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Sample records for adsorption ratio residual

  1. Adsorption of Roxarsone onto Drinking Water Treatment Residuals: Preliminary Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, J.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Sharma, S.

    2006-05-01

    Roxarsone (3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenyl-arsonic acid) is an organo-arsenical compound, commonly used as a feed additive in the broiler poultry industry to control coccidial intestinal parasites. Roxarsone is not toxic to the birds not only because of the low dose, and also because it most likely does not convert to toxic inorganic arsenic (As) in their systems. However, upon excretion, roxarsone may undergo transformation to inorganic As, posing a serious risk of contaminating the agricultural land and water bodies via surface runoff or leaching. The use of poultry litter as fertilizer results in As accumulation rates of up to 50 metric tons per year in agricultural lands. The immediate challenge, as identified by the various regulatory bodies in recent years is to develop an efficient, yet cost-effective and environmentally sound approach to cleaning up such As- contaminated soils. Recent studies conducted by our group have suggested that the drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) can effectively retain As, thereby decreasing its mobility in the environment. The WTRs are byproducts of drinking water treatment processes and are typically composed of amorphous Fe/Al oxides, activated C and cationic polymers. They can be obtained free-of-cost from water treatment plants. It is well demonstrated that the environmental mobility of As is controlled by adsorption/desorption reactions onto mineral surfaces. Hence, knowledge of adsorption and desorption of As onto the WTRs is of environmental relevance. The reported study examined the adsorption and desorption characteristics of As using two types of WTRs, namely the Fe-WTRs (byproduct of Fe salt treatment), and the Al-WTRs (byproduct of Al salt treatment). All adsorption experiments were carried out in batch and As retention on the WTRs was investigated as a function of solid/solution ratio (1:5, 1:10, 1:25 and 1:50), equilibration time (10 min - 48 hr), pH (2 - 10) and initial As load (100, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg As/L). The

  2. Arsenic Adsorption and Desorption by Drinking Water Treatment Residuals: Incubation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandanapu, V.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Makris, K.

    2005-05-01

    Arsenic (As) has been used for a long time in agricultural practices, primarily to control pests and noxious weeds. In many cases, the indiscriminate usage of toxic arsenical compounds has left a legacy of contaminated soils. Recent awareness of the toxicity of As at much lower concentrations than previously deemed to be dangerous has led to increased interest in the environmental chemistry of As. The immediate challenge, as perceived by various regulatory bodies is to develop a cost-effective, reliable and environmentally sound approach to cleaning up such contaminated soils. In-situ immobilization technologies are an attractive alternative to conventional remediation methods. One of the most interesting of these in-situ techniques is the use of Water Treatment Residuals (WTRs). The WTRs are by-products of drinking water purification processes and generally contain sediments, organic carbon, and Al/Fe oxides. The oxides are typically amorphous (with very high specific surface area) and have tremendous affinity for oxyanions (e.g., arsenate), due to their high positive surface charge. Recent studies conducted by our group have suggested that WTRs retain As and decrease arsenic mobility. However, a better understanding of As adsorption/desorption by WTRs is necessary for effective implementation of appropriate in-situ remedial strategies. Hence, the present study examines the potential use of WTRs (Al-WTR and Fe-WTR) as adsorbents for the removal of arsenate in solutions. Furthermore, it investigates the extent of desorption of the pre-adsorbed arsenate onto the WTR surfaces. Effects of various key parameters, such as solid solution ratio, equilibration time and arsenic concentration were examined to achieve the optimized conditions for arsenate adsorption. Preliminary batch adsorption experiments showed the optimum equilibration time to be 24 h and the solid/solution ratio to be 1:5 for arsenate adsorption. Sorption data has been evaluated using both Langmuir and

  3. Effect of Solution Properties on Arsenic Adsorption by Drinking Water Treatment Residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, R.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Sharma, S.

    2005-05-01

    purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of solution properties, such as pH, ionic strength and competing ions on the adsorption of As by WTRs and WTR amended soils. Three types of WTRs are being used, namely Fe- WTR, Al- WTR and Ca-WTR. Effect of pH is being studied by varying the pH values between 3 and 9. The solid/solution ratio has been fixed at 1:5 and a 24 h equilibration has been chosen based on the results of earlier adsorption experiments. Furthermore, As adsorption will be studied in presence of potentially competing ions such as phosphate, sulfate, and selenate. Keywords: Adsorption, water treatment residuals, oxyanions, in-situ remediation, Arsenic

  4. Adsorption of arsenic from a Nova Scotia groundwater onto water treatment residual solids.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Meaghan K; Gagnon, Graham A

    2010-11-01

    Water treatment residual solids were examined in batch adsorption and column adsorption experiments using a groundwater from Halifax Regional Municipality that had an average arsenic concentration of 43 μg/L (±4.2 μg/L) and a pH of 8.1. The residual solids studied in this paper were from five water treatment plants, four surface water treatment plants that utilized either alum, ferric, or lime in their treatment systems, and one iron removal plant. In batch adsorption experiments, iron-based residual solids and lime-based residual solids pre-formed similarly to GFH, a commercially-available adsorbent, while alum-based residual solids performed poorly. Langmuir isotherm modeling showed that ferric residuals had the highest adsorptive capacity for arsenic (Q(max) = 2230 mg/kg and 42,910 mg/kg), followed by GFH (Q(max) = 640 mg/kg), lime (Q(max) = 160 mg/kg) and alum (Q(max) = <1 mg/kg and 3 mg/kg). Similarly, the maximum arsenic removal was >93% for the ferric and lime residuals and GFH, while the maximum arsenic removal was <49% for the alum residuals under the same conditions. In a column adsorption experiment, ferric residual solids achieved arsenic removal of >26,000 bed volumes before breakthrough past 10 μg As/L, whereas the effluent arsenic concentration from the GFH column was under the method detection limit at 28,000 bed volumes. Overall, ferric and lime water treatment residuals were promising adsorbents for arsenic adsorption from the groundwater, and alum water treatment residuals did not achieve high levels of arsenic adsorption.

  5. Adsorption of DDT and PCB by Nanomaterials from Residual Soil.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mohd Raihan; Mobasser, Shariat

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study on adsorption of dichlorodiphenythreechloroethen (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on three nanomaterials including Multi walled Carbon Nanotube (MWNT), nano-clay and nano-alumina. DDT and PCBs are of significant concern due their high toxicity and long environmental half-lives. Experiments were conducted using batch adsorption procedures at different DDT and PCBs concentrations, from 10 to 60 mg/L. The amounts of MWNT, nano-clay and Nano-alumina used were 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75%, 1%, 2% and 10%. The adsorption of PCBs solution onto the MWNT, nano-clay and nano-alumina was characterized by an initial rapid adsorption which eventually became constant within 22, 20, and 17 hours, respectively. The adsorption of DDT solution onto the MWNT, nano-clay and nano-alumina was also characterized by an initial rapid adsorption which gradually became constant within 22, 22 and 16 hours, respectively. Results of this study indicated that MWNT was a better adsorbent material compared to nano-clay and nano-alumina for both contaminants in this study. While at 10% of MWNT 88.9% and 77% of DDT and PCB were removed by MWNT, respectively. The effect of pH and temperature were also investigated. PMID:26659225

  6. Adsorption of DDT and PCB by Nanomaterials from Residual Soil.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mohd Raihan; Mobasser, Shariat

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study on adsorption of dichlorodiphenythreechloroethen (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on three nanomaterials including Multi walled Carbon Nanotube (MWNT), nano-clay and nano-alumina. DDT and PCBs are of significant concern due their high toxicity and long environmental half-lives. Experiments were conducted using batch adsorption procedures at different DDT and PCBs concentrations, from 10 to 60 mg/L. The amounts of MWNT, nano-clay and Nano-alumina used were 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75%, 1%, 2% and 10%. The adsorption of PCBs solution onto the MWNT, nano-clay and nano-alumina was characterized by an initial rapid adsorption which eventually became constant within 22, 20, and 17 hours, respectively. The adsorption of DDT solution onto the MWNT, nano-clay and nano-alumina was also characterized by an initial rapid adsorption which gradually became constant within 22, 22 and 16 hours, respectively. Results of this study indicated that MWNT was a better adsorbent material compared to nano-clay and nano-alumina for both contaminants in this study. While at 10% of MWNT 88.9% and 77% of DDT and PCB were removed by MWNT, respectively. The effect of pH and temperature were also investigated.

  7. Adsorption of DDT and PCB by Nanomaterials from Residual Soil

    PubMed Central

    Taha, Mohd Raihan; Mobasser, Shariat

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study on adsorption of dichlorodiphenythreechloroethen (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on three nanomaterials including Multi walled Carbon Nanotube (MWNT), nano-clay and nano-alumina. DDT and PCBs are of significant concern due their high toxicity and long environmental half-lives. Experiments were conducted using batch adsorption procedures at different DDT and PCBs concentrations, from 10 to 60 mg/L. The amounts of MWNT, nano-clay and Nano-alumina used were 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75%, 1%, 2% and 10%. The adsorption of PCBs solution onto the MWNT, nano-clay and nano-alumina was characterized by an initial rapid adsorption which eventually became constant within 22, 20, and 17 hours, respectively. The adsorption of DDT solution onto the MWNT, nano-clay and nano-alumina was also characterized by an initial rapid adsorption which gradually became constant within 22, 22 and 16 hours, respectively. Results of this study indicated that MWNT was a better adsorbent material compared to nano-clay and nano-alumina for both contaminants in this study. While at 10% of MWNT 88.9% and 77% of DDT and PCB were removed by MWNT, respectively. The effect of pH and temperature were also investigated. PMID:26659225

  8. Adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solutions onto modified wheat residue: characteristics, kinetic and column studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Wenyi; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yu; Ni, Shouqing

    2009-04-01

    Kinetic and column adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solution using modified wheat residue (MWS) as an adsorbent were studied in a batch reactor. The respective characteristic rate constants and activation energy were presented after linear and non-linear fitting. In addition, the effects of influent concentration of phosphate and flow rates on the column adsorption were also investigated. The results showed that the adsorption process could reach equilibrium in 10-15 min, and the pseudo-second-order equation generated the best agreement with experimental data for adsorption systems. The activation energy was 3.39 kJ mol(-1) indicating that the synthesis process was a physical adsorption. In the column tests, the increase of influent concentration and flow rate both decreased the breakthrough time, and the MWS-packed column exhibited excellent phosphate removal from aqueous solution. These results provide strong evidence of the potential of MWS for the technological applications of phosphate removal from aqueous solutions.

  9. Phosphate adsorption performance of a novel filter substrate made from drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendong; Ma, Cui; Zhang, Yinting; Yang, Shengjiong; Shao, Yue; Wang, Xiaochang

    2016-07-01

    Phosphate is one of the most predominant pollutants in natural waters. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the phosphate adsorption performance of a (NFS) made from drinking water treatment residuals. The adsorption of phosphate on the NFS fitted well with the Freundlich isotherm and pseudo second-order kinetic models. At pH7.0, the maximum adsorption capacity of 1.03mg/g was achieved at 15°C corresponding to the wastewater temperature in cold months, and increased notably to 1.31mg/g at 35°C. Under both acidic conditions (part of the adsorption sites was consumed) and basic conditions (negative charges formed on the surface of NFS, which led to a static repulsion of PO4(3-) and HPO4(2-)), the adsorption of phosphate was slightly inhibited. Further study showed that part of the adsorption sites could be recovered by 0.25mol/L NaOH. The activation energy was calculated to be above 8.0kJ/mol, indicating that the adsorption of phosphate on NFS was probably a chemical process. Considering the strong phosphate adsorption capacity and recoverability, NFS showed great promise on enhancing phosphate removal from the secondary treated wastewater in the filtration process. PMID:27372133

  10. Phosphate adsorption performance of a novel filter substrate made from drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendong; Ma, Cui; Zhang, Yinting; Yang, Shengjiong; Shao, Yue; Wang, Xiaochang

    2016-07-01

    Phosphate is one of the most predominant pollutants in natural waters. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the phosphate adsorption performance of a (NFS) made from drinking water treatment residuals. The adsorption of phosphate on the NFS fitted well with the Freundlich isotherm and pseudo second-order kinetic models. At pH7.0, the maximum adsorption capacity of 1.03mg/g was achieved at 15°C corresponding to the wastewater temperature in cold months, and increased notably to 1.31mg/g at 35°C. Under both acidic conditions (part of the adsorption sites was consumed) and basic conditions (negative charges formed on the surface of NFS, which led to a static repulsion of PO4(3-) and HPO4(2-)), the adsorption of phosphate was slightly inhibited. Further study showed that part of the adsorption sites could be recovered by 0.25mol/L NaOH. The activation energy was calculated to be above 8.0kJ/mol, indicating that the adsorption of phosphate on NFS was probably a chemical process. Considering the strong phosphate adsorption capacity and recoverability, NFS showed great promise on enhancing phosphate removal from the secondary treated wastewater in the filtration process.

  11. Selenium Adsorption To Aluminum-Based Water Treatment Residuals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aluminum-based water treatment residuals (WTR) can adsorb water-and soil-borne P, As(V), As(III), and perchlorate, and may be able to adsorb excess environmental selenium. WTR, clay minerals, and amorphous aluminum hydroxide were shaken for 24 hours in selenate or selenite solut...

  12. Selenium adsorption to aluminum-based water treatment residuals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum-based water treatment residuals (WTR) can adsorb water- and soil-borne P, As(V), As(III), and perchlorate, and may be able to adsorb excess environmental selenium. WTR, clay minerals, and amorphous aluminum hydroxide were shaken for 24 hours in selenate or selenite solutions at pH values o...

  13. Selenium-Water Treatment Residual Adsorption And Characterization

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aluminum-based water treatment residuals (WTR) have the ability to adsorb tremendous quantities of soil-borne P, and have been shown to adsorb other anions, such as As (V), As (III), and ClO4-. Environmental issues associated with Se in the Western US led us to study W...

  14. Characteristics and kinetics of phosphate adsorption on dewatered ferric-alum residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Guo, Wei; Tian, Binghui; Pei, Yuansheng; Zhang, Kejiang

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics and kinetics of phosphate (P) adsorption on dewatered ferric-alum water treatment residuals (Fe-Al-WTRs) have been investigated. The existence of both aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) in the residuals can result in significantly high P adsorption capacities. The P adsorption kinetics of Fe-Al-WTRs exhibited an initial rapid phase, followed by a slower phase. This could be described by three models, including a pseudo-first-order equation, a pseudo-second-order equation, and a double-constant rate equation. The latter was especially good for those runs with initial P concentrations of 500 and 1000 mg L(-1). Both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms fit the experimental data well, particularly the Freundlich isotherm, which had a correlation coefficient of 0.9930. The maximum measured P adsorption capacity of Fe-Al-WTRs was 45.42 mg g(-1), which is high when compared to those of most WTRs, as well as other reported adsorbents. The results also show that the P adsorption is a spontaneous endothermic process. Highest P adsorption capacities of Fe-Al-WTRs were measured at low pHs and a particle size range of 0.6 to 0.9 mm.

  15. Adsorption of methyl violet from aqueous solutions by the biochars derived from crop residues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren-kou; Xiao, Shuang-cheng; Yuan, Jin-hua; Zhao, An-zhen

    2011-11-01

    The adsorption of methyl violet by the biochars from crop residues was investigated with batch and leaching experiments--adsorption capacity varied with their feedstock in the following order: canola straw char>peanut straw char>soybean straw char>rice hull char. This order was generally consistent with the amount of negative charge of the biochars. Zeta potentials and Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy, combined with adsorption isotherms and effect of ionic strength, indicated that adsorption of methyl violet on biochars involved electrostatic attraction, specific interaction between the dye and carboxylate and phenolic hydroxyl groups on the biochars, and surface precipitation. Leaching experiments showed that 156 g of rice hull char almost completely removed methyl violet from 18.2 L of water containing 1.0 mmol/L of methyl violet. The biochars had high removal efficiency for methyl violet and could be effective adsorbents for removal of methyl violet from wastewater. PMID:21924897

  16. [Active carbon from Thalia dealbata residues: its preparation and adsorption performance to crystal violet].

    PubMed

    Chu, Shu-Yi; Yang, Min; Xiao, Ji-Bo; Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Yan-Ping; Yan, Xiang-Jun; Tian, Guang-Ming

    2013-06-01

    By using phosphoric acid as activation agent, active carbon was prepared from Thalia dealbata residues. The BET specific surface area of the active carbon was 1174.13 m2 x g(-1), micropore area was 426.99 m2 x g(-1), and average pore diameter was 3.23 nm. An investigation was made on the adsorption performances of the active carbon for crystal violet from aqueous solution under various conditions of pH, initial concentration of crystal violet, contact time, and contact temperature. It was shown that the adsorbed amount of crystal violet was less affected by solution pH, and the adsorption process could be divided into two stages, i. e., fast adsorption and slow adsorption, which followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. At the temperature 293, 303, and 313 K, the adsorption process was more accordance with Langmuir isotherm model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was 409.83, 425.53, and 438.59 mg x g(-1), respectively. In addition, the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic, and the randomness of crystal violet molecules increased. PMID:24066559

  17. [Active carbon from Thalia dealbata residues: its preparation and adsorption performance to crystal violet].

    PubMed

    Chu, Shu-Yi; Yang, Min; Xiao, Ji-Bo; Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Yan-Ping; Yan, Xiang-Jun; Tian, Guang-Ming

    2013-06-01

    By using phosphoric acid as activation agent, active carbon was prepared from Thalia dealbata residues. The BET specific surface area of the active carbon was 1174.13 m2 x g(-1), micropore area was 426.99 m2 x g(-1), and average pore diameter was 3.23 nm. An investigation was made on the adsorption performances of the active carbon for crystal violet from aqueous solution under various conditions of pH, initial concentration of crystal violet, contact time, and contact temperature. It was shown that the adsorbed amount of crystal violet was less affected by solution pH, and the adsorption process could be divided into two stages, i. e., fast adsorption and slow adsorption, which followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. At the temperature 293, 303, and 313 K, the adsorption process was more accordance with Langmuir isotherm model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was 409.83, 425.53, and 438.59 mg x g(-1), respectively. In addition, the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic, and the randomness of crystal violet molecules increased.

  18. Quantifying residual hydrogen adsorption in low-temperature STMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natterer, F. D.; Patthey, F.; Brune, H.

    2013-09-01

    We report on low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy observations demonstrating that individual Ti atoms on hexagonal boron nitride dissociate and adsorb hydrogen without measurable reaction barrier. The clean and hydrogenated states of the adatoms are clearly discerned by their apparent height and their differential conductance revealing the Kondo effect upon hydrogenation. Measurements at 50 K and 5 × 10- 11 mbar indicate a sizable hydrogenation within only 1 h originating from the residual gas pressure, whereas measurements at 4.7 K can be carried out for days without H2 contamination problems. However, heating up a low-T STM to operate it at variable temperature results in very sudden hydrogenation at around 17 K that correlates with a sharp peak in the total chamber pressure. From a quantitative analysis we derive the desorption energies of H2 on the cryostat walls. We find evidence for hydrogen contamination also during Ti evaporation and propose a strategy on how to dose transition metal atoms in the cleanliest fashion. The present contribution raises awareness of hydrogenation under seemingly ideal ultra-high vacuum conditions, it quantifies the H2 uptake by isolated transition metal atoms and its thermal desorption from the gold plated cryostat walls.

  19. Impact of biochar produced from post-harvest residue on the adsorption behavior of diesel oil on loess soil.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu Feng; Sun, Hang; Yves, Uwamungu J; Li, Hong; Hu, Xue Fei

    2016-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of biochar, produced from wheat residue at different temperatures, on the adsorption of diesel oil by loess soil. Kinetic and equilibrium data were processed to understand the adsorption mechanism of diesel by biochar-affected loess soil; dynamic and thermodynamic adsorption experiments were conducted to characterize this adsorption. The surface features and chemical structure of biochar, modified at varying pyrolytic temperatures, were investigated using surface scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The kinetic data showed that the adsorption of diesel oil onto loess soil could be described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model, with the rate-controlling step being intraparticle diffusion. However, in the presence of biochar, boundary layer control and intraparticle diffusion were both involved in the adsorption. Besides, the adsorption equilibrium data were well described by the Freundlich isothermal model. The saturated adsorption capacity weakened as temperature increased, suggesting a spontaneous exothermic process. Thermodynamic parameter analysis showed that adsorption was mainly a physical process and was enhanced by chemical adsorption. The adsorption capacity of loess soil for diesel oil was weakened with increasing pH. The biochar produced by pyrolytic wheat residue increased the adsorption behavior of petroleum pollutants in loess soil.

  20. In situ analysis of adsorption process from residual gases during thin film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giedraitis, A.; Tamulevicius, S.; Slapikas, K.; Gudaitis, R.; Juraitis, A.

    2008-03-01

    In this work we present the developed experimental technique as well as results of optical control of adsorption processes during thin film deposition. Different metallic films: (silver) as a model material and barium getter films were studied. Thermal evaporation method has been used to deposit thin metallic films and films of barium getter on glass substrates. Kinetics of the optical absorbance of the growing film was registered in situ measuring transmission of the film-substrate structure. These measurements were done in parallel to the ex-situ absorption (UV-VIS) and reflection spectra as well as XRD analysis. Such complex measurements enabled us to follow adsorption process from the residual gases during thermal evaporation as well to control adsorption process after the evaporation.

  1. Vapor-phase elemental mercury adsorption by residual carbon separated from fly ash.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Gang; Chen, Chang-He; Kolker, Kruse H

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption capacity for vapor-phase elemental mercury (Hg0) of residual carbon separated from fly ash was studied in an attempt for the control of elemental mercury emissions from combustion processes. At low mercury concentrations (< 200 microg/m3), unburned carbon had higher adsorption capacity than commercial activated carbon. The adsorbality of unburned carbon was also found to be source dependent. Isotherms of FS carbon (separated from fly ash of a power plant of Shishi in Fujian Province) were similar to those classified as type II. Isotherms of XJ carbon (separated from fly ash of a power plant of Jingcheng in Shanxi Province) were more like those classified as type II. Due to the relatively low production costs, these residual carbons would likely be considerably more cost-effective for the full-scale removal of mercury from combustion flue gases than other technology.

  2. Influence of the inherent properties of drinking water treatment residuals on their phosphorus adsorption capacities.

    PubMed

    Bai, Leilei; Wang, Changhui; He, Liansheng; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-12-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the phosphorus (P) adsorption and desorption on five drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) collected from different regions in China. The physical and chemical characteristics of the five WTRs were determined. Combined with rotated principal component analysis, multiple regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between the inherent properties of the WTRs and their P adsorption capacities. The results showed that the maximum P adsorption capacities of the five WTRs calculated using the Langmuir isotherm ranged from 4.17 to 8.20mg/g at a pH of 7 and further increased with a decrease in pH. The statistical analysis revealed that a factor related to Al and 200 mmol/L oxalate-extractable Al (Alox) accounted for 36.5% of the variations in the P adsorption. A similar portion (28.5%) was attributed to an integrated factor related to the pH, Fe, 200 mmol/L oxalate-extractable Fe (Feox), surface area and organic matter (OM) of the WTRs. However, factors related to other properties (Ca, P and 5 mmol/L oxalate-extractable Fe and Al) were rejected. In addition, the quantity of P desorption was limited and had a significant negative correlation with the (Feox+Alox) of the WTRs (p<0.05). Overall, WTRs with high contents of Alox, Feox and OM as well as large surface areas were proposed to be the best choice for P adsorption in practical applications.

  3. Comparison of different phosphate species adsorption by ferric and alum water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sijia; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2013-05-01

    As safe byproducts of drinking water treatment processes, ferric and alum water treatment residuals (FARs) have the potential to be new phosphate (P) immobilization materials. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate and compare the adsorption characteristics of three P species by FARs. The results showed that the kinetic processes of different P species' adsorption by FARs could be described by a pseudo second-order model. The ranking list of the initial adsorption rates with respect to different phosphates was pyrophosphate, phytate, orthophosphate, hexametaphosphate and glycerophosphate. Of the six models considered, the two-site Langmuir model most effectively described the adsorption characteristics of the various P species. Upon fitting the results, the maximum adsorption capacities were determined to be 40.24 mg/g for phytate, 18.04 mg/g for pyrophosphate, 17.14 mg/g for orthophosphate, 15.86 mg/g for hexametaphosphate and 10.81 mg/g for glycerophosphate. In addition, the adsorption processes of the different P species were spontaneous endothermic processes and were favored at lower pH values. The pH dependency was found to be especially true for orthophosphate, where the adsorption capacity decreased by 1.22 mg/g with an increase in pH from 5 to 9. Fractionation of the adsorbed P species from the FARs demonstrated that Al-P and Fe-P were the dominating forms, constituting approximately 80%-90% of the total P fractions, which indicated that the adsorbed P species had a low leaching risk and could stably exist in the FARs. Therefore, the FARs could be effective in controlling pollution in water caused by different P species.

  4. Effect of low molecular weight organic acids on phosphorus adsorption by ferric-alum water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Wang, Ziyuan; Lin, Lu; Tian, Binghui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2012-02-15

    Effects of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs; citric acid, oxalic acid and tartaric acid) on phosphorus (P) adsorption by ferric-alum water treatment residuals (FARs) were studied. Both batch and column experiments indicated that the effects of LMWOAs on P adsorption were closely related to adsorption time. Initially, all acids presented inhibitory function on P adsorption. The inhibition became weaker with time, eventually promoting P adsorption for citric acid and tartaric acid. In the column experiment with a 61-day duration, high P adsorption rates (>55%) were observed for the test groups containing citric acid and tartaric acid. Interestingly, higher pH likely enhanced P adsorption with the effects of LMWOAs and a distinct relationship between LMWOAs' effects on P adsorption and their concentrations was not observed. Moreover, fractionation of the adsorbed P from the FARs demonstrated that oxalic acid reduced P adsorption capacity, while citric acid and tartaric acid increased. Based on the forms of Fe and Al existing in the FARs and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses, LMWOAs can promote P adsorption through activating crystalline Fe/Al and preventing crystallization of amorphous Fe/Al to increase P adsorption sites, and can also inhibit P adsorption by competition with adsorption sites.

  5. [Characteristics of orthophosphate adsorption on ferric-alum residuals (FARs) from drinking water treatment plant].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Hui; Pei, Yuan-Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Batch tests have been used to investigate the characteristics of orthophosphate adsorption on ferric-alum residuals (FARs) from drinking water treatment plant. ICP, SEM and XRD analyses confirm that the FARs enriched in Fe and Al elements and presented amorphism structure. Orthophosphate sorption by the FARs can be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics equation. Fine adsorption effects of the FARs were found under lower pH values, particularly a 40.13% drop of the adsorptive capacity from pH 4.6 to pH 7.6. The FARs with grain sizes of 0.6-0.9 mm had the highest adsorption capacity of orthophosphate. Experimental data could be better fitted by the isotherm models of Langmuir (R2 = 0.9736) and Freundlich (R2 = 0.9916). The maximal adsorptive capacity reached 45.45 mg x g(-1) estimated from Langmuir isotherm model. Compared with other natural and industrial materials, FARs has relatively higher adsorption capacity. Under similar testing conditions, it was found that only about 10% orthophosphate could be desorbed from the FARs. Further study demonstrated that the mean energy of orthophosphate sorption on the FARs was 13.36 kJ x mol(-1) and the deltaH0 > 0, deltaS0 > 0 and deltaG0 < 0, which indicated that orthophosphate sorption on the FARs was a spontaneously endothermic chemical reaction. It can be therefore highly valued that the FARs may be applied to phosphate removal from wastewater and surface water.

  6. Enhancing phosphate adsorption by Mg/Al layered double hydroxide functionalized biochar with different Mg/Al ratios.

    PubMed

    Li, Ronghua; Wang, Jim J; Zhou, Baoyue; Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Ali, Amjad; Zhang, Zengqiang; Gaston, Lewis A; Lahori, Altaf Hussain; Mahar, Amanullah

    2016-07-15

    Mg/Al ratio plays a significant role for anion adsorption by Mg/Al-layered double hydroxides (Mg/Al-LDHs) modified biochar. In this study, Mg/Al-LDHs biochar with different Mg/Al ratios (2, 3, 4) were prepared by co-precipitation for phosphate removal from aqueous solution. Factors on phosphate adsorption including Mg/Al ratio, pH, and the presence of other inorganic anions were investigated through batch experiments. Increasing Mg/Al ratio in the Mg/Al-LDHs biochar composites generally enhanced phosphate adsorption with Langmuir adsorption maximum calculated at 81.83mg phosphorous (P) per gram of 4:1Mg/Al-LDHs biochar at pH3.0. The adsorption process was best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Solution pH had greater effects on the phosphate adsorption by Mg/Al LDHs biochar composites with lower Mg/Al ratios. The presence of other inorganic anions decreased the phosphate adsorption efficiency in the order of F(-) > SO4(2-) > NO2(-) >Cl(-). Phosphate adsorption mechanism involves ion exchange, electrostatic attraction and surface inner-sphere complex formation. Overall, Mg/Al-LDHs biochar composites offer a potential alternative of carbon-based adsorbent for phosphate removal from aqueous solution. PMID:27058131

  7. The effect of zeolite treatment by acids on sodium adsorption ratio of coal seam gas water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Ozdemir, Orhan; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Do, Duong D

    2012-10-15

    Many coal seam gas (CSG) waters contain a sodium ion concentration which is too high relative to calcium and magnesium ions for environment acceptance. Natural zeolites can be used as a cheap and effective method to control sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, which is a measure of the relative preponderance of sodium to calcium and magnesium) due to its high cation exchange capacity. In this study, a natural zeolite from Queensland was examined for its potential to treat CSG water to remove sodium ions to lower SAR and reduce the pH value. The results demonstrate that acid activated zeolite at 30%wt solid ratio can reduce the sodium content from 563.0 to 182.7 ppm; the pH from 8.74 to 6.95; and SAR from 70.3 to 18.5. Based on the results of the batch experiments, the sodium adsorption capacity of the acid-treated zeolite is three times greater than that of the untreated zeolite. Both the untreated and acid-treated zeolite samples were characterized using zeta potential, surface characterization, DTA/TG and particle size distribution in order to explain their adsorption behaviours.

  8. The effect of zeolite treatment by acids on sodium adsorption ratio of coal seam gas water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Ozdemir, Orhan; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Do, Duong D

    2012-10-15

    Many coal seam gas (CSG) waters contain a sodium ion concentration which is too high relative to calcium and magnesium ions for environment acceptance. Natural zeolites can be used as a cheap and effective method to control sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, which is a measure of the relative preponderance of sodium to calcium and magnesium) due to its high cation exchange capacity. In this study, a natural zeolite from Queensland was examined for its potential to treat CSG water to remove sodium ions to lower SAR and reduce the pH value. The results demonstrate that acid activated zeolite at 30%wt solid ratio can reduce the sodium content from 563.0 to 182.7 ppm; the pH from 8.74 to 6.95; and SAR from 70.3 to 18.5. Based on the results of the batch experiments, the sodium adsorption capacity of the acid-treated zeolite is three times greater than that of the untreated zeolite. Both the untreated and acid-treated zeolite samples were characterized using zeta potential, surface characterization, DTA/TG and particle size distribution in order to explain their adsorption behaviours. PMID:22841594

  9. [Effectiveness of arsenite adsorption by ferric and alum water treatment residuals with different grain sizes].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lu; Xu, Jia-Rui; Wu, Hao; Wang, Chang-Hui; Pei, Yuan-Sheng

    2013-07-01

    Effectiveness of arsenite adsorption by ferric and alum water treatment residuals (FARs) with different grain sizes was studied. The results indicated that the content of active Fe and Al, the specific surface area and pore volume in FARs with different grain sizes were in the range of 523.72-1 861.72 mmol x kg(-1), 28.15-265.59 m2 x g(-1) and 0.03-0.09 cm3 x g(-1), respectively. The contents of organic matter, fulvic acid, humic acid and humin were in the range of 46.97-91.58 mg x kg(-1), 0.02-32.27 mg x kg(-1), 22.27-34.09 mg x kg(-1) and 10.76-34.22 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Results of SEM and XRD analysis further demonstrated that FARs with different grain sizes were amorphousness. Batch experiments suggested that both the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations could well describe the kinetics adsorption processes of arsenite by FARs. Moreover, the contents of arsenite absorbed by FARs increased with the increase of arsenite concentrations. The theoretical saturated adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir isotherm model were in the range of 6.72-21.79 mg x g(-1). Interestingly, pH showed little effect on the arsenite adsorption capability of FARs. The capability of FARs had a close relationship with their physicochemical properties. Correlation analysis showed that the active Fe and Al contents and pore volume had major effects on the arsenite adsorption capability of FARs.

  10. A combined process of adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation for furfural removal using zero-valent iron residue.

    PubMed

    Li, Furong; Bao, Jianguo; Zhang, Tian C; Lei, Yutian

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using a combined adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation process (with zero-valent iron (ZVI) residue from heat wraps as an absorbent and catalyst) to remove furfural in the solution was evaluated. The influencing parameters (e.g. pH, H2O2 concentration, initial furfural concentration) and the reusability of ZVI residue (to replace the iron powder) were estimated. The ZVI residue was found to have much better adsorption effect on furfural at pH 2.0 compared with pH 6.7. For Fenton-like reaction alone with ZVI residue, the highest furfural removal of 97.5% was observed at the concentration of 0.176 mol/L H2O2, and all of the samples had >80% removal efficiency at different initial furfural concentrations of 2, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mmol/L. However, with a combined adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation, the removal efficiency of furfural was nearly 100% for all treatments. The ZVI residue used for furfural removal was much better than that of iron powder in the Fenton-like reaction at a seven-cycle experiment. This study suggests the combined process of adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation using ZVI residue is effective for the treatment of furfural in the liquid.

