Sepharose insolubilized fibrin monomers (high-affinity thrombin) was used to investigate the effect of Zn(II) on the thrombin adsorption to fibrin. Results showed that at Zn(II) concentrations exceeding 100 mumols/l, thrombin binding to fibrin was decreased concomitant with the Zn(II) concentration and time; at lower Zn(II) concentrations, thrombin adsorption was enhanced. Experimental results were identical by using 125I-labelled high-affinity alpha-thrombin or by measuring the thrombin activity either by chromogenic substrate or by a clotting time method. In contrast, Ca(II) alone (final conc. 3 mmol/l) or in combination with Zn(II) was not effective. However, at higher Ca(II) concentrations (7.5-15 mmol/l), thrombin adsorption was apparently decreased. Control experiments revealed that Zn(II) had no impact on the clottability of fibrinogen, and that the results of the experiments with Ca(II) were not altered by possible cross-linking of fibrin. We conclude that unlike Ca(II), Zn(II) is highly effective in modulating thrombin adsorption to fibrin.

  19. Adsorption of diblock polypeptides on polystyrene latex.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ritesh; Forciniti, Daniel

    2012-10-30

    The adsorption of peptides at solid/liquid interfaces is affected by peptide/surface and peptide/peptide hydrophobic and electrostatic forces. Three diblock copolypeptides and two homopeptides were adsorbed on poly(styrene) nanospheres from water, water/methanol, and water/glycerol mixtures at different pH's to study both of these effects. Peptides with one hydrophilic (glutamic acid or lysine) and one nonpolar block (alanine) or with both hydrophilic blocks with opposite charges (glutamic acid and lysine) were chemically synthesized and used as adsorbates in this study. The amount adsorbed was determined, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to measure the adsorbed layer thickness. It was found that peptide/surface and peptide/peptide electrostatic interactions dominate the adsorption process. Hydrophobic forces also play a role, but secondary to electrostatic forces. Positively charged blocks show high affinity for the surface, whereas negatively charged blocks were excluded from it. Poly(Lys) has the highest affinity by the surface, while (Glu)(14)-b-(Ala)(5) has the lowest. Adsorption of all peptides was inhibited by methanol and promoted by glycerol. The adsorption for (Lys)(5)-b-(Glu)(6) was extremely sensitive to pH, irrespective of cosolvent, whereas the thickness for (Lys)(30)-b-(Ala)(41) was sensitive to pH as well as cosolvent. Aggregation was observed in the presence of the nanosurfaces but not in the bulk peptides under some pH and solvent conditions.

  20. A benchmark database for adsorption bond energies to transition metal surfaces and comparison to selected DFT functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellendorff, Jess; Silbaugh, Trent L.; Garcia-Pintos, Delfina; Nørskov, Jens K.; Bligaard, Thomas; Studt, Felix; Campbell, Charles T.

    2015-10-01

    We present a literature collection of experimental adsorption energies over late transition metal surfaces for systems where we believe the energy measurements are particularly accurate, and the atomic-scale adsorption geometries are particularly well established. We propose that this could become useful for benchmarking theoretical methods for calculating adsorption processes. We compare the experimental results to six commonly used electron density functionals, including some (RPBE, BEEF-vdW) which were specifically developed to treat adsorption processes. The comparison shows that there is ample room for improvements in the theoretical descriptions.

  1. Adsorption modeling for macroscopic contaminant dispersal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Axley, J.W.

    1990-05-01

    Two families of macroscopic adsorption models are formulated, based on fundamental principles of adsorption science and technology, that may be used for macroscopic (such as whole-building) contaminant dispersal analysis. The first family of adsorption models - the Equilibrium Adsorption (EA) Models - are based upon the simple requirement of equilibrium between adsorbent and room air. The second family - the Boundary Layer Diffusion Controlled Adsorption (BLDC) Models - add to the equilibrium requirement a boundary layer model for diffusion of the adsorbate from the room air to the adsorbent surface. Two members of each of these families are explicitly discussed, one based on the linear adsorption isotherm model and the other on the Langmuir model. The linear variants of each family are applied to model the adsorption dynamics of formaldehyde in gypsum wall board and compared to measured data.

  2. Final report of CCQM-K136 measurement of porosity properties (specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter) of nanoporous Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobina, E.; Zimathis, A.; Prinz, C.; Emmerling, F.; Unger, W.; de Santis Neves, R.; Galhardo, C. E.; De Robertis, E.; Wang, H.; Mizuno, K.; Kurokawa, A.

    2016-01-01

    CCQM key comparison K-136 Measurement of porosity properties (specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter) of nanoporous Al2O3 has been performed by the Surface Analysis Working Group (SAWG) of the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM). The objective of this key comparison is to compare the equivalency of the National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and Designated Institutes (DIs) for the measurement of specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter) of nanoporous substances (sorbents, catalytic agents, cross-linkers, zeolites, etc) used in advanced technology. In this key comparison, a commercial sorbent (aluminum oxide) was supplied as a sample. Five NMIs participated in this key comparison. All participants used a gas adsorption method, here nitrogen adsorption at 77.3 K, for analysis according to the international standards ISO 15901-2 and 9277. In this key comparison, the degrees of equivalence uncertainties for specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter was established. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Adsorption of methylene blue onto sonicated sepiolite from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Küncek, Ilknur; Sener, Savaş

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to enhance the methylene blue (MB) adsorption of sepiolite by ultrasonic treatment. The natural sepiolite was pretreated by sonication to improve the surface characteristics and enhance the dye uptake capacity. Sonication process resulted in a significant increase in the specific surface area (SSA) of sepiolite. The FTIR spectrum of the sonicated sepiolite indicates that the tetrahedral sheet is probably distorted after sonication process. The effect of various parameters such as sonication, pH, initial dye concentration and temperature on dye adsorption has been investigated. The adsorbed amount of MB on sepiolite increased after sonication as well as with increasing pH and temperature. The experimental data were evaluated by applying the pseudo-first- and second-order, and the intraparticle diffusion adsorption kinetic models. Adsorption process of MB onto sepiolite followed the pseudo-second-order rate expression. The experimental data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, and found that the isotherm data were reasonably well correlated by Langmuir isotherm. Maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of sepiolite for MB increased from 79.37 to 128.21 mg/g after the sonication. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as Delta G(0), Delta H(0) and DeltaS(0) were calculated. The thermodynamics of MB/sepiolite system indicated spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. Adsorption measurements showed that the process was very fast and physical in nature.

  4. Adsorption of nanoparticles at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Thorsten; Paulus, Michael; Schroer, Martin A; Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Sternemann, Christian; Möller, Johannes; Tolan, Metin; Degen, Patrick; Rehage, Heinz

    2012-05-15

    The adsorption of differently charged nanoparticles at liquid-solid interfaces was investigated by in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements. The layer formation of positively charged maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles at the aqueous solution-SiO(2) interface was observed while negatively charged gold nanoparticles show no adsorption at this interface. Thus, the electrostatic interaction between the particles and the charged surface was determined as the driving force for the adsorption process. The data analysis shows that a logarithmic particle size distribution describes the density profile of the thin adsorbed maghemite layer. The size distribution in the nanoparticle solution determined by small angle X-ray scattering shows an average particle size which is similar to that found for the adsorbed film. The formed magehemite film exhibits a rather high stability.

  5. Initial stages of CO2 adsorption on CaO: a combined experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Solis, Brian H; Cui, Yi; Weng, Xuefei; Seifert, Jan; Schauermann, Swetlana; Sauer, Joachim; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2017-02-08

    Room temperature adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) on monocrystalline CaO(001) thin films grown on a Mo(001) substrate was studied by infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and quantum chemical calculations. For comparison, CO2 adsorption was examined on poorly ordered, nanoparticulate CaO films prepared on Ru(0001). For both systems, CO2 readily adsorbs on the clean CaO surface. However, additional bands were observable on the CaO/Ru(0001) films compared with CaO/Mo(001), because the stricter IRAS surface selection rules do not apply to adsorption on the disordered thin films grown on Ru(0001). Spectral evolution with increasing exposure of the IRA bands suggested the presence of several adsorption sites which are consecutively populated by CO2. Density functional calculations showed that CO2 adsorption occurs as monodentate surface carbonate (CO3(2-)) species at monatomic step sites and other low-coordinated sites, followed by formation of carbonates on terraces, which dominate at increasing CO2 exposure. To explain the coverage-dependent IRAS results, we propose CO2 surface islanding from the onset, most likely in the form of pairs and other chain-like species, which were calculated as thermodynamically favorable. The calculated adsorption energy for isolated CO2 on the terrace sites (184 ± 10 kJ mol(-1)) is larger than the adsorption energy obtained by temperature programmed desorption (∼120-140 kJ mol(-1)) and heat of adsorption taken from microcalorimetry measurements at low coverage (∼125 kJ mol(-1)). However, the calculated adsorption energies become less favorable when carbonate chains intersect on CaO terraces, forming kinks. Furthermore, our assignments of the initial stages of CO2 adsorption are consistent with the observed coverage effect on the CO2 adsorption energy measured by microcalorimetry and the IRAS results.

  6. Protein Adsorption to Titanium and Zirconia Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance Method.

    PubMed

    Kusakawa, You; Yoshida, Eiji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto titanium (Ti) or zirconia (ZrO2) was evaluated using a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). As proteins, fibronectin (Fn), a cell adhesive protein, and albumin (Alb), a cell adhesion-inhibiting protein, were evaluated. The Ti and ZrO2 sensors for QCM were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electron probe microanalysis observation, measurement of contact angle against water, and surface roughness. The amounts of Fn and Alb adsorbed onto the Ti and ZrO2 sensors and apparent reaction rate were obtained using QCM measurements. Ti sensor showed greater adsorption of Fn and Alb than the ZrO2 sensor. In addition, amount of Fn adsorbed onto the Ti or ZrO2 sensors was higher than that of Alb. The surface roughness and hydrophilicity of Ti or ZrO2 may influence the adsorption of Fn or Alb. With regard to the adsorption rate, Alb adsorbed more rapidly than Fn onto Ti. Comparing Ti and ZrO2, Alb adsorption rate to Ti was faster than that to ZrO2. Fn adsorption will be effective for cell activities, but Alb adsorption will not. QCM method could simulate in vivo Fn and Alb adsorption to Ti or ZrO2.

  7. From aggregative adsorption to surface depletion: Aqueous systems of CnEm amphiphiles at hydrophilic surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Rother, Gernot; Müter, Dirk; Bock, Henry; ...

    2017-03-27

    Adsorption of a short-chain nonionic amphiphile (C6E3) at the surface of mesoporous silica glass (CPG-10) was studied by a combination of adsorption measurements and mesoscale simulations. Adsorption measurements covering a wide composition range of the C6E3 + water system show that no adsorption occurs up to the critical micelle concentration (cmc), at which a sharp increase of adsorption is observed that is attributed to ad-micelle formation at the pore walls. Intriguingly, as the concentration is increased further, the surface excess of the amphiphile begins to decrease and eventually becomes negative, which corresponds to preferential adsorption of water rather than amphiphilemore » at high amphiphile concentrations. The existence of such a surface-azeotropic point has not previously been reported in the surfactant adsorption field. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations were performed to reveal the structural origin of this transition from aggregative adsorption to surface depletion. Finally, the simulations indicate that this transition can be attributed to the repulsive interaction between head groups, causing amphiphilic depletion in the region around the corona of the surface micelles.« less

  8. Protein Adsorption to Titanium and Zirconia Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance Method

    PubMed Central

    Kusakawa, You

    2017-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto titanium (Ti) or zirconia (ZrO2) was evaluated using a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). As proteins, fibronectin (Fn), a cell adhesive protein, and albumin (Alb), a cell adhesion-inhibiting protein, were evaluated. The Ti and ZrO2 sensors for QCM were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electron probe microanalysis observation, measurement of contact angle against water, and surface roughness. The amounts of Fn and Alb adsorbed onto the Ti and ZrO2 sensors and apparent reaction rate were obtained using QCM measurements. Ti sensor showed greater adsorption of Fn and Alb than the ZrO2 sensor. In addition, amount of Fn adsorbed onto the Ti or ZrO2 sensors was higher than that of Alb. The surface roughness and hydrophilicity of Ti or ZrO2 may influence the adsorption of Fn or Alb. With regard to the adsorption rate, Alb adsorbed more rapidly than Fn onto Ti. Comparing Ti and ZrO2, Alb adsorption rate to Ti was faster than that to ZrO2. Fn adsorption will be effective for cell activities, but Alb adsorption will not. QCM method could simulate in vivo Fn and Alb adsorption to Ti or ZrO2. PMID:28246591

  9. A Thermodynamic Study of Heavy Metal Adsorption at the Biofilm/Mineral Interface: Comparison Between Thermodynamic Model Results and In-situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelabert, A.; Ha, J.; Wang, Y.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Cordova-Ardy, C.; Gescher, J.; Bargar, J. R.; Rogers, J.; Eng, P. J.; Ghose, S. K.; Farges, F.; Spormann, A. M.; Brown, G. E.

    2007-12-01

    Fe- and Al-(oxyhydr)oxides are among the most reactive mineral surfaces in water-rock systems. Bacteria are effective adsorbents of metal ions and can form colonies on the surfaces of minerals. The resulting biofilm coatings may create local microenvironments that could change significantly trace metal ion sorption compared to biofilm-free mineral surfaces. In this study, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy were used to identify the different types of metal binding sites in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 (wild type) as well as the nature of the functional groups involved in metal complexation. Adsorption affinities of these sites for Pb(II) and Zn(II) as well as site densities were determined by fitting metal adsorption data as a function of pH and ionic strength using a constant capacitance model in the FITEQL computer code. Electrokinetic techniques were used to determine the biofilm influence on the overall mineral surface charge. This influence was quantified by determining the in-situ partitioning of Pb(II) between S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished and oriented single crystal surfaces of α-alumina (1-102) and hematite (0001) using the long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescent yield (XSW-FY) method. ATR-FTIR spectra of S. oneidensis strain MR-1 revealed the presence of carboxyl, amide, and phosphate groups, as well as carbohydrate moieties. Electrophoretic mobility measurements of S. oneidensis MR-1 cell surfaces indicate that the bacterial surfaces become negatively charged at pH ~ 3.5, suggesting a high Pb(II) and Zn(II) adsorption capacity of the biofilm. Changes in ionic strengths from 1M to 0.01M NaNO3 had no effect on the interactions of the metal ions with the bacteria, suggesting that the physical structure of the cell wall does not change over this range of electrolyte concentrations. The thermodynamic stability of metal complexes on S. oneidensis and the binding sites concentrations for these metal complexes have been determined by FITEQL

  10. Multilayer adsorption on fractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Péter; Felinger, Attila

    2014-01-10

    Multilayer adsorption is often observed in liquid chromatography. The most frequently employed model for multilayer adsorption is the BET isotherm equation. In this study we introduce an interpretation of multilayer adsorption measured on liquid chromatographic stationary phases based on the fractal theory. The fractal BET isotherm model was successfully used to determine the apparent fractal dimension of the adsorbent surface. The nonlinear fitting of the fractal BET equation gives us the estimation of the adsorption equilibrium constants and the monolayer saturation capacity of the adsorbent as well. In our experiments, aniline and proline were used as test molecules on reversed phase and normal phase columns, respectively. Our results suggest an apparent fractal dimension 2.88-2.99 in the case of reversed phase adsorbents, in the contrast with a bare silica column with a fractal dimension of 2.54.

  11. A novel enzyme immunoassay based on potentiometric measurement of molecular adsorption events by an extended-gate field-effect transistor sensor.

    PubMed

    Kamahori, Masao; Ishige, Yu; Shimoda, Maki

    2007-06-15

    We developed a novel enzyme immunoassay based on a potentiometric measurement of molecular adsorption events by using an extended-gate field-effect transistor (FET) sensor. The adsorbing rate of a thiol compound on a gold surface was found to depend on the concentration of the compound. To construct an electrochemical enzyme immunoassay system by using the sensor, the enzyme chemistry of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to generate a thiol compound was used and combined with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). After the AChE-catalyzed reaction, the amount of the antigen was obtained by detecting the adsorbing rate of the generated thiol compound on the gold electrode using the FET sensor. The measurement stability was also found to improve when a high frequency voltage of 10 kHz or more was superimposed to the reference electrode. The signal corresponding to a range between 1 and 250 pg/mL of Interleukin 1 beta was obtained by the FET sensor when a voltage of 1 MHz was superimposed onto the reference electrode. The FET sensor based ELISA used in this measurement technique can successfully detect Interleukin 1 beta at concentrations as low as 1 pg/mL.

  12. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC.

  13. Radiotracer study of the adsorption of organic compounds on gold. adsorption of chloroacetic and phenylacetic acid, and the effects of cadmium, copper, and silver adatoms on it

    SciTech Connect

    Horani, G.; Andreev, V.N.; Vazarinov, V.E.

    1986-04-01

    This paper studies the adsorption of monochloroacetic and phenylacetic acid (MA and PA, respectively) by the radiotracer technique on gold-plated gold electrodes in acidic solutions. The authors also study the effect of cadmium, copper, and silver adatoms on these processes. The adsorption of MA was measured as a function of potential of the electrode. Data from these measurements are presented. Data show that cadmium, copper, and silver ions present in the solution have no effect on the adsorption of PA at potentials where they are not adsorbed on the gold surface. It is confirmed that the radiotracer technique will be as effective in adsorption studies on the gold-plated gold electrode as it was in the case of the platinized platinum electrode.

  14. Adsorption of Organic Molecules to van der Waals Materials: Comparison of Fluorographene and Fluorographite with Graphene and Graphite

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Understanding strength and nature of noncovalent binding to surfaces imposes significant challenge both for computations and experiments. We explored the adsorption of five small nonpolar organic molecules (acetone, acetonitrile, dichloromethane, ethanol, ethyl acetate) to fluorographene and fluorographite using inverse gas chromatography and theoretical calculations, providing new insights into the strength and nature of adsorption of small organic molecules on these surfaces. The measured adsorption enthalpies on fluorographite range from −7 to −13 kcal/mol and are by 1–2 kcal/mol lower than those measured on graphene/graphite, which indicates higher affinity of organic adsorbates to fluorographene than to graphene. The dispersion-corrected functionals performed well, and the nonlocal vdW DFT functionals (particularly optB86b-vdW) achieved the best agreement with the experimental data. Computations show that the adsorption enthalpies are controlled by the interaction energy, which is dominated by London dispersion forces (∼70%). The calculations also show that bonding to structural features, like edges and steps, as well as defects does not significantly increase the adsorption enthalpies, which explains a low sensitivity of measured adsorption enthalpies to coverage. The adopted Langmuir model for fitting experimental data enabled determination of adsorption entropies. The adsorption on the fluorographene/fluorographite surface resulted in an entropy loss equal to approximately 40% of the gas phase entropy. PMID:28145699

  15. Adsorption and desorption studies of lysozyme by Fe3O4-polymer nanocomposite via fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koc, Kenan; Alveroglu, Esra

    2015-06-01

    The work have been undertaken in this study is to synthesis and characterize Fe3O4-polymer nanocomposites which are having different morphological properties. Also, investigation of the adsorption and desorption behaviour of lysozyme onto Fe3O4-polymer nanocomposites have been studied. Fe3O4 nanoparticles, synthesized by in situ in polyacrylamide hydrogels, show super-paramagnetic behaviour and saturation magnetization of composite material have been tuned by changing the hydrogel conformation. Adsorption and desorption studies of lysozyme were followed by using pure water at room temperature via fluorescence measurements. Fluorescence measurements showed that, the composite materials adsorbed lysozyme molecules less than 20 s and higher monomer concentration of composite materials cause faster adsorption. Besides, structure of lysozyme molecules were not changed during the adsorption and desorption. As a result Fe3O4-polymer nanocomposites could be used for drug delivery, protein separation and PAAm gels could be used for synthesis of magnetic composites with varying magnetic properties.

  16. A comparative study and evaluation of sulfamethoxazole adsorption onto organo-montmorillonites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Laifu; Gao, Manglai; Gu, Zheng; Yang, Senfeng; Liu, Yuening

    2014-12-01

    Three organo-montmorillonites were prepared using surfactants, and their adsorption behaviors toward sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were investigated. The surfactants used were cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTMAB), 3-(N,N-dimethylhexadecylammonio) propane sulfonate (HDAPS) and 1,3-bis(hexadecyldimethylammonio)-propane dibromide (BHDAP). The properties of the organo-montmorillonites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements. Results showed that the interlayer spacing of montmorillonite was increased and the surface area as well as the morphology were changed. Batch adsorption experiments showed that the surfactant loading amount had a great effect on the adsorption of SMX. The adsorption process was pH dependent and the maximum adsorption capacity was obtained at pH3 for HDAPS-Mt, while CTMAB-Mt and BHDAP-Mt showed a high removal efficiency at 3-11. The adsorption capacity increased with the initial SMX concentration and contact time but decreased with increasing solution ionic strength. Kinetic data were best described by the pseudo second-order model. Equilibrium data were best represented by the Langmuir model, and the Freundlich constant (n) indicated a favorable adsorption process. The maximum adsorption capacity of SMX was 235.29 mg/g for CTMAB-Mt, 155.28 mg/g for HDAPS-Mt and 242.72 mg/g for BHDAP-Mt. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated to evaluate the spontaneity and endothermic or exothermic nature. The adsorption mechanism was found to be dominated by electrostatic interaction, while hydrophobic interaction played a secondary role.

  17. An improved single crystal adsorption calorimeter for determining gas adsorption and reaction energies on complex model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer-Wolfarth, Jan-Henrik; Hartmann, Jens; Farmer, Jason A.; Flores-Camacho, J. Manuel; Campbell, Charles T.; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2011-02-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum microcalorimeter for measuring heats of adsorption and adsorption-induced surface reactions on complex single crystal-based model surfaces is described. It has been specifically designed to study the interaction of gaseous molecules with well-defined model catalysts consisting of metal nanoparticles supported on single crystal surfaces or epitaxial thin oxide films grown on single crystals. The detection principle is based on the previously described measurement of the temperature rise upon adsorption of gaseous molecules by use of a pyroelectric polymer ribbon, which is brought into mechanical/thermal contact with the back side of the thin single crystal. The instrument includes (i) a preparation chamber providing the required equipment to prepare supported model catalysts involving well-defined nanoparticles on clean single crystal surfaces and to characterize them using surface analysis techniques and in situ reflectivity measurements and (ii) the adsorption/reaction chamber containing a molecular beam, a pyroelectric heat detector, and calibration tools for determining the absolute reactant fluxes and adsorption heats. The molecular beam is produced by a differentially pumped source based on a multichannel array capable of providing variable fluxes of both high and low vapor pressure gaseous molecules in the range of 0.005-1.5 × 1015 molecules cm-2 s-1 and is modulated by means of the computer-controlled chopper with the shortest pulse length of 150 ms. The calorimetric measurements of adsorption and reaction heats can be performed in a broad temperature range from 100 to 300 K. A novel vibrational isolation method for the pyroelectric detector is introduced for the reduction of acoustic noise. The detector shows a pulse-to-pulse standard deviation ≤15 nJ when heat pulses in the range of 190-3600 nJ are applied to the sample surface with a chopped laser. Particularly for CO adsorption on Pt(111), the energy input of 15 nJ (or 120 nJ cm

  18. Visualization of Adsorption: Luminescent Mesoporous Silica-Carbon Dots Composite for Rapid and Selective Removal of U(VI) and in Situ Monitoring the Adsorption Behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Xu, Chao; Lu, Yuexiang; Wu, Fengcheng; Ye, Gang; Wei, Guoyu; Sun, Taoxiang; Chen, Jing

    2017-03-01

    The removal and separation of uranium from aqueous solutions are quite important for resource reclamation and environmental protection. Being one of the most effective techniques for metal separation, adsorption of uranium by a variety of adsorbent materials has been a subject of study with high interest in recent years. However, current methods for monitoring the adsorption process require complicated procedures and tedious measurements, which hinders the development of processes for efficient separation of uranium. In this work, we prepared a type of luminescent mesoporous silica-carbon dots composite material that has high efficiency for the adsorption of uranium and allows simultaneous in situ monitoring of the adsorption process. Carbon dots (CDs) were prepared in situ and introduced onto amino-functionalized ordered mesoporous silica (SBA-NH2) by a facile microplasma-assisted method. The prepared CDs/SBA-NH2 nanocomposites preserved the high specific surface area of the mesoporous silica, as well as the fluorescent properties of the CDs. Compared with bare SBA-NH2, the CDs/SBA-NH2 nanocomposites showed much improved adsorption ability and excellent selectivity for uranyl ions. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity of the composites decreased along with the increase of uranium uptake, indicating that the CDs/SBA-NH2 nanocomposites could be used for on-site monitoring of the adsorption behavior. More interestingly, the adsorption selectivity of the composites for metal ions was in good agreement with the selective fluorescence response of the original CDs, which means that the adsorption selectivity of CDs-based composite materials can be predicted by evaluating the fluorescence selectivity of the CDs for metal ions. As the first study of CDs-based nanocomposites for the adsorption of actinide elements, this work opens a new avenue for the in situ monitoring of adsorption behavior of CDs-based nanocomposites while extending their application areas.

  19. High-capacity hydrogen and nitric oxide adsorption and storage in a metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo; Wheatley, Paul S; Zhao, Xuebo; Fletcher, Ashleigh J; Fox, Sarah; Rossi, Adriano G; Megson, Ian L; Bordiga, S; Regli, L; Thomas, K Mark; Morris, Russell E

    2007-02-07

    Gas adsorption experiments have been carried out on a copper benzene tricarboxylate metal-organic framework material, HKUST-1. Hydrogen adsorption at 1 and 10 bar (both 77 K) gives an adsorption capacity of 11.16 mmol H2 per g of HKUST-1 (22.7 mg g(-)1, 2.27 wt %) at 1 bar and 18 mmol per g (36.28 mg g(-)1, 3.6 wt %) at 10 bar. Adsorption of D2 at 1 bar (77 K) is between 1.09 (at 1 bar) and 1.20(at <100 mbar) times the H2 values depending on the pressure, agreeing with the theoretical expectations. Gravimetric adsorption measurements of NO on HKUST-1 at 196 K (1 bar) gives a large adsorption capacity of approximately 9 mmol g(-1), which is significantly greater than any other adsorption capacity reported on a porous solid. At 298 K the adsorption capacity at 1 bar is just over 3 mmol g(-1). Infra red experiments show that the NO binds to the empty copper metal sites in HKUST-1. Chemiluminescence and platelet aggregometry experiments indicate that the amount of NO recovered on exposure of the resulting complex to water is enough to be biologically active, completely inhibiting platelet aggregation in platelet rich plasma.

  20. Dithiocarbamate-modified starch derivatives with high heavy metal adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Bo; Fan, Wen; Yi, Xiaowei; Wang, Zuohua; Gao, Feng; Li, Yijiu; Gu, Hongbo

    2016-01-20

    In this work, three types of dithiocarbamate (DTC)-modified starch derivatives including DTC starch (DTCS), DTC enzymolysis starch (DTCES) and DTC mesoporous starch (DTCMS) were developed, which showed the significant heavy metal adsorption performance. The adsorption ability of these three DTC modified starch derivatives followed the sequences: DTCMS>DTCES>DTCS. In single metal aqueous solutions, the uptake amount of heavy metal ions onto the modified starches obeyed the orders: Cu(II)>Ni(II)>Cr(VI)>Zn(II)>Pb(II). The adsorption mechanism was proved by the chelating between DTC groups and heavy metal ions through the pH effect measurements. A monolayer adsorption of Langmuir isotherm model for the adsorption of Cu(II) onto DTCMS was well fitted rather than the multilayer adsorption of Freundlich isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics of Cu(II) onto starch derivatives was found to be fit well with the pseudo-second-order model. Additionally, in the presence of EDTA, the adsorption ability and uptake amount of heavy metal ions onto these three DTC modified starch derivatives is identical with the results obtained in the absence of EDTA.

  1. Oxygen adsorption on the Al₉Co₂(001) surface: first-principles and STM study.

    PubMed

    Villaseca, S Alarcón; Loli, L N Serkovic; Ledieu, J; Fournée, V; Gille, P; Dubois, J-M; Gaudry, E

    2013-09-04

    Atomic oxygen adsorption on a pure aluminum terminated Al9Co2(001) surface is studied by first-principle calculations coupled with STM measurements. Relative adsorption energies of oxygen atoms have been calculated on different surface sites along with the associated STM images. The local electronic structure of the most favourable adsorption site is described. The preferential adsorption site is identified as a 'bridge' type site between the cluster entities exposed at the (001) surface termination. The Al-O bonding between the adsorbate and the substrate presents a covalent character, with s-p hybridization occurring between the states of the adsorbed oxygen atom and the aluminum atoms of the surface. The simulated STM image of the preferential adsorption site is in agreement with experimental observations. This work shows that oxygen adsorption generates important atomic relaxations of the topmost surface layer and that sub-surface cobalt atoms strongly influence the values of the adsorption energies. The calculated Al-O distances are in agreement with those reported in Al2O and Al2O3 oxides and for oxygen adsorption on Al(111).

  2. Study of char gasification in a reaction/adsorption apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.; Crowley, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    The reaction of an activated carbon (coconut char) with CO/sub 2/ was studied in a reaction/adsorption apparatus which allows successive reactivity and physical adsorption measurements to be made on the same solid sample. Reaction and surface area evolution data were obtained in the temperature range from 800 to 900/sup 0/C. All reaction rate trajectories obtained in this study showed a maximum in the reaction rate, 2-3 times higher than the initial rate, at about 85% conversion. There was no correlation between these results and the evolution of the internal surface area although the reaction appeared to take place initially in the kinetically controlled regime.

  3. The adsorption of caesium—137 on bentonites from the Carpathian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, N. M.; Kónya, J.; Földvári, M.; Kovács-Pálffy, P.

    2003-01-01

    The adsorption of cesium was studied on the surface of bentonite rocks from the Carpathian basin. The adsorbed quantity at carrier-free concentration was measured using 137Cs, the adsorption capacity of bentonites for cesium ions was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The relation of the cesium adsorption and mineral composition as well as the structural modifications of crystal structure was studied by X-ray diffraction spectrometry and thermoanalysis. The results show that the adsorbed quantity of cesium primarily depends on the montmorillonite content of bentonites.

  4. EXCESS FIBRINOGEN ADSORPTION TO MONOLAYERS OF MIXED LIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, V.; Britt, D.W.; Hlady, V.

    2010-01-01

    Adsorption of fibrinogen to the monolayers of mixed lipids, dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) and eicosylamine (EA) was measured at a surface pressure of 20 mN/m by an in situ surface plasmon resonance technique. Pressure-area isotherms of DPPC+EA mixtures on water and buffer subphases indicated good lipid miscibility and some contraction of the monolayers at intermediate and higher surface pressures. Surface electric potential of the DPPC+EA monolayers showed excess values for intermediate DPPC:EA ratios. Fibrinogen adsorption and its adsorption rates from a dilute solution (0.03 mg/ml) were proportional to the fraction of EA in the monolayer indicating that protein binding was primarily driven by electrostatic interactions between positive EA charges in the monolayer and a net negative protein charge. At a higher protein concentration (0.06 mg/ml) both the fibrinogen adsorbed amount and its maximum adsorption rate showed excess values relative to the pure EA for 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1 DPPC+EA monolayers. This excess adsorption could be explained, in part, by the contraction of the monolayers with intermediate DPPC:EA ratios which resulted in an excess surface electric potential. PMID:20829000

  5. Adsorption of H2, Ne, and N2 on Activated Charcoal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. K.; Tward, E.; Boudaie, K. I.

    1986-01-01

    9-page report presents measured adsorption isotherms of hydrogen, neon, and nitrogen on activated charcoal for temperatures from 77 to 400 K and pressures from 1 to 80 atmospheres (0.1 to 8.1 MPa). Heats of adsorption calculated from isotherms also presented. Report gives expressions, based on ideal-gas law, which show relationship between different definitions of volume of gas adsorbed and used in describing low-pressure isotherms.

  6. Studies on adsorption characteristics and mechanism of adsorption of chlorhexidine mainly by carbon black.

    PubMed

    Akaho, E; Fukumori, Y

    2001-09-01

    The extent of adsorption of chlorhexidine to carbon black and sanitary cotton was determined by measuring the amounts of chlorhexidine adsorbed to carbon black or sanitary cotton from the chlorhexidine solution containing specific amount of carbon black or sanitary cotton. As another comparative antiseptic example of adsorption phenomena, adsorption of acrinol to sanitary cotton was also studied. The specific surface area of carbon black was measured by the BET method of adsorption isotherm. The pattern of adsorption of chlorhexidine to carbon black was temperature-dependent Langmuir isotherms, and the amounts adsorbed increased as the temperature was raised. Since chlorhexidine, whose pKa's are 2.2 and 10.3, is considered to exist in aqueous solution as the di-cation, an ion-ion interaction should be formed between protonated biguanide and anionic portions of carbon black or sanitary cotton. The chlorophenyl and hexane moieties interact with hydrophobic portions of carbon black or sanitary cotton. The perturbation experiment conducted on this interaction system showed that the nature of interaction was irreversible. The enthalpy change calculated from Langmuir constants was small, indicating the existence of ion-ion interaction. The entropy values, 27.4 to 28.2 e.u. obtained in this system, suggested that the hydration shells of the ions were rather tightly bound. The area occupied by a chlorhexidine molecule, 548 (A)(2), was twice greater than the projection area, 276 (A)(2), suggesting that chlorhexidine was adsorbed in such a way that each molecule is sufficiently well spaced.

  7. Adsorption of goethite onto quartz and kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Weiner, Eugene R.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of colloidal goethite onto quartz and kaolinite substrates has been studied as a function of pH and NaCl concentration. Goethite adsorption was measured quantitatively by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that adsorption onto both substrates is due primarily to coulombic forces; however, the pH dependence of adsorption is very different for the two substrates. This is explained by the fact that the surface charge on quartz is entirely pH-dependent, while kaolinite has surface faces which carry a permanent negative charge. Adsorption of goethite on to kaolinite increases markedly with increasing NaCl concentration, while adsorption onto quartz is relatively independent of NaCl concentration. This can be explained by the influence of NaCl concentration upon the development of surface charge on the substrates. A method is described for separating surface-bound goethite from free goethite.

  8. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  9. Electrokinetic investigation of surfactant adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bellmann, C; Synytska, A; Caspari, A; Drechsler, A; Grundke, K

    2007-05-15

    Fuerstenau [D.W. Fuerstenau, in: M.L. Hair (Ed.), Dekker, New York, 1971, p. 143] has already discussed the role of hydrocarbon chain of surfactants, the effect of alkyl chain length, chain structure and the pH of the solution on the adsorption process of surfactants. Later Kosmulski [M. Kosmulski, Chemical Properties of Material Surfaces, Surfactant Science Series, vol. 102, Dekker, New York, Basel, 2001] included the effect of surfactant concentration, equilibration time, temperature and electrolyte in his approaches. Certainly, the character of the head groups of the surfactant and the properties of the adsorbent surface are the basis for the adsorption process. Different surfactants and adsorbents cause different adsorption mechanisms described firstly by Rosen [M.J. Rosen, Surfactants and Interfacial Phenomena, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1989]. These adsorption mechanisms and their influencing factors were studied by electrokinetic investigations. Here only changes of the charges at the surfaces could be detected. To control the results of electrokinetic investigations they were compared with results from ellipsometric measurements. In the case of surfactant adsorption the chain length was vitally important. It could be shown by the adsorption of alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromides onto polymer films spin coated at wafer surfaces. The influence of the chain length depending on surface properties of the polymer film was studied. Streaming potential measurements were applied for these investigations. The obtained results enabled us to calculate the molar cohesive free energy per mol of CH2-group in the alkaline chain of the surfactant if all other specific adsorption effects were neglected.

  10. Heat transfer to the adsorbent in solar adsorption cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, Peter; Patsch, Marek; Papucik, Stefan; Vantuch, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with design and construction of solar adsorption cooling device and with heat transfer problem in adsorber. The most important part of adsorption cooling system is adsorber/desorber containing adsorbent. Zeolith (adsorbent) type was chosen for its high adsorption capacity, like a coolant was used water. In adsorber/desorber occur, at heating of adsorbent, to heat transfer from heat change medium to the adsorbent. The time required for heating of adsorber filling is very important, because on it depend flexibility of cooling system. Zeolith has a large thermal resistance, therefore it had to be adapted the design and construction of adsorber. As the best shows the tube type of adsorber with double coat construction. By this construction is ensured thin layer of adsorbent and heating is quick in all volume of adsorbent. The process of heat transfer was experimentally measured, but for comparison simulated in ANSYS, too.

  11. Adsorption of acid dye onto organobentonite.

    PubMed

    Baskaralingam, P; Pulikesi, M; Elango, D; Ramamurthi, V; Sivanesan, S

    2006-02-06

    Removal of Acid Red 151 from aqueous solution at different dye concentrations, adsorbent doses and pH has been studied. The bentonite clay has been modified using cationic surfactants, which has been confirmed using XRD and FT-IR analyses. Experimental result has shown that the acidic pH favours the adsorption. The adsorption isotherms are described by means of Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption capacity has been found to be 357.14 and 416.66 mg g(-1) for the cetyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride-bentonite (CDBA-bent) and cetylpyridinium chloride-bentonite (CP-bent), respectively. Kinetic studies show that the adsorption followed second-order kinetics.

  12. Adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic solution onto porous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, A.; Ramlan, N. A.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Chu, C. M.; Farm, Y. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Adsorption isotherm is essential component in the understanding of the adsorption process. Several methods of the measurements, analysis and interpretation of adsorption from solution have been reported in the literature. Most of the measurements of adsorption isotherm from solution were involved the measurement of excess isotherm conducted at low region of sorbates concentration. Direct interpretation of excess adsorption isotherm as adsorption isotherm is always been practice. Therefore, in this work a study on the measurement of the adsorption isotherm from solution of non-azeotropic organic solvent mixture onto porous adsorbents for whole range of liquid concentration was conducted. The study included the measurement of excess adsorption isotherm using conventional technique. Theoretical analysis and interpretation of adsorption isotherm from the excess isotherm were conducted using Pseudo Ideal Adsorption, Gibbs Dividing Plane Model and Langmuir-Fruendlich binary isotherm model. For organic solvents, acetone and propanol were chosen as the adsorbates due to the non-azeotropic properties in the mixture. Activated carbon and silicalite were chosen as adsorbents due to the different in their porosity such as macro porous and micro porous structure. The result of the study has revealed that the adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic mixture onto activated carbon and silicalite can be interpreted as monolayer type of adsorption.

  13. Hydrogen Adsorption on Activated Carbon an Carbon Nanotubes Using Volumetric Differential Pressure Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanip, S. M.; Saidin, M. A. R.; Aziz, M.; Ismail, A. F.

    2010-03-01

    A simple hydrogen adsorption measurement system utilizing the volumetri differential pressure technique has been designed, fabricated and calibrated. Hydroge adsorption measurements have been carried out at temperatures 298 K and 77 K on activate carbon and carbon nanotubes with different surface areas. The adsorption data obtained will b helpful in understanding the adsorption property of the studied carbon materials using th fundamentals of adsorption theory. The principle of the system follows the Sievert-type metho The system measures a change in pressure between the reference cell, R1 and the sample cell S1, S2, S3 over a certain temperature range. R1, S1, S2, and S3 having known fixed volume The sample temperatures will be monitored by thermocouple TC while the pressures in R1 an S1, S2, S3 will be measured using a digital pressure transducer. The maximum operatin pressure of the pressure transducer is 20 bar and calibrated with an accuracy of ±0.01 bar. Hig purity hydrogen is being used in the system and the amount of samples for the study is betwee 1.0-2.0 grams. The system was calibrated using helium gas without any samples in S1, S2 an S3. This will provide a correction factor during the adsorption process providing an adsorption free reference point when using hydrogen gas resulting in a more accurate reading of th adsorption process by eliminating the errors caused by temperature expansion effects and oth non-adsorption related phenomena. The ideal gas equation of state is applied to calculate th hydrogen adsorption capacity based on the differential pressure measurements. Activated carbo with a surface area of 644.87 m2/g showed a larger amount of adsorption as compared to multiwalled nanotubes (commercial) with a surface area of 119.68 m2/g. This study als indicated that there is a direct correlation between the amounts of hydrogen adsorbed an surface area of the carbon materials under the conditions studied and that the adsorption significant at 77

  14. Modeling the adsorption of mixed gases based on pure gas adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, N.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption-based Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers usually operate with pure gases. A sorption-based compressor has many benefits; however, it is limited by the pressure ratios it can provide. Using a mixed-refrigerant (MR) instead of a pure refrigerant in JT cryocoolers allows working at much lower pressure ratios. Therefore, it is attractive using MRs in sorption- based cryocoolers in order to reduce one of its main limitations. The adsorption of mixed gases is usually investigated under steady-state conditions, mainly for storage and separation processes. However, the process in a sorption compressor goes through various temperatures, pressures and adsorption concentrations; therefore, it differs from the common mixed gases adsorption applications. In order to simulate the sorption process in a compressor a numerical analysis for mixed gases is developed, based on pure gas adsorption characteristics. The pure gas adsorption properties have been measured for four gases (nitrogen, methane, ethane, and propane) with Norit-RB2 activated carbon. A single adsorption model is desired to describe the adsorption of all four gases. This model is further developed to a mixed-gas adsorption model. In future work more adsorbents will be tested using these four gases and the adsorption model will be verified against experimental results of mixed-gas adsorption measurements.

  15. Adsorption of phenolic compound by aged-refuse.

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Chai; Youcai, Zhao

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol by aged-refuse has been studied. Adsorption isotherms have been determined for phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol and the data fits well to the Freundlich equation. The chlorinated phenols are absorbed more strongly than the phenol and the adsorption capacity has an oblivious relationship with the numbers and the position of chlorine subsistent. The experiment data suggests that both the partition function and the chemical adsorption involve in the adsorption process. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model were applied to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption and the results show that it fit the pseudo-second-order model. More than one step involves in the adsorption process and the overall rate of the adsorption process appears to be controlled by the chemical reaction. The thermodynamic analysis indicates that the adsorption is spontaneous and endothermic.

  16. Interplay of vapor adsorption and liquid imbibition in nanoporous Vycor glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiepsch, Sebastian; Pelster, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the kinetics of spontaneous capillary rise and of the concurrent vapor adsorption in nanoporous, monolithic samples of Vycor glass with a mean pore diameter of 7.5 nm. As liquids, we have chosen n -alcohols (n =4 -10 ) whose vapor pressures at room temperature range from p0=965 Pa down to p0=0.743 Pa. Dielectric measurements allow us to achieve spatial selectivity to predefined parts of the porous Vycor glass. In this way, we are able to measure the overall uptake of molecules as well as vapor adsorption from the surroundings in unfilled parts of the pore network, i.e., above the liquid menisci of the rising imbibition front. We show that the latter process is unaltered compared to free adsorption in samples suspended above a liquid reservoir. Only at low vapor pressures, i.e., for long alcohols, vapor adsorption can be neglected and the capillary rise follows the theoretical predictions of the Lucas-Washburn √{t } law. The more volatile the alcohol, the more important the additional adsorption of molecules becomes. We show that the overall filling process in the pore network is well described by a superposition of the Lucas-Washburn law and the measured vapor adsorption. In addition, the experiments give insight into the vapor diffusion dynamics in the porous matrix.

  17. Surface chemistry of ferrihydrite: Part 2. Kinetics of arsenate adsorption and coprecipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Dadis, J.A.; Waychunas, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of As(V) adsorption by ferrihydrite was investigated in coprecipitation and postsynthesis adsorption experiments conducted in the pH range 7.5-9.0. In coprecipitation experiments, As(V) was present in solution during the hydrolysis and precipitation of iron. In adsorption experiments, a period of rapid (<5 min) As(V) uptake from solution was followed by continued uptake for at least eight days, as As(V) diffused to adsorption sites on ferrihydrite surfaces within aggregates of colloidal particles. The time dependence of As(V) adsorption is well described by a general model for diffusion into a sphere if a subset of surface sites located near the exterior of aggregates is assumed to attain adsorptive equilibrium rapidly. The kinetics of As(V) desorption after an increase in pH were also consistent with diffusion as a rate-limiting process. Aging of pure ferrihydrite prior to As(V) adsorption caused a decrease in adsorption sites on the precipitate owing to crystallite growth. In coprecipitation experiments, the initial As(V) uptake was significantly greater than in post-synthesis adsorption experiments, and the rate of uptake was not diffusion limited because As(V) was coordinated by surface sites before crystallite growth and coagulation processes could proceed. After the initial adsorption, As(V) was slowly released from coprecipitates for at least one month, as crystallite growth caused desorption of As(V). Adsorption densities as high as 0.7 mole As(V) per mole of Fe were measured in coprecipitates, in comparison to 0.25 mole As(V) per mole of Fe in post-synthesis adsorption experiments. Despite the high Concentration of As(V) in the precipitates, EXAFS spectroscopy (Waychunas et al., 1993) showed that neither ferric arsenate nor any other As-bearing surface precipitate or solid solution was formed. The high adsorption densities are possible because the ferrihydrite particles are extremely small, approaching the size of small dioctahedral chains at

  18. Modeling competitive adsorption of mixtures of volatile organic compounds in a fixed-bed of beaded activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Tefera, Dereje Tamiru; Hashisho, Zaher; Philips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2014-05-06

    A two-dimensional mathematical model was developed to study competitive adsorption of n-component mixtures in a fixed-bed adsorber. The model consists of an isotherm equation to predict adsorption equilibria of n-component volatile organic compounds (VOCs) mixture from single component isotherm data, and a dynamic adsorption model, the macroscopic mass, energy and momentum conservation equations, to simulate the competitive adsorption of the n-components onto a fixed-bed of adsorbent. The model was validated with experimentally measured data of competitive adsorption of binary and eight-component VOCs mixtures onto beaded activated carbon (BAC). The mean relative absolute error (MRAE) was used to compare the modeled and measured breakthrough profiles as well as the amounts of adsorbates adsorbed. For the binary and eight-component mixtures, the MRAE of the breakthrough profiles was 13 and 12%, respectively, whereas, the MRAE of the adsorbed amounts was 1 and 2%, respectively. These data show that the model provides accurate prediction of competitive adsorption of multicomponent VOCs mixtures and the competitive adsorption isotherm equation is able to accurately predict equilibrium adsorption of VOCs mixtures.

  19. The effect of pre-adsorption of OVA or WPC on subsequent OVA or WPC fouling on heated stainless steel surface.

    PubMed

    Lv, Huiting; Huang, Song; Mercadé-Prieto, Ruben; Wu, Xue E; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2015-05-01

    Fouling on the heat exchanger surface during food processing has been researched extensively due to its great importance in energy efficiency, product quality and food safety. The nature of heat exchanger surface has an effect on the initial deposition behavior and deposit removal behavior to some degree. Protein adsorption on surface is considered to be the initial stage in fouling. In the current study, protein 'pre-adsorption' at room temperature on stainless steel has been investigated as a means to influence the behavior of protein fouling at pasteurization temperatures. Pre-adsorption was carried out with whey protein concentrate (WPC) and ovalbumin (OVA), respectively, which reduced the fouling of OVA (∼20-30% energy saving in the processing time examined). However, the pre-adsorption had little effect on fouling of whey protein concentrate. Contact angles were measured to show the surface change due to protein pre-adsorption. Protein pre-adsorption made the surfaces more hydrophilic.

  20. Adsorptive potential of cationic Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) dye onto natural untreated clay (NUC) from aqueous phase: Mass transfer analysis, kinetic and equilibrium profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, A.; Malkoc, E.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, natural untreated clay (NUC) was studied for the removal of Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) from aqueous solution in batch system. The effects of initial BY2 concentration, contact time, solution temperature and solution pH on BY2 adsorption were investigated. Nitrogen sorption measurements were employed to investigate the variation in surface and pore properties after dye adsorption. The adsorbent was characterized by means of FTIR, PSD, TEM, XRD and BET analysis. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Scatchard isotherm models. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 833.33 mg/g at 25 °C (at room temperature). The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental datas compared with pseudo-first-order kinetic adsorption models. To explain mass transfer mechanism of BY2 adsorption, obtained experimental datas were applied Weber and Morris model, Body and Frusawa and Smith models. The results show that the adsorption process is controlled by film diffusion. The thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were determined. Adsorption of BY2 on NUC is exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The calculated activation energy of adsorption was found to be 5.24 kJ/mol for BY2. This value indicates that the adsorption process is a physisorption.

  1. Partition and water/oil adsorption of some surfactants.

    PubMed

    Tadmouri, Rawad; Zedde, Chantal; Routaboul, Corinne; Micheau, Jean-Claude; Pimienta, Véronique

    2008-10-02

    Adsorption isotherms have been determined at the water/oil interface for five biphasic systems involving surfactants (non-ionic and ionic) present in both phases at partition equilibrium. The systems studied were polyoxyethylene(23)lauryl ether (Brij35) in water/hexane and four ionic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and a series of three tetraalkylammonium dodecylsulfate (TEADS, TPADS, and TBADS) in water/CH 2Cl 2. Interfacial tension measurements performed at the water/air and water/oil interfaces provided all the necessary information for the determination of the adsorption parameters by taking partition into account. These measurements also allowed the comparison of the adsorption properties at both interfaces which showed an increase of the adsorption equilibrium constant and a decrease of the maximum surface concentration at the water/oil interface compared to water/air. The values of the critical aggregation concentration showed, in all cases, that only the surfactant dissolved in the aqueous phase contribute to the decrease of the water/oil interfacial tension. In the case of the four ionic surfactants, the critical aggregation concentration obtained in biphasic conditions were lowered because of the formation of mixed surfactant-CH 2Cl 2 aggregates.

  2. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn

    PubMed Central

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1–3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013–2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration. PMID:24982664

  3. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn.

    PubMed

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1-3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013-2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration.

  4. Adsorption of CO2 from flue gas streams by a highly efficient and stable aminosilica adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shou-Heng; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Chien, Yi-Chi; Hyu, Han-Ren

    2011-02-01

    Three ordered mesoporous silicas (OMSs) with different pore sizes and pore architectures were prepared and modified with amine functional groups by a postgrafting method. The carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption on these amine-modified OMSs was measured by using microbalances at 348 K, and their adsorption capacities were found to be 0.2-1.4 mmol g(-1) under ambient pressure using dry 15% CO2. It was found experimentally that the CO2 adsorption capacity and adsorption rate were attributed to the density of amine groups and pore volume, respectively. A simple method is described for the production of densely anchored amine groups on a solid adsorbent invoking direct incorporation of tetraethylenepentamine onto the as-synthesized OMSs. Unlike conventional amine-modified OMSs, which typically show CO2 adsorption capacity less than 2 mmol g(-1), such organic template occluded amine-OMS composites possessed remarkably high CO2 uptake of approximately 4.6 mmol g(-1) at 348 K and 1 atm for a dry 15% CO2/nitrogen feed mixture. The enhancement of 8% in CO2 adsorption capacity was also observed in the presence of 10.6% water vapor. Durability tests done by cyclic adsorption-desorption revealed that these adsorbents also possess excellent stability.

  5. Relations between structural parameters and adsorption characterization of templated nanoporous materials with cubic symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ravikovitch, P.I.; Neimark, A.V.

    2000-03-21

    A systematic approach is proposed to structural characterization of templated nanoporous materials with cubic symmetry by gas adsorption. The authors hypothesize that regular structures of these materials can be described in terms of triply periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS), similarly to bicontinuous mesophases observed in oil-water, lipid, block copolymer, and other amphiphilic systems. The authors relate topological characteristics of TPMS to the pore structure parameters evaluated from adsorption measurements, such as the specific surface area, pore volume, mean pore size, and also pore wall thickness. The relations obtained can be used for discrimination of possible TPMS morphologies. The method developed is used for characterization of newly synthesized MCM-48 mesoporous materials by low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. They show that adsorption data fully support the minimal gyroid model of MCM-48 structure (Ia3d space group) established earlier by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy studies. The mean pore size of MCM-48 can be accurately described by the hydraulic diameter calculated from the capillary condensation region of nitrogen adsorption isotherms by the nonlocal density functional theory method. Moreover, the adsorption method allows one to estimate the pore wall thickness, which cannot be done by XRD. For a series of high-quality MCM-48 materials reported recently in the literature, the calculated mean wall thickness varied from 0.8 to 1.2 nm. The adsorption method developed is recommended as a complement to X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy techniques for characterization of nanoporous materials.

  6. Adsorption characteristics of Orange II and Chrysophenine on sludge adsorbent and activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Hsiu-Mei, Chiang; Ting-Chien, Chen; San-De, Pan; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-01-30

    Sludge adsorbent (SA) and commercial activated carbon fibers (ACFC and ACFT) were applied to Orange II and Chrysophenine (CH) adsorption (BET surface area: ACFC>ACFT>SA). ACFT was primarily in the micropore range, while SA was approximately 500 A (macropore) and 80 A (mesopore). The ACFC pore volume was high in both the mesopore and micropore regions. Measurement of the oxygen surface functional groups of the adsorbents using Boehm's titration method showed a similar distribution on the carbon fibers (mainly in the carbonyl group), while SA was mainly in the carboxyl, lactone and phenolic groups. The SA, ACFC and ACFT adsorption capacities of Orange II (30-80 mg/l) ranged from 83 to 270, 209-438, and 25-185 mg/g at temperatures ranging from 10 to 60 degrees C, respectively. CH concentration ranged from 30 to 80 mg/l, corresponding to SA and ACFC adsorption capacities of 39-191 and 48-374 mg/g over the defined temperature range, from 10 to 60 degrees C. CH adsorption on ACFT was low. The adsorption capacity of Orange II on ACFT was lower than on SA at 10 degrees C, but at higher temperatures the Orange II molecules were transported into the ACFT, producing an adsorption capacity similar to that of SA. Mass transfer increased with temperature, overcoming the adsorption energy barrier. Overall, SA and ACFC were more effective than ACFT.

  7. Dye Adsorption Behavior of Polyvinyl Alcohol/Glutaraldehyde/β-Cyclodextrin Polymer Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghemati, Dj.; Aliouche, Dj.

    2014-05-01

    Crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol/glutaraldehyde (PVA/GA) membranes were prepared, and attempts to obtain hydrophilic crosslinked PVA membranes were made by adding various amounts of β-cyclodexrin (β-CD), which is a typical cyclic oligosaccharide able to form inclusion complexes with organic host molecules (host-guest complexes). Thus, membranes of PVA/GA/β-CD were synthesized. The membranes were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and swelling measurements. The ability of cyclodextrin to include a wide variety of chemicals was also exploited for the dye adsorption to show the potentialities of the membranes in textile liquid waste processing. Adsorption of reactive methyl orange, and methylene blue dyes on PVA/GA/β-CD membranes was consequently studied using UV-Vis spectroscopy at wavelengths of 547, 463, and 660 nm. Adsorption reached equilibrium after 24 h. Results indicated that there is no covalent bond formation between PVA and β-CD; the β-CD is completely mixed into the PVA matrix polymer. The adsorption capacity increases with increasing amounts of cyclodextrin; the maximum adsorption capacity was obtained with 8% β-CD. Therefore, the change in adsorption capacities may be due to the dye structure effect, and the negative value of free energy indicated the spontaneous nature of adsorption.

  8. Perchlorate adsorption and desorption on activated carbon and anion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Meng, Xiaoguang; Wang, Chao; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Bang, Sunbaek; Choe, Eunyoung; Lippincott, Lee

    2009-05-15

    The mechanisms of perchlorate adsorption on activated carbon (AC) and anion exchange resin (SR-7 resin) were investigated using Raman, FTIR, and zeta potential analyses. Batch adsorption and desorption results demonstrated that the adsorption of perchlorate by AC and SR-7 resin was reversible. The reversibility of perchlorate adsorption by the resin was also proved by column regeneration test. Solution pH significantly affected perchlorate adsorption and the zeta potential of AC, while it did not influence perchlorate adsorption and the zeta potential of resin. Zeta potential measurements showed that perchlorate was adsorbed on the negatively charged AC surface. Raman spectra indicated the adsorption resulted in an obvious position shift of the perchlorate peak, suggesting that perchlorate was associated with functional groups on AC at neutral pH through interactions stronger than electrostatic interaction. The adsorbed perchlorate on the resin exhibited a Raman peak at similar position as the aqueous perchlorate, indicating that perchlorate was adsorbed on the resin through electrostatic attraction between the anion and positively charged surface sites.

  9. Albumin (BSA) Adsorption over Graphene in Aqueous Environment: Influence of Orientation, Adsorption Protocol, and Solvent Treatment.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vellosillo, Perceval; Serena, P A; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-02-23

    We report 150 ns explicit solvent MD simulations of the adsorption on graphene of albumin (BSA) in two orientations and using two different adsorption protocols, i.e., free and forced adsorption. Our results show that free adsorption occurs with little structural rearrangements. Even taking adsorption to an extreme, by forcing it with a 5 nN downward force applied during the initial 20 ns, we show that along a particular orientation BSA is able to preserve the structural properties of the majority of its binding sites. Furthermore, in all the cases considered in this work, the ibuprofen binding site has shown a strong resilience to structural changes. Finally, we compare these results with implicit solvent simulations and find that the latter predicts an extreme protein unfolding upon adsorption. The origin of this discrepancy is attributed to a poor description of the water entropic forces at interfaces in the implicit solvent methods.

  10. Competitive adsorption of VOCcs and BOM: Oxic and anoxic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sorial, G.A.; Papadimas, S.P.; Suidan, M.T.; Speth, T.F.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of the presence of molecular oxygen on the adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in distilled Milli-Q water and in water supplemented with background organic matter (BOM) is evaluated. Experiments are conducted under conditions where molecular oxygen is present in the test environment (oxic adsorption), and where oxygen is absent from the test environment (anoxic adsorption). Adsorption isotherms for tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) in Milli-Q water showed no impact of the presence of oxygen on their adsorption behavior, while adsorption isotherms for cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE) showed higher capacities under toxic conditions. The Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST) successfully predicted the VOCs anoxic adsorption isotherms in BOM. However, the IAST model did not predict the VOCs oxic adsorption isotherms in BOM.

  11. Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Shows Minimal, Measure-Specific Effects on Dynamic Postural Control in Young and Older Adults: A Double Blind, Sham-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Doumas, Michail

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether stimulating the cerebellum and primary motor cortex (M1) using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) could affect postural control in young and older adults. tDCS was employed using a double-blind, sham-controlled design, in which young (aged 18–35) and older adults (aged 65+) were assessed over three sessions, one for each stimulatory condition–M1, cerebellar and sham. The effect of tDCS on postural control was assessed using a sway-referencing paradigm, which induced platform rotations in proportion to the participant’s body sway, thus assessing sensory reweighting processes. Task difficulty was manipulated so that young adults experienced a support surface that was twice as compliant as that of older adults, in order to minimise baseline age differences in postural sway. Effects of tDCS on postural control were assessed during, immediately after and 30 minutes after tDCS. Additionally, the effect of tDCS on corticospinal excitability was measured by evaluating motor evoked potentials using transcranial magnetic stimulation immediately after and 30 minutes after tDCS. Minimal effects of tDCS on postural control were found in the eyes open condition only, and this was dependent on the measure assessed and age group. For young adults, stimulation had only offline effects, as cerebellar stimulation showed higher mean power frequency (MPF) of sway 30 minutes after stimulation. For older adults, both stimulation conditions delayed the increase in sway amplitude witnessed between blocks one and two until stimulation was no longer active. In conclusion, despite tDCS’ growing popularity, we would caution researchers to consider carefully the type of measures assessed and the groups targeted in tDCS studies of postural control. PMID:28099522

  12. Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Shows Minimal, Measure-Specific Effects on Dynamic Postural Control in Young and Older Adults: A Double Blind, Sham-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Craig, Chesney E; Doumas, Michail

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether stimulating the cerebellum and primary motor cortex (M1) using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) could affect postural control in young and older adults. tDCS was employed using a double-blind, sham-controlled design, in which young (aged 18-35) and older adults (aged 65+) were assessed over three sessions, one for each stimulatory condition-M1, cerebellar and sham. The effect of tDCS on postural control was assessed using a sway-referencing paradigm, which induced platform rotations in proportion to the participant's body sway, thus assessing sensory reweighting processes. Task difficulty was manipulated so that young adults experienced a support surface that was twice as compliant as that of older adults, in order to minimise baseline age differences in postural sway. Effects of tDCS on postural control were assessed during, immediately after and 30 minutes after tDCS. Additionally, the effect of tDCS on corticospinal excitability was measured by evaluating motor evoked potentials using transcranial magnetic stimulation immediately after and 30 minutes after tDCS. Minimal effects of tDCS on postural control were found in the eyes open condition only, and this was dependent on the measure assessed and age group. For young adults, stimulation had only offline effects, as cerebellar stimulation showed higher mean power frequency (MPF) of sway 30 minutes after stimulation. For older adults, both stimulation conditions delayed the increase in sway amplitude witnessed between blocks one and two until stimulation was no longer active. In conclusion, despite tDCS' growing popularity, we would caution researchers to consider carefully the type of measures assessed and the groups targeted in tDCS studies of postural control.

  13. Analysis of conservative tracer measurement results using the Frechet distribution at planted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel and showing the effect of clogging processes.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    A mathematical process, developed in Maple environment, has been successful in decreasing the error of measurement results and in the precise calculation of the moments of corrected tracer functions. It was proved that with this process, the measured tracer results of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C) can be fitted more accurately than with the conventionally used distribution functions (Gaussian, Lognormal, Fick (Inverse Gaussian) and Gamma). This statement is true only for the planted HSFCW-Cs. The analysis of unplanted HSFCW-Cs needs more research. The result of the analysis shows that the conventional solutions (completely stirred series tank reactor (CSTR) model and convection-dispersion transport (CDT) model) cannot describe these types of transport processes with sufficient accuracy. These outcomes can help in developing better process descriptions of very difficult transport processes in HSFCW-Cs. Furthermore, a new mathematical process can be developed for the calculation of real hydraulic residence time (HRT) and dispersion coefficient values. The presented method can be generalized to other kinds of hydraulic environments.

  14. H2O Adsorption Kinetics on Smectites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Howard, J.; Quinn, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    The adsorptive equilibration of H2O with montomorillonite has been measured. At low temperatures and pressures equilibration can require many hours, effectively preventing smectites at the martian surface from responding to diurnal pressure and temperature variations.

  15. Basic dye adsorption onto an agro-based waste material--sesame hull (Sesamum indicum L.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanfang; Yang, Fan; Wang, Yongqian; Ma, Li; Wu, Yonghong; Kerr, Philip G; Yang, Linzhang

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this project was to establish an economical and environmentally benign biotechnology for removing methylene blue (MB) from wastewater. The adsorption process of MB onto abandoned sesame hull (Sesamum indicum L.) (SH) was investigated in a batch system. The results showed that a wide range of pH (3.54-10.50) was favorable for the adsorption of MB onto SH. The Langmuir model displayed the best fit for the isothermal data. The exothermic adsorption process fits a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity (359.88 mg g(-1)) was higher than most previously investigated low-cost bioadsorbents (e.g., peanut hull, wheat straw, etc.). This study indicated that sesame hull is a promising, unconventional, affordable and environmentally friendly bio-measure that is easily deployed for removing high levels of MB from wastewater.

  16. Characterizing Nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms in soils using multifractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz Ferreiro, Jorge; Miranda, José G. V.; Vidal Vázquez, Eva

    2010-05-01

    The specific surface area is an attribute known to characterize the soil ability to retain and transport nutrients and water. A number of studies have shown that specific surface area correlates cation exchange capacity, organic matter content, water retention, aggregate stability and clay swelling. In the past fractal theory has been widely used to study different gas adsorption isotherms like water vapour and nitrogen adsorption isotherms. More recently we have shown that nitrogen adsorption isotherms showed multifractal nature. In this work, both N2 adsorption and desorption isotherms measured in a Mollisol were examined as a probability measure using the multifractal formalism in order to determinate its possible multifractal behaviour. Soil samples were collected in two different series of an Argiudoll located in the north of Buenos Aires and in the south of Santa Fe provinces, Argentina. Two treatments of each soil series were sampled at three depths, without replication, resulting in six samples per soil series and a total of twelve samples analyzed. Multifractal analysis was performed using the box counting method. Both, the N2 adsorption and desorption isotherms exhibited a well defined scaling behaviour indicating a fully developed multifractal structure of each isotherm branch. The singularity spectra and Rényi dimension spectra obtained for adsorption and also for desorption isotherms had shapes similar to the spectra of multifractal measures and several parameters were extracted from these spectra. The capacity dimension, D0, for both N2 adsorption and desorption data sets were not significantly different from 1.00. However, nitrogen adsorption and desorption data showed significantly different values of entropy dimension, D1, and correlation dimension, D2. For instance, entropy dimension values extracted from multifractal spectra of adsorption isotherms were on average 0.578 and varied from 0.501 to 0.666. In contrast, the corresponding figures for

  17. Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica for uranium adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guo; Yurun, Feng; Li, Ma; Dezhi, Gao; Jie, Jing; Jincheng, Yu; Haibin, Sun; Hongyu, Gong; Yujun, Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica (TBP-SBA-15) was synthesized by modified mesoporous silica with γ-amino propyl triethoxy silane and tributyl phosphate. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), thermo-gravimetric/differential thermalanalyzer (TG/DTA), N2 adsorption-desorption (BET) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. Results showed that TBP-SBA-15 had large surface areas with ordered channel structure. Moreover, the effects of adsorption time, sorbent dose, solution pH, initial uranium concentration and temperature on the uranium adsorption behaviors were investigated. TBP-SBA-15 showed a high uranium adsorption capacity in a broad range of pH values. The U(VI) adsorption rate of TBP-SBA-15 was fast and nearly achieved completion in 10 min with the sorbent dose of 1 g/L. The U(VI) adsorption of TBP-SBA-15 followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model, indicating that the process was belonged to chemical adsorption. Furthermore, the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0) confirmed that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous.

  18. Adsorption of Pb and Cd on the natural surface coatings (NSCs) in the presence of organochlorine pesticides: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuhai; Li, Yu; Liu, Liang; Hua, Xiuyi

    2008-07-01

    Adsorption of Pb and Cd in the presence and absence of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) on natural surface coatings (NSCs), which were collected in the Nanhu Lake in Changchun, China, was measured in order to investigate the effect of the OCPs on the adsorption of heavy metals on the NSCs. Adsorption of Pb/Cd was carried out under controlled laboratory conditions (mineral salt solution with defined species, ionic strength 0.05 mol/l, 25 degrees C and pH 6.0) with initial Pb and Cd concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 2.5 mol/l. The classical Langmuir adsorption isotherm was applied to estimate the equilibrium coefficients of the adsorption of Pb and Cd on the NSCs. Adsorption interference between Pb/Cd and the OCPs on the NSCs indicated that the adsorption of Pb/Cd on the NSCs was influenced by the OCPs, and competitive adsorption between Pb and the OCPs was observed while adsorption of Cd was enhanced by addition of the OCPs. Adsorption data fit the Langmuir isotherm well for the NSCs treated with the OCPs at different equilibrium concentrations. The results showed that the amount of adsorbed Pb decreased by more than 40% while the amount of adsorbed Cd increased by over 60% with an increase in the initial concentrations of the OCPs ranging from 0 to 5.0 microg/l and that adsorption of Pb/Cd on the NSCs was strongly affected by the OCPs. This preliminary study highlights the importance of the OCPs on the NSCs in controlling the transport, fate, biogeochemistry, bioavailability and toxicity of trace metals in aquatic environments.

  19. Multimodal underwater adsorption of oxide nanoparticles on catechol-based polymer nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Uchiyama, Shun; Miyashita, Tokuji; Mitsuishi, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    Multimodal underwater adsorption behaviour of catechol units was demonstrated by examining the adsorption of different oxide nanoparticles on nanoscale-integrated polymer nanosheets. Catechol-based polymer nanosheets were fabricated using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique with random copolymers (p(DDA/DMA)s) of N-dodecylacrylamide (DDA) and dopamine methacrylamide (DMA). The p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets were immersed into water dispersions of SiO2, Al2O3, and WO3 nanoparticles (NPs) respectively. The results show that the adsorption properties can be altered by varying the NP type: SiO2 NP adsorption was observed only below pH = 6, at which the o-quinone form in p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets transforms into the catechol form or vice versa. However, their transition point for Al2O3 NP adsorption was found at approximately pH 10, at which the surface potential of Al2O3 NPs changes the charge polarity, indicating that the electrostatic interaction is predominant. For WO3 NPs, adsorption was observed when citric acid, which modifies the surface of WO3 NPs by complex formation, was used as a pH-controlling agent, but no adsorption was found for hydrochloric acid used as a pH controlling agent. FT-IR measurements proved that miniscule amounts of water molecules were trapped in p(DDA/DMA) nanosheets and that they acquired hydrogen bonding network formations, which might assist nanoparticle adsorption underwater and make the catechol units adjustable. The results indicate that the nanoscale spatial arrangements of catechol units in films are crucially important for the application of multimodal adsorption of oxide nanoparticles on catechol-based polymer materials.Multimodal underwater adsorption behaviour of catechol units was demonstrated by examining the adsorption of different oxide nanoparticles on nanoscale-integrated polymer nanosheets. Catechol-based polymer nanosheets were fabricated using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique with random copolymers (p(DDA/DMA)s) of N

  20. Effect of nanographene platelets (NGP) surface area on organic dye adsorption using Fe3O4-NGP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufik, A.; Saleh, R.

    2016-11-01

    Fe3O4-NanoGraphene Platelets (NGP) composites with different surface area were successfully synthesized using sol gel method. The inverse cubic spinel structures as well as graphitic like structure from NGP were detected using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Measurement, while the ferromagnetic behavior for all samples were detected using Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM) measurement. The vibrational mode for all samples were characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), and thermal stability for all samples were characterized using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). The adsorption process were tested using methylene blue (MB) as a model of organic pollutant. The result showed that the higher NGP surface area could enhance the adsorption capacity of the samples. The kinetic model of adsorption shows that the adsorption process of Fe3O4-NGP materials followed the second order kinetic reaction. The reusability of adsorbent were also performed to analyze the stability of the adsorbent.

  1. Adsorption-induced strain of a nanoscale silicon honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosman, A.; Puibasset, J.; Rolley, E.

    2015-03-01

    We report on systematic measurements of both adsorption and anisotropic mechanical deformations of mesoporous silicon, using heptane at room temperature. Porous Si obtained from highly doped (100) Si can be thought of as a nanoscale random honeycomb with pores parallel to the [001] axis. We show that strains ε\\parallel and ε\\bot measured along and transversely to the pore axis exhibit a hysteretic behavior as a function of the fluid pressure, which is due to the hysteresis in fluid adsorption. The pressure dependence of the strains together with the independent measurement of the transverse stress, allows us to determine the biaxial transverse modulus and to estimate the longitudinal Young's modulus of porous Si. We argue that the value of these constants implies that Young's modulus of the 6 nm thick walls of the honeycomb is about 5 times smaller than that of bulk silicon, striking evidence of finite-size effects.

  2. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  3. Binary adsorption equilibrium of carbon dioxide and water vapor on activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xiao, Penny; Webley, Paul

    2009-09-15

    Adsorption equilibria of a CO2/H2O binary mixture on activated alumina F-200 were measured at several temperatures and over a wide range of concentrations from 4% to around 90% of the saturated water vapor pressure. In comparison with the single-component data, the loading of CO2 was not reduced in the presence of H2O, whereas at low relative humidity the adsorption of H2O was depressed. The binary system was described by a competitive/cooperative adsorption model where the readily adsorbed water layers acted as secondary sites for further CO2 adsorption via hydrogen bonding or hydration reaction. The combination of kinetic models, namely, a Langmuir isotherm for characterizing pure CO2 adsorption and a BET isotherm for H2O, was extended to derive a binary adsorption equilibrium model for the CO2/H2O mixture. Models based on the ideal adsorbed solution theory of Myers and Prausnitz failed to characterize the data over the whole composition range, and a large deviation of binary CO2/H2O equilibrium from ideal solution behavior was observed. The extended Langmuir-BET (LBET) isotherm, analogous to the extended Langmuir equation, drastically underestimated the CO2 loading. By incorporating the interactions between CO2 and H2O molecules on the adsorbent surface and taking into account the effect of nonideality, the realistic interactive LBET (R-LBET) model was found to be in very good agreement with the experimental data. The derived binary isosteric heat of adsorption showed that the heat was reduced by competitive adsorption but promoted by cooperative adsorption.

  4. Adsorption ability comparison of plasma proteins on amorphous carbon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Aoi; Akasaka, Hiroki; Ohshio, Shigeo; Toda, Ikumi; Nakano, Masayuki; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2012-11-01

    To understand why amorphous carbon (a-C:H) film shows antithrombogenicity, an adsorption ability of plasma proteins on a-C:H surface was investigated. Protein adsorption is the initial process of clot formation. The protein adsorption ability on a-C:H film surface was compared by the detection using the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon to estimate the protein adsorption. The protein adsorption abilities of a fibrinogen (Fib) and a human γ-globulin (HGG) were estimated by the SPR method using a multilayer structure of a-C:H/Au/Cr/glass. Although the adsorption of HGG for a-C:H was saturated at 32 μM in HGG concentration, the adsorption of Fib was not saturated under the detection limit of this method. These results indicated that the adsorption ability to the a-C:H film surface of Fib was higher than HGG.

  5. Adsorption of thorium from aqueous solutions by perlite.

    PubMed

    Talip, Z; Eral, M; Hiçsönmez, U

    2009-02-01

    The use of expanded perlite for the adsorption of thorium from aqueous solution by batch technique is presented. The effects of particle size, pH of the solution, initial thorium concentration, shaking time, V/m ratio and temperature were determined. It was found that the adsorption capacity increases by the increase in the pH of the suspensions. The rate of thorium adsorption on expanded perlite was observed to be fast in the first hour of the reaction time. Adsorption isotherms were expressed by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models and the adsorption experiments conducted at 30 +/- 1 degrees C showed that the adsorption isotherms correlated well with the Langmuir model. From the adsorption data, thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG(o), DeltaH(o) and DeltaS(o) were calculated as a function of temperature.

  6. Competitive adsorption of ibuprofen and amoxicillin mixtures from aqueous solution on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Hayet; Carmona, Rocio J; Gomis-Berenguer, Alicia; Souissi-Najar, Souad; Ouederni, Abdelmottaleb; Ania, Conchi O

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the competitive adsorption under dynamic and equilibrium conditions of ibuprofen (IBU) and amoxicillin (AMX), two widely consumed pharmaceuticals, on nanoporous carbons of different characteristics. Batch adsorption experiments of pure components in water and their binary mixtures were carried out to measure both adsorption equilibrium and kinetics, and dynamic tests were performed to validate the simultaneous removal of the mixtures in breakthrough experiments. The equilibrium adsorption capacities evaluated from pure component solutions were higher than those measured in dynamic conditions, and were found to depend on the porous features of the adsorbent and the nature of the specific/dispersive interactions that are controlled by the solution pH, density of surface change on the carbon and ionization of the pollutant. A marked roll-up effect was observed for AMX retention on the hydrophobic carbons, not seen for the functionalized adsorbent likely due to the lower affinity of amoxicillin towards the carbon adsorbent. Dynamic adsorption of binary mixtures from wastewater of high salinity and alkalinity showed a slight increase in IBU uptake and a reduced adsorption of AMX, demonstrating the feasibility of the simultaneous removal of both compounds from complex water matrices.

  7. Effect of surface acidic oxides of activated carbon on adsorption of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen-Chia; Li, Hong-Song; Chen, Chien-Hung

    2008-11-30

    The influence of surface acidity of activated carbon (AC) was experimentally studied on adsorption of ammonia (NH(3)). Coconut shell-based AC was modified by various acids at different concentrations. There were five different acids employed to modified AC, which included nitric acid, sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, and acetic acid. Acidic functional groups on the surface of ACs were determined by a Fourier transform infrared spectrograph (FTIR) and by the Boehm titration method. Specific surface area and pore volume of the ACs were measured by a nitrogen adsorption apparatus. Adsorption amounts of NH(3) onto the ACs were measured by a dynamic adsorption system at room temperature according to the principle of the ASTM standard test method. The concentration of NH(3) in the effluent stream was monitored by a gas-detecting tube technique. Experimental results showed that adsorption amounts of NH(3) on the modified ACs were all enhanced. The ammonia adsorption amounts on various activated carbons modified by different acids are in the following order: nitric acid>sulfuric acid>acetic acid approximately phosphoric acid>hydrochloric acid. It is worth to note that the breakthrough capacity of NH(3) is linearly proportional to the amount of acidic functional groups of the ACs.

  8. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  9. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  10. Measurement of surface stay times for physical adsorption of gases. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Univ.; [using molecular beam time of flight technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    A molecular beam time-of-flight technique is studied as a means of determining surface stay times for physical adsorption. The experimental approach consists of pulsing a molecular beam, allowing the pulse to strike an adsorbing surface and detecting the molecular pulse after it has subsequently desorbed. The technique is also found to be useful for general studies of adsorption under nonequilibrium conditions including the study of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. The shape of the detected pulse is analyzed in detail for a first-order desorption process. For mean stay times, tau, less than the mean molecular transit times involved, the peak of the detected pulse is delayed by an amount approximately equal to tau. For tau much greater than these transit times, the detected pulse should decay as exp(-t/tau). However, for stay times of the order of the transit times, both the molecular speed distributions and the incident pulse duration time must be taken into account.

  11. Adsorption kinetics of laterally and polarly flagellated Vibrio.

    PubMed Central

    Belas, M R; Colwell, R R

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of laterally and polarly flagellated bacteria to chitin was measured, and from the data obtained, a modified Langmuir adsorption isotherm was derived. Results indicated that the adsorption of laterally flagellated Vibrio parahaemolyticus follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, a type of adsorption referred to as surface saturation kinetics, when conditions are favorable for the production of lateral flagella. When conditions were not favorable for the production of lateral flagella, bacterial adsorption did not follow the Langmuir adsorption isotherm; instead, proportional adsorption kinetics were observed. The adsorption of some polarly flagellated bacteria exhibited surface saturation kinetics. However, the binding index (the product of the number of binding sites and bacterial affinity to the surface) of polarly flagellated bacteria differed significantly from that of laterally flagellated bacteria, suggesting that polarly flagellated bacteria adsorb to chitin by a different mechanism from that used by the laterally flagellated bacteria. From the results of dual-label adsorption competition experiments, in which polarly flagellated V. cholerae competed with increasing concentrations of laterally flagellated V. parahaemolyticus, it was observed that laterally flagellated bacteria inhibited the adsorption of polarly flagellated bacteria. In contrast, polarly flagellated bacteria enhanced the adsorption of V. cholerae. In competition experiments, where V. parahaemolyticus competed against increasing concentrations of other bacteria, polarly flagellated bacteria enhanced V. parahaemolyticus adsorption significantly, whereas laterally flagellated bacteria only slightly enhanced the process. The direct correlation observed between surface saturation kinetics, the production of lateral flagella, and the ability of laterally flagellated bacteria to inhibit the adsorption of polarly flagellated bacteria suggests that lateral flagella represent a

  12. Enhanced adsorption of humic acids on ordered mesoporous carbon compared with microporous activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengling; Xu, Zhaoyi; Wan, Haiqin; Wan, Yuqiu; Zheng, Shourong; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2011-04-01

    Humic acids are ubiquitous in surface and underground waters and may pose potential risk to human health when present in drinking water sources. In this study, ordered mesoporous carbon was synthesized by means of a hard template method and further characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, transition electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and zeta-potential measurement. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate adsorption of two humic acids from coal and soil, respectively, on the synthesized carbon. For comparison, a commercial microporous activated carbon and nonporous graphite were included as additional adsorbents; moreover, phenol was adopted as a small probe adsorbate. Pore size distribution characterization showed that the synthesized carbon had ordered mesoporous structure, whereas the activated carbon was composed mainly of micropores with a much broader pore size distribution. Accordingly, adsorption of the two humic acids was substantially lower on the activated carbon than on the synthesized carbon, because of the size-exclusion effect. In contrast, the synthesized carbon and activated carbon showed comparable adsorption for phenol when the size-exclusion effect was not in operation. Additionally, we verified by size-exclusion chromatography studies that the synthesized carbon exhibited greater adsorption for the large humic acid fraction than the activated carbon. The pH dependence of adsorption on the three carbonaceous adsorbents was also compared between the two test humic acids. The findings highlight the potential of using ordered mesoporous carbon as a superior adsorbent for the removal of humic acids.

  13. TREATMENT OF LANDFILL LEACHATE BY COUPLING COAGULATION-FLOCCULATION OR OZONATION TO GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION.

    PubMed

    Oloibiri, Violet; Ufomba, Innocent; Chys, Michael; Audenaert, Wim; Demeestere, Kristof; Van Hulle, Stijn W H

    2015-01-01

    A major concern for landfilling facilities is the treatment of their leachate. To optimize organic matter removal from this leachate, the combination of two or more techniques is preferred in order to meet stringent effluent standards. In our study, coagulation-flocculation and ozonation are compared as pre- treatment steps for stabilized landfill leachate prior to granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The efficiency of the pre treatment techniques is evaluated using COD and UVA254 measurements. For coagulation- flocculation, different chemicals are compared and optimal dosages are determined. After this, iron (III) chloride is selected for subsequent adsorption studies due to its high percentage of COD and UVA254 removal and good sludge settle-ability. Our finding show that ozonation as a single treatment is effective in reducing COD in landfill leachate by 66% compared to coagulation flocculation (33%). Meanwhile, coagulation performs better in UVA254 reduction than ozonation. Subsequent GAC adsorption of ozonated effluent, coagulated effluent and untreated leachate resulted in 77%, 53% and 8% total COD removal respectively (after 6 bed volumes). The effect of the pre-treatment techniques on GAC adsorption properties is evaluated experimentally and mathematically using Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models. Mathematical modelling of the experimental GAC adsorption data shows that ozonation increases the adsorption capacity and break through time with a factor of 2.5 compared to coagulation-flocculation.

  14. Effect of cation type, alkyl chain length, adsorbate size on adsorption kinetics and isotherms of bromide ionic liquids from aqueous solutions onto microporous fabric and granulated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Safia; Duclaux, Laurent; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; Reinert, Laurence; Farooq, Amjad; Yasin, Tariq

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption from aqueous solution of imidazolium, pyrrolidinium and pyridinium based bromide ionic liquids (ILs) having different alkyl chain lengths was investigated on two types of microporous activated carbons: a fabric and a granulated one, well characterized in terms of surface chemistry by "Boehm" titrations and pH of point of zero charge measurements and of porosity by N2 adsorption at 77 K and CO2 adsorption at 273 K. The influence of cation type, alkyl chain length and adsorbate size on the adsorption properties was analyzed by studying kinetics and isotherms of eight different ILs using conductivity measurements. Equilibrium studies were carried out at different temperatures in the range [25-55 °C]. The incorporation of ILs on the AC porosity was studied by N2 adsorption-desorption measurements at 77 K. The experimental adsorption isotherms data showed a good correlation with the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of ILs onto activated carbons was an exothermic process, and that the removal efficiency increased with increase in alkyl chain length, due to the increase in hydrophobicity of long chain ILs cations determined with the evolution of the calculated octanol-water constant (Kow). The negative values of free energies indicated that adsorption of ILs with long chain lengths having hydrophobic cations was more spontaneous at the investigated temperatures.

  15. Apparatus for the study of macromolecular adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, C. S.; Hallock, R. B.

    1989-04-01

    A surface plasmon adsorbate monitor (SPAM) is described which allows the adsorption of macromolecules or other adsorbates to a metal surface to be monitored. Surface plasmons are employed and the apparatus has no moving parts. The kinetics of adsorption may be studied on a time scale of seconds rather than the more common time scale of minutes; a simple improvement in computer memory access should allow temporal studies in the millisecond range. As an illustration, the adsorption of carboxyl-terminated polystyrene from a solution with acetone onto a silver surface is measured.

  16. Corrected thermodynamic description of adsorption via formalism of the theory of volume filling of micropores.

    PubMed

    Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A; Rychlicki, Gerhard

    2006-06-01

    Based on the series of benzene adsorption and related enthalpy of adsorption data measured on porous carbons that possess various porous structures, we show that the creation of a solidlike structure in pores depends on the average pore diameter of an adsorbent. Taking into account the solidlike adsorbed phase in the thermodynamic description of the adsorption process via the formalism of the theory of volume filling of micropores (TVFM) leads to very good agreement between the data measured experimentally and those calculated from TVFM. Finally we show that the boundary between solidlike and liquidlike structures of benzene molecules in carbon pores is located around the average pore diameter, close to ca. 2.1-2.4 nm.

  17. Molecular diffusion between walls with adsorption and desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Maximilien; Bénichou, Olivier; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The time dependency of the diffusion coefficient of particles in porous media is an efficient probe of their geometry. The analysis of this quantity, measured, e.g., by nuclear magnetic resonance, can provide rich information pertaining to porosity, pore size distribution, permeability, and surface-to-volume ratio of porous materials. Nevertheless, in numerous if not all practical situations, transport is confined by walls where adsorption and desorption processes may occur. In this article, we derive explicitly the expression of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient between two confining walls in the presence of adsorption and desorption. We show that they strongly modify the time-dependency of the diffusion coefficient, even in this simple geometry. We finally propose several applications, from sorption rates measurements to the use as a reference for numerical implementations for more complex geometries.

  18. Adsorption of phenol from aqueous solution by using carbonised beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Gülbeyi; Ciçek, Handan; Dursun, Arzu Y

    2005-10-17

    The beet pulp, a major low value by-product in sugar industry was used to prepare carbon for phenol adsorption. It was produced by carbonisation in N2 atmosphere at 600 degrees C for 1.5 h. The surface area of beet pulp carbon was measured as 47.5 m2g(-1) by using BET method. The adsorption studies of phenol from aqueous solution on beet pulp carbon (BPC) have been studied in the range of 25-500 mgdm(-3) initial phenol concentrations and at the temperatures of 25, 40 and 60 degrees C. The maximum phenol adsorption capacity was obtained as 89.5 mgg(-1)at the temperature of 60 degrees C at pH=6.0. The Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the adsorption equilibrium and it was reported that experimental data fitted very well to Freundlich model, although they could be modelled by the Langmuir equation. Batch adsorption models, based on the assumption of the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order mechanism, were applied to examine the kinetics of the adsorption. The results showed that kinetic data were followed more closely the pseudo-second order model than the pseudo-first order. The thermodynamic parameters such as, equilibrium constant (K), Gibbs free energy changes (DeltaG degrees ), standard enthalpy change (DeltaH degrees ) and standard entropy change (DeltaS degrees ) had been determined. The results show that adsorption of phenol on BPC is an endothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  19. Adsorption of halogenated aliphatic contaminants by graphene nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Apul, Onur Guven; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-08-01

    In this study, adsorption of ten environmentally halogenated aliphatic synthetic organic compounds (SOCs) by a pristine graphene nanosheet (GNS) and a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was examined, and their adsorption behaviors were compared with those of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and a granular activated carbon (GAC). In addition, the impacts of background water components (i.e., natural organic matter (NOM), ionic strength (IS) and pH) on the SOC adsorption behavior were investigated. The results indicated HD3000 and SWCNT with higher microporous volumes exhibited higher adsorption capacities for the selected aliphatic SOCs than graphenes, demonstrating microporosity of carbonaceous adsorbents played an important role in the adsorption. Analysis of adsorption isotherms demonstrated that hydrophobic interactions were the dominant contributor to the adsorption of aliphatic SOCs by graphenes. However, π-π electron donor-acceptor and van der Waals interactions are likely the additional mechanisms contributing to the adsorption of aliphatic SOCs on graphenes. Among the three background solution components examined, NOM showed the most influential effect on adsorption of the selected aliphatic SOCs, while pH and ionic strength had a negligible effects. The NOM competition on aliphatic adsorption was less pronounced on graphenes than SWCNT. Overall, in terms of adsorption capacities, graphenes tested in this study did not exhibit a major advantage over SWCNT and GAC for the adsorption of aliphatic SOCs.

  20. Adsorption equilibria of chlorinated organic solvents onto activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, J.H.; Choi, D.K.; Kim, S.H.

    1998-04-01

    Adsorption equilibria of dichloromethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene on activated carbon were obtained by a static volumetric technique. Isotherms were measured for the pure vapors in the temperature range from 283 to 363 K and pressures up to 60 kPa for dichloromethane, 16 kPa for 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and 7 kPa for trichloroethylene, respectively. The Toth and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations were used to correlate experimental isotherms. Thermodynamic properties such as the isosteric heat of adsorption and the henry`s constant were calculated. It was found that the values of isosteric heat of adsorption were varied with surface loading. Also, the Henry`s constant showed that the order of adsorption affinity is 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and dichloromethane. By employing the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation, the limiting volume of the adsorbed space, which equals micropore volume, was determined, and its value was found to be approximately independent of adsorbates.

  1. Functionalized SBA-15 materials for bilirubin adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tao; Zhao, Yanling; Xu, Yao; Wu, Dong; Xu, Jun; Deng, Feng

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the driving force for bilirubin adsorption on mesoporous materials, a comparative study was carried out between pure siliceous SBA-15 and three functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous materials: CH 3-SBA-15 (MS), NH 2-SBA-15 (AS), and CH 3/NH 2-SBA-15 (AMS) that were synthesized by one-pot method. The obtained materials exhibited large surface areas (553-810 m 2/g) and pore size (6.6-7.1 nm) demonstrated by XRD and N 2-ad/desorption analysis. The SEM images showed that the materials had similar fiberlike morphology. The functionalization extent was calculated according to 29Si MAS NMR spectra and it was close to the designed value (10%). The synthesized mesoporous materials were used as bilirubin adsorbents and showed higher bilirubin adsorption capacities than the commercial active carbon. The adsorption capacities of amine functionalized samples AMS and AS were larger than those of pure siliceous SBA-15 and MS, indicating that electrostatic interaction was the dominant driving force for bilirubin adsorption on mesoporous materials. Increasing the ionic strength of bilirubin solution by adding NaCl would decrease the bilirubin adsorption capacity of mesoporous material, which further demonstrated that the electrostatic interaction was the dominant driving force for bilirubin adsorption. In addition, the hydrophobic interaction provided by methyl groups could promote the bilirubin adsorption.