  11. Overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells.

    PubMed

    Flores-Cano, J V; Sánchez-Polo, M; Messoud, J; Velo-Gala, I; Ocampo-Pérez, R; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2016-03-15

    This study analyzed the overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole, and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells. It was also elucidated whether the overall adsorption rate was controlled by reaction on the adsorbent surface or by intraparticle diffusion. Experimental data of the pollutant concentration decay curves as a function of contact time were interpreted by kinetics (first- and second-order) and diffusion models, considering external mass transfer, surface and/or pore volume diffusion, and adsorption on an active site. The experimental data were better interpreted by a first-order than second-order kinetic model, and the first-order adsorption rate constant varied linearly with respect to the surface area and total pore volume of the adsorbents. According to the diffusion model, the overall adsorption rate is governed by intraparticle diffusion, and surface diffusion is the main mechanism controlling the intraparticle diffusion, representing >90% of total intraparticle diffusion.

  12. Overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells.

    PubMed

    Flores-Cano, J V; Sánchez-Polo, M; Messoud, J; Velo-Gala, I; Ocampo-Pérez, R; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2016-03-15

    This study analyzed the overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole, and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells. It was also elucidated whether the overall adsorption rate was controlled by reaction on the adsorbent surface or by intraparticle diffusion. Experimental data of the pollutant concentration decay curves as a function of contact time were interpreted by kinetics (first- and second-order) and diffusion models, considering external mass transfer, surface and/or pore volume diffusion, and adsorption on an active site. The experimental data were better interpreted by a first-order than second-order kinetic model, and the first-order adsorption rate constant varied linearly with respect to the surface area and total pore volume of the adsorbents. According to the diffusion model, the overall adsorption rate is governed by intraparticle diffusion, and surface diffusion is the main mechanism controlling the intraparticle diffusion, representing >90% of total intraparticle diffusion. PMID:26731310

  13. Double-sided F and Cl adsorptions on graphene at various atomic ratios: Geometric, orientation and electronic structure aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widjaja, Hantarto; Jiang, Zhong-Tao; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Yin, Chun-Yang; Goh, Bee-Min; Mondinos, Nicholas; Amri, Amun; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.

    2016-06-01

    Elemental adsorption on graphene offers an effective procedure in fine-tuning electronic and mechanical properties of graphene. The effects of dopants depend on adsorption site, the degree of coverage as well as on the configuration of the deployed supercell. In this contribution, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the electronic structures of F and Cl adsorption (double-sided, top site) on graphene in terms of adsorption orientation, atomic ratios, i.e., from C:F/Cl = 18:2 to C:F/Cl = 2:2. Despite being members of the halogens group, F- and Cl-adsorbed on graphene show contrasting trends. F is adsorbed to graphene more strongly than Cl. F favours full and 25% adsorption coverage, while Cl favours 25% coverage. Both F and Cl cases open band gap (at Fermi energy) at certain atomic concentration coverage, but none creates magnetization.

  14. Removal of copper from acid wastewater of bioleaching by adsorption onto ramie residue and uptake by Trichoderma viride.

    PubMed

    Wang, Buyun; Wang, Kai

    2013-05-01

    A continuous batch bioleaching was built to realize the bioleaching of sewage sludge in large scale. In the treatment, heavy metal in acid wastewater of bioleaching was removed by adsorption onto ramie residue. Then, acid wastewater was reused in next bioleaching batch. In this way, most time and water of bioleaching was saved and leaching efficiency of copper, lead and chromium kept at a high level in continuous batch bioleaching. It was found that residual heavy metal in sewage sludge is highly related to that in acid wastewater after bioleaching. To get a high leaching efficiency, concentration of heavy metal in acid wastewater should be low. Adsorption of copper from acid wastewater onto ramie residue can be described by pseudo first-order kinetics equation and Freundlich isotherm model. Trichoderma viride has the potential to be used for the concentration and recovery of heavy metal adsorbed onto ramie residue. PMID:23567687

  15. Cationic cellulose nanofibers from waste pulp residues and their nitrate, fluoride, sulphate and phosphate adsorption properties.

    PubMed

    Sehaqui, Houssine; Mautner, Andreas; Perez de Larraya, Uxua; Pfenninger, Numa; Tingaut, Philippe; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Cationic cellulose nanofibers (CNF) having 3 different contents of positively charged quaternary ammonium groups have been prepared from waste pulp residues according to a water-based modification method involving first the etherification of the pulp with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride followed by mechanical disintegration. The cationic nanofibers obtained were observed by scanning electron microscopy and the extent of the reaction was evaluated by conductometric titration, ζ-potential measurements, and thermogravimetric analyses. The cationic CNF had a maximum cationic charge content of 1.2mmolg(-1) and positive ζ-potential at various pH values. Sorption of negatively charged contaminants (fluoride, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate ions) and their selectivity onto cationic CNF have been evaluated. Maximum sorption of ∼0.6mmolg(-1) of these ions by CNF was achieved and selectivity adsorption studies showed that cationic CNF are more selective toward multivalent ions (PO4(3-) and SO4(2-)) than monovalent ions (F(-) and NO3(-)). In addition, we demonstrated that cationic CNF can be manufactured into permeable membranes capable of dynamic nitrate adsorption by utilizing a simple paper-making process.

  16. Cationic cellulose nanofibers from waste pulp residues and their nitrate, fluoride, sulphate and phosphate adsorption properties.

    PubMed

    Sehaqui, Houssine; Mautner, Andreas; Perez de Larraya, Uxua; Pfenninger, Numa; Tingaut, Philippe; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Cationic cellulose nanofibers (CNF) having 3 different contents of positively charged quaternary ammonium groups have been prepared from waste pulp residues according to a water-based modification method involving first the etherification of the pulp with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride followed by mechanical disintegration. The cationic nanofibers obtained were observed by scanning electron microscopy and the extent of the reaction was evaluated by conductometric titration, ζ-potential measurements, and thermogravimetric analyses. The cationic CNF had a maximum cationic charge content of 1.2mmolg(-1) and positive ζ-potential at various pH values. Sorption of negatively charged contaminants (fluoride, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate ions) and their selectivity onto cationic CNF have been evaluated. Maximum sorption of ∼0.6mmolg(-1) of these ions by CNF was achieved and selectivity adsorption studies showed that cationic CNF are more selective toward multivalent ions (PO4(3-) and SO4(2-)) than monovalent ions (F(-) and NO3(-)). In addition, we demonstrated that cationic CNF can be manufactured into permeable membranes capable of dynamic nitrate adsorption by utilizing a simple paper-making process. PMID:26453885

  17. Engineering the hydrophobic residues of a GH11 xylanase impacts its adsorption onto lignin and its thermostability.

    PubMed

    Rakotoarivonina, Harivony; Hermant, Béatrice; Aubry, Nathalie; Rémond, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to characterise the parameters governing the non-specific adsorption of a xylanase from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus (Tx-Xyn11) onto lignin isolated from maize stems. Such adsorption may be due to hydrophobic interactions between Tx-Xyn11 and lignin. Our strategy was to mutate hydrophobic residues present on the surface of Tx- Xyn11 into non-hydrophobic residues. Three mutants (P1, P2, and P3) with altered hydrophobic regions were produced and characterised. The thermostability of the P1 mutant was largely decreased compared with the thermostable Tx-Xyn11. The rate of adsorbed enzyme onto lignin was reduced to a similar extent for the P1 and P2 mutants, whereas the adsorption of the P3 mutant was less affected compared with that of Tx-Xyn11. When considered separately, the hydrophobic residues did not affect xylanase adsorption onto lignin. The addition of Tween 20 also led to the decreased adsorption of Tx-Xyn11 onto lignin. These results suggest that hydrophobic interactions are a key parameter in the interaction of Tx-Xyn11 with isolated lignin.

  18. Comprehensive reuse of drinking water treatment residuals in coagulation and adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Hwang, Min-Jin; Park, Dae-Seon; Ahn, Kyu-Hong

    2016-10-01

    While drinking water treatment residuals (DWTRs) inevitably lead to serious problems due to their huge amount of generation and limitation of landfill sites, their unique properties of containing Al or Fe contents make it possible to reuse them as a beneficial material for coagulant recovery and adsorbent. Hence, in the present study, to comprehensively handle and recycle DWTRs, coagulant recovery from DWTRs and reuse of coagulant recovered residuals (CRs) were investigated. In the first step, coagulant recovery from DWTRs was conducted using response surface methodology (RSM) for statistical optimization of independent variables (pH, solid content, and reaction time) on response variable (Al recovery). As a result, a highly acceptable Al recovery of 97.5 ± 0.4% was recorded, which corresponds to 99.5% of the predicted Al recovery. Comparison study of recovered and commercial coagulant from textile wastewater treatment indicated that recovered coagulant has reasonable potential for use in wastewater treatment, in which the performance efficiencies were 68.5 ± 2.1% COD, 97.2 ± 1.9% turbidity, and 64.3 ± 1.0% color removals at 50 mg Al/L. Subsequently, in a similar manner, RSM was also applied to optimize coagulation conditions (Al dosage, initial pH, and reaction time) for the maximization of real cotton textile wastewater treatment in terms of COD, turbidity, and color removal. Overall performance revealed that the initial pH had a remarkable effect on the removal performance compared to the effects of other independent variables. This is mainly due to the transformation of metal species form with increasing or decreasing pH conditions. Finally, a feasibility test of CRs as adsorbent for phosphate adsorption from aqueous solution was conducted. Adsorption equilibrium of phosphate at different temperatures (10-30 °C) and initial levels of pH (3-11) indicated that the main mechanisms of phosphate adsorption onto CRs are endothermic and chemical

  19. Comprehensive reuse of drinking water treatment residuals in coagulation and adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Hwang, Min-Jin; Park, Dae-Seon; Ahn, Kyu-Hong

    2016-10-01

    While drinking water treatment residuals (DWTRs) inevitably lead to serious problems due to their huge amount of generation and limitation of landfill sites, their unique properties of containing Al or Fe contents make it possible to reuse them as a beneficial material for coagulant recovery and adsorbent. Hence, in the present study, to comprehensively handle and recycle DWTRs, coagulant recovery from DWTRs and reuse of coagulant recovered residuals (CRs) were investigated. In the first step, coagulant recovery from DWTRs was conducted using response surface methodology (RSM) for statistical optimization of independent variables (pH, solid content, and reaction time) on response variable (Al recovery). As a result, a highly acceptable Al recovery of 97.5 ± 0.4% was recorded, which corresponds to 99.5% of the predicted Al recovery. Comparison study of recovered and commercial coagulant from textile wastewater treatment indicated that recovered coagulant has reasonable potential for use in wastewater treatment, in which the performance efficiencies were 68.5 ± 2.1% COD, 97.2 ± 1.9% turbidity, and 64.3 ± 1.0% color removals at 50 mg Al/L. Subsequently, in a similar manner, RSM was also applied to optimize coagulation conditions (Al dosage, initial pH, and reaction time) for the maximization of real cotton textile wastewater treatment in terms of COD, turbidity, and color removal. Overall performance revealed that the initial pH had a remarkable effect on the removal performance compared to the effects of other independent variables. This is mainly due to the transformation of metal species form with increasing or decreasing pH conditions. Finally, a feasibility test of CRs as adsorbent for phosphate adsorption from aqueous solution was conducted. Adsorption equilibrium of phosphate at different temperatures (10-30 °C) and initial levels of pH (3-11) indicated that the main mechanisms of phosphate adsorption onto CRs are endothermic and chemical

  20. Activated carbon derived from carbon residue from biomass gasification and its application for dye adsorption: Kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Maneerung, Thawatchai; Liew, Johan; Dai, Yanjun; Kawi, Sibudjing; Chong, Clive; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In this work, activated carbon (AC) as an effective and low-cost adsorbent was successfully prepared from carbon residue (or char, one of the by-products from woody biomass gasification) via physical activation. The surface area of char was significantly increased from 172.24 to 776.46m(2)/g after steam activation at 900°C. The obtained activated carbons were then employed for the adsorption of dye (Rhodamine B) and it was found that activated carbon obtained from steam activation exhibited the highest adsorption capability, which is mainly attributed to the higher surface area and the abundance of hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups on the activated carbon surface. Moreover, it was also found that the adsorption capability significantly increased under the basic condition, which can be attributed to the increased electrostatic interaction between the deprotonated (negatively charged) activated carbon and dye molecules. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted into different adsorption isotherms and found to fit well with Langmuir model (indicating that dye molecules form monolayer coverage on activated carbon) with a maximum monolayer adsorption capability of 189.83mg/g, whereas the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics.

  1. Adsorption of cesium from aqueous solution using agricultural residue--walnut shell: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dahu; Zhao, Yingxin; Yang, Shengjiong; Shi, Wansheng; Zhang, Zhenya; Lei, Zhongfang; Yang, Yingnan

    2013-05-01

    A novel biosorbent derived from agricultural residue - walnut shell (WS) is reported to remove cesium from aqueous solution. Nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCF) was incorporated into this biosorbent, serving as a high selectivity trap agent for cesium. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) were utilized for the evaluation of the developed biosorbent. Determination of kinetic parameters for adsorption was carried out using pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order kinetic models and intra-particle diffusion models. Adsorption equilibrium was examined using Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherms. A satisfactory correlation coefficient and relatively low chi-square analysis parameter χ(2) between the experimental and predicted values of the Freundlich isotherm demonstrate that cesium adsorption by NiHCF-WS is a multilayer chemical adsorption. Thermodynamic studies were conducted under different reaction temperatures and results indicate that cesium adsorption by NiHCF-WS is an endothermic (ΔH° > 0) and spontaneous (ΔG° < 0) process.

  2. Activated carbon derived from carbon residue from biomass gasification and its application for dye adsorption: Kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Maneerung, Thawatchai; Liew, Johan; Dai, Yanjun; Kawi, Sibudjing; Chong, Clive; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In this work, activated carbon (AC) as an effective and low-cost adsorbent was successfully prepared from carbon residue (or char, one of the by-products from woody biomass gasification) via physical activation. The surface area of char was significantly increased from 172.24 to 776.46m(2)/g after steam activation at 900°C. The obtained activated carbons were then employed for the adsorption of dye (Rhodamine B) and it was found that activated carbon obtained from steam activation exhibited the highest adsorption capability, which is mainly attributed to the higher surface area and the abundance of hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups on the activated carbon surface. Moreover, it was also found that the adsorption capability significantly increased under the basic condition, which can be attributed to the increased electrostatic interaction between the deprotonated (negatively charged) activated carbon and dye molecules. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted into different adsorption isotherms and found to fit well with Langmuir model (indicating that dye molecules form monolayer coverage on activated carbon) with a maximum monolayer adsorption capability of 189.83mg/g, whereas the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. PMID:26512858

  3. Infiltration into cropped soils: effect of rain and sodium adsorption ratio-impacted irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Donald L; Wood, James D; Lesch, Scott M

    2008-01-01

    The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and salinity criteria for water suitability for irrigation have been developed for conditions where irrigation water is the only water source. It is not clear that these criteria are applicable to environments where there is a combination of rain and irrigation during the growing season. The interaction of rainfall with irrigation water is expected to result in increased sodicity hazard because of the low electrical conductivity of rain. In this study we examined the effects of irrigation waters of SAR 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mmol(1/2) L(-1/2) and electrical conductivities of 1 and 2 dS m(-1) on the infiltration rate of two soils with alternating cycles of rain (simulated with a rainfall sprinkler) and irrigation water, separated by drying cycles. The infiltration rate of surface samples from two soils, Kobase silty clay (fine, smectitic, frigid, Torrertic Haplustept) and Glendive very fine sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed superactive, calcareous, frigid Aridic Ustifluvent) were evaluated under alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cropped conditions for over 140 d and under full canopy cover. Reductions in infiltration were observed for both soils for SAR above 2, and the reductions became more severe with increasing SAR. Saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements taken from undisturbed cores at the end of the experiment were highly variable, suggesting that in situ infiltration measurements may be preferred when evaluating SAR effects. PMID:18765763

  4. Isomer residual ratio of odd-odd isotope {sup 180}Ta in supernova nucleosynthsis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Takehito; Kajino, Toshitaka; Chiba, Satoshi; Mathews, Grant

    2010-06-01

    The nucleosynthesis of {sup 180}Ta has remained an unsolved problem and as its origin many nucleosynthesis mechanisms have been proposed. This isotope has the unique feature that the naturally occurring abundance of {sup 180}Ta is actually a meta-stable isomer (half-life of >=10{sup 15} yr), while the ground state is a 1{sup +} unstable state which beta-decays with a half-life of only 8.15 hr. We have made a new time-dependent calculation of {sup 180}Ta meta-stable isomer residual ratio after supernova neutrino-induced reactions. This residual isomer ratio is crucial for understanding the production and survival of this naturally occurring rare isotope. We have constructed a new model under temperature evolution after type II supernova explosion. We include the explicit linking between the isomer and all known excited states and found that the residual ratio is insensitive to astrophysical parameters such as neutrino energy spectrum, explosion energy, decay time constant. We find that the explicit time evolution of the synthesis of {sup 180}Ta avoids the overproduction relative to {sup 138}La for a neutrino process neutrino temperature of 4 MeV.

  5. [Adsorption of methylene blue from water by the biochars generated from crop residues].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren-Kou; Zhao, An-Zhen; Xiao, Shuang-Cheng; Yuan, Jin-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Biochars were prepared from straws of rice, peanut and soybean and rice hull using a low temperature pyrolysis method and adsorption of methylene blue by these biochars were investigated with batch and leaching experiments. Results indicated that biochars have high adsorption capacity for methylene blue and followed the order: rice straw char > soybean straw char > peanut straw char > rice hull char. This order is generally consistent with the amount of negative charge and specific surface area of these biochars. While methylene blue was mainly adsorbed specifically by the biochars, because the adsorption of methylene blue increased with the increase of ionic strength and the adsorption led to the shift of zeta potential of biochar particles to positive value direction. Langmuir equation fitted the adsorption isotherms well and can be used to describe the adsorption behaviors of methylene blue by the biochars. The maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue predicted by langmuir equation was 196.1, 169.5, 129.9 and 89.3 mmol x kg(-1) for rice straw char, soybean straw char, peanut straw char and rice hull char, respectively. Leaching experiments show that rice hull char of 156 g can remove methylene blue from 30 L water containing 0.3 mmol x L(-1) of methylene blue completely and the cumulative amount of methylene blue absorbed by the biochar reaches 57.7 mmol x kg(-1). The biochars can be used as efficient adsorbents to remove methylene blue from waste water of dye.

  6. [Adsorption of methylene blue from water by the biochars generated from crop residues].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren-Kou; Zhao, An-Zhen; Xiao, Shuang-Cheng; Yuan, Jin-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Biochars were prepared from straws of rice, peanut and soybean and rice hull using a low temperature pyrolysis method and adsorption of methylene blue by these biochars were investigated with batch and leaching experiments. Results indicated that biochars have high adsorption capacity for methylene blue and followed the order: rice straw char > soybean straw char > peanut straw char > rice hull char. This order is generally consistent with the amount of negative charge and specific surface area of these biochars. While methylene blue was mainly adsorbed specifically by the biochars, because the adsorption of methylene blue increased with the increase of ionic strength and the adsorption led to the shift of zeta potential of biochar particles to positive value direction. Langmuir equation fitted the adsorption isotherms well and can be used to describe the adsorption behaviors of methylene blue by the biochars. The maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue predicted by langmuir equation was 196.1, 169.5, 129.9 and 89.3 mmol x kg(-1) for rice straw char, soybean straw char, peanut straw char and rice hull char, respectively. Leaching experiments show that rice hull char of 156 g can remove methylene blue from 30 L water containing 0.3 mmol x L(-1) of methylene blue completely and the cumulative amount of methylene blue absorbed by the biochar reaches 57.7 mmol x kg(-1). The biochars can be used as efficient adsorbents to remove methylene blue from waste water of dye. PMID:22452202

  7. Removal of oil from oil-in-saltwater emulsions by adsorption onto nano-alumina functionalized with petroleum vacuum residue.

    PubMed

    Franco, Camilo A; Nassar, Nashaat N; Cortés, Farid B

    2014-11-01

    Formation water from oilfields is one of the major environmental issues related to the oil industry. This research investigated oil adsorption onto nanoparticles of hydrophobic alumina and alumina nanoparticles functionalized with a petroleum vacuum residue (VR) at 2 and 4wt% to reduce the amount of oil in oil-saltwater emulsions at different pH values (5, 7 and 9). The initial concentration of crude oil in water ranged from 100 to 500mg/L. The change in oil concentration after adsorption was determined using a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The results indicated that all of the systems performed more effectively at a pH of 7 and using Al/4VR material. The oil adsorption was higher for neutral and acid systems compared with basic ones, and it was improved by increasing the amount of VR on the surface of the alumina. Additionally, the amount of NaCl adsorbed onto nanoparticles was estimated for different mixtures. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics were evaluated using the Dubinin-Astakhov model, the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller model, and pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order models, with a better fitting to the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller model and pseudo-second-order model. PMID:25112913

  8. Removal of oil from oil-in-saltwater emulsions by adsorption onto nano-alumina functionalized with petroleum vacuum residue.

    PubMed

    Franco, Camilo A; Nassar, Nashaat N; Cortés, Farid B

    2014-11-01

    Formation water from oilfields is one of the major environmental issues related to the oil industry. This research investigated oil adsorption onto nanoparticles of hydrophobic alumina and alumina nanoparticles functionalized with a petroleum vacuum residue (VR) at 2 and 4wt% to reduce the amount of oil in oil-saltwater emulsions at different pH values (5, 7 and 9). The initial concentration of crude oil in water ranged from 100 to 500mg/L. The change in oil concentration after adsorption was determined using a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The results indicated that all of the systems performed more effectively at a pH of 7 and using Al/4VR material. The oil adsorption was higher for neutral and acid systems compared with basic ones, and it was improved by increasing the amount of VR on the surface of the alumina. Additionally, the amount of NaCl adsorbed onto nanoparticles was estimated for different mixtures. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics were evaluated using the Dubinin-Astakhov model, the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller model, and pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order models, with a better fitting to the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller model and pseudo-second-order model.

  9. Adsorption of ribose nucleotides on manganese oxides with varied mn/o ratio: implications for chemical evolution.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Brij; Shanker, Uma; Kamaluddin

    2011-10-01

    Manganese exists in different oxidation states under different environmental conditions with respect to redox potential. Various forms of manganese oxides, namely, Manganosite (MnO), Bixbyite (Mn(2)O(3)), Hausmannite (Mn(3)O(4)) and Pyrolusite (MnO(2)) were synthesized and their possible role in chemical evolution studied. Adsorption studies of ribose nucleotides (5'-AMP, 5'-GMP, 5'-CMP and 5'-UMP) on these manganese oxides at neutral pH, revealed a higher binding affinity to manganosite (MnO) compared to the other manganese oxides. That manganese oxides having a lower Mn-O ratio show higher binding affinity for the ribonucleotides indirectly implies that such oxides may have provided a surface onto which biomonomers could have been concentrated through selective adsorption. Purine nucleotides were adsorbed to a greater extent compared to the pyrimidine nucleotides. Adsorption data followed Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and X( m ) and K( L ) values were calculated. The nature of the interaction and mechanism was elucidated by infrared spectral studies conducted on the metal-oxide and ribonucleotide-metal-oxide adducts.

  10. Adsorption of Ribose Nucleotides on Manganese Oxides with Varied Mn/O Ratio: Implications for Chemical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Brij; Shanker, Uma; Kamaluddin

    2011-10-01

    Manganese exists in different oxidation states under different environmental conditions with respect to redox potential. Various forms of manganese oxides, namely, Manganosite (MnO), Bixbyite (Mn2O3), Hausmannite (Mn3O4) and Pyrolusite (MnO2) were synthesized and their possible role in chemical evolution studied. Adsorption studies of ribose nucleotides (5'-AMP, 5'-GMP, 5'-CMP and 5'-UMP) on these manganese oxides at neutral pH, revealed a higher binding affinity to manganosite (MnO) compared to the other manganese oxides. That manganese oxides having a lower Mn-O ratio show higher binding affinity for the ribonucleotides indirectly implies that such oxides may have provided a surface onto which biomonomers could have been concentrated through selective adsorption. Purine nucleotides were adsorbed to a greater extent compared to the pyrimidine nucleotides. Adsorption data followed Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and X m and K L values were calculated. The nature of the interaction and mechanism was elucidated by infrared spectral studies conducted on the metal-oxide and ribonucleotide-metal-oxide adducts.

  11. Variation of transition temperatures and residual resistivity ratio in vapor-grown FeSe

    DOE PAGES

    Böhmer, A. E.; Taufour, V.; Straszheim, W. E.; Wolf, T.; Canfield, P. C.

    2016-07-29

    The study of the iron-based superconductor FeSe has blossomed with the availability of high-quality single crystals, obtained through flux/vapor-transport growth techniques below the structural transformation temperature of its tetragonal phase, T≈450°C. Here, we report on the variation of sample morphology and properties due to small modifications in the growth conditions. A considerable variation of the superconducting transition temperature Tc, from 8.8 K to 3 K, which cannot be correlated with the sample composition, is observed. Instead, we point out a clear correlation between Tc and disorder, as measured by the residual resistivity ratio. Notably, the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural transition is alsomore » found to be quite strongly disorder dependent (Ts≈72–90K) and linearly correlated with Tc.« less

  12. Estimating the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the effect of residual foreground contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Fantaye, Y.; Leach, S.M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Stivoli, F.; Grain, J.; Tristram, M.; Stompor, R. E-mail: stivoli@gmail.com E-mail: leach@sissa.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2011-08-01

    We consider future balloon-borne and ground-based suborbital experiments designed to search for inflationary gravitational waves, and investigate the impact of residual foregrounds that remain in the estimated cosmic microwave background maps. This is achieved by propagating foreground modelling uncertainties from the component separation, under the assumption of a spatially uniform foreground frequency scaling, through to the power spectrum estimates, and up to measurement of the tensor to scalar ratio in the parameter estimation step. We characterize the error covariance due to subtracted foregrounds, and find it to be subdominant compared to instrumental noise and sample variance in our simulated data analysis. We model the unsubtracted residual foreground contribution using a two-parameter power law and show that marginalization over these foreground parameters is effective in accounting for a bias due to excess foreground power at low l. We conclude that, at least in the suborbital experimental setups we have simulated, foreground errors may be modeled and propagated up to parameter estimation with only a slight degradation of the target sensitivity of these experiments derived neglecting the presence of the foregrounds.

  13. Cellulase adsorption and an evaluation of enzyme recycle during hydrolysis of steam-exploded softwood residues.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanpin; Yang, Bin; Gregg, David; Saddler, John N; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2002-01-01

    The sugar yield and enzyme adsorption profile obtained during the hydrolysis of SO2-catalyzed steam-exploded Douglas-fir and posttreated steam-exploded Douglas-fir substrates were determined. After hot alkali peroxide posttreatment, the rates and yield of hydrolysis attained from the posttreated Douglas-fir were significantly higher, even at lower enzyme loadings, than those obtained with the corresponding steam-exploded Douglas-fir. The enzymatic adsorption profiles observed during hydrolysis of the two substrates were significantly different. Ultrafiltration was employed to recover enzyme in solution (supernatant) and reused in subsequent hydrolysis reactions with added, fresh substrate. These recycle findings suggested that the enzyme remained relatively active for three rounds of recycle. It is likely that enzyme recovery and reuse during the hydrolysis of posttreated softwood substrates could lead to reductions in the need for the addition of fresh enzyme during softwood-based bioconversion processes.

  14. Relationship between residual feed intake and lymphocyte mitochondrial complex protein concentration and ratio in crossbred steers.

    PubMed

    Davis, M P; Brooks, M A; Kerley, M S

    2016-04-01

    Rate of oxygen uptake by muscle mitochondria and respiratory chain protein concentrations differed between high- and low-residual feed intake (RFI) animals. The hypothesis of this research was that complex I (CI), II (CII), and III (CIII) mitochondria protein concentrations in lymphocyte (blood) mitochondria were related to the RFI phenotype of beef steers. Daily feed intake (ADFI) was individually recorded for 92 Hereford-crossbreed steers over 63 d using GrowSafe individual feed intake system. Predicted ADFI was calculated as the regression of ADFI on ADG and midtest BW. Difference between ADFI and predicted ADFI was RFI. Lymphocytes were isolated from low-RFI (-1.32 ± 0.11 kg/d; = 10) and high-RFI (1.34 ± 0.18 kg/d; = 8) steers. Immunocapture of CI, CII, and CIII proteins from the lymphocyte was done using MitoProfile CI, CII, and CIII immunocapture kits (MitoSciences Inc., Eugene, OR). Protein concentrations of CI, CII, and CIII and total protein were quantified using bicinchoninic acid colorimetric procedures. Low-RFI steers consumed 30% less ( = 0.0004) feed and had a 40% improvement ( < 0.0001) in feed efficiency compared with high-RFI steers with similar growth ( = 0.78) and weight measurements ( > 0.65). High- and low-RFI steers did not differ in CI ( = 0.22), CII ( = 0.69), and CIII ( = 0.59) protein concentrations. The protein concentration ratios for CI to CII ( = 0.03) were 20% higher and the ratios of CI to CIII ( = 0.01) were 30% higher, but the ratios of CII to CIII ( = 0.89) did not differ when comparing low-RFI steers with high-RFI steers. The similar magnitude difference in feed intake, feed efficiency measurements, and CI-to-CIII ratio between RFI phenotypes provides a plausible explanation for differences between the phenotypes. We also concluded that mitochondria isolated from lymphocytes could be used to study respiratory chain differences among differing RFI phenotypes. Further research is needed to determine if lymphocyte mitochondrial

  15. Adsorption of charged protein residues on an inorganic nanosheet: Computer simulation of LDH interaction with ion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, Alexey A.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2016-08-01

    Quasi-two-dimensional and hybrid nanomaterials based on layered double hydroxides (LDH), cationic clays, layered oxyhydroxides and hydroxides of metals possess large specific surface area and strong electrostatic properties with permanent or pH-dependent electric charge. Such nanomaterials may impact cellular electrostatics, changing the ion balance, pH and membrane potential. Selective ion adsorption/exchange may alter the transmembrane electrochemical gradient, disrupting potential-dependent cellular processes. Cellular proteins as a rule have charged residues which can be effectively adsorbed on the surface of layered hydroxide based nanomaterials. The aim of this study is to attempt to shed some light on the possibility and mechanisms of protein "adhesion" an LDH nanosheet and to propose a new direction in anticancer medicine, based on physical impact and strong electrostatics. An unbiased molecular dynamics simulation was performed and the combined process free energy estimation (COPFEE) approach was used.

  16. Effects of the aspect ratio on the dye adsorption of ZnO nanorods grown by using a sonochemical method for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seok Cheol; Yun, Won Suk; Sohn, Sang Ho; Oh, Sang Jin

    2012-11-01

    Well-aligned ZnO nanorods for the photoelectrode of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were grown via a sonochemical method, and the effects of their aspect ratios on the dye adsorption in DSSCs were studied. The control of the aspect ratio of well-aligned ZnO nanorods was performed by tuning the mole concentration of zinc acetate dehydrate in the range of 0.04-0.06M. The dye amounts adsorbed in the ZnO nanorods were estimated from the UV-Visible absorbance by using the Beer-Lambert law. The efficiency of DSSCs with ZnO nanorods was measured to investigate the effects of the aspect ratio of the ZnO nanorods on the dye adsorption properties. A change in the aspect ratio of the ZnO nanorods was founded to yield a change in their dye adsorption ability, resulting in a change in the efficiency of the DSSCs.

  17. Biodegradation and adsorption of C1- and C2-phenanthrenes and C1- and C2-dibenzothiophenes in the presence of clay minerals: effect on forensic diagnostic ratios.

    PubMed

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Head, Ian M; Manning, David A C

    2014-07-01

    The impact of modified montmorillonites on adsorption and biodegradation of crude oil C1-phenanthrenes, C1-dibenzothiophenes, C2-phenanthrenes and C2-dibenzothiophenes was investigated in aqueous clay/oil microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. Consequently, the effect on C1-dibenzothiophenes/C1-phenanthrenes, C2-dibenzothiophenes/C2-phenanthrenes, 2+3-methyldibenzothiophene/4-methyldibenzothiophene and 1-methyldibenzothiophene/4-methyldibenzothiophene ratios commonly used as diagnostic ratios for oil forensic studies was evaluated. The clay mineral samples were treated to produce acid activated montmorillonite, organomontmorillonite and homoionic montmorillonite which were used in this study. The different clay minerals (modified and unmodified) showed varied degrees of biodegradation and adsorption of the C1-phenanthrenes, C1-dibenzothiophenes, C2-phenanthrenes and C2-dibenzothiophenes. The study indicated that as opposed to biodegradation, adsorption has no effect on the diagnostic ratios. Among the diagnostic ratios reviewed, only C2-dibenzothiophenes/C2-phenanthrenes ratio was neither affected by adsorption nor biodegradation making this ratio very useful in forensic studies of oil spills and oil-oil correlation.

  18. [Determination of butene-fipronil residue in dry samples by multiple adsorption synchronous purification-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ding, Liping; Guo, Jing; Zheng, Ling; Chen, Chuntian; Chen, Zhitao

    2013-08-01

    A method was developed for the determination of butene-fipronil residue in dry samples by multiple adsorption synchronous purification (MASP) -gas chromatography (GC) -mass spectrometry (MS). After extracted with 1% acetic acid-acetonitrile, the samples were pretreated with MASP method including extraction, salting-out and purification procedures, and analyzed with GC-MS under the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, and then quantified by matrix-match standard solution with external standard method. The results showed good linearity in the range of 2 - 100 microg/L with the correlation coefficients (r(2)) not less than 0.999. The average fortified recovery of butene-fipronil in samples was found in the range of 92.2% - 97.5% at three fortified levels from 2 to 10 microg/kg, with the relative standard deviations of 2.69% - 5.21% (n = 6). The limit of detection (S/N = 3) for butane-fipronil was 2 microg/kg and the limit of quantification (S/N = 10) was 6 microg/kg. The method is simple, rapid and accurate, and could be used for the routine analysis of butane-fipronil in dry samples. Meanwhile, the pyrolysis mechanism of butane-fipronil, as a new substance, is discussed. PMID:24369607

  19. Effects of grind size when alkaline treating corn residue and impact of ratio of alkaline-treated residue and distillers grains on performance of finishing cattle.