  2. Adsorption of crude oil on anhydrous and hydrophobized vermiculite.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Umberto G; de F Melo, Marcus A; da Silva, Adaílton F; de Farias, Robson F

    2003-04-15

    This publication reports the adsorption of crude oil on vermiculite samples, expanded and hydrophobized with carnauba (Copernícia Cerífera) wax. The adsorption studies were performed by using columns filled with the vermiculite matrices and by dispersion of the vermiculite samples in an oil-water (50 ppm of oil) emulsion. The hydrate vermiculite exhibits a very low adsorption capacity against crude oil. On the other hand, anhydrous (expanded) and hydrophobized matrices show a high adsorption capacity. The 10% hydrophobized matrix show a 50% increased adsorption capacity, in comparison with the expanded one. For adsorption performed in the water-oil emulsion, saturation of the solid hydrophobized matrix is achieved after 60 min. The hydrophobized samples exhibit adsorption factors in the 0.7-1.0 range.

  3. An eco-friendly dyeing of woolen yarn by Terminalia chebula extract with evaluations of kinetic and adsorption characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Shabbir, Mohd; Rather, Luqman Jameel; Shahid-ul-Islam; Bukhari, Mohd Nadeem; Shahid, Mohd; Ali Khan, Mohd; Mohammad, Faqeer

    2016-01-01

    In the present study Terminalia chebula was used as an eco-friendly natural colorant for sustainable textile coloration of woolen yarn with primary emphasis on thermodynamic and kinetic adsorption aspects of dyeing processes. Polyphenols and ellagitannins are the main coloring components of the dye extract. Assessment of the effect of pH on dye adsorption showed an increase in adsorption capacity with decreasing pH. Effect of temperature on dye adsorption showed 80 °C as optimum temperature for wool dyeing with T. chebula dye extract. Two kinetic equations, namely pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order equations, were employed to investigate the adsorption rates. Pseudo second-order model provided the best fit (R2 = 0.9908) to the experimental data. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted by Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The adsorption behavior accorded well (R2 = 0.9937) with Langmuir isotherm model. Variety of eco-friendly and sustainable shades were developed in combination with small amount of metallic mordants and assessed in terms of colorimetric (CIEL∗a∗b∗ and K/S) properties measured using spectrophotometer under D65 illuminant (10° standard observer). The fastness properties of dyed woolen yarn against light, washing, dry and wet rubbing were also evaluated. PMID:27222752

  4. Water adsorption constrained Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory: Montmorillonite and illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Courtney D.; Greenaway, Ann L.; Christie, Matthew J.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2014-04-01

    Fresh mineral aerosol has recently been found to be effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and contribute to the number of cloud droplets in the atmosphere due to the effect of water adsorption on CCN activation. The work described here uses experimental water adsorption measurements on Na-montmorillonite and illite clay to determine empirical adsorption parameters that can be used in a recently derived theoretical framework (Frenkel-Halsey-Hill Activation Theory, FHH-AT) that accounts for the effect of water adsorption on CCN activation. Upon fitting the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption model to water adsorption measurements, we find FHH adsorption parameters, AFHH and BFHH, to be 98 ± 22 and 1.79 ± 0.11 for montmorillonite and 75 ± 17 and 1.77 ± 0.11 for illite, respectively. The AFHH and BFHH values obtained from water adsorption measurements differ from values reported previously determined by applying FHH-AT to CCN activation measurements. Differences in FHH adsorption parameters were attributed to different methods used to obtain them and the hydratable nature of the clays. FHH adsorption parameters determined from water adsorption measurements were then used to calculate the critical super-saturation (sc) for CCN activation using FHH-AT. The relationship between sc and the dry particle diameter (Ddry) gave CCN activation curve exponents (xFHH) of -0.61 and -0.64 for montmorillonite and illite, respectively. The xFHH values were slightly lower than reported previously for mineral aerosol. The lower exponent suggests that the CCN activity of hydratable clays is less sensitive to changes in Ddry and the hygroscopicity parameter exhibits a broader variability with Ddry compared to more soluble aerosols. Despite the differences in AFHH, BFHH and xFHH, the FHH-AT derived CCN activities of montmorillonite and illite are quite similar to each other and in excellent agreement with experimental CCN measurements resulting from wet-generated clay aerosol

  5. Trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption using sustainable organic mulch.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongsu; Seo, Youngwoo

    2010-09-15

    Soluble substrates (electron donors) have been commonly injected into chlorinated solvent contaminated plume to stimulate reductive dechlorination. Recently, different types of organic mulches with economic advantages and sustainable benefits have received much attention as new supporting materials that can provide long term sources of electron donors for chlorinated solvent bioremediation in engineered biowall systems. However, sorption capacities of organic mulches for chlorinated solvents have not been studied yet. In this study, the physiochemical properties of organic mulches (pine, hardwood and cypress mulches) were measured and their adsorption capacity as a potential media was elucidated. Single, binary and quaternary isotherm tests were conducted with trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trans-dichloroethylene (trans-DCE) and cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE). Among the three tested mulches, pine mulch showed the highest sorption capacity for the majority of the tested chemicals in single isotherm test. In binary or quaternary isotherm tests, competition among chemicals appears to diminish the differences in Q(e) for tested mulches. However, pine mulch also showed higher adsorption capacity for most chemicals when compared to hardwood and cypress mulches in the two isotherm tests. Based upon physicochemical properties of the three mulches, higher sorption capacity of pine mulch over hardwood and cypress mulches appears to be attributed to a higher organic carbon content and the lower polarity.

  6. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  7. A Modular Approach To Study Protein Adsorption on Surface Modified Hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Ozhukil Kollath, Vinayaraj; Van den Broeck, Freya; Fehér, Krisztina; Martins, José C; Luyten, Jan; Traina, Karl; Mullens, Steven; Cloots, Rudi

    2015-07-13

    Biocompatible inorganic nano- and microcarriers can be suitable candidates for protein delivery. This study demonstrates facile methods of functionalization by using nanoscale linker molecules to change the protein adsorption capacity of hydroxyapatite (HA) powder. The adsorption capacity of bovine serum albumin as a model protein has been studied with respect to the surface modifications. The selected linker molecules (lysine, arginine, and phosphoserine) can influence the adsorption capacity by changing the electrostatic nature of the HA surface. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of linker-molecule interactions with the HA surface have been performed by using NMR spectroscopy, zeta-potential measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analyses. Additionally, correlations to theoretical isotherm models have been calculated with respect to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Lysine and arginine increased the protein adsorption, whereas phosphoserine reduced the protein adsorption. The results show that the adsorption capacity can be controlled with different functionalization, depending on the protein-carrier selections under consideration. The scientific knowledge acquired from this study can be applied in various biotechnological applications that involve biomolecule-inorganic material interfaces.

  8. Theoretical and experimental study of isothiazolinone adsorption onto ordered mesoporous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardones, Lucas E.; Legnoverde, María Soledad; Simonetti, Sandra; Basaldella, Elena I.

    2016-12-01

    Mesoporous silica SBA-15 particles were synthesized in order to evaluate their effectiveness as encapsulating agents for a commercial biocide composed of a mixture of methylisothiazolinone and chloromethylisothiazolinone (MIT/CMIT). Three powdered samples of silica particles having different textural properties, sizes and morphologies were hydrothermally obtained and then characterized by SEM, TEM, SAXS, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements. Adsorption of the biocide on the prepared materials was investigated, and the results showed that adsorption capacities increase as the particle size becomes smaller. Higher biocide amounts were also retained on particles having increased pore size and pore volume. Additionally, a most probable interaction mechanism between MIT/CMIT and SBA-15 is proposed on the basis of molecular modeling calculations. The theoretical approach indicates that two adsorption geometries with comparable minimum levels of strength can be adopted by the biocide: planar adsorption when the biocide molecule rings are adsorbed on the silica surface and vertical adsorption when the O atom of the MIT/CMIT interacts with the H atom of silanols.

  9. Adsorption and inactivation behavior of horseradish peroxidase on cellulosic fiber surfaces.

    PubMed

    Di Risio, Sabina; Yan, Ning

    2009-10-15

    The physical immobilization behavior of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on cellulosic fiber surfaces was characterized using adsorption and inactivation isotherms measured by the depletion method followed by fitting of Langmuir's and Freundlich's models to the experimental data. The adsorption and inactivation behavior of simpler and relatively non-porous high and low crystalline cellulosic substrates (microcrystalline cellulose and regenerated cellulose) as well as more complex and porous cellulosic pulp fibers (bleached kraft softwood fibers) were investigated. The effect of the sorbent surface energy on HRP adsorption was demonstrated by increasing the hydrophobicity of the cellulosic fibers using an internal sizing agent. The influence of the fiber surface charge density on HRP adsorption was studied via modification of the cellulosic fibers using TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidiniloxy radical)-mediated oxidation methods. Results showed that hydrophobic interactions had a much larger effect on HRP adsorption than electrostatic interactions. More hydrophobic fiber surfaces (lower polar surface energy) result in larger enzyme-fiber binding affinity constants and higher binding heterogeneity. It was also found that oxidation of the cellulosic fiber substrate reduces enzyme adsorption affinity but significantly increases the loading capacity per unit weight of the surface.

  10. Preliminary investigation of the capillary adsorption for a hollow waveguide based laser ammonia analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhenhui; Wang, Ruixue; Li, Jinyi

    2016-10-01

    Hollow Waveguide (HWG) is usually used as a gas cell in an infrared gas sensor feathered with low-volume and high-sensitivity. However, the measured concentration is often distorted by the interference of the adsorption of gas molecules on the inner wall surface of the HWG. This adsorption is a type of physical absorption called capillary adsorption. In order to correct this distortion, the characteristics of HWG adsorption of ammonia were investigated by using the laser analyzer itself under HWG heating-cooling process and various ammonia flow rate in the HWG. The results showed that the readout of ammonia concentration increased by 17.8% when heating the HWG for no-flowing ammonia in the HWG, and the readout undergone a process of increase to fast decrease to slow increase when heating the HWG for flowing ammonia in the HWG at various flow rate. These surely come from the adsorption and desorption of ammonia on the inner wall surface of the HWG. The preliminary investigation provides a quantitative readout distortion and a creditable evidence for further study about the adsorption of HWG.

  11. Experimental studies on equilibrium adsorption isosteres and determination of the thermodynamic quantities of polar media on alumina Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonova, Albena

    2017-03-01

    The present work is a revieif of theoretical and experimental study on the adsorption performance of the adsorbent Alumina (Al2O3) used in the adsorption system. An experimental investigation on the equilibrium adsorption isosteres at low pressure (< 1 atm) of working pairs Al2O3/H2O and Al2O3/C2H6O2 is carried out. The isovolume measurement method is adopted in the test setup to directly measure the saturated vapor pressures of working pairs at vapor-liquid equilibrium (dG=0 and dμi=0). Quantity adsorbed is determined from pressure, volume and temperature using gas law. The isosteric heat of adsorption is calculated from the slope of the plot of lnP versus 1/T different amounts of adsorbate onto adsorbent as follows: 0,01 vol% Al2O3/H2O; 0,03 vol% Al2O3/H2O; 0,1 vol% Al2O3/H2O; 0,01 vol% Al2O3/C2H6O2; 0,03 vol% Al2O3/C2H6O2; 0,1 vol% Al2O3/C2H6O2. This study shows that adsorption working pair Al2O3 C2H6O2 has better adsorption performances than those of the A2O3/H2O. Surface acidity! is a most important property! far both adsorption and catalysis and therefore is examined structure of active sites of alumina surface. Thermodynamic parameters such as isosteric heat of adsorption, isosteric enthalpy and entropy of adsorption are critical design variables in estimating the performance and predicting the mechanism of an adsorption process and are also one of the basic requirements for the characterization and optimization of an adsorption process

  12. Adsorption of amylase enzyme on ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Beier, Søren Prip; Enevoldsen, Ann Dorrit; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M; Hansen, Ernst B; Jonsson, Gunnar

    2007-08-28

    A method to measure the static adsorption on membrane surfaces has been developed and described. The static adsorption of amylase-F has been measured on two different ultrafiltration membranes, both with a cutoff value of 10 kDa (a PES membrane and the ETNA10PP membrane, which is a surface-modified PVDF membrane). The adsorption follows the Langmuir adsorption theory. Thus, the static adsorption consists of monolayer coverage and is expressed both as a permeability drop and an adsorption resistance. From the adsorption isotherms, the maximum static permeability drops and the maximum static adsorption resistances are determined. The maximum static permeability drop for the hydrophobic PES membrane is 75%, and the maximum static adsorption resistance is 0.014 m2.h.bar/L. The maximum static permeability drop for the hydrophilic surface-modified PVDF membrane (ETNA10PP) is 23%, and the maximum static adsorption resistance is 0.0046 m2.h.bar/L. The difference in maximum static adsorption, by a factor of around 3, affects the performance during the filtration of a 5 g/L amylase-F solution at 2 bar. The two membranes behave very similarly during filtration with almost equal fluxes and retentions even though the initial water permeability of the PES membrane is around 3 times larger than the initial water permeability of the ETNA10PP membrane. This is mainly attributed to the larger maximum static adsorption of the PES membrane. The permeability drop during filtration exceeds the maximum static permeability drop, indicating that the buildup layer on the membranes during filtration exceeds monolayer coverage, which is also seen by the increase in fouling resistance during filtration. The accumulated layer on the membrane surface can be described as a continually increasing cake-layer thickness, which is independent of the membrane type. At higher concentrations of enzyme, concentration polarization effects cannot be neglected. Therefore, stagnant film theory and the osmotic

  13. In Situ Fluorescence Measurement of Tear Film [Na+], [K+], [Cl−], and pH in Mice Shows Marked Hypertonicity in Aquaporin-5 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ederra, Javier; Levin, Marc H.; Verkman, A. S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Tear film composition depends on water and ion transport across ocular surface epithelia and on fluid secretion by lacrimal glands. The purpose of this study was to establish in situ fluorescence methods to measure tear film ionic concentrations and pH in mice and to determine whether tear film composition is sensitive to deficiency of the major ocular surface aquaporin water channels. Methods Tear film ionic concentrations and pH were measured in anesthetized mice by ratio imaging fluorescence microscopy after topical application of ion/pH-sensing, dual-wavelength fluorescent indicators. [Na+], [K+], and [Cl−] were measured with membrane-impermeant indicators developed by our laboratory, and pH was measured with bis(carboxyethyl)-carboxyfluorescein fluorescence-conjugated dextran. Measurements were performed on wild-type mice and on knockout mice lacking aquaporins AQP1, AQP3, and AQP5. Results In wild-type mice, tear film [Na+] was 139 ± 8 mM, [K+] was 48 ± 1 mM, [Cl−] was 127 ± 4 mM, and pH was 7.59 ± 0.2 (SE; n = 5–8). pH did not differ significantly in the AQP knockout mice. [Na+] was increased by approximately twofold in AQP5 null mice (230 ± 20 mM) and was greatly reduced after exposure of the ocular surface to a humidified atmosphere. [K+] was mildly reduced in AQP1 null mice. Conclusions These results establish an in situ optical methodology to measure tear film [Na+], [K+], [Cl−], and pH in living mice, without the need for fluid sampling. Tear film hypertonicity in AQP5 deficiency is likely caused by reduced transcorneal water secretion in response to evaporative water loss. PMID:19136711

  14. [Adsorption dynamics and breakthrough characteristics based on the fluidization condition].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Yao; Huang, Xing; Yuan, Yi-Long; Chen, Rui-Hui; Zhou, Hang; Zhou, Dan-Dan

    2014-02-01

    Few studies on the adsorption dynamics and breakthrough characteristics based on the fluidization condition have been reported. In a fluidized bed adsorption reactor with phenol as the adsorbate and granular activated carbon as the adsorbent, the adsorption efficiency, adsorption dynamic characteristics, adsorption breakthrough curves and adsorption capacities were studied and compared with those of a fixed bed operated under the same conditions. The results showed that the adsorption efficiencies exceeded 93% in 5 min in both the fluidized conditions and fixed conditions at the superficial velocities of 8 mm x s(-1) and 13 mm x s(-1). Meanwhile, the above adsorption reactions fitted to Pseudo-second-order with linear correlation coefficients greater than 0.999. The adsorption capacity of fluidized conditions was 8.77 mg x g(-1) and 24.70 mg x g(-1) at the superficial velocities of 6 mm x s(-1) and 8 mm x s(-1). Generally, the fluidized bed reactor showed a higher adsorption efficiency and greater adsorption capacity than the fixed bed reactor.

  15. Measured flow and tracer-dye data showing the anthropogenic effects on the hydrodynamics of south Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, spring 1996 and 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltmann, Richard N.

    1998-01-01

    Tidal flows were measured using acoustic Doppler current profilers and ultrasonic velocity meters during spring 1996 and 1997 in south Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, when (1) a temporary barrier was installed at the head of Old River to prevent the entrance of migrating San Joaquin River salmon smolts, (2) the rate of water export from the south Delta was reduced for an extended period of time, and (3) a 30-day pulse flow was created on the San Joaquin River to move salmon smolts north away from the export facilities during spring 1997. Tracer-dye measurements also were made under these three conditions.

  16. Gas-phase adsorption in dealuminated natural clinoptilolite and liquid-phase adsorption in commercial DAY zeolite and modified ammonium Y zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Hernandez, Alba Nydia

    The adsorption of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a very important tool for the material characterization. On the other hand, in separation and recovery technology, the adsorption of the CO2 is important to reduce the concentration of this gas considered as one of the greenhouse gases. Natural zeolites, particularly clinoptilolite, are widely applied to eliminate some pollutants from the environment. One of the goals of this research is to study the structure, composition and morphology of one natural clinoptilolite dealuminated with ammonium hexafluorosilicate (AHFi) and with orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4). Each modified sample was characterized using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Carbon Dioxide adsorption at 0° C, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (SEM-EDAX). In addition, the surface chemistry of the modified clinoptilolites was analyzed with Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The adsorption measurements were also used to study of the interaction of CO2 molecule within the adsorption space of these modified clinoptilolites. It was concluded that one of the modified clinoptilolites, (CSW-HFSi-0.1M), showed a great quality as adsorbent and as catalytic comparable to commercial synthetic zeolites. As far as we know, the modification of clinoptilolite with HFSi to improve their adsorption properties had not been previously attempted. In the second part of this dissertation, the dynamic adsorption of three isomers of nitrophenols using as adsorbent a commercial DAY zeolite was investigated. Also, the dynamic adsorption of methanol in a less hydrophobic zeolite, Ammonium Y Zeolite was investigated. The obtained breakthrough curves showed that the commercial DAY zeolite could be a suitable adsorbent to the liquid-phase adsorption of the phenolic compounds. Notwithstanding the modified ammonium Y zeolite had a low Si/Al ratio (less hydrophobic) than commercial DAY zeolite; this

  17. Adsorption of arabinoxylan on cellulosic surfaces: influence of degree of substitution and substitution pattern on adsorption characteristics.

    PubMed

    Köhnke, Tobias; Ostlund, Asa; Brelid, Harald

    2011-07-11

    This study presents results that show that the fine structure of arabinoxylan affects its interaction with cellulosic surfaces, an important understanding when designing and evaluating properties of xylan-cellulose-based materials. Arabinoxylan samples, with well-defined structures, were prepared from a wheat flour arabinoxylan with targeted enzymatic hydrolysis. Turbidity measurements and analyses using NMR diffusometry showed that the solubility and the hydrodynamic properties of arabinoxylan are determined not only by the degree of substitution but also by the substitution pattern. On the basis of results obtained from adsorption experiments on microcrystalline cellulose particles and on cellulosic model surfaces investigated with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, it was also found that arabinoxylan adsorbs irreversibly on cellulosic surfaces and that the adsorption characteristics, as well as the properties of the adsorbed layer, are controlled by the fine structure of the xylan molecule.

  18. Control of protein adsorption on functionalized electrospun fibers.

    PubMed

    Grafahrend, Dirk; Calvet, Julia Lleixa; Klinkhammer, Kristina; Salber, Jochen; Dalton, Paul D; Möller, Martin; Klee, Doris

    2008-10-15

    Electrospun fibers that are protein resistant and functionalized with bioactive signals were produced by solution electrospinning amphiphilic block copolymers. Poly (ethylene glycol)-block-poly(D,L-lactide) (PEG-b-PDLLA) was synthesized in two steps, with a PEG segment of 10 kDa, while the PDLLA block ranged from 20 to 60 kDa. Depending on the PEG and PDLLA segment ratio, as well as solvent selection, the hydrophilicity and protein adsorption could be altered on the electrospun mesh. Furthermore, an alpha-acetal PEG-b-PDLLA was synthesized that allowed the conjugation of active molecules, resulting in surface functionalization of the electrospun fiber. Electrospun material with varying morphologies and diameter were electrospun from 10, 20, and 30 wt.% solutions. Sessile drop measurements showed a reduction in the contact angle from 120 degrees for pure poly(D,L-lactide) with increasing PEG/PDLLA ratio. All electrospun block PEG-b-PDLLA fibers had hydrophilic properties, with contact angles below 45 degrees . The fibers were collected onto six-arm star-poly(ethylene glycol) (star-PEG) coated silicon wafers and incubated with fluorescently labeled proteins. All PEG-b-PDLLA fibers showed no detectable adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) independent of their composition while a dependence between hydrophobic block length was observed for streptavidin adsorption. Fibers of block copolymers with PDLLA blocks smaller than 39 kDa showed no adsorption of BSA or streptavidin, indicating good non-fouling properties. Fibers were surface functionalized with N(epsilon)-(+)-biotinyl-L-lysine (biocytin) or RGD peptide by attaching the molecule to the PEG block during synthesis. Protein adsorption measurements, and the controlled interaction of biocytin with fluorescently labeled streptavidin, showed that the electrospun fibers were both resistant to protein adsorption and are functionalized. Fibroblast adhesion was contrasting between the unfunctionalized and RGD

  19. Adsorption hysteresis, capillary condensation, and melting in multilayer methane films on graphite foam

    SciTech Connect

    Lysek, M.J.; LaMadrid, M.; Day, P.; Goodstein, D. )

    1992-03-01

    We have studied adsorption hysteresis in the system multilayer methane adsorbed on graphite foam by measuring heat capacities on each branch of the hysteresis curve. We are able to show that, on the stable branch, capillary condensation begins, surprisingly, at 1.1 layers. These observations call into question previous conclusions about this and other multilayer adsorbed systems. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Fluorocarbon Adsorption in Hierarchical Porous Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Vijayakumar, M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Martin, P F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-09

    The adsorption behavior of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives was examined on a set of microporous metal organic framework (MOF) sorbents and another set of hierarchical mesoporous MOFs. The microporous M-DOBDC (M = Ni, Co) showed a saturation uptake capacity for R12 of over 4 mmol/g at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous MOF MIL-101 showed an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching over 14 mmol/g at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption were found to generally correlate with the polarizability of the refrigerant with R12 > R22 > R13 > R14 > methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting MOFs for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling and refrigeration applications.

  1. Adsorption of the natural protein surfactant Rsn-2 onto liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Brandani, Giovanni B; Vance, Steven J; Schor, Marieke; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Smith, Brian O; MacPhee, Cait E; Cheung, David L

    2017-03-22

    To stabilize foams, droplets and films at liquid interfaces a range of protein biosurfactants have evolved in nature. Compared to synthetic surfactants, these combine surface activity with biocompatibility and low solution aggregation. One recently studied example is Rsn-2, a component of the foam nest of the frog Engystomops pustulosus, which has been predicted to undergo a clamshell-like opening transition at the air-water interface. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and surface tension measurements we study the adsorption of Rsn-2 onto air-water and cyclohexane-water interfaces. The protein adsorbs readily at both interfaces, with adsorption mediated by the hydrophobic N-terminus. At the cyclohexane-water interface the clamshell opens, due to the favourable interaction between hydrophobic residues and cyclohexane molecules and the penetration of cyclohexane molecules into the protein core. Simulations of deletion mutants showed that removal of the N-terminus inhibits interfacial adsorption, which is consistent with the surface tension measurements. Deletion of the hydrophilic C-terminus also affects adsorption, suggesting that this plays a role in orienting the protein at the interface. The characterisation of the interfacial behaviour gives insight into the factors that control the interfacial adsorption of proteins, which may inform new applications of this and similar proteins in areas including drug delivery and food technology and may also be used in the design of synthetic molecules showing similar changes in conformation at interfaces.

  2. Selected pesticides adsorption and desorption in substrates from artificial wetland and forest buffer.

    PubMed

    Passeport, Elodie; Benoit, Pierre; Bergheaud, Valérie; Coquet, Yves; Tournebize, Julien

    2011-07-01

    Buffer zones such as artificial wetlands and forest buffers may help decrease non-point-source pesticide pollution from agricultural catchments. The present study focuses on understanding the role of the substrates mainly found in such buffer zones for pesticide adsorption and desorption. Radiolabeled [(14)C]isoproturon, [(14)C]metazachlor, and [(14)C]epoxiconazole were used to measure adsorption and desorption isotherms on wetland sediments and plants and forest soil and litter from two sites in France. Wetland sediments and forest soil exhibited the most important potential for pesticide adsorption. Wetland plants and forest litter also showed high adsorption coefficients and were associated with highly hysteretic desorption, particularly for the moderately mobile isoproturon and metazachlor. Adsorption of the highly hydrophobic epoxiconazole was strong and associated with weak desorption from all substrates. Calculated sorption coefficients were larger than those classically measured on soils. Isoproturon, metazachlor, and epoxiconazole K(OC) sorption coefficients ranged from 84 to 372, 131 to 255, and 1,356 to 3,939 L/kg, respectively. Therefore, specifically collecting buffer zone substrate sorption data is needed for modeling purposes. Results showed that forests and wetlands present potential for pesticide retention. This may be enhanced by planting vegetation and leaving dead vegetal material in buffer zone design.

  3. Adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-song; Yang, Xiao-juan; Mao, Yan-peng; Chen, Yu; Long, Xiang-li; Yuan, Wei-kang

    2011-01-30

    In this study, the adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions has been investigated in a batch stirred cell. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the effects of temperature, EDTA concentration, pH, activated carbon mass and particle size on EDTA adsorption. The experimental results manifest that the EDTA adsorption rate increases with its concentration in the aqueous solutions. EDTA adsorption also increases with temperature. The EDTA removal from the solution increases as activated carbon mass increases. The Langmuir and Freundlich equilibrium isotherm models are found to provide a good fitting of the adsorption data, with R(2) = 0.9920 and 0.9982, respectively. The kinetic study shows that EDTA adsorption on the activated carbon is in good compliance with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters (E(a), ΔG(0), ΔH(0), ΔS(0)) obtained indicate the endothermic nature of EDTA adsorption on activated carbon.

  4. Whole scalp resting state EEG of oscillatory brain activity shows no parametric relationship with psychoacoustic and psychosocial assessment of tinnitus: A repeated measures study.

    PubMed

    Pierzycki, Robert H; McNamara, Adam J; Hoare, Derek J; Hall, Deborah A

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is a perception of sound that can occur in the absence of an external stimulus. A brief review of electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) literature demonstrates that there is no clear relationship between tinnitus presence and frequency band power in whole scalp or source oscillatory activity. Yet a preconception persists that such a relationship exists and that resting state EEG could be utilised as an outcome measure for clinical trials of tinnitus interventions, e.g. as a neurophysiological marker of therapeutic benefit. To address this issue, we first examined the test-retest correlation of EEG band power measures in tinnitus patients (n = 42). Second we examined the evidence for a parametric relationship between numerous commonly used tinnitus variables (psychoacoustic and psychosocial) and whole scalp EEG power spectra, directly and after applying factor reduction techniques. Test-retest correlation for both EEG band power measures and tinnitus variables were high. Yet we found no relationship between whole scalp EEG band powers and psychoacoustic or psychosocial variables. We conclude from these data that resting state whole scalp EEG should not be used as a biomarker for tinnitus and that greater caution should be exercised in regard to reporting of findings to avoid confirmation bias. The data was collected during a randomised controlled trial registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT01541969).

  5. Various adiposity measures show similar positive associations with type 2 diabetes in Caucasians, native Hawaiians, and Japanese Americans: the multiethnic cohort.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, Astrid; Heak, Sreang; Morimoto, Yukiko; Grandinetti, Andrew; Kolonel, Larry N; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2015-03-01

    The authors evaluated the association of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and hip circumference (HC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) with diabetes in Caucasians, Native Hawaiians, and Japanese Americans aged 45 to 75 years in the Multiethnic Cohort. Diabetes cases were obtained from self-reports and by linkages with health insurance plans. The authors estimated adjusted prevalence odds ratios (PORs) and compared the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). All measures were positively associated with diabetes prevalence; the PORs were 1.25 to 1.64 in men and 1.52 to 1.83 in women. In all 3 ethnic groups, the AUCs in men were greater for BMI than for the other measures, whereas in women, the AUCs were greater for combined models than for BMI alone, but the differences were small and not clinically significant. It does not appear that one anthropometric measure best reflects diabetes prevalence or performs better in one ethnic group than in another.

  6. [Adsorption kinetics and mechanism of lead (II) on polyamine-functionalized mesoporous activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-Quan; Wang, Yan-Jin; Yang, Mei-Rong; Zhu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Zheng

    2014-08-01

    Bagasse mesoporous carbon was prepared by microwave assisted H3 PO4 activation. Amido and imido groups were modified with ethanediamine on the channels' surface of mesoporous carbon through nitric oxidation and amide reaction. The influence of Pb(II) concentration, adsorption time on Pb(II) adsorption on the ethanediamine-modified mesoporous carbon (AC-EDA) was investigated. The adsorption kinetics and mechanism were also discussed. The results showed that AC-EDA had a great performance for Pb(II) adsorption, and more than 70% of Pb(II) was adsorbed in 5 minutes. The adsorption amount of Pb(II) on the carbon increased with the increase of solution pH in acidic conditions. It was found that AC-EDA had different binding energies on different adsorption sites for Pb(II) separation. The Pb(II) adsorption process on AC-EDA was controlled by intra-particle diffusion in the first 3 min, and then film diffusion played the important pole on the adsorption. The adsorption amount increased with the increase of temperature, indicating the adsorption was an endothermic reaction. The high adsorption energy (> 11 kJ x mol(-1)) implied that the) adsorption was a chemical adsorption. The XPS of AC-EDA before and after Pb(II) adsorption showed that the polyamine group was involved in the adsorption, and should be a main factor of the high efficient adsorption.

  7. Water adsorption constrained Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory: Montmorillonite and illite clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, C. D.; Greenaway, A.; Christie, M. J.; Baltrusaitis, J.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, fresh, unprocessed mineral aerosol has been found to contribute to the number of available cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplets in the atmosphere due to the effect of water adsorption on CCN activation. The work described here uses experimental water adsorption measurements on montmorillonite and illite clay to determine empirical adsorption parameters for a recently derived theoretical framework (Frenkel-Halsey-Hill Activation Theory, FHH-AT) used to calculate CCN activities of clay minerals. Upon fitting the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption model to experimental water adsorption measurements, we find FHH adsorption parameters, AFHH and BFHH, to be 98×22 and 1.79×0.11 for Na-montmorillonite and 75×17 and 1.77×0.11 for illite, respectively. The AFHH and BFHH values obtained for these clays are significantly different from FHH adsorption parameters derived from CCN activation measurements reported previously for similar clay minerals. Differences in FHH adsorption parameters were attributed to the different approaches used, the hydratable nature of the clays and the relative difficulty in measuring CCN activation of hydratable clays due to relatively long adsorption and desorption equilibration times. However, despite these differences, the calculated CCN activities of montmorillonite and illite are quite similar and are in excellent agreement with experimental CCN activation measurements reported previously for similar clays. The different FHH adsorption parameters, however, translate to lower sc-Ddry CCN activation curve exponents (xFHH = -0.61 and -0.64 for montmorillonite and illite, respectively) than have been reported previously. The lower exponent suggests that the CCN activity of hydratable clay aerosol is less sensitive to changes in dry particle diameter (Ddry) and the hygroscopicity parameter exhibits a broader variability with Ddry compared to more soluble aerosols. This study illustrates that FHH-AT using adsorption

  8. 2-Hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium xylan adsorption onto rod-like cellulose nanocrystal.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jae Hyun; Dong, Shuping; Röemhild, Katrin; Kaya, Abdulaziz; Sohn, Daewon; Tanaka, Keiji; Roman, Maren; Heinze, Thomas; Esker, Alan R

    2015-02-15

    Chemical incompatibility and relatively weak interaction between lignocellulosic fibers and synthetic polymers have made studies of wood fiber-thermoplastic composite more challenging. In this study, adsorption of 2-hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium xylans onto rod-like cellulose nanocrystals are investigated by zeta-potential measurements, and polarized and depolarized dynamic light scattering as a factor for better understanding of lignocellulosic fibers and cellulose nanocrystals. Zeta-potential measurements show xylan derivative adsorption onto cellulose nanocrystals. Decay time distributions of the ternary system and binary system from dynamic light scattering show that aggregates exist in the binary system and they disappear in the ternary system. At low 2-hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium xylan concentrations relative to that of cellulose nanocrystal, xylan derivatives adsorbed onto some of the cellulose nanocrystal. Hence, more xylan derivatives adsorbed onto cellulose nanocrystal increased with increasing xylan derivative concentration. Also, the concentration dependence of the ratio of the rotational diffusion coefficient to the translational diffusion coefficient revealed a strong adsorptive interaction between xylan derivatives and the cellulose nanocrystals.

  9. Preparation and characterization of porous reduced graphene oxide based inverse spinel nickel ferrite nanocomposite for adsorption removal of radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Lingamdinne, Lakshmi Prasanna; Choi, Yu-Lim; Kim, Im-Soon; Yang, Jae-Kyu; Koduru, Janardhan Reddy; Chang, Yoon-Young

    2017-03-15

    For the removal of uranium(VI) (U(VI)) and thorium(IV) (Th(IV)), graphene oxide based inverse spinel nickel ferrite (GONF) nanocomposite and reduced graphene oxide based inverse spinel nickel ferrite (rGONF) nanocomposite were prepared by co-precipitation of GO with nickel and iron salts in one pot. The spectral characterization analyses revealed that GONF and rGONF have a porous surface morphology with an average particle size of 41.41nm and 32.16nm, respectively. The magnetic property measurement system (MPMS) studies confirmed the formation of ferromagnetic GONF and superparamagnetic rGONF. The adsorption kinetics studies found that the pseudo-second-order kinetics was well tune to the U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption. The results of adsorption isotherms showed that the adsorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) were due to the monolayer on homogeneous surface of the GONF and rGONF. The adsorptions of both U(VI) and Th(IV) were increased with increasing system temperature from 293 to 333±2K. The thermodynamic studies reveal that the U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption onto GONF and rGONF was endothermic. GONF and rGONF, which could be separated by external magnetic field, were recycled and re-used for up to five cycles without any significant loss of adsorption capacity.

  10. Cu and Zn adsorption to a heterogeneous natural sediment: Influence of leached cations and natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Power, Leanne M; Cheng, Tao; Rastghalam, Zahra Sadat

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption of heavy metals by natural sediments has important implications to the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface environments. Although the importance of major multivalent cations and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in heavy metal adsorption had been previously demonstrated, the leaching of major cations and DOM from sediments and its influence on heavy metal adsorption have not been fully examined. In this study, the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, and natural organic matter that leached from a natural sediment in Cu and Zn adsorption experiments were measured and used in surface complexation models to elucidate their effects on Cu and Zn adsorption. Experimental results showed that the leaching of cations and DOM was substantial and pH-dependent. The leached concentrations of Ca and Mg were reasonably simulated based on BaCl2 extractable Ca and Mg at pH < 5, and Al and Fe activities were accurately predicted for specific pH ranges by assuming solubility control by Al(OH)3 and Fe(OH)3. Visual MINTEQ simulations showed that the leached cations markedly decreased Cu adsorption at pH < 6 and Zn adsorption at pH 3-8. Due to varying affinity for DOM between Cu and Zn, DOM was found to decrease Cu adsorption at pH > 6 due to formation of Cu-DOM aqueous complexes, but increase Zn adsorption at pH 4-7 due to formation of aqueous complexes between DOM and major cations, which reduced competition from these cations against Zn for binding sites on the sediment.

  11. Multifractal characteristics of Nitrogen adsorption isotherms from tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    One of the primary methods used to characterize a wide range of porous materials, including soils, are gas adsorption isotherms. An adsorption isotherm is a function relating the amount of adsorbed gas or vapour to the respective equilibrium pressure, during pressure increase at constant temperature. Adsorption data allow easily estimates of specific surface area and also can provide a characterization of pore surface heterogeneity. Most of the properties and the reactivity of soil colloids are influenced by their specific surface area and by parameters describing the surface heterogeneity. For a restricted scale range, linearity between applied pressure and volume of adsorbate holds, which is the basis for current estimations of specific surface area. However, adsorption isotherms contain also non-linear segments of pressure versus volume so that evidence of multifractal scale has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to analyze the multifractal behaviour of nitrogen adsorption isotherms from a set of tropical soils. Samples were collected form 54 horizons belonging to 19 soil profiles in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The most frequent soil type was Oxisol, according to the Soil Survey Staff, equivalent to Latossolo in the Brazilian soil classification system. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms at standard 77 K were measured using a Thermo Finnigan Sorptomatic 1990 gas sorption analyzer (Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA). From the raw data a distributions of mass along a support was obtained to perform multifractal analysis. The probability distribution was constructed by dividing the values of the measure in a given segment by the sum of the measure in the whole scale range. The box-counting method was employed to perform multifractal analysis. All the analyzed N2 adsorption isotherms behave like a multifractal system. The singularity spectra, f(α), showed asymmetric concave down parabolic shapes, with a greater tendency toward the left side, where moments

  12. [Characteristic of ammonia nitrogen adsorption on karst underground river sediments].

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Chen, Kun-Kun; Jiang, Guang-Hui

    2011-02-01

    Karst aquifers are one of the most important aquifers in Southwestern China. One of the characteristics of karst aquifers is the enhanced permeability permits high flow velocities are capable of transporting suspended and bedload sediments. Mobile sediment in karst may act as a vector for the transport of contaminates. 14 sediment samples were collected from two underground rivers in two typical karst areas in Liuzhou city, Guangxi Autonomous Region, China. According to simulated experiment methods, characteristic of adsorption of ammonia nitrogen on sediment was studied. The results of ammonia nitrogen adsorption dynamics on sediments showed that the maximum adsorption velocity was less than 2 h. The adsorption balance quantity in 5 h accounted for 71% - 98% of the maximum adsorption quantity. The maximum adsorption quantity of ammonia nitrogen was 385.5 mg/kg, which was sediment from a cave in the middle areas of Guancun underground river system. The study of isotherm adsorption indicated adsorption quantity of NH4+ increase followed by incremental balance concentration of NH4+ in the aquatic phase. Adsorption quantity of ammonia nitrogen in sediments has a relative linear relationship with adsorption balance concentrations. Adsorption-desorption balance concentrations were all low, indicating sediments from underground rivers have great adsorption potential. Under the condition of low and high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen in overlying water, Langmuir and Tempkin couldn't simulate or simulate results couldn't reach remarkable level, whilst Linear and Freundlich models could simulate well. Research on different type sediments, sampling times and depths from two underground rivers shows characteristic of ammonia nitrogen adsorption on karst underground river sediments doesn't have good correspondence with the type of sediments. One of the reasons is there is no big difference between sediments in the development of climate, geology, hydrological conditions

  13. Interfacial Adsorption of Antifreeze Proteins: A Neutron Reflection Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai; Perumal, Shiamalee; Zhao, Xiubo; Du, Ning; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Jia, Zongchao; Lu, Jian R.

    2008-01-01

    Interfacial adsorption from two antifreeze proteins (AFP) from ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus, type III AFP, AFP III, or maAFP) and spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana, isoform 501, or cfAFP) were studied by neutron reflection. Hydrophilic silicon oxide was used as model substrate to facilitate the solid/liquid interfacial measurement so that the structural features from AFP adsorption can be examined. All adsorbed layers from AFP III could be modeled into uniform layer distribution assuming that the protein molecules were adsorbed with their ice-binding surface in direct contact with the SiO2 substrate. The layer thickness of 32 Å was consistent with the height of the molecule in its crystalline form. With the concentration decreasing from 2 mg/ml to 0.01 mg/ml, the volume fraction of the protein packed in the monolayer decreased steadily from 0.4 to 0.1, consistent with the concentration-dependent inhibition of ice growth observed over the range. In comparison, insect cfAFP showed stronger adsorption over the same concentration range. Below 0.1 mg/ml, uniform layers were formed. But above 1 mg/ml, the adsorbed layers were characterized by a dense middle layer and two outer diffuse layers, with a total thickness around 100 Å. The structural transition indicated the responsive changes of conformational orientation to increasing surface packing density. As the higher interfacial adsorption of cfAFP was strongly correlated with the greater thermal hysteresis of spruce budworm, our results indicated the important relation between protein adsorption and antifreeze activity. PMID:18234809

  14. Argon adsorption and the lunar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of Ar adsorption experiments on a terrestrial labradorite and lunar rock 15415 crushed in vacuo are reported. The experiments were designed to test lunar atmosphere simulation models for the behavior of Ar on the lunar surface, as determined from the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer results. These models (Hodges, 1980, 1982) used a single adsorption potential to characterize the surfaces of lunar soil grains, with the result that high (6-7 kcal/mol) heats of adsorption were inferred. The present experimental results show that very high adsorption potentials are indeed associated with fresh mineral surfaces, but that these energetic surfaces occupy only small fractions of the total surface area. Nonetheless, these small fractions of surface, if they can be maintained in the lunar regolith in steady-state condition, could be sufficient to account for the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer observations.

  15. Effects of pyrophosphate ions on protein adsorption onto calcium hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Kazuhiko; Oda, Shohei; Tsuyama, Shintaro

    2008-02-28

    The effects of pyrophosphate ions (PP: P2O7(4-)) on the adsorption of proteins onto calcium hydroxyapatite (Hap) were examined using typical proteins of bovine serum albumin (BSA: isoelectric point (iep) = 4.7, molecular mass (M(s)) = 67 200 Da, acidic protein), myoglobin (MGB: iep = 7.0, M(s) = 17 800 Da, neutral protein), and lysozyme (LSZ: iep = 11.1, M(s) = 14,600 Da, basic protein). The UV and CD measurements determined that both the secondary and the tertiary structures of protein molecules do not vary in the presence of PP. The adsorption of BSA was strongly depressed by the addition of PP in all the methods with changing the order of PP addition. Even if BSA was pre-adsorbed on the Hap surface, PP replaced BSA molecules by strong preferential adsorption onto Hap to reduce the amounts of adsorbed BSA. A similar effect was observed with the adsorption of MGB. On the other hand, the amount of adsorbed LSZ (n(LSZ)) was increased with an increase in the concentration of PP, and the n(LSZ) value showed a maximum point in each adsorption isotherm. This fact was explained by a compression of the electric double layer (EDL) around each LSZ molecule by PP. This compression of the EDL induced the reduction of lateral electrostatic repulsions between charged LSZ molecules on the Hap surface and enhanced the formation of closed-packed monolayers to raise the n(LSZ) value. However, since the number of PPs around a LSZ molecule is decreased by an increase in the LSZ concentration in each system, the thickness of the EDL may be increased. Hence, n(LSZ) was reduced again after the maximum point in each system. Tripolyphosphate (TPP: P3O10(5-)) ions exhibited similar effects on the adsorption behaviors of all proteins, but a much more pronounced effect was observed on the LSZ system. TPP with a higher eletronegativity shielded the EDL more highly than PP to increase the n(LSZ) value. The results of the zeta potential for all the protein systems supported the modes of protein

  16. Hierarchical Porous Zeolite Structures for Pressure Swing Adsorption Applications.

    PubMed

    Besser, Benjamin; Tajiri, Henrique Akira; Mikolajczyk, Gerd; Möllmer, Jens; Schumacher, Thomas C; Odenbach, Stefan; Gläser, Roger; Kroll, Stephen; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2016-02-10

    Porous adsorbents with hierarchical structured macropores ranging from 1 to 100 μm are prepared using a combination of freeze casting and additional sacrificial templating of polyurethane foams, with a zeolite 13X powder serving as adsorbent. The pore system of the prepared monoliths features micropores assigned to the zeolite 13X particle framework, interparticular pores of ∼1-2 μm, lamellar pores derived from freeze casting of ∼10 μm, and an interconnected pore network obtained from the sacrificial templates ranging from around 100 to 200 μm with a total porosity of 71%. Gas permeation measurements show an increase in intrinsic permeability by a factor of 14 for monoliths prepared with an additional sacrificial templated foam compared to monoliths solely providing freeze casting pores. Cyclic CO2 adsorption and desorption tests where pressure swings between 8 and 140 kPa reveal constant working capacities over multiple cycles. Furthermore, the monoliths feature a high volumetric working capacity of ∼1.34 mmol/cm(3) which is competitive to packed beds made of commercially available zeolite 13X beads (∼1.28 mmol/cm(3)). Combined with the faster CO2 uptake showing an adsorption of 50% within 5-8 s (beads ∼10 s), the monoliths show great potential for pressure swing adsorption applications, where high volumetric working capacities, fast uptakes, and low pressure drops are needed for a high system performance.

  17. Effect of Adsorption on the Contact Angle: Water-Glass System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz, Ali; Ward, Charles A.