    PubMed

    Shreck, A L; Nuttelman, B L; Schneider, C J; Burken, D B; Harding, J L; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Cecava, M J

    2015-07-01

    Two studies were conducted to optimize use of alkaline-treated corn stover and wheat straw and distillers grains as partial corn replacements. In Exp. 1, a finishing experiment used 30 pens (12 steers/pen) of calf-fed steers (initial BW = 374 ± 23.9 kg) with a 2 × 2 + 1 factorial arrangement of treatments with 6 replications per treatment. Factors were grind size, where corn stover was processed through a 2.54- or 7.62-cm screen, and chemical treatment (corn stover either fed in native, non-treated form [NT; 93.4% DM] or alkaline treated [AT; 5% CaO hydrated to 50% DM]). No interactions (P ≥ 0.38) were noted between grind size and chemical treatment. Feeding AT compared with NT improved (P ≤ 0.02) final BW, ADG, and G:F. Reducing grind size improved (P ≤ 0.01) ADG and G:F, and no interaction with chemical treatment was observed. Steers fed AT had similar DMI, ADG, G:F, and carcass characteristics compared with a 5% roughage control that contained 15 percentage units (DM basis) more corn. In Exp. 2, 60 individually fed steers (initial BW = 402 ± 61.4 kg) were randomly assigned to 10 diets. Six treatments evaluated 10, 25, or 40% dry-rolled corn (DRC), which was replaced with either a 2:1 or 3:1 ratio (DM basis) of modified distillers grains plus solubles (MDGS) and treated corn stover analyzed as a 2 × 3 factorial. An additional 3 treatments were added where a 3:1 ratio of MDGS:straw were compared with a 3:1 ratio of MDGS:stover. As DRC increased, G:F (P = 0.06) quadratically increased for 3:1 MDGS:stover diets. Increasing DRC increased (P = 0.07) G:F in treated stover diets, regardless of ratio. Increasing DRC increased (P = 0.10) ADG for 3:1 ratios for both straw and stover. Reducing grind size, feeding a maximum of 20% treated crop residue, and maintaining at least 25% corn in the diet are strategies for optimizing cattle performance when replacing dry-rolled and high-moisture corn with treated crop residues and distillers grains. PMID:26440029

  20. Effects of grind size when alkaline treating corn residue and impact of ratio of alkaline-treated residue and distillers grains on performance of finishing cattle.

    PubMed

    Shreck, A L; Nuttelman, B L; Schneider, C J; Burken, D B; Harding, J L; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Cecava, M J

    2015-07-01

    Two studies were conducted to optimize use of alkaline-treated corn stover and wheat straw and distillers grains as partial corn replacements. In Exp. 1, a finishing experiment used 30 pens (12 steers/pen) of calf-fed steers (initial BW = 374 ± 23.9 kg) with a 2 × 2 + 1 factorial arrangement of treatments with 6 replications per treatment. Factors were grind size, where corn stover was processed through a 2.54- or 7.62-cm screen, and chemical treatment (corn stover either fed in native, non-treated form [NT; 93.4% DM] or alkaline treated [AT; 5% CaO hydrated to 50% DM]). No interactions (P ≥ 0.38) were noted between grind size and chemical treatment. Feeding AT compared with NT improved (P ≤ 0.02) final BW, ADG, and G:F. Reducing grind size improved (P ≤ 0.01) ADG and G:F, and no interaction with chemical treatment was observed. Steers fed AT had similar DMI, ADG, G:F, and carcass characteristics compared with a 5% roughage control that contained 15 percentage units (DM basis) more corn. In Exp. 2, 60 individually fed steers (initial BW = 402 ± 61.4 kg) were randomly assigned to 10 diets. Six treatments evaluated 10, 25, or 40% dry-rolled corn (DRC), which was replaced with either a 2:1 or 3:1 ratio (DM basis) of modified distillers grains plus solubles (MDGS) and treated corn stover analyzed as a 2 × 3 factorial. An additional 3 treatments were added where a 3:1 ratio of MDGS:straw were compared with a 3:1 ratio of MDGS:stover. As DRC increased, G:F (P = 0.06) quadratically increased for 3:1 MDGS:stover diets. Increasing DRC increased (P = 0.07) G:F in treated stover diets, regardless of ratio. Increasing DRC increased (P = 0.10) ADG for 3:1 ratios for both straw and stover. Reducing grind size, feeding a maximum of 20% treated crop residue, and maintaining at least 25% corn in the diet are strategies for optimizing cattle performance when replacing dry-rolled and high-moisture corn with treated crop residues and distillers grains.

  1. The ratio of clay content to total organic carbon content is a useful parameter to predict adsorption of the herbicide butachlor in soils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongzhen; He, Yan; Xu, Jianming; Huang, Panming; Jilani, Ghulam

    2008-03-01

    Thirteen soils collected from 11 provinces in eastern China were used to investigate the butachlor adsorption. The results indicated that the total organic carbon (TOC) content, clay content, amorphous Fe2O3 content, silt content, CEC, and pH had a combined effect on the butachlor sorption on soil. Combination of the data obtained from the 13 soils in the present study with other 23 soil samples reported by other researchers in the literature showed that Koc would be a poor predictive parameter for butachlor adsorption on soils with TOC content higher than 4.0% and lower than 0.2%. The soils with the ratio of clay content to TOC content (RCO) values less than 60 adsorbed butachlor mainly by the partition into soil organic matter matrix. The soils with RCO values higher than 60 apparently adsorbed butachlor by the combination of the partition into soil organic matter matrix and adsorption on clay surface.

  2. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  3. Water-quality characteristics, including sodium-adsorption ratios, for four sites in the Powder River drainage basin, Wyoming and Montana, water years 2001-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Melanie L.; Mason, Jon P.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, monitors streams throughout the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming and parts of Montana for potential effects of coalbed natural gas development. Specific conductance and sodium-adsorption ratios may be larger in coalbed waters than in stream waters that may receive the discharge waters. Therefore, continuous water-quality instruments for specific conductance were installed and discrete water-quality samples were collected to characterize water quality during water years 2001-2004 at four sites in the Powder River drainage basin: Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming; Crazy Woman Creek near Arvada, Wyoming; Clear Creek near Arvada, Wyoming; and Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. During water years 2001-2004, the median specific conductance of 2,270 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius (?S/cm) in discrete samples from the Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming, was larger than the median specific conductance of 1,930 ?S/cm in discrete samples collected downstream from the Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. The median specific conductance was smallest in discrete samples from Clear Creek (1,180 ?S/cm), which has a dilution effect on the specific conductance for the Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. The daily mean specific conductance from continuous water-quality instruments during the irrigation season showed the same spatial pattern as specific conductance values for the discrete samples. Dissolved sodium, sodium-adsorption ratios, and dissolved solids generally showed the same spatial pattern as specific conductance. The largest median sodium concentration (274 milligrams per liter) and the largest range of sodium-adsorption ratios (3.7 to 21) were measured in discrete samples from the Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming. Median concentrations of sodium and sodium-adsorption ratios were substantially smaller in Crazy Woman Creek and Clear Creek, which tend to

  4. Study of Fuel Ratios on the Fusion Reactivity in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device Using a Residual Gas Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupakar Murali, S.; Santarius, John F.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2009-09-01

    Gridded Inertial Electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices are of interest due to their flexibility in burning advanced fuels, their tuning ability of the applied voltage to the reaction cross-section. Although this device is not suitable for power production in its present form, it does have several near term applications. The number of applications of this device increases with increasing fusion reactivity. These devices are simple to operate but are inherently complicated to understand and an effort to incrementally understand the device to improve its operational efficiency is underway at University of Wisconsin, Madison. Of all the parameters under study we are focusing on the effects of flow rate and flow ratio on the fusion reactivity in the present paper. Experiments were conducted to understand the influence of fuel flow ratio on the fusion reactions. The residual gas analyzer (RGA) was used to study the impurity concentration as the flow ratio was changed. It was observed that the higher flow rate resulted in reduced impurity levels and hence an increase in fusion rate. Several different species of gases were detected, some of these molecules formed inside the RGA analyzer. The flow ratio scan revealed that the optimum mixture of D2 with 3He to be D2:3He::1:2 for maximum D-3He fusion rate.

  5. Adsorptive removal of oil spill from oil-in-fresh water emulsions by hydrophobic alumina nanoparticles functionalized with petroleum vacuum residue.

    PubMed

    Franco, Camilo A; Cortés, Farid B; Nassar, Nashaat N

    2014-07-01

    Oil spills on fresh water can cause serious environmental and economic impacts onshore activities affecting those who exploit freshwater resources and grassland. Alumina nanoparticles functionalized with vacuum residue (VR) were used as a low-cost and high hydrophobic nanosorbents. The nanomaterial resulting showed high adsorption affinity and capacity of oil from oil-in-freshwater emulsion. The effects of the following variables on oil removal were investigated, namely: contact times, solution pH, initial oil concentrations, temperature, VR loadings and salinity. Kinetic studies showed that adsorption was fast and equilibrium was achieved in less than 30 min. The amount adsorbed of oil was higher for neutral system compared to acidic or basic medium. Increasing the VR loading on nanoparticle surface favored the adsorption. Results of this study showed that oil removal for all systems evaluated had better performance at pH value of 7 using nano-alumina functionalized with 4 wt% VR. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics were evaluated using the Polanyi theory-based Dubinin-Ashtakhov (DA) model, and pseudo-first and pseudo-second order-models, respectively. PMID:24776679

  6. Adsorptive removal of oil spill from oil-in-fresh water emulsions by hydrophobic alumina nanoparticles functionalized with petroleum vacuum residue.

    PubMed

    Franco, Camilo A; Cortés, Farid B; Nassar, Nashaat N

    2014-07-01

    Oil spills on fresh water can cause serious environmental and economic impacts onshore activities affecting those who exploit freshwater resources and grassland. Alumina nanoparticles functionalized with vacuum residue (VR) were used as a low-cost and high hydrophobic nanosorbents. The nanomaterial resulting showed high adsorption affinity and capacity of oil from oil-in-freshwater emulsion. The effects of the following variables on oil removal were investigated, namely: contact times, solution pH, initial oil concentrations, temperature, VR loadings and salinity. Kinetic studies showed that adsorption was fast and equilibrium was achieved in less than 30 min. The amount adsorbed of oil was higher for neutral system compared to acidic or basic medium. Increasing the VR loading on nanoparticle surface favored the adsorption. Results of this study showed that oil removal for all systems evaluated had better performance at pH value of 7 using nano-alumina functionalized with 4 wt% VR. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics were evaluated using the Polanyi theory-based Dubinin-Ashtakhov (DA) model, and pseudo-first and pseudo-second order-models, respectively.

  7. Nitrous oxide emissions from yellow brown soil as affected by incorporation of crop residues with different carbon-to-nitrogen ratios: a case study in central China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan; Iqbal, Javed; Hu, Ronggui; Shaaban, Muhammad; Cai, Jianbo; Chen, Xi

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the influence of crop residues decomposition on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission, a field study was performed with application of crop residues with different C:N ratios in a bare yellow brown soil at the experimental station of Zhangjiachong at Zigui, China. We set up six experimental treatments: no crop residue (CK), rapeseed cake (RC), potato stalk (PS), rice straw (RS), wheat straw (WS), and corn straw (CS). The carbon (C) to nitrogen (N) ratios of these crop residues were 7.5, 32.9, 40.4, 65.7, and 90.9, respectively. Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured using a static closed chamber method. N2O emissions were significantly enhanced by incorporation of crop residues. Cumulative N2O emissions negatively correlated with C:N ratio (R (2) = 0.9821) of the crop residue, but they were positively correlated with average concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon. Nitrogen emission fraction, calculated as N2O-N emissions originated from the crop residues N, positively correlated with C:N ratio of the residues (P < 0.05). Soil temperature did, whereas soil moisture did not, control the residue's induced N2O emissions because a significant correlation (P < 0.01) existed between soil temperature and N2O emissions in all treatments except the control. In contrast, a significant relationship between soil moisture and N2O emissions was found in the control only. Furthermore, N2O emission significantly correlated (P < 0.05) with NO3 (-)-N, and NH4 (+)-N contents from all residue treatments. These results indicate that (1) crop residues with distinct carbon and nitrogen contents can significantly alter soil N2O flux rates; and (2) soil biotic as well as abiotic variables are critical in determining soil-atmospheric N2O emissions after crop residue incorporation into soil.

  8. Evaluation of critical current density and residual resistance ratio limits in powder in tube Nb3Sn conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Christopher; Tarantini, Chiara; Hawn Sung, Zu; Lee, Peter J.; Sailer, Bernd; Thoener, Manfred; Schlenga, Klaus; Ballarino, Amalia; Bottura, Luca; Bordini, Bernardo; Scheuerlein, Christian; Larbalestier, David C.

    2016-08-01

    High critical current density (J c) Nb3Sn A15 multifilamentary wires require a large volume fraction of small grain (SG), superconducting A15 phase, as well as Cu stabilizer with high Residual Resistance Ratio (RRR) to provide electromagnetic stabilization and protection. In powder-in-tube (PIT) wires the unreacted Nb7.5 wt%Ta outer layer of the tubular filaments acts as a diffusion barrier and protects the interfilamentary Cu stabilizer from Sn contamination. A high RRR requirement generally imposes a restricted A15 reaction heat treatment to prevent localized full reaction of the filament that could allow Sn to reach the Cu. In this study we investigate recent high quality PIT wires that achieve a J c (12 T, 4.2 K) up to ∼2500 A mm‑2 and find that the minimum diffusion barrier thickness decreases as the filament aspect ratio increases from ∼1 in the inner rings of filaments to 1.3 in the outer filament rings. We found that just 2–3 diffusion barrier breaches can degrade RRR from 300 to 150 or less. Using progressive etching of the Cu we also found that the RRR degradation is localized near the external filaments where deformation is highest. Consequently minimizing filament distortion during strand fabrication is important for reducing RRR degradation. The additional challenge of developing the highest possible J c must be addressed by forming the maximum fraction of high J c SG A15 and minimizing low J c large-grain (LG) A15 morphologies. In one wire we found that 15% of the filaments had a significantly enhanced SG/LG A15 ratio and no residual A15 in the core, a feature that opens a path to substantial J c improvement.

  9. Evaluation of critical current density and residual resistance ratio limits in powder in tube Nb3Sn conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Christopher; Tarantini, Chiara; Hawn Sung, Zu; Lee, Peter J.; Sailer, Bernd; Thoener, Manfred; Schlenga, Klaus; Ballarino, Amalia; Bottura, Luca; Bordini, Bernardo; Scheuerlein, Christian; Larbalestier, David C.

    2016-08-01

    High critical current density (J c) Nb3Sn A15 multifilamentary wires require a large volume fraction of small grain (SG), superconducting A15 phase, as well as Cu stabilizer with high Residual Resistance Ratio (RRR) to provide electromagnetic stabilization and protection. In powder-in-tube (PIT) wires the unreacted Nb7.5 wt%Ta outer layer of the tubular filaments acts as a diffusion barrier and protects the interfilamentary Cu stabilizer from Sn contamination. A high RRR requirement generally imposes a restricted A15 reaction heat treatment to prevent localized full reaction of the filament that could allow Sn to reach the Cu. In this study we investigate recent high quality PIT wires that achieve a J c (12 T, 4.2 K) up to ˜2500 A mm-2 and find that the minimum diffusion barrier thickness decreases as the filament aspect ratio increases from ˜1 in the inner rings of filaments to 1.3 in the outer filament rings. We found that just 2-3 diffusion barrier breaches can degrade RRR from 300 to 150 or less. Using progressive etching of the Cu we also found that the RRR degradation is localized near the external filaments where deformation is highest. Consequently minimizing filament distortion during strand fabrication is important for reducing RRR degradation. The additional challenge of developing the highest possible J c must be addressed by forming the maximum fraction of high J c SG A15 and minimizing low J c large-grain (LG) A15 morphologies. In one wire we found that 15% of the filaments had a significantly enhanced SG/LG A15 ratio and no residual A15 in the core, a feature that opens a path to substantial J c improvement.

  10. Evaluation of critical current density and residual resistance ratio limits in powder in tube Nb3Sn conductors

    DOE PAGES

    Segal, Christopher; Tarantini, Chiara; Sung, Zu Hawn; Lee, Peter J.; Sailer, Bernd; Thoener, Manfred; Schlenga, Klaus; Ballarino, Amalia; Bottura, Luca; Bordini, Bernardo; et al

    2016-06-10

    High critical current density (Jc) Nb3Sn A15 multifilamentary wires require a large volume fraction of small grain, superconducting A15 phase, as well as Cu stabilizer with high Residual Resistance Ratio (RRR) to provide electromagnetic stabilization and protection. In Powder-in-Tube (PIT) wires the unreacted Nb7.5wt.%Ta outer layer of the tubular filaments acts as a diffusion barrier and protects the interfilamentary Cu stabilizer from Sn contamination. A high RRR requirement generally imposes a restricted A15 reaction heat treatment (HT) to prevent localized full reaction of the filament that could allow Sn to reach the Cu. In this paper we investigate recent highmore » quality PIT wires that achieve a Jc(12 T, 4.2 K) up to ~2500 A/mm-2 and find that the minimum diffusion barrier thickness decreases as the filament aspect ratio increases from ~1 in the inner rings of filaments to 1.3 in the outer filament rings. We found that just 2-3 diffusion barrier breaches can degrade RRR from 300 to 150 or less. Using progressive etching of the Cu we also found that the RRR degradation is localized near the external filaments where deformation is highest. Consequently minimizing filament distortion during strand fabrication is important for reducing RRR degradation. The additional challenge of developing the highest possible Jc must be addressed by forming the maximum fraction of high Jc small-grain (SG) A15 and minimizing low Jc large-grain (LG) A15 morphologies. Finally, in one wire we found that 15% of the filaments had a significantly enhanced SG/LG A15 ratio and no residual A15 in the core, a feature that opens a path to substantial Jc improvement.« less

  11. Modelling soil sodium and potassium adsorption ratio (SPAR) in the immediate period after a grassland fire in Lithuania.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerda, Artemi; Misiūnė, Ieva

    2015-04-01

    The soil sodium and potassium adsorption ratio (SPAR) is an index that measures the amount of sodium and potassium adsorbed onto clay and organic matter surfaces, in relation to calcium and magnesium. Assess the potential of soil dispersion or flocculation, a process which has implication in soil hydraulic properties and erosion (Sarah, 2004). Depending on severity and the type of ash produced, fire can changes in the immediate period the soil nutrient status (Bodi et al. 2014). Ash releases onto soil surface a large amount of cations, due the high pH. Previous works showed that SPAR from ash slurries is higher than solutions produced from litter (Pereira et al., 2014a). Normally the spatial distribution of topsoil nutrients in the immediate period after the fire is very heterogeneous, due to the different impacts of fire. Thus it is important to identify the most accurate interpolation method in order to identify with better precision the impacts of fire on soil properties. The objective of this work is to test several interpolation methods. The study area is located in near Vilnius (Lithuania) at 54° 42' N, 25° 08 E, 158 masl. Four days after the fire it was designed a plot in a burned area with near Vilnius (Lithuania) at 54° 42' N, 25° 08 E, 158 masl. Twenty five samples were collected from the topsoil. The SPAR index was calculated according to the formula: (Na++K+)/(Ca2++Mg2+)1/2 (Sarah, 2004). Data followed the normal distribution, thus no transformation was required previous to data modelling. Several well know interpolation models were tested, as Inverse Distance to a Weight (IDW) with the power of 1, 2, 3 and 4, Radial Basis Functions (RBF), Inverse Multiquadratic (IMT), Multilog (MTG), Multiquadratic (MTQ), Natural Cubic Spline (NCS) and Thin Plate Spline (TPS) and Local Polynomial (LP) with the power of 1 and 2 and Ordinary Kriging. The best interpolator was the one which had the lowest Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) (Pereira et al., 2014b). The

  12. Variation of physicochemical properties of drinking water treatment residuals and Phoslock(®) induced by fulvic acid adsorption: Implication for lake restoration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Jiang, He-Long; Xu, Huacheng; Yin, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    The use of phosphorus (P) inactivating agents to reduce internal P loading from sediment for lake restoration has attracted increasing attention. Reasonably, the physicochemical properties of P inactivating agents may vary with the interference of various environmental factors, leading to the change of control effectiveness and risks. In this study, the effect of fulvic acid (FA) adsorption on the properties of two agents, drinking water treatment residuals (DWTRs) and Phoslock®, was investigated. The results showed that after adsorption, there was little change for the main structures of DWTRs and Phoslock®, but the thermostability of Phoslock®, as well as the particle size and settleability of the two agents decreased. The specific surface area and pore volume of DWTRs also decreased, while those of Phoslock® increased. Further analysis indicated that aluminum and iron in DWTRs were stable during FA adsorption, but a substantial increase of lanthanum release from Phoslock® was observed, in particular at first (P < 0.01). Moreover, the P immobilization capability of DWTRs had little change after FA adsorption, while the capability of Phoslock® after FA adsorption decreased in solutions (P < 0.001) and sediments (P < 0.1); interestingly, from the view of engineering application, the performance of Phoslock® was not substantially affected. Overall, each P inactivating agent had its own particular responses of the physicochemical properties to environment factors, and detailed investigations on the applicability of each agent were essential before practical application.

  13. A single amino acid residue determines the ratio of hydrolysis to transglycosylation catalyzed by β-glucosidases.

    PubMed

    Frutuoso, M A; Marana, S R

    2013-01-01

    The propensity to catalysis of transglycosylation of the β-glucosidase Tmβgly is higher than for Sfβgly. Moreover the propensity to catalysis of transglycosylation is directly proportional to the substrate concentration for Tmβgly, whereas for Sfβgly it is constant. For instance, 60% of a Tmβgly sample catalyzes transglycosylation reactions at 40 mM p-nitrophenyl β-glucoside, whereas only 40% is engaged in hydrolysis of this substrate. For Sfβgly the fraction involved in transglycosylation is only 30 %. In addition, 48 % of a Tmβgly sample catalyzes transglycosylation reactions at 8 mM methylumbelliferyl β-glucoside, whereas Sfβgly does not catalyze transglycosylation using this substrate. Interestingly, these Tmβgly properties were grafted into Sfβgly by a single replacement of a residue forming a channel involved in supplying the catalytic water molecules for attack on the covalent intermediate present in the reaction catalyzed by β-glucosidases. Hence a single residue determines the ratio of hydrolysis to transglycosylation reactions catalyzed by these β-glucosidases.

  14. Measured and Estimated Sodium-Adsorption Ratios for Tongue River and its Tributaries, Montana and Wyoming, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, M.R.; Nimick, David A.; Cleasby, Thomas E.; Kinsey, Stacy M.; Lambing, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The Tongue River drains an area of about 5,400 square miles and flows northward from its headwaters in the Bighorn National Forest of northeastern Wyoming to join the Yellowstone River at Miles City, Montana. Water from the Tongue River and its tributaries is extensively used for irrigation in both Wyoming and Montana. The Tongue River watershed contains vast coal deposits that are extracted at several surface mines. In some areas of the watershed, the coal beds also contain methane gas (coal-bed methane or natural gas), which has become the focus of intense exploration and development. Production of coal-bed methane requires the pumping of large volumes of ground water from the coal beds to reduce water pressure within the formation and release the stored gas. Water from the coal beds typically is high in sodium and low in calcium and magnesium, resulting in a high sodium-adsorption ratio (SAR). Disposal of ground water with high sodium concentrations into the Tongue River has the potential to increase salinity and SAR of water in the river, and potentially reduce the quality of water for irrigation purposes. This report documents SAR values measured in water samples collected at 12 monitoring sites in the Tongue River watershed and presents regression relations between specific conductance (SC) and SAR at each site for the years 2004-06. SAR in water samples was determined from laboratory-measured concentrations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium. The results of regression analysis indicated that SC and SAR were significantly related (p-values < 0.05) at most sites. The regression relations developed for most monitoring sites in the Tongue River watershed were used with continuous SC data to estimate daily SAR during the 2004 and 2005 irrigation seasons and to estimate 2006 provisional SAR values, which were displayed on the Web in real-time. Water samples were collected and analyzed from seven sites on the main stem of the Tongue River located at: (1) Monarch

  15. Comparative net energy ratio analysis of pellet produced from steam pretreated biomass from agricultural residues and energy crops

    DOE PAGES

    Shahrukh, Hassan; Oyedun, Adetoyese Olajire; Kumar, Amit; Ghiasi, Bahman; Kumar, Linoj; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2016-04-05

    Here, a process model was developed to determine the net energy ratio (NER) for production of pellets from steam pretreated agricultural residue (AR) and energy crop (i.e. switchgrass in this case). The NER is a ratio of the net energy output to the total net energy input from non-renewable energy sources into a system. Scenarios were developed to measure the effects of temperature and level of steam pretreatment on the NER of steam pretreated AR- and switch grass-based pellets. The NER for the base case at 6 kg h-1 is 1.76 and 1.37 for steam-pretreated AR- and switchgrass-based pellets, respectively.more » The reason behind the difference is that more energy is required to dry switchgrass pellets than AR pellets. The sensitivity analysis for the model shows that the optimum temperature for steam pretreatment is 160 C with 50% pretreatment (half the feedstock is pretreated, while the rest is undergoes regular pelletization). The uncertainty results for NER for steam pretreated AR and switch grass pellets are 1.62 ± 0.10 and 1.42 ± 0.11, respectively.« less

  16. Biochars prepared from anaerobic digestion residue, palm bark, and eucalyptus for adsorption of cationic methylene blue dye: characterization, equilibrium, and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Wan, Shungang; Luo, Wensui

    2013-07-01

    Biochars prepared from anaerobic digestion residue (BC-R), palm bark (BC-PB) and eucalyptus (BC-E) were used as sorbents for removal of cationic methylene blue dye (MB). The FE-SEM images indicated that the biochars have a well-developed pore structure, and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas of BC-R, BC-PB, and BC-E were 7.60, 2.46, and 10.35 m(2)g(-1), respectively. The efficiencies of MB removal in the samples with initial concentrations of 5 mg L(-1) at pH 7.0 and 40°C by BC-R, BC-PB, and BC-E after 2h were 99.5%, 99.3%, and 86.1%, respectively. Pseudo-second-order kinetics was the most suitable model for describing the adsorption of MB onto the biochars. The experimental data were best described by the Langmuir isotherm model, with a maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 9.50 mg g(-1) at 40°C for BC-R. The biochars produced from the three types of solid waste showed considerable potential for adsorption.

  17. Adsorptive removal of dye using biochar derived from residual algae after in-situ transesterification: Alternate use of waste of biodiesel industry.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Piyushi; Subramanian, K A; Dastidar, M G

    2016-11-01

    The primary aim of this present study was to utilize the residual biomass (DB) of Spirulina platensis algae, left after in-situ transesterification, for biochar preparation. This is a solid waste residue of biodiesel industry. The biochar (BC) prepared was examined for its capacity to adsorb congo red dye from the aqueous solution. The results were compared with other adsorbents used in the study such as commercial activated carbon (AC), original algae biomass (AB) and DB. The results of proximate analysis of BC showed the decrease in the percentage of volatile matter and an increase in fixed carbon content compared to DB. The physico-chemical properties of BC were studied using elemental analysis, SEM, FTIR and XRD techniques. The AC and BC adsorbents showed better performance in removing 85.4% and 82.6% of dye respectively from solution compared to AB (76.6%) and DB (78.1%). The effect of initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage and pH of solution on the adsorption phenomena was studied by conducting the batch adsorption experiments. The highest specific uptake for biochar was observed at acidic pH of 2 with 0.2 g/100 ml of adsorbent dosage and 90 mg/l of initial concentration. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted to three isotherms, namely Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin. Freundlich model proved to show the best suited results with value of correlation coefficient of 99.12%. Thus, the application of DB for production of biochar as potential adsorbent supports sustainability of algae biodiesel. PMID:27474901

  18. Adsorptive removal of dye using biochar derived from residual algae after in-situ transesterification: Alternate use of waste of biodiesel industry.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Piyushi; Subramanian, K A; Dastidar, M G

    2016-11-01

    The primary aim of this present study was to utilize the residual biomass (DB) of Spirulina platensis algae, left after in-situ transesterification, for biochar preparation. This is a solid waste residue of biodiesel industry. The biochar (BC) prepared was examined for its capacity to adsorb congo red dye from the aqueous solution. The results were compared with other adsorbents used in the study such as commercial activated carbon (AC), original algae biomass (AB) and DB. The results of proximate analysis of BC showed the decrease in the percentage of volatile matter and an increase in fixed carbon content compared to DB. The physico-chemical properties of BC were studied using elemental analysis, SEM, FTIR and XRD techniques. The AC and BC adsorbents showed better performance in removing 85.4% and 82.6% of dye respectively from solution compared to AB (76.6%) and DB (78.1%). The effect of initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage and pH of solution on the adsorption phenomena was studied by conducting the batch adsorption experiments. The highest specific uptake for biochar was observed at acidic pH of 2 with 0.2 g/100 ml of adsorbent dosage and 90 mg/l of initial concentration. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted to three isotherms, namely Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin. Freundlich model proved to show the best suited results with value of correlation coefficient of 99.12%. Thus, the application of DB for production of biochar as potential adsorbent supports sustainability of algae biodiesel.

  19. Coating morphology and surface composition of acrylic terpolymers with pendant catechol, OEG and perfluoroalkyl groups in varying ratio and the effect on protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Ji, Hua; Duan, Jiang; Tu, Haiyang; Zhang, Aidong

    2016-04-01

    This work aims at developing versatile low-biofouling polymeric coatings by using acrylic terpolymers (DOFs) that bear pendant catechol (D), oligo(ethylene glycol) (O), and perfluoroalkyl (F) groups in varying ratios. The polymers were endowed with the ability to form firmly coatings on virtually any surfaces and undergo surface microphase separation and self-assembly, as revealed by the surface enrichment of F pendants and the morphology variation from irregular solid domains to discrete crater-type aggregates of different size. The effect on protein adsorption was investigated using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and adhesive fibrinogen (Fib) as model proteins. The coating of DOF164 (low F content), which has morphology of discrete crater-type aggregates of ∼ 400 nm in size, adsorbed a least amount of protein but with a highest protein unit activity as determined by SPR and immunosorbent assay; whereas the coating of DOF1612 (high F content) showed a 12.3-fold higher adsorption capacity toward Fib. Interestingly, a 2.2-fold lower adsorption amount but with a 1.8-fold higher unit activity was found for Fib adsorbed on the DOF164 surface than on DOF250 (without F fraction), whose OEG segments being a widely recognized protein compatible material. The features of the DOF164 terpolymer presenting a robust coating ability and a minimal protein adsorption capacity while with a high protein unit activity suggest its potential application as a non-fouling surface-modifier for medical antifouling coatings and as a matrix material for selective protein immobilization and activity preservation in biosensor construction. PMID:26764109

  20. Selective adsorption mechanisms of antilipidemic and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug residues on functionalized silica-based porous materials in a mixed solute.

    PubMed

    Suriyanon, Nakorn; Permrungruang, Jutima; Kaosaiphun, Jidanan; Wongrueng, Aunnop; Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit; Punyapalakul, Patiparn

    2015-10-01

    The selective adsorption mechanisms of naproxen (NAP), acetaminophen (ACT), and clofibric acid (CFA) on silica-based porous materials were examined by single and mixed-batch adsorption. Effects of the types and densities of surface functional groups on adsorption capacities were determined, including the role of hydrophobic and hydrophilic dissolved organic matters (DOMs). Hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS), superparamagnetic HMS (HMS-SP) and SBA-15 were functionalized and applied as adsorbents. Compared with powdered activated carbon (PAC), amine-functionalized HMS had a better adsorption capacity for CFA, but PAC possessed a higher adsorption capacity for the other pharmaceuticals than HMS and its two derivatives. In contrast to PAC, the adsorption capacity of the mesoporous silicas varied with the solution pH, being highest at pH 5. Electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding were found to be the main mechanisms. Increase in grafted amine group density on silica surfaces can enhance the CFA adsorption capacity. Further, hydrophilic DOM can decrease CFA adsorption capacities on amino-grafted adsorbents by adsorption site competition, while hydrophobic DOM can interfere with CFA adsorption by the interaction between hydrophobic DOM and CFA. Finally, in a competitive adsorption study, the adsorption capacity of hydrophilic adsorbents for acidic pharmaceuticals varied with their pKa values.

  1. Selective adsorption mechanisms of antilipidemic and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug residues on functionalized silica-based porous materials in a mixed solute.

    PubMed

    Suriyanon, Nakorn; Permrungruang, Jutima; Kaosaiphun, Jidanan; Wongrueng, Aunnop; Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit; Punyapalakul, Patiparn

    2015-10-01

    The selective adsorption mechanisms of naproxen (NAP), acetaminophen (ACT), and clofibric acid (CFA) on silica-based porous materials were examined by single and mixed-batch adsorption. Effects of the types and densities of surface functional groups on adsorption capacities were determined, including the role of hydrophobic and hydrophilic dissolved organic matters (DOMs). Hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS), superparamagnetic HMS (HMS-SP) and SBA-15 were functionalized and applied as adsorbents. Compared with powdered activated carbon (PAC), amine-functionalized HMS had a better adsorption capacity for CFA, but PAC possessed a higher adsorption capacity for the other pharmaceuticals than HMS and its two derivatives. In contrast to PAC, the adsorption capacity of the mesoporous silicas varied with the solution pH, being highest at pH 5. Electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding were found to be the main mechanisms. Increase in grafted amine group density on silica surfaces can enhance the CFA adsorption capacity. Further, hydrophilic DOM can decrease CFA adsorption capacities on amino-grafted adsorbents by adsorption site competition, while hydrophobic DOM can interfere with CFA adsorption by the interaction between hydrophobic DOM and CFA. Finally, in a competitive adsorption study, the adsorption capacity of hydrophilic adsorbents for acidic pharmaceuticals varied with their pKa values. PMID:26025186

  2. Effects of Zeolite Structure and Si/Al Ratio on Adsorption Thermodynamics and Intrinsic Kinetics of Monomolecular Cracking and Dehydrogenation of Alkanes over Bronsted Acid Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janda, Amber Leigh

    butene products. Theoretical calculations suggest that this effect originates from the adsorption of isobutene at channel intersections, indicating that dehydrogenation occurs with stronger preference for these locations than does cracking. In order to analyze the effects of zeolite structure on monomolecular alkane activation reactions, it is necessary to separate the contributions of the adsorption and reaction steps to observed kinetics. A method is developed in Chapter 3 for obtaining the enthalpy and entropy changes for adsorption of n-alkanes from the gas phase onto Bronsted protons (DeltaH ads·H+ and DeltaSads·H+) using configurational-bias Monte Carlo (CBMC) simulations. In Chapter 4 the effects of zeolite structural confinement on n-butane cracking and dehydrogenation are characterized for zeolites that differ predominately in the size and abundance of cavities. Values of DeltaHads·H+ and DeltaSads·H+ are obtained from CBMC simulations and used to extract intrinsic rates and activation parameters. As DeltaS ads·H+ (a proxy for confinement) becomes more negative, DeltaH ‡int and DeltaS‡int decrease for terminal cracking and dehydrogenation when the channel topology (e.g., straight, sinusoidal) is fixed. This observation, as well as positive values for DeltaS‡int, indicate that the transition states for these reactions resemble the products. Finally, in Chapter 5 the influence of channel and cage topology on n-alkane adsorption are characterized for zeolites and zeotypes with one-dimensional pore systems. When cages are not present, DeltaHads·H+ and DeltaSads·H+ at fixed pore-limiting diameter (PLD; the diameter of the largest sphere that can traverse the pores) decrease in magnitude as the ratio of the smallest to largest channel diameter decreases and the pore become less circular. The higher entropy of alkanes in non-circular pores is attributed to greater freedom of movement and can cause the free energy to be lower in these environments relative

  3. Dynamics of Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) of linear chains consisting of n circular discs - Role of aspect ratio and departure from convexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelke, Pradip B.; Limaye, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    We study Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) of linear chains consisting of n circular discs on a two-dimensional continuum substrate. The study has been carried out for n = 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 25, 30, 50, 70, 100 and 300. For all values of n, instantaneous coverage, Θ(t), in late time regime, is found to approach to jammed state coverage, Θ(∞), in a power law fashion, Θ(∞) - Θ(t) ~ t- p. It is observed that, with the increase in n, the exponent p goes on decreasing from the value 0.33 for n = 2 to the value 0.20 for n = 20 and then again starts rising to reach the value of 0.33 for large n. It is also found that for n ≤ 20, the exponent p has near perfect correlation with the coefficient of departure from convexity. On the other hand the jammed state coverage Θ(∞) is found to depend both on the coefficient of departure from convexity as well as on the aspect ratio of the chain.

  4. Analysis of the biological response of endothelial and fibroblast cells cultured on synthetic scaffolds with various hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratios: influence of fibronectin adsorption and conformation.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Fernández, Alberto J; Unger, Ronald E; Peters, Kirsten; Halstenberg, Sven; Santos, Marina; Salmerón Sánchez, Manuel; Meseguer Dueñas, Jose Maria; Monleón Pradas, Manuel; Gómez Ribelles, Jose Luis; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2009-06-01

    In this study we developed polymer scaffolds intended as anchorage rings for cornea prostheses among other applications, and examined their cell compatibility. In particular, a series of interconnected porous polymer scaffolds with pore sizes from 80 to 110 microns were manufactured varying the ratio of hydrophobic to hydrophilic monomeric units along the polymer chains. Further, the effects of fibronectin precoating, a physiological adhesion molecule, were tested. The interactions between the normal human fibroblast cell line MRC-5 and primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with the scaffold surfaces were evaluated. Adhesion and growth of the cells was examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Whereas MRC-5 fibroblasts showed adhesion and spreading to the scaffolds without any precoating, HUVECs required a fibronectin precoating for adhesion and spreading. Although both cell types attached and spread on scaffold surfaces with a content of up to a 20% hydrophilic monomers, cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation increased with increasing hydrophobicity of the substrate. This effect is likely due to better adsorption of serum proteins to hydrophobic substrates, which then facilitate cell adhesion. In fact, atomic force microscopy measurements of fibronectin on surfaces representative of our scaffolds revealed that the amount of fibronectin adsorption correlated directly with the hydrophobicity of the surface. Besides cell adhesion we also examined the inflammatory state of HUVECs in contact with the scaffolds. Typical patterns of platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 expression were observed at intercellular boarders. HUVECs adhering on the scaffolds retained their proinflammatory response potential as shown by E-selectin mRNA expression after stimulation with lipopolyssacharide (LPS). The proinflammatory activation occurred in most of the cells, thus confirming the presence of a functionally intact endothelium. Little or no

  5. The Effects of Salinity and Sodium Adsorption Ratio on the Water Retention and Hydraulic Conductivity Curves of Soils From The Pampa del Tamarugal, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, M. S.; Munoz, J.; Suarez, F. I.; Fierro, V.; Moreno, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Pampa del Tamarugal is located in the Atacama Desert, the most arid desert of the world. It has important reserves of groundwater, which are probably fed by infiltration coming from the Andes Mountain, with groundwater levels fluctuating between 3 and 10-70 m below the land surface. In zones where shallow groundwater exists, the capillary rise allows to have a permanently moist vadose zone, which sustain native vegetation such as the Tamarugos (Prosopis tamarugo Phil.) and Algarrobos (Prosopis alba Griseb.). The native vegetation relies on the soil moisture and on the evaporative fluxes, which are controlled by the hydrodynamic characteristics of the soils. The soils associated to the salt flats of the Pampa del Tamarugal are a mixture of sands and clays, which have high levels of sulfates, chloride, carbonates, sodium, calcium, magnesium, and potassium, with high pH and electrical conductivity, and low organic matter and cationic exchange capacity. In this research, we are interested in evaluating the impact of salinity and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) on the hydrodynamic characteristics of the soil, i.e., water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves. Soils were collected from the Pampa del Tamarugal and brought to the laboratory for characterization. The evaporation method (HYPROP, UMS) was used to determine the water retention curve and the hydraulic conductivity curve was estimated combining the evaporation method with direct measurements using a variable head permeameter (KSAT, UMS). It was found that higher sodium concentrations increase the water retention capacity and decrease the soiĺs hydraulic conductivity. These changes occur in the moist range of the hydrodynamic characteristics. The soil's hydraulic properties have significant impact on evaporation fluxes, which is the mayor component of the water balance. Thus, it is important to quantify them and incorporate salt precipitation/dissolution effect on the hydrodynamic properties to correctly

  6. Analysis of household ignitable liquids and their post-combustion weathered residues using compound-specific gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Zeland; An, Yan; Konstantynova, Kateryna I; Jackson, Glen P

    2013-12-10

    The continuing rise in home and vehicular arson cases involving the use of ignitable liquids continues to be an area of concern for criminal and civil investigators. In this study, the compound-specific δ(13)C values of various components of four flammable household chemicals were measured using a single quadrupole mass spectrometer and an isotope ratio mass spectrometer as simultaneous detectors for a gas chromatograph. Whereas compound-specific carbon isotope ratios were able to discriminate between different sources of neat (pre-combustion) ignitable liquids, analyses of the post-combustion residues were problematic. Weathering caused by combustion resulted in a significant increase in the (13)C content of specific peaks relative to the neat liquids (i.e. less negative delta values) such that the isotopic comparison of pre- and post-combustion residues resulted in fractionation ranging from 0 to +10‰. Because of the current lack of understanding of isotopic fractionation during combustion, and because of problems encountered with co-elution in the more complex samples, compound-specific IRMS does not appear to be suitable for fire debris analysis. The comparison of non-combusted or non-weathered ignitable liquids is much more reliable, especially for relatively simple mixtures, and is best suited for exclusionary purposes until such time as a comprehensive database of samples is developed. Without a measure of the population variance, one cannot presently predict the false positive identification rate for the comparison of two ignitable liquids; i.e. the probability that two random ignitable liquid samples have indistinguishable isotope ratios. PMID:24314542

  7. Comparative studies on adsorptive removal of heavy metal ions by biosorbent, bio-char and activated carbon obtained from low cost agro-residue.

    PubMed

    Kırbıyık, Çisem; Pütün, Ayşe Eren; Pütün, Ersan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Fe(III) and Cr(III) metal ion adsorption processes were carried out with three adsorbents in batch experiments and their adsorption performance was compared. These adsorbents were sesame stalk without pretreatment, bio-char derived from thermal decomposition of biomass, and activated carbon which was obtained from chemical activation of biomass. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared techniques were used for characterization of adsorbents. The optimum conditions for the adsorption process were obtained by observing the influences of solution pH, adsorbent dosage, initial solution concentration, contact time and temperature. The optimum adsorption efficiencies were determined at pH 2.8 and pH 4.0 for Fe(III) and Cr(III) metal ion solutions, respectively. The experimental data were modelled by different isotherm models and the equilibriums were well described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetic, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich models were applied to analyze the kinetic data and to evaluate rate constants. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model gave a better fit than the others. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy change ΔG°, standard enthalpy change ΔH° and standard entropy change ΔS° were evaluated. The thermodynamic study showed the adsorption was a spontaneous endothermic process. PMID:26819399

  8. Separation of soybean saponins from soybean meal by a technology of foam fractionation and resin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianxing; Wu, Zhaoliang; Liu, Wei; Gao, Yanfei; Guo, Shenghao; Kang, Shufang

    2016-05-18

    Foam fractionation and resin adsorption were used to recover soybean saponins from the industrial residue of soybean meal. First, a two-stage foam fractionation technology was studied for concentrating soybean saponins from the leaching liquor. Subsequently, resin adsorption was used to purify soybean saponins from the foamate in foam fractionation. The results showed that the enrichment ratio, the recovery percentage, and the purity of soybean saponins by using the two-stage foam fractionation technology could reach 4.45, 74%, and 67%, respectively. After resin adsorption and desorption, the purity of soybean saponins in the freeze-dried powder from the desorption solution was 88.4%.

  9. The atherogenic dyslipidemia ratio [log(TG)/HDL-C] is associated with residual vascular risk, beta-cell function loss and microangiopathy in type 2 diabetes females

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherogenic dyslipidemia (AD), defined as low HDL-C plus elevated triglycerides (TG), comorbid to T2DM, increases cardiometabolic risk for CAD even when LDL-C is at target. In T2DM males, AD was shown to correlate with β-cell function loss, yet it is not established whether this applies across gender. Aim To establish the prevalence and severity of AD in T2DM females, and to determine how it relates to cardiometabolic phenotype, glucose homeostasis, micro- and macrovascular complications, and 10-year absolute CV risk (UKPDS Risk Engine). Methods 340 T2DM females were ranked according to quintiles (Q) of the continuous variable log(TG)/HDL-C, with AD prevalence defined as HDL-C <50 mg.dL-1 plus TG ≥150 mg.dL-1, and β-cell function assessed with HOMA. Results AD prevalence was 35%; mean HDL-C and TG were 52 (15) and 160 (105) mg.dL-1. AD was significantly related to central fat, metabolic syndrome, sedentarity and skeletal sarcopenia, as well as to hsCRP, fibrinogen, uric acid, cystatin-C, Big ET-1, and 10-year UKPDS CV risk. AD correlated stepwise with lower β-cell function and hyperbolic product, and with accelerated loss of residual insulin secretion, higher HbA1c and prevalent microangiopathy. Conclusions log(TG)/HDL-C is a simple means to grade AD and residual macrovascular risk in T2DM females. This ratio associates with major non-LDL cardiometabolic variables and ranks predicted CAD risk. In addition, log(TG)/HDL-C identifies worsening glucose homeostasis, poorer glycemic control, and prevalent microangiopathy. PMID:23046637

  10. Adsorptive removal of fluoride from aqueous medium using a fixed bed column packed with Zr(IV) loaded dried orange juice residue.

    PubMed

    Paudyal, Hari; Pangeni, Bimala; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Ohto, Keisuke; Alam, Shafiq

    2013-10-01

    The potential of the adsorbent prepared from DOJR marketed as cattle food in Japan was identified as an efficient and low cost adsorbent for fluoride using fixed bed column. DOJR was loaded with Zr(IV) ions to develop active adsorption sites for fluoride. Fluoride adsorption performance of column packed with Zr(IV) loaded DOJR was assessed under variable operating conditions such as Zr(IV) loading temperature, initial fluoride concentration, bed depth, initial pH, and flow rate. Breakthrough curve modeling showed that Thomas and bed depth service time (BDST) models were in good agreement with the experimental data. Application of adsorbent investigated in this study to the treatment of actual waste plating solution containing fluoride ion showed successful removal below acceptable standard in Japan using a fixed bed column, hence, Zr(IV)-DOJR can be expected to be a promising candidate for the treatment waste water containing trace amount of fluoride ion in fixed bed column. PMID:23916190

  11. Cadmium(II) adsorption on Cladophora crispata in batch stirred reactors in series

    SciTech Connect

    Oezer, A.; Oezer, D.; Dursun, G.; Bulak, S.

    1999-06-01

    In this study, the adsorption of cadmium(II) ions onto Cladophora crispata was investigated in a two-staged batch reactor. The sorption phenomenon was expressed by the Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms and these expressions were used for the calculation of the equilibrium value of the residual cadmium(II) concentration at each stage. The experimental equilibrium values were compared with the values obtained from Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm equations. These results showed that the increase in biomass quantity or the increase of X{sub {omicron}}/V{sub {omicron}} ratios affected the quantities of cadmium removed from aqueous solution.

  12. Pesticide residue analysis by off-line SPE and on-line reversed-phase LC-GC using the through-oven-transfer adsorption/desorption interface.

    PubMed

    Perez, M; Alario, J; Vazquez, A; Villén, J

    2000-02-15

    A new method to determine pesticide residue in water is presented. The described method includes using off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) and on-line reversed-phase liquid chromatography-gas chromatography (RPLC-GC). An interface, based on a modified programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) injector, packed with a suitable trapping material, is used for on-line RPLC-GC. The changes made in the PTV injector affect the pneumatic system, sample introduction, and solvent elimination. The new interface is easily capable of automation. Methanol/wate (70/30) is used as the eluent in the LC preseparation step. The LC column flow during elution is different from the flow during the transfer step. The transferred volumes range from 500 to 1400 microL (volume of the fractions of interest). Solvent elimination is almost 100% before the sample reaches the GC column. The described system does not show any variation of the peak retention times. The detection limit for real samples ranges from 0.04 to 1.5 ng/L, using NP detection.

  13. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  14. Immunoglobulin heavy/light chain ratios improve paraprotein detection and monitoring, identify residual disease and correlate with survival in multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, H; Milosavljevic, D; Zojer, N; Faint, J M; Bradwell, A R; Hübl, W; Harding, S J

    2013-01-01

    The novel heavy/light chain (HLC) assay was used for the detection and measurement of monoclonal immunoglobulins, response evaluation and prognostication. This test allows identification and quantification of the different light chain types of each immunoglobulin class (for example, IgGκ and IgGλ) and enables calculation of ratios of monoclonal/polyclonal immunoglobulin (HLC ratio). Sequential sera of 156 patients with IgG or IgA myeloma started on first-line therapy and followed for a median of 46.1 months were analyzed. Results were compared with those obtained with conventional techniques (serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP), immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE), nephelometry (NEPH), and the free light chain test (FLC)). Our data show that the HLC assay allowed quantification of monoclonal proteins not accurately measurable by SPEP or NEPH. When both HLC and FLC testing were applied for response assessment, clonal excess was noted in 14/31 patients with complete response (CR). HLC ratio indicated presence of disease in 8/31 patients who achieved CR and, in sequential studies indicated evolving relapse in three patients before IFE became positive. Highly abnormal HLC ratios at presentation were significantly associated with shorter overall survival (40.5 months vs median not reached, P=0.016). Multivariate analysis revealed HLC ratio (P=0.03) and β2-microglobulin (P<0.01) as independent risk factors for survival. PMID:22955329

  15. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  16. ADSORPTIVE MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES: MEDIA SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on six items to be considered when selecting an adsorptive media for removing arsenic from drinking water; performance, EBCT, pre-treatment, regeneration, residuals, and cost. Each item is discussed in general and data and photographs from th...

  17. Modelling and understanding the competitive adsorption of microcystins and tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Campinas, Margarida; Viegas, Rui M C; Rosa, Maria João

    2013-10-01

    A predictive model integrating adsorption kinetics and competitive isotherm models (Homogeneous Surface Diffusion Model, Freundlich-type and Fritz & Schlünder isotherms) was developed to describe and understand the competing mechanism(s) and the ionic strength (IS) role on microcystins (MC) and tannic acid (TA) competitive adsorption. The developed model showed good agreement with the experimental data obtained from batch adsorption tests and isotherms conducted with MC extracts and TA model solutions (single-solute and multicomponent, IS presence and absence) using a mesoporous powdered activated carbon (PAC). Results confirm that similar size molecules such as MC and TA are strong competitors and tannin-rich waters may severely affect MC residuals in the treated water. Unlike usually considered, both direct site and pore blockage mechanisms seem relevant. Competition effects appear to be more dependent on the competitor/contaminant molar ratio than on the initial concentrations. The IS affects the extent and the mechanisms of MC-TA competitive adsorption, reducing PAC dose for safe control of MC residuals. The developed model, including a Ds analysis, is an important tool to understand the competitive adsorption of similar size adsorbates. PMID:23880216

  18. Surface Curvature Relation to Protein Adsorption for Carbon-based Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zonglin; Yang, Zaixing; Chong, Yu; Ge, Cuicui; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Bell, David R.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-06-01

    The adsorption of proteins onto carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) is dictated by hydrophobic and π-π interactions between aliphatic and aromatic residues and the conjugated CBN surface. Accordingly, protein adsorption is highly sensitive to topological constraints imposed by CBN surface structure; in particular, adsorption capacity is thought to increase as the incident surface curvature decreases. In this work, we couple Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations with fluorescence spectroscopy experiments to characterize this curvature dependence in detail for the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). By studying BSA adsorption onto carbon nanotubes of increasing radius (featuring descending local curvatures) and a flat graphene sheet, we confirm that adsorption capacity is indeed enhanced on flatter surfaces. Naïve fluorescence experiments featuring multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), however, conform to an opposing trend. To reconcile these observations, we conduct additional MD simulations with MWCNTs that match those prepared in experiments; such simulations indicate that increased mass to surface area ratios in multi-walled systems explain the observed discrepancies. In reduction, our work substantiates the inverse relationship between protein adsorption capacity and surface curvature and further demonstrates the need for subtle consideration in experimental and simulation design.

  19. New field-based agricultural biomass burning trace gas, PM2.5, and black carbon emission ratios and factors measured in situ at crop residue fires in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianran; Wooster, Martin J.; Green, David C.; Main, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Despite policy attempts to limit or prevent agricultural burning, its use to remove crop residues either immediately after harvest (e.g. field burning of wheat stubble) or after subsequent crop processing (e.g. "bonfires" of rice straw and rapeseed residues) appears to remain widespread across parts of China. Emission factors for these types of small but highly numerous fire are therefore required to fully assess their impact on atmospheric composition and air pollution. Here we describe the design and deployment of a new smoke measurement system for the close-range sampling of key gases and particles within smoke from crop residue fires, using it to assess instantaneous mixing ratios of CO and CO2 and mass concentrations of black carbon (BC) and PM2.5 from wheat stubble, rice straw, and rapeseed residue fires. Using data of our new smoke sampling system, we find a strong linear correlation between the PM2.5 mass and BC, with very high PM2.5 to BC emission ratios found in the smouldering phase (up to 80.7 mg m-3.(mg m-3)-1) compared to the flaming phase (2.0 mg m-3.(mg m-3)-1). We conclude that the contribution of BC to PM2.5 mass was as high as 50% in the flaming phase of some burns, whilst during smouldering it sometimes decreased to little over one percent. A linear mixing model is used to quantify the relative contribution of each combustion phase to the overall measured smoke composition, and we find that flaming combustion dominated the total emission of most species assessed. Using time series of trace gas concentrations from different fire cases, we calculated 'fire integrated' trace gas emission factors (EFs) for wheat, rice and rapeseed residue burns as 1739 ± 19 g kg-1, 1761 ± 30 g kg-1and 1704 ± 27 g kg-1 respectively for CO2, and 60 ± 12 g kg-1, 47 ± 19 g kg-1 and 82 ± 17 g kg-1 respectively for CO. Where comparisons were possible, our EFs agreed well with those derived via a simultaneously-deployed open path Fourier transform infrared (OP

  20. Field determination of biomass burning emission ratios and factors via open-path FTIR spectroscopy and fire radiative power assessment: headfire, backfire and residual smouldering combustion in African savannahs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, M. J.; Freeborn, P. H.; Archibald, S.; Oppenheimer, C.; Roberts, G. J.; Smith, T. E. L.; Govender, N.; Burton, M.; Palumbo, I.

    2011-02-01

    Biomass burning emissions factors are vital to quantifying trace gases releases from vegetation fires. Here we evaluate emissions factors for a series of savannah fires in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa using ground-based open path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and an infrared lamp separated by 150-250 m distance. Molecular abundances along the extended open path are retrieved using a spectral forward model coupled to a non-linear least squares fitting approach. We demonstrate derivation of trace gas column amounts for horizontal paths transecting the width of the advected plume, and find, for example, that CO mixing ratio changes of ~0.001 μmol mol-1 (~10 ppbv) can be detected across the relatively long optical paths used here. We focus analysis on five key compounds whose production is preferential during the pyrolysis (CH2O), flaming (CO2) and smoldering (CO, CH4, NH3) fire phases. We demonstrate that well constrained emissions ratios for these gases to both CO2 and CO can be derived for the backfire, headfire and residual smouldering combustion stages of these savannah fires, from which stage-specific emission factors can then be calculated. Headfires and backfires in general show similar emission ratios and emission factors, but those of the residual smouldering combustion stage can differ substantially (e.g., ERCH4/CO2 up to ~7 times higher than for the flaming stages). The timing of each fire stage was identified via airborne optical and thermal IR imagery and ground-observer reports, with the airborne IR imagery also used to derive estimates of fire radiative energy, thus allowing the relative amount of fuel burned in each stage to be calculated and the "fire averaged" emission ratios and emission factors to be determined. The derived "fire averaged" emission ratios are dominated by the headfire contribution, since the vast majority of the fuel is burned in this stage. Our fire averaged emission ratios and factors for CO2 and CH4

  1. Preparation of zeolite NaA for CO2 capture from nickel laterite residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tao; Liu, Li-ying; Xiao, Penny; Che, Shuai; Wang, He-ming

    2014-08-01

    Zeolite NaA was successfully prepared from nickel laterite residue for the first time via a fusion-hydrothermal procedure. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized zeolite NaA were characterized with a range of experimental techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. It was revealed that the structures of the produced zeolites were dependent on the molar ratios of the reactants and hydrothermal reaction conditions, so the synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain pure zeolite NaA. Adsorption of nitrogen and carbon dioxide on the prepared zeolite NaA was also measured and analyzed. The results showed that zeolite NaA could be prepared with reasonable purity, it had physicochemical properties comparable with zeolite NaA made from other methods, and it had excellent gas adsorption properties, thus demonstrating that zeolite NaA could be prepared from nickel laterite residue.

  2. Microwave-assisted preparation and adsorption performance of activated carbon from biodiesel industry solid reside: influence of operational parameters.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-01-01

    Preparation of activated carbon has been attempted using KOH as activating agent by microwave heating from biodiesel industry solid residue, oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFBAC). The significance of chemical impregnation ratio (IR), microwave power and activation time on the properties of activated carbon were investigated. The optimum condition has been identified at the IR of 1.0, microwave power of 600 W and activation time of 7 min. EFBAC was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement, determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue as dye model compound. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 395.30 mg/g and carbon yield of 73.78%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume were corresponding to 1372 m2/g and 0.76 cm3/g, respectively.

  3. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided.

  4. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-06-15

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided. 5 figs.

  5. Modeling the adsorption of mixed gases based on pure gas adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, N.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption-based Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers usually operate with pure gases. A sorption-based compressor has many benefits; however, it is limited by the pressure ratios it can provide. Using a mixed-refrigerant (MR) instead of a pure refrigerant in JT cryocoolers allows working at much lower pressure ratios. Therefore, it is attractive using MRs in sorption- based cryocoolers in order to reduce one of its main limitations. The adsorption of mixed gases is usually investigated under steady-state conditions, mainly for storage and separation processes. However, the process in a sorption compressor goes through various temperatures, pressures and adsorption concentrations; therefore, it differs from the common mixed gases adsorption applications. In order to simulate the sorption process in a compressor a numerical analysis for mixed gases is developed, based on pure gas adsorption characteristics. The pure gas adsorption properties have been measured for four gases (nitrogen, methane, ethane, and propane) with Norit-RB2 activated carbon. A single adsorption model is desired to describe the adsorption of all four gases. This model is further developed to a mixed-gas adsorption model. In future work more adsorbents will be tested using these four gases and the adsorption model will be verified against experimental results of mixed-gas adsorption measurements.

  6. Field determination of biomass burning emission ratios and factors via open-path FTIR spectroscopy and fire radiative power assessment: headfire, backfire and residual smouldering combustion in African savannahs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, M. J.; Freeborn, P. H.; Archibald, S.; Oppenheimer, C.; Roberts, G. J.; Smith, T. E. L.; Govender, N.; Burton, M.; Palumbo, I.

    2011-11-01

    Biomass burning emissions factors are vital to quantifying trace gas release from vegetation fires. Here we evaluate emissions factors for a series of savannah fires in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa using ground-based open path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and an IR source separated by 150-250 m distance. Molecular abundances along the extended open path are retrieved using a spectral forward model coupled to a non-linear least squares fitting approach. We demonstrate derivation of trace gas column amounts for horizontal paths transecting the width of the advected plume, and find for example that CO mixing ratio changes of ~0.01 μmol mol-1 [10 ppbv] can be detected across the relatively long optical paths used here. Though FTIR spectroscopy can detect dozens of different chemical species present in vegetation fire smoke, we focus our analysis on five key combustion products released preferentially during the pyrolysis (CH2O), flaming (CO2) and smoldering (CO, CH4, NH3) processes. We demonstrate that well constrained emissions ratios for these gases to both CO2 and CO can be derived for the backfire, headfire and residual smouldering combustion (RSC) stages of these savannah fires, from which stage-specific emission factors can then be calculated. Headfires and backfires often show similar emission ratios and emission factors, but those of the RSC stage can differ substantially. The timing of each fire stage was identified via airborne optical and thermal IR imagery and ground-observer reports, with the airborne IR imagery also used to derive estimates of fire radiative energy (FRE), allowing the relative amount of fuel burned in each stage to be calculated and "fire averaged" emission ratios and emission factors to be determined. These "fire averaged" metrics are dominated by the headfire contribution, since the FRE data indicate that the vast majority of the fuel is burned in this stage. Our fire averaged emission ratios and factors

  7. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  8. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively.

  9. Adsorption of thorium from aqueous solutions by perlite.

    PubMed

    Talip, Z; Eral, M; Hiçsönmez, U

    2009-02-01

    The use of expanded perlite for the adsorption of thorium from aqueous solution by batch technique is presented. The effects of particle size, pH of the solution, initial thorium concentration, shaking time, V/m ratio and temperature were determined. It was found that the adsorption capacity increases by the increase in the pH of the suspensions. The rate of thorium adsorption on expanded perlite was observed to be fast in the first hour of the reaction time. Adsorption isotherms were expressed by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models and the adsorption experiments conducted at 30 +/- 1 degrees C showed that the adsorption isotherms correlated well with the Langmuir model. From the adsorption data, thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG(o), DeltaH(o) and DeltaS(o) were calculated as a function of temperature.

  10. Random sequential adsorption of trimers and hexamers.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-12-01

    Adsorption of trimers and hexamers built of identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Particles were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Numerical simulations allowed us to determine the maximal random coverage ratio, RSA kinetics as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining the kinetics of the adsorption process obtained experimentally. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured. All the results were compared with previous results obtained for spheres, dimers and tetramers.

  11. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solutions by perlite.

    PubMed

    Mathialagan, T; Viraraghavan, T

    2002-10-14

    The present study examined the use of perlite for the removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions. The effects of pH and contact time on the adsorption process were examined. The optimum pH for adsorption was found to be 6.0. Residual cadmium concentration reached equilibrium in 6h and the rate of cadmium adsorption by perlite was rapid in the first hour of the reaction time. Ho's pseudo-second-order model best described the kinetics of the reaction. Batch adsorption experiments conducted at room temperature (22+/-1 degrees C) showed that the adsorption pattern followed the Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum removal of cadmium obtained from batch studies was 55%. Thomas model was used to describe the adsorption data from column studies. The results generally showed that perlite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for cadmium removal from aqueous solutions.

  12. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  13. Optimizing production of hydroxyapatite from alkaline residue for removal of Pb2+ from wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yubo; Wang, YanPeng; Sun, Xiuyun; Li, Jiansheng; Shen, Jinyou; Han, Weiqing; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Lianjun

    2014-10-01

    Alkaline residue, a common solid waste generated from the ammonia-soda process for the production of soda ash, has been converted into hydroxyapatite for Pb2+ removal from wastewater. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the preparation conditions which were Ca/P (molar ratio), reaction temperature and reaction time, with the Pb2+ removal percentage as targeted response. The optimum conditions were identified to be Ca/P of 1.29, reaction temperature of 165.87 °C and reaction time of 14.5 h. Batch tests were conducted to evaluate the adsorption performance of optimum adsorbent (O-HAP), and the adsorption data were analyzed with different kinetic and isotherm models. The results showed that the pseudo-second order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model could best describe the adsorption of Pb2+ on O-HAP. The maximum adsorption capacity calculated from Langmuir equation was 1429 mg/g, which was greater than other familiar adsorbents. The MINTEQ results predicted that the formation of different Pb precipitates was the main mechanism in Pb2+ removal process, which was in good agreement with the kinetic and thermodynamic studies and were confirmed by the SEM-EDS and XRD analysis. In addition to aqueous medium, the O-HAP also could efficiently immobilize Pb2+ from contaminated soil.

  14. Blast furnace residues for arsenic removal from mining-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Pedroza, Fco Raúl; Soria-Aguilar, Ma de Jesús; Martínez-Luevanos, Antonia; Narvaez-García, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    In this work, blast furnace (BF) residues were well characterized and then evaluated as an adsorbent material for arsenic removal from a mining-contaminated groundwater. The adsorption process was analysed using the theories of Freundlich and Langmuir. BF residues were found to be an effective sorbent for As (V) ions. The modelling of adsorption isotherms by empirical models shows that arsenate adsorption is fitted by the Langmuir model, suggesting a monolayer adsorption of arsenic onto adsorbents. Arsenate adsorption onto BF residue is explained by the charge density surface affinity and by the formation of Fe (II) and Fe (III) corrosion products onto BF residue particles. The results indicate that BF residues represent an attractive low-cost absorbent option for the removal of arsenic in wastewater treatment.

  15. Adsorption of ferrous ions onto montmorillonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dawei; Niu, Xia; Qiao, Min; Liu, Gang; Li, Hongxin; Meng, Zhenxiao

    2015-04-01

    The adsorption of Fe (II) onto montmorillonites was investigated through initial concentration, contact time, pH and temperature. During the whole adsorption process, the ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) was added as a kind of antioxidant, at the same time, deionized water (after boiling) and nitrogen protection were also used to avoid oxidation. The Fe2+/Fetotal ratio of the iron exists in the Fe-montmorillonites was found more than 95%. Two kinetic models, including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model, were used to analyze the adsorption process of Fe (II) on montmorillonites. The results of our study showed that adsorption process fitted with pseudo-second-order well. Adsorption isotherms showed that Langmuir model was better than Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters ΔG0 and ΔH0 were 3.696 kJ/mol and 6.689 kJ/mol (we just gave the values at 298 K), respectively. The positive values at different temperatures showed that the adsorption process was non-spontaneous and endothermic. The characteristics of materials were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Surface area and porosity analyzer, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and Zeta potential distribution.

  16. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  17. The distribution of nitrogen species and adsorption of ammonium in sediments from the tidal Potomac River and estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.; Kennedy, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of dissolved ammonium, adsorbed ammonium and residual, organic and total nitrogen was measured in Potomac River tidal, transition zone and lower estuary sediments to a depth of 66 cm. For these sediments, exchangeable ammonium, and thereby adsorbed ammonium concentrations, were determined directly using an ammonia electrode in alkaline sediment suspensions. Ammonia electrode data were comparable to data obtained by KCl extraction of fresh sediment. The conventional unitless ammonium adsorption coefficient, calculated as the slope of the regression line drawn when sediment-adsorbed ammonium (??mol g-1 dry wt of sediment) is plotted against interstitial water ammonium (??mol g-1 dry wt sediment), is 1??5 for this system. When a modified ammonium adsorption coefficient is calculated from sediment-adsorbed ammonium concentrations and a ratio of interstitial water ammonium and potassium concentrations, the regression equation through the data has a zero intercept and is more nearly linear than the regression equation of data based on conventional calculations. The use of a ratio including ammonium and potassium concentrations in the interstitial water term takes into account ionic strength variations in the estuary and competition between ammonium and potassium for adsorption sites. ?? 1987.