    2002-03-01

    The contact angle at the line formed by the intersection of solid, liquid and vapor phases is usually assumed to be only a function of temperature. This amounts to neglecting the effects of vapor adsorption. However recent experimental observations made during a Space Shuttle flight raised questions about this view. To explain the observations, it was hypothesized that in the limit of the pressure approaching the saturation vapour pressure, adsorption effects can gave rise to an approximately 20° increase in the contact angle. In a ground-based laboratory, this hypothesis examined. Nine cylinders, each with a different diameters has been partially filled with water, sealed and the miniscule height measured under isothermal conditions. By determining the interface shape from the Laplace equation that has the measured meniscus height, the value of the contact angle and pressure at the three-phase line can be inferred. An equilibrium adsorption isotherm relation is derived using a model of the adsorbate that was previously introduced by Hill. The adsorption isotherm relation this obtained contains three temperature-dependent parameters, and when used with the Gibbs adsorption equation, an expression for the contact angle in terms of these parameters is obtained. Their values at each of 5 different temperatures were determined by fitting theoretical relation to the measured contact angles. This permits the amount adsorbed in the limit of the pressure approaching the saturation vapour pressure to be calculated—a parameter range not previously explored. It also permits one to show that the contact angles measured on the Space Shuttle are completely consistent with those measured in a ground-based larboratory provided one takes adsorption into account. The results suggest the contact angle depends strongly on the pressure and that its pressure-dependence can not be neglected when the pressure at the three phase line is near the saturation vapor pressure.

  18. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  19. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  20. Flight and wind-tunnel measurements showing base drag reduction provided by a trailing disk for high Reynolds number turbulent flow for subsonic and transonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Sheryll Goecke; Huffman, Jarrett K.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of a trailing disk, or trapped vortex concept, in reducing the base drag of a large body of revolution was studied from measurements made both in flight and in a wind tunnel. Pressure data obtained for the flight experiment, and both pressure and force balance data were obtained for the wind tunnel experiment. The flight test also included data obtained from a hemispherical base. The experiment demonstrated the significant base drag reduction capability of the trailing disk to Mach 0.93 and to Reynolds numbers up to 80 times greater than for earlier studies. For the trailing disk data from the flight experiment, the maximum decrease in base drag ranged form 0.08 to 0.07 as Mach number increased from 0.70 to 0.93. Aircraft angles of attack ranged from 3.9 to 6.6 deg for the flight data. For the trailing disk data from the wind tunnel experiment, the maximum decrease in base and total drag ranged from 0.08 to 0.05 for the approximately 0 deg angle of attack data as Mach number increased from 0.30 to 0.82.

  1. A novel method of measuring leaf epidermis and mesophyll stiffness shows the ubiquitous nature of the sandwich structure of leaf laminas in broad-leaved angiosperm species

    PubMed Central

    Onoda, Yusuke; Schieving, Feike; Anten, Niels P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Plant leaves commonly exhibit a thin, flat structure that facilitates a high light interception per unit mass, but may increase risks of mechanical failure when subjected to gravity, wind and herbivory as well as other stresses. Leaf laminas are composed of thin epidermis layers and thicker intervening mesophyll layers, which resemble a composite material, i.e. sandwich structure, used in engineering constructions (e.g. airplane wings) where high bending stiffness with minimum weight is important. Yet, to what extent leaf laminas are mechanically designed and behave as a sandwich structure remains unclear. To resolve this issue, we developed and applied a novel method to estimate stiffness of epidermis- and mesophyll layers without separating the layers. Across a phylogenetically diverse range of 36 angiosperm species, the estimated Young’s moduli (a measure of stiffness) of mesophyll layers were much lower than those of the epidermis layers, indicating that leaf laminas behaved similarly to efficient sandwich structures. The stiffness of epidermis layers was higher in evergreen species than in deciduous species, and strongly associated with cuticle thickness. The ubiquitous nature of sandwich structures in leaves across studied species suggests that the sandwich structure has evolutionary advantages as it enables leaves to be simultaneously thin and flat, efficiently capturing light and maintaining mechanical stability under various stresses. PMID:25675956

  2. Does Cruciate-Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty Show Better Quadriceps Recovery than Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty? - Objective Measurement with a Dynamometer in 102 Knees

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kye-Youl; Song, Sang-Jun; Bae, Dae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Cruciate-retaining (CR) prostheses have been considered to produce more physiologic femoral rollback, provide better proprioception, and result in better quadriceps recovery than posterior-stabilized (PS) prostheses after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, there are very few studies demonstrating these benefits in an objective manner. We investigated whether CR-TKA could result in (1) better quadriceps recovery; (2) a greater proportion of patients with beyond the preoperative level of recovery; and (3) better clinical outcomes than PS-TKA. Methods This was a prospective non-randomized comparative study on the results of CR-TKA and PS-TKA. CR prostheses were used in 51 knees and PS prostheses in 51 knees. Quadriceps force was measured with a dynamometer preoperatively and at postoperative 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months consecutively. The Knee Society score (KSS) and range of motion (ROM) were also evaluated. Results There were no differences between two groups in terms of the objective quadriceps force during the follow-up period. The proportion of patients with beyond the preoperative level of recovery was similar between groups. Moreover, the KSS and ROM were not significantly different between two groups. Conclusions CR-TKA did not result in better quadriceps recovery than PS-TKA during the 6-month follow-up. In other words, PS-TKA could lead to comparable quadriceps recovery despite greater preoperative weaknesses such as more restricted ROM and more severe degenerative changes of the knee. PMID:27904719

  3. Adsorption of barium and calcium chloride onto negatively charged alpha-Fe(2)O(3) particles.

    PubMed

    Pochard, Isabelle; Denoyel, Renaud; Couchot, Pierre; Foissy, Alain

    2002-11-01

    Adsorption of cations (Na(+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+)) onto negatively charged (pH 10.4) hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) particles has been studied. The oxide material was carefully prepared in order to obtain monodisperse suspensions of well-crystallized, quasi-spherical particles (50 nm in diameter). The isoelectric point (IEP) is located at pH 8.5. Adsorption of barium ions onto oxide particles was carried out and the electrophoretic mobility was measured throughout the adsorption experiment. Comparison with calcium adsorption at full coverage reveals a higher uptake of Ba(2+). In both cases it shows also that chloride ions coadsorb with M(2) ions. Simultaneous uptake of the positive and negative ions explains why the electrophoretic mobility does not reverse to cationic migration. A theoretical study of the surface speciation has been carried out, using the MuSiC model. It reveals the presence of negative as well as positive sites on both sides of the point of zero charge (PZC) of the hematite particles, which may explain the coadsorption of Ba(2+) and Cl(-) at pH 10.4. The effective charge of the oxide particles, calculated from the electrophoretic mobility, is in very good agreement with the results found with the MuSiC modelization and the chloride/barium adsorption ratio. It also verifies the theory of ionic condensation. Calorimetric measurements gave a negative heat for the overall reaction occurring when Ba(2+)/Cl(-) ions adsorb onto hematite. Despite the fact that anions (Cl(-) and OH(-)) adsorption onto mineral oxides is an exothermic phenomenon, it is likely that barium and calcium adsorption is endothermic, denoting the formation of an inner-sphere complex as reported in the literature.

  4. Morphological measurements and ITS sequences show that the new alder rust in Europe is conspecific with Melampsoridium hiratsukanum in eastern Asia.

    PubMed

    Hantula, J; Kurkela, T; Hendry, S; Yamaguchi, T

    2009-01-01

    Three species of Melampsoridium have been reported to infect hosts in genus Alnus. An epidemic of foliar rust affecting A. glutinosa and A. incana began in Europe in the mid-1990s, and the associated pathogen was identified as Melampsoridium hiratsukanum based on morphology. In this investigation we analyzed the morphology and genetic variation of alder rusts from Europe and Japan and the host specificity of the European epidemic rust. Our results showed that two rusts occur on the leaves of alders native to northern Europe; in Scotland an endemic rust indistinguishable from M. betulinum occurs, whereas alders in areas of Europe affected by the current epidemic were infected by M. hiratsukanum. M. hiratsukanum from naturally infected alder in Finland produced aecia on all Larix species tested but did not infect Betula leaves.

  5. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal–halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the “Cl-down” configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable. PMID:27066160

  6. Synthesis of activated carbon-based amino phosphonic acid chelating resin and its adsorption properties for Ce(III) removal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Yan, Chunjie; Wang, Yixia; Tang, Conghai; Zhou, Sen; Zhao, Yuan; Ma, Rui; Duan, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the adsorption of Ce(III) onto chelating resin based on activated carbon (CRAC). The CRAC adsorbent was prepared from activated carbon (AC) followed by oxidation, silane coupling, ammoniation and phosphorylation, and characterized by Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry, nitrogen adsorption measurements and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of solution pH, adsorbent dosage and contact time were studied by batch technique. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used to describe the adsorption behaviour of Ce(III) by CRAC, and the results showed that the adsorption behaviour well fitted the Langmuir model. The maximum uptake capacity (qmax) calculated by using the Langmuir equation for cerium ions was found to be 94.34 mg/g. A comparison of the kinetic models and the overall experimental data was best fitted with the type 1 pseudo second-order kinetic model. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) showed that the adsorption for Ce(III) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic at 25-45 °C. The CRAC showed an excellent adsorptive selectivity towards Ce(III). Moreover, more than 82% of Ce(III) adsorbed onto CRAC could be desorbed with HCl and could be used several times.

  7. Late Pleistocene Rapid Climate Change Events Measured in Stalagmites From a Semi-Arid Cave in Iran Show Pan-Eurasian Climate Signal Matching NGRIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehterian, S.; Pourmand, A.; Sharifi, A.; Murphy, L.; Lahijani, H. A. K.; Naderi, M.; Swart, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Although new records of Pleistocene climate variability have begun to emerge from speleothems in Western and Eastern Asia, much remains unknown about climate variability on centennial to millennial timescales during the last glacial and interglacial periods across the interior of West Asia. The regional climate of West Asia is governed by interactions between the Northern Hemisphere Westerly Jet, the Siberian Anticyclone and the Indian Ocean Summer Monsoon, making this region highly sensitive to abrupt climate variability. Here we present the first high-resolution oxygen isotope record of two stalagmites from a cave in the semi-arid region of NW Iran. The records from Qaleh Kord Cave (QKC, 35°47'50"N, 48°51'25"E) span between 73 kya to 127 kya and cover marine isotope stages MIS4 and MIS5. The absolute chronology of both stalagmites was established using a novel high-precision U-Th geochronometry technique with multi-collection ICP-MS. The δ18O composition of QKC stalagmites closely agree with changes in δ18O composition of the NGRIP ice core from Greenland, indicating a close atmospheric teleconnection between the climate of the North Atlantic and the interior of West Asia during this period. Because the chronology of NGRIP beyond 60 kya is calculated via numerical flow models and not directly measured, data from our stalagmites provide absolute age tie points to improve the accuracy of the deepest portion of the ice record. Furthermore, agreement between our records and those from the Soreq (Israel) and Sanbao (China) caves in West and East Asia point to a pan-Eurasian climate signal. In order to investigate the mechanisms that drive changes in climate in Western Asia on millennial timescales and examine the role of orbital characteristics and changes in insolation on atmospheric circulation and precipitation during MIS5, we present results from fully-coupled general circulation simulation CESM1 at three time slices of 80, 95, and 115 kya.

  8. Real-Time H2 O2 Measurements in Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) Show Increased Antioxidant Capacity in Cells From Osteoporotic Women.

    PubMed

    Román, Flavia; Urra, Carla; Porras, Omar; Pino, Ana María; Rosen, Clifford J; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo

    2017-03-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) derived from an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major determinant of aging and lifespan. It has also been associated with several age-related disorders, like postmenopausal osteoporosis of Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs are the common precursors for osteoblasts and adipocytes; appropriate commitment and differentiation of MSCs into a specific phenotype is modulated, among other factors, by ROS balance. MSCs have shown more resistance to ROS than differentiated cells, and their redox status depends on complex and abundant anti-oxidant mechanisms. The purpose of this work was to analyze in real time, H2 O2 signaling in individual h-MSCs, and to compare the kinetic parameters of H2 O2 management by cells derived from both control (c-) and osteoporotic (o-) women. For these purposes, cells were infected with a genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor named HyPer, which is specific for detecting H2 O2 inside living cells. Subsequently, cells were sequentially challenged with 50 and 500 μM H2 O2 pulses, and the cellular response was recorded in real time. The results demonstrated adequate expression of the biosensor allowing registering fluorescence from HyPer at a single cell level. Comparison of the response of c- and o-MSCs to the oxidant challenges demonstrated improved antioxidant activity in o-MSCs. This was further corroborated by measuring the relative expression of mRNAs for catalase, superoxide dismutase-1, thioredoxine, and peroxiredoxine, as well as by cell-surviving capacity under short-term H2 O2 treatment. We conclude that functional differences exist between healthy and osteoporotic human MSCs. The mechanism for these differences requires further study. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 585-593, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Adsorption Behavior of Pb(II) Onto Potassium Polytitanate Nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Mohammad; Tiling, Leonard D; El Saliby, Ibrahim; McDonagh, Andrew; Kim, Jong-Beom; Kim, Jong-Ho; Shon, Ho Kyong

    2016-02-01

    Potassium polytitanate nanofibres prepared by a hydrothermal method were investigated for their possible application in removing toxic metals from aqueous solution. Particular attention was paid to employing the titanate as a novel effective adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II). Batch adsorption experiments demonstrated that the adsorption was influenced by various conditions such as solution pH, adsorbent dosage and initial Pb(II) concentration. The results showed that the adsorption rate was faster in the first 5 min and equilibrium was achieved after 180 min. The maximum amount of adsorption was detected at pH 5. Potassium titanate showed much higher adsorption capacity compared to P25. The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) onto titanate best fit the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. FTIR spectra revealed that the hydroxyl groups in titanate were responsible for Pb(II) adsorption. The principal mechanism of the adsorption of Pb(II) in the present study is attributed to both ion exchange and oxygen bonding. The adsorption-desorption results demonstrated that the titanate could be readily regenerated after adsorption. Therefore, the present titanate exhibits great potential for the removal of Pb(II) from wastewater.

  10. The adsorption behavior of octafluoropropane at the water/gas interface

    SciTech Connect

    Giebel, Friederike; Paulus, Michael; Nase, Julia Bieder, Steffen; Kiesel, Irena; Tolan, Metin

    2014-12-14

    We studied the adsorption behavior of the gas octafluoropropane at the water/gas interface as a function of different pressures. In a custom-made measurement cell, the gas pressure was varied in a range between 1 bar and close to the condensation pressure of octafluoropropane. The electron density profiles of the adsorption layers show that the layer thickness increases with pressure. The evolution of the layer electron density indicates that the bulk electron density is reached if a layer consisting of more than one monolayer of octafluoropropane is adsorbed on the water surface.

  11. Differential Heat of Adsorption and Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yun; Wu, Jianzhong

    2017-01-31

    Heat of adsorption is a basic thermodynamic property extensively used not only for understanding thermal effects and heat management in industrial gas storage and separation processes but also for development and validation of adsorption models and materials force fields. Despite a long history of theoretical studies and a vast experimental literature, controversies often arise in the thermodynamic analysis of heat effects due to various assumptions used to describe gas adsorption and inconsistencies between direct calorimetric measurements and isosteric heat obtained from various adsorption isotherms. Here we present a rigorous theoretical procedure for predicting isosteric heat without any assumption about the geometry of porous adsorbents or operating conditions. Quantitative relations between the differential heat and various isosteres have been established with the grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation for gas adsorption in amorphous as well as crystalline porous materials. The inconsistencies and practical issues with conventional methods for the analysis of the heat effect have been clarified in the context of the exact results for model systems. Via the resolution of a number of controversies about heat analysis, we hope that the new theoretical procedure will be adopted for both fundamental research and industrial applications of gas adsorption processes.

  12. Argon adsorption in open-ended single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rols, S.; Johnson, M.R.; Zeppenfeld, P.; Bienfait, M.; Vilches, O.E.; Schneble, J.

    2005-04-15

    Thermodynamic and neutron-diffraction measurements combined with molecular dynamics simulation are used to determine the adsorption energies and the structure of argon condensed in the various adsorption sites of purified open-ended single-wall nanotube bundles. On the basis of these experiments and the simulation results, a consistent adsorption scenario has been derived. The adsorption proceeds first by the population of the walls inside the open nanotubes and the formation of one-dimensional Ar chains in the grooves at the outer surface of the bundles, followed by the filling of the remaining axial sites inside the nanotubes and the completion of a quasihexagonal monolayer on the outer surface of the bundle. The measurements also provide an estimate of the relative abundance of the various adsorption sites revealing that a major part of the adsorbed Ar is stored inside the open-ended nanotubes. Nanotube bundles generally show a certain degree of heterogeneity and some interstitial sites should be populated over a range of Ar chemical potential. However, for the sample used here, diffraction data and simulations suggest that heterogeneity is not a key feature of the bundles and there is little direct evidence of interstitial sites being populated.

  13. Adsorption of peptide nucleic acid and DNA decamers at electrically charged surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Fojta, M; Vetterl, V; Tomschik, M; Jelen, F; Nielsen, P; Wang, J; Palecek, E

    1997-01-01

    Adsorption behavior of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and DNA decamers (GTAGATCACT and the complementary sequence) on a mercury surface was studied by means of AC impedance measurements at a hanging mercury drop electrode. The nucleic acid was first attached to the electrode by adsorption from a 5-microliter drop of PNA (or DNA) solution, and the electrode with the adsorbed nucleic acid layer was then washed and immersed in the blank background electrolyte where the differential capacity C of the electrode double layer was measured as a function of the applied potential E. It was found that the adsorption behavior of the PNA with an electrically neutral backbone differs greatly from that of the DNA (with a negatively charged backbone), whereas the DNA-PNA hybrid shows intermediate behavior. At higher surface coverage PNA molecules associate at the surface, and the minimum value of C is shifted to negative potentials because of intermolecular interactions of PNA at the surface. Prolonged exposure of PNA to highly negative potentials does not result in PNA desorption, whereas almost all of the DNA is removed from the surface at these potentials. Adsorption of PNA decreases with increasing NaCl concentration in the range from 0 to 50 mM NaCl, in contrast to DNA, the adsorption of which increases under the same conditions. PMID:9129832

  14. Assessing the Adsorption Properties of Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, R.

    2014-12-01

    Fine-grained rocks, such as shales, contain a significant amount of nanopores that can significantly contribute to their storage capacity through the mechanism of adsorption. The current ability to extract natural gas that is adsorbed in the rock's matrix is limited and current technology focuses primarily on the free gas in the fractures, thus leading to very low recovery efficiencies. Shales constitute also a great portion of so-called caprocks above potential CO2 sequestration sites; hereby, the adsorption process may limit the CO2 mobility within the cap-rock, thus minimizing leakage phenomena. Whether it is a reservoir or a caprock, understanding and quantifying the mechanisms of adsorption in these natural materials is key to improve the engineering design of subsurface operations. Results will be presented from a laboratory study that combines conventional techniques for the measurement of adsorption isotherms with novel methods that allows for the imaging of adsorption using x-rays. Various nanoporous materials are considered, thus including rocks, such as shales and coals, pure clay minerals and engineered adsorbents with well-defined nanopore structures, such as zeolites. Supercritical CO2 adsorption isotherms have been measured with a Rubotherm Magnetic Suspension balance by covering the pressure range 0.1-20~MPa. A medical x-ray CT scanner has been used to identify three-dimensional patterns of the adsorption properties of a packed-bed of adsorbent, thus enabling to assess the spatial variability of the adsorption isotherm. The data are analyzed by using thermodynamically rigorous measures of adsorption and a graphical method is applied for their interpretation. The density of the adsorbed phase is estimated and compared to data reported in the literature; the latter is key to disclose gas-reserves and/or potential storage capacity estimates. When evaluated against classic adsorbent materials, the adsorption mechanism in shales is further complicated by

  15. Daytime and nighttime aircraft lidar measurements showing evidence of particulate matter transport into the Northeastern valleys of the Lower Fraser Valley, BC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, K. B.; Snyder, B. J.

    2004-11-01

    As part of the Pacific 2001 Air Quality Field Study a simultaneous upward/downward airborne lidar system called AERIAL (AERosol Imaging Airborne Lidar) operating at the fundamental Nd:YAG wavelength, 1064 nm, was flown aboard the National Research Council of Canada Convair 580 (CV580). The primary task of this platform was to establish a regional picture of particulate matter (PM) concentrations in the Lower Fraser Valley (LFV). The high temporal and spatial resolution of the lidar, provided images of PM stratification and boundary layer structure along predetermined flight lines. The flight lines were divided into a series of north-south and east-west lines to provide a snapshot of the LFV as well as provide aerial support for three main ground sites. The airborne lidar system also included a cross-polarization channel that is sensitive to particle shape (non-sphericity), for example smoke plumes from forest fires. There were nine flights flown over a 3-week period including two night flights. Comparing AERIAL results on the 26 and 29 August, between the afternoon and nighttime, showed increased PM concentrations in the Northeastern tributary valleys during the night flights due to a persistent sea breeze signal on both days. The complexity of the LFV airshed was further evidenced by the re-circulation of pollutants through upslope advection. The spatial and temporal variation of the planetary boundary layer height was also shown to play an important role in the air quality of the region.

  16. Adsorption of phenanthrene on natural snow.

    PubMed

    Domine, Florent; Cincinelli, Alessandra; Bonnaud, Elodie; Martellini, Tania; Picaud, Sylvain

    2007-09-01

    The snowpack is a reservoir for semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and, in particular, for persistent organic pollutants (POPs), which are sequestered in winter and released to the atmosphere or hydrosphere in the spring. Modeling these processes usually assumes that SVOCs are incorporated into the snowpack by adsorption to snow surfaces, but this has never been proven because the specific surface area (SSA) of snow has never been measured together with snow composition. Here we expose natural snow to phenanthrene vapors (one of the more volatile POPs) and measure for the first time both the SSA and the chemical composition of the snow. The results are consistent with an adsorption equilibrium. The measured Henry's law constant is H(Phen)(T) = 2.88 x 10(22) exp(-10660/7) Pa m2 mol(-1), with Tin Kelvin. The adsorption enthalpy is delta H(ads) = -89 +/- 18 kJ mol(-1). We also perform molecular dynamics calculations of phenanthrene adsorption to ice and obtain AHads = -85 +/- 8 kJ mol(-1), close to the experimental value. Results are applied to the adsorption of phenanthrene to the Arctic and subarctic snowpacks. The subarctic snowpack, with a low snow area index (SAI = 1000), is a negligible reservoir of phenanthrene, butthe colder Arctic snowpack, with SAI = 2500, sequesters most of the phenanthrene present in the (snow + boundary layer) system.

  17. Experimental comparison of adsorption characteristics of silica gel and zeolite in moist air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, F.; Yuan, Z. X.; Wang, W. C.; Du, C. X.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the macro adsorption characteristic of water vapor by the allochroic silica gel and the zeolite 5A and ZSM-5 were investigated experimentally. BET analysis method presented the difference of the porosity, the micro pore volume, and the specific surface area of the material. The dynamic and the equilibrium characteristics of the sample were measured thermo-gravimetrically in the moist air. In general, the ZSM-5 zeolite showed an inferior feature of the adsorption speed and the equilibrium concentration to the others. By comparison to the result of SAPO-34 zeolite in the open literature, the 5A zeolite showed some superiorities of the adsorption. The equilibrium concentration of the ZSM-5 zeolite was higher than that of the SAPO-34 calcined in the nitrogen, whereas it was lower than that calcined in the air. The adsorption isotherm was correlated and the relation of the isotherm to the microstructure of the material was discussed. With more mesopore volume involved, the zeolite presented an S-shaped isotherm in contrast to the exponential isotherm of the silica gel. In addition, the significance of the S-shaped isotherm for the application in adsorption heat pump has also been addressed.

  18. Mechanisms of CPB Modified Zeolite on Mercury Adsorption in Simulated Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Huang, Hui; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hao, Shuoshuo; Shen, Yuanyuan; Chen, Hong

    2016-06-01

    A systematic study was carried out to analyze the effects of mercury(II) adsorption by surface modified zeolite (SMZ) and adsorption mechanism. Cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was used to prepare SMZ. The characterization methods by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that both the surface and internal zeolite were covered with CPB molecules, but the main binding sites were surface. Results showed that the organic carbon and cation exchange capacity of the SMZ were 7.76 times and 4.22 times higher than those of natural zeolite (NZ), respectively. Zeta potentials before and after modification were measured at -7.80 mV and -30.27 mV, respectively. Moreover, the saturation adsorptive capacity of SMZ was 16.35 times higher than NZ in mercury-containing wastewater. The possible mechanisms of mercury elimination were surface adsorption, hydrophobic interaction, ion exchange, electricity neutralization. The adsorption process was affected little by competitive ions.

  19. Adsorption and synergism of cellobiohydrolase I and II of Trichoderma reesei during hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Medve, J.; Tjerneld, F. . Dept. of Biochemistry); Staahlberg, J. . Dept. of Molecular Biology)

    1994-11-05

    Hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) by cellobiohydrolase I and II (CBH I and II) from Trichoderma reesei has been studied. Adsorption and synergism of the enzymes were investigated. Experiments were performed at different temperatures and enzyme/substrate ratios using CBH I and CBH II alone and in reconstituted equimolar mixtures. Fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) analysis was found to be an accurate and reproducible method to follow the enzyme adsorption. A linear correlation was found between the conversion and the amount of adsorbed enzyme when Avicel was hydrolyzed by increasing amounts of CBH I and/or CBH II. CBH I had lower specific activity compared to CBH II although, over a wide concentration range, more CBH I was adsorbed than CBH II. Synergism between the cellobiohydrolases during hydrolysis of the amorphous fraction of Avicel showed a maximum as a function of total enzyme concentration. Synergism measured as a function of bound enzyme showed a continuous increase, which indicates that by decreasing the distance between the two enzymes the synergism is enhanced. The adsorption process for both enzymes was slow. Depending on the enzyme/substrate ratio it took 30--90 min to reach 95% of the equilibrium binding. The amount of bound enzyme decreased with increasing temperature. The two enzymes compete for the adsorption sites but also bind to specific sites. Stronger competition for adsorption sites was shown by CBH I.

  20. Adsorption hysteresis in nanopores

    PubMed

    Neimark; Ravikovitch; Vishnyakov

    2000-08-01

    Capillary condensation hysteresis in nanopores is studied by Monte Carlo simulations and the nonlocal density functional theory. Comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data on low temperature sorption of nitrogen and argon in cylindrical channels of mesoporous siliceous molecular sieves of MCM-41 type, we have revealed four qualitatively different sorption regimes depending on the temperature and pore size. As the pore size increases at a given temperature, or as the temperature decreases at a given pore size, the following regimes are consequently observed: volume filling without phase separation, reversible stepwise capillary condensation, irreversible capillary condensation with developing hysteresis, and capillary condensation with developed hysteresis. We show that, in the regime of developed hysteresis (pores wider than 5 nm in the case of nitrogen sorption at 77 K), condensation occurs spontaneously at the vaporlike spinodal while desorption takes place at the equilibrium. A quantitative agreement is found between the modeling results and the experimental hysteresis loops formed by the adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results obtained provide a better understanding of the general behavior of confined fluids and the specifics of sorption and phase transitions in nanomaterials.

  1. Adsorption of Ar on individual carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyubenko, Boris; Kahn, Joshua; Vilches, Oscar; Cobden, David

    2015-03-01

    We compare and contrast results of adsorption measurements of Ar on single-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphite. Adsorption isotherms on individual suspended nanotubes were obtained using both the mechanical resonance frequency shift (sensitive to mass adsorption) and the electrical conductance. Isotherms on graphene mounted on hexagonal boron nitride were obtained using only the conductance. New volumetric adsorption isotherms on bulk exfoliated graphite were also obtained, paying special attention to the very low coverage region (less than 2% of a monolayer). This allowed us to compare the degree of heterogeneity on the three substrate types, the binding energies, and the van der Waals 2D parameters. Research supported by NSF DMR 1206208.

  2. The study of adsorption characteristics of electrospun polymer nanofibers for benzenes in water.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Kang, Xue-Jun; Ma, Yu-Qin; Chen, Li-Qin; Wang, Yu; Gu, Zhong-Ze

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption properties of benzene, p-dichlorobenzene and nitrobenzene on polymer nanofibers were studied. Compared with polyacrylonitrile nanofiber, polystyrene (PS) nanofiber presented better adsorption performance. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of adsorption equilibria, and Freundlich isotherms fitted better. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption of PS nanofiber followed pseudo first-order model. Various thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (delta G), enthalpy (delta H) and entropy (delta S) were calculated for predicting the adsorption nature of PS nanofiber for three benzenes, which indicated that the adsorption was spontaneous and a physical process. The regeneration efficiency maintains over 80% after five cycles of adsorption/desorption tests. It showed that PS nanofibers are promising candidates for adsorption and removal of aromatic hydrocarbons from water.

  3. Adsorption of ammonium on biochar prepared from giant reed.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jie; Huang, Lei; Yang, Zhimin; Zhao, Yaqi; Deng, Chaoren; Chen, Yucheng; Li, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Giant reed was used as precursor for making biochar in order for the adsorption of NH4 (+)-N from aqueous solution. And the adsorption of the product to NH4 (+)-N was examined. The surface features of biochar were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD patterns showed several peaks and correspond to the high amount of crystalline material. The crystals contain KCl, K2O, CaO, MgO, and SiO and possess high surface area which enhances adsorption. The influence of different parameters such as initial concentration, adsorption time, pH, and ionic strength has been carried out. The adsorption could reach equilibrium through 24 h reaction and had the best adsorption amount at the solution pH values from 7 to 9. The cation has great influence on the adsorption of NH4 (+)-N, whereas the anion exerted a weaker effect. The adsorption followed pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. And the intraparticle diffusion and desorption studies further elucidated that the mechanism of adsorption on the product was ion exchange. The product equilibrium data was well described by the Langmuir and Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacities were 1.490 mg/g. Biochar derived from giant reed at 500 °C was suggested as a promising adsorbent for the removal of NH4 (+)-N from slightly polluted wastewater.

  4. The influence of using Jordanian natural zeolite on the adsorption, physical, and mechanical properties of geopolymers products.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Rushdi Ibrahim; El-Eswed, Bassam; Alshaaer, Mazen; Khalili, Fawwaz; Khoury, Hani

    2009-06-15

    Geopolymers consist of an amorphous, three-dimensional structure resulting from the polymerization of aluminosilicate monomers that result from dissolution of kaolin in an alkaline solution at temperatures around 80 degrees C. One potential use of geopolymers is as Portland cement replacement. It will be of great importance to provide a geopolymer with suitable mechanical properties for the purpose of water storage and high adsorption capacity towards pollutants. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of using Jordanian zeolitic tuff as filler on the mechanical performance and on the adsorption capacity of the geopolymers products. Jordanian zeolitic tuff is inexpensive and is known to have high adsorption capacity. The results confirmed that this natural zeolitic tuff can be used as a filler of stable geopolymers with high mechanical properties and high adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and Cu(II) ions. The XRD measurements showed that the phillipsite peaks (major mineral constituent of Jordanian zeolite) were disappeared upon geopolymerization. The zeolite-based geopolymers revealed high compressive strength compared to reference geopolymers that employ sand as filler. Adsorption experiments showed that among different geopolymers prepared, the zeolite-based geopolymers have the highest adsorption capacity towards methylene blue and copper(II) ions.

  5. Studies with an immobilized metal affinity chromatography cassette system involving binuclear triazacyclononane-derived ligands: automation of batch adsorption measurements with tagged recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Martin; Coghlan, Campbell J; Hearn, Milton T W

    2014-07-18

    This study describes the determination of the adsorption isotherms and binding kinetics of tagged recombinant proteins using a recently developed IMAC cassette system and employing automated robotic liquid handling procedures for IMAC resin screening. These results confirm that these new IMAC resins, generated from a variety of different metal-charged binuclear 1,4,7-triaza-cyclononane (tacn) ligands, interact with recombinant proteins containing a novel N-terminal metal binding tag, NT1A, with static binding capacities similar to those obtained with conventional hexa-His tagged proteins, but with significantly increased association constants. In addition, higher kinetic binding rates were observed with these new IMAC systems, an attribute that can be positively exploited to increase process productivity. The results from this investigation demonstrate that enhancements in binding capacities and affinities were achieved with these new IMAC resins and chosen NT1A tagged protein. Further, differences in the binding performances of the bis(tacn) xylenyl-bridged ligands were consistent with the distance between the metal binding centres of the two tacn moieties, the flexibility of the ligand and the potential contribution from the aromatic ring of the xylenyl group to undergo π/π stacking interactions with the tagged proteins.

  6. Measurement of toxic volatile organic compounds in indoor air of semiconductor foundries using multisorbent adsorption/thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Hou; Lin, Ming-Nan; Feng, Chien-Tai; Yang, Kuang-Ling; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Lo, Jiunn-Guang

    2003-05-09

    A method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the air of class-100 clean rooms at semiconductor fabrication facilities was developed. Air samples from two semiconductor factories were collected each hour on multisorbent tubes (including Carbopack B, Carbopack C, and Carbosieve SIII) with a 24-h automatic active sampling system and analyzed using adsorption/thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Experimental parameters, including thermal desorption temperature, desorption time, and cryofocusing temperature, were optimized. The average recoveries and the method detection limits for the target compounds were in the range 94-101% and 0.31-0.89 ppb, respectively, under the conditions of a 1 L sampling volume and 80% relative humidity. VOCs such as acetone, isopropyl alcohol, 2-heptanone, and toluene, which are commonly used in the semiconductor and electronics industries, were detected and accurately quantified with the established method. Temporal variations of the analyte concentrations observed were attributed to the improper use of organic solvents during operation.

  7. Moisture adsorption in optical coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, H. Angus

    1988-01-01

    The thin film filter is a very large aperture component which is exceedingly useful because of its small size, flexibility and ease of mounting. Thin film components, however, do have defects of performance and especially of stability which can cause problems in systems, particularly where long-term measurements are being made. Of all of the problems, those associated with moisture absorption are the most serious. Moisture absorption occurs in the pore-shaped voids inherent in the columnar structure of the layers. Ion-assisted deposition is a promising technique for substantially reducing moisture adsorption effects in thin film structures.

  8. Bile salt adsorption ability of dietary fiber from named varieties of carrot at different developmental ages.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J A; Eastwood, M A; Yeoman, M M

    1980-06-01

    The adsorption of bile salts to fiber has been measured using fiber prepared from different varieties of carrot at different developmental ages. We investigated the carrot varieties Altrinchan and Chantenay and used the bile salts deoxycholate and glycocholate. The method used to measure adsorption distinguished between true adsorption and apparent adsorption due to bile salts trapped within the interstices of the fiber matrix. Adsorption ability was influenced by the developmental age of the carrot but not by variety. Adsorption ability was at a maximum when the carrot fresh weight was at a maximum. The adsorption ability measured was true adsorption and was not dependent on the water holding capacity of the fiber. Deoxycholate was better adsorbed than glycocholate and the results suggest that the developmental age of a fiber source could be important when formulating diets designed to influence bile salt metabolism.

  9. Water Adsorption on a-Fe2O3(0001) at Near Ambient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Susumu

    2011-08-19

    We have investigated hydroxylation and water adsorption on {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) at water vapor pressures up to 2 Torr and temperatures ranging from 277 to 647 K (relative humidity (RH) {le} 34%) using ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Hydroxylation occurs at the very low RH of 1 x 10{sup -7} % and precedes the adsorption of molecular water. With increasing RH, the OH coverage increases up to one monolayer (ML) without any distinct threshold pressure. Depth profiling measurements showed that hydroxylation occurs only at the topmost surface under our experimental conditions. The onset of molecular water adsorption varies from {approx}2 x 10{sup -5} to {approx} 4 x 10{sup -2} % RH depending on sample temperature and water vapor pressure. The coverage of water reaches 1 ML at {approx}15% RH and increases to 1.5 ML at 34% RH.

  10. Water adsorption on alpha-Fe2O3(0001) at near ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Susumu; Kendelewicz, Tom; Newberg, John T.; Ketteler, Guido; Starr, David E.; Mysak, Erin R.; Andersson, Klas J.; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Bluhm, Henrik; Salmeron, Miquel; Brown Jr., Gordon E.; Nilsson, Anders

    2009-11-23

    We have investigated hydroxylation and water adsorption on {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) at water vapor pressures up to 2 Torr and temperatures ranging from 277 to 647 K (relative humidity (RH) {<=} 34%) using ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Hydroxylation occurs at the very low RH of 1 x 10{sup -7}% and precedes the adsorption of molecular water. With increasing RH, the OH coverage increases up to one monolayer (ML) without any distinct threshold pressure. Depth profiling measurements showed that hydroxylation occurs only at the topmost surface under our experimental conditions. The onset of molecular water adsorption varies from {approx}2 x 10{sup -5} to {approx}4 x 10{sup -2}% RH depending on sample temperature and water vapor pressure. The coverage of water reaches I ML at {approx} 15% RH and increases to 1.5 ML at 34% RH.

  11. Prediction of static contact angles on the basis of molecular forces and adsorption data.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Savage, Michael D; Cerro, Ramon L

    2016-08-01

    At a three-phase contact line, a liquid bulk phase is in contact with and coexists with a very thin layer of adsorbed molecules. This adsorbed film in the immediate vicinity of a liquid wedge modifies the balance of forces between the liquid and solid phases such that, when included in the balance of forces, a quantitative relationship emerges between the adsorbed film thickness and the static contact angle. This relationship permits the prediction of static contact angles from molecular forces and equilibrium adsorption data by means of quantities that are physically meaningful and measurable. For n-alkanes on polytetrafluoroethylene, for which there are experimental data available on adsorption and contact angles, our computations show remarkable agreement with the data. The results obtained are an improvement on previously published calculations-particularly for alkanes with a low number of carbon atoms, for which adsorption is significant.

  12. Prediction of static contact angles on the basis of molecular forces and adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, M. Elena; Savage, Michael D.; Cerro, Ramon L.

    2016-08-01

    At a three-phase contact line, a liquid bulk phase is in contact with and coexists with a very thin layer of adsorbed molecules. This adsorbed film in the immediate vicinity of a liquid wedge modifies the balance of forces between the liquid and solid phases such that, when included in the balance of forces, a quantitative relationship emerges between the adsorbed film thickness and the static contact angle. This relationship permits the prediction of static contact angles from molecular forces and equilibrium adsorption data by means of quantities that are physically meaningful and measurable. For n-alkanes on polytetrafluoroethylene, for which there are experimental data available on adsorption and contact angles, our computations show remarkable agreement with the data. The results obtained are an improvement on previously published calculations—particularly for alkanes with a low number of carbon atoms, for which adsorption is significant.

  13. Phytic acid adsorption on the copper surface: Observation of electrochemistry and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shu; Guo, Xiao-yu; Song, Ping; Pan, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Hao-qiong; Wen, Ying; Yang, Hai-Feng

    2013-07-01

    The adsorption of phytic acid (PA) on copper was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrochemical polarization measurement and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. Electrochemical results indicated that inhibition efficiency of PA film for copper from corrosion in 3 wt% NaCl solution was beyond 80% at an optimum self-assembly concentration of 0.1 mM for 6 h. Electrochemical polarization indicated that PA functioned as a cathodic inhibitor. In addition, Raman studies showed that PA adsorbed on the copper surface formed via P-O groups. Finally, the value of ΔGads (-39.96 kJ mol-1) was close to -40 kJ mol-1, suggesting that the adsorption of PA on the copper surface was the chemical adsorption.

  14. Critical Casimir force in the presence of random local adsorption preference.

    PubMed

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    We study the critical Casimir force for a film geometry in the Ising universality class. We employ a homogeneous adsorption preference on one of the confining surfaces, while the opposing surface exhibits quenched random disorder, leading to a random local adsorption preference. Disorder is characterized by a parameter p, which measures, on average, the portion of the surface that prefers one component, so that p=0,1 correspond to homogeneous adsorption preference. By means of Monte Carlo simulations of an improved Hamiltonian and finite-size scaling analysis, we determine the critical Casimir force. We show that by tuning the disorder parameter p, the system exhibits a crossover between an attractive and a repulsive force. At p=1/2, disorder allows to effectively realize Dirichlet boundary conditions, which are generically not accessible in classical fluids. Our results are relevant for the experimental realizations of the critical Casimir force in binary liquid mixtures.

  15. Single and binary adsorption of proteins on ion-exchange adsorbent: The effectiveness of isothermal models.

    PubMed

    Liang, Juan; Fieg, Georg; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous and sequential adsorption equilibria of single and binary adsorption of bovine serum albumin and bovine hemoglobin on Q Sepharose FF were investigated in different buffer constituents and initial conditions. The results in simultaneous adsorption showed that both proteins underwent competitive adsorption onto the adsorbent following greatly by protein-surface interaction. Preferentially adsorbed albumin complied with the universal rule of ion-exchange adsorption whereas buffer had no marked influence on hemoglobin adsorption. Moreover, an increase in initial ratios of proteins was benefit to a growth of adsorption density. In sequential adsorption, hemoglobin had the same adsorption densities as single-component adsorption. It was attributed to the displacement of preadsorbed albumin and multiple layer adsorption of hemoglobin. Three isothermal models (i.e. extended Langmuir, steric mass-action, and statistical thermodynamic (ST) models) were introduced to describe the ion-exchange adsorption of albumin and hemoglobin mixtures. The results suggested that extended Langmuir model gave the lowest deviation in describing preferential adsorption of albumin at a given salt concentration while steric mass-action model could very well describe the salt effect in albumin adsorption. For weaker adsorbed hemoglobin, ST model was the preferred choice. In concert with breakthrough data, the research further revealed the complexity in ion-exchange adsorption of proteins.

  16. Adsorption of star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, A.; Joanny, J. F.

    1991-06-01

    The adsorption of star polymers on a flat solid surface is analyzed by means of scalling arguments based on the Daoud-Cotton blob model. For the adsorption of a single star, consisting of f arms comprising each N monomers, we distinguish three regimes determined by the adsorption energy of a monomer at the surface, δ kT. 1) Strong adsorption characterized by the full adsorption of all arms occurs for δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) A “Sombrero” like structure comprising f_ads fully adsorbed arms and f{-}f_ads free arms is obtained for (f/N)^{3/5}> δ > f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. 3) Weakly adsorbed stars retain, essentially, the structure of a free star. This regime occurs for δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. The weakly adsorbed structure may also exist as a metastable state if δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}. Nous étudions l'adsorption de polymères en étoile sur une surface solide en utilisant une approche de lois d'échelles basée sur le modèle de blobs de Daoud et Cotton. Pour une étoile formée de f bras contenant chacun N monomères, nous distinguons trois régimes suivant la valeur de l'énergie d'adsorption d'un monomère sur la surface δ kT. 1) L'adsorption forte caractérisée par une adsorption complète de tous les bras se produit lorsque δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) Une structure en “sombrero” avec f_ads bras adsorbés et f{-}f_ads bras libres est obtenue si f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}δ < (f/N)^{3/5}. 3) Les étoiles faiblement adsorbées gardent une structure très similaire à celle des étoiles libres en solution. Ce régime existe si δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. La structure correspondant aux étoiles faiblement adsorbées peut aussi exister comme un état métastable si δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}.

  17. Study on the adsorption feature of rutin aqueous solution on macroporous adsorption resins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenbin; Zhang, Anjie; Li, Jie; Dong, Fang; Di, Duolong; Wu, Youzhi

    2010-04-15

    The adsorption feature of different kinds of polystyrene-based macroporous adsorption resins (MARs) was investigated systemically at constant temperature employing Rutin as the adsorbate. Different from traditional adsorption patterns, Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption, and the results showed interesting aspects: (1) With the increase of the volume of the initial solution, the adsorption capacity increased to the maximum, and then decreased gradually. (2) Experimental results clearly verified the opinion that the adsorption process of MARs could be divided into three stages-macropores, mesopores, and micropores-by the capillary effects occurring at the two intersections, and the adsorption feature for every stage could be described well by the fourth type of Brunauer model. (3) The model that the inductive effect transmitted to the first layer could not interpret our experimental results reasonably. Thus, the model that the inductive effect passed on to a higher layer was proposed by investigating regression of the experimental results and the conclusion that the inductive effect transmitted to the third layer was drawn.

  18. Evaluation of various substances to prevent adsorption of tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) to glass surfaces*

    PubMed Central

    Landi, S.; Held, H. R.; Tseng, M. C.

    1970-01-01

    It is well known that a dilute tuberculin PPD solution (1 IU or 5 IU per dose) very rapidly loses its potency owing to adsorption of tuberculoprotein to the wall of the container into which it is dispensed. The amount of tuberculoprotein adsorbed per cm2 of glass surface has been measured for phosphate-buffered saline over a wide pH range (pH 1 to pH 10). The maximum adsorption was found at pH 4 (0.31 μg/cm2) and the least at between pH 6 and pH 10 (0.15 μg/cm2). The rate of adsorption of tuberculoprotein to glass was not changed when the phosphate-buffered saline was replaced by borate-buffered saline. Tuberculin PPD prepared by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method, by the trichloroacetic acid precipitation method and by a combination of both methods adsorbed equally well to glass and no difference in the rate of adsorption for these tuberculoproteins was found. Forty-two substances in addition to Tween 80 were tested for their property to prevent adsorption of tuberculoprotein to glass in dilute tuberculin PPD solutions (50 IU/ml of 14C-labelled PPD). The most efficient anti-adsorption agents were found to be nonionic surfactants, some ionic surfactants and some colloidal substances; polypeptides and non-surface-active substances of low molecular weight showed little or no anti-adsorption property. The labelling of PPD with 14C has proved to be a valuable tool, particularly for long-term adsorption studies and for screening substances to be used as efficient anti-adsorption agents. These studies have permitted the selection of agents which could be added to dilute solutions of tuberculin PPD (10 IU/ml to 500 IU/ml or 0.2 μg/ml to 10 μg/ml respectively) in order to avoid loss of potency due to adsorption. PMID:5312323

  19. [Elimination of carbendazim from fruit conditioning waters by adsorption on different materials].