  18. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that the GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.

  19. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that themore » GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.« less

  20. On tide-induced lagrangian residual current and residual transport: 1. Lagrangian residual current

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Shizuo; Cheng, Ralph T.; Pangen, Xi

    1986-01-01

    Residual currents in tidal estuaries and coastal embayments have been recognized as fundamental factors which affect the long-term transport processes. It has been pointed out by previous studies that it is more relevant to use a Lagrangian mean velocity than an Eulerian mean velocity to determine the movements of water masses. Under weakly nonlinear approximation, the parameter k, which is the ratio of the net displacement of a labeled water mass in one tidal cycle to the tidal excursion, is assumed to be small. Solutions for tides, tidal current, and residual current have been considered for two-dimensional, barotropic estuaries and coastal seas. Particular attention has been paid to the distinction between the Lagrangian and Eulerian residual currents. When k is small, the first-order Lagrangian residual is shown to be the sum of the Eulerian residual current and the Stokes drift. The Lagrangian residual drift velocity or the second-order Lagrangian residual current has been shown to be dependent on the phase of tidal current. The Lagrangian drift velocity is induced by nonlinear interactions between tides, tidal currents, and the first-order residual currents, and it takes the form of an ellipse on a hodograph plane. Several examples are given to further demonstrate the unique properties of the Lagrangian residual current.

  1. Database for protein adsorption: update on developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszek, Ewa; Vasina, Elena N.; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2008-12-01

    Protein adsorption at solid-liquid interfaces is critical to many applications, including biomaterials, protein microarrays and lab-on-a-chip devices. Despite this general interest, and a large amount of research in the last half a century, protein adsorption cannot be predicted with an engineering level, design-orientated accuracy. Here we describe a Biomolecular Adsorption Database (BAD), freely available online, which archives the published protein adsorption data. Piecewise linear regression with breakpoint applied to the data in the BAD suggests that the input variables to protein adsorption, i.e., protein concentration in solution; protein descriptors derived from primary structure (number of residues, protein hydrophobicity and spread of amino acid hydrophobicity, isoelectric point); surface descriptors (contact angle); and fluid environment descriptors (pH, ionic strength), correlate well with the output variable - the protein concentration on the surface. Furthermore, neural network analysis revealed that the size of the BAD makes it sufficiently representative, with a neural network-based predictive error of 5% or less. Interestingly, a consistently better fit is obtained if the BAD is divided into two separate subsets representing protein adsorption on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. Based on these findings, selected entries from the BAD have been used to construct neural network-based estimation routines, which predict the amount of adsorbed protein, the thickness of the absorbed layer and the surface tension of the proteincovered surface. While the BAD is of general interest, the prediction of the thickness and the surface tension of the protein-covered layers are of particular relevance to the design of microfluidics devices.

  2. Influence of Ca2+ on tetracycline adsorption on montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Parolo, M Eugenia; Avena, Marcelo J; Pettinari, Gisela R; Baschini, Miria T

    2012-02-15

    The adsorption of tetracycline (TC) on montmorillonite was studied as a function of pH and Ca(2+) concentration using a batch technique complemented with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. In the absence of Ca(2+), TC adsorption was high at low pH and decreased as the pH increased. In the presence of Ca(2+), at least two different adsorption processes took place in the studied systems, i.e., cation exchange and Ca-bridging. Cation exchange was the prevailing process at pH<5, and thus, TC adsorption decreased by increasing total Ca(2+) concentration. On the contrary, Ca-bridging was the prevailing process at pH>5, and thus, TC adsorption increased by increasing Ca(2+) concentration. The pH 5 represents an isoadsorption pH where both adsorption processes compensate each other. TC adsorption became independent of Ca(2+) concentration at this pH. For TC adsorption on Ca(2+)-montmorillonite in 0.01 M NaCl experiments, the ratio adsorbed TC/retained Ca(2+) was close to 1 in the pH range of 5-9, indicating an important participation of Ca(2+) in the binding of TC to montmorillonite. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that TC adsorption induced intercalation between montmorillonite layers forming a multiphase system with stacking of layers with and without intercalated TC. PMID:22189389

  3. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  4. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  5. Sub-ambient carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Tamilarasan, P.; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2015-04-14

    Carbon dioxide adsorption on carbon surface can be enhanced by doping the surface with heterogeneous atoms, which can increase local surface affinity. This study presents the carbon dioxide adsorption properties of nitrogen doped graphene at low pressures (<100 kPa). Graphene was exposed to nitrogen plasma, which dopes nitrogen atoms into carbon hexagonal lattice, mainly in pyridinic and pyrrolic forms. It is found that nitrogen doping significantly improves the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at all temperatures, due to the enrichment of local Lewis basic sites. In general, isotherm and thermodynamic parameters suggest that doped nitrogen sites have nearly same adsorption energy of surface defects and residual functional groups. The isosteric heat of adsorption remains in physisorption range, which falls with surface coverage, suggesting the distribution of magnitude of adsorption energy. The absolute values of isosteric heat and entropy of adsorption are slightly increased upon nitrogen doping.

  6. Adsorption in sparse networks. 1: Cylinder model

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.

    1998-06-15

    Materials with very low density, such as aerogels, are networks with polymers or chains of particles joined at nodes, where the spacing of the nodes is large compared to the thickness of the chains. In such a material, most of the solid surface has positive curvature, so condensation of an adsorbate is more difficult than condensation in a body containing cavities whose surfaces have negative curvature. A model is presented in which the network is represented by straight cylinders joined at nodes with coordination numbers 4, 6, or 12. The shape of the adsorbate/adsorptive interface is obtained for each network by minimizing its surface area. The adsorption behavior is found to depend on the ratio of the node separation, l, to the radius of the cylinders, a: if l/a exceeds a critical value (which depends on the coordination of the node), then the curvature of the adsorbate/adsorptive interface approaches zero while the adsorbate occupies a small fraction of the pore volume; if l/a is less than the critical value, then condensation occurs. Even in the latter case, interpretation of the adsorption isotherm in terms of cylindrical pores (as in the BJH model) yields apparent pore sizes much greater than the actual spacing of the nodes. In a companion paper, this model is applied to silica aerogels and found to give a good fit to both the adsorption and desorption curves with a single distribution of node spacings.

  7. Influence of post-harvest crop residue fires on surface ozone mixing ratios in the N.W. IGP analyzed using 2 years of continuous in situ trace gas measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Sarkar, C.; Sinha, V.

    2016-04-01

    O3, CO, and NOx affect air quality and tropospheric chemistry but factors that control them in the densely populated N.W. Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) are poorly understood. This work presents the first simultaneous 2 year long in situ data set acquired from August 2011 to September 2013 at a N.W. IGP site (30.667°N, 76.729°E; 310 m asl). We investigate the impact of emissions and meteorology on the diel and seasonal variability of O3, CO, and NOx. Regional post-harvest crop residue fires contribute majorly to an enhancement of 19 ppb in hourly averaged ozone concentrations under similar meteorological conditions in summer and 7 ppb under conditions of lower radiation during the post monsoon. d[O3]/dt (from sunrise to daytime O3 maxima) was highest during periods influenced by post-harvest fires in post monsoon season (9.2 ppb h-1) and lowest during monsoon season (4.1 ppb h-1). Analysis of air mass clusters revealed that enhanced chemical formation of O3 and not transport was the driver of the summertime and post monsoon ambient O3 maxima. Despite having high daytime NOx (>12 ppb) and CO (>440 ppb) in winter, average daytime O3 was less than 40 ppb due to reduced photochemistry and fog. Average daytime O3 during the monsoon was less than 45 ppb due to washout of precursors and suppressed photochemistry due to cloud cover. The 8 h ambient air quality O3 standard was violated on 451 days in the period August 2011-September 2013. The results show that substantial mitigation efforts are required to reduce regional O3 pollution in the N.W. IGP.

  8. Adsorption and regenerative oxidation of trichlorophenol with synthetic zeolite: Ozone dosage and its influence on adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Prigent, Bastien; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2016-07-01

    Regeneration of loaded adsorbents is a key step for the sustainability of an adsorption process. In this study, ozone was applied to regenerate a synthetic zeolite for the adsorption of trichlorophenol (TCP) as an organic model pollutant. Three initial concentrations of TCP in water phase were used in adsorption tests. After the equilibrium, zeolite loaded different amounts of TCP was dried and then regenerated with ozone gas. It was found that the adsorption capacity of zeolite was increased through three regeneration cycles. However, the adsorption kinetics was compromised after the regeneration with slightly declined 2nd order reaction constants. The ozone demand for the regeneration was highly dependent on the TCP mass loaded onto the zeolite. It was estimated that the mass ratio of ozone to TCP was 1.2 ± 0.3 g O3/g TCP. PMID:27043379

  9. Phosphorus Recovery Using Zirconium-Loaded Saponified Orange Juice Residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Mitsunori; Biswas, Biplob K.; Ohura, Seichirou; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Ishikawa, Susumu; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Ohto, Keisuke

    Zirconium was immobilized to orange juice residue, to investigate the feasibility of using zirconium-loaded saponified orange juice residue (Zr-SOJR) for phosphorus recovery from secondary effluent and the extraction solution from incinerated sewage sludge ash by using H2SO4 and HCl. These had phosphorus concentrations of 68.2 mg/dm3 and 5.9 mg/dm3, respectively. The phosphorus removal rate secondary effluent increased with an increasing solid/liquid ratio in batch experiments. The adsorption capacity of Zr-SOJR was also compared with those obtained using a synthetic phosphorus solution and using zirconium-loaded ferrite. The prepared absorbent was effective for phosphorus removal and exhibited a reasonably high sorption capacity, twice that of zirconium ferrite. Secondary effluent was treated by packed column, and this reached break-through after 300 bed volumes. The results from phosphorous extraction from the ash indicate that can be treated with acid to efficiently recover phosphorous and thus can be absorbed by Zr-SOJR.

  10. Dry fermentation of agricultural residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, W. J.; Chandler, J. A.; Dellorto, S.; Fanfoni, K. J.; Fast, S.; Jackson, D.; Kabrick, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    A dry fermentation process is discussed which converts agricultural residues to methane, using the residues in their as produced state. The process appears to simplify and enhance the possibilities for using crop residues as an energy source. The major process variables investigated include temperature, the amount and type of inoculum, buffer requirements, compaction, and pretreatment to control the initial available organic components that create pH problems. A pilot-scale reactor operation on corn stover at a temperature of 550 C, with 25 percent initial total solids, a seed-to-feed ratio of 2.5 percent, and a buffer-to-feed ratio of 8 percent achieved 33 percent total volatile solids destruction in 60 days. Volumetric biogas yields from this unit were greater than 1 vol/vol day for 12 days, and greater than 0.5 vol/vol day for 32 days, at a substrate density of 169 kg/m (3).

  11. Possibility of using adsorption refrigeration unit in district heating network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzebielec, Andrzej; Rusowicz, Artur; Jaworski, Maciej; Laskowski, Rafał

    2015-09-01

    Adsorption refrigeration systems are able to work with heat sources of temperature starting with 50 °C. The aim of the article is to determine whether in terms of technical and economic issues adsorption refrigeration equipment can work as elements that produce cold using hot water from the district heating network. For this purpose, examined was the work of the adsorption air conditioning equipment cooperating with drycooler, and the opportunities offered by the district heating network in Warsaw during the summer. It turns out that the efficiency of the adsorption device from the economic perspective is not sufficient for production of cold even during the transitional period. The main problem is not the low temperature of the water supply, but the large difference between the coefficients of performance, COPs, of adsorption device and a traditional compressor air conditioning unit. When outside air temperature is 25 °C, the COP of the compressor type reaches a value of 4.49, whereas that of the adsorption device in the same conditions is 0.14. The ratio of the COPs is 32. At the same time ratio between the price of 1 kWh of electric power and 1 kWh of heat is only 2.85. Adsorption refrigeration equipment to be able to compete with compressor devices, should feature COPads efficiency to be greater than 1.52. At such a low driving temperature and even changing the drycooler into the evaporative cooler it is not currently possible to achieve.

  12. [Determination of residual organic solvents and macroporous resin residues in Akebia saponin D].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao-han; Yang, Xiao-lin; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Ding, Gang; Huang, Wen-zhe; Yang, Zhong-lin

    2015-05-01

    According to ICH, Chinese Pharmacopoeia and supplementary requirements on the separation and purification of herbal extract with macroporous adsorption resin by SFDA, hexane, acetidine, ethanol, benzene, methyl-benzene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, styrene, diethyl-benzene and divinyl-benzene of residual organic solvents and macroporous resin residues in Akebia saponin D were determined by headspace capillary GC. Eleven residues in Akebia saponin D were completely separated on DB-wax column, with FID detector, high purity nitrogen as the carry gases. The calibration curves were in good linearity (0.999 2-0.999 7). The reproducibility was good (RSD < 10%). The average recoveries were 80.0% -110%. The detection limit of each component was far lower than the limit concentration. The method is simple, reproducible, and can be used to determine the residual organic solvents and macroporous resin residues in Akebia saponin D. PMID:26390656

  13. Adsorption edge study about cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc adsorption by variable charge soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, J. C.; Mouta, E. R.; Soares, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    The improper discharge of industrial and urban residues and the inadvertent use of fertilizers and pesticides can result in soil and water pollution and improve the potential of trace metals to enter in the human food chain. Adsorption reactions occur at the solid/liquid interface and are the most important mechanisms for controlling the activity of metal ions in soil solution. In a complex system with amphoteric behavior, the comprehension of the mobility, availability and fate of pollutants in the soil system is crucial for the prediction of the environmental consequences and for development of prevention/remediation strategies. A comparative study of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) adsorption by highly weathered soils was carried out. Surface (0-0.2m) and subsoil (B horizon) samples were taken from a Rhodic Kandiudalf (RH), an Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox (XA) and an Anionic "Rhodic" Acrudox (RA), located in brazilian humid tropical area. As the pH and the ionic strength are important environmental factors influencing the solution chemistry of heavy metals in variable charge systems, adsorption envelopes, in a batch adsorption experiment, were elaborated by reacting, for 24 h, soil samples with individual 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 aqueous solutions containing nitrate salts of the adsorptive heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) at the initial concentration of 5 mg L-1, with an increasing pH value from 3.0 to 8.0. pH50-100%, the difference between the pH of 100 and 50 percent metal adsorption was determined. A sharp increase of adsorption density (adsorption edge) was observed within a very narrow pH range, usually less than two pH units. Commonly, the relative affinity of a soil for a metal cation increases with the tendency of the cation to form inner-sphere surface complexes. This may be caused by differences in extent of hydrolysis of Cu ions and in affinity of adsorption sites for Cu. In general, subsurface samples showed low pH50

  14. Adsorption of ionisable pesticides in soils.

    PubMed

    Kah, M; Brown, C D

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the fate of a pesticide in soil is fundamental to the accurate assessment of its environmental behaviour and vital in ensuring the safe use of new and existing products. Ionisable pesticides comprise a significant proportion of both existing and new active substances registered for use in agriculture worldwide. This group of pesticides includes chemicals that are frequently found in groundwater and surface waters in many different countries. Despite this, approaches to predict the influence of soil properties on the behaviour of ionisable pesticides in soils are poorly developed. Current regulatory assessments frequently default to methods developed for nonionic chemicals, although it is evident that ionisable compounds do not often react like neutral molecules. This review presents the state of knowledge on the adsorption of ionisable pesticides in soils. It first introduces the issues concerning adsorption and the characteristics of this particular kind of chemical. The mechanisms postulated for the adsorption of ionisable pesticides are then described: these are hydrophobic partitioning, ionic exchange, charge transfer, ligand exchange, cation or water bridging, and the formation of bound residues. Relatively little experimental evidence is available, and we are still unable to determine the quantitative contribution of each process in a particular situation. Knowledge is still lacking concerning phenomena occurring at the surfaces of soil particles. Measurements do not allow determination of the operative pH at the surface of soil particles or in microenvironments, and the influence of ionic strength or competition effects is difficult to assess. Subsequently, the review focuses on the influence of soil properties on adsorption and on potential to predict the behaviour of ionisable pesticides in soils. Unlike hydrophobic compounds, adsorption of ionisable pesticides is highly sensitive to variation in pH. This relationship mainly derives from the

  15. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Xochilt; Schiavi, Federica; Keppler, Hans

    2016-03-01

    data provided here, the gas compositions in equilibrium with the ash surfaces can be calculated. In particular, for dacitic composition, the molar ratio of S/Cl adsorbed to the ash surface is related to the molar S/Cl ratio in the gas phase according to the equation ln ⁡(S / Cl) adsorbed = 2855T-1 + 0.28 ln ⁡(S / Cl) gas - 11.14. Our data also show that adsorption on ash will significantly reduce the fraction of HCl reaching the stratosphere, only if the initial HCl content in the volcanic gas is low (<1 mol%). For higher initial HCl concentrations, adsorption on ash has only a minor effect. While HCl scavenging by hydrometeors may remove a considerable fraction of HCl from the eruption column, recent models suggest that this process is much less efficient than previously thought. Our experimental data therefore support the idea that the HCl loading from major explosive eruptions may indeed cause severe depletions of stratospheric ozone.

  16. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  17. Sulfate adsorption on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-10-15

    Recent spectroscopic work has suggested that only one surface species of sulfate is dominant on hematite. Sulfate is therefore a very suitable anion to test and develop adsorption models for variable charge minerals. The authors have studied sulfate adsorption on goethite covering a large range of sulfate concentrations, surface coverages, pH values, and electrolyte concentrations. Four different techniques were used to cover the entire range of conditions. For characterization at low sulfate concentrations, below the detection limit of sulfate with ICP-AES, the authors used proton-sulfate titrations at constant pH. Adsorption isotherms were studied for the intermediate sulfate concentration range. Acid-base titrations in sodium sulfate and electromobility were used for high sulfate concentrations. All the data can be modeled with one adsorbed species if it is assumed that the charge of adsorbed sulfate is spatially distributed in the interface. The charge distribution of sulfate follows directly from modeling the proton-sulfate adsorption stoichoimemtry sine this stoichiometry is independent of the intrinsic affinity constant of sulfate. The charge distribution can be related to the structure of the surface complex by use of the Pauling bond valence concept and is in accordance with the microscopic structure found by spectroscopy. The intrinsic affinity constant follows from the other measurements. Modeling of the proton-ion stoichoimetry with the commonly used 2-pK models, where adsorbed ions are treated as point charges, is possible only if at least two surface species for sulfate are used.

  18. SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, C.S.

    1959-06-16

    Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

  19. Random sequential adsorption on partially covered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Weroński, Paweł

    1998-06-01

    The random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach was used to analyze adsorption of hard spheres at surfaces precovered with smaller sized particles. Numerical simulations were performed to determine the available surface function φl of larger particles for various particle size ratios λ=al/as and surface concentration of smaller particles θs. It was found that the numerical results were in a reasonable agreement with the formula stemming from the scaled particle theory with the modification for the sphere/sphere geometry. Particle adsorption kinetics was also determined in terms of the RSA simulations. By extrapolating the θl vs τ-1/2 dependencies, the jamming concentrations of larger spheres θl∞ were determined as a function of the initial smaller sphere concentration. It was found that θl∞ were considerably reduced by the presence of smaller sized particles, especially for λ≫1. The pair correlation function g of larger particles in the jamming state was also determined, showing more short range ordering (at the same θl) in comparison with monodisperse systems. The theoretical predictions stemming from our calculations suggest that the presence of trace amounts of very small particles may exert a decisive influence on adsorption of larger particles.

  20. [Effect of low molecular weight organic acids on Pb2+ adsorption and desorption by constant charge soil colloids].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yati; Wang, Xudong; Zhang, Yiping; Qu, Aihua

    2003-11-01

    The isothermal curves of Pb2+ adsorption-desorption by soil colloids followed Freundlich and Langmuir equation. The adsorption constant Ka showed the trend of old manured loessal soil > yellow loessal soil > dark cultivated loessal soil > yellow cinamon soil, which was consistent with surface charge density sigma 0, an indicator of the strength of Pb2+ adsorption by each soil colloid. Low molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) made Pb2+ adsorbed amount decreased and adsorption affinity increased, and the effect of citric acid was larger than that of oxalic acid. The constant Kd of residual Pb2+ adsorption after desorption showed the trend of old manured loessal soil > yellow cinamon soil > dark cultivated loessal soil > yellow loessal soil, which reflected the adsorption strength of residual Pb2+ after desorption, and was related to the contents of organic matter and free ferric oxide. The isothermal curves of Pb2+ desorption from soil colloids were obvious higher than those of Pb2+ adsorption. In NaNO3 and oxalic acid background solution, the isothermal curves of Pb2+ adsorption were far away from those of Pb2+ desorption, showing that the hysteretic degree between adsorption and desorption was very large. The isothermal curves of Pb2+ desorption from soil colloids were closed to those of Pb2+ adsorption in citric acid background solution, which showed that the Pb adsorption and desorption was reversible.

  1. Competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of organic matter on iron oxide: I. Competitive adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Baohua; Mehlhorn, Tonia L.; Liang, Liyuan; McCarthy, John F.

    1996-06-01

    Different organic compounds or fractions of natural organic matter (NOM) show different adsorption affinities ( K) and capacities ( qm) on mineral surfaces. We hypothesize that these different organic compounds or fractions compete for adsorption when surface adsorption sites are limited. In this study, competitive adsorption of binary mixtures of Suwannee River NOM (SR-NOM), polyacrylic acid (PAA), phthalic acid, and salicylic acid on iron oxide was investigated at a constant solid:solution ratio, temperature, and pressure, but at varying C weight fractions, pH, and solution concentrations of the mixture. Results revealed that, in general, PAA is the most competitive whereas SR-NOM is more competitive than phthalic and salicylic acids. The competitive adsorption of these organic compounds is pH-dependent. At pH < 4, PAA becomes less competitive than SR-NOM or phthalic and salicylic acids. The competition among these organic compounds may be related to their carboxyl functional groups and their molecular structure. The overall strong competitiveness of PAA at pH > 4 in comparison with other organics is attributed to its high carboxyl density and linear molecular structure, which promote strong surface complexation with iron oxide. Because of the heterogeneity or polydispersity of NOM, this research indicates that NOM partitioning and transport in the subsurface soil environment are influenced by the dynamic competitive interactions between NOM subcomponents (or fractions). This process ultimately influences the distribution, interaction, and cotransport of contaminants and mineral colloids that are associated with NOM.

  2. Ibuprofen adsorption in four agricultural volcanic soils.

    PubMed

    Estevez, Esmeralda; Hernandez-Moreno, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Vera, Juan Ramon; Palacios-Diaz, Maria Pino

    2014-01-15

    Ibuprofen (IB) is a high environmental risk drug and one of the most frequently prescribed in human medicine. Recently, IB has been detected in Gran Canaria in reclaimed water for irrigation and in groundwater. Adsorption was studied in four volcanic soils from three islands of the Canarian Archipelago. Once the biodegradation process has been excluded from the experimental conditions, a batch method was applied using initial concentrations of 1-5-10-20-50-100-200 mg L(-1) and two soil/water ratios (w/V): 1:5 (OECD, 2000) and 1:1. Non-linear and linearized Langmuir and Freundlich equations were well fitted. The wide IB range tested in our batch studies allowed us to measure experimental adsorption values close to the maximum adsorption capacity (S(max)) as estimated by Langmuir, making it possible thereby to validate the use of the Langmuir equation when there is a burst of contamination at high concentration. The distribution coefficient (Kd), S(max) and Retardation Factor (RF) varied from 0.04 to 0.5 kg L(-1), 4-200 mgk g(-1) and 1.2-1.9, respectively. The lowest S(max) and Kd values were found for the 1:1S/W ratio whereas most batch studies employ 1:5S/W ratios, thus obtaining higher adsorption parameters than when considering field conditions (1:1). Despite the high anion retention of andic soils, similar Kd and RF to those reported for other soils were obtained in 1:5, while high S(max) was found. Our results demonstrate that IB adsorption in volcanic areas responds not only to the soil properties commonly cited in adsorption studies, but also depends on andic properties, sorbent concentration and Dissolved Organic Carbon, the higher values of which are related to the lower Kd and S(max). The low RF and low detection frequency of the IB in groundwater suggests that a) reclaimed water irrigation is not the main source of IB, and b) the existence of some uncontrolled water disposal points in the zone.

  3. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  4. Carbonaceous materials for adsorptive refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, B.; Wolak, E.

    2012-06-01

    Carbon monoliths prepared from hard coal precursors were obtained. The porous structure of the monoliths was evaluated on the basis of nitrogen adsorption — desorption equilibrium data. The investigated monoliths have a well-developed microporous structure with significant specific surface area (S BET ). Equilibrium studies of methanol vapour adsorption were used to characterize the methanol adsorptive capacity that was determined using a volumetric method. The heat of wetting by methanol was determined in order to estimate the energetic effects of the adsorption process. The results of the investigations show that all monoliths exhibit high adsorption capacity and high heat of wetting with methanol.

  5. Microemulsion synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanomaterials and their adsorption behaviors for Cr3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y. L.; Wang, X. S.; Cui, H. H.; Mu, M. M.; Huang, F. Z.

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles with different morphologies, such as nanorods, nanospheres, and their mixtures were successfully synthesized by microemulsion method with soluble additive. Their adsorption capacity for Cr3+ ion was investigated. Most of the Cr3+ were absorbed by HAP within 60 min. The adsorption capacity of the HAP nanospheres was the best, and the maximum Cr3+ removal ratio was 96.4%, revealing that the metal ions adsorption by HAP is dependent on the morphology of its particles.

  6. Extracorporeal adsorption of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Staubach, K H; Rosenfeldt, J A; Veit, O; Bruch, H P

    1997-02-01

    In a porcine endotoxin shock model using a continuous intravenous endotoxin infusion of 250 ng/kg body weight per hour, the cardiorespiratory and hematologic parameters were studied while applying a new on-line polymyxin B immobilized adsorption system. This preliminary report shows that the new adsorbent can remove endotoxin selectively from the circulation and confers a good amount of protection from endotoxin-induced cardiopulmonary decompensation as well as hematologic alterations. Survival time could be extended from 216 min to 313 min. Whereas cardiac output and mean arterial pressure declined critically after 3 h in the controls, the treated group remained stable for another 3 h. These data show that endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B coupled covalently to acrylic spheres as an adjunctive on-line measure in the septic syndrome seems feasible. PMID:10225785

  7. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  8. Adsorption of metal ions by carboxymethylchitin and carboxymethylchitosan hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasikiewicz, Jaroslaw M.; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Tamada, Masao; Mitomo, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Fumio

    2005-07-01

    Radiation cross-linking of CM-chitin and CM-chitosan has been investigated. Such parameters of radiation cross-linking as gelation doses, cross-linking and degradation radiation yields and ratios of scission to cross-linking has been determined for both polymers. The absorption ability of various metal ions into EB-radiation cross-linked carboxymethylchitin and carboxymethylchitosan has been investigated. The highest adsorption of scandium and gold has been obtained for carboxymethylchitin (CMCht) and carboxymethylchitosan (CMChts), respectively. Kinetic studies showed that adsorption of most of the metal ions occur in a relatively short period of time (2 h). Detail investigation of adsorption of gold ions has been carried out for both hydrogels. The maximum uptake of Au cations, based on Langmuir equation was determined to be 37.59 for CM-chitosan and 11.86 for CM-chitin. Both hydrogels indicate favorable adsorption of gold cations.

  9. [Effect of SDS on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto amphoteric modified bentonites].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Tao; Meng, Zhao-Fu; Yang, Ya-Ti; Yang, Shu-Ying; Li, Bin; Xu, Shao-e

    2014-07-01

    Under different modified ratios, temperatures, pH and ionic strengths, the effect of sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto bentonites which modified with amphoteric modifier dodecyl dimethyl betaine (BS-12) was studied by batch experiments, and the adsorption mechanism was also discussed. Results showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ on amphoteric bentonites can be enhanced significantly by SDS combined modification, Cd2+ adsorption decreases in the order: BS + 150SDS (BS-12 + 150% SDS) > BS + 100SDS (BS-12 + 100% SDS) > BS +50SDS(BS-12 + 50% SDS) > BS + 25SDS (BS-12 + 25% SDS) > BS (BS-12) > CK (unmodified soil). The adsorption isotherm can be described by the Langmuir equation. The change of temperature effect from positive on CK and amphoteric bentonites to negative on BS + 150SDS bentonites is observed with an increase of SDS modified ratio. The pH has little influence on Cd2+ adsorption on bentonites. The adsorption of Cd2+ on bentonites decreases with ionic strength rise, but the effect of ionic strength can be reduced with an increase of SDS modified ratio also. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites was spontaneously controlled by entropy increment. When the SDS modified ratio is lower than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites is a process with characteristics of both enthalpy increment and entropy increment, while the SDS modified ratio is equal to or higher than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites becomes a process of enthalpy decrement and entropy increment. PMID:25244843

  10. [Preparation of nicosulfuron molecularly imprinted microspheres and research of adsorption characteristics].

    PubMed

    Xia, Ying; Zhang, Lan; Zhao, Ercheng; Jia, Chunhong; Zhu, Xiaodan

    2014-02-01

    Molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIPMs) for binding and recognition of nicosulfuron (NS) (NS-MIPMs) were prepared by precipitation polymerization. Methacrylic acid (MAA) was used as the functional monomer, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) as the linking agent, 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator and chloroform as the porogenic solvent. The preparation conditions were optimized, and MIPMs exhibited the best adsorption capacity when the molar ratio of NS/MAA/TRIM/AIBN was 1:4:4:1 and the volume of the porogenic solvent was 90 mL. An ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer was employed to study the mechanism of the interaction between NS and MAA, and the results showed that the NS-MAA complexes of 1:1 molar ratio were obtained in the pre-polymerization phase. The rebinding capacity of MIPMs was evaluated according to adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherm of the imprinted microspheres. The Scatchard plot revealed that the template polymer system has a two-site binding behavior and the MIPMs exhibited the maximum rebinding to NS at 11,370.5 microg/g. The MIPMs were then used as adsorbents in a solid phase extraction (SPE) column and the optimum loading, washing and eluting conditions for the MIPMs were established. Additionally, a rapid method for the determination of NS residues in soil was developed using an NS-MIPMs SPE column. The analyte was extracted using acetonitrile and phosphate buffer, cleaned-up by an NS-MIPMs SPE column and analyzed by HPLC. The results showed that good linearity was observed in the range of 0.01-1 mg/L for NS, with a correlation coefficient of 0. 998 6. The recovery tests were performed at the spiked levels of 0.02-1 mg/kg, and the recoveries were in the range of 82.2%-86.3% with the relative standard deviations of 1.9%-4.3%. The advantages of the proposed method are that it is easy to operate, reliable and applicable to analyze the NS residues in soil samples. PMID:24822444

  11. Cd adsorption onto Anoxybacillus flavithermus: Surface complexation modeling and spectroscopic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, Peta-Gaye; Daughney, Christopher J.; Peak, Derek

    2008-06-09

    Several recent studies have applied surface complexation theory to model metal adsorption behaviour onto mesophilic bacteria. However, no investigations have used this approach to characterise metal adsorption by thermophilic bacteria. In this study, we perform batch adsorption experiments to quantify cadmium adsorption onto the thermophile Anoxybacillus flavithermus. Surface complexation models (incorporating the Donnan electrostatic model) are developed to determine stability constants corresponding to specific adsorption reactions. Adsorption reactions and stoichiometries are constrained using spectroscopic techniques (XANES, EXAFS, and ATR-FTIR). The results indicate that the Cd adsorption behaviour of A. flavithermus is similar to that of other mesophilic bacteria. At high bacteria-to-Cd ratios, Cd adsorption occurs by formation of a 1:1 complex with deprotonated cell wall carboxyl functional groups. At lower bacteria-to-Cd ratios, a second adsorption mechanism occurs at pH > 7, which may correspond to the formation of a Cd-phosphoryl, CdOH-carboxyl, or CdOH-phosphoryl surface complex. X-ray absorption spectroscopic investigations confirm the formation of the 1:1 Cd-carboxyl surface complex, but due to the bacteria-to-Cd ratio used in these experiments, other complexation mechanism(s) could not be unequivocally resolved by the spectroscopic data.

  12. [Adsorption characteristics of f2 bacteriophages by four substrates in constructed wetland].

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Zheng, Xiang; Wei, Yuan-Song; Yang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Performance of f2 phages adsorption by four substrates including anthracite coal, steel slag, zeolite and forsterite was investigated through batch and dynamic experiments. Results of batch experiments showed that the removal efficiency of f2 phages by these four substrates was in the order of anthracite > steel slag > forsterite approximately zeolite. The adsorption of f2 phages by anthracite experienced fast, medium and slow stages, and the removal efficiency of f2 phages increased gradually with the increase of anthracite dosage, e. g. the optimized dosage of anthracite was 8.0 g at a solid/liquid ratio of 1:12.5 (m/V). The isothermal adsorption of all four substrates was described with Freundlich and Langmuir isothermal adsorption equation very well, and the adsorption of f2 phages by both anthracite and steel slag fitted pseudo-second order adsorption kinetics at their theoretical adsorption capacities of 3. 35 x 10(8) PFU.g-1 and 2.56 x 10(8) PFU.g-1, respectively, nearly the same as the equilibrium adsorption capacities obtained under the experiment conditions. And the liquid diffusion process was a rate-limiting step of the adsorption of f2 phage by both anthracite and steel slag, but not the only one. The results of dynamic adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption process of f2 phages in the three adsorption columns including anthracite, steel slag and zeolite experienced four stages of adaption, adsorption, pulse adsorption and adsorption equilibrium, and the total removal rates of f2 phages were more than 2. 55 Ig.