    PubMed

    Giry, G; Ayele, J; Gauthier, C

    2001-07-01

    The main aim of this work is to test different materials (activated carbon and other more "rustic" materials like clay and coal) as potential adsorbents in order to evaluate their adsorption capacity for carbendazime. The experiments were realized with certified carbendazim or with benlate solutions left to change long enough to suppose all the benomyl converted into carbendazim. The results were introduced through adsorption kinetic and isotherm forms or interpreted according to the Langmuir model. They pointed out that final elimination percentages of certified carbendazim don't exceed 55%. But even the activated carbon remains the most effective adsorbent, clay and coal present an interesting adsorption capacity, 45% for clay (but its performance is varied), 35% for coal. The presence of formulation additives has an inhibitive effect whatever the materials is. Some adsorption attempts with clay and coal mixtures (100 mg l(-1) of each one) were realized, there isn't a cumulative adsorption, final percentages of elimination are about 45%. Characterization attempts of the adsorbents pointed out that all the materials have a negative global surface charge. But clay possesses a surface charge far more negative than coal, sodipolary lap of carbendazim can further the adsorption. The measures of surface functions according to Boehm titration and capillary rising technique showed that coal differentiates from the other materials by its high capacity to establish Lifshitz-Van der Waals interactions. Carbendazim molecule can present a dipolary moment which could lead to the formation of hydrogen bonds. But results of capillary rising are to be considered by surface unities that could explain the superior adsorption capacity of clay (internal surface: 800m2 g(-1)).

  20. Adsorption studies of methylene blue dye on tunisian activated lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, A.; Hamdi, N.; Srasra, E.

    2011-02-01

    Activated carbon prepared from natural lignin, providing from a geological deposit, was used as the adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) dye from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to evaluate various experimental parameters like pH and contact time for the removal of this dye. Effective pH for MB removal was 11. Kinetic study showed that the adsorption of dye was gradual process. Quasi equilibrium reached in 4 h. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order were used to fit the experimental data. Pseudo-second-order rate equation was able to provide realistic description of adsorption kinetics. The experimental isotherms data were also modelled by the Langmuir and Freundlich equation of adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 147 mg/g. Activated lignin was shown to be a promising material for adsorption of MB from aqueous solutions.

  1. Communication: Thermodynamic analysis of critical conditions of polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimino, R.; Rasmussen, C. J.; Neimark, A. V.

    2013-11-01

    Polymer adsorption to solid surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon, which has attracted long-lasting attention. Dependent on the competition between the polymer-solid adsorption and polymer-solvent solvation interactions, a chain may assume either 3d solvated conformation when adsorption is weak or 2d adsorbed conformation when adsorption is strong. The transition between these conformations occurring upon variation of adsorption strength is quite sharp, and in the limit of "infinite" chain length, can be treated as a critical phenomenon. We suggest a novel thermodynamic definition of the critical conditions of polymer adsorption from the equality of incremental chemical potentials of adsorbed and free chains. We show with the example of freely jointed Lennard-Jones chains tethered to an adsorbing surface that this new definition provides a link between thermodynamic and geometrical features of adsorbed chains and is in line with classical scaling relationships for the fraction of adsorbed monomers, chain radii of gyration, and free energy.

  2. CRYOGENIC ADSORPTION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES OVER NANO-STRUCTURED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, S.; Heung, L.

    2010-10-07

    Porous materials such as zeolites, activated carbon, silica gels, alumina and a number of industrial catalysts are compared and ranked for hydrogen and deuterium adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. All samples show higher D{sub 2} adsorption than that of H{sub 2}, in which a HY sample has the greatest isotopic effect while 13X has the highest hydrogen uptake capacity. Material's moisture content has significant impact to its hydrogen uptake. A material without adequate drying could result in complete loss of its adsorption capacity. Even though some materials present higher H{sub 2} adsorption capacity at full pressure, their adsorption at low vapor pressure may not be as good as others. Adsorption capacity in a dynamic system is much less than in a static system. A sharp desorption is also expected in case of temperature upset.

  3. Communication: Thermodynamic analysis of critical conditions of polymer adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Cimino, R.; Neimark, A. V.; Rasmussen, C. J.

    2013-11-28

    Polymer adsorption to solid surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon, which has attracted long-lasting attention. Dependent on the competition between the polymer-solid adsorption and polymer-solvent solvation interactions, a chain may assume either 3d solvated conformation when adsorption is weak or 2d adsorbed conformation when adsorption is strong. The transition between these conformations occurring upon variation of adsorption strength is quite sharp, and in the limit of “infinite” chain length, can be treated as a critical phenomenon. We suggest a novel thermodynamic definition of the critical conditions of polymer adsorption from the equality of incremental chemical potentials of adsorbed and free chains. We show with the example of freely jointed Lennard-Jones chains tethered to an adsorbing surface that this new definition provides a link between thermodynamic and geometrical features of adsorbed chains and is in line with classical scaling relationships for the fraction of adsorbed monomers, chain radii of gyration, and free energy.

  4. Adsorption Dynamics Of Water On The Surface Of TiO2 (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundaleski, B.; Silva, A. G.; Schröder, U.; Moutinho, A. M. C.; Teodoro, O. M. N. D.

    2010-07-01

    Rutile titanium dioxide TiO2 is used in a number of technological areas. Therefore, in surface science, it has become the most studied oxide surface, and it is generally used to model the TiO2 catalytic properties under ultra high vacuum conditions. While water adsorption on rutile TiO2 (110) has been mainly investigated using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STM), we use here a different approach based on the work function spectroscopy (WF): water adsorption induces formation of a dipole layer which locally changes the work function. The change can be experimentally monitored by the onset shift of the energy spectrum of secondary electrons. Although X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is not sensitive enough to monitor water adsorption on TiO2 having low defect concentration, WF results clearly show the work function change which is undoubtedly attributed to the water adsorption. These measurements were done for different water vapour pressures, exposure times, sample temperatures and general surface conditions. Time evolution of the work function change, together with that of the H2O partial pressure, enable us to successfully model the adsorption dynamics and help us understand the observed results. This analysis clearly shows existence of at least three different adsorption mechanisms. The interplay between them governs the measured time evolution of the work function change. Their relative contributions depend on the surface temperature and, presumably, its topography. These results will be discussed in the light of several recent experimental (mainly using STM) and theoretical studies of this system done by other authors.

  5. Anion adsorption induced surface reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei

    2005-11-01

    Surface stress plays an important role in the behavior of solid surfaces. Potential-controlled anion adsorption in electrolytes alters the surface stress of the electrode and results in morphology changes to the surfaces. With a combination of potential-induced surface stress measurement and in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), it is demonstrated that anion adsorption induces changes in structure of thin films and modifies the growth morphology and stress evolution in epitaxially grown films. Surface structural transitions in the heteroepitaxial system consisting of one to two gold monolayers on platinum substrates were observed. By increasing the potential, structural transitions, from (1 x 1), to a striped phase, to a hexagonal structure, occurred in the gold bilayer. This hexagonal structure was related to the formation of an ordered sulfate adlayer with a ( 3x7 ) structure. Such transitions were repeatable by cycling the potential. Furthermore, the transitions between various dislocation structures were affected by anion adsorption. The surface composition of the gold bilayer on Pt was measured by underpotential deposition of copper. By subtracting the contribution of a pure Pt surface from the gold bi-layer on Pt, a stress change of -2.4 N/m was observed, which agrees with the stress change of -2.46 N/m predicted to accompany formation of 1.5 MLs of coherent Au on Pt(111) from epitaxy theory. The Cu monolayer deposited on Au(111) from an acid sulfate electrolyte was found to be pseudomorphic while the Cu monolayer formed on Au(111) in vacuum was incoherent. The stress-thickness change associated with the coherent monolayer of copper on Au(111) in electrolyte was -0.6 N/m, while conventional epitaxy theories predict a value of +7.76 N/m. STM results elucidated the sulfate adsorption on the copper monolayer caused an expansion of the layer as evidenced by a Moire Structure. For the Cu monolayer on Au(111), the sulfate-induced expansion

  6. Adsorption of organic acids on TiO2 nanoparticles: effects of pH, nanoparticle size, and nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Pettibone, John M; Cwiertny, David M; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H

    2008-06-01

    In this study, the adsorption of two organic acids, oxalic acid and adipic acid, on TiO2 nanoparticles was investigated at room temperature, 298 K. Solution-phase measurements were used to quantify the extent and reversibility of oxalic acid and adipic acid adsorption on anatase nanoparticles with primary particle sizes of 5 and 32 nm. At all pH values considered, there were minimal differences in measured Langmuir adsorption constants, K ads, or surface-area-normalized maximum adsorbate-surface coverages, Gamma max, between 5 and 32 nm particles. Although macroscopic differences in the reactivity of these organic acids as a function of nanoparticle size were not observed, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy showed some distinct differences in the absorption bands present for oxalic acid adsorbed on 5 nm particles compared to 32 nm particles, suggesting different adsorption sites or a different distribution of adsorption sites for oxalic acid on the 5 nm particles. These results illustrate that molecular-level differences in nanoparticle reactivity can still exist even when macroscopic differences are not observed from solution phase measurements. Our results also allowed the impact of nanoparticle aggregation on acid uptake to be assessed. It is clear that particle aggregation occurs at all pH values and that organic acids can destabilize nanoparticle suspensions. Furthermore, 5 nm particles can form larger aggregates compared to 32 nm particles under the same conditions of pH and solid concentrations. The relative reactivity of 5 and 32 nm particles as determined from Langmuir adsorption parameters did not appear to vary greatly despite differences that occur in nanoparticle aggregation for these two different size nanoparticles. Although this potentially suggests that aggregation does not impact organic acid uptake on anatase particles, these data clearly show that challenges remain in assessing the available surface area for adsorption in nanoparticle aqueous suspensions

  7. Dual-porosity Mn2O3 cubes for highly efficient dye adsorption.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yongjiu; Ren, Bin; Jiang, Hanmei; Zhou, Bingjie; Lv, Liping; Ren, Jingzheng; Dong, Lichun; Li, Jing; Liu, Zhenfa

    2017-03-08

    Dual-porosity materials containing both macropores and mesopores are highly desired in many fields. In this work, we prepared dual-porosity Mn2O3 cube materials with large-pore mesopores, in which, macropores are made by using carbon spheres as the hard templates, while the mesopores are produced via a template-free route. The attained dual-porosity Mn2O3 materials have 24nm of large-pore mesopores and 700nm of macropores. Besides, the achieved materials own cubic morphologies with particle sizes as large as 6.0μm, making them separable in the solution by a facile natural sedimentation. Dye adsorption measurements reveal that the dual-porosity materials possess a very high maximum adsorption capacity of 125.6mg/g, much larger than many reported materials. Particularly, the adsorbents can be recycled and the dye removal efficiency can be well maintained at 98% after four cycles. Adsorption isotherm and kinetics show that the Langmuir model and the pseudo-second-order kinetics model can well describe the adsorption process of Congo Red on the dual-porosity Mn2O3 cube materials. In brief, the reported dual-porosity Mn2O3 demonstrates a good example for controlled preparation of dual-porosity materials with large-pore mesopores, and the macropore-mesopore dual-porosity distribution is good for mass transfer in dye adsorption application.

  8. STM Observation of Molecular Adsorption on Graphene and Nitrogen Doped Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Seiji; Saiki, Koichiro

    2014-03-01

    Carbon alloy catalyst (CAC) shows catalytic activity to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and it is expected as a substitution of Pt in fuel cells due to its catalytic property. At present CAC are synthesized by burning organic compounds which contain nitrogen atoms such as phthalocyanine. The catalytic activity of CAC is lower than Pt. Since catalytic sites and oxygen reduction process is still unknown, elucidation of catalytic sites of CAC helps to synthesize high performance CAC. STM is a useful tool to investigate adsorption and reaction at atomic level. However, disordered structure of CAC makes it difficult to use STM for catalytic site observation. To overcome this difficulty, we synthesized nitrogen doped graphene (NG) and and pristine graphene (PG) on Pt (111) and used it as model catalyst to study the catalytic property of CAC. Oxygen adsorption is the first step of oxygen reduction reaction. Therefore we investigated the oxygen adsorption to NG and PG by STM. Oxygen adsorbed at domain boundary (DB) of NG?According to XPS measurement nitrogen atoms exist at edge site preferably. These results indicate that nitrogen atom enhances oxygen adsorption activity. In addition, actual reaction process occurs in H2O. Thus we also investigated H2O adsorption on NG.

  9. Ammonia adsorption and its effects on framework stability of MOF-5 and MOF-177.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dipendu; Deng, Shuguang

    2010-08-15

    Ammonia adsorption equilibrium and kinetics on MOF-5 and MOF-177 were measured volumetrically at 298 K and ammonia pressures up to 800 torr. This study allowed us to determine the ammonia adsorption properties and stability of both MOFs after exposure to ammonia. MOF-177 adsorbed more ammonia than MOF-5 at ammonia pressures below 150 torr and the ammonia adsorption capacity on both MOFs at 800 torr was about the same (12.2 mmol/g). It can be inferred from the adsorption results that physical adsorption of ammonia on both MOFs dominated at ammonia pressures below 150 torr after which chemical reactions between ammonia and MOF frameworks take place. After exposure to ammonia both MOFs lost majority of their pore textures as evidenced by a drastic decrease of specific surface area and pore volume. The X-ray diffraction study suggested a complete loss of crystallinity of both MOFs, and the FT-IR and Raman spectral analyses showed the generation of free organic ligands within both MOF-5 and MOF-177 after they were exposed to ammonia. Ammonia molecules are proposed to destroy the MOF frameworks by forming hydrogen bonds with Zn(4)O clusters of MOFs.

  10. Experimental design based response surface methodology optimization of ultrasonic assisted adsorption of safaranin O by tin sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Roosta, M; Ghaedi, M; Daneshfar, A; Sahraei, R

    2014-03-25

    In this research, the adsorption rate of safranine O (SO) onto tin sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (SnS-NPAC) was accelerated by the ultrasound. SnS-NP-AC was characterized by different techniques such as SEM, XRD and UV-Vis measurements. The present results confirm that the ultrasound assisted adsorption method has remarkable ability to improve the adsorption efficiency. The influence of parameters such as the sonication time, adsorbent dosage, pH and initial SO concentration was examined and evaluated by central composite design (CCD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF). Conducting adsorption experiments at optimal conditions set as 4 min of sonication time, 0.024 g of adsorbent, pH 7 and 18 mg L(-1) SO make admit to achieve high removal percentage (98%) and high adsorption capacity (50.25 mg g(-)(1)). A good agreement between experimental and predicted data in this study was observed. The experimental equilibrium data fitting to Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models show that the Langmuir model is a good and suitable model for evaluation and the actual behavior of adsorption. Kinetic evaluation of experimental data showed that the adsorption processes followed well pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models.

  11. Experimental design based response surface methodology optimization of ultrasonic assisted adsorption of safaranin O by tin sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roosta, M.; Ghaedi, M.; Daneshfar, A.; Sahraei, R.

    2014-03-01

    In this research, the adsorption rate of safranine O (SO) onto tin sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (SnS-NPAC) was accelerated by the ultrasound. SnS-NP-AC was characterized by different techniques such as SEM, XRD and UV-Vis measurements. The present results confirm that the ultrasound assisted adsorption method has remarkable ability to improve the adsorption efficiency. The influence of parameters such as the sonication time, adsorbent dosage, pH and initial SO concentration was examined and evaluated by central composite design (CCD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF). Conducting adsorption experiments at optimal conditions set as 4 min of sonication time, 0.024 g of adsorbent, pH 7 and 18 mg L-1 SO make admit to achieve high removal percentage (98%) and high adsorption capacity (50.25 mg g-1). A good agreement between experimental and predicted data in this study was observed. The experimental equilibrium data fitting to Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models show that the Langmuir model is a good and suitable model for evaluation and the actual behavior of adsorption. Kinetic evaluation of experimental data showed that the adsorption processes followed well pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models.

  12. Adsorption of deamidated antibody variants on macroporous and dextran-grafted cation exchangers: II. Adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yinying; Carta, Giorgio; Ferreira, Gisela; Robbins, David

    2011-03-18

    Single and multicomponent batch adsorption kinetics were obtained for deamidated mAb variants on two commercial cation exchangers, one with an open macroporous structure--UNOsphere S--and the other with charged dextran grafts--Capto S. The adsorption kinetics for the macroporous matrix was found to be controlled largely by pore diffusion. The effective diffusivity estimated from single component data was a fraction of the mAb free solution diffusivity, and its value could be used to accurately predict the adsorption kinetics for two- and three-component systems. In this case, when two or more variants were adsorbed simultaneously, both experimental and predicted results showed a temporary overshoot of the amount adsorbed above the equilibrium value for the more deamidated variant followed by a gradual approach to equilibrium. Adsorption rates on the dextran grafted material were much faster than those observed for the macroporous matrix for both single component and simultaneous adsorption cases. In this case, no significant overshoot was observed for the more deamidated forms. The Capto S adsorption kinetics could be described well by a diffusion model with an adsorbed phase driving force for single component adsorption and for the simultaneous adsorption of multiple variants. However, this model failed to predict the adsorption kinetics when more deamidated forms pre-adsorbed on the resin were displaced by less deamidated ones. In this case, the kinetics of the displacement process was much slower indicating that the pre-adsorbed components severely hindered transport of the more strongly bound variants. Overall, the results indicate that despite the lower capacity, the macroporous resin may be more efficient in process applications where displacement of one variant by another takes place as a result of the faster and more predictable kinetics.

  13. [Adsorption of Cd2+ on biochar from aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-juan; Liang, Xue-feng; Lin, Da-song; Xu, Ying-ming; Wang, Lin; Sun, Yue-bing; Qin, Xu

    2013-09-01

    Biomass-based materials such as biochar have a good performance in heavy metal adsorption. The adsorption of Cd2+ on biochar converted from cotton straw was studied. Adsorption isotherm, kinetics and effect factors such as temperature, pH and ionic strength were investigated. The adsorption of Cd2+ on biochar can be fitted by the Freundlich isotherm better than the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption amounts of Cd2+ at different temperatures were 9.738 mg x g(-1) (288.15 K), 10.14 mg x g(-1) (298.15 K), 10.40 mg x g(-1) (308.15 K) and 10.71 mg x g(-1) (318.15 K), respectively. The free energies AG(theta) were from -8.346 kJ x mol(-1) to -10.276 kJ x mol(-1) at different temperatures, indicating that the adsorption of Cd2+ onto biochar is spontaneous and is an endothermic process. The adsorption process can reach equilibrium within 40 minutes and can be fitted by the pseudo second order kinetic model. pH showed a significant effect on the adsorption of Cd2+ on biochar in the range of 2-8. The adsorption amount of Cd2+ on biochar shows a reducing trend with the increasing ionic strength.

  14. Poliovirus Adsorption by 34 Minerals and Soils

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Rebecca S.; Taylor, Dene H.; Sturman, Lawrence S.; Reddy, Michael M.; Fuhs, G. Wolfgang

    1981-01-01

    The adsorption of radiolabeled infectious poliovirus type 2 by 34 well-defined soils and mineral substrates was analyzed in a synthetic freshwater medium containing 1 mM CaCl2 and 1.25 mM NaHCO3 at pH 7. In a model system, adsorption of poliovirus by Ottawa sand was rapid and reached equilibrium within 1 h at 4°C. Near saturation, the adsorption could be described by the Langmuir equation; the apparent surface saturation was 2.5 × 106 plaque-forming units of poliovirus per mg of Ottawa sand. At low surface coverage, adsorption was described by the Freundlich equation. The soils and minerals used ranged from acidic to basic and from high in organic content to organic free. The available negative surface charge on each substrate was measured by the adsorption of a cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. Most of the substrates adsorbed more than 95% of the virus. In general, soils, in comparison with minerals, were weak adsorbents. Among the soils, muck and Genesee silt loam were the poorest adsorbents; among the minerals, montmorillonite, glauconite, and bituminous shale were the least effective. The most effective adsorbents were magnetite sand and hematite, which are predominantly oxides of iron. Correlation coefficients for substrate properties and virus adsorption revealed that the elemental composition of the adsorbents had little effect on poliovirus uptake. Substrate surface area and pH, by themselves, were not significantly correlated with poliovirus uptake. A strong negative correlation was found between poliovirus adsorption and both the contents of organic matter and the available negative surface charge on the substrates as determined by their capacities for adsorbing the cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. PMID:6274259

  15. The effect of elastomer chain flexibility on protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vyner, Moira C; Liu, Lina; Sheardown, Heather D; Amsden, Brian G

    2013-12-01

    Cells are known to respond differently when grown on materials of varying stiffness. However, the mechanism by which a cell senses substrate stiffness is unknown. Lower crosslink density elastomers formed from acrylated star-poly(d,l lactide-co-ϵ-caprolactone) have previously been shown to support higher smooth muscle cell proliferation in in vitro culture. This difference in growth was hypothesized to be due to differences in protein adsorption that resulted from differences in polymer chain mobility at the surface. Therefore, layer mass and viscoelastic properties were measured for HSA, IgG, fibronectin, vitronectin, and serum supplemented media adsorbed to elastomers of two crosslink densities. Significantly more fibronectin adsorbed to the lower crosslink density surface while significantly more IgG adsorbed to the higher crosslink density surface. Furthermore, differences in fibronectin and IgG layer shear moduli were observed, suggesting that there was a difference in the conformation of the adsorbed protein. ATR-FTIR analysis showed that the lower crosslink density elastomer absorbed more surface water. The increased amount of water may cause greater entropic gains upon protein adsorption to the lower crosslink density surface, which increases total protein adsorption from serum and may cause differences in protein conformation and thus cell behavior.

  16. Evaluation of the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero coverage for hydrogen on activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnke, E.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Olsen, R.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Activated carbons made from corn cob show promise as materials for high-capacity hydrogen storage. As part of our characterization of these materials, we are interested in learning how different production methods affect the adsorption energies. In this talk, we will show how hydrogen adsorption isotherms may be used to calculate these adsorption energies at zero coverage using Henry's law. We will additionally discuss differences between the binding energy and the isosteric heat of adsorption by applying this analysis at different temperatures.

  17. Amine-functionalized monodispersed porous silica microspheres with enhanced CO2 adsorption performance and good cyclic stability.

    PubMed

    Le, Yao; Guo, Daipeng; Cheng, Bei; Yu, Jiaguo

    2013-10-15

    Carbon dioxide capture using solid adsorbent has caused more and more attention in the world. Herein, amine-functionalized monodispersed porous silica microspheres (MPSM) were prepared by the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in a water-ethanol-dodecylamine mixed solution, then calcined at 600°C, and finally functionalized with tetraethylenepentamine (TEA). The CO2 adsorption performance of the prepared samples was measured using a Chemisorb 2720 pulse chemisorption system (Micromeritics, USA). The results showed that the specific surface area and pore volume of the 600°C-calcined SiO2 microspheres reached 921m(2)/g and 0.48cm(3)/g, respectively. All the TEA-functionalized samples exhibited good CO2 adsorption performance, which were related to the amount of loaded TEA, adsorption temperatures, and the specific surface areas of the prepared samples. An optimal TEA loading amount (34wt%) and adsorption temperature (75°C) were determined. The maximum CO2 adsorption amount (4.27mmolg(-1) adsorbent) was achieved on the 600°C-calcined SiO2 microsphere sample with TEA loading of 34wt%. Repeated adsorption/desorption cycle experiments revealed that the TEA-functionalized SiO2 microspheres were good CO2 adsorbents exhibiting excellent cyclic stability.

  18. Highly porous activated carbon based adsorption cooling system employing difluoromethane and a mixture of pentafluoroethane and difluoromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askalany, Ahmed A.; Saha, Bidyut B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation for a low-grade thermally powered two-beds adsorption cooling system employing HFC-32 and a mixture of HFC-32 and HFC-125 (HFC-410a) with activated carbon of type Maxsorb III. The present simulation model adopts experimentally measured adsorption isotherms, adsorption kinetics and isosteric heat of adsorption data. Effect of operating conditions (mass flow rate of hot water, driving heat source temperature and evaporator temperature) on the system performance has been studied in detail. The simulation results showed that the system could be powered by low-grade heat source temperature (below 85 °C). AC/HFC-32 and AC/HFC-410a adsorption cooling cycles achieved close specific cooling power and coefficient of performance values of 0.15 kW/kg and 0.3, respectively at a regeneration temperature of 90 °C along with evaporator temperature of 10 °C. The investigated semi continuous adsorption cooling system could produce a cooling power of 9 kW.

  19. Adsorptive removal of 2-chlorophenol by low-cost coir pith carbon.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Kavitha, D

    2003-03-17

    Adsorption of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) by coir pith carbon was carried out by varying the parameters such as agitation time, 2-CP concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and temperature. Adsorption equilibrium reached at 40, 60, 80 and 100 min for 2-CP concentration of 10, 20, 30 and 40 mg/l, respectively. Adsorption followed second-order kinetics. The adsorption equilibrium data obeyed Freundlich isotherm. Acidic pH was favorable for the adsorption of 2-CP. Desorption studies showed that chemisorption plays a major role in the adsorption process.

  20. CARBON ADSORPTION FOR INDOOR AIR CLEANING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the use of carbon adsorption for indoor air cleaning, focusing on the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using granular activated carbon (GAC). It addresses GAC performance in two directions. Initially, it presents performance measurements for GAC at...

  1. H2O Adsorption Kinetics on Smectites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Quinn, Richard C.; Howard, Jeanie; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The adsorptive equilibration of H2O a with montomorillonite, a smectite clay has been measured. At low temperatures and pressures, equilibration can require many hours, effectively preventing smectites at the martian surface from responding rapidly to diurnal pressure and temperature variations.

  2. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  3. Toward Accurate Adsorption Energetics on Clay Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in nature, and the manner in which they interact with their surroundings has important industrial and environmental implications. Consequently, a molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of molecules on clay surfaces is crucial. In this regard computer simulations play an important role, yet the accuracy of widely used empirical force fields (FF) and density functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functionals is often unclear in adsorption systems dominated by weak interactions. Herein we present results from quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) for water and methanol adsorption on the prototypical clay kaolinite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time QMC has been used to investigate adsorption at a complex, natural surface such as a clay. As well as being valuable in their own right, the QMC benchmarks obtained provide reference data against which the performance of cheaper DFT methods can be tested. Indeed using various DFT exchange-correlation functionals yields a very broad range of adsorption energies, and it is unclear a priori which evaluation is better. QMC reveals that in the systems considered here it is essential to account for van der Waals (vdW) dispersion forces since this alters both the absolute and relative adsorption energies of water and methanol. We show, via FF simulations, that incorrect relative energies can lead to significant changes in the interfacial densities of water and methanol solutions at the kaolinite interface. Despite the clear improvements offered by the vdW-corrected and the vdW-inclusive functionals, absolute adsorption energies are often overestimated, suggesting that the treatment of vdW forces in DFT is not yet a solved problem. PMID:27917256

  4. Cotton cellulose: enzyme adsorption and enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrame, P.L.; Carniti, P.; Focher, B.; Marzetti, A.; Cattaneo, M.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of a crude cellulase complex from Trichoderma viride on variously pretreated cotton cellulose samples was studied in the framework of the Langmuir approach at 2-8 degrees. The saturation amount of adsorbed enzyme was related to the susceptibility of the substrates to hydrolysis. In every case the adsorption process was faster by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the hydrolysis step to give end products. For ZnCl/sub 2/-treated cotton cellulose the Langmuir parameters correlated fairly well with the value of the Michaelis constant, measured for its enzymic hydrolysis, and the adsorptive complex was indistinguishable from the complex of the Michaelis-Menten model for the hydrolysis.

  5. Adsorption of monoclonal antibodies to glass microparticles.

    PubMed

    Hoehne, Matthew; Samuel, Fauna; Dong, Aichun; Wurth, Christine; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2011-01-01

    Microparticulate glass represents a potential contamination to protein formulations that may occur as a result of processing conditions or glass types. The effect of added microparticulate glass to formulations of three humanized antibodies was tested. Under the three formulation conditions tested, all three antibodies adsorbed irreversibly at near monolayer surface coverages to the glass microparticles. Analysis of the secondary structure of the adsorbed antibodies by infrared spectroscopy reveal only minor perturbations as a result of adsorption. Likewise, front-face fluorescence quenching measurements reflected minimal tertiary structural changes upon adsorption. In contrast to the minimal effects on protein structure, adsorption of protein to suspensions of glass microparticles induced significant colloidal destabilization and flocculation of the suspension.

  6. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  7. SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, C.S.

    1959-06-16

    Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

  8. Effect of grain size on uranium(VI) surface complexation kinetics and adsorption additivity.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M

    2011-07-15

    The contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption was studied using a sediment from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.053-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (<0.053 mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch and flow-cell experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms and kinetic uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. One important implication of this study is that grain-size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  9. Experimental and molecular mechanics and ab initio investigation of activated adsorption and desorption of trichloroethylene in mineral micropores.

    PubMed

    Farrell, James; Luo, Jing; Blowers, Paul; Curry, Joan

    2002-04-01

    This research investigated activated adsorption of a hydrophobic organic contaminant(HOC) in mineral micropores using experimental and molecular modeling techniques. Adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) on a silica gel adsorbent was measured using a frontal analysis chromatography technique at atmospheric and elevated fluid pressures. Increasing the fluid pressure yielded increased TCE uptake that was not released upon lowering the pressure back to atmospheric conditions. This showed that the increase in pressure was able to rapidly induce the formation of a desorption-resistant fraction that previous investigations have shown requires months to develop at atmospheric pressure. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) modeling was then used to elucidate the nature of water and TCE behavior within silica micropores. The GCMC modeling showed that molecular scale packing restrictions resulted in pore fluid densities that ranged from 0.28 to 0.78 of those in the bulk solution. The modeling also showed that TCE was able to displace water from hydrophilic mineral pores due to molecular scale packing restrictions. Exothermic isosteric heats for TCE adsorption up to -27 kJ/mol were observed and were greatest in pores of 7 and 8 A. This indicated that TCE adsorption was energetically most favorable in pores that were minimally large enough to accommodate a TCE molecule. The pressure-induced uptake appeared to result primarily from an increase in the packing density in the smallest pores. Ab initio calculations showed that small distortions of a TCE molecule from its low energy conformation require high activation energies. Results from this study indicate that activated adsorption requiring bond angle distortions in the adsorbate may be responsible forthe slow attainment of adsorptive equilibrium of HOCs on microporous solids. Likewise, activated desorption from molecular-sized adsorption sites may contribute to the slow release of HOCs from aquifer sediments.

  10. Solvothermal synthesis of MnFe2O4-graphene composite-Investigation of its adsorption and antimicrobial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chella, Santhosh; Kollu, Pratap; Komarala, Eswara Vara P. R.; Doshi, Sejal; Saranya, Murugan; Felix, Sathiyanathan; Ramachandran, Rajendran; Saravanan, Padmanapan; Koneru, Vijaya Lakshmi; Venugopal, Velmurugan; Jeong, Soon Kwan; Nirmala Grace, Andrews

    2015-02-01

    Graphene manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4-G) composite was prepared by a solvothermal process. The as-prepared graphene manganese ferrite composite was tested for the adsorption of lead (Pb(II)) and cadmium (Cd(II)) ions by analytical methods under diverse experimental parameters. With respect to contact time measurements, the adsorption of Pb and Cd ions increased and reached equilibrium within 120 and 180 min at 37 °C with a maximum adsorption at pH 5 and 7 respectively. The Langmuir model correlates to the experimental data showing an adsorption capacity of 100 for Pb(II) and 76.90 mg g-1 for Cd(II) ions. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the adsorption of Pb and Cd ions onto MnFe2O4-G was spontaneous, exothermic and feasible in the range of 27-47 °C. Cytotoxicity behavior of graphene against bacterial cell membrane is well known. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, the antibacterial activity of graphene and MnFe2O4-G nanocomposite was compared. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, nanocomposite MnFe2O4-G dispersion showed the highest antibacterial activity of 82%, as compared to graphene showing 37% cell loss. Results showed that the prepared composite possess good adsorption efficiency and thus could be considered as an excellent material for removal of toxic heavy metal ions as explained by adsorption isotherm. Hence MnFe2O4-G can be used as an adsorbent as well as an antimicrobial agent.

  11. Functionalized mesoporous silica materials for molsidomine adsorption: Thermodynamic study

    SciTech Connect

    Alyoshina, Nonna A.; Parfenyuk, Elena V.

    2013-09-15

    A series of unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials was prepared. The unmodified mesoporous silica was synthesized via sol–gel synthesis in the presence of D-glucose as pore-forming agent. The functionalized by phenyl, aminopropyl and mercaptopropyl groups silica materials were prepared via grafting. The fabricated adsorbent materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and elemental analysis methods. Then their adsorption properties for mesoionic dug molsidomine were investigated at 290–313 K and physiological pH value. Thermodynamic parameters of molsidomine adsorption on the synthesized materials have been calculated. The obtained results showed that the adsorption process of molsidomine on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. The unmodified and mercaptopropyl modified silica materials exhibit significantly higher adsorption capacities and energies for molsidomine than the aminopropyl modified sample. The effects are discussed from the viewpoint of nature of specific interactions responsible for the adsorption. - Graphical abstract: Comparative analysis of the thermodynamic characteristics of molsidomine adsorption showed that the adsorption process on mesoporous silica materials is controlled by chemical nature of surface functional groups. Molsidomine adsorption on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. Taking into account ambiguous nature of mesoionic compounds, it was found that molsidomine is rather aromatic than dipolar. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials were prepared. • Molsidomine adsorption on the silica materials was studied. • Phenyl modified silica shows the highest adsorption capacity and favorable energy. • Molsidomine exhibits the lowest affinity to aminopropyl modified silica.

  12. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  13. Neptunium(V) adsorption to calcite.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Frank; Brendebach, Boris; Bosbach, Dirk

    2008-12-12

    The migration behavior of the actinyl ions U(VI)O2(2+), Np(V)O2+ and Pu(V,VI)O2(+,2+) in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption reactions (inner- or outer-sphere adsorption, ion-exchange, coprecipitation/structural incorporation) with minerals. Here NpO2+ adsorption onto calcite is studied in batch type experiments over a wide range of pH (6.0-9.4) and concentration (0.4 microM-40 microM) conditions. pH is adjusted by variation of CO2 partial pressure. Adsorption is found to be pH dependent with maximal adsorption at pH 8.3 decreasing with increasing and decreasing pH. pH dependence of adsorption decreases with increasing Np(V) concentration. EXAFS data of neptunyl adsorbed to calcite and neptunyl in the supernatant shows differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance, 1.85+/-0.01 angstroms for the adsorbed and 1.82+/-0.01 angstroms for the solution species. The equatorial environment of the neptunyl in solution shows about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.45+/-0.02 angstroms. For adsorbed neptunyl there are also about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.46+/-0.01 angstroms. An additional feature in the adsorbed species' R-space spectrum can be related to carbonate neighbours, 3 to 6 carbon backscatterers (C-eq) at 3.05+/-0.03 angstroms and 3 to 6 oxygen backscatterers (O-eq2) at 3.31+/-0.02 angstroms. The differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance and the C-eq and O-eq2 backscatterers which are only present for the adsorbed species indicate inner-sphere bonding of the adsorbed neptunyl species to the calcite surface. Experiments on adsorption kinetics indicate that after a fast surface adsorption process a continuous slow uptake occurs which may be explained by incorporation via surface dissolution and reprecipitation processes. This is also indicated by the part irreversibility of the adsorption as shown by increased KD values after desorption compared to adsorption.

  14. Analytical performance and clinical usefulness of two binding assays for growth hormone binding protein (GHBP) measurement: high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-gel filtration and dextran-coated charcoal adsorption.

    PubMed

    Llopis, M A; Granada, M L; Audí, L; Sanmartí, A; Bel, J; Sánchez-Planell, L; Formiguera, X; Marin, F; Corominas, A

    1997-11-28

    We compared two binding assays for growth hormone binding protein (GHBP) measurements, which differ in the method of bound and free GH separation: HPLC-gel filtration or dextran coated-charcoal adsorption (DCC). Two pools of sera (high and medium GHBP activity) were used for quality-control assessment. Moreover, 62 samples from 34 children and 28 adults with different nutritional status were studied. Total, between- and intra-iodination coefficients of variation (CVs) from the two methods were not different. Although percentage binding measured in the pool sera significantly differed, the concentrations assessed by Scatchard plot were comparable. Results obtained by the two methods in the 62 sera were significantly correlated (r = 0.77, P < 0.001). With both methods GHBP activity correlated with chronological age and body mass index (BMI) and differed among groups with different nutritional status. Although HPLC and DCC separation methods for GHBP measurement differ in their practicability, our study demonstrates that performance and the clinical usefulness of the two methods are comparable.

  15. Synthesis of Large-Pore Stabilized MIL-53(Al) Compounds with Increased CO2 Adsorption and Decreased Water Adsorption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    isotherms showed typical Type I behaviour as per the IUPAC classification. Gas adsorption An Intelligent Gravimetric Analyzer ( IGA -1 series, Hiden...40 min was used for each point in the isotherm. Water adsorption An Intelligent Gravimetric Analyzer ( IGA -3 series, Hiden Analytical Ltd.) was used

  16. Comparative isosteric ion adsorption for minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omenyi, Samuel N.; Herren, Blair J.; Snyder, Robert S.; Seaman, Geoffrey V. F.

    1986-01-01

    A comparative isosteric ion adsorption study for minerals (kaolinite, rutile, and quartz) was performed in aqueous solutions of CaCl2, LaCl3, and Th(NO3)4 in the presence of the neutral salt NaCl. It was observed that the concentration of Ca(2+) ions required to produce a standard reduction in the electrophoretic mobility of mineral particles was always appreciably greater than the concentration required for the Th(4+) ions. The effectiveness of adsorption of the cations differed from particle to particle and showed that ion adsorption on a mineral surface depends, among other things, on the nature of the mineral surface and on the particular adsorbed cation. The number of cation binding sites on mineral surfaces and the electrochemical free energies of cation adsorption were calculated. It was found that the adsorption energy of La(3+) and Th(4+) ions on rutile, kaolinite, and quartz was greater than that of Ca(2+) on these minerals.

  17. Selective Ion Pair Adsorption of Cobalt and Copper Salts on Cationically Produced Poly(1,3-divinylimidazolid-2-one)/Silica Hybrid Particles.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Prause, Silvio; Spange, Stefan; Friedrich, Manfred

    2001-04-15

    For quantitative metal salt adsorption, poly(1,3-divinylimidazolid-2-one)/silica [poly BVU(cat.)/silica] particles with different polymer contents have been synthesized by a cationic surface polymerization of 1,3-divinylimidazolid-2-one onto silica. Preliminary experiments with the metal ion salts CoCl(2), CoI(2), CuCl(2), and FeCl(3) on poly-BVU(cat.)/silica particles, a radically produced poly-BVU(rad.) resin, and a cationically produced poly-BVU(cat.) resin have been carried in acetone solution to check the suitability of the adsorbents. The adsorption mechanism for Co(2+) and Cu(2+) on poly-BVU(cat.)/silica is in accordance with the Langmuir model for monolayer adsorption as shown by quantitative adsorption measurements by means of UV/vis spectroscopy. An ion pair adsorption mechanism is suggested for CoCl(2), CoI(2), and CuCl(2) on poly-BVU(cat.)/silica because both environments cationically produced poly-BVU and residual silanol groups are required for linking the cation and anion. ESR spectroscopic results of CoCl(2)-, CuCl(2)-, and FeCl(3)-poly-BVU(cat.)/silica hybrid adsorbates show selective adsorption for Co(2+) and Cu(2+). However, two different adsorption sites are indicated for Fe(3+) on poly-BVU(cat.)/silica. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption study of the adsorptive removal of Cr(VI) using modified wheat residue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Suhong; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu; Xu, Xing

    2010-09-01

    A new adsorbent modified from wheat residue was synthesized after reaction with epichlorohydrin and triethylamine by using the modifying agents of diethylenetriamine in the presence of organic medium of N,N-dimethylformamide. The performance of the modified wheat straw (MWS) was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and point of zero charge analysis. The adsorption was investigated in a batch adsorption system, including both equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics. Results showed that MWR had great anion-adsorbing capacity, due to the existence of a large number of introduced amino groups, and the value of pH(PZC) was around 5.0. Equilibrium data were analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherm models and were found to be best represented by the Freundlich isotherm model. Evaluation of the adsorption process identified its endothermic nature. The maximum adsorption capacity of MWS for the removal of Cr(VI) was 322.58mg/g at 328K, indicating that MWS has high chromium removal efficiency, compared to other adsorbents reported. The kinetics of adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation. The mechanism of adsorption was investigated using the intraparticle diffusion model. Thermodynamic parameters (free energy change, enthalpy change, and entropy change) revealed that the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto MWS was endothermic and spontaneous; additionally, the adsorption can be characterized as an ion-exchange process. The results suggest that MWS is an inexpensive and efficient adsorbent for removing Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solution.

  19. Application of activated carbon derived from scrap tires for adsorption of Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Shuangxi; Zhu, Tan

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon derived from solid hazardous waste scrap tires was evaluated as a potential adsorbent for cationic dye removal. The adsorption process with respect to operating parameters was investigated to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of the activated pyrolytic tire char (APTC) for Rhodamine B (RhB). Systematic research including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic studies was performed. The results showed that APTC was a potential adsorbent for RhB with a higher adsorption capacity than most adsorbents. Solution pH and temperature exert significant influence while ionic strength showed little effect on the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data obey Langmuir isotherm and the kinetic data were well described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process followed intra-particle diffusion model with more than one process affecting the adsorption process. Thermodynamic study confirmed that the adsorption was a physisorption process with spontaneous, endothermic and random characteristics.

  20. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  1. Bromate adsorption using Fe-pillared bentonite.

    PubMed

    He, Shilong; Zhang, Dandan; Gu, Li; Zhang, Shenghua; Yu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Bromate is an emerging hazardous substance in drinking water. In this study, the removal ofbromate by Fe-pillared bentonite was investigated using various experimental parameters: contact time, initial concentration (Co), temperature, initial pH and competing anions. The adsorption ofbromate followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic better than it followed other kinetic models, and the pseudo-second-order kinetic study showed that equilibrium could be achieved within 60 min. Equilibrium isotherms were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson and Toth isotherm models. The Toth and Redlich-Peterson models better represented the bromate adsorption. Results also indicated that, other than the competing anions and solution pH, temperature was a key parameter affecting adsorption. It was ultimately concluded that Fe-pillared bentonite was effective at removing bromate from water.

  2. Reuse of Solid Waste in Adsorption of the Textile Dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziti, Chafika; Boukerroui, Abdelhamid

    This work presents the study of the reuse of a regenerated spent bleaching earth (RSBE). The RSBE material was tested in the removal of a basic textile dye presents in aqueous solution. The effect of physicochemical parameters such as stirring speed, initial concentration, contact time and temperature have been invested and thermodynamic nature of the adsorption process was determined by calculating the ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° values The results obtained show that the adsorption mechanism was described by the Langmuir model and the adsorption capacity, qmax (72.41 to 82.37 mg.g-1), increases with temperature (20-50 °C). The thermodynamic parameters show a presence of a strong affinity between two phases (liquid-solid) and an endothermic equilibrium adsorption process. However, the phenomenon of the adsorption kinetic follows the pseudo second order kinetic model.

  3. Evaluation of the adsorption capacity of alkali-treated waste materials for the adsorption of sulphamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Lisha

    2012-01-01

    The present work is to develop potential adsorbents from waste material and employ them for the removal of a hazardous antibacterial, sulphamethoxazole, from the wastewater by the Adsorption technique. The Adsorption technique was used to impound the dangerous antibiotics from wastewater using Deoiled Soya (DOS), an agricultural waste, and Water Hyacinth (WH), a prolific colonizer. The adsorption capacity of these adsorbents was further enhanced by treating them with sodium hydroxide solution and it was seen that the adsorption capacity increases by 10 to 25%. Hence a comparative account of the adsorption studies of all the four adsorbents, i.e. DOS, Alkali-treated DOS, WH and Alkali-treated Water Hyacinth has been discussed in this paper. Different isotherms like Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich were also deduced from the adsorption data. Isotherm studies were in turn used in estimating the thermodynamic parameters. DOS showed sorption capacity of 0.0007 mol g(-1) while Alkali-treated Deoiled Soya exhibited 0.0011 mol g(-1) of sorption capacity, which reveals that the adsorption is higher in case of alkali-treated adsorbent. The mean sorption energy (E) was obtained between 9 and 12 kJ mol, which shows that the reaction proceeds by ion exchange reaction. Kinetic study reveals that the reaction follows pseudo-second-order rate equation. Moreover, mass transfer studies performed for the ongoing processes show that the mass transfer coefficient obtained for alkali-treated moieties was higher than the parent moieties. The breakthrough curves plotted from the column studies show percentage saturation of 90-98%. About 87-97% of sulphamethoxazole was recovered from column by desorption.

  4. The adsorptive capacity of vapor-phase mercury chloride onto powdered activated carbon derived from waste tires.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsun-Yu; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Wu, Chun-Hsin; Hung, Chung-Hsuang

    2006-11-01

    Injection of powdered activated carbon (PAC) upstream of particulate removal devices (such as electrostatic precipitator and baghouses) has been used effectively to remove hazardous air pollutants, particularly mercury-containing pollutants, emitted from combustors and incinerators. Compared with commercial PACs (CPACs), an alternative PAC derived from waste tires (WPAC) was prepared for this study. The equilibrium adsorptive capacity of mercury chloride (HgCl2) vapor onto the WPAC was further evaluated with a self-designed bench-scale adsorption column system. The adsorption temperatures investigated in the adsorption column were controlled at 25 and 150 degrees C. The superficial velocity and residence time of the flow were 0.01 m/sec and 4 sec, respectively. The adsorption column tests were run under nitrogen gas flow. Experimental results showed that WPAC with higher Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area could adsorb more HgCl2 at room temperature. The equilibrium adsorptive capacity of HgCl2 for WPAC measured in this study was 1.49 x 10(-1) mg HgCl2/g PAC at 25 degrees C with an initial HgCI2 concentration of 25 microg/m3. With the increase of adsorption temperature < or = 150 degrees C, the equilibrium adsorptive capacity of HgCl2 for WPAC was decreased to 1.34 x 10(-1) mg HgCl2/g PAC. Furthermore, WPAC with higher sulfur contents could adsorb even more HgCl2 because of the reactions between sulfur and Hg2+ at 150 degrees C. It was demonstrated that the mechanisms for adsorbing HgCl2 onto WPAC were physical adsorption and chemisorption at 25 and 150 degrees C, respectively. Experimental results also indicated that the apparent overall driving force model appeared to have the good correlation with correlation coefficients (r) > 0.998 for HgCl2 adsorption at 25 and 150 degrees C. Moreover, the equilibrium adsorptive capacity of HgCl2 for virgin WPAC was similar to that for CPAC at 25 degrees C, whereas it was slightly higher for sulfurized WPAC than for

  5. High adsorption capacity NaOH-activated carbon for dye removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-Chin; Tseng, Ru-Ling

    2008-04-15

    In this study, the surface coverage ratio (Sc/Sp) and monolayer cover adsorption amount per unit surface area (qmon/Sp) were employed to investigate the adsorption isotherm equilibrium of the adsorption of dyes (AB74, BB1 and MB) on NaOH-activated carbons (FWNa2, FWNa3 and FWNa4); the adsorption rate of the Elovich equation (1/b) and the ratio of 1min adsorption amount of adsorbate to the monolayer cover amount of adsorbate (q1/qmon) were employed to investigate adsorption kinetics. The qmon/Sp of NaOH-activated carbons was better than that of KOH-activated carbons prepared from the same raw material (fir wood). The Sc/Sp values of the adsorption of all adsorbates on adsorbent FWNa3 in this study were found to be higher than those in related literature. Parameters 1/b and q1 of the adsorption of dyes on activated carbons in this study were higher than those on KOH-activated carbons; the q1/qmon value of FWNa3 was the highest. The pore structure and the TPD measurement of the surface oxide groups were employed to explain the superior adsorption performance of FWNa3. A high surface activated carbon (FWNa3) with excellent adsorption performance on dyes with relation to adsorption isotherm equilibrium and kinetics was obtained in this study. Several adsorption data processing methods were employed to describe the adsorption performance.

  6. Adsorption isotherms of cellulose-based polymers onto cotton fibers determined by means of a direct method of fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Ingo; Oppel, Claudia; Gernert, Ulrich; Barreleiro, Paula; von Rybinski, Wolfgang; Gradzielski, Michael

    2012-05-22

    We present a novel method for the measurement of polymer adsorption on fibers by employing fluorescently labeled polymers. The method itself can be used for any compound that either shows fluorescence or can be labeled with a fluorescent dye, which renders it ubiquitously applicable for adsorption studies. The main advantage of the method is that the choice of adsorbent is not limited to flat surfaces, thereby allowing the investigation of fibrous and porous systems. As an example of high interest for application we determined the adsorption isotherms of various polysaccharide-based polymers with different charges and different substituents on cotton fibers. These experiments show that the extent of adsorption depends not only on the charge conditions but also very much on the specific interactions between the polymer and fiber. For instance, the cationic hydroxyethyl cellulose can become bound to an extent similar to that of the anionic alginate, while the anionic carboxymethyl cellulose of similar charge density adsorbs much less under these conditions. This shows that the adsorption of polymers depends subtly on the details of the interaction between the polymer and fiber but can be determined with good precision with our direct fluorescence method.

  7. INFLUENCE OF THE KRAMER EFFECT ON ADSORPTION ON METALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ADSORPTION, *ALLOYS, *FILMS, *METALS, *PROCESSING, ACIDS, ALCOHOLS , CYCLOHEXANES, EXCHANGE REACTIONS , FATTY ACIDS, HEAT TREATMENT , LEAD ALLOYS...LINOLENIC ACID, MACHINING , MEASUREMENT, MONOMOLECULAR FILMS, OLEIC ACID, SURFACES, TIN ALLOYS, WATER

  8. Water dissociative adsorption on NiO(111): Energetics and structure of the hydroxylated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Wei; Bajdich, Michal; Carey, Spencer; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Nørskov, Jens K.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2016-09-19

    The energetics of the reactions of water with metal oxide surfaces are of tremendous interest for catalysis, electrocatalysis, and geochemistry, yet the energy for the dissociative adsorption of water was only previously measured on one well-defined oxide surface, iron oxide. In the present paper, the enthalpy of the dissociative adsorption of water is measured on NiO(111)-2 × 2 at 300 K using single-crystal adsorption calorimetry. The differential heat of dissociative adsorption decreases with coverage from 170 to 117 kJ/mol in the first 0.25 ML of coverage. Water adsorbs molecularly on top of that, with a heat of ~92 kJ/mol. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reproduce the measured energies well (all within 17 kJ/mol) and provide insight into the atomic-level structure of the surfaces studied experimentally. They show that the oxygen-terminated O-octo(2 × 2) structure is the most stable NiO(111)-2 × 2 termination and gives reaction energies with water that are more consistent with the calorimetry results than the metal-terminated surface. They show that water adsorbs dissociatively on this (2 × 2)-O-octo surface to produce a hydroxyl-covered surface with a heat of adsorption of 171 ± 5 kJ/mol in the low-coverage limit (very close to 170 kJ/mol experimentally) and an integral heat that decreases by 14 kJ/mol up to saturation (compared to ~30 kJ/mol experimentally). As a result, sensitivity of this reaction’s energy to choice of DFT method is tested using a variety of different exchange correlation functionals, including HSE06, and found to be quite weak.

  9. Water dissociative adsorption on NiO(111): Energetics and structure of the hydroxylated surface

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Wei; Bajdich, Michal; Carey, Spencer; ...

    2016-09-19

    The energetics of the reactions of water with metal oxide surfaces are of tremendous interest for catalysis, electrocatalysis, and geochemistry, yet the energy for the dissociative adsorption of water was only previously measured on one well-defined oxide surface, iron oxide. In the present paper, the enthalpy of the dissociative adsorption of water is measured on NiO(111)-2 × 2 at 300 K using single-crystal adsorption calorimetry. The differential heat of dissociative adsorption decreases with coverage from 170 to 117 kJ/mol in the first 0.25 ML of coverage. Water adsorbs molecularly on top of that, with a heat of ~92 kJ/mol. Densitymore » functional theory (DFT) calculations reproduce the measured energies well (all within 17 kJ/mol) and provide insight into the atomic-level structure of the surfaces studied experimentally. They show that the oxygen-terminated O-octo(2 × 2) structure is the most stable NiO(111)-2 × 2 termination and gives reaction energies with water that are more consistent with the calorimetry results than the metal-terminated surface. They show that water adsorbs dissociatively on this (2 × 2)-O-octo surface to produce a hydroxyl-covered surface with a heat of adsorption of 171 ± 5 kJ/mol in the low-coverage limit (very close to 170 kJ/mol experimentally) and an integral heat that decreases by 14 kJ/mol up to saturation (compared to ~30 kJ/mol experimentally). As a result, sensitivity of this reaction’s energy to choice of DFT method is tested using a variety of different exchange correlation functionals, including HSE06, and found to be quite weak.« less

  10. H2O Adsorption on Smectites: Application to the Diurnal Variation of H2O in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Howard, J.; Quinn, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    Observations of the Martian planetary boundary layer lead to interpretations that are baffling and contradictory. In this paper, we specifically address the question of whether or not water vapor finds a substantial diurnal reservoir in the Martian regolith. To address this issue, we have measured H2O adsorption kinetics on SWy-1, a Na-rich montmorillonite from Wyoming. The highest-temperature (273 K) data equilibrates rapidly. Data gathered at realistic H2O partial pressures and temperatures appropriate to early morning show two phenomena that preclude a significant role for smectites in diurnally exchanging a large column abundance. First, the equilibration timescale is longer than a sol. Second, the equilibrium abundances are a small fraction of that predicted by earlier adsorption isotherms. The explanation for this phenomenon is that smectite clay actually increases its surface area as a function of adsorptive coverage. At Mars-like conditions, we show that the interlayer sites of smectites are likely to be unavailable.

  11. Assessment of multi-mycotoxin adsorption efficacy of grape pomace.

    PubMed

    Avantaggiato, Giuseppina; Greco, Donato; Damascelli, Anna; Solfrizzo, Michele; Visconti, Angelo

    2014-01-15

    Grape pomace (pulp and skins) was investigated as a new biosorbent for removing mycotoxins from liquid media. In vitro adsorption experiments showed that the pomace obtained from Primitivo grapes is able to sequester rapidly and simultaneously different mycotoxins. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) was the most adsorbed mycotoxin followed by zearalenone (ZEA), ochratoxin A (OTA), and fumonisin B1 (FB1), whereas the adsorption of deoxynivalenol (DON) was negligible. AFB1 and ZEA adsorptions were not affected by changing pH values in the pH 3-8 range, whereas OTA and FB1 adsorptions were significantly affected by pH. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms obtained at different temperatures (5-70 °C) and pH values (3 and 7) were modeled and evaluated using the Freundlich, Langmuir, Sips, and Hill models. The goodness of the fits and the parameters involved in the adsorption mechanism were calculated by the nonlinear regression analysis method. The best-fitting models to describe AFB1, ZEA, and OTA adsorption by grape pomace were the Sips, Langmuir, and Freundlich models, respectively. The Langmuir and Sips models were the best models for FB1 adsorption at pH 7 and 3, respectively. The theoretical maximum adsorption capacities (mmol/kg dried pomace) calculated at pH 7 and 3 decreased in the following order: AFB1 (15.0 and 15.1) > ZEA (8.6 and 8.3) > OTA (6.3-6.9) > FB1 (2.2 and 0.4). Single- and multi-mycotoxin adsorption isotherms showed that toxin adsorption is not affected by the simultaneous presence of different mycotoxins in the liquid medium. The profiles of adsorption isotherms obtained at different temperatures and pH and the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH°, ΔS°) suggest that mycotoxin adsorption is an exothermic and spontaneous process, which involves physisorption weak associations. Hydrophobic interactions may be associated with AFB1 and ZEA adsorption, whereas polar noncovalent interactions may be associated with OTA and FB1 adsorption. In conclusion, this study

  12. Adsorption of methylene blue from aqueous solution by graphene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tonghao; Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Sun, Jiankun; Jiao, Yuqin; Yang, Guangming; Wang, Zonghua; Xia, Yanzhi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-02-01

    Graphene was prepared using a modified Hummers' method. The physico-chemical properties of graphene were characterized by TEM, BET specific surface area, FTIR, Raman and XRD measurements. The effect factors including pH, contact time, temperature and dosage on the adsorption properties of methylene blue onto graphene were investigated. The experimental data of isotherm followed the Langmuir isotherm model better than the Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from Langmuir isotherm equation at 293 K was 153.85 mg/g, indicating graphene is a good adsorbent for the adsorption of MB. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of methylene blue onto graphene fit the pseudo second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of methylene blue onto graphene was an endothermic and spontaneous process.

  13. Adsorption of humic acids and trace metals in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies concerning the interactions between suspended hydrous iron oxide and dissolved humic acids and trace metals are reported. As a major component of dissolved organic matters and its readiness for adsorption at the solid/water interface, humic acids may play a very important role in the organometallic geochemistry of suspended sediments and in determining the fate and distribution of trace metals, pesticides and anions in natural water systems. Most of the solid phases in natural waters contain oxides and hydroxides. The most simple promising theory to describe the interactions of hydrous iron oxide interface is the surface complex formation model. In this model, the adsorptions of humic acids on hydrous iron oxide may be interpreted as complex formation of the organic bases (humic acid oxyanions) with surface Fe ions. Measurements on adsorptions were made in both fresh water and seawater. Attempts have been made to fit our data to Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption equilibrium constants were determined.

  14. Competitive Protein Adsorption on Polysaccharide and Hyaluronate Modified Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ombelli, Michela; Costello, Lauren; Postle, Corinne; Anantharaman, Vinod; Meng, Qing Cheng; Composto, Russell J.; Eckmann, David M.

    2011-01-01

    We measured adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen (Fg) onto six distinct bare and dextran- and hyaluronate-modified silicon surfaces created using two dextran grafting densities and three hyaluronic acid (HA) sodium salts derived from human umbilical cord, rooster comb and streptococcus zooepidemicus. Film thickness and surface morphology depended on HA molecular weight and concentration. BSA coverage was enhanced on surfaces upon competitive adsorption of BSA:Fg mixtures. Dextranization differentially reduced protein adsorption onto surfaces based on oxidation state. Hyaluronization was demonstrated to provide the greatest resistance to protein coverage, equivalent to that of the most resistant dextranized surface. Resistance to protein adsorption was independent of the type of hyaluronic acid utilized. With changing bulk protein concentration from 20 to 40 µg ml−1 for each species, Fg coverage on silicon increased by 4×, whereas both BSA and Fg adsorption on dextran and HA were far less dependent of protein bulk concentration. PMID:21623481

  15. [Adsorption of Congo red from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yan-Hui; Lin, Jian-Wei

    2013-08-01

    The adsorption of Congo red (CR) from aqueous solution on hydroxyapatite was investigated using batch experiments. The hydroxyapatite was effective for CR removal from aqueous solution. The adsorption kinetics of CR on hydroxyapatite well followed a pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium adsorption data of CR on hydroxyapatite could be described by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and showed that the adsorption of CR on hydroxyapatite was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The CR adsorption capacity for hydroxyapatite decreased significantly with increasing pH from 8 to 10. Thermal regeneration showed that hydroxyapatite could be used for six desorption-adsorption cycles with high removal efficiency for CR in each cycle. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value below the pH at point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) include electrostatic attraction, hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. The mechanisms for CR adsorption on hydroxyapatite with pH value above its pH(PZC) include hydrogen bonding and Lewis acid-base interaction. Results of this work indicate that hydroxyapatite is a promising adsorbent for CR removal from aqueous solution.

  16. Adsorption of Pyrene onto the Agricultural By-Product: Corncob.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Tong, Dongli; Allinson, Graeme; Jia, Chunyun; Gong, Zongqing; Liu, Wan

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of pyrene on corncob was studied to provide a theoretical basis for the possible use of this material as an immobilized carrier for improving the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil. The results were as follows. Kinetic experiments showed that the adsorption processes obeyed a pseudo-second-order model. The intraparticle diffusion of Weber-Morris model fitting showed that the film and intraparticle diffusions were the key rate-limiting processes, and the adsorption process mainly consisted of three steps: boundary layer diffusion and two intra-particle diffusions. Experimental adsorption data for pyrene were successfully described by the adsorption-partition equilibrium model. The maximum adsorption capacity at 25°C was 214.8 μg g(-1). The adsorption contribution decreased significantly when the Ce/Sw (the equilibrium concentration/solubility in water) was higher than 1. Adsorption decreased with increased temperature. Based on the above results, the corncob particles could be helpful in the bioremediation of pyrene-contaminated soil.

  17. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of arsenic onto ceria nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qinzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Yuhui; He, Xiao; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2012-01-01

    The rapid increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles [ENPs] has resulted in an increasing concern over the potential impacts of ENPs on the environmental and human health. ENPs tend to adsorb a large variety of toxic chemicals when they are emitted into the environment, which may enhance the toxicity of ENPs and/or adsorbed chemicals. The study was aimed to investigate the adsorption and desorption behaviors of arsenic on ceria NPs in aqueous solution using batch technique. Results show that the adsorption behavior of arsenic on ceria NPs was strongly dependent on pH and independent of ionic strength, indicating that the electrostatic effect on the adsorption of these elements was relatively not important compared to surface chemical reactions. The adsorption isotherms fitted very well to both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The thermodynamic parameters (Δ H 0 , Δ S 0 , and Δ G 0 ) for the adsorption of arsenic were determined at three different temperatures of 283, 303, and 323 K. The adsorption reaction was endothermic, and the process of adsorption was favored at high temperature. The desorption data showed that desorption hysteresis occurred at the initial concentration studied. High adsorption capacity of arsenic on ceria NPs suggests that the synergistic effects of ceria NPs and arsenic on the environmental systems may exist when they are released into the environment.

  18. Adsorption of Ions at Uncharged Insoluble Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Peshkova, Tatyana V; Minkov, Ivan L; Tsekov, Roumen; Slavchov, Radomir I

    2016-09-06

    A method is proposed for the experimental determination of the adsorption of inorganic electrolytes at a surface covered with insoluble surfactant monolayer. This task is complicated by the fact that the change of the salt concentration alters both chemical potentials of the electrolyte and the surfactant. Our method resolves the question by combining data for the surface pressure versus area of the monolayer at several salt concentrations with data for the equilibrium spreading pressure of crystals of the surfactant (used to fix a standard state). We applied the method to alcohols spread at the surface of concentrated halide solutions. The measured salt adsorption is positive and has nonmonotonic dependence on the area per surfactant molecule. For the liquid expanded film, depending on the concentration, there is one couple of ions adsorbed per each 3-30 surfactant molecules. We analyzed which ion, the positive or the negative, stands closer to the surface, by measuring the effect of NaCl on the Volta potential of the monolayer. The potentiometric data suggest that Na(+) is specifically adsorbed, while Cl(-) remains in the diffuse layer, i.e., the surface is positively charged. The observed reverse Hofmeister series of the adsorptions of NaF, NaCl, and NaBr suggests the same conclusion holds for all these salts. The force that causes the adsorption of Na(+) seems to be the interaction of the ion with the dipole moment of the monolayer.

  19. Adsorption of Ions at Uncharged Insoluble Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshkova, T. V.; Minkov, I. L.; Tsekov, R.; Slavchov, R. I.

    2016-08-01

    A method is proposed for the experimental determination of the adsorption of inorganic electrolytes at a surface covered with insoluble surfactant monolayer. This task is complicated by the fact that the change of the salt concentration alters both chemical potentials of the electrolyte and the surfactant. Our method resolves the question by combining data for the surface pressure versus area of the monolayer at several salt concentrations with data for the equilibrium spreading pressure of crystals of the surfactant (used to fix a standard state). We applied the method to alcohols spread at the surface of concentrated halide solutions. The measured salt adsorption is positive and has nonmonotonic dependence on the area per surfactant molecule. For the liquid expanded film, depending on the concentration, there is one couple of ions adsorbed per each 3–30 surfactant molecules. We analyzed which ion, the positive or the negative, stands closer to the surface, by measuring the effect of NaCl on the Volta potential of the monolayer. The potentiometric data suggest that Na+ is specifically adsorbed, while Cl– remains in the diffuse layer, i.e., the surface is positively charged. The observed reverse Hofmeister series of the adsorptions of NaF, NaCl, and NaBr suggests the same conclusion holds for all these salts. The force that causes the adsorption of Na+ seems to be the interaction of the ion with the dipole moment of the monolayer.

  20. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  1. The distribution and adsorption behavior of aliphatic amines in marine and lacustrine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuchen; Lee, C. )

    1990-10-01

    The methylated amines - monomethyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethyl amine (MMA, DMA, TMA) - are commonly found in aquatic environments, apparently as a result of decomposition processes. Adsorption of these amines to clay minerals and organic matter significantly influences their distribution in sediments. Laboratory measurements using {sup 14}C-radiolabelled amines and application of a linear partitioning model resulted in calculated adsorption coefficients of 2.4-4.7 (MMA), 3.3 (DMA), and 3.3-4.1 (TMA). Further studies showed that adsorption of amines is influenced by salinity of the porewaters, and clay mineral and organic matter content of the sediment solid phase. Concentrations of monomethyl- and dimethyl amine were measured in the porewaters and the solid phase of sediment samples collected from Flax Pond and Lake Ronkonkoma (NY), Long Island Sound, and the coastal Peru upwelling area. These two amines were present in all sediments investigated. A clear seasonal increase in the solid-phase concentration of MMA and DMA in Flax Pond sediments was likely related to the annual senescence of salt marsh grasses, either directly as a source of these compounds or indirectly by providing additional exchange capacity to the sediments. The distribution of amines in the solid and dissolved phases observed in all sediments investigated suggests that the distribution of these compounds results from a balance among production, decomposition, and adsorption processes.

  2. Laboratory investigation of steam adsorption in geothermal reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Luetkehans, J.

    1988-02-01

    Some vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs and low-permeability gas reservoirs exhibit anomalous behavior that may be caused by surface adsorption. For example, geothermal reservoirs in the Larderello are of Italy and reservoirs in the Geysers Geothermal Field, California produce little, if any, liquid. Yet to satisfy material balance constraints, another phase besides steam must be present. If steam adsorption occurring in significant amounts is not accounted for, the reserves will be grossly under-estimated. In addition, well tests may be misinterpreted because the pressure response is delayed owing to be adsorbed material leaving or entering the gaseous phase. In the present research the role of adsorption in geothermal reservoirs in investigated. Two sets of laboratory equipment were constructed to measure adsorption isotherms of cores from Berea sandstone, Larderello, and The Geysers. Seven experimental runs were completed using nitrogen on the low temperature apparatus at -196/sup 0/C. Eight runs were conducted using steam on the high temperature apparatus at temperatures ranging from 150 C to 207/sup 0/C. The largest specific surface area and the greatest nitrogen adsorption isotherm were measured on the Berea sandstone, followed by a core from Larderello and then The Geysers. Difficulties in determining whether a system had reached equilibrium at the end of each step lead to questions regarding the magnitude of adsorption measured by the steam runs. Nevertheless, adsorption was observed and the difficulties themselves were useful indicators of needed future research.

  3. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  4. Adsorption efficiency of natural materials for low-concentration cesium in solution.

    PubMed

    Miura, A; Kubota, T; Hamada, K; Hitomi, T

    2016-01-01

    In this study, several natural materials were investigated in order to clarify their potential use as cesium (Cs) adsorbents in situ. Four materials--carbonized rice hull, beech sawdust, oak sawdust, and charcoal (Japanese cedar)--which were previously shown to have Cs adsorption capabilities, were examined. Cs adsorption experiments were conducted using different initial Cs and adsorbent concentrations. The physical properties, adsorption isotherms, and adsorption processes were then examined, so as to exploit the Cs adsorption characteristics in the field. Based on these findings, carbonized rice hull and beech sawdust were selected as effective Cs adsorbents. It was found that these materials show continuous and stable Cs adsorption rates for different initial Cs concentrations. The adsorption efficiency of these two adsorption materials in combination was considered, and it was shown that the adsorption isotherms for carbonized rice hull and beech sawdust follow the Freundlich model. Furthermore, the beech sawdust adsorption process exhibited better agreement with the calculated values obtained via the adsorption rate model and the adsorption kinetics model than did the carbonized rice hull adsorption.

  5. Adsorption of small biological molecules on silica from diluted aqueous solutions: Quantitative characterization and implications to the Bernal's hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Gromovoy, Taras Yu.; Khil'Chevskaya, Elena G.

    1995-08-01

    To describe quantitatively the adsorption of prebiotically important compounds of low molecular weight (amino acids, short linear peptides, cyclic dipeptides, the Krebs's cycle and other carboxylic acids, nucleosides and related phosphates) on silica surface from diluted neutral aqueous solutions, equilibrium constants (K) and free energies (-ΔG) of adsorption were determined from the retention values measured by means of high-performance liquid chromatography on a silica gel column and from the isotherms measured under static conditions. For most carboxylic acids (including amino acids and linear peptides) -ΔG values were negative and K<1, thus showing very weak adsorption. Cyclic dipeptides (2,5-piperazinediones) exhibited higher adsorbability; -ΔG>0 and K>1 were found for most of them. Influence of the structure of α-substituent on the adsorbability is analyzed. A linear dependence of -ΔG on the number of aliphatic carbon atoms in a sorbate molecule was found for the series of aliphatic bifunctional amino acids, related dipeptides and 2,5-piperazinediones, as well as for the row from glycine to triglycyl glycine. The adsorption of nucleosides and their phosphates is characterized by much higherK and -ΔG values (of the order of 102 and 104, respectively). The adsorption data available from our work and literature are summarized and discussed with implications to the Bernal's hypothesis on the roles of solid surfaces in the prebiotic formation of biopolymers from monomeric ‘building blocks’.

  6. Adsorption behavior of the catechins and caffeine onto polyvinylpolypyrrolidone.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhan-Bo; Liang, Yue-Rong; Fan, Fang-Yuan; Ye, Jian-Hui; Zheng, Xin-Qiang; Lu, Jian-Liang

    2011-04-27

    Adsorbent is one of the most important factors for separation efficiency in fixed-bed purification techniques. The adsorption behavior of catechins and caffeine onto polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) was investigated by static adsorption tests. The results showed that catechins rather than caffeine were preferred to adsorb onto PVPP since the adsorption selectivity coefficient of total catechins vs caffeine was around 22.5, and that adsorption of catechins could be described by the pseudo-second-order model. Adsorption amount of caffeine onto PVPP in green tea extracts solution was much higher than that in purified caffeine solution although the initial concentration of caffeine was similar in the two solutions, indicating the caffeine might be attached with catechins which were adsorbed by PVPP instead of being adsorbed by PVPP directly. The results also showed that the adsorption capacity of catechins and caffeine decreased with an increase in temperature, and that Freundlich and Langmuir models were both suitable for describing the isothermal adsorption of catechins, but not suitable for caffeine. The predicted maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of total catechins by PVPP was 671.77 mg g(-1) at 20 °C, which was significantly higher than that by other reported adsorbents. The thermodynamics analyses indicated that the adsorption of catechins onto PVPP was a spontaneous and exothermic physisorption process, revealing lower temperature was favorable for the adsorption of catechins. Elution tests showed that the desorption rates of catechins and caffeine were higher than 91% and 99% after two elution stages; in detail, almost all of the caffeine could be washed down at the water eluting stage, while catechins could be recovered at the dimethyl sulfoxide/ethanol solution eluting stage. Thus, the PVPP could be used as an excellent alternative adsorbent candidate for separating catechins from crude tea extracts, although some investigations, such as exploring the new

  7. On the Henry constant and isosteric heat at zero loading in gas phase adsorption.

    PubMed

    Do, D D; Nicholson, D; Do, H D

    2008-08-01

    The Henry constant and the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero loading are commonly used as indicators of the strength of the affinity of an adsorbate for a solid adsorbent. It is assumed that (i) they are observable in practice, (ii) the Van Hoff's plot of the logarithm of the Henry constant versus the inverse of temperature is always linear and the slope is equal to the heat of adsorption, and (iii) the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero loading is either constant or weakly dependent on temperature. We show in this paper that none of these three points is necessarily correct, first because these variables might not be observable since they are outside the range of measurability; second that the linearity of the Van Hoff plot breaks down at very high temperature, and third that the isosteric heat versus loading is a strong function of temperature. We demonstrate these points using Monte Carlo integration and Monte Carlo simulation of adsorption of various gases on a graphite surface. Another issue concerning the Henry constant is related to the way the adsorption excess is defined. The most commonly used equation is the one that assumes that the void volume is the volume extended all the way to a boundary passing through the centres of the outermost solid atoms. With this definition the Henry constant can become negative at high temperatures. Although adsorption at these temperatures may not be practical because of the very low value of the Henry constant, it is more useful to define the Henry constant in such a way that it is always positive at all temperatures. Here we propose the use of the accessible volume; the volume probed by the adsorbate when it is in nonpositive regions of the potential, to calculate the Henry constant.

  8. Preparation of aminated-polyacrylonitrile nanofiber membranes for the adsorption of metal ions: comparison with microfibers.

    PubMed

    Neghlani, Parvin Karimi; Rafizadeh, Mehdi; Taromi, Faramarz Afshar

    2011-02-15

    Polyacrylonitrile nanofibers (PAN-nFs) were produced using the electrospinning method. Subsequently, the electrospun fibers were modified by diethylenetriamine to produce aminated polyacrylonitrile (APAN) nanofibers. Finally, the adsorbability of copper ions on the surface of the nanofibers was examined in an aqueous solution. Attenuated total internal reflection (ATIR) analysis confirmed the surface amination of the produced PAN-nFs. The grafting yield was calculated by the gravimetric method. The optimum condition was determined to yield the maximum grafting of amine groups to PAN with no losses in sample flexibility. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to measure the copper ion concentration in the solution. Results indicate that the adsorption process in nanofibers is three times faster in comparison with microfibers. Moreover, the pH effect was studied based on the adsorption behavior of copper ions on the APAN nanofibers. In addition, thermodynamic parameters were calculated, revealing that the process was endothermic and demonstrating that randomness increased at the solid-solution interface during the process. The obtained enthalpy value indicates that the chelation of copper ions among the aminated polyacrylonitrile can be regarded as a chemical adsorption process. The adsorption data fit well with the Langmuir isotherm. The saturation adsorption capacity obtained from the Langmuir model for Cu(II) ions was 116.522 mg/g which is five times more than the reported value for APAN microfibers [S. Deng, R. Bai, J.P. Chen, Aminated polyacrylonitrile fibers for lead and copper removal, Langmuir,19 (2003)5058-5064]. Analysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that the surface roughness increased upon adsorption of the metal ion. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination demonstrated that there were no cracks or sign of degradation on the surface after amination.

  9. Fractionation of Natural Organic Matter Upon Adsorption to the Bacterium, Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manecki, M.; Maurice, P. A.; Fein, J. B.

    2001-12-01

    High pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was used to measure changes in molecular weight distribution and average molecular weight upon adsorption of fulvic acid onto Bacillus subtilis at pH 3-7. The FA was an XAD-8 extract from a stream in the New Jersey Pine Barrens (USA), and had a weight average molecular weight of 1890 Da. Adsorption of aqueous FA onto B.subtilis was relatively fast, with steady state attained within 2 hours. An adsorption isotherm at pH 4.5 revealed a strong affinity of FA for the B.subtilis surface. The maximum adsorption capacity of a 20g bacteria/L suspension was greater than 9 mg C/L of FA at pH 4.5. Adsorption of FA onto B.subtilis was strongly pH dependent, increasing markedly with decreasing pH over the pH range 3-7. Comparison of HPSEC analysis of control (FA not reacted with bacteria) versus reacted samples showed that in all experiments, the weight average molecular weight (Mw) of FA remaining in solution decreased by several hundred Da. The observed decrease in solution Mw upon adsorption indicated that the higher molecular weight FA components adsorbed preferentially to the bacterial surfaces, at all studied pH values (3-7). Additionally, there was a low molecular weight FA fraction that did not adsorb, even at low pH. Our results suggest that hydrophobic interactions may be important for FA sorption to B.subtilis and that low molecular weight, more hydrophilic components may thus be less likely to adsorb than higher molecular weight, more hydrophobic components.

  10. Effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y F; Zheng, J; Zheng, L; Zhou, Z R

    2015-02-01

    Salivary pellicle is a biofilm that is formed by the selective adsorption of salivary proteins. Almost all the functions of the salivary pellicle (lubricating properties, anti-caries properties, etc.) are closely associated with its adhesion strength to tooth surface. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of adsorption time on the adhesion strength between salivary pellicle and human tooth enamel, aiming to understand what act as the determinant of the interfacial adhesion. In this study, human tooth enamel samples were immersed in human whole saliva in vitro to obtain a salivary pellicle on the surface of enamel. Immersion treatments lasting up to 1, 3, 10 and 60 min were conducted, respectively. Nano-scratch tests were conducted on the surface of enamel after different adsorption times. The wettability of enamel surface was measured through water contact angle. Results showed that the shear energy between salivary pellicle and enamel surface increased exponentially with the adsorption time. The adhesion force between salivary pellicle and bare enamel surface was more than twice that between salivary pellicle and salivary pellicle. It was found that both the wettability and zeta potential of enamel increased obviously after 1 min saliva-adsorption treatment, and then they almost kept stable as the adsorption time further increased. In summary, the adhesion strength between initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface was much higher than that between initial salivary pellicle and outer salivary pellicle. It seemed that electrostatic interaction contributed to the adhesion between the initial salivary pellicle and enamel surface, but not to the adhesion between the initial and outer salivary pellicle. The results would be helpful to extend the understanding of the adhesion mechanism of salivary pellicle and then to develop new artificial saliva and dental restorative materials.

  11. Evaluating metal-organic frameworks for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture via temperature swing adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, JA; Sumida, K; Herm, ZR; Krishna, R; Long, JR

    2011-08-01

    Two representative metal-organic frameworks, Zn4O(BTB)(2)(BTB3- = 1,3,5-benzenetribenzoate; MOF-177) and Mg-2(dobdc) (dobdc(4-) = 1,4-dioxido-2,5-benzenedicarboxylate; Mg-MOF-74, CPO-27-Mg), are evaluated in detail for their potential use in post-combustion CO2 capture via temperature swing adsorption (TSA). Low-pressure single-component CO2 and N-2 adsorption isotherms were measured every 10 degrees C from 20 to 200 degrees C, allowing the performance of each material to be analyzed precisely. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the separation phenomena and the thermodynamics of CO2 adsorption, the isotherms were analyzed using a variety of methods. With regard to the isosteric heat of CO2 adsorption, Mg-2(dobdc) exhibits an abrupt drop at loadings approaching the saturation of the Mg2+ sites, which has significant implications for regeneration in different industrial applications. The CO2/N-2 selectivities were calculated using ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) for MOF-177, Mg-2(dobdc), and zeolite NaX, and working capacities were estimated using a simplified TSA model. Significantly, MOF-177 fails to exhibit a positive working capacity even at regeneration temperatures as high as 200 degrees C, while Mg-2(dobdc) reaches a working capacity of 17.6 wt% at this temperature. Breakthrough simulations were also performed for the three materials, demonstrating the superior performance of Mg-2(dobdc) over MOF-177 and zeolite NaX. These results show that the presence of strong CO2 adsorption sites is essential for a metal-organic framework to be of utility in post-combustion CO2 capture via a TSA process, and present a methodology for the evaluation of new metal-organic frameworks via analysis of single-component gas adsorption isotherms.

  12. Ciprofloxacin adsorption on graphene and granular activated carbon: kinetics, isotherms, and effects of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuan; Tsang, Daniel C W; Chen, Feng; Li, Shiyu; Yang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a commonly used antibiotic and widely detected in wastewaters and farmlands nowadays. This study evaluated the efficacy of next-generation adsorbent (graphene) and conventional adsorbent (granular activated carbon, GAC) for CIP removal. Batch experiments and characterization tests were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium isotherms, thermodynamic properties, and the influences of solution chemistry (pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter (NOM), and water sources). Compared to GAC, graphene showed significantly faster adsorption and reached equilibrium within 3 min, confirming the rapid access of CIP into the macroporous network of high surface area of graphene as revealed by the Brunner-Emmet-Teller measurements analysis. The kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second-order model, suggesting the importance of the initial CIP concentration related to surface site availability of graphene. The adsorption isotherm on graphene followed Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 323 mg/g, which was higher than other reported carbonaceous adsorbents. The CIP adsorption was thermodynamically favourable on graphene and primarily occurred through π - π interaction, according to the FTIR spectroscopy. While the adsorption capacity of graphene decreased with increasing solution pH due to the speciation change of CIP, the adverse effects of ionic strength (0.01-0.5 mol L(-1)), presence of NOM (5 mg L⁻¹), and different water sources (river water or drinking water) were less significant on graphene than GAC. These results indicated that graphene can serve as an alternative adsorbent for CIP removal in commonly encountered field conditions, if proper separation and recovery is available in place.

  13. Ethanol, acetic acid, and water adsorption from binary and ternary liquid mixtures on high-silica zeolites.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Travis C; Vane, Leland M

    2006-04-11

    Adsorption isotherms were measured for ethanol, acetic acid, and water adsorbed on high-silica ZSM-5 zeolite powder from binary and ternary liquid mixtures at room temperature. Ethanol and water adsorption on two high-silica ZSM-5 zeolites with different aluminum contents and a high-silica beta zeolite were also compared. The amounts adsorbed were measured using a recently developed technique that accurately measures the changes in adsorbent/liquid mixture density and liquid concentration. This technique allows the adsorption of each compound in a liquid mixture to be measured. Adsorption data for binary mixtures were fit with the dual-site extended Langmuir model, and the parameters were used to predict ternary adsorption isotherms for each compound with reasonable accuracy. In ternary mixtures, acetic acid competed with ethanol and water for adsorption sites and reduced ethanol adsorption more than it reduced water adsorption.

  14. Adsorption characteristics of nano-TiO2 onto zebrafish embryos and its impacts on egg hatching.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Su, Chia-Chi; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Dong, Cheng-Di; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Huang, C P

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of nanoparticles (NPs) uptake may fundamentally alter physicochemical effects of engineered NPs on aquatic organisms, thereby yielding different ecotoxicology assessment results. The adsorption behavior of nano-TiO2 (P-25) on zebrafish embryos in Holtfreter's medium (pH 7.2, I ∼ 7.2 × 10(-2) M) and the presence of sodium alginate (100 mg/L) as dispersant was investigated. Zebrafish embryos (total 100) were exposed to nano-TiO2 at different concentrations (e.g., 0, 10, 20, 60, 120 mg/L) in batch-mode assay. The adsorption capacity of nano-TiO2 on fish eggs was determined by measuring the Ti concentration on the egg surface using ICP-OES analysis. Results showed that the adsorption capacity increased rapidly in the first hour, and then declined to reach equilibrium in 8 h. The adsorption characteristics was visualized as a three-step process of rapid initial layer formation, followed by break-up of aggregates and finally rearrangement of floc structures; the maximum adsorption capacity was the sum of an inner rigid layers of aggregates of 0.81-0.84 μg-TiO2/#-egg and an outer softly flocculated layers of 1.01 μg-TiO2/#-egg. The Gibbs free energy was 543.29-551.26 and 100.75 kJ/mol, respectively, for the inner-layer and the outer-layer aggregates. Adsorption capacity at 0.5-1.0 μg-TiO2/#-egg promoted egg hatching; but hatching was inhibited at higher adsorption capacity. Results clearly showed that the configuration of TiO2 aggregates could impact the hatching efficiency of zebrafish embryos.

  15. Thermodynamic investigations using molecular dynamics simulations with potential of mean force calculations for cardiotoxin protein adsorption on mixed self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Wei; Hsiao, Pai-Yi; Lu, Ming-Chang; Chieng, Ching-Chang

    2012-10-25

    Understanding protein adsorption onto solid surfaces is of critical importance in the field of bioengineering, especially for applications such as medical implants, diagnostic biosensors, drug delivery systems, and tissue engineering. This study proposed the use of molecular dynamics simulations with potential of mean force (PMF) calculations to identify and characterize the mechanisms of adsorption of a protein molecule on a designed surface. A set of model systems consisting of a cardiotoxin (CTX) protein and mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces were used as examples. The set of mixed SAM surfaces with varying topographies were created by mixing alkanethiol chains of different lengths. The results revealed that CTX proteins underwent similar conformal changes upon adsorption onto the various mixed SAMs but showed distinctive characteristics in free energy profiles. Enhancement of the adsorption affinity, i.e., the change in free energy of adsorption, for mixed SAMs was demonstrated by using atomic force microscopic measurements. A component analysis conducted to quantify the physical mechanisms that promoted CTX adsorption revealed contributions from both SAMs and the solvent. Further component analyses of thermodynamic properties, such as the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy, indicated that the contribution from SAMs was driven by enthalpy, and the contribution from the solvent was driven by entropy. The results indicated that CTX adsorption was an entropy-driven process, and the entropic component from the solvent, i.e., the hydrophobic interaction, was the major driving force for CTX adsorption onto SAMs. The study also concluded that the surfaces composed of mixtures of SAMs with different chain lengths promoted the adsorption of CTX protein.

  16. Kinetics and equilibrium adsorption studies of dimethylamine (DMA) onto ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinhai; Meng, Yuanyuan; Sun, Tongxi; Mahmood, Qaisar; Wu, Donglei; Zhu, Jianhang; Lu, George

    2011-01-30

    The fine grained resin ZGSPC106 was used to adsorb dimethylamine (DMA) from aqueous solution in the present research. Batch experiments were performed to examine the effects of initial pH of solution and agitation time on the adsorption process. The thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were also analyzed. The maximum adsorption was found at natural pH of DMA solution and equilibrium could be attained within 12 min. The equilibrium adsorption data were conformed satisfactorily to the Langmuir equation. The evaluation based on Langmuir isotherm gave the maximal static saturated adsorption capacity of 138.89 mg/g at 293K. Various thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) showed that the adsorption was spontaneous, endothermic and feasible. DMA adsorption on ZGSPC106 fitted well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Furthermore, the adsorption mechanism was discussed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis.

  17. Superior Adsorption and Regenerable Dye Adsorbent Based on Flower-Like Molybdenum Disulfide Nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sancan; Liu, Kerui; Hu, Linfeng; Teng, Feng; Yu, Pingping; Zhu, Yufang

    2017-03-01

    Herein we report superior dye-adsorption performance for flower-like nanostructure composed of two dimensional (2D) MoS2 nanosheets by a facile hydrothermal method, more prominent adsorption of cationic dye compared with anodic dye indicates the dye adsorption performance strongly depends on surface charge of MoS2 nanosheets. The adsorption mechanism of dye is analyzed, the kinetic data of dye adsorption fit well with the pseudo-second-order model, meanwhile adsorption capability at different equilibrium concentrations follows Langmuir model, indicating the favorability and feasibility of dye adsorption. The regenerable property for MoS2 with full adsorption of dye molecules by using alkaline solution were demonstrated, showing the feasibility of reuse for the MoS2, which is promising in its practical water treatment application.

  18. Preparation of adsorbent with magnesium sulfate and straw pulp black liquor and its phenol adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lugang; Wang, Haizeng

    2009-09-01

    A magnesia adsorbent was prepared from straw pulp black liquor and magnesium sulfate for the first time, and its adsorption of phenol from aqueous solution was examined. The characteristics of the adsorbent were tested through chemical analysis, surface analysis, X-ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy. The effects of various factors, such as dose, adsorption time and adsorption temperature, on phenol adsorption behavior were studied. The results show that the adsorption processes can be fitted to the isotherm Langmuir model very well. It was found that the adsorption process was strongly influenced by temperature and the optimal temperature for phenol removal was 40 °C. The optimum adsorption time was 10 min, and desorption would happen afterwards. Between the models of Langmuir and Freundlich, the adsorption process of phenol onto magnesia fitted the Langmuir equation better.

  19. Superior Adsorption and Regenerable Dye Adsorbent Based on Flower-Like Molybdenum Disulfide Nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sancan; Liu, Kerui; Hu, Linfeng; Teng, Feng; Yu, Pingping; Zhu, Yufang

    2017-01-01

    Herein we report superior dye-adsorption performance for flower-like nanostructure composed of two dimensional (2D) MoS2 nanosheets by a facile hydrothermal method, more prominent adsorption of cationic dye compared with anodic dye indicates the dye adsorption performance strongly depends on surface charge of MoS2 nanosheets. The adsorption mechanism of dye is analyzed, the kinetic data of dye adsorption fit well with the pseudo-second-order model, meanwhile adsorption capability at different equilibrium concentrations follows Langmuir model, indicating the favorability and feasibility of dye adsorption. The regenerable property for MoS2 with full adsorption of dye molecules by using alkaline solution were demonstrated, showing the feasibility of reuse for the MoS2, which is promising in its practical water treatment application. PMID:28272411

  20. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  1. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  2. What Do Maps Show?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet, appropriate for grades 4-8, features a teaching poster which shows different types of maps (different views of Salt Lake City, Utah), as well as three reproducible maps and reproducible activity sheets which complement the maps. The poster provides teacher background, including step-by-step lesson plans for four geography…

  3. Show Me the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    Because today's students have grown up steeped in video games and the Internet, most of them expect feedback, and usually gratification, very soon after they expend effort on a task. Teachers can get quick feedback to students by showing them videotapes of their learning performances. The author, a 3rd grade teacher describes how the seemingly…

  4. Chemistry Game Shows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Susan; Muzyka, Jennifer

    2002-04-01

    We present a technological improvement to the use of game shows to help students review for tests. Our approach uses HTML files interpreted with a browser on a computer attached to an LCD projector. The HTML files can be easily modified for use of the game in a variety of courses.

  5. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  6. Talk Show Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  7. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  8. CR-100 synthetic zeolite adsorption characteristics toward Northern Banat groundwater ammonia.