  13. DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E

    2009-01-12

    This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

  14. ZnCl2-activated biochar from biogas residue facilitates aqueous As(III) removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Tan, Fen; Zhang, Chuanpan; Jiang, Xiuli; Chen, Zheng; Li, Heng; Zheng, Yanmei; Li, Qingbiao; Wang, Yuanpeng

    2016-07-01

    Biochars prepared from biogas residue using different chemical activators were investigated for their As(III) adsorption properties. The results indicated that the original biochars did not exhibit significant As(III) adsorption. However, ZnCl2-activated biochar, which possessed the largest specific surface area, 516.67 cm2/g, and exhibited a perfectly porous texture, showed excellent performance in a 500 μgL-1 solution of As(III). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were utilized to identify the mechanism of As(III) adsorption by ZnCl2-activated biochar. Adsorption was found to occur mainly through ligand exchange of the hydroxyl in Zn-OH to form Zn-O-As(III), as well as through porous adsorption. As a low-cost adsorbent, the adsorption process was well fitted using a pseudo-second-order model, with an R2 > 0.993. The adsorption process was fast, requiring nearly 90 min to reach adsorption equilibrium. Batch adsorption experimental results indicated that ZnCl2-activated biochar has a maximum adsorption capacity of 27.67 mg/g at pH 7.0, and the adsorption process followed the Freundlich isotherm model well, with an R2 > 0.994. In addition, the current work demonstrated the efficiency of using ZnCl2-activated biochar adsorbent to treat As(III)-contaminated water.

  15. Optimization of adsorptive immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Archana; Heinemann, Matthias; Spiess, Antje C; Daussmann, Thomas; Büchs, Jochen

    2005-04-01

    In this work, a systematic examination of various parameters of adsorptive immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) on solid support is performed and the impact of these parameters on immobilization efficiency is studied. Depending on the source of the enzymes, these parameters differently influence the immobilization efficiency, expressed in terms of residual activity and protein loading. Residual activity of 79% was achieved with ADH from bakers' yeast (YADH) after optimizing the immobilization parameters. A step-wise drying process has been found to be more effective than one-step drying. A hypothesis of deactivation through bubble nucleation during drying of the enzyme/glass bead suspension at low drying pressure (<45 kPa) is experimentally verified. In the case of ADH from Lactobacillus brevis (LBADH), >300% residual activity was found after drying. Hyperactivation of the enzyme is probably caused by structural changes in the enzyme molecule during the drying process. ADH from Thermoanaerobacter species (ADH T) is found to be stable under drying conditions (>15 kPa) in contrast to LBADH and YADH.

  16. Multisite adsorption of cadmium on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Venema, P.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1996-11-10

    Recently a new general ion adsorption model has been developed for ion binding to mineral surfaces (Hiemstra and van Riemsdijk, 1996). The model uses the Pauling concept of charge distribution (CD) and is an extension of the multi-site complexation (MUSIC) approach. In the CD-MUSIC model the charge of an adsorbing ion that forms an inner sphere complex is distributed over its ligands, which are present in two different electrostatic planes. In this paper the authors have applied the CD-MUSIC model to the adsorption of metal cations, using an extended data set for cadmium adsorbing on goethite. The adsorption of cadmium and the cadmium-proton exchange ratio were measured as function of metal ion concentration, pH, and ionic strength. The data could be described well, taking into account the surface heterogeneity resulting from the presence of two different crystal planes (the dominant 110 face and the minor 021 face). The surface species used in the model are consistent with recent EXAFS data. In accordance with the EXAFS results, high-affinity complexes at the 021 face were used in the model.

  17. Adsorption characteristics of brush polyelectrolytes on silicon oxynitride revealed by dual polarization interferometry.

    PubMed

    Bijelic, Goran; Shovsky, Alexander; Varga, Imre; Makuska, Ricardas; Claesson, Per M

    2010-08-01

    Adsorption properties of bottle-brush polyelectrolytes have been investigated using dual polarization interferometry (DPI), which provides real time monitoring of adsorbed layer thickness and refractive index. The adsorption on silicon oxynitride was carried out from aqueous solution with no added inorganic salt, and the adsorbed polyelectrolyte layer was subsequently rinsed with NaCl solutions of increasing concentration. The bottle-brush polyelectrolytes investigated in this study have different ratios of permanent cationic charged segments and uncharged PEO side chains. Both the cationic groups and the PEO side chains have affinity for silica-like surfaces, and thus contribute to the adsorption process that becomes rather complex. Adsorption properties in water, responses to changes in ionic strength of the surrounding medium, adsorption kinetics and the layer structure are all strongly dependent on the ratio between backbone charges and side chains. The results are interpreted in terms of competitive adsorption of segments with different chemical nature. The adsorption kinetics is relatively fast, taking only tens to hundreds of seconds when adsorbed from dilute 100 ppm solutions. The DPI technique was found to be suitable for studying such rapid adsorption processes, including determination of the initial adsorption kinetics. We expect that the effects observed in this study are of general importance for synthetic and biological polymers carrying segments of different nature.

  18. Cd adsorption onto bacterial surfaces: A universal adsorption edge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Nathan; Fein, Jeremy

    2001-07-01

    In this study, we measure the thermodynamic stability constants for proton and Cd binding onto the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus megaturium, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Sporosarcina ureae, and Bacillus cereus. Potentiometric titrations and Cd-bacteria adsorption experiments yield average values for the carboxyl site pK a, site concentration, and log stability constant for the bacterial surface Cd-carboxyl complex of 5.0, 2.0 × 10 -3 mol/g and 4.0 respectively. Our results indicate that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit nearly identical Cd adsorption behavior as a function of pH. We propose that metal-bacteria adsorption is not dependent on the bacterial species involved, and we develop a generalized adsorption model which may greatly simplify the task of quantifying the effects of bacterial adsorption on dissolved mass transport in realistic geologic systems.

  19. Rethinking Critical Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Peach, Sarah; Polak, Robert D.

    1996-03-01

    Recent reflectivity experiments on near-critical mixtures of carbon disulfide and nitromethane contained in glass cells footnote Niraj S. Desai, Sarah Peach, and Carl Franck, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4129 (1995) have shown that preferential adsorption of one liquid component onto the wall can be controlled by chemical modification of the glass. The glass was treated with varying amounts of hexamethyldisilazane to decrease surface polarity and therefore enhance the adsorption of carbon disulfide in a surprisingly continuous way. The effect of the glass wall on the local liquid composition can be described by two different scaling hypotheses: using a short range field on the liquid closest to the wall, or pinning the amplitude of the order parameter at the surface. We have found that only the second approach is consistent with the experimental data, although this is difficult to reconcile with observed wetting critical phenomena. We also have reexamined the issue of substrate inhomogeneity and conclude that the substrates were indeed homogeneous on relevant length scales. Supported by the NSF under DMR-9320910 and the central facilities of the Materials Science Center at Cornell University.

  20. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-decorated silicon carbide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ram Sevak; Solanki, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen storage for fuel cell is an active area of research and appropriate materials with excellent hydrogen adsorption properties are highly demanded. Nanotubes, having high surface to volume ratio, are promising storage materials for hydrogen. Recently, silicon carbide nanotubes have been predicted as potential materials for future hydrogen storage application, and studies in this area are ongoing. Here, we report a systematic study on hydrogen adsorption properties in metal (Pt, Ni and Al) decorated silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The hydrogen adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of adsorption energy, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that hydrogen adsorptions on Pt, Ni and Al-decorated SiCNTs undergo spontaneous exothermic reactions with significant modulation of electronic structure of SiCNTs in all cases. Importantly, according to the Mulliken charge population analysis, dipole-dipole interaction causes chemisorptions of hydrogen in Pt, Ni and Al decorated SiCNTs with formation of chemical bonds. The study is a platform for the development of metal decorated SiCNTs for hydrogen adsorption or hydrogen storage application.

  1. Adsorption and dissociation kinetics of alkanes on CaO(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakradhar, A.; Liu, Y.; Schmidt, J.; Kadossov, E.; Burghaus, U.

    2011-08-01

    The adsorption kinetics of ethane, butane, pentane, and hexane on CaO(100) have been studied by multi-mass thermal desorption (TDS) spectroscopy. The sample cleanliness was checked by Auger electron spectroscopy. A molecular and dissociative adsorption pathway was evident for the alkanes, except for ethane, which does not undergo bond activation. Two TDS peaks appeared when recording the parent mass, which are assigned to different adsorption sites/configurations of the molecularly adsorbed alkanes. Bond activation leads to desorption of hydrogen and several alkane fragments assigned to methane and ethylene formation. Only one TDS feature is seen in this case. Formation of carbon residuals was absent.

  2. Modification of porous starch for the adsorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaofei; Liu, Xueyuan; Anderson, Debbie P; Chang, Peter R

    2015-08-15

    Porous starch xanthate (PSX) and porous starch citrate (PSC) were prepared in anticipation of the attached xanthate and carboxylate groups respectively forming chelation and electrostatic interactions with heavy metal ions in the subsequent adsorption process. The lead(II) ion was selected as the model metal and its adsorption by PSX and PSC was characterized. The adsorption capacity was highly dependent on the carbon disulfide/starch and citric acid/starch mole ratios used during preparation. The adsorption behaviors of lead(II) ion on PSXs and PSCs fit both the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir isotherm equation reached 109.1 and 57.6 mg/g for PSX and PSC when preparation conditions were optimized, and the adsorption times were just 20 and 60 min, respectively. PSX and PSC may be used as effective adsorbents for removal of heavy metals from contaminated liquid. PMID:25794731

  3. Modification of porous starch for the adsorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaofei; Liu, Xueyuan; Anderson, Debbie P; Chang, Peter R

    2015-08-15

    Porous starch xanthate (PSX) and porous starch citrate (PSC) were prepared in anticipation of the attached xanthate and carboxylate groups respectively forming chelation and electrostatic interactions with heavy metal ions in the subsequent adsorption process. The lead(II) ion was selected as the model metal and its adsorption by PSX and PSC was characterized. The adsorption capacity was highly dependent on the carbon disulfide/starch and citric acid/starch mole ratios used during preparation. The adsorption behaviors of lead(II) ion on PSXs and PSCs fit both the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir isotherm equation reached 109.1 and 57.6 mg/g for PSX and PSC when preparation conditions were optimized, and the adsorption times were just 20 and 60 min, respectively. PSX and PSC may be used as effective adsorbents for removal of heavy metals from contaminated liquid.

  4. Carbon dioxide and nitrogen adsorption on cation-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolites.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong D; Liu, Qingling; Lobo, Raul F

    2013-01-15

    Samples of high-silica SSZ-13, ion exchanged with protons and alkali-metal cations Li(+), Na(+), and K(+), were investigated using adsorption isotherms of CO(2) and N(2). The results show that Li-, Na-SSZ-13 have excellent CO(2) capacity at ambient temperature and pressure; in general, Li-SSZ-13 shows the highest capacity for N(2), CO(2) particularly in the low-pressure region. The effect of cation type and Si/Al ratio (6 and 12) on the adsorption properties was investigated through analysis of adsorption isotherms and heats of adsorption. The separation of CO(2) in a flue gas mixture was evaluated for these adsorbents in the pressure swing adsorption and vacuum pressure adsorption processes. PMID:23249267

  5. [Study on adsorption of tea polyphenol and caffine with polyamide resin].

    PubMed

    Tang, Ke-wen; Zhou, Chun-shan; Zhong, Shi-an; Zhu, Jie-ding

    2003-02-01

    The performance of adsorption of tea polyphenol and caffine with polyamide resin was investigated. The results obtained by spectrophotometry and HPLC show that the ability of adsorption of tea polyphenol with polyamide is stronger than that of caffine, in which hydrogen bond plays a very important role. The adsorption amount of caffine is 2.65 mg.g-1 with 7.5% adsorption ratio when 100 mL of 0.71 g.L-1 caffine is adsorbed on polyamide resine, but the adsorption amount of tea polyphenol is up to 148.13 mg.g-1 with 85% adsorption ratio when 700 mL of 1.98 g.L-1 tea polyphenol is adsorbed on polyamide resine. The dilution ratios of caffine and tea polyphenol are 74% and 90%, respectively, when they are diluted by 85% alcohol. The static adsorptions of caffine and tea polyphenol on polyamide resine reach equilibrium quickly in 80 min, and the plots of adsorption kinetics are nearly linear. Tea polyphenol and caffine are successfully separated on polyamide resine, and the obtained product contains more than 96% of tea polyphenol and 80% of EGCC with caffine less than 2.8%. PMID:12939992

  6. Global versus local adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Marloie, Gael; Markovits, Alexis; Ellinger, Yves

    2015-10-01

    The origin of the enantiomeric excess found in the amino acids present in the organic matter of carbonaceous meteorites is still unclear. Selective adsorption of one of the two enantiomers existing after a racemic formation could be part of the answer. Hereafter we report a comparative study of the adsorption of the R and S enantiomers of α-alanine and lactic acid on the hydroxylated { } chiral surface of α-quartz using numerical simulation techniques. Structurally different adsorption sites were found with opposite R versus S selectivity for the same molecule-surface couple, raising the problem of whether to consider adsorption as a local property or as a global response characteristic of the whole surface. To deal with the second term of this alternative, a statistical approach was designed, based on the occurrence of each adsorption site whose energy was calculated using first principle periodic density functional theory. It was found that R-alanine and S-lactic acid are the enantiomers preferentially adsorbed, even if the adsorption process on the quartz { } surface stays with a disappointingly poor enantio-selectivity. Nevertheless, it highlighted the important point that considering adsorption as a global property changes perspectives in the search for more efficient enantio-selective supports and more generally changes the way to apprehend adsorption processes in astro-chemistry/biology.

  7. Design method for adsorption beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, R. L.; Jackson, J. K.

    1970-01-01

    Regenerable adsorption beds for long-term life support systems include synthetic geolite to remove carbon dioxide and silica gel to dehumidify the atmospheric gas prior to its passage through the geolite beds. Bed performance is evaluated from adsorption characteristics, heat and mass transfer, and pressure drop.

  8. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  9. A Comparative Study of the Adsorption of Water and Methanol in Zeolite BEA: A Molecular Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Van T.; Nguyen, Phuong T.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Wick, Collin D.; Do, Duong D.

    2014-09-15

    Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were carried out to study the equilibrium adsorption concentration of methanol and water in all-silica zeolite BEA over the wide temperature and pressure ranges. For both water and methanol, their adsorptive capacity increases with increasing pressure and decreasing temperature. The onset of methanol adsorption occurs at much lower pressures than water adsorption at all temperatures. Our GCMC simulation results also indicate that the adsorption isotherms of methanol exhibit a gradual change with pressure while water adsorption shows a sharp first-order phase transition at low temperatures. To explore the effects of Si/Al ratio on adsorption, a series of GCMC simulations of water and methanol adsorption in zeolites HBEA with Si/Al=7, 15, 31, 63 were performed. As the Si/Al ratio decreases, the onsets of both water and methanol adsorption dramatically shift to lower pressures. The type V isotherm obtained for water adsorption in hydrophobic BEA progressively changes to type I isotherm with decreasing Si/Al ratio in hydrophilic HBEA. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  10. Adsorptive removal of methylene blue by CuO-acid modified sepiolite as effective adsorbent and its regeneration with high-temperature gas stream.

    PubMed

    Su, Chengyuan; Wang, Liang; Chen, Menglin; Huang, Zhi; Lin, Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic adsorption of methylene blue dye onto CuO-acid modified sepiolite was investigated. Meanwhile, the equilibrium and kinetic data of the adsorption process were studied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Furthermore, a high-temperature gas stream was applied to regenerate the adsorbent. The results showed that the Langmuir isotherm model was applied to describe the adsorption process. The positive value of enthalpy change indicated that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. In the dynamic adsorption process, the best adsorption performance was achieved when the ratio of column height to diameter was 2.56 and the treatment capacity was 6 BV/h. The optimal scenario for regeneration experiments was the regeneration temperature of 550-650 °C, the space velocity of 100 min(-1) and the regeneration time of 10 min. The effective adsorption of CuO-acid modified sepiolite was kept for 12 cycles of adsorption and regeneration. PMID:27533859

  11. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  12. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  13. Remediation of textile effluent using agricultural residues.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Chandrashekar B; Singh, Dalel; Nigam, Poonam

    2002-01-01

    The sorption of artificial dye effluent made from two different dyes, Solar orange 7 GLL and Solar Jade Green FFB from Clariant, onto three different agricultural residues--barley husk, sugarcane bagasse, and wheat straw--was studied. Twenty percent of 600-microm particle size of these agricultural residues was used as substrates and studied individually. The percentage of dye removal was observed in concentrations of dye varying from 50 to 200 mg/L. The effect of temperature ranging from 25 to 50 degrees C and pH from 6.0 to 12.0 on the dye removal by the substrates was also studied. The effective adsorption of the substrates was calculated.

  14. Separation of capsaicin from capsaicinoids by macroporous resin adsorption chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changxia; Liu, Ruican; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yiming; Xu, Tao; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei; Liu, Chunqiao

    2015-12-01

    The aim of present study is to develop an efficient and low-cost method for capsaicin production isolated from capsaicinoids by macroporous resin adsorption chromatography. HZ816 resin has shown the best adsorption and desorption capacities for capsaicin among other resins. To optimize the operating parameters for separation, initial concentration, diameter-to-height ratio, mobile phase ratio, and crystallization method were investigated. When capsaicinoids solution (5 g/L) was loaded onto the column (diameter-to-height ratio = 1:12) with ethanol/1% w/w NaOH (4:6, v/v) as the mobile phase, capsaicin was purified most effectively. By using acid neutralization as the crystallization method, the purity of capsaicin improved from 90.3 to 99.5% with 82.3% yield. In conclusion, this study provides a simple and low-cost method for the industrial-scale production of high-purity capsaicin. PMID:26456215

  15. Quantitation of enantiospecific adsorption on chiral nanoparticles from optical rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Nisha; Ondeck, Nathaniel; Gellman, Andrew J.

    2014-11-01

    Au nanoparticles modified with enantiomerically pure D- or L-cysteine have been shown to serve as enantioselective adsorbents of R- and S-propylene oxide. A simple adsorption model and accompanying experimental protocol have been developed to enable optical rotation measurements to be analyzed for quantitative determination of the ratios of the enantiospecific adsorption equilibrium constants of chiral species on the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles, KLS/KDS = KDR/KLR. This analysis is robust in the sense that it obviates the need to measure the absolute surface area of the absorbent nanoparticles, a quantity that is somewhat difficult to obtain accurately. This analysis has been applied to optical rotation data obtained from solutions of R- and S-propylene oxide, in varying concentration ratios, with D- and L-cysteine coated Au nanoparticles, in varying concentration ratios.

  16. Adsorption characteristics of Congo Red onto the chitosan/montmorillonite nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wang, Aiqin

    2007-08-25

    A series of biopolymer chitosan/montmorillonite (CTS/MMT) nanocomposites were prepared by controlling the molar ratio of chitosan (CTS) and montmorillonite (MMT). The nanocomposites were characterized by FTIR and XRD. The effects of different molar ratios of CTS and MMT, initial pH value of the dye solution and temperature on adsorption capacities of samples for Congo Red (CR) dye have been investigated. The adsorption capacities of CTS, MMT and CTS/MMT nanocomposite with CTS to MMT molar ratio of 5:1 for CR were compared. The results indicated that the adsorption capacity of CTS/MMT nanocomposite was higher than the mean values of those of CTS and MMT. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms were also studied. It was shown that all the sorption processes were better fitted by pseudo-second-order equation and the Langmuir equation. PMID:17349744

  17. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  18. Characterization of air pollution control residues produced in a municipal solid waste incinerator in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Quina, Margarida J; Santos, Regina C; Bordado, João C; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2008-04-01

    This study is mainly related with the physical and chemical characterization of a solid waste, produced in a municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process, which is usually referred as air pollution control (APC) residue. The moisture content, loss on ignition (LOI), particle size distribution, density, porosity, specific surface area and morphology were the physical properties addressed here. At the chemical level, total elemental content (TC), total availability (TA) and the leaching behaviour with compliance tests were determined, as well as the acid neutralization capacity (ANC). The main mineralogical crystalline phases were identified, and the thermal behaviour of the APC residues is also shown. The experimental work involves several techniques such as laser diffraction spectrometry, mercury porosimetry, helium pycnometry, gas adsorption, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), ion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous thermal analysis (STA). The results point out that the APC residues do not comply with regulations in force at the developed countries, and therefore the waste should be considered hazardous. Among the considered heavy metals, lead, zinc and chromium were identified as the most problematic ones, and their total elemental quantities are similar for several samples collected in an industrial plant at different times. Moreover, the high amount of soluble salts (NaCl, KCl, calcium compounds) may constitute a major problem and should be taken into account for all management strategies. The solubility in water is very high (more than 24% for a solid/liquid ratio of 10) and thus the possible utilizations of this residue are very limited, creating difficulties also in the ordinary treatments, such as in solidification/stabilization with binders.

  19. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  20. [Thermodynamics adsorption and its influencing factors of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on the bentonite and humus].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Chi; Zai, De-Xin; Zhao, Rong

    2010-11-01

    The adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite and humus was investigated by using the equilibrium oscillometry. The adsorption capacity of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on humus was great higher than bentonite at the same concentration. Equilibrium data of Langmuir, Freundlich isotherms showed significant relationship to the adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on humus (chlorpyrifos: R2 0.996 4, 0.996 3; triazophos: R2 0.998 9, 0.992 4). Langmuir isotherm was the best for chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite (chlorpyrifos: R2 = 0.995 7, triazophos: R2 = 0.998 9). The pH value, adsorption equilibrium time and temperature were the main factors affecting adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite and humus. The adsorption equilibrium time on mixed adsorbent was 12h for chlorpyrifos and 6h for triazophos respectively. The mass ratio of humus and bentonite was 12% and 14% respectively, the adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos was the stronglest and tended to saturation. At different temperatures by calculating the thermodynamic parameters deltaG, deltaH and deltaS, confirmed that the adsorption reaction was a spontaneous exothermic process theoretically. The adsorption was the best when the pH value was 6.0 and the temperature was 15 degrees C.

  1. Adsorption of cadmium ions on oxygen surface sites in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.F.; Thomas, K.M.

    2000-02-08

    Various types of oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the surface of coconut shell derived activated carbon by oxidation using nitric acid. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and selective neutralization were used to characterize the surface oxygen functional groups. The oxidized carbons were also heat treated to provide a suite of carbons where the oxygen functional groups of various thermal stabilities were varied progressively. The adsorption of cadmium ions was enhanced dramatically by oxidation of the carbon. The ratio of released protons to adsorbed cadmium ions on oxidized carbon was approximately 2, indicating cation exchange was involved in the process of adsorption. Na{sup +} exchange studies with the oxidized carbon gave a similar ratio. After heat treatment of the oxidized carbons to remove oxygen functional groups, the ratio of H{sup +} released to Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed and the adsorption capacity decreased significantly. Both reversible and irreversible processes were involved in cadmium ion adsorption with reversible adsorption having higher enthalpy. The irreversible adsorption resulted from cation exchange with carboxylic acid groups, whereas the reversible adsorption probably involved physisorption of the partially hydrated cadmium ion.

  2. Lead sorption-desorption from organic residues.

    PubMed

    Duarte Zaragoza, Victor M; Carrillo, Rogelio; Gutierrez Castorena, Carmen M

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption are mechanisms involved in the reduction of metal mobility and bioavailability in organic materials. Metal release from substrates is controlled by desorption. The capacity of coffee husk and pulp residues, vermicompost and cow manure to adsorb Pb2+ was evaluated. The mechanisms involved in the sorption process were also studied. Organic materials retained high concentrations of lead (up to 36,000 mg L(-1)); however, the mechanisms of sorption varied according to the characteristics of each material: degree of decomposition, pH, cation exchange capacity and percentage of organic matter. Vermicompost and manure removed 98% of the Pb from solution. Lead precipitated in manure and vermicompost, forming lead oxide (PbO) and lead ferrite (PbFe4O7). Adsorption isotherms did not fit to the typical Freundlich and Langmuir equations. Not only specific and non-specific adsorption was observed, but also precipitation and coprecipitation. Lead desorption from vermicompost and cow manure was less than 2%. For remediation of Pb-polluted sites, the application of vermicompost and manure is recommended in places with alkaline soils because Pb precipitation can be induced, whereas coffee pulp residue is recommended for acidic soils where Pb is adsorbed.

  3. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  4. Pesticide residues in eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Cromartie, E.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.

    1969-01-01

    Bald and golden eagles found sick or dead in 18 States and Canada during 1964-1965 were analyzed for pesticide residues. Residues in bald eagles were considerably higher than in golden eagles. Residues of DDE, DDD, and dieldrin were detected in all samples of bald eagle carcasses; other compounds found, less frequently were heptachlor epoxide, endrin, and DCBP, a metabolite of DDT. DDE was detected in all samples of golden eagle carcasses; DDD, DDT, dieldrin, and heptachlor epoxide were detected less frequently.

  5. Robust design of binary countercurrent adsorption separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Storti, G. ); Mazzotti, M.; Morbidelli, M.; Carra, S. )

    1993-03-01

    The separation of a binary mixture, using a third component having intermediate adsorptivity as desorbent, in a four section countercurrent adsorption separation unit is considered. A procedure for the optimal and robust design of the unit is developed in the frame of Equilibrium Theory, using a model where the adsorption equilibria are described through the constant selectivity stoichiometric model, while mass-transfer resistances and axial mixing are neglected. By requiring that the unit achieves complete separation, it is possible to identify a set of implicity constraints on the operating parameters, that is, the flow rate ratios in the four sections of the unit. From these constraints explicit bounds on the operating parameters are obtained, thus yielding a region in the operating parameters space, which can be drawn a priori in terms of the adsorption equilibrium constants and the feed composition. This result provides a very convenient tool to determine both optimal and robust operating conditions. The latter issue is addressed by first analyzing the various possible sources of disturbances, as well as their effect on the separation performance. Next, the criteria for the robust design of the unit are discussed. Finally, these theoretical findings are compared with a set of experimental results obtained in a six port simulated moving bed adsorption separation unit operated in the vapor phase.

  6. Mobility of organic carbon from incineration residues

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Holger Svensson, Malin

    2008-07-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may affect the transport of pollutants from incineration residues when landfilled or used in geotechnical construction. The leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash and air pollution control residue (APC) from the incineration of waste wood was investigated. Factors affecting the mobility of DOC were studied in a reduced 2{sup 6-1} experimental design. Controlled factors were treatment with ultrasonic radiation, full carbonation (addition of CO{sub 2} until the pH was stable for 2.5 h), liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, pH, leaching temperature and time. Full carbonation, pH and the L/S ratio were the main factors controlling the mobility of DOC in the bottom ash. Approximately 60 weight-% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the bottom ash was available for leaching in aqueous solutions. The L/S ratio and pH mainly controlled the mobilization of DOC from the APC residue. About 93 weight-% of TOC in the APC residue was, however, not mobilized at all, which might be due to a high content of elemental carbon. Using the European standard EN 13 137 for determination of total organic carbon (TOC) in MSWI residues is inappropriate. The results might be biased due to elemental carbon. It is recommended to develop a TOC method distinguishing between organic and elemental carbon.

  7. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  8. PDMS compound adsorption in context.

    PubMed

    Li, Nianzhen; Schwartz, Michael; Ionescu-Zanetti, Cristian

    2009-02-01

    Soft lithography of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), an elastomeric polymer, has enabled rapid and inexpensive fabrication of microfluidic devices for various biotechnology applications. However, concerns remain about adsorption of compounds on PDMS surfaces because of its porosity and hydrophobicity. Here, the adsorption of 2 small fluorescent dyes of different hydrophobicity (calcein and 5- (and 6-)carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMR)) on PDMS surface has been systematically characterized, and PDMS adsorption has been compared with 2 traditional substrates: glass and polystyrene. To characterize adsorption in a regimen that is more relevant to microfluidic applications, the adsorption and desorption of the 2 compounds in PDMS microfluidic channels under flow conditions were also studied. Results showed that there was minimal adsorption of the hydrophilic compound calcein on PDMS, whereas the more hydrophobic TMR adsorbed on PDMS up to 4 times of that on glass or polystyrene. Under flow conditions, the desorption profiles and times needed to drop desorbed compound concentrations to negligible levels (desorption time constant, 10-42 s) were characterized. In the worst case scenario, after a 4-min exposure to TMR, 4 min of continuous wash resulted in compound concentrations in the microchannels to drop to values below 2 x 10(- 5) of the initial concentration.

  9. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  10. Partitioning Residue-derived and Residue-induced Emissions of N2O Using 15N-labelled Crop Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, R. E.; Carverhill, J.; Lemke, R.; Knight, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of N2O emissions in Canada indicate that 17% of all agriculture-based emissions are associated with the decomposition of crop residues. However, research specific to the western Canadian prairies (including Saskatchewan) has shown that the N2O emission factor for N sources in this region typically ranges between 0.2 and 0.6%, which is well below the current IPCC default emission factor of 1.0%. Thus, it stands to reason that emissions from crop residues should also be lower than those calculated using the current IPCC emission factor. Current data indicates that residue decomposition, N mineralization and N2O production are affected by a number of factors such as C:N ratio and chemical composition of the residue, soil type, and soil water content; thus, a bench-scale incubation study was conducted to examine the effects of soil type and water content on N2O emissions associated with the decomposition of different crop residues. The study was carried out using soils from the Black, Dark Brown, Brown, and Gray soil zones and was conducted at both 50% and 70% water-filled pore space (WFPS); the soils were amended with 15N-labeled residues of wheat, pea, canola, and flax, or with an equivalent amount of 15N-labeled urea; 15N2O production was monitored using a Picarro G5101-i isotopic N2O analyzer. Crop residue additions to the soils resulted in both direct and indirect emissions of N2O, with residue derived emissions (RDE; measured as 15N2O) generally exceeding residue-induced emissions (RIE) at 50% WFPS—with RDEs ranging from 42% to 88% (mean = 58%) of the total N2O. Conversely, at 70% WFPS, RDEs were generally lower than RIEs—ranging from 21% to 83% (mean = 48%). Whereas both water content and soil type had an impact on N2O production, there was a clear and consistent trend in the emission factors for the residues; i.e., emissions were always greatest for the canola residue and lowest for the wheat residue and urea fertilizer; and intermediate for pea

  11. Miscible viscous fingering with linear adsorption on the porous matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M.; Martin, M.; De Wit, A.

    2007-07-01

    Viscous fingering between miscible fluids of different viscosities can affect the dispersion of finite samples in porous media. In some applications, as typically in chromatographic separations or pollutant dispersion in underground aquifers, adsorption onto the porous matrix of solutes (the concentration of which rules the viscosity of the solution) can affect the fingering dynamics. Here, we investigate theoretically the influence of such an adsorption on the stability and nonlinear properties of viscous samples displaced in a two-dimensional system by a less viscous and miscible carrying fluid. The model is based on Darcy's law for the evolution of the fluid velocity coupled to a diffusion-convection equation for the concentration of a solute in the mobile phase inside the porous medium. The adsorption-desorption dynamics of the solute onto the stationary phase is assumed to be at equilibrium, to follow a linear isotherm and is characterized by a retention parameter κ' equal to the adsorption-desorption equilibrium constant K multiplied by the phase ratio F. In practice, retention on the porous matrix renormalizes the log-mobility ratio by a factor (1+κ'). Correspondingly, a linear stability analysis and nonlinear simulations of the model show that an increase of κ' leads to a stabilization of viscous fingering with fingers appearing on a dimensional time scale multiplied by (1+κ')3 and with a dimensional wavelength multiplied by (1+κ').