    PubMed

    Tomić, Željko; Kukučka, Miroslav; Stojanović, Nikoleta Kukučka; Kukučka, Andrej; Jokić, Aleksandar

    2016-10-14

    The adsorption characteristics of synthetic zeolite CR-100 in a fixed-bed system using continuous flow of groundwater containing elevated ammonia concentration were examined. The possibilities for adsorbent mass calculation throughout mass transfer zone using novel mathematical approach as well as zeolite adsorption capacity at every sampling point in time or effluent volume were determined. The investigated adsorption process consisted of three clearly separated steps indicated to sorption kinetics. The first step was characterized by decrease and small changes in effluent ammonia concentration vs. experiment time and quantity of adsorbed ammonia per mass unit of zeolite. The consequences of this phenomenon were showed in the plots of the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherm models through a better linear correlation according as graphical points contingent to the first step were not accounted. The Temkin and the Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models showed the opposite tendency with better fitting for overall measurements. According to the obtained isotherms parameter data, the investigated process was found to be multilayer physicochemical adsorption, and also that synthetic zeolite CR-100 is a promising material for removal of ammonia from Northern Banat groundwater with an ammonia removal efficiency of 90%.

  9. Adsorption behaviour of PuF6 on UO2F2 by the use of 236Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Nobuaki; Matsuda, Minoru; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki; Kirishima, Akira

    2010-03-01

    To know the behavior of plutonium in the fluoride volatility process (FLUOREX PROCESS) for the spent nuclear fuel, both UO2 and PuO2 are fluorinated by fluorine forming volatile UF6 and PuF6, respectively. Then PuF6 is separated and recovered from UF6 by using adsorption materials such as uranyl fluoride UO2F2. In this paper, adsorption behavior of PuF6on UO2F2 was examined by the use of 236Pu tracer. First, the stability of UO2F2 in F2atmosphere was analyzed by TG-DTA method showing that uranium volatilized completely over 350 °C by the formation of UF6 and the adsorption of plutonium by UO2F2 should be done at temperatures lower than 250 °C. The behavior of PtF6 as a chemical analogue of PuF6 was also conducted for comparison and it showed that the deposition of PtF4 on UO2F2 at 200 °C. When the 236Pu doped U3O8 was reacted with 10%F2-He gas, the PuF6 vaporized at ca. 600 °C. Then adsorption of 236Pu on UO2F2 was observed by α ray measurement. The adsorption mechanism of Pu on UO2F2 was discussed with experimental data and thermodynamic consideration.

  10. Acetaldehyde removal using an atmospheric non-thermal plasma combined with a packed bed: role of the adsorption process.

    PubMed

    Klett, C; Duten, X; Tieng, S; Touchard, S; Jestin, P; Hassouni, K; Vega-González, A

    2014-08-30

    This work is an attempt in order to help towards understanding the influence of the adsorption process on the removal of a VOC (acetaldehyde, CH3CHO) using cyclic non thermal plasma (NTP) combined with a packed-bed of a catalyst support, α-Al2O3. In the first part, the results obtained by placing the saturated alumina pellets inside the plasma discharge zone are discussed, in terms of acetaldehyde removal, CO and CO2 production. In the second part, adsorption of CH3CHO, CO, CO2 and O3 was carried out, from single and multicomponent mixtures of the different compounds. The results showed that (i) the adsorption capacities followed the order CH3CHO≫  CO2>CO; (ii) O3 was decomposed on the alumina surface; (iii) CO oxidation occurred on the surface when O3 was present. In the third part, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to follow the alumina surface during acetaldehyde adsorption. DRIFTS measurements demonstrated that besides the bands of molecularly adsorbed acetaldehyde, several absorptions appeared on the spectra showing the intermediate surface transformation of acetaldehyde already at 300K. Finally, the relationship between the adsorption results and the NTP combined with a packed-bed process is discussed.

  11. [Adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto modified activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Tong, Xi-Zhen; Shi, Bao-You; Xie, Yue; Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-09-01

    Modified coal and coconut shell based powdered activated carbons (PACs) were prepared by FeCl3 and medium power microwave treatment, respectively. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the characteristics of adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto original and modified PACs. Based on pore structure and surface functional groups characterization, the adsorption behaviors of modified and original PACs were compared. The competitive adsorption of humic acid (HA) and PFOS on original and modified coconut shell PACs were also investigated. Results showed that both Fe3+ and medium power microwave treatments changed the pore structure and surface functional groups of coal and coconut shell PACs, but the changing effects were different. The adsorption of PFOS on two modified coconut shell-based PACs was significantly improved. While the adsorption of modified coal-based activated carbons declined. The adsorption kinetics of PFOS onto original and modified coconut shell-based activated carbons were the same, and the time of reaching adsorption equilibrium was about 6 hours. In the presence of HA, the adsorption of PFOS by modified PAC was reduced but still higher than that of the original.

  12. Adsorption of mercury on laterite from Guizhou Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Lijun; Guo, Baiwei; He, Shouyang

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of Hg(II) on laterite from Guizhou Province, China, were studied and the adsorption mechanism was discussed. The results showed that different mineral compositons in the laterite will cause differences in the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). Illite and non-crystalloids are the main contributors to enhancing the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). The pH of the solution is an important factor affecting the adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite. The alkalescent environment (pH 7-9) is favorable to the adsorption of Hg(II). The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) increases with increasing pH. When the pH reaches a certain value, the amount of the adsorbed Hg(II) will reach the maximum level. The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) decreases with increasing pH. The optimal pHs of laterite and kaolinite are 9 and 8, respectively. The optimal initial concentrations of Hg(II) on laterite and kaolinite are 250 and 200 microg/ml, respectively. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Langmuir model. The adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite is a quick process while that of Hg(II) on kaolinite is a slow reaction. Laterite from Guizhou Province is a promising environmental material which can be used in the removal of Hg(II) from wastewater.

  13. Adsorption dynamics of molecular nitrogen at an Fe(111) surface.

    PubMed

    Nosir, M A; Martin-Gondre, L; Bocan, G A; Díez Muiño, R

    2017-03-08

    We present an extensive theoretical study of N2 adsorption mechanisms on an Fe(111) surface. We combine the static analysis of a six-dimensional potential energy surface (6D-PES), based on ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations for the system, with quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations to simulate the adsorption dynamics. There are four molecular adsorption states, usually called γ, δ, α, and ε, arising from our DFT calculations. We find that N2 adsorption in the γ-state is non-activated, while the threshold energy is associated with the entrance channel for the other three adsorption states. Our QCT calculations confirm that there are activated and nonactivated paths for the adsorption of N2 on the Fe(111) surface, which is in agreement with previous experimental investigations. Molecular dynamics at a surface temperature Ts = 300 K and impact energies Ei in the 0-5 eV range show the relative occupancy of the γ, δ, α, and ε states. The δ-state, however, is only marginally populated despite its adsorption energy being very similar to that of the γ-state. Our QCT calculations trace the dependence of molecular trapping on the surface temperature Ts and initial impact energy Ei and quantify the rates of the different competitive channels that eventually lead to molecular adsorption.

  14. Mechanism of amitriptyline adsorption on Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2).

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Hsiang; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Li, Zhaohui; Kuo, Chung-Yih; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Chen, Wan-Ru; Lv, Guocheng

    2014-07-30

    The uptake of amitriptyline (AMI) from aqueous environment by Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2) was studied in a batch system under different physicochemical conditions. The adsorbent was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. The AMI adsorption on SAz-2 obeyed the Langmuir isotherm with a capacity of 330mg/g (1.05mmol/g) at pH 6-7. The adsorption kinetics was fast, almost reaching equilibrium in 2h, and followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Desorption of exchangeable cations correlated with the AMI adsorption well, indicating that cation exchange was the major mechanism. X-ray diffraction patterns showing significant expansions of the d001 spacing and characteristic FTIR band shifts toward higher frequencies after AMI adsorption onto SAz-2 indicated that the adsorbed AMI molecules were intercalated into the interlayers of the mineral. Thermodynamic parameters based on partitioning coefficients suggested that the AMI adsorption was an endothermic physisorption at high adsorption levels. At low and higher AMI adsorption levels, the intercalated AMI molecules take a horizontal monolayer and bilayer conformation, respectively. The higher adsorption capacity suggested that SAz-2 could be a good candidate to remove AMI from wastewater and would be an important environmental sink for the fate and transport of AMI in soils and groundwater.

  15. Adsorption behavior of some radionuclides on the Chinese weathered coal.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianfeng; Xu, Qichu; Bai, Tao

    2007-08-01

    The equilibrium and kinetic properties of Am(III), Eu(III) and Cs(I) ions adsorption by three weathered coals (WCs) from China, have been investigated in batch stirred-tank experiments. The effects of contact time, solution acidity and initial sorbate concentration on the adsorption of Am(III), Eu(III) and Cs(I) by Yuxian(YX) Tongchuan (TC) and Pingxiang (PX) WC were evaluated. The radionuclide ions are able to form complex compounds with carboxylic and phenolic groups of WCs and they are also bounded with phenolic groups even at high acidity reaction solution (>0.1 mol/L). Mechanisms including ion exchange, complexation and adsorption to the coal surface are possible in the sorption process. The acidity of the solution played an important role in the adsorption. Even acidity as high as 0.1 mol/L, 60% of Am(III) or Eu(III), 40% of Cs(I) were found to be sorbed on the YX WC, which had the best adsorption capacity for Am(III) and Eu(III). Our batch adsorption studies showed the equilibrium adsorption data fit the linear Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The maximum equilibrium uptake of Eu(III) were 0.412, 3.701, 5.446 mmol/g for JXWC, TCWC and YXWC, respectively.

  16. Effect of the adsorbate kinetic diameter on the accuracy of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for modeling adsorption of organic vapors on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Niknaddaf, Saeid; Hashisho, Zaher

    2012-11-30

    This paper investigates the effect of the kinetic diameter (KD) of the reference adsorbate on the accuracy of the Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation for predicting the adsorption isotherms of organic vapors on microporous activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms for 13 organic compounds on microporous beaded activated carbon were experimentally measured, and predicted using the D-R model and affinity coefficients. The affinity coefficients calculated based on molar volumes, molecular polarizabilities, and molecular parachors were used to predict the isotherms based on four reference compounds (4.3≤KD≤6.8 Å). The results show that the affinity coefficients are independent of the calculation method if the reference and test adsorbates are from the same organic group. Choosing a reference adsorbate with a KD similar to that of the test adsorbate results in better prediction of the adsorption isotherm. The relative error between the predicted and the measured adsorption isotherms increases as the absolute difference in the kinetic diameters of the reference and test adsorbates increases. Finally, the proposed hypothesis was used to explain reports of inconsistent findings among published articles. The results from this study are important because they allow a more accurate prediction of adsorption capacities of adsorbents which allow for better design of adsorption systems.

  17. Equilibrium and kinetics of water adsorption in carbon molecular sieve: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, S W; Coons, J E

    2004-09-28

    Measurements of water adsorption equilibrium and kinetics in Takeda carbon molecular sieve (CMS) were undertaken in an effort to characterize fundamental mechanisms of adsorption and transport. Adsorption equilibrium revealed a type III isotherm that was characterized by cooperative multimolecular sorption theory. Water adsorption was found to be reversible and did not display hysteresis upon desorption over the conditions studied. Adsorption kinetics measurements revealed that a Fickian diffusion mechanism governed the uptake of water and that the rate of adsorption decreased with increasing relative pressure. Previous investigations have attributed the observed decreasing trend in the rate of adsorption to blocking of micropores. Here, it is proposed that the decrease is attributed to the thermodynamic correction to Fick's law which is formulated on the basis of the chemical potential as the driving force for transport. The thermodynamically corrected formulation accounted for observations of transport of water and other molecules in CMS.

  18. Fluorocarbon adsorption in hierarchical porous frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, RK; Annapureddy, HVR; Vijaykumar, M; Schaef, HT; Martin, PF; McGrail, BP; Dang, LX; Krishna, R; Thallapally, PK

    2014-07-09

    Metal-organic frameworks comprise an important class of solid-state materials and have potential for many emerging applications such as energy storage, separation, catalysis and bio-medical. Here we report the adsorption behaviour of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives on a set of microporous and hierarchical mesoporous frameworks. The microporous frameworks show a saturation uptake capacity for dichlorodifluoromethane of >4 mmol g(-1) at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/P-o) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous framework shows an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching >14 mmol g(-1) at P/P-o of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption is found to generally correlate with the polarizability and boiling point of the refrigerant, with dichlorodifluoromethane >chlorodifluoromethane >chlorotrifluoromethane >tetrafluoromethane >methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting these sorbents for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling.

  19. Critical analysis of adsorption data statistically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, Achla; Singh, S. K.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental data can be presented, computed, and critically analysed in a different way using statistics. A variety of statistical tests are used to make decisions about the significance and validity of the experimental data. In the present study, adsorption was carried out to remove zinc ions from contaminated aqueous solution using mango leaf powder. The experimental data was analysed statistically by hypothesis testing applying t test, paired t test and Chi-square test to (a) test the optimum value of the process pH, (b) verify the success of experiment and (c) study the effect of adsorbent dose in zinc ion removal from aqueous solutions. Comparison of calculated and tabulated values of t and χ 2 showed the results in favour of the data collected from the experiment and this has been shown on probability charts. K value for Langmuir isotherm was 0.8582 and m value for Freundlich adsorption isotherm obtained was 0.725, both are <1, indicating favourable isotherms. Karl Pearson's correlation coefficient values for Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were obtained as 0.99 and 0.95 respectively, which show higher degree of correlation between the variables. This validates the data obtained for adsorption of zinc ions from the contaminated aqueous solution with the help of mango leaf powder.

  20. Fluorocarbon adsorption in hierarchical porous frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motkuri, Radha Kishan; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Vijaykumar, M.; Schaef, H. Todd; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-01

    Metal-organic frameworks comprise an important class of solid-state materials and have potential for many emerging applications such as energy storage, separation, catalysis and bio-medical. Here we report the adsorption behaviour of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives on a set of microporous and hierarchical mesoporous frameworks. The microporous frameworks show a saturation uptake capacity for dichlorodifluoromethane of >4 mmol g-1 at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous framework shows an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching >14 mmol g-1 at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption is found to generally correlate with the polarizability and boiling point of the refrigerant, with dichlorodifluoromethane >chlorodifluoromethane >chlorotrifluoromethane >tetrafluoromethane >methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting these sorbents for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling.

  1. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2011-07-27

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  2. Adsorption and diffusion of water on graphene from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jie; Michaelides, Angelos; Alfè, Dario; Schimka, Laurids; Kresse, Georg; Wang, Enge

    2011-07-01

    Water monomer adsorption on graphene is examined with state-of-the-art electronic structure approaches. The adsorption energy determinations on this system from quantum Monte Carlo and the random-phase approximation yield small values of <100 meV. These benchmarks provide a deeper understanding of the reactivity of graphene that may underpin the development of improved more approximate methods enabling the accurate treatment of more complex processes at wet-carbon interfaces. As an example, we show how dispersion-corrected density functional theory, which we show gives a satisfactory description of this adsorption system, predicts that water undergoes ultra-fast diffusion on graphene at low temperatures.

  3. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of phenol onto graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Liu, Tonghao; Sun, Jiankun; Jiao, Yuqin; Xia, Yanzhi; Xia, Linhua; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of temperature on phenol adsorbed by graphene shows that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of phenol increases with the increase in temperature from 285 to 333 K. Increasing adsorption capacities with temperature indicates that the adsorption of phenol is controlled by an endothermic reaction. Highlights: ► The graphene has high phenol adsorption capacity. ► The graphene has a high specific surface area of 305 m{sup 2}/g. ► The adsorption capacity is high at acidic pH range. ► The graphene has rapid phenol adsorption rate. ► Phenol adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. -- Abstract: Graphene, a new member of carbon family, has been prepared, characterized and used as adsorbent to remove phenol from aqueous solution. The effect parameters including pH, dosage, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption properties of phenol onto graphene were investigated. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity can reach 28.26 mg/g at the conditions of initial phenol concentration of 50 mg/L, pH 6.3 and 285 K. Adsorption data were well described by both Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene fit the pseudo second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene was endothermic and spontaneous.

  4. Adsorption of Dimethyldodecylamine Oxide and Its Mixtures with Triton X-100 at the Hydrophilic Silica/Water Interface Studied Using Total Internal Reflection Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Dien; Baldelli, Steven

    2016-12-08

    Adsorption of dimethyldodecylamine oxide (DDAO) and its mixtures with Triton X-100 (TX-100) at the hydrophilic silica/water interface has been studied using total internal reflection (TIR) Raman spectroscopy and target factor analysis (TFA). The use of a linear vibrational spectroscopic technique helps obtain information on molecular behavior, adsorbed amount, and conformational order of surfactant molecules at the interface. The results obtained from polarized Raman measurements of pure DDAO show insignificant changes in the orientation and conformational order of surface molecules as a function of DDAO bulk concentrations. The adsorption isotherm of pure DDAO shows a change in the structure of the adsorbed layer at concentrations close to the critical micelle concentration (cmc). TFA reveals that, for a low concentration of DDAO (0.30 mM in this study), adsorption of both DDAO and TX-100 in the mixed surfactants was enhanced at low TX-100 concentrations. The synergistic effect is dominant at low concentrations of TX-100, with enhanced adsorption of both surfactants. Although competitive adsorption is effective at high concentrations of TX-100, the presence of a small amount of DDAO at the interface still enhances TX-100 adsorption. When DDAO concentrations are increased to 1.00 mM, TX-100 replaces DDAO molecules on the surface when TX-100 concentration is increased.

  5. Adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose on alumina particles.

    PubMed

    Zhivkov, Alexandar M; Hristov, Rosen P

    2015-06-01

    The polyelectrolyte adsorption on colloid particles is often used for stabilization or flocculation of water suspensions. The aim of this work is to study the adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) on alumina (γ-Al2O3) colloid particles. The particles and polymer are chosen because of the capability of the metal-oxide ampholyte surface and the weak polyelectrolytes to alter their charge by pH. The measurements are done at pH 6.0 where the CMC carboxylic gropes are almost fully dissociated and the alumina surface is positively charged. The high linear charge density of the polyelectrolyte chain provides Na(+) counterions condensation on the COO(-) groups. The main employed method is the electric light scattering based on particle orientation in sinusoidal electric field. The electric polarizability and the relaxation time after field switching off (both depending on the particle charge and size) are used as criteria for polymer adsorption and particle aggregation. Micro-electrophoresis is applied as additional techniques indicating the sign and density of the surface charge. The results obtained give the conditions (time dependence, particle and polymer concentrations) where the CMC adsorption is complete and the suspension is stable.

  6. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show.

  7. Predicting protein dynamic binding capacity from batch adsorption tests.

    PubMed

    Carta, Giorgio

    2012-10-01

    The dynamic binding capacity (DBC) and its dependence on residence time influence the design and productivity of adsorption columns used in protein capture applications. This paper offers a very simple approach to predict the DBC of an adsorption column based on a measurement of the equilibrium binding capacity (EBC) and of the time needed to achieve one-half of the EBC in a batch adsorption test. The approach is based on a mass transfer kinetics model that assumes pore diffusion with a rectangular isotherm; however, the same approach is also shown to work for other systems where solute transport inside the particle occurs through other transport mechanisms.

  8. Measurement of the interaction forces at various pH levels by using AFM for the interpretation of DNA adsorption on silanized surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung Pil; Suga, Kosaku; Fujihara, Masamichi; Park, Byung-Eun

    2014-09-01

    Various surfaces have been used for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) immobilization, one example being a silanized surface. This is useful for determining DNA lengths and, thus, locating specific gene sequences in DNA by using fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. In this study, we deposited DNA by using the molecular combing method and, we used fluorescence microscopy to study how the chain lengths of n-alkylsilanes affected the surface density of DNA deposited on the silanized surfaces in a tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TE) buffer. The forces between a cleaned silicon-nitride (Si3N4) tip and each substrate surface in aqueous buffers at various pH levels (1.0 ~ 9.0) were also studied by using atomic force microscopy to measure the force-distance curves. We explain why the density of lambda bacteriophage DNA (λ-DNA) deposited by using the molecular combing method at pH 8 was lower on the silanized surface with the shorter alkyl chain than it was on the silanized surface with the longer alkyl chain in terms of the electrical double layer (EDL) and the adhesive force.

  9. Characterization of Au-Rh/TiO2 bimetallic nanocatalysts by CO and CH3CN adsorption: XPS, TEM and FTIR measurements.

    PubMed

    Kiss, János; Németh, Róbert; Koós, Akos; Raskó, János

    2009-06-01

    On X-ray photoelectron spectra of the Au-Rh/TiO2 catalysts the position of Au4f peak was practically unaffected by the presence of rhodium, the peak position of Rh3d, however, shifted to lower binding energy with the increase of gold content of the catalysts. Rh enrichment in the outer layers of the bimetallic crystallites was experienced. The bands due to Au0-CO, Rh0-CO and (Rh0)2-CO were observed on the IR spectra of bimetallic samples, no signs for Rh+-(CO)2 were detected on these catalysts. The band due to CH3CN on Lewis acid centers shifted to lower wavenumbers with the increase of Rh content, which shows that the strength of Lewis acid sites weakens with the increase of Rh content of the catalysts. CH3CN, on the other hand, dissociates producing CN(a) species even at this temperature. From the shift to higher wavenumbers of the band due to CN(a) the strengthening of the C-N bond with increasing Rh content has been established. The results were interpreted by electron donation from titania through gold to rhodium and by the higher particle size of bimetallic crystallites. The effects of catalyst composition, reaction temperature and composition of the reacting gas mixtures have been studied on the oxidation of CO in the presence of hydrogen (PROX process). The presence of both O2 and H2 reduced the surface concentration of CO adsorbed on metallic sites. Mass spectroscopic analysis of the gas phase showed that gaseous CO2 formed in the highest amount in CO+O2 mixture, the presence of H2 suppressed the amount of CO2 produced. This negative effect of hydrogen was the lowest on 1% Rh/TiO2, the highest inhibition was observed on Au/TiO2 systems.

  10. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre.

  11. Selective adsorption of flavor-active components on hydrophobic resins.

    PubMed

    Saffarionpour, Shima; Sevillano, David Mendez; Van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Noordman, T Reinoud; Brouwer, Eric; Ottens, Marcel

    2016-12-09

    This work aims to propose an optimum resin that can be used in industrial adsorption process for tuning flavor-active components or removal of ethanol for producing an alcohol-free beer. A procedure is reported for selective adsorption of volatile aroma components from water/ethanol mixtures on synthetic hydrophobic resins. High throughput 96-well microtiter-plates batch uptake experimentation is applied for screening resins for adsorption of esters (i.e. isoamyl acetate, and ethyl acetate), higher alcohols (i.e. isoamyl alcohol and isobutyl alcohol), a diketone (diacetyl) and ethanol. The miniaturized batch uptake method is adapted for adsorption of volatile components, and validated with column breakthrough analysis. The results of single-component adsorption tests on Sepabeads SP20-SS are expressed in single-component Langmuir, Freundlich, and Sips isotherm models and multi-component versions of Langmuir and Sips models are applied for expressing multi-component adsorption results obtained on several tested resins. The adsorption parameters are regressed and the selectivity over ethanol is calculated for each tested component and tested resin. Resin scores for four different scenarios of selective adsorption of esters, higher alcohols, diacetyl, and ethanol are obtained. The optimal resin for adsorption of esters is Sepabeads SP20-SS with resin score of 87% and for selective removal of higher alcohols, XAD16N, and XAD4 from Amberlite resin series are proposed with scores of 80 and 74% respectively. For adsorption of diacetyl, XAD16N and XAD4 resins with score of 86% are the optimum choice and Sepabeads SP2MGS and XAD761 resins showed the highest affinity towards ethanol.

  12. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  13. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Xochilt; Schiavi, Federica; Keppler, Hans

    2016-03-01

    data provided here, the gas compositions in equilibrium with the ash surfaces can be calculated. In particular, for dacitic composition, the molar ratio of S/Cl adsorbed to the ash surface is related to the molar S/Cl ratio in the gas phase according to the equation ln ⁡(S / Cl) adsorbed = 2855T-1 + 0.28 ln ⁡(S / Cl) gas - 11.14. Our data also show that adsorption on ash will significantly reduce the fraction of HCl reaching the stratosphere, only if the initial HCl content in the volcanic gas is low (<1 mol%). For higher initial HCl concentrations, adsorption on ash has only a minor effect. While HCl scavenging by hydrometeors may remove a considerable fraction of HCl from the eruption column, recent models suggest that this process is much less efficient than previously thought. Our experimental data therefore support the idea that the HCl loading from major explosive eruptions may indeed cause severe depletions of stratospheric ozone.

  14. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions.

    PubMed

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-21

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers--or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)--has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials.

  15. Adsorption of Crystal Violet Dye Using Zeolite A Synthesized From Coal Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumaeri; Kusumastuti, E.; Santosa, S. J.; Sutarno

    2017-02-01

    Adsorption of Crystal Violet (CV) dye using zeolite A synthesized from coal fly ash (ZA) has been done. Effect of pH, contact time, and the initial concentration of dye adsorption was studied in this adsorption. Model experimental of adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics were also studied. The adsorption is done in a batch reactor at room temperature. A total of 0.01 g of zeolite A was added to the Erlenmeyer flask 50 mL containing 20 mL of the dye solution of Crystal Violet in a variety of conditions of pH, contact time and initial concentration. Furthermore, Erlenmeyer flask and its contents were shaken using an orbital shaker at a speed of 200 rpm. After a specified period of adsorption, the solution was centrifuged for 2 minutes so that the solids separated from the solution. The concentration of the dye after adsorption determined using Genesis-20 Spectrophotometer. The results showed that the Zeolite A synthesized from coal fly ash could be used as an effective adsorbent for Crystal Violet dye. The optimum adsorption occurs at pH 6, and contact time 45 minutes. At the initial concentration of 2 to 6 mg/L, adsorption is reduced from 79 to 62.8%. Crystal Violet dye adsorption in zeolite A fulfilled kinetic model of pseudo-order 2 and model of Freundlich adsorption isotherm.

  16. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M.; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S.; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers—or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)—has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials.

  17. Preparation of Fiber Based Binder Materials to Enhance the Gas Adsorption Efficiency of Carbon Air Filter.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae Hwan; Choi, Jeong Rak; Lim, Dae Young; Lee, So Hee; Yeo, Sang Young

    2015-10-01

    Fiber binder adapted carbon air filter is prepared to increase gas adsorption efficiency and environmental stability. The filter prevents harmful gases, as well as particle dusts in the air from entering the body when a human inhales. The basic structure of carbon air filter is composed of spunbond/meltblown/activated carbon/bottom substrate. Activated carbons and meltblown layer are adapted to increase gas adsorption and dust filtration efficiency, respectively. Liquid type adhesive is used in the conventional carbon air filter as a binder material between activated carbons and other layers. However, it is thought that the liquid binder is not an ideal material with respect to its bonding strength and liquid flow behavior that reduce gas adsorption efficiency. To overcome these disadvantages, fiber type binder is introduced in our study. It is confirmed that fiber type binder adapted air filter media show higher strip strength, and their gas adsorption efficiencies are measured over 42% during 60 sec. These values are higher than those of conventional filter. Although the differential pressure of fiber binder adapted air filter is relatively high compared to the conventional one, short fibers have a good potential as a binder materials of activated carbon based air filter.

  18. Structural characterization and adsorption properties of pluronic F127 onto iron oxides magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dehvari, Khalilalrahman; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wang, Steven S S

    2014-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with polymers have shown low toxicity and chemical stability in physiological condition, thereby can be used to deliver encapsulated drugs throughout the body by external magnetic fields. In this study, magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized thorough co-precipitation method and their interaction with Pluronic F127 block copolymer as well as adsorption properties of polymer onto nanoparticles were investigated. Adsorption measurement revealed different adsorption behaviors below and above the polymer's critical micelle concentration. The Freundlich isotherm was found to better describe the adsorption behavior of Pluronic F127 onto SIONPs particles below the block copolymer critical micelle concentration. At higher concentration, the adsorbed amount is likely to diminish due to interpenetration of the adsorbed macromolecular micelles and volume-excluded effects for block copolymers. Furthermore, magnetic nanocomposites with different concentration of polymers were prepared through hydrothermal method. The crystalline structure, morphology, pore structure, and magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles/nanocomposites products at different pH and polymer concentration were studied. Results showed that due to the hematite impurities, magnetic nanocomposites synthesized at higher pH have lower magnetization.

  19. Adsorption of short-chain organic acids onto nearshore marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansone, Francis J.; Andrews, Christine C.; Okamoto, Mauri Y.

    1987-07-01

    The adsorption of acetate, butyrate, lactate, and stearate was measured using a clastic mud from Cape Lookout Bight N.C. (CLB), a lateritic muddy sand from Kahana Stream, Oahu, Hawaii (KS), and a fine carbonate sand from Waimanalo Beach, Oahu, (WB). Partition coefficients ( Kd, moles adsorbed per g of solid phase/moles dissolved per ml of porewater) ranged from 10 2.3 to ≤10 -3.0, and displayed the following trends: CLB > KS > WB, and stearate > acetate ˜- butyrate > lactate. The percent adsorption of the sediment organic acid pools showed similar trends: stearate, 99%; acetate, 9-23%; butyrate, 5-23%; lactate, ≤0.2-7%. These results reflected the relatively nonpolar nature of the sand surfaces in WB and KS sediments, and the polarities of the organic acids. Kd was approximately constant for each organic acid-sediment combination over a dissolved organic acid concentration range of 10 7, using concentrations between 1M and 10 -14 M. This constancy over a wide porewater concentration range suggested that adsorption was not limited by the availability of surface adsorption sites.

  20. Activated carbons prepared from wood particleboard wastes: characterisation and phenol adsorption capacities.

    PubMed

    Girods, P; Dufour, A; Fierro, V; Rogaume, Y; Rogaume, C; Zoulalian, A; Celzard, A

    2009-07-15

    The problems of valorisation of particleboard wastes on one hand, and contamination of aqueous effluents by phenolic compounds on the other hand, are simultaneously considered in this work. Preparation of activated carbons from a two steps thermo-chemical process, formerly designed for generating combustible gases, is suggested. The resultant carbonaceous residue is activated with steam at 800 degrees C. Depending on the preparation conditions, surface areas within the range 800-1300 m(2)/g are obtained, close to that of a commercial activated carbon (CAC) specially designed for water treatment and used as a reference material. The present work shows that particleboard waste-derived activated carbons (WAC) are efficient adsorbents for the removal of phenol from aqueous solutions, with maximum measured capacities close to 500 mg/g. However, most of times, the adsorption capacities are slightly lower than that of the commercial material in the same conditions, i.e., at equilibrium phenol concentrations below 300 ppm. Given the extremely low cost of activated carbons prepared from particleboard waste, it should not be a problem to use it in somewhat higher amounts than what is required with a more expensive commercial material. Phenol adsorption isotherms at 298 K were correctly fitted by various equations modelling type I and type II isotherms for CAC and WAC, respectively. Phenol adsorption isotherms of type II were justified by a 3-stages adsorption mechanism.

  1. Design of a hybrid advective-diffusive microfluidic system with ellipsometric detection for studying adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Cunlu; Wijnperlé, Daniel; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-05-01

    Establishing and maintaining concentration gradients that are stable in space and time is critical for applications that require screening the adsorption behavior of organic or inorganic species onto solid surfaces for wide ranges of fluid compositions. In this work, we present a design of a simple and compact microfluidic device based on steady-state diffusion of the analyte, between two control channels where liquid is pumped through. The device generates a near-linear distribution of concentrations. We demonstrate this via experiments with dye solutions and comparison to finite-element numerical simulations. In a subsequent step, the device is combined with total internal reflection ellipsometry to study the adsorption of (cat)ions on silica surfaces from CsCl solutions at variable pH. Such a combined setup permits a fast determination of an adsorption isotherm. The measured optical thickness is compared to calculations from a triple layer model for the ion distribution, where surface complexation reactions of the silica are taken into account. Our results show a clear enhancement of the ion adsorption with increasing pH, which can be well described with reasonable values for the equilibrium constants of the surface reactions.

  2. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  3. Limited adsorption selectivity of active carbon toward non-saccharide compounds in lignocellulose hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojiang; Zhuang, Jingshun; Wang, Xiaojun; Li, Zongquan; Fu, Yingjuan; Qin, Menghua

    2016-05-01

    Prehydrolysis of lignocellulose produces abundant hemicellulose-derived saccharides (HDS). To obtain pure HDS for application in food or pharmaceutical industries, the prehydrolysis liquor (PHL) must be refined to remove non-saccharide compounds (NSC) derived from lignin depolymerization and carbohydrate degradation. In this work, activated carbon (AC) adsorption was employed to purify HDS from NSC with emphasis on adsorption selectivity. The adsorption isotherms showed the priority of NSC to be absorbed over HDS at low AC level. However, increase of AC over 90% of NSC removal made adsorption non-selective due to competitive adsorption between NSC and HDS. Size exclusion chromatography showed that the adsorption of oligomeric HDS was dominant while monomeric HDS was inappreciable. The limited selectivity suggested that AC adsorption is infeasibility for HDS purification, but applicable as a pretreatment method.

  4. Highly efficient simultaneous ultrasonic-assisted adsorption of Pb(II), Cd(II), Ni(II) and Cu (II) ions from aqueous solutions by graphene oxide modified with 2,2'-dipyridylamine: Central composite design optimization.

    PubMed

    Zare-Dorabei, Rouholah; Ferdowsi, Somayeh Moazen; Barzin, Ahmad; Tadjarodi, Azadeh

    2016-09-01

    In present work, a graphene oxide chemically modified with 2,2'-dipyridylamine (GO-DPA), was synthesized by simple, fast and low-cost process for the simultaneous adsorption of four toxic heavy metals, Pb(II), Cd(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), from aqueous solutions. The synthesized adsorbent was characterized by FT-IR, XRD, XPS, SEM and AFM measurements. The effects of variables such as pH solution, initial ion concentrations, adsorbent dosage and sonicating time were investigated on adsorption efficiency by rotatable central composite design. The optimum conditions, specified as 8mg of adsorbent, 20mgL(-1) of each ion at pH 5 and short time of 4min led to the achievement of a high adsorption capacities. Ultrasonic power had important role in shortening the adsorption time of ions by enhancing the dispersion of adsorbent in solution. The adsorption kinetic studies and equilibrium isotherms for evaluating the mechanism of adsorption process showed a good fit to the pseudo-second order and Langmuir model, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacities (Qm) of this adsorbent were 369.749, 257.201, 180.893 and 358.824mgg(-1) for lead, cadmium, nickel and copper ions, respectively. The removal performance of adsorbent on the real wastewater samples also showed the feasibility of adsorbent for applying in industrial purposes.

  5. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  6. Adsorption and correlation with their thermodynamic properties of triazine herbicides on soils.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-chun; Liu, Wei-ping; Liu, Hui-jun; Liu, Guang-shen

    2003-07-01

    Adsorption of atrazine, prometryne and prometon was determined on six soils with different physical and chemical properties. The adsorption isotherms of three herbicides could well fit Freundlich equation. On all of six soils, adsorption of herbicides increased in the order: atrazine approximately = prometon < prometryne. This order is quite the same to the calculation result of by means of excess thermodynamic properties of triazine. The Freundlich adsorption constants, Kf, showed to have good correlation with organic matter (OM%) of soils for each of these herbicides, suggesting that OM is the main factor, which dominates in the adsorption process of these triazine herbicides.

  7. Fabrication of copper patterns on flexible substrate by patterning-adsorption-plating process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Xin-Yao; Wang, Dong-Yu; Yang, Zhen-Guo

    2014-01-22

    A novel patterning-adsorption-plating process to additively fabricate copper patterns is developed. Functional ink with ion-adsorption nanoparticles was inkjet printed on PET substrate to form the patterned adsorption film. Catalytic ion was adsorbed by amino groups in the adsorption film, and catalyzed the electroless plating of copper. The mercapto groups introduced to the film enhance the reliability of the patterns. Specific solvent used in the ink increase the surface roughness of the adsorption film, leading to a better adhesion of the patterns. The prepared copper patterns show excellent conductivity about the same with bulk copper and good adhesion on PET.

  8. Adsorption of imidazole on Au(111) surface: Dispersion corrected density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzaouihda, Safia; Mahjoubi, Khaled; Abou El Makarim, Hassna; Komiha, Najia; Benoit, David M.

    2016-10-01

    We use density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation to study the adsorption of imidazole on the Au(111) surface and account for dispersion effect using Grimme's empirical dispersion correction technique. Our results show that the adsorption energy of imidazole depends on the slab size and on the adsorption site. In agreement with other studies, we find the largest adsorption energy for imidazole on a top site of Au(111). However, we also note that the adsorption energy at other sites is substantial.

  9. Children's school-breakfast reports and school-lunch reports (in 24-h dietary recalls): conventional and reporting-error-sensitive measures show inconsistent accuracy results for retention interval and breakfast location.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Suzanne D; Guinn, Caroline H; Smith, Albert F; Hitchcock, David B; Royer, Julie A; Puryear, Megan P; Collins, Kathleen L; Smith, Alyssa L

    2016-04-14

    Validation-study data were analysed to investigate retention interval (RI) and prompt effects on the accuracy of fourth-grade children's reports of school-breakfast and school-lunch (in 24-h recalls), and the accuracy of school-breakfast reports by breakfast location (classroom; cafeteria). Randomly selected fourth-grade children at ten schools in four districts were observed eating school-provided breakfast and lunch, and were interviewed under one of eight conditions created by crossing two RIs ('short'--prior-24-hour recall obtained in the afternoon and 'long'--previous-day recall obtained in the morning) with four prompts ('forward'--distant to recent, 'meal name'--breakfast, etc., 'open'--no instructions, and 'reverse'--recent to distant). Each condition had sixty children (half were girls). Of 480 children, 355 and 409 reported meals satisfying criteria for reports of school-breakfast and school-lunch, respectively. For breakfast and lunch separately, a conventional measure--report rate--and reporting-error-sensitive measures--correspondence rate and inflation ratio--were calculated for energy per meal-reporting child. Correspondence rate and inflation ratio--but not report rate--showed better accuracy for school-breakfast and school-lunch reports with the short RI than with the long RI; this pattern was not found for some prompts for each sex. Correspondence rate and inflation ratio showed better school-breakfast report accuracy for the classroom than for cafeteria location for each prompt, but report rate showed the opposite. For each RI, correspondence rate and inflation ratio showed better accuracy for lunch than for breakfast, but report rate showed the opposite. When choosing RI and prompts for recalls, researchers and practitioners should select a short RI to maximise accuracy. Recommendations for prompt selections are less clear. As report rates distort validation-study accuracy conclusions, reporting-error-sensitive measures are recommended.

  10. Chemical modification of oxalate decarboxylase to improve adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rihui; He, Junbin; Wu, Jia; Cai, Xinghua; Long, Han; Chen, Shengfeng; Liu, Haiqian

    2017-02-03

    In order to enhance the adsorption capacity of oxalate decarboxylase (Oxdc) on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and improve the application performance of Oxdc, chemical modification of Oxdc with ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTAD) was investigated in this work. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis results demonstrated that Oxdc and EDTAD have been covalently bound, and suggested that the chemical modification occurred at the free amino of the side chain and the α-amine of the N-terminus of Oxdc. Fluorescene and circular dichroic measurement showed that the structure and conformation of Oxdc were tinily altered after modification by EDTAD. The optimum pH of EDTAD-modified Oxdc was shifted to the alkaline side about 1.5 unit and it has a higher thermostability. The analysis of kinetic parameters indicated that the EDTAD-modified Oxdc showed a higher affinity towards the substrate. Through modification the adsorption capacity of Oxdc onto CaOx monohydrate crystals was increased by 42.42%.

  11. [Adsorption characteristics of f2 bacteriophages by four substrates in constructed wetland].

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Zheng, Xiang; Wei, Yuan-Song; Yang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Performance of f2 phages adsorption by four substrates including anthracite coal, steel slag, zeolite and forsterite was investigated through batch and dynamic experiments. Results of batch experiments showed that the removal efficiency of f2 phages by these four substrates was in the order of anthracite > steel slag > forsterite approximately zeolite. The adsorption of f2 phages by anthracite experienced fast, medium and slow stages, and the removal efficiency of f2 phages increased gradually with the increase of anthracite dosage, e. g. the optimized dosage of anthracite was 8.0 g at a solid/liquid ratio of 1:12.5 (m/V). The isothermal adsorption of all four substrates was described with Freundlich and Langmuir isothermal adsorption equation very well, and the adsorption of f2 phages by both anthracite and steel slag fitted pseudo-second order adsorption kinetics at their theoretical adsorption capacities of 3. 35 x 10(8) PFU.g-1 and 2.56 x 10(8) PFU.g-1, respectively, nearly the same as the equilibrium adsorption capacities obtained under the experiment conditions. And the liquid diffusion process was a rate-limiting step of the adsorption of f2 phage by both anthracite and steel slag, but not the only one. The results of dynamic adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption process of f2 phages in the three adsorption columns including anthracite, steel slag and zeolite experienced four stages of adaption, adsorption, pulse adsorption and adsorption equilibrium, and the total removal rates of f2 phages were more than 2. 55 Ig.

  12. Temperature-dependent adsorption of nitrogen on porous vycor glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Tito E.; Tsou, Hsi Lung

    1998-03-01

    Adsorption isotherms of N2 have been measured in the temperature range from 77 to 120 K in samples of porous vycor glass. From the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theory the surface layer coverages are determined. These are found to be temperature dependent. When adsorption-isotherm coverage data are expressed as a function of the adsorption potential δμ, the result is roughly temperature independent for coverages ranging from submonolayer to thin film, below capillary condensation. This characteristic curve, which represents the distribution of adsorption sites vs the adsorption potential, is compared with results from two models for the adsorbate: Dubinin's isotherm for microporous solids and its extension to rough surfaces, which places importance on the porosity of the surface, and Halsey's extension of the Frankel-Halsey-Hill isotherm, which takes into account the long-range variations of the substrate adsorption potential. The impact of this work on the interpretation of N2 adsorption data in terms of a surface area is discussed.

  13. Adsorption Kinetics in Micellar Solutions of Nonionic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colegate, Daniel M.; Bain, Colin D.

    2005-11-01

    Standard models of the adsorption kinetics of surfactants at the air-water surface assume that micelles break down into monomers in the bulk solution and that only monomers adsorb. We show here that micelles of the nonionic surfactant C14E8 adsorb to the surface of a liquid jet at a diffusion-controlled rate. Micellar adsorption can be switched off by incorporation of a small amount of ionic surfactant into the micelle and switched on again by addition of salt. More sophisticated models of adsorption processes in micellar solutions are required that permit a kinetic flux of micelles to the air-water interface.

  14. Adsorption of poly acrylic acid onto the surface of calcite: an experimental and simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sparks, David J; Romero-González, Maria E; El-Taboni, Elfateh; Freeman, Colin L; Hall, Shaun A; Kakonyi, Gabriella; Swanson, Linda; Banwart, Steven A; Harding, John H

    2015-11-07

    Macromolecular binding to minerals is of great importance in the formation of biofilms, and carboxylate functional groups have been found to play a pivotal role in the functioning of these macromolecules. Here we present both fluorescence time-resolved anisotropy measurements and simulation data on the conformational behaviour and binding of a poly acrylic acid polymer. In solution the polymer exhibits a pH dependent behaviour, with a coiled conformation at a low pH and extended conformation at higher pH values. The polymer is readily adsorbed on the surface of calcite, preferring to bind in an extended conformation, with the strength of the adsorption dependent on the pH and presence of counter ions. We discuss the reasons why the calculated adsorption free energy differs from that obtained from a Langmuir isotherm analysis, showing that they refer to different quantities. The enhanced binding of the extended conformations shows the importance of flexibility in the binding of macromolecules.

  15. Intrinsic flexibility of the zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-7 unveiled by CO₂ adsorption and Hg intrusion.

    PubMed

    Pera-Titus, Marc

    2014-06-06

    ZIF-7, built as an assembly of Zn(II) centers and benzimidazolate ligands, shows prominent S-shaped isotherms upon CO2 adsorption that can be attributed to sorbate-induced gate-opening phenomena involving a narrow-to-large pore phase transition. This peculiar sorption pattern can be captured via the formulation of thermodynamic isotherms, providing a direct enthalpic and entropic view of the gate-opening process. Relying on such an approach, an energy barrier with preferential enthalpic nature for CO2 adsorption/desorption in the gate-opening region could be unveiled. Moreover, the elastic energy involved during the gate-opening process was revisited to 1.4-2.8 kJ mol(-1) of solid in the temperature range 273-323 K, matching the value measured by isostatic compression of a ZIF-7_lp sample filled with DMF and showing a dominant entropic contribution.

  16. Methylene blue adsorption on a DMPA lipid langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Giner Casares, Juan José; Camacho, Luis; Martín-Romero, Maria Teresa; López Cascales, José Javier

    2010-07-12

    Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto a dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) Langmuir air/water monolayer is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, UV reflection spectroscopy and surface potential measurements. The free-energy profile associated with MB transfer from water to the lipid monolayer shows two minima of -66 and -60 kJ mol(-1) for its solid and gas phase, respectively, corresponding to a spontaneous thermodynamic process. From the position of the free-energy minima, it is possible to predict the precise location of MB in the interior of the DMPA monolayer. Thus, MB is accommodated in the phosphoryl or carbonyl region of the DMPA Langmuir air/water interface, depending on the isomorphic state (solid or gas phase, respectively). Reorientation of MB, measured from the bulk solution to the interior of the lipid monolayer, passes from a random orientation in bulk solution to an orientation parallel to the surface of the lipid monolayer when MB is absorbed.

  17. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  18. Adsorption edge study about cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc adsorption by variable charge soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, J. C.; Mouta, E. R.; Soares, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    The improper discharge of industrial and urban residues and the inadvertent use of fertilizers and pesticides can result in soil and water pollution and improve the potential of trace metals to enter in the human food chain. Adsorption reactions occur at the solid/liquid interface and are the most important mechanisms for controlling the activity of metal ions in soil solution. In a complex system with amphoteric behavior, the comprehension of the mobility, availability and fate of pollutants in the soil system is crucial for the prediction of the environmental consequences and for development of prevention/remediation strategies. A comparative study of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) adsorption by highly weathered soils was carried out. Surface (0-0.2m) and subsoil (B horizon) samples were taken from a Rhodic Kandiudalf (RH), an Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox (XA) and an Anionic "Rhodic" Acrudox (RA), located in brazilian humid tropical area. As the pH and the ionic strength are important environmental factors influencing the solution chemistry of heavy metals in variable charge systems, adsorption envelopes, in a batch adsorption experiment, were elaborated by reacting, for 24 h, soil samples with individual 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 aqueous solutions containing nitrate salts of the adsorptive heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) at the initial concentration of 5 mg L-1, with an increasing pH value from 3.0 to 8.0. pH50-100%, the difference between the pH of 100 and 50 percent metal adsorption was determined. A sharp increase of adsorption density (adsorption edge) was observed within a very narrow pH range, usually less than two pH units. Commonly, the relative affinity of a soil for a metal cation increases with the tendency of the cation to form inner-sphere surface complexes. This may be caused by differences in extent of hydrolysis of Cu ions and in affinity of adsorption sites for Cu. In general, subsurface samples showed low pH50

  19. Adsorption of radon and water vapor on commercial activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, N.M.; Ghosh, T.K.; Hines, A.L.; Loyalka, S.K.

    1995-02-01

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherms are reported for radon and water vapor on two commercial activated carbons: coconut shell Type PCB and hardwood Type BD. The isotherms of the water vapor were measured gravimetrically at 298 K. The isotherms of radon from dry nitrogen were obtained at 293, 298, and 308 K while the data for the mixture of radon and water vapor were measured at 298 K. The concentrations of radon in the gas and solid phases were measured simultaneously, once the adsorption equilibrium and the radioactive equilibrium between the radon and its daughter products were established. The shape of the isotherms was of Type III for the radon and Type V for the water vapor, according to Brunauer`s classification. The adsorption mechanism was similar for both the radon and the water vapor, being physical adsorption on the macropore surface area in the low pressure region and micropore filling near saturation pressure. The uptake capacity of radon decreased both with increasing temperature and relative humidity. The heat of adsorption data indicated that the PCB- and the BD-activated carbons provided a heterogeneous surface for radon adsorption. The equilibrium data for radon were correlated with a modified Freundlich equation.

  20. Impact of EfOM size on competition in activated carbon adsorption of organic micro-pollutants from treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zietzschmann, Frederik; Worch, Eckhard; Altmann, Johannes; Ruhl, Aki Sebastian; Sperlich, Alexander; Meinel, Felix; Jekel, Martin

    2014-11-15

    The competitive impacts of different fractions of wastewater treatment plant effluent organic matter (EfOM) on organic micro-pollutant (OMP) adsorption were investigated. The fractionation was accomplished using separation by nanofiltration (NF). The waters resulting from NF were additionally treated to obtain the same dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations as the initial water. Using size exclusion chromatography (LC-OCD) it could be shown that the NF treatment resulted in an EfOM separation by size. Adsorption tests showed different competitive effects of the EfOM fractions with the OMP. While large EfOM compounds that were retained in NF demonstrated a reduced competition as compared to the raw water, the NF-permeating EfOM compounds showed an increased competition with the majority of the measured OMP. The effects of small size EfOM are particularly negative for OMP which are weak/moderate adsorbates. Adsorption analysis was carried out for the differently fractionized waters. The small sized EfOM contain better adsorbable compounds than the raw water while the large EfOM are less adsorbable. This explains the observed differences in the EfOM competitiveness. The equivalent background compound (EBC) model was applied to model competitive adsorption between OMP and EfOM and showed that the negative impacts of EfOM on OMP adsorption increase with decreasing size of the EfOM fractions. The results suggest that direct competition for adsorption sites on the internal surface of the activated carbon is more substantial than indirect competition due to pore access restriction by blockage. Another explication for reduced competition by large EfOM compounds could be the inability to enter and block the pores due to size exclusion.

  1. [Adsorption-desorption Characteristics of Fermented Rice Husk for Ferrous and Sulfur Ions].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-mei; Liao, Min; Hua, Jia-yuan; Chen, Na; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Pei-zhi; Xie Kai-zhi; XU, Chang-xu; Liu, Guang-rong

    2015-10-01

    To understand the potential of rice husk to fix Fe2+ and S2- ions, the sorption of Fe2+ and S2- by fermented rice husk was studied by using batch incubation experiments in the present study. The effects of adsorption time, Fe2+ and S2- concentration, pH, the temperature and ionic strength in adsorption reaction solution on the sorption were investigated. Therefore, the stability of Fe2+ and S2- adsorbed by fermented rice husk was further validated by desorption experiments performed under similar conditions as adsorption. The results showed that, the adsorption kinetics of Fe2+ (r = 0.912 1) and S2- (r = 0.901 1) by fermented rice husk fits the Elovich kinetics equation, and Freundlich isotherm model could simulate the isotherm adsorption processes of Fe2+ (R2 = 0.965 1) and S2- (R2 = 0.936 6) on fermented rice husk was better than other models. The adsorption processes on fermented rice husk were non- preferential adsorption for Fe2+ and S2, while the adsorption process of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was spontaneous reaction and the adsorption process of S2- was non-spontaneous reaction. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk were endothermic process since high temperature could benefit to the adsorption. The adsorption mechanism of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by coordination adsorption, the adsorption mechanism of S2- on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by ligand exchange adsorption. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk showed greater pH adaptability which ranged from 1.50 to 11.50. With the increasing of ionic strength, the amount of adsorbed Fe2+ on fermented rice husk wasincreased in some extent, the amount of adsorbed S2- on fermented rice husk was slightly decreased, which further proved the adsorption of Fe2+ was major in inner sphere complexation and the adsorption of S2- was major in outer complexation. The desorption rates of Fe2+ and S2- which was adsorbed by fermented

  2. Adsorption effect on the degradation of carbaryl, mecoprop, and paraquat by anodic fenton treatment in an SWy-2 montmorillonite clay slurry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Peng; Lemley, Ann T

    2008-11-12

    The Fenton reaction-based anodic Fenton treatment (AFT) was applied to three widely used organic agrochemicals, carbaryl, mecoprop, and paraquat, in a clay slurry. The adsorption and degradation behaviors of these neutral (carbaryl), anionic (mecoprop), and cationic (paraquat) agrochemicals were studied in a slurry of SWy-2 Na(+)-montmorillonite clay, and adsorption isotherms were obtained at given experimental conditions. The d spacing (d 001) of the clay layer before and after adsorption or degradation was measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of the change of d spacing, molecular disposition at the clay interlayer was inferred: both mecoprop and paraquat form a monolayer sitting flat and parallel to the clay siloxane surfaces. Results show that, due to different adsorption mechanisms, the adsorption effect on chemical degradation by AFT varies with pesticide: strong and tight adsorption of paraquat at the clay interlayer protects paraquat from being attacked by hydroxyl radicals; loosely adsorbed carbaryl or mecoprop is readily degraded. XRD analysis clearly indicates that AFT is capable of effectively degrading interlayer noncationic organic chemicals that are not usually available for biodegradation.

  3. Influence of alternating current on the adsorption of indigo carmine.

    PubMed

    Kesraoui, Aida; Selmi, Taher; Seffen, Monig; Brouers, François

    2016-08-23

    The main purpose of this work is to study the effect of a new process of accelerating which consist to couple the electrochemical process with the adsorption to remove an anionic dye, the indigo carmine. That is why, we investigated the effects of the new process of accelerating the adsorption process by using alternating current (AC) on the retention of an anionic dye, the indigo carmine. The adsorption capacity of dye (mg/g) was raised with the raise of current voltage in solution, temperature, and initial indigo carmine concentration and decreased with the increase of initial solution pH, current density, and mass of carbon. The results demonstrate that the removal efficiency of 97.0 % with the current voltage of 15 V is achieved at a current density of 0.014 A/cm(2), of pH 2 using zinc as electrodes and contact time of 210 min for adsorption in the presence of AC. Concerning the adsorption without AC, the results obtained showed that for an initial concentration equal to 20 mg/L, more than 95 % amount of adsorbed dye was retained after 405 min of contact in batch system. The comparison between adsorption in the presence and absence of an alternating current shows the importance of the alternating current in the acceleration of the adsorption method and improve the performances of FILTRASORB 200. For both cases, the adsorption mechanism follows the fractal kinetics BSf(n,α) model and the Brouers-Sotolongo isotherm model provides a good fit of the experimental data for both adsorption with and without alternating current.

  4. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-11

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces.

  5. The adsorption mechanism of nortryptiline on C18-bonded discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-08-01

    The adsorption isotherms of an ionizable compound, nortriptyline, were accurately measured by frontal analysis (FA) on a C{sub 18}-Discovery column, first without buffer (in an aqueous solution of acetonitrile at 15%, v/v of ACN), then with a buffer (in 28%, v/v ACN solution). The buffers were aqueous solutions containing 20 mM of formic acid or a phosphate buffer at pH 2.70. The linear range of the isotherm could not be reached with the non-buffered mobile phase using a dynamic range larger than 40,000 (from 1.2 x 10{sup -3} g/L to 50 g/L). With a 20 mM buffer in the liquid phase, the isotherm is linear for concentrations of nortriptyline inferior to 10{sup -3} g/L (or 3 {micro} mol/L). The adsorption energy distribution (AED) was calculated to determine the heterogeneity of the adsorption process. AED and FA were consistent and lead to a trimodal distribution. A tri-Moreau and a tri-Langmuir isotherm models accounted the best for the adsorption of nortriptyline without and with buffer, respectively. The nature of the buffer affects significantly the middle-energy sites while the properties of the lowest and highest of the three types of energy sites are almost unchanged. The desorption profiles of nortriptyline show some anomalies in relation with the formation of a complex multilayer adsorbed phase of acetonitrile whose excess isotherm was measured by the minor disturbance method. The C{sub 18}-Discovery column has about the same total saturation capacity, around 200 g of nortriptyline per liter of adsorbent (or 116 mg/g), with or without buffer. About 98-99% of the available surface consists in low energy sites. The coexistence of these different types of sites on the surface solves the McCalley's enigma, that the column efficiency begins to drop rapidly when the analyte concentration reaches values that are almost one hundred times lower than those that could be predicted from the isotherm data acquired under the same experimental conditions. Due to the

  6. The adsorption of plutonium IV and V on goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Arthur L.; Murray, James W.; Sibley, Thomas H.

    1985-11-01

    The adsorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) on goethite (αFeOOH) from NaNO 3 solution shows distinct differences related to the different hydrolytic character of these two oxidation states. Under similar solution conditions, the adsorption edge of the more strongly hydrolyzable Pu(IV) occurs in the pH range 3 to 5 while that for Pu(V) is at pH 5 to 7. The adsorption edge for Pu(V) shifts with time to lower pH values and this appears to be due to the reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) in the presence of the goethite surface. These results suggest that redox transformations may be an important aspect of Pu adsorption chemistry and the resulting scavenging of Pu from natural waters. Increasing ionic strength (from 0.1 M to 3 M NaCl or NaNO 3 and 0.03 M to 0.3 M Na 2SO 4) did not influence Pu(IV) or Pu(V) adsorption. In the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Pu(V) reduction to Pu(IV) occurred in solution. Pu(IV) adsorption on goethite decreased by 30% in the presence of 240 ppm natural DOC found in Soap Lake, Washington waters. Increasing concentrations of carbonate ligands decreased Pu(IV) and Pu(V) adsorption on goethite, with an alkalinity of 1000 meq/l totally inhibiting adsorption. The Pu-goethite adsorption system provides the data base for developing a thermodynamic model of Pu interaction with an oxide surface and with dissolved ligands, using the MINEQL computer program. From the model calculations we determined equilibrium constants for the adsorption of Pu(IV) hydrolysis species. The model was then applied to Pu adsorption in carbonate media to see how the presence of CO 3-2 could influence the mobility of Pu. The decrease in adsorption appears to be due to formation of a Pu-CO 3 complex. Model calculations were used to predict what the adsorption curves would look like if Pu-CO 3 complexes formed.

  7. Simultaneous adsorption of phenol and cadmium on amphoteric modified soil.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhao-Fu; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Zeng-Qiang

    2008-11-30

    Surface modification is an effective way to enhance adsorption of pollutants by soil. In this study, we investigated the individual adsorption of cadmium ion (Cd(2+)) and phenol and also in combination by the clay layer of a loessial soil treated with the amphoteric modifier, duodalkylbetaine (BS-12). Three levels of BS-12 modification were compared in this experiment: (1) unmodified soil (CK), (2) modification with an amount of BS-12 equivalent to 50% of the soil's CEC (50BS) and (3) modification with an amount of BS-12 equivalent to 100% of the soil's CEC (100BS). Cd(2+) adsorption was 0.92-1.70 times higher in the amphoteric modified soil compared to unmodified soil. Adsorption isotherms for Cd(2+) displayed a L1-type shape. Phenol adsorption was 1.25-4.35 times higher in the amphoteric modified soil compared to the unmodified control. The adsorption isotherms of phenol on amphoteric modified soils were generally linear, but changed to L1-type isotherms for modified soil in the Cd(2+)+phenol treatment at 40 degrees C. The results clearly showed that amphoteric modified soil had the ability to simultaneously adsorb Cd(2+) and phenol. Cd(2+) adsorption by the amphoteric modified soil was related to the initial concentration of Cd(2+) in the supernatant. Cd(2+) adsorption in the 100BS treatment exceeded adsorption in the 50BS treatment when Cd(2+) initial concentrations were higher than approximate 200 microg mL(-1). Phenol adsorption by modified soils decreased in the order: 100BS>50BS>CK and was primarily determined by the surface hydrophobicity of the soil. For the unmodified soil, total adsorption in the Cd(2+)+phenol treatment was slightly lower compared to treatments that contained only Cd(2+) or phenol. This indicated an antagonistic effect between the adsorption of Cd(2+) and phenol, which was reduced after amphoteric modification. A comparison of temperature effects on Cd(2+) and phenol adsorption indicated that Cd(2+) was both physically and chemically

  8. Alkoxysilane adsorption on metal oxide substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsier, R. D.; Zhuang, G. R.; Henriksen, P. N.

    1989-01-01

    Reflection-absorption infrared and inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopies have been used to study adsorption of liquid phase mono-, di-, and trialkoxysilanes on evaporated Al and Cu substrates. Spectral evidence shows that substrate properties influence the chemical and physical nature of trialkoxysilane films and that silane functionality plays a role in molecular orientation. Results show that dialkoxysilane films contain structural gradients, with adsorption at the monomolecular level influenced by surface morphology, and with organofunctionality and dosing procedure affecting the formation of thicker films. Evidence is presented that monoalkoxysilanes react with alumina surfaces, and a broad, multipeaked band from 1600 to 1900/cm has been interpreted as characteristic of the silylated AlO(x)Pb interface.

  9. Adsorption of ammonia by sulfuric acid treated zirconium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Glover, T Grant; Peterson, Gregory W; DeCoste, Jared B; Browe, Matthew A

    2012-07-17

    The adsorption of ammonia on Zr(OH)(4), as well as Zr(OH)(4) treated with sulfuric acid, were examined. The results show that treating Zr(OH)(4) with sulfuric acid leads to the formation of a sulfate on the surface of the material, and that the sulfate contributes to the ammonia adsorption capacity through the formation of an ammonium sulfates species. Calcination of Zr(OH)(4) decreases the ammonia adsorption capacity of the material and limits the formation of sulfate species. NMR and FTIR spectroscopy results are presented that show the presence of two distinct ammonium species on the surface of the material. The adsorption capacity of the materials is shown to be a complex phenomenon that is impacted by the surface area, the sulfur content, and the pH of the material. The results illustrate that Zr(OH)(4), which is known to adsorb acidic gases, can be modified and used to adsorb basic gases.

  10. Adsorption study of Ammonia Nitrogen by watermelon rind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, A.; Yusof, L.; Beddu, N. S.; Galasin, N.; Lee, P. Y.; Lee, R. N. S.; Zahrim, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The utilization of fruit waste for low-cost adsorbents as a replacement for costly conventional methods of removing ammonia nitrogen from wastewater has been reviewed. The adsorption studies were conducted as a function of contact time and adsorbent dosage and it were carried out on four different adsorbents; fresh watermelon rind and modified watermelon rind with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4). Adsorbents were tested for characterization by using zeta potential test and all samples shows negative values thus makes it favourable for the adsorption process. The batch experimental result showed that adsorption process is rapid and equilibrium was established within 40 minutes of contact time. The ammonia nitrogen removal rate amounted in range of 96% to 99%, and the adsorption capacities were in range of 1.21 to 1.24 mg/g for all four different types of adsorbents used.

  11. Hydrogen adsorption on sulphur-doped SiC nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevak Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is an energy carrier and clean fuel that can be used for a broad range of applications that include fuel cell vehicles. Therefore, development of materials for hydrogen storage is demanded. Nanotubes, in this context, are appropriate materials. Recently, silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNTs) have been predicted as potential nanomaterials for hydrogen storage, and atomic doping into the nanotubes improves the H2 adsorption. Here, we report H2 adsorption properties of sulphur-doped (S-doped) SiCNTs using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The H2 adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of energy band structures, density of states (DOS), adsorption energy and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that, compared to the intrinsic SiCNT, S-doped SiCNT is more sensitive to H2 adsorption. H2 gas adsorption on S-doped C-sites of SiCNT brings about significant modulation of the electronic structure of the nanotube, which results in charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas, and dipole-dipole interactions cause chemisorptions of hydrogen. However, in the case of H2 gas adsorption on S-doped Si-sites of the nanotube, lesser charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas results in physisorptions of the gas. The efficient hydrogen sensing properties of S-doped SiCNTs, studied here, may have potential for its practical realization for hydrogen storage application.

  12. Adsorption-driven translocation of polymer chain into nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2012-06-01

    The polymer translocation into nanopores is generally facilitated by external driving forces, such as electric or hydrodynamic fields, to compensate for entropic restrictions imposed by the confinement. We investigate the dynamics of translocation driven by polymer adsorption to the confining walls that is relevant to chromatographic separation of macromolecules. By using the self-consistent field theory, we study the passage of a chain trough a small opening from cis to trans compartments of spherical shape with adsorption potential applied in the trans compartment. The chain transfer is modeled as the Fokker-Plank diffusion along the free energy landscape of the translocation pass represented as a sum of the free energies of cis and trans parts of the chain tethered to the pore opening. We investigate how the chain length, the size of trans compartment, the magnitude of adsorption potential, and the extent of excluded volume interactions affect the translocation time and its distribution. Interplay of these factors brings about a variety of different translocation regimes. We show that excluded volume interactions within a certain range of adsorption potentials can cause a local minimum on the free energy landscape, which is absent for ideal chains. The adsorption potential always leads to the decrease of the free energy barrier, increasing the probability of successful translocation. However, the translocation time depends non-monotonically of the magnitude of adsorption potential. Our calculations predict the existence of the critical magnitude of adsorption potential, which separates favorable and unfavorable regimes of translocation.

  13. Competition between adsorption-induced swelling and elastic compression of coal at CO2 pressures up to 100 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, Sander; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2012-11-01

    Enhanced Coalbed Methane production (ECBM) by CO2 injection frequently proves ineffective due to rapidly decreasing injectivity. Adsorption-induced swelling of the coal matrix has been identified as the principal factor controlling this reduction. To improve understanding of coal swelling in response to exposure to CO2 at high pressures, numerous laboratory studies have been performed in the past decades. These studies consistently reveal an increase in swelling with CO2 pressure. However, it remains unclear what the relative contributions are of adsorption-induced swelling versus elastic compression of the coal framework, and hence what is the true relationship between adsorption-induced swelling and CO2 uptake. Here, we report the results of dilatometry experiments conducted on unconfined, cylindrical coal matrix samples (˜4 mm long and 4 mm in diameter) of high volatile bituminous coal, where we aim to measure the effective volumetric effect of CO2 and to separate this into a component caused by adsorption-induced swelling and a component caused by elastic compression. The experiments were performed using a high pressure eddy current dilatometer that was used to measure one-dimensional sample expansion or contraction (resolution <50 nm). The tests were conducted at a constant temperature of 40 °C, and CO2 pressures up to 100 MPa. Our results show that the matrix samples reveal anisotropic expansion over the full range of CO2 pressures used. Expansion perpendicular to the bedding was about 1.4 times the average expansion measured in the bedding plane. Net volumetric strains, which were computed from the net linear strain in all directions measured, reveal that the response of coal is characterised by an expansion-dominated stage below 10-20 MPa of CO2 pressure and a contraction-dominated stage at higher CO2 pressures. Our data demonstrate direct competition between adsorption-induced swelling and elastic compression in the coal matrix. We propose a model for

  14. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  15. Adsorption of hematite nanoparticles onto Caco-2 cells and the cellular impairments: effect of particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Kalive, Madhavi; Capco, David G.; Chen, Yongsheng

    2010-09-01

    The increasing applications of engineered nanomaterials nowadays have elevated the potential of human exposure through various routes including inhalation, skin penetration and digestion. To date there is scarce information on a quantitative description of the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and cell surfaces and the detrimental effects from the exposure. The purpose of this work was to study in vitro exposure of Caco-2 cells to hematite (α-Fe2O3) NPs and to determine the particle size effects on the adsorption behaviors. Cellular impairment was also investigated and compared. Hematite NPs were synthesized as part of this study with a discrete size distribution and uniform morphology examined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Caco-2 cells were cultured as a model epithelium to mirror human intestinal cells and used to evaluate the impacts of the exposure to NPs by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). Cell surface disruption, localization and translocation of NPs through the cells were analyzed with immunocytochemical staining and confocal microscopy. Results showed that hematite NPs had mean diameters of 26, 53, 76 and 98 nm and were positively charged with minor aggregation in the buffer solution. Adsorption of the four sizes of NPs on cells reached equilibrium within approximately 5 min but adsorption kinetics were found to be size-dependent. The adsorption rates expressed as mg m - 2 min - 1 were greater for large NPs (76 and 98 nm) than those for small NPs (26 and 53 nm). However, adsorption rates, expressed in units of m - 2 min - 1, were much greater for small NPs than large ones. After the adsorption equilibrium was reached, the adsorbed mass of NPs on a unit area of cells was calculated and showed no significant size dependence. Longer exposure time (>3 h) induced adverse cellular effects as indicated by the drop in TEER compared to the control cells without the exposure

  16. Influence of alternative cations distribution in AgxLi96-x-LSX on dehydration kinetics and its selective adsorption performance for N2 and O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panezai, Hamida; Sun, Jihong; Jin, Xiaoqi

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption characteristics of pure gases N2 and O2 on various silver exchanged low silica X-type (AgxLi96-x-LSX) zeolites were investigated. The equilibrium adsorption isotherms of N2 and O2 were measured at 273 and 298 K. Textual and structural properties of parent and resultant AgxLi96-x-LSX were characterized by XRD, BET surface area, and SEM techniques. Kinetics of their thermal dehydration were studied by exploiting thermogravimetric and differential data (TG-DTG) obtained at three heating rates (5, 10 and 15 K) using two model-free (Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa) and one model fitting (Coats-Redfern) methods. Forty one mechanism functions were used to evaluate kinetic triplet (activation energy, frequency factor, and most probable mechanism/model) for different stages of dehydration. Results revealed that the impact of very small content of silver on the adsorption of N2 is pronounced and attributed to weak chemical bonds formed between N2 and Ag+ clusters due to strong adsorption of N2 at low pressure, whereas O2 adsorption is affected to a negligible extent. In addition, the N2/O2 adsorption selectivity shows unexpected low values for Ag87.08Li7.94Na0.98-LSX with higher Ag+ content (91.00 %), which might be due to low crystalline water content as well as Ag+ clusters located at SIII sites. N2 adsorption strongly depends on temperature as higher adsorption occurs at low temperature 273 K as compared to 298 K.

  17. Enhanced adsorptive removal of toxic dyes using SiO2 nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batool, S. S.; Imran, Z.; Hassan, Safia; Rasool, Kamran; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Rafiq, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Electrospinning method was used to synthesize porous SiO2 nanofibers. The adsorption of Methyl Orange and Safranin O by porous SiO2 nanofibers was carried out by varying the parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, dye concentration, and temperature. Equilibrium adsorption data followed Langmuir isotherms. Kinetic adsorption followed second-order rate kinetics model. The maximum adsorption capacity for Methyl Orange and Safranin O was found to be 730.9 mg/g and 960.4 mg/g, respectively. Acidic pH was favorable for the adsorption of Methyl Orange while basic pH was favorable for the adsorptions of Safranin O. Modeling study suggested the major mode of adsorption, while thermodynamic study showed the endothermic reactions. This effort has pronounced impact on environmental applications of SiO2 nanofibers as auspicious adsorbent nanofibers for organic material from aqueous solution.

  18. [Adsorption of acid orange II from aqueous solution onto modified peat-resin particles].

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing-Ye; Yang, Lin-Zhang

    2007-06-01

    The adsorption of acid orange II onto modified peat-resin particles was examined in aqueous solution in a batch system. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetic and the intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetic data. The results showed that both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models could be used to describe the adsorption of acid orange II onto modified peat-resin particles. The maximum adsorption capacity was 71.43 mg x g(-1). The data analysis indicated that the intraparticle diffusion model could fit the results of kinetic experiment well. The adsorption rate of acid orange II onto modified peat-resin particles is affected by the initial dye concentrations, sizes and doses of modified peat-resin particles and agitation rates. The surface of modified peat-resin particle is the major adsorption area.

  19. Study on the methylene blue adsorption from wastewaters by pore-expanded calcium fluoride sludge adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Hong, Junming; Lin, Bing; Hong, Gui-Bing; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2014-04-01

    The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto pore-expanded calcium fluoride sludge (ECF) by the batch adsorption technique was investigated. The results showed that the adsorption capacity increased with increasing MB concentration but decreased as pH was increased. In order to investigate the adsorption mechanisms, three simplified isotherm models and kinetic models were used in this study. The best-fit adsorption isotherm was achieved with the Temkin model. Furthermore, the pseudo-second-order kinetic model agreed very well with the dynamical behavior for the adsorption of MB onto ECF. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the adsorption process of MB onto ECF was spontaneous and exothermic. The results indicated that ECF adsorbed MB efficiently and could be used as a waste adsorbent for the removal of cationic dyes in wastewater treatment.

  20. Adsorption and Exchange Kinetics of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Phosphorus Ligands on Gold Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuge, X. Q.; Bian, Z. C.; Luo, Z. H.; Mu, Y. Y.; Luo, K.

    2017-02-01

    The adsorption kinetics process of hydrophobic ligand (triphenylphosphine, PPh3) and hydrophilic ligand (tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine oxide, THPO) on the surface of gold electrode were estimated by using electrical double layer capacitance (EDLC). Results showed that the adsorption process of both ligands included fast and slow adsorption processes, and the fast adsorption process could fit the first order kinetic equation of Langmuir adsorption isotherm. During the slow adsorption process, the surface coverage (θ) of PPh3 was higher than that of THPO due to the larger adsorption kinetic constant of PPh3 than that of THPO, which implied that PPh3 could replace THPO on the gold electrode. The exchange process of both ligands on the surface of gold electrode proved that PPh3 take the place of THPO by testing the variation of EDLC which promote the preparation of Janus gold, and the theoretic simulation explained the reason of ligands exchange from the respect of energy..

  1. Adsorption potential of mercury(II) from aqueous solutions onto Romanian peat moss.

    PubMed

    Bulgariu, Laura; Ratoi, Mioara; Bulgariu, Dumitru; Macoveanu, Matei

    2009-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the adsorption potential of Romanian peat moss for the removal of mercury(II) from aqueous solutions. The batch system experiments carried out showed that this natural material was effective in removing mercury(II). The analysis of FT-IR spectra indicated that the mechanism involved in the adsorption can be mainly attributed to the binding of mercury(II) with the carboxylic groups of Romanian peat moss. Adsorption equilibrium approached within 60 min. The adsorption data fitted well the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) was 98.94 mg g(-1). Pseudo-second-order kinetic model was applicable to the adsorption data. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that the adsorption process was spontaneous as the Gibbs free energy values were found to be negative (between -17.58 and -27.25 kJ mol(-1)) at the temperature range of 6-54 degrees C.

  2. The adsorption and reaction of adenine nucleotides on montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; Hagan, William J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The binding of AMP to Zn(2+)-montmorillonite is investigated in the presence of salts and Good's zwitterion buffers, PIPES and MES. The initial concentrations of nucleotide and the percent adsorbtion are used to calculate the adsorption isotherms, and the Langmuir adsorption equation is used for the analysis of data. The adsorption coefficient was found to be three times greater in the presence of 0.2 M PIPES than in its absence. In addition, basal spacings measured by X-ray diffraction were increased by the buffer. These results are interpreted in terms of a model in which the adsorption of AMP is mediated by a Zn(2+) complex of PIPES in different orientations in the interlamellar region of the montmorillonite. Mixed ligand complexes of this type are reminiscent of the complexes observed between metal ions and biological molecules in living systems.

  3. Study of cetyltrimethylammonium and cetylpyridinium adsorption on montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Praus, Petr; Turicová, Martina; Studentová, Sona; Ritz, Michal

    2006-12-01

    Adsorption of cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA) and cetylpyridinium (CP) onto Na-rich montmorillonite (MMT) was studied. For this purpose, the adsorption isotherms of CTA and CP, along with desorption curves of metal cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+), were obtained by means of capillary isotachophoresis and atomic absorption spectrometry. Infrared, X-ray diffraction pattern, specific surface area, porosity, and moisture adsorption measurements of montmorillonite revealed that CTA and CP were adsorbed in monolayer arrangements. CTA is assumed to be attached to the negatively charged MMT surface mainly by electrostatic forces. On the other hand, CP, adsorbed in higher amounts, can be additionally bound via other interactions of pyridinium rings, such as induced and pi-pi interactions. By the surfactant adsorption, the montmorillonite surface became hydrophobic and its micro- and mesopores were significantly diminished. Using scanning electron microscopy, aggregation of such organically modified MMT particles was observed.

  4. Adsorption of polyetheramines on montmorillonite at high pH.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yannan; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2010-11-16

    Adsorption of a series of polyetheramines on montmorillonite in aqueous suspension was investigated by a range of methods: elemental analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, measurement of pH, conductivity and electrophoretic mobility, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Adsorption proceeds through an ion exchange mechanism. The maximum surface coverage attained is equivalent to about 40% of the cationic exchange capacity of the clay. Adsorption of the poly(oxypropylene) block adjacent to the amine group onto the clay surface may contribute to this. Surprisingly the adsorption takes place at pH conditions well above the pK(a) of the amine surfactants, where they are not protonated in the bulk solution. The surface coverage as a function of molar mass broadly agrees with predictions assuming adsorbed polymers adopt a densely packed mushroom configuration at the clay surface.

  5. Comparison of the Adsorption of Original and Biosimilar Preparations of Filgrastim on Infusion Sets and the Inhibition of Adsorption by Polysorbate 80.

    PubMed

    Tange, Mio; Matsumoto, Akino; Yoshida, Miyako; Kojima, Honami; Haraguchi, Tamami; Uchida, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the adsorption of filgrastim on infusion sets (comprising infusion bag, line and filter) and to compare the adsorption of the original filgrastim preparation with biosimilar preparations using HPLC. The inhibitory effect of polysorbate 80 on this adsorption was also evaluated. Filgrastim was mixed with isotonic sodium chloride solution or 5% (w/v) glucose solution in the infusion fluid. Filgrastim adsorption on infusion sets was observed with all preparations and with both types of infusion solution. The adsorption ratio was about 30% in all circumstances. Filgrastim adsorption on all parts of the infusion set (bag, line and filter) was dramatically decreased by the addition of polysorbate 80 solution at concentrations at or over its critical micelle concentration (CMC). The filgrastim adsorption ratio was highest at a solution pH of 5.65, which is the isoelectric point (pI) of filgrastim. This study showed that the degree of filgrastim adsorption on infusion sets is similar for original and biosimilar preparations, but that the addition of polysorbate 80 to the infusion solution at concentrations at or above its CMC is effective in preventing filgrastim adsorption. The addition of a total-vitamin preparation with a polysorbate 80 concentration over its CMC may be an effective way of preventing filgrastim adsorption on infusion sets.

  6. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil and its components. III. Influence of clay acidity, humic acid coating and herbicide structure on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-ping; Fang, Zhuo; Liu, Hui-jun; Yang, Wei-chun

    2002-04-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite, soil humic acid, and their mixtures was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption isotherms of acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on Ca(2+)-, Mg(2+)-, Al(3+)- and Fe(3+)-saturated clays were well described by the Freundlich equation. Regardless of the type of exchange cations, Kf decreased in the order of metolachlor > acetolachlor > alachlor > propachlor on the same clay. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in binding, probably via H-bond with water molecules in the clay interlayer. The type and position of substitutions around the carbonyl group may have affected the electronegativity of oxygen, thus influencing the relative adsorption of these herbicides. For the same herbicide, adsorption on clay increased in the order of Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Al3+ < or = Fe3+ which coincided with the increasing acidity of homoionic clays. Acidity of cations may have affected the protonation of water, and thus the strength of H-bond between the clay water and herbicide. Complexation of clay and humic acid resulted in less adsorption than that expected from independent adsorption by the individual constituents. The effect varied with herbicides, but the greatest decrease in adsorption occurred at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio for all the herbicides. Causes for the decreased adsorption need to be characterized to better understand adsorption mechanisms and predict adsorption from soil compositions.

  7. Microcalorimetry of oxygen adsorption on fcc Co{110}.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kristine; Fiorin, Vittorio; Jenkins, Stephen J; King, David A

    2012-05-28

    The coverage dependent heats of adsorption and sticking probabilities for oxygen on fcc Co{110} have been measured at 300 K using single crystal adsorption calorimetry (SCAC). Initial adsorption is consistent with dissociative chemisorption at low coverage followed by oxide formation above 0.6 ML coverage. The initial heat of adsorption of 633 kJ mol(-1) is similar to heat values calorimetrically measured on other ferromagnetic metal surfaces, such as nickel and iron. As the coverage increases, the heat of adsorption and sticking probability drop very rapidly up to the onset of oxidation. As already observed for other oxygen-metal surface systems, strong lateral adatom repulsions are responsible for the transition from the chemisorption regime to oxide film formation at higher coverage. The heat of oxide formation at the onset is 475 kJ mol(-1), which is consistent with the formation of CoO crystallites. The oxide film formation is discussed in terms of nucleation and island growth, and the Mott-Cabrera mechanisms, the latter being evidenced by the relatively constant heat of adsorption and sticking probability in contrast to the nickel and iron oxidation cases.

  8. [Kinetics of adsorption of Pb2+ onto small river sediment].

    PubMed

    Shi, Gui-Tao; Chen, Zhen-Lou; Bi, Chun-Juan; Sun, Chao; Sun, Yue-Di; Xu, Shi-Yuan

    2009-06-15

    The batch experiments of adsorption of Pb2+ onto small river sediments were conducted. The kinetics of the sorption process was analyzed. The results showed that the equilibrium time of adsorption increased with the increasing of sediment mass in solution, while both adsorbed Pb2+ on per unit of sediment and Pb2+ concentration in the solution after equilibrium decreased. More than 95% of Pb2+ in solution was removed when sediment contents larger than 0.6 g x L(-1). Both pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics were tested and it was found that the latter gave a better explanation of the adsorption process. The equilibrium adsorption capacities calculated from the pseudo-second-order model could represent the true value. There was no significant correlation between initial adsorption rate of Pb2+ and the amount of sediment in solution. However, the pseudo-second-order rate constant increased in the solution with more adsorbent, namely chemical adsorption controlled the process. Elovich equation could explain the mechanism of sorption in the solution with higher contents of sediment; nevertheless, the process of low concentration of adsorbent adsorbing Pb2+ disagreed well with Elovich equation. In terms of adsorption rate in the sorption, intra-particle diffusion dominated in the more sediment solution. On the other hand, multi-linearity was presented for the adsorption rate in less adsorbent solution. The first, sharper portion represented adsorption on the external surface. The second portion indicated Pb2+ diffused gradually into the interior of particles and intra-particle diffusion controlled.

  9. Enhanced adsorption of paracetamol on closed carbon nanotubes by formation of nanoaggregates: carbon nanotubes as potential materials in hot-melt drug deposition-experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Terzyk, Artur P; Pacholczyk, Agnieszka; Wiśniewski, Marek; Gauden, Piotr A

    2012-06-15

    We present the new results of systematic studies of paracetamol adsorption on closed, commercially available, unmodified carbon nanotubes. The results of thermal analysis, static adsorption measurements and the comparison with phenol adsorption data lead to suggestion that the formation of paracetamol nanoaggregates in the interstitial spaces between nanotubes occurs. This effect is also confirmed by the results of (performed in two ways) independent dynamic measurements and by molecular dynamics simulation technique. Next, we show that the behavior of adsorbed paracetamol during heating leads to the creation of a new drug delivery system. The properties of this system depend on the type of applied nanotubes and the parameters of the process called hot-melt drug deposition. Thus, we conclude that confined nanoaggregate formation, as well as hot-melt deposition should be promising effects in the preparation of highly effective, new drug delivery systems.

  10. Enhanced laminin adsorption on nanowires compared to flat surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hammarin, Greger; Persson, Henrik; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Prinz, Christelle N

    2014-10-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are widely used to interface living cells, and numerous nanowire-based devices have been developed to manipulate or sense cell behavior. We have, however, little knowledge on the nature of the cell-nanowire interface. Laminin is an extracellular matrix protein promoting cell attachment and growth. Here, we used a method based on fluorescence microscopy and measured the relative amount of laminin adsorbed on nanowires compared to flat surfaces. The amount of adsorbed laminin per surface area is up to 4 times higher on 55nm diameter gallium phosphide nanowires compared to the flat gallium phosphide surface between the nanowires. We show that this enhanced adsorption on nanowires cannot be attributed to electrostatic effects, nor to differences in surface chemistry, but possibly to pure geometrical effects, as increasing the nanowire diameter results in a decreased amount of adsorbed protein. The increased adsorption of laminin on nanowires may explain the exceptionally beneficial properties of nanowire substrates for cellular growth reported in the literature since laminin is often used as surface coating prior to cell cultures in order to promote cell growth, and also because primary cell suspensions contain endogenous laminin.

  11. Lysozyme immobilization via adsorption process using sulphonic acid functionalized silane grafted copolymer.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Rauf, Tharun A

    2013-07-01

    A unique silane based adsorbent material, [stearyl alcohol (SA)-grafted-epichlorohydrin (E)]-grafted-aminoproypyl silanetriol (APST) was synthesized and functionalized with sulphonyl groups via sulphonation process [(SA-g-E)-g-APST/SO3H]. The adsorbent material characterization was done by FTIR, XRD, and TGA analysis. Immobilization of protein Lysozyme (LYZ) using batch adsorption process was carried out for studying the protein-particle interaction. The most suitable pH for maximum adsorption was found to be 7.0. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model was found to be the best fit and the adsorption equilibrium was attained within 3h. Studies on diffusion parameters explained that the adsorption mechanism was controlled by film diffusion mode. The adsorption process was then evaluated using the various isotherm models and the Sips isotherm model proved to be the best fit with a maximum adsorption capacity of 37.68 mg/g. The isotherm favorability of the adsorption process was calculated by calculating the separation factor (R(L)) and the values confirmed the favorability of the adsorption process. Studies on adsorption percentage with respect to temperature and thermodynamic studies revealed that adsorption process is exothermic, spontaneous with maximum entropy. Batch adsorption/desorption studies in acidic medium, for over six cycles showed the repeatability and regeneration capability of the adsorbent material (SA-g-E)-g-APST/SO3H.

  12. Adsorption of clofibric acid and ketoprofen onto powdered activated carbon: effect of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaohuan; Deshusses, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of two acidic pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), clofibric acid and ketoprofen, onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated with a particular focus on the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the PhACs. Suwannee River humic acids (SRHAs) were used as a substitute for NOM. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to obtain adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms with and without SRHAs in the system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption ofclofibric acid was not significantly affected by the presence of SRHAs at a concentration of 5 mg (as carbon) L(-1). An adsorption capacity of 70 to 140 mg g(-1) was observed and equilibrium was reached within 48 h. In contrast, the adsorption of ketoprofen was markedly decreased (from about 120 mg g(-1) to 70-100 mg g(-1)) in the presence of SRHAs. Higher initial concentrations of clofibric acid than ketoprofen during testing may explain the different behaviours that were observed. Also, the more hydrophobic ketoprofen molecules may have less affinity for PAC when humic acids (which are hydrophilic) are present. The possible intermolecular forces that could account for the different behaviour of clofibric acid and ketoprofen adsorption onto PAC are discussed. In particular, the relevance of electrostatic forces, electron donor-acceptor interaction, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces are discussed

  13. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  14. Correlating Physicochemical Properties of Boronic Acid-Chitosan Conjugates to Glucose Adsorption Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Asantewaa, Yaa; Aylott, Jonathan; Burley, Jonathan C.; Billa, Nashiru; Roberts, Clive J.

    2012-01-01

    Phenyl boronic acid (PBA), which is known to interact with glucose, was covalently bonded to chitosan by direct reductive N-alkylation of chitosan with 4-formylphenylboronic acid (4-FPBA). Evidence of PBA bonding on chitosan was assessed by FTIR, ToF-SIMS, SEM, DSC and glucose adsorption sensitivity measurements. FTIR spectra showed strong signals at 1560 and 630 cm−1 indicating the formation of p-substituted benzene. Similarly, ToF-SIMS analyses on the conjugates registered fragments of boron ion (B−) at 11.0 m/z whose intensity increased in proportion to 4-FPBA loading. The degree to which PBA was bonded to chitosan was related to the 4-FPBA load used in the reaction (termed F1 through to F6 with increasing 4-FPBA load). Glucose adsorption sensitivity to PBA-bonded chitosan was directly related to the amount of PBA functionality within the conjugates and the physical nature of the matrices (porous or crystalline). Topographic analysis by SEM revealed that PBA-chitosan conjugates F1, F2 and F3 have porous matrices and their sensitivity to glucose adsorption was directly proportional to the degree of PBA substitution onto chitosan. Conversely, conjugates F4, F5 and F6 appeared crystalline under SEM and glucose adsorption sensitivity decreased in proportion to amount of PBA bonded to chitosan. The crystalline nature of the conjugates was confirmed by DSC, where the exothermic event related to the melting of the bonded PBA moiety, occurred at 338 °C. Thus, decreased sensitivity to glucose adsorption by the conjugates can be ascribed to the crystallinity imparted by increased content of the bonded PBA moiety, providing an optimal loading of PBA in terms of maximizing response to glucose. PMID:24300397

  15. Theoretical predictions of thermodynamic parameters of adsorption of nitrogen containing environmental contaminants on kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Scott, Andrea Michalkova; Burns, Elizabeth A; Lafferty, Brandon J; Hill, Frances C

    2015-02-01

    In this study thermodynamic parameters of adsorption of nitrogen containing environmental contaminants (NCCs, 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN), and 3-one-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO)) interacting with the tetrahedral and octahedral surfaces of kaolinite were predicted. Adsorption complexes were investigated using a density functional theory and both periodic and cluster approach. The complexes, modeled using the periodic boundary conditions approach, were fully optimized at the BLYP-D2 level to obtain the structures and adsorption energies. The relaxed kaolinite-NCCs structures were used to prepare cluster models to calculate thermodynamic parameters and partition coefficients at the M06-2X-D3 and BLYP-D2 levels from the gas phase. The entropy effect on the Gibbs free energies of adsorption of NCCS on kaolinite was also studied and compared with available experimental data. The results showed that in all calculated models, the NCCs molecules are physisorbed and they favor a parallel orientation toward both kaolinite surfaces. It was found that all calculated NCCs compounds are more stable on the octahedral than on the tetrahedral surface of kaolinite. The Gibbs free energies and partition coefficients were also predicted for interactions of NCCs with Na-kaolinite from aqueous solution. Calculations revealed adsorption of NCCs is effective from the gas phase on both cation free kaolinite surfaces and on Na-kaolinite from aqueous solution at room temperature. Theoretical data were validated against experimental results, and the reasons for small differences between calculated and measured partition coefficients are discussed.

  16. Galactose adsorption on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, Matti; Puisto, Mikko

    2014-03-01

    In order to understand the valorisation of biomass, it is essential to study the behavior of sugar molecules on catalytic surfaces. We have studied the adsorption of galactose molecules on the Ru(0001) surface using first principles calculations. We present results for the fully relaxed configurations of the molecule at different adsorption sites. We also compare the effect of the inclusion of the van der Waals interactions on both the energetics of the free galactose molecule and the adsorption energy of galactose on Ru(0001). We compare our results, obtained using periodically repeated supercells, to those obtained with cluster calculations.

  17. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Rother, Gernot; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Wallacher, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined

  18. The toxicity of plastic nanopar