  12. The Golden Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2004-01-01

    The Golden Ratio is sometimes called the "Golden Section" or the "Divine Proportion", in which three points: A, B, and C, divide a line in this proportion if AC/AB = AB/BC. "Donald in Mathmagicland" includes a section about the Golden Ratio and the ratios within a five-pointed star or pentagram. This article presents two computing exercises that…

  13. Equilibrium and kinetic data and process design for adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Emrah; Ozacar, Mahmut; Sengil, I Ayhan

    2008-06-15

    The adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite in a batch adsorber has been studied. Four kinetic models, the pseudo first- and second-order equations, the Elovich equation and the intraparticle diffusion equation, were selected to follow the adsorption process. Kinetic parameters; rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and correlation coefficients, for each kinetic equation were calculated and discussed. It was shown that the adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite could be described by the pseudo second-order equation. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin equations. Adsorption of Congo Red onto bentonite followed the Langmuir isotherm. A single stage batch adsorber was designed for different adsorbent mass/treated effluent volume ratios using the Langmuir isotherm. PMID:18055111

  14. Adsorption of lanthanum to goethite in the presence of gluconate

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Laurence C.; Sarah Pepper; Sue Clark

    2005-05-01

    Adsorption of Lanthanum to Goethite in the Presence of Gluconic Acid L. C. HULL,1 S. E. PEPPER2 AND S. B. CLARK2 1Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (hulllc@inel.gov) 2Washington State University, Pullman, WA (spepper@wsu.edu), (s_clark@wsu.edu) Lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elements in radioactive waste can pose risks to humans and ecological systems for many years. Organic complexing agents, from natural organic matter or the degradation of waste package components, can alter the mobility of these elements. We studied the effect of gluconic acid, as an analogue for cellulose degradation products, on the adsorption of lanthanum, representing lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elments, to goethite, representing natural iron minearals and degradation products of waste packages. Batch pH adsorption edge experiments were conducted with lanthanum alone, and with lanthanum and gluconate at a 1:1 mole ratio. Lanthanum concentrations studied were 0.1, 1, and 10 mM, covering a range from 10% to 1000% of the calculated available adsorption sites on goethite. In the absence of gluconate, lanthanum was primarily present in solution as free lanthanum ion. With gluconate present, free lanthanum concentration in solution decreased with increasing pH as step-wise deprotonation of the gluconate molecule increased the fraction lanthanum complexed with gluconate. Adsorption to the goethite surface was represented with the diffuse double-layer model. The number of adsorption sites and the intrinsic binding constants for the surface complexes were estimated from the pH adsorption edge data using the computer code FITEQL 4.0. Two surface reactions were used to fit the adsorption data in the absence of gluconate. A strong binding site with no proton release and a much higher concentration of weak binding sites with release of two protons per lanthanum adsorbed. The adsorption of lanthanum was not measurably affected by the presence of gluconate

  15. Expanded and packed bed albumin adsorption on fluoride modified zirconia.

    PubMed

    Mullick, A; Griffith, C M; Flickinger, M C

    1998-11-01

    The expanded bed characteristics of 75-103microm fluoride-modified zirconia (FmZr) particles synthesized by a fed batch oil emulsion process were investigated. These particles are distinguished from commercially available expanded-bed adsorbents by virtue of their high density (2.8 g/cc) and the mixed mode protein retention mechanism which allows for the retention of both cationic and anionic proteins. The linear velocity versus bed porosity data agree with the Richardson-Zaki relationship with the terminal velocity in infinite medium of 2858.4 cm/h and a bed expansion index of 5.1. Residence time distribution (RTD) studies and bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption studies were performed as a function of the height of the settled bed to the column diameter (H:D) ratio and degree of bed expansion with superficial velocities of 440 to 870 cm/h. The settled bed, a 2x expanded bed, and a 3x expanded bed were studied for the H:D ratios of 1:1, 2:1, and 3:1. The dynamic binding capacity (DBC) at 5% breakthrough was low (2-8 mg BSA/mL settled bed) and was independent of the H:D ratio or the degree of bed expansion. The saturation DBC was 32.3 +/- 7.0 mg BSA/mL settled bed. The adsorption-desorption kinetics and intraparticle diffusion for protein adsorption on FmZr (38-75 micrometer) were investigated by studying the packed bed RTD and BSA adsorption as a function of temperature and flow rate. The data show that the adsorption-desorption kinetics along with intraparticle diffusion significantly influence protein adsorption on FmZr. Low residence times ( approximately 0.8 min) of BSA result in a DBC at 5% breakthrough which is 3.5-fold lower compared to that at 6-fold higher protein residence time. At low linear velocity (45 cm/h) the breakthrough curve is nearly symmetrical and becomes asymmetrical and more dispersed at higher linear velocity (270 cm/h) due to the influence of slow adsorption-desorption kinetics and intraparticle diffusion. Bioeng 60: 333-340, 1998. PMID

  16. An active carbon catalyst prevents coke formation from asphaltenes during the hydrocracking of vacuum residue

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuyama, H.; Terai, S.

    2007-07-01

    Active carbons were prepared by the steam activation of a brown coal char. The active carbon with mesopores showed greater adsorption selectivity for asphaltenes. The active carbon was effective at suppressing coke formation, even with the high hydrocracking conversion of vacuum residue. The analysis of the change in the composition of saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes in the cracked residue with conversion demonstrated the ability of active carbon to restrict the transformation of asphaltenes to coke. The active carbon that was richer in mesopores was presumably more effective at providing adsorption sites for the hydrocarbon free-radicals generated initially during thermal cracking to prevent them from coupling and polycondensing.

  17. Metal adsorption on mosses: Toward a universal adsorption model.

    PubMed

    González, A G; Pokrovsky, O S

    2014-02-01

    This study quantifies the adsorption of heavy metals on 4 typical moss species used for environmental monitoring in the moss bag technique. The adsorption of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto Hypnum sp., Sphagnum sp., Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachytecium rutabulum has been investigated using a batch reactor in a wide range of pH (1.3-11.0) and metal concentrations in solution (1.6μM-3.8mM). A Linear Programming Model (LPM) was applied for the experimental data to derive equilibrium constants and the number of surface binding sites. The surface acid-base titration performed for 4 mosses at a pH range of 3-10 in 0.1M NaNO3 demonstrated that Sphagnum sp. is the most efficient adsorbent as it has the maximal number of proton-binding sites on the surface (0.65mmol g(-1)). The pKa computed for all the moss species suggested the presence of 5 major functional groups: phosphodiester, carboxyl, phosphoryl, amine and polyphenols. The results of pH-edge experiments demonstrated that B. rutabulum exhibits the highest percentage of metal adsorption and has the highest number of available sites for most of the metals studied. However, according to the results of the constant pH "Langmuirian" isotherm, Sphagnum sp. can be considered as the strongest adsorbent, although the relative difference from other mosses is within 20%. The LPM was found to satisfactorily fit the experimental data in the full range of the studied solution parameters. The results of this study demonstrate a rather similar pattern of five metal adsorptions on mosses, both as a function of pH and as a metal concentration, which is further corroborated by similar values of adsorption constants. Therefore, despite the species and geographic differences between the mosses, a universal adsorption edge and constant pH adsorption isotherm can be recommended for 4 studied mosses. The quantitative comparison of metal adsorption with other common natural organic and inorganic materials demonstrates

  18. Fractional Statistical Theory of Adsorption of Polyatomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardo, J. L.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Romá, F.

    2004-10-01

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane’s statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory.

  19. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption of polyatomics.

    PubMed

    Riccardo, J L; Ramirez-Pastor, A J; Romá, F

    2004-10-29

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane's statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory. PMID:15525184

  20. Effects of reactor decontamination complexing agents on soil adsorption-column studies

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Owen, Antionette T.

    1999-12-01

    The effects of picolinate, an organic ligand used to decontaminate nuclear reactor cooling systems, in leachates generated from shallow-land burial (SLB) of low-level nuclear wastes (LLW) on soil adsorption was determined. Using batch adsorption tests and varying the concentration of picolinate, the adsorption tendencies of two metals [Ni(II) and U(VI)] and the ligand were measured as a function of solution pH. We found that when total metal concentrations were fixed at 10^-5 M, picolinate at ligand-to-metal [L:M] ratios $10 did significantly reduce adsorption of Ni but even at a L:M ratio of 100 there was no effect on U(VI) adsorption. These results are compared with data on other metals in the presence of picolinate and for metal adsorption in the presence of EDTA. We conclude that picolinic acid is less of a threat than EDTA in waste leachates to reduce metal adsorption (increase mobility) and that picolinate concentrations must reach or exceed 10^-4 M for the most impacted metals (i.e., those that form the very strongest complexes with picolinate). There are no leachate data on these decontamination agents for the common burial technique (disposal of de-watered resins in high integrity containers) that can be used to evaluate potential hazards of these organo-radionuclide complexes.

  1. Adsorption of methylene blue and methyl red dyes from aqueous solutions onto modified zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Z; Karasavvidis, Ch; Dimirkou, A; Antoniadis, V

    2013-01-01

    Zeolite, hematite, modified zeolite and commercial activated charcoal were examined for their ability to remove methylene blue (MB) and methyl red (MR) from their aqueous solutions. Modified zeolite and hematite were produced according to the Schwertmann and Cornell method while zeolite and commercial activated charcoal were obtained from S&B and Fluka AG companies, respectively. Adsorption experiments were conducted at three different adsorbent-to-solution ratios, namely 8, 16 and 24 g/L under environmental conditions and continuous stirring. Equilibrium isotherms of MB and MR were studied at different initial concentrations (from 5 × 10(-4) to 5 × 10(-3) g/L). MB adsorption kinetics were also studied. The maximum adsorption of MB and MR from their aqueous solutions was achieved at 24 g/L (adsorbent-to-dye solution ratio) after 1 h and was equal to 100% (MB) on modified zeolite and 99% (MR) on commercial activated charcoal, respectively. All the other materials achieved intermediate values of dye adsorption. From the applied kinetic models, the pseudo-second-order equation best described the adsorption of MB and MR. Consequently, modified zeolite showed the highest adsorption capacity for MB, while commercial activated charcoal showed the highest adsorption capacity of MR. The studied adsorbents can be used as filters to remove dyes from wastewaters.

  2. Biosynthesis of bifunctional iron oxyhydrosulfate by Acidithiobacillus ferroxidans and their application to coagulation and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Gan, Min; Song, Zibo; Jie, Shiqi; Zhu, Jianyu; Zhu, Yaowu; Liu, Xinxing

    2016-02-01

    Coagulation and adsorption are important environmental technologies, which were widely applied in water treatment. In this study, a type of villous iron oxyhydrosulfate with low crystallinity, high content iron, sulfate and hydroxyl was synthesized by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, which possessed coagulation and heavy metal adsorption ability simultaneously. The results showed that the Cu(II) adsorption capacity increased within a small range over the pH range of 3.0-5.0 but increased evidently over the range of 6.0-8.0. The maximal Cu(II) adsorption capacity of sample Af and Gf reached 50.97 and 46.08mg/g respectively. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) adsorption was 6.0, and the maximal adsorption capacity reached 51.32 and 59.57mg/g. The Langmuir isotherm can better describe the adsorption behavior of Cr(VI). Coagulation performance of the iron oxyhydrosulfate (Sh) has been significantly enhanced by polysilicic acid (PSA), which was mainly determined by PSA/Sh ratio, pH and coagulant dosage. Coagulation efficiency maintained approximately at 98% when the PSA/Sh ratio ranged from 0.4/0.1 to 1.0/0.1. Polysilicic acid worked efficiently in wide pH range extending, from 2 to 3.5. Coagulation performance improved significantly with the increasing of the coagulant dosage at lower dosage range, while, at higher dosage range, the improvement was not evident even with more coagulant addition.

  3. Influence of activated carbon characteristics on toluene and hexane adsorption: Application of surface response methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo, Mª Teresa; de Yuso, Alicia Martínez; Valenciano, Raquel; Rubio, Begoña; Pino, Mª Rosa

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the adsorption capacity of toluene and hexane over activated carbons prepared according an experimental design, considering as variables the activation temperature, the impregnation ratio and the activation time. The response surface methodology was applied to optimize the adsorption capacity of the carbons regarding the preparation conditions that determine the physicochemical characteristics of the activated carbons. The methodology of preparation produced activated carbons with surface areas and micropore volumes as high as 1128 m2/g and 0.52 cm3/g, respectively. Moreover, the activated carbons exhibit mesoporosity, ranging from 64.6% to 89.1% the percentage of microporosity. The surface chemistry was characterized by TPD, FTIR and acid-base titration obtaining different values of surface groups from the different techniques because the limitation of each technique, but obtaining similar trends for the activated carbons studied. The exhaustive characterization of the activated carbons allows to state that the measured surface area does not explain the adsorption capacity for either toluene or n-hexane. On the other hand, the surface chemistry does not explain the adsorption results either. A compromise between physical and chemical characteristics can be obtained from the appropriate activation conditions, and the response surface methodology gives the optimal activated carbon to maximize adsorption capacity. Low activation temperature, intermediate impregnation ratio lead to high toluene and n-hexane adsorption capacities depending on the activation time, which a determining factor to maximize toluene adsorption.

  4. Correlation and prediction of adsorption capacity and affinity of aromatic compounds on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenhao; Yang, Kun; Chen, Wei; Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Jie; Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption of 22 nonpolar and polar aromatic compounds on 10 carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with various diameters, lengths and surface oxygen-containing group contents was investigated to develop predictive correlations for adsorption, using the isotherm fitting of Polanyi theory-based Dubinin-Ashtakhov (DA) model. Adsorption capacity of aromatic compounds on CNTs is negatively correlated with melting points of aromatic compounds, and surface oxygen-containing group contents and surface area ratios of mesopores to total pores of CNTs, but positively correlated with total surface area of CNTs. Adsorption affinity is positively correlated with solvatochromic parameters of aromatic compounds, independent of tube lengths and surface oxygen-containing group contents of CNTs, but negatively correlated with surface area ratios of mesopores to total pores of CNTs. The correlations of adsorption capacity and adsorption affinity with properties of both aromatic compounds and CNTs clearly have physical significance, can be used successfully with DA model to predict adsorption of aromatic compounds on CNTs from the well-known physiochemical properties of aromatic compounds (i.e., solvatochromic parameters, melting points) and CNTs (i.e., surface area and total acidic group contents), and thus can facilitate the environmental application of CNTs as sorbents and environmental risk assessment of both aromatic contaminants and CNTs.

  5. Mesoscopic coarse-grained simulations of lysozyme adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gaobo; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Coarse-grained simulations are adopted to study the adsorption behavior of lysozyme on different (hydrophobic, neutral hydrophilic, zwitterionic, negatively charged, and positively charged) surfaces at the mesoscopic microsecond time scale (1.2 μs). Simulation results indicate the following: (i) the conformation change of lysozyme on the hydrophobic surface is bigger than any other studied surfaces; (ii) the active sites of lysozyme are faced to the hydrophobic surface with a "top end-on" orientation, while they are exposed to the liquid phase on the hydrophilic surface with a "back-on" orientation; (iii) the neutral hydrophilic surface can induce the adsorption of lysozyme, while the nonspecific protein adsorption can be resisted by the zwitterionic surface; (iv) when the solution ionic strength is low, lysozyme can anchor on the negatively charged surface easily but cannot adsorb on the positively charged surface; (v) when the solution ionic strength is high, the positively charged lysozyme can also adsorb on the like-charged surface; (vi) the major positive potential center of lysozyme, especially the residue ARG128, plays a vital role in leading the adsorption of lysozyme on charged surfaces; (vii) when the ionic strength is high, a counterion layer is formed above the positively charged surface, which is the key factor why lysozyme can adsorb on a like-charged surface. The coarse-grained method based on the MARTINI force field for proteins and the BMW water model could provide an efficient way to understand protein interfacial adsorption behavior at a greater length scale and time scale. PMID:24785197

  6. Adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisaharu; Matsumoto, Michiaki

    1996-07-01

    The adsorption characteristics of metal ions on chitosan chemically modified by D-galactose were examined. The pH dependency on the distribution ratio was found to be affected by the valency of the metal ion, and the apparent adsorption equilibrium constants of the metal ions were determined. The order of adsorption of the metal ions is Ga > In > Nd > Eu for the trivalent metal ions and Cu > Ni > Co for the divalent metal ions. It is believed that amino and hydroxyl groups in the chitosan act as a chelating ligand.

  7. Adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, Cengiz; Walters, Mark; Horne, Roland N.

    1996-01-24

    This paper reports on a continuing experimental effort to characterize the adsorption behavior of rocks from The Geysers steam field in California. We show adsorption results obtained for 36 rock samples. All of the adsorption isotherms plotted on the same graph exhibit an envelope of isotherms. The minimum and the maximum values of the slope (or rate of adsorption) and of the magnitude within this envelope of isotherms belonged to the UOC-1 (felsite) and NCPA B-5 (serpentine) samples. The values of surface area and porosity, and pore size distribution for 19 of the samples indicated a very weak correlation with adsorption. An interpretation of the pore size distributions and the liquid saturation isotherms suggests that the change in the slope and the magnitude of the adsorption isotherms within the envelope is controlled primarily by the physical adsorption mechanism instead of capillary condensation. Grain-size and framework grain to matrix ratio are found to be insufficient to characterize this adsorption behavior. An accurate identification of the mineralogy of the samples will be essential to complete this analysis.

  8. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  9. Adsorption-induced colloidal aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, B. M.; Petit, J.-M.; Beysens, D.

    1998-03-01

    Reversible colloidal aggregation in binary liquid mixtures has been studied for a number of years. As the phase separation temperature of the liquid mixture is approached the thickness of an adsorption layer around the colloidal particles increases. Beysens and coworkers have demonstrated experimentally that this adsorption layer is intimately connected with the aggregation of the colloidal particles, however, no definitive theory has been available which can explain all of the experimental observations. In this contribution we describe an extension of the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek theory of colloidal aggregation which takes into account the presence of the adsorption layer and which more realistically models the attractive dispersion interactions. This modified theory can quantitatively account for many of the observed experimental features such as the characteristics of the aggregated state, the general shape of the aggregation line, and the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient for a lutidine-water mixture containing a small volume fraction of silica colloidal particles.

  10. Arsenite Sorption by Drinking-Water Treatment Residuals: Redox Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makris, K. C.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.

    2005-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a major human carcinogen and could pose a serious human health risk at concentrations as low as 50 ppb in drinking water. Elevated As concentrations in soils currently used for residential purposes (located on former agricultural lands amended with arsenical pesticides) have increased the possibility of human contact with soil-As. Studies have shown that As bioavailability in the environment is primarily a function of its chemical speciation, which depends upon the redox potential. Arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity to living organisms is primarily due to exposure to the reduced species of As - arsenite, i.e., As(III), rather than the oxidized species - arsenate, i.e., As(V); the mobility of As(III) is much higher than As(V). One of the most promising methods to decrease the mobility of arsenite in the soil-water system is promoting its retention onto amorphous Fe/Al hydroxides. Drinking-Water Treatment Residuals (WTRs) are an inexpensive source of such Fe/Al hydroxides, which can be land-applied following the USEPA-regulated biosolids application rules. The WTRs are byproducts of drinking-water purification processes and generally contain sediment, organic carbon, and Al/Fe hydroxides. The hydroxides are typically amorphous and have tremendous affinity for oxyanions (e.g., arsenate). Preliminary work showed that WTRs are characterized by large internal surface area and porosity that partly explains their high affinity for As(V). The current study examines the potential of two WTRs (Fe-based and Al-based) to adsorb arsenite from solution. We hypothesize that As(III) adsorption onto the Fe-based WTR (whose stability is highly redox-sensitive) would be vastly different from the adsorption of As(III) onto the redox-insensitive Al-based WTR. Our main objective is to characterize As(III) sorption by both Fe- and Al-based WTRs by changing critical factors, such as the solid:solution ratio, contact time, and initial As(III) load. Results from this study

  11. FY-2015 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nicholas Ray; Watson, Tony Leroy

    2015-09-30

    Nuclear fission produces fission and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2015 according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. Updates to the deep-bed test system have also been performed to enable the inclusion of evaporated HNO3 and increased NO2 concentrations in future tests. This report summarizes the result of those activities. Test results showed that iodine adsorption from gaseous methyl iodide using reduced silver zeolite (AgZ) resulted in initial iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) under 1,000 for the conditions of the long-duration test performed this year (45 ppm CH3I, 1,000 ppm each NO and NO2, very low H2O levels [3 ppm] in balance air). The mass transfer zone depth exceeded the cumulative 5-inch depth of 4 bed segments, which is deeper than the 2-4 inch depth estimated for the mass transfer zone for adsorbing I2 using AgZ in prior deep-bed tests. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity for the AgZ under the conditions of this test was 6.2% (6.2 g adsorbed I per 100 g sorbent). The maximum Ag utilization was 51%. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  12. Adsorption on a stepped substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikoski, J.; Timonen, J.; Kaski, K.

    1994-09-01

    The effect of substrate steps on the adsorption of particles is considered. The problem is formulated as a lattice-gas model with nearest neighbor interactions and it is studied by a numerical transfer-matrix method. In particular, the influence of the substrate-induced row potential on adsorbed monolayers is discussed. It is found that strong row-transition-like features appear in the presence of a row potential and it is suggested that these may be seen in adsorption on vicinal faces.

  13. Properties and reactivity of Fe-organic matter associations formed by coprecipitation versus adsorption: Clues from arsenate batch adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Robert; Lorenz, Dennis; Guggenberger, Georg; Haumaier, Ludwig; Freund, Anja

    2014-11-01

    Ferric oxyhydroxides play an important role in controlling the bioavailability of oxyanions such as arsenate and phosphate in soil. Despite this, little is known about the properties and reactivity of Fe(III)-organic matter phases derived from adsorption (reaction of organic matter (OM) to post-synthesis Fe oxide) versus coprecipitation (formation of Fe oxides in presence of OM). Coprecipitates and adsorption complexes were synthesized at pH 4 using two natural organic matter (NOM) types extracted from forest floor layers (Oi and Oa horizon) of a Haplic Podzol. Iron(III) coprecipitates were formed at initial molar metal-to-carbon (M/C) ratios of 1.0 and 0.1 and an aluminum (Al)-to-Fe(III) ratio of 0.2. Sample properties were studied by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 gas adsorption, dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic mobility measurements. Arsenic [As(V)] adsorption to Fe-OM phases was studied in batch experiments (168 h, pH 4, 100 μM As). The organic carbon (OC) contents of the coprecipitates (82-339 mg g-1) were higher than those of adsorption complexes (31 and 36 mg g-1), leading to pronounced variations in specific surface area (9-300 m2 g-1), average pore radii (1-9 nm), and total pore volumes (11-374 mm3 g-1) but being independent of the NOM type or the presence of Al. The occlusion of Fe solids by OM (XPS surface concentrations: 60-82 atom% C) caused comparable pHPZC (1.5-2) of adsorption complexes and coprecipitates. The synthesis conditions resulted in different Fe-OM association modes: Fe oxide particles in 'M/C 0.1' coprecipitates covered to a larger extent the outermost aggregate surfaces, for some 'M/C 1.0' coprecipitates OM effectively enveloped the Fe oxides, while OM in the adsorption complexes primarily covered the outer aggregate surfaces. Despite of their larger OC contents, adsorption of As(V) was fastest to coprecipitates formed at low Fe availability (M/C 0.1) and facilitated by desorption of weakly

  14. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption applied to protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, E; Centres, P M; Ochoa, N A; Ramirez-Pastor, A J

    2013-01-15

    Experimental adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed on sulfonated microspheres were described by means of two analytical models: the first is the well-known Langmuir-Freundlich model (LF), and the second, called fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA), is a statistical thermodynamics model developed recently by Ramirez-Pastor et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 186101]. The experimental data, obtained by Hu et al. [Biochem. Eng. J. 23 (2005) 259] for different concentrations of sulfonate group on the surface of the microspheres, were correlated by using a fitting algorithm based on least-squares statistics. The combination of LF and FSTA models, along with the choice of an adequate fitting procedure, allowed us to obtain several conclusions: (i) as previously reported in the literature, the maximum amount adsorbed increases as the amount of sulfonate group increases; (ii) the equilibrium constant does not appear as a sensitive parameter to the amount of sulfonate group on the surface of the microspheres; and (iii) the values of the fitting parameters obtained from FSTA may be indicative of a mismatch between the equilibrium separation of the intermolecular interaction and the distance between the adsorption sites. The exhaustive study presented here has shown that FSTA model is a good one considering the complexity of the physical situation, which is intended to be described and could be more useful in interpreting experimental data of adsorption of molecules with different sizes and shapes. PMID:23084559

  15. Direct gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite residues in the absence and presence of water vapor: a feasibility study for carbon dioxide sequestration.

    PubMed

    Veetil, Sanoopkumar Puthiya; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra; Mercier, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Mineral carbonation of serpentinite mining residue offers an environmentally secure and permanent storage of carbon dioxide. The strategy of using readily available mining residue for the direct treatment of flue gas could improve the energy demand and economics of CO2 sequestration by avoiding the mineral extraction and separate CO2 capture steps. The present is a laboratory scale study to assess the possibility of CO2 fixation in serpentinite mining residues via direct gas-solid reaction. The degree of carbonation is measured both in the absence and presence of water vapor in a batch reactor. The gas used is a simulated gas mixture reproducing an average cement flue gas CO2 composition of 18 vol.% CO2. The reaction parameters considered are temperature, total gas pressure, time, and concentration of water vapor. In the absence of water vapor, the gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite mining residues is negligible, but the residues removed CO2 from the feed gas possibly due to reversible adsorption. The presence of small amount of water vapor enhances the gas-solid carbonation, but the measured rates are too low for practical application. The maximum CO2 fixation obtained is 0.07 g CO2 when reacting 1 g of residue at 200 °C and 25 barg (pCO2 ≈ 4.7) in a gas mixture containing 18 vol.% CO2 and 10 vol.% water vapor in 1 h. The fixation is likely surface limited and restricted due to poor gas-solid interaction. It was identified that both the relative humidity and carbon dioxide-water vapor ratio have a role in CO2 fixation regardless of the percentage of water vapor.

  16. Direct gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite residues in the absence and presence of water vapor: a feasibility study for carbon dioxide sequestration.

    PubMed

    Veetil, Sanoopkumar Puthiya; Pasquier, Louis-César; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra; Mercier, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Mineral carbonation of serpentinite mining residue offers an environmentally secure and permanent storage of carbon dioxide. The strategy of using readily available mining residue for the direct treatment of flue gas could improve the energy demand and economics of CO2 sequestration by avoiding the mineral extraction and separate CO2 capture steps. The present is a laboratory scale study to assess the possibility of CO2 fixation in serpentinite mining residues via direct gas-solid reaction. The degree of carbonation is measured both in the absence and presence of water vapor in a batch reactor. The gas used is a simulated gas mixture reproducing an average cement flue gas CO2 composition of 18 vol.% CO2. The reaction parameters considered are temperature, total gas pressure, time, and concentration of water vapor. In the absence of water vapor, the gas-solid carbonation of serpentinite mining residues is negligible, but the residues removed CO2 from the feed gas possibly due to reversible adsorption. The presence of small amount of water vapor enhances the gas-solid carbonation, but the measured rates are too low for practical application. The maximum CO2 fixation obtained is 0.07 g CO2 when reacting 1 g of residue at 200 °C and 25 barg (pCO2 ≈ 4.7) in a gas mixture containing 18 vol.% CO2 and 10 vol.% water vapor in 1 h. The fixation is likely surface limited and restricted due to poor gas-solid interaction. It was identified that both the relative humidity and carbon dioxide-water vapor ratio have a role in CO2 fixation regardless of the percentage of water vapor. PMID:25940479

  17. Evaluation of the adsorptive behavior of cesium and strontium on hydroxyapatite and zeolite for decontamination of radioactive substances.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, K; Aoki, H

    2016-08-12

    Removal of radioactive substances, such as cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr), has become an emerging issue after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster. To assess the possibility that hydroxyapatite (HA) and zeolites can be used for removal of radioactive substances, the adsorption capacities of Cs and Sr on the HA and a zeolite were investigated. The influence of Fe ions on Cs and Sr adsorption on the HA and the zeolite was also evaluated, because Fe ions are the most effective inhibitor of Cs adsorption on the zeolite.In the Cs adsorption process on the HA and the zeolite, the zeolite showed a higher adsorption ratio than the HA, and the maximum sorption capacity of the zeolite was calculated as 196 mg/g, whereas the HA showed a higher Sr adsorption ratio than the zeolite. The maximum sorption capacity of Sr on the HA was 123 mg/g. Under coexistence with Fe, Cs adsorption on the zeolite decreased with increasing Fe concentration, reaching 2.0 ± 0.8% at 0.1 M Fe concentration. In contrast, Cs adsorption on the zeolite was improved by adding the HA. In the case of coexistence of the HA, the Cs adsorption on the mixture of the HA and the zeolite was 52.4% ± 3.6 % at 0.1 M Fe concentration, although Cs adsorption on the HA alone was quite low. In the Fe adsorption processes of the HA and the zeolite, the HA exhibited a maximum sorption capacity of 256 mg/g, which was much higher than that of the zeolite (111 mg/g). The high affinity of Fe on the HA contributes to the improvement of the deteriorated Cs adsorption on the zeolite due to Fe ions. PMID:27567777

  18. Residue chemistry guidelines.

    PubMed

    Olinger, C L; Schmitt, R D; Zager, E

    1993-01-01

    Residue chemistry guidelines are designed to determine what the potential residues in food are and how much may be present as a result of pesticide application, so that a tolerance level may be established. Some requirements are established to assist in the enforcement of tolerances by the USDA, FDA, and the states. I realize I have given you a quick overview of the residue chemistry requirements. There are many documents which are available if you should require more information, such as the Subdivision O Residue Chemistry Guidelines, Standard Evaluation Procedures (which are used by reviewers when evaluating the studies), the Data Reporting Guidelines (which provide guidance on preparing final reports), and the Technical Guidance from Phase III of Reregistration. We have also released various papers on studies when additional guidance is required. Most of these documents are available from NTIS. I hope you will consider this information when auditing residue chemistry studies. As I see the efforts that you, the QA professionals, have made to educate yourselves on residue chemistry studies through programs such as this meeting, I have a little more confidence in answering the question "Do you trust them?" with a "Yes." Thank you.

  19. Adsorption of Organics from Domestic Water Supplies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Michael J.; Suffet, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    This article discusses the current state of the art of organics removal by adsorption. Various theoretical explanations of the adsorption process are given, along with practical results from laboratory, pilot-scale, and full-scale applications. (CS)

  20. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  1. Compression Ratio Adjuster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    New mechanism alters compression ratio of internal-combustion engine according to load so that engine operates at top fuel efficiency. Ordinary gasoline, diesel and gas engines with their fixed compression ratios are inefficient at partial load and at low-speed full load. Mechanism ensures engines operate as efficiently under these conditions as they do at highload and high speed.

  2. Offer/Acceptance Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mimi

    1997-01-01

    Explores how human resource professionals, with above average offer/acceptance ratios, streamline their recruitment efforts. Profiles company strategies with internships, internal promotion, cooperative education programs, and how to get candidates to accept offers. Also discusses how to use the offer/acceptance ratio as a measure of program…

  3. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Specialized ratio analysis.

    PubMed

    Wyer, J C; Salzinger, F H

    1983-01-01

    Many common management techniques have little use in managing a medical group practice. Ratio analysis, however, can easily be adapted to the group practice setting. Acting as broad-gauge indicators, financial ratios provide an early warning of potential problems and can be very useful in planning for future operations. The author has gathered a collection of financial ratios which were developed by participants at an education seminar presented for the Virginia Medical Group Management Association. Classified according to the human element, system component, and financial factor, the ratios provide a good sampling of measurements relevant to medical group practices and can serve as an example for custom-tailoring a ratio analysis system for your medical group.

  5. Multilayer adsorption by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Mateo, J.; Salmerón Sánchez, M.; Monleón Pradas, M.; Torregrosa Cabanilles, C.

    2012-10-01

    Adsorption phenomena are characterized by models that include free parameters trying to reproduce experimental results. In order to understand the relationship between the model parameters and the material properties, the adsorption of small molecules on a crystalline plane surface has been simulated using the bond fluctuation model. A direct comparison between the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) model for multilayer adsorption and computer simulations allowed us to establish correlations between the adsorption model parameters and the simulated interaction potentials.

  6. Adsorption and excess fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of Xe and Kr on lunar soil 10084 was measured by a method that employs only very low fractions of monolayer coverage. Results are presented as parameters for calculation of the Henry constant for adsorption as a function of temperature. The adsorption potentials are about 3 kcal/mole for Kr and 5 kcal/mole for Xe; heating the sample in vacuum increased the Xe potential to nearly 7 kcal/mole. Henry constants at the characteristic lunar temperature are about 0.3 cu cm STP/g-atm. These data were applied to consider whether adsorption is important in producing the excess fission Xe effect characteristic of highland breccias. Sorption equilibrium with a transient lunar atmosphere vented fission Xe produces concentrations seven orders of magnitude lower than observed concentrations. Higher concentrations result because of the resistance of the regolith to upward diffusion of Xe. A diffusion coefficient of 0.26 sq cm/sec is estimated for this process.

  7. Interfacial adsorption in ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Cruz, M.O. de la; Voorhees, P.W.

    1999-11-26

    Interfaces of A-B-C ternary alloys decomposed into two and three phases are studied. The effect of the gradient energy coefficients {bar {kappa}}{sub II}, I = A, B, C, on the interface composition profiles of ternary alloys is examined. The adsorption of component C in ternary alloys is obtained numerically by finding steady-state solutions of the nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard equations and by solving the two Euler-Lagrange equations resulting from minimizing the interfacial energy, and analytically near the critical point. It is found that the solutions from both numerical methods are identical for a two-phase system. In symmetric ternary systems (equal interaction energy between each pair of components) with a minority component C, the gradient energy coefficient of C, {bar {kappa}}{sub CC}, can have a very strong influence on the degree of adsorption. In the {alpha} and {beta} two-phase regions, where {alpha} and {beta} are the phases rich in the majority components A and B, respectively, as {bar {kappa}}{sub CC} increases, the adsorption of the minority component C in the {alpha} and {beta} interfaces decreases. Near a critical point, however, the degree of adsorption of minority component C is independent of the gradient energy coefficient.

  8. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  9. Adsorption and desorption of bivalent metals to hematite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Grover, Valerie A; Hu, Jinxuan; Engates, Karen E; Shipley, Heather J

    2012-01-01

    The use of commercially prepared hematite nanoparticles (37.0 nm) was studied as an adsorbent in the removal of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions. Single-metal adsorption was studied as a function of metal and adsorbent concentrations, whereas binary metal competition was found to be dependent on the molar ratio between the competing metals. Competitive effects indicated that Pb had strong homogenous affinity to the nanohematite surface, and decreased adsorption of Cd, Cu, and Zn occurred when Pb was present in a binary system. Metal adsorption strength to nanohematite at pH 6.0 increased with metal electronegativity: Pb > Cu > Zn ∼ Cd. Equilibrium modeling revealed that the Langmuir-Freundlich composite isotherm adequately described the adsorption and competitive effects of metals to nanohematite, whereas desorption was best described by the Langmuir isotherm. The desorption of metals from nanohematite was found to be pH dependent, with pH 4.0 > pH 6.0 > pH 8.0, and results showed that greater than 65% desorption was achieved at pH 4.0 within three 24-h cycles for all metals.

  10. Accelerating Gas Adsorption on 3D Percolating Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wen, Chenyu; Zhang, Youwei; Wu, Dongping; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-02-01

    In the field of electronic gas sensing, low-dimensional semiconductors such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can offer high detection sensitivity owing to their unprecedentedly large surface-to-volume ratio. The sensitivity and responsivity can further improve by increasing their areal density. Here, an accelerated gas adsorption is demonstrated by exploiting volumetric effects via dispersion of SWCNTs into a percolating three-dimensional (3D) network in a semiconducting polymer. The resultant semiconducting composite film is evaluated as a sensing membrane in field effect transistor (FET) sensors. In order to attain reproducible characteristics of the FET sensors, a pulsed-gate-bias measurement technique is adopted to eliminate current hysteresis and drift of sensing baseline. The rate of gas adsorption follows the Langmuir-type isotherm as a function of gas concentration and scales with film thickness. This rate is up to 5 times higher in the composite than only with an SWCNT network in the transistor channel, which in turn results in a 7-fold shorter time constant of adsorption with the composite. The description of gas adsorption developed in the present work is generic for all semiconductors and the demonstrated composite with 3D percolating SWCNTs dispersed in functional polymer represents a promising new type of material for advanced gas sensors.

  11. Accelerating Gas Adsorption on 3D Percolating Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wen, Chenyu; Zhang, Youwei; Wu, Dongping; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In the field of electronic gas sensing, low-dimensional semiconductors such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can offer high detection sensitivity owing to their unprecedentedly large surface-to-volume ratio. The sensitivity and responsivity can further improve by increasing their areal density. Here, an accelerated gas adsorption is demonstrated by exploiting volumetric effects via dispersion of SWCNTs into a percolating three-dimensional (3D) network in a semiconducting polymer. The resultant semiconducting composite film is evaluated as a sensing membrane in field effect transistor (FET) sensors. In order to attain reproducible characteristics of the FET sensors, a pulsed-gate-bias measurement technique is adopted to eliminate current hysteresis and drift of sensing baseline. The rate of gas adsorption follows the Langmuir-type isotherm as a function of gas concentration and scales with film thickness. This rate is up to 5 times higher in the composite than only with an SWCNT network in the transistor channel, which in turn results in a 7-fold shorter time constant of adsorption with the composite. The description of gas adsorption developed in the present work is generic for all semiconductors and the demonstrated composite with 3D percolating SWCNTs dispersed in functional polymer represents a promising new type of material for advanced gas sensors. PMID:26888337

  12. Accelerating Gas Adsorption on 3D Percolating Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wen, Chenyu; Zhang, Youwei; Wu, Dongping; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In the field of electronic gas sensing, low-dimensional semiconductors such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can offer high detection sensitivity owing to their unprecedentedly large surface-to-volume ratio. The sensitivity and responsivity can further improve by increasing their areal density. Here, an accelerated gas adsorption is demonstrated by exploiting volumetric effects via dispersion of SWCNTs into a percolating three-dimensional (3D) network in a semiconducting polymer. The resultant semiconducting composite film is evaluated as a sensing membrane in field effect transistor (FET) sensors. In order to attain reproducible characteristics of the FET sensors, a pulsed-gate-bias measurement technique is adopted to eliminate current hysteresis and drift of sensing baseline. The rate of gas adsorption follows the Langmuir-type isotherm as a function of gas concentration and scales with film thickness. This rate is up to 5 times higher in the composite than only with an SWCNT network in the transistor channel, which in turn results in a 7-fold shorter time constant of adsorption with the composite. The description of gas adsorption developed in the present work is generic for all semiconductors and the demonstrated composite with 3D percolating SWCNTs dispersed in functional polymer represents a promising new type of material for advanced gas sensors. PMID:26888337

  13. [Preparation of surface molecularly imprinted polymers for penicilloic acid, and its adsorption properties].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Penglei; Luo, Zhimin; Chang, Ruimiao; Ge, Yanhui; Du, Wei; Chang, Chun; Fu, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    On account of the specificity and reproducibility for the determination of penicilloic acid in penicillin, this study aims to prepare penicilloic acid imprinted polymers (PEOA-MIPs) by surface polymerization method at the surface of modified silica particles by using penicilloic acid (PEOA) as the template molecule, methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate ( EGDMA) as the cross linker, and methanol/acetonitrile as the solvents. The synthesis conditions were optimized, and PEOA-MIPs had the best adsorption capacity when the molar ratio of template molecule/functional monomer was 1 :4, cross linking degree was 85% and the solvent ratio of methanol/acetonitrile was 1 :1 (v/v). The adsorption properties were evaluated by adsorption experiments, including the adsorption isotherms, kinetics and selectivity. The adsorption process between PEOA-MIPs and PEOA fitted the Langmuir adsorption isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacity of 122. 78 mg/g and the pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics with fast adsorption kinetics (the equilibrium time of 45 min). The as-synthesized PEOA-MIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The results indicated that the MIPs layer has been successfully grafted on the surface of SiO2 microparticles and the PEOA-MIPs had the excellent thermal stability. The PEOA-MIPs showed the highest selective recognition for PEOA. The PEOA-MIPs possess a high adsorption capacity, rapid mass-transfer rate and high selectivity to PEOA when compared with non-imprinted polymers (PEOA-NIPs). The PEOA-MIPs was expected to be used as the solid phase extraction medium and this study provides the potential applications for fast recognition and analysis of the penicilloic acid in penicillin. PMID:26753284

  14. Adsorption and desorption of chlorpyrifos to soils and sediments.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Seyoum Yami; Beutel, Marc W; Yonge, David R; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2012-01-01

    ,439 and 15,500 L/kg for sediipents. This variation may result from several factors, including various experimental artifacts, variation in quality of soil organic matter, and inconsistencies in experimental methodologies. Based on this review, there appears to be no definitive quantification of chlorpyrifos adsorption or desorption characteristics. Thus, it is difficult to predict its adsorptive behavior with certainty, without resorting to experimental methods specific to the soil or sediment of interest. This limitation should be recognized in the context of current efforts to predict the risk, fate, and transport of chlorpyrifos based upon published partition coefficients. Based on a comprehensive review of the peer-reviewed literature related to adsorption and desorption of chlorpyrifos, we propose the following key areas for future research. From this review, it becomes increasingly evident that pesticide partitioning cannot be fully accounted for by the fraction of soil or solid-matrix organic matter or carbon content. Therefore, research that probes the variation in the nature and quality of soil organic matter on pesticide adsorption is highly desirable. Pesticide persistence and bioavailability depend on insights into desorption capacity. Therefore, understanding the fate and environmental impact of hydrophobic pesticides is incomplete without new research being performed to improve insights into pesticide desorption from soils and sediments. There is also a need for greater attention and consistency in developing experimental methods aimed at estimating partition coefficients. Moreover, in such testing, choosing initial concentrations and liquid-solid ratios that are more representative of environmental conditions could improve usefulness and interpretation of data that are obtained. Future monitoring efforts should include the sampling and analysis of suspended particulates to account for suspended solid-phase CPF, a commonly underestimated fraction in surface

  15. Sugarcane rice residue biochars and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sugarcane production in U.S. involves either pre-harvest burning or after-harvest burning of the residue. Approximately 70-90% of the dry matter of harvested sugarcane trash is lost through open field burning. This practice has caused considerable concerns over air quality and soil sustainability. We propose an alternative conservation approach to convert the sugarcane residue to biochar and used as soil amendment to conserve carbon and potentially improve soil fertility. In this study, fundamental properties of biochars made from sugarcane residue along with rice residues were tested for agronomic and environmental benefits. Sugarcane and rice harvest residues and milling processing byproducts bagasse and rice husk were converted to biochars at different pyrolysis temperatures and characterized. In general, sugarcane leave biochar contained more P, K, Ca and Mg than sugarcane bagasse biochar. Rice straw biochar had more S, K Ca but less P than rice husk biochar. Both biochars had higher available fraction of total P than that of total K. Sugarcane leave biochar converted at 450oC was dominated with various lignin derived phenols as well as non-specific aromatic compounds whereas bagasse biochar was with both lignin derived phenol and poly aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Rice straw char was dominated with non-specific aromatic compounds. At 750oC, charred material was dominated with aromatic ethers while losing the aromatic C=C structures. These molecular and surface property differences likely contributed to the difference in water holding capacities observed with these biochars. On the other hand, rice straw biochars produced at different pyrolysis temperatures had no significant effect on rice germination. Soils treated with sugarcane leave/trash biochar significantly enhanced sugarcane growth especially the root length. Treating soil with either sugarcane leave or bagasse char also enhanced soil adsorption capacity of atrazine; a common herbicide used in sugarcane

  16. Zinc isotope fractionation during surface adsorption by bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafantaris, F. A.; Borrok, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The cycling and transport of zinc (Zn) in natural waters is partly controlled by its adsorption and uptake by bacterial communities. These reactions are reflected in changes in the ratios of stable Zn isotopes; however, the magnitudes and directions of these changes are largely unconstrained. In the current work, we attempt to define Zn isotope fractionation factors for bacteria-Zn interactions by performing adsorption experiments with representative Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas mendocina) bacteria. Experiments included, (1) pH-dependent adsorption using differing bacteria:Zn ratios, (2) Zn loading at constant pH, and (3) kinetics and reversibility experiments. Results indicate that Zn adsorption is fully reversible for both bacterial species. Moreover, under the same experimental conditions both bacterial species adsorbed Zn to similar extents. Initial isotopic analysis (using a Nu Instruments MC-ICP-MS) demonstrates that, as the extent of adsorption increases, the heavier Zn isotopes are preferentially incorporated as bacterial-surface complexes. Under conditions of low bacteria:Zn ratio, the Δ66Znbacteria-solution was about 0.3% for both bacterial species. This separation factor is similar to that found in other studies involving the complexation of Zn with biologic or organic components. For example, the complexation of Zn with Purified Humic Acid (PHA) resulted in a Δ66ZnPHA-solution of +0.24% [1], and sorption of Zn onto two separate diatom species resulted in Δ66Znsolid-solution of +0.43% and +0.27%, respectively [2]. These results suggest that Zn complexation with functional groups common to bacteria and natural organic matter may be a process that universally incorporates the heavier Zn isotopes. Our current work is focused on quantifying Zn isotope fractionation during metabolic incorporation by separating this effect from surface adsorption reactions. [1] Jouvin et al., (2009) Environ. Sci. Technol., 43(15) 5747

  17. Influence of the nature and age of cover crop residues on the sorption of three pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassigneul, Ana; Alletto, Lionel; Chuette, Delphine; Le Gac, Anne-Laure; Hatier, Jules; Etievant, Veronique; Bergheaud, Valérie; Baumberger, Stéphanie; Méchin, Valérie; Justes, Eric; Benoit, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    In agricultural fields, soil and water quality preservation is strongly influenced by pesticides use and behavior. To limit the environmental impacts of agricultural activities, best management practices such as the use of cover crops are encouraged. Cover crops during the fallow period were found to be efficient in reducing nitrate leaching, controlling soil erosion, improving soil organic content and enhancing soil biological activity. This technique was also found to modify soil water dynamics in the following crop. According to these effects, modifications on pesticide behavior in soil, such as sorption, degradation and transport, are expected (Alletto et al., 2012 ; 2013). In this study, the impact of the nature and level of decomposition of cover crop was studied on the sorption characteristics of three pesticides. These pesticides differed in their physicochemical characteristics (hydrophobicity, solubility, persistence) and were two herbicides, S-metolachlor and glyphosate, which are largely used in maize production and predominantly found as pollutants in water; and one fungicide, epoxiconazole. Correlations between pesticide sorption and physicochemical characteristics of the cover crop residues were studied. Residues of oat, turnip rape, red clover and phacelia were collected in March 2011 and incubated at 28°C and at the water holding capacity during 0, 6, 28 or 56 days. For each date, adsorption of the three radiolabeled pesticides was measured in batch on the different cover crop residues, and their biochemical composition (Van Soest fractionation), hydrophobicity (contact angle measurement) and C/N ratio were determined. Results showed that the adsorption of the pesticides differed significantly according to (i) the pesticide, (ii) the nature of cover crop, (iii) the decomposition level of the cover crop and the interaction cover crop x decomposition time. Epoxiconazole was the most adsorbed molecule, with Kd values ranging from 161 ± 30 L/Kg (oat

  18. Dextran-grafted cation exchanger based on superporous agarose gel: adsorption isotherms, uptake kinetics and dynamic protein adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qing-Hong; Jia, Guo-Dong; Sun, Yan

    2010-07-30

    A novel chromatographic medium for high-capacity protein adsorption was fabricated by grafting dextran (40kDa) onto the pore surfaces of superporous agarose (SA) beads. The bead was denoted as D-SA. D-SA, SA and homogeneous agarose (HA) beads were modified with sulfopropyl (SP) group to prepare cation exchangers, and the adsorption and uptake of lysozyme on all three cation-exchange chromatographic beads (SP-HA, SP-SA and SP-D-SA) were investigated at salt concentrations of 6-50mmol/L. Static adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption capacity of SP-D-SA (2.24mmol/g) was 78% higher than that of SP-SA (1.26mmol/g) and 54% higher than that of SP-HA (1.45mmol/g) at a salt concentration of 6mmol/L. Moreover, salt concentration had less influence on the adsorption capacity and dissociation constant of SP-D-SA than it did on SP-HA, suggesting that dextran-grafted superporous bead is a more potent architecture for chromatographic beads. In the dynamic uptake of lysozyme to the three cation-exchange beads, the D(e)/D(0) (the ratio of effective pore diffusivity to free solution diffusivity) values of 1.6-2.0 were obtained in SA-D-SA, indicating that effective pore diffusivities of SP-D-SA were about two times higher than free solution diffusivity for lysozyme. At 6mmol/L NaCl, the D(e) value in SA-D-SA (22.0x10(-11)m(2)/s) was 14.4-fold greater than that in SP-HA. Due to the superior uptake kinetics in SA-D-SA, the highest dynamic binding capacity (DBC) and adsorption efficiency (the ratio of DBC to static adsorption capacity) was likewise found in SP-D-SA. It is thus confirmed that SP-D-SA has combined the advantages of superporous matrix structure and drafted ligand chemistry in mass transport and offers a new opportunity for the development of high-performance protein chromatography.

  19. Birthweight ratio revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Brownlee, K G; Ng, P C; Roussounis, S H; Dear, P R

    1991-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis suggested in a recent report that the birthweight ratio might be a useful predictor of several important clinical outcome measures in babies of less than 31 weeks' gestation, we examined the association between the birthweight ratio and aspects of both short and long term outcome in 436 Leeds babies of less than 31 weeks' gestation. Unlike the report, and contrary to what we had expected, we were unable to find any significant association between birthweight ratio and length of time on the ventilator, mortality, neurological outcome, or intellectual outcome. PMID:2025035

  20. Beta-thujaplicin: new quantitative CZE method and adsorption to goethite.

    PubMed

    Dyrskov, Lone; Strobel, Bjarne W; Svensmark, Bo; Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun

    2004-03-24

    Beta-thujaplicin (beta-TH) is a toxic tropolone derivative present in the heartwood of western red cedar (Thuja plicata) and is used as a preservative and antimicrobial additive in a number of commercial goods. beta-TH released from western red cedar timber used outdoor and from other products containing beta-TH may transfer to soil and leach to groundwater and surface waters. The objective of this study was to quantify the adsorption of beta-TH to goethite as a typical model for geosorbents. Adsorption was studied using pH-adjusted goethite suspensions with solid:solution ratios of 1:500, 0.01 M NaNO(3) electrolyte, and 20 degrees C. beta-TH was determined using a new capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method providing a detection limit of 0.21 microM. Near-sorption equilibrium was attained within 48 h. beta-TH showed maximum adsorption at low pH (3.8) and a 70% drop in adsorption from pH 6.2 to 8.8. The Langmuir type adsorption isotherm at pH 5.5 approached a maximum adsorption of 220 micromol/g (= 6.2 micromol/m(2)), which is more than twice the amount of phosphate adsorbed under similar conditions. The affinity of beta-TH for goethite is low as compared with organic ligands such as citrate, oxalate, and 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate. The adsorption data and FTIR analyses indicate that beta-TH is most likely adsorbed as monodentate mononuclear surface complexes at the surface of goethite. Hydrophobic adsorption is thought to contribute to the adsorption, in particular at low pH. The strong adsorption of beta-TH to goethite suggests low mobility in most soil environments, the risk of contamination increasing in soils with high pH (calcareous material), low contents of iron and aluminum oxides, phyllosilicates, and organic matter.

  1. Adsorption of vapreotide on gold colloids studied by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J. A.; Cabanzo, R.; Mejia Ospino, E.

    2016-02-01

    Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) has been used to investigate the somatostatin (SST) analogue Vapreotide (VAP) in gold colloids. The optimum conditions to detect SERS signals of VAP have been studied. The observed SERS bands correspond to different vibrational modes of the peptide; being the most dominant SERS signals the ones derived from the aromatic amino acids Tryptophan (Trp), Phenylalanine (Phe) and Tyrosine (Tyr). Changes in enhancement and wavenumber of the proper bands upon adsorption on gold colloid are consistent with VAP adsorption, primarily through Tryptophan residues.

  2. Adsorption induced enzyme denaturation: the role of protein surface in adsorption induced protein denaturation on allyl glycidyl ether (AGE)-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDM) copolymers.

    PubMed

    Thudi, Lahari; Jasti, Lakshmi S; Swarnalatha, Y; Fadnavis, Nitin W; Mulani, Khudbudin; Deokar, Sarika; Ponrathnam, Surendra

    2012-02-01

    The effects of protein size on adsorption and adsorption-induced denaturation of proteins on copolymers of allyl glycidyl ether (AGE)-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDM) have been studied. Different responses were observed for the amount of protein adsorbed and denatured on the polymer surface for different proteins (trypsin, alchol dehydrogenase from baker's yeast (YADH), glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Gluconobacter cerinus, and alkaline phosphates from calf intestinal mucosa (CIAP). Protein adsorption on the copolymer with 25% crosslink density (AGE-25) was dependent not only on the size of the protein but also on the presence of glycoside residues on the protein surface. Adsorption and denaturation of proteins follows the order YADH>trypsin>GDH>CIAP although the molecular weights of the proteins follow the order YADH>CIAP>GDH>trypsin. The lack of correlation between amount of adsorbed protein and its molecular weight was due to the presence of glycoside residues on CIAP and GDH which protect the enzyme surface from denaturation. Enzyme stabilities in aqueous solutions of 1-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone (CHP) correlate well with the trend in denaturation by the copolymer, strongly suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a major role in protein binding and the mechanism of protein denaturation is similar to that for water-miscible organic solvents.

  3. The adsorption and oxidation of cyanogen on copper surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, A. F.; Chinn, M.; Parkinson, C. R.

    2003-07-01

    The adsorption of cyanogen on clean and oxygen pre-treated graphite supported copper films, and a polycrystalline copper surface, and the co-adsorption of cyanogen and oxygen on graphite supported copper films, and a polycrystalline copper surface has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cyanogen dissociates on the copper surfaces at 300 K, yielding an adsorbed cyano group, CN (a). On the oxygen pre-treated copper surface cyanogen reacts quantitatively with the adsorbed oxygen at 300 K to form a surface cyanate species, NCO. On annealing to 600 K this species decomposes, leaving only N adatoms and residual adsorbed CN on the surface. The co-adsorption of cyanogen and oxygen from a cyanogen-oxygen mixture enhances the formation of NCO to the extent that all available surface oxygen is consumed to form NCO on annealing at 450 K. In the absence of available atomic surface oxygen NCO does not decompose at temperatures up to 600 K. NCO and NCO 2 are shown to be the intermediates in the oxidation of cyanogen on copper films and a polycrystalline copper foil.

  4. Residual Stress Predictions in Polycrystalline Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    VEDULA,VENKATA R.; GLASS,S. JILL; SAYLOR,DAVID M.; ROHRER,GREGORY S.; CARTER,W. CRAIG; LANGER,STEPHEN A.

    1999-12-13

    Microstructure-level residual stresses arise in polycrystalline ceramics during processing as a result of thermal expansion anisotropy and crystallographic disorientation across the grain boundaries. Depending upon the grain size, the magnitude of these stresses can be sufficiently high to cause spontaneous microcracking during the processing of these materials. They are also likely to affect where cracks initiate and propagate under macroscopic loading. The magnitudes of residual stresses in untextured and textured alumina samples were predicted using object oriented finite (OOF) element analysis and experimentally determined grain orientations. The crystallographic orientations were obtained by electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The residual stresses were lower and the stress distributions were narrower in the textured samples compared to those in the untextured samples. Crack initiation and propagation were also simulated using the Griffith fracture criterion. The grain boundary to surface energy ratios required for computations were estimated using AFM groove measurements.

  5. Genesis of ion-adsorption type REE ores in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanematsu, K.; Yoshiaki, K.; Watanabe, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Ion-adsorption type REE deposits, which have been economically mined only in southern China, are predominant supply sources for HREE in the world. The ore bodies consist of weathered granites called ion-adsorption ores. The majority of REE (>50 %) are electrostatically adsorbed onto weathering products in the ores and they can be extracted by ion exchange using an electrolyte solution (e.g., ammonium sulfate solution). Recently the occurrences of ion-adsorption ores have been reported in Indochina, SE Asia. In this study, we discuss geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of parent granites and weathered granites in Thailand in order to reveal the genesis of ion-adsorption ores. Permo-Triassic and Cretaceous-Paleogene granite plutons are distributed from northern Thailand to western Indonesia through eastern Myanmar and Peninsular Malaysia. They are mostly ilmenite-series calcalkaline biotite or hornblende-biotite granites. REE contents of the granites range from 60 to 600 ppm and they are relatively high in Peninsula Thailand. REE-bearing minerals consist mainly of apatite, zircon, allanite, titanite, monazite and xenotime. Some I-type granites contain REE fluorocarbonate (probably synchysite-(Ce)) in cavities and cracks in feldspars and it is the dominant source of REE for ion-adsorption ores because the fluorocarbonate is easily soluble during weathering. In contrast, insoluble monazite and xenotime are not preferable for ion-adsorption ores although they are common ore minerals of placer REE deposits. Weathered granites show REE contents ranging from 60 to 1100 ppm in Thailand because REE are relatively immobile compared with mobile elements (e.g., Na, K, Ca). In the weathered granites, REE are contained in residual minerals and secondary minerals and are adsorbed onto the surface of weathering products. A weathering profile of granite with ion-adsorption type mineralization can be divided into upper and lower parts based on REE enrichment and Ce

  6. Thorough removal of inorganic and organic mercury from aqueous solutions by adsorption on Lemna minor powder.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Yang, Huang; Ni, Jian-Cong

    2011-02-15

    The adsorption ability of duckweed (Lemna minor) powders for removing inorganic and organic mercury (methyl and ethyl mercury) has been studied using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimal adsorption conditions were: (a) the pH value of the solution 7.0 for inorganic and ethyl mercury, 9.0 for methyl mercury, and (b) equilibrium adsorption time 10, 20, and 40 min for inorganic mercury, methyl mercury, and ethyl mercury, respectively. After adsorption by L. minor powder for 40 min, when the initial concentrations of inorganic and organic mercury were under 12.0 μg L(-1) and 50.0 μg L(-1), respectively, the residual concentrations of mercury could meet the criterion of drinking water (1.0 μg L(-1)) and the permitted discharge limit of wastewater (10.0 μg L(-1)) set by China and USEPA, respectively. Thorough removal of both inorganic and organic mercury from aqueous solutions was reported for the first time. The significant adsorption sites were C-O-P and phosphate groups by the surface electrostatic interactions with aqueous inorganic and organic mercury cations, and then the selective adsorption was resulted from the strong chelating interaction between amine groups and mercury on the surface of L. minor cells.

  7. Removal of molybdate anions from water by adsorption on zeolite-supported magnetite.

    PubMed

    Verbinnen, Bram; Block, Chantal; Hannes, Dries; Lievens, Patrick; Vaclavikova, Miroslava; Stefusova, Katarina; Gallios, Georgios; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2012-09-01

    Industrial wastewater may contain high molybdenum concentrations, making treatment before discharge necessary. In this paper, the removal of molybdate anions from water is presented, using clinoptilolite zeolite coated with magnetite nanoparticles. In batch experiments the influence of pH, ionic strength, possible interfering (oxy)anions, temperature and contact time is investigated. Besides determination of kinetic parameters and adsorption isotherms, thermodynamic modeling is performed to get better insight into the adsorption mechanism; molybdenum is assumed to be adsorbed as a FeOMoO2(OH).2H2O inner-sphere complex. At the optimum pH of 3, the adsorption capacity is around 18 mg molybdenum per gram adsorbent. The ionic strength of the solution has no influence on the adsorption capacity. Other anions, added to the molybdenum solution in at least a tenfold excess, only have a minor influence on the adsorption of molybdenum, with the exception of phosphate. Adsorption increases when temperature is increased. It is demonstrated that the adsorbent can be used to remove molybdenum from industrial wastewater streams, and that the limitations set by the World Health Organization (residual concentration of 70 microg/l Mo) can easily be met.

  8. Adsorption kinetics of pesticide in soil assessed by optofluidics-based biosensing platform.

    PubMed

    Long, Feng; Zhu, Anna; Shi, Hanchang; Sheng, Jianwu; Zhao, Zhen

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of pesticides in soil is a key process that affects transport, degradation, mobility, and bioaccumulation of these substances. To obtain extensive knowledge regarding the adsorption processes of pesticides in the environment, the new green assay technologies for the rapid, sensitive, field-deployable, and accurate quantification of pesticides are required. In the present study, an evanescent wave-based optofluidics biosensing platform (EWOB) was developed by combining advanced photonics and microfluidics technology for the rapid sensitive immunodetection and adsorption kinetics assay of pesticides. The robustness, reusability, and accuracy of the EWOB allow an enhanced prediction of pesticide adsorption kinetics in soil. Using atrazine (ATZ) as the target model, we found that the adsorption kinetics in soil followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. EWOB was compared with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method and yielded a good correlation coefficient (r(2)=0.9968). The underestimated results of LC-MS/MS resulted in a higher adsorption constant of ATZ in soil derived from LC-MS/MS than that of a biosensor. The proposed EWOB system provides a simple, green, and powerful tool to investigate the transport mechanism and fate of pesticide residues.

  9. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  10. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC. PMID:26871732

  11. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed

    Calvet, R

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described.

  12. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal–halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the “Cl-down” configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable. PMID:27066160

  13. Effectiveness and potential of straw- and wood-based biochars for adsorption of imidazolium-type ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kaishun; Qiu, Yuping; Ben Li; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2016-08-01

    The growing industrial application of imidazolium-type ionic liquids (ITILs) is likely to result in their release to the environment. Water-soluble ITILs are difficult to remove from wastewaters using traditional adsorbents. In this work, we developed different biochars derived from straw and wood (named as SBB and WBB, respectively) to improve the adsorption effectiveness for removal of ITILs from wastewaters. SBB had high O/C element ratio (0.143), while WBB had high ratio of Vmicro/Vtotal (61.5%) compared with commercial activated carbon (AC). Both of them showed greater adsorption of ITILs than AC with different adsorption mechanisms. FTIR spectra revealed that electrostatic interactions were the dominant driving force in SBB adsorption, while high micropore volume promoted adsorption in WBB. The adsorption of [C2mim][BF4] on SBB and WBB was strongly enhanced by trivalent PO4(3-) anions, suggesting that PO4(3-) anions could be used as promoter to increase the removal efficiency of ITILs from wastewater. Using HCl solution (pH=0.5) as regenerant, SBB and WBB were regenerated with nearly 100% recovery of adsorption capacity over ten consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles. Straw-based biochar and wood-based biochar are efficient sorbents for removal of water-soluble ionic liquids from aqueous solutions.

  14. Adsorption/desorption characteristics and separation of anthocyanins from muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia) juice pomace by use of macroporous adsorbent resins.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Amandeep K; Gu, Liwei

    2013-02-20

    In this study, the adsorption/desorption characteristics of anthocyanins on five Amberlite resins (FPX-66, XAD-7HP, XAD-16N, XAD-1180, and XAD-761) were evaluated. FPX-66 and XAD-16N showed the highest adsorption and desorption capacities and ratios for anthocyanins from muscadine pomace extract, while XAD-7HP had the lowest adsorption and desorption capacities and ratios. On the basis of static adsorption and desorption tests, three resins (FPX-66, XAD-16N, and XAD-1180) were selected for adsorption kinetics and isotherms. The adsorption mechanism was better explained by the pseudo-first-order kinetics for FPX-66 and XAD-16N; however, for XAD-1180, pseudo-second-order kinetics was the most suitable model. The experimental data fitted best to Langmuir isotherm model for all three resins. Dynamic testing was done on a column packed with FPX-66 resin and breakthrough volume was reached at 17 bed volumes of muscadine pomace water extract during adsorption. Three bed volumes of aqueous ethanol (70%) resulted in complete desorption. Resin adsorption resulted in a concentrated pomace extract that contained 13% (w/w) anthocyanins with no detectable sugars. PMID:23368425

  15. Fluorine doping into diamond-like carbon coatings inhibits protein adsorption and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Terumitsu; Yohena, Satoshi; Kamijo, Aki; Okazaki, Yuko; Hotta, Atsushi; Takahashi, Koki; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2007-12-15

    The first major event when a medical device comes in contact with blood is the adsorption of plasma proteins. Protein adsorption on the material surface leads to the activation of the blood coagulation cascade and the inflammatory process, which impair the lifetime of the material. Various efforts have been made to minimize protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. Recently, diamond-like carbon (DLC) has received much attention because of their antithrombogenicity. We recently reported that coating silicon substrates with fluorine-doped diamond-like carbon (F-DLC) drastically suppresses platelet adhesion and activation. Here, we evaluated the protein adsorption on the material surfaces and clarified the relationship between protein adsorption and platelet behaviors, using polycarbonate and DLC- or F-DLC-coated polycarbonate. The adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen were assessed using a colorimetric protein assay, and platelet adhesion and activation were examined using a differential interference contrast microscope. A higher ratio of albumin to fibrinogen adsorption was observed on F-DLC than on DLC and polycarbonate films, indicating that the F-DLC film should prevent thrombus formation. Platelet adhesion and activation on the F-DLC films were more strongly suppressed as the amount of fluorine doping was increased. These results show that the F-DLC coating may be useful for blood-contacting devices.

  16. The adsorption theory of heterogeneous nucleation and its application to ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaksonen, A.; Malila, J.

    2015-12-01

    In the classical picture of heterogeneous nucleation, spherical liquid caps, characterized by a contact angle, appear on a surface at supersaturated conditions, and if these caps are larger than so called critical size, they grow spontaneously, whereas smaller caps will evaporate. In reality, vapor adsorption takes place already at subsaturated conditions, and depending on the substrate-vapor interactions, the adsorbed layer may consist of clusters centered on so called active sites. The extent of adsorption can be calculated using adsorption isotherms which give the average adsorption layer thickness as a function of vapor saturation ratio, provided that adsorption constants (characterizing the substrate-vapor interactions) are known. We recently proposed a new theory (Laaksonen, J. Phys. Chem. A., 2015) that combines adsorption and heterogeneous nucleation so that it can be used to calculate both the adsorption layer thickness at subsaturated conditions, as well as the onset supersaturation for nucleation. We showed that the new theory performs much better than the classical theory both with flat surfaces, and in the case of water vapor nucleating on SiO2, TiO2, and Ag2O nanoparticles (Laaksonen and Malila, ACPD, in press). Here, we review the new theory, and compare its predictive capability to that of the classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. We furthermore discuss the potential use of the new theory for calculation of condensation and deposition mode ice nucleation in the atmosphere.

  17. First principles derived, transferable force fields for CO2 adsorption in Na-exchanged cationic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hanjun; Kamakoti, Preeti; Ravikovitch, Peter I; Aronson, Matthew; Paur, Charanjit; Sholl, David S

    2013-08-21

    The development of accurate force fields is vital for predicting adsorption in porous materials. Previously, we introduced a first principles-based transferable force field for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites (Fang et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2012, 116, 10692). In this study, we extend our approach to CO2 adsorption in cationic zeolites which possess more complex structures. Na-exchanged zeolites are chosen for demonstrating the approach. These methods account for several structural complexities including Al distribution, cation positions and cation mobility, all of which are important for predicting adsorption. The simulation results are validated with high-resolution experimental measurements of isotherms and microcalorimetric heats of adsorption on well-characterized materials. The choice of first-principles method has a significant influence on the ability of force fields to accurately describe CO2-zeolite interactions. The PBE-D2 derived force field, which performed well for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites, does not do so for Na-exchanged zeolites; the PBE-D2 method overestimates CO2 adsorption energies on multi-cation sites that are common in cationic zeolites with low Si/Al ratios. In contrast, a force field derived from the DFT/CC method performed well. Agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment not only for LTA-4A on which the force field fitting is based, but for other two common adsorbents, NaX and NaY.

  18. Adsorption and desorption of atrazine and deethylatrazine by low organic carbon geologic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.

    1994-05-01

    The adsorption and desorption of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6- isopropylamino-s-triazine) and a primary metabolite, deethylatrazine (2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine; DEA), by low organic C ({le} 3.3 g kg{sup -1}) materials were measured by batch-equilibrium techniques. The adsorbents were samples of glacial outwash sand, till, and stream sediments. The adsorption of both atrazine and DEA conformed to linear isotherms. The adsorption of atrazine by most of the absorbents yielded apparent K, values that were in excess of those based on surface agricultural soils. Adsorption correlated with only the pH of the sand-water suspensions. The desorption of atrazine was hysteretic under the conditions of the measurement. DEA had a lower affinity for the same adsorbents; the mean ratio of Kd values of DEA to those of atrazine was 0.37 {+-} 0.20. DEA adsorption did not correlate with organic C, surface area, clay content of the adsorbents, or with the pH of the suspensions. DEA adsorption, unlike atrazine, tended to be reversible. There was a linear relationship between the adsorption constants of atrazine and those of DEA. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Adsorption and desorption of atrazine and deethylatrazine by low organic carbon geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6- isopropylamino-s-triazine) and a primary metabolite, deethylatrazine (2- amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine; DEA), by low organic C (??? 3.3 g kg-1) materials were measured by batch-equilibrium techniques. The adsorbents were samples of glacial outwash sand, till, and stream sediments. The adsorption of both atrazine and DEA conformed to linear isotherms. The adsorption of atrazine by most of the adsorbents yielded apparent K(oc) values that were in excess of those based on surface agricultural soils. Adsorption correlated with only the pH of the sand-water suspensions. The desorption of atrazine was hysteretic under the conditions of the measurement. DEA had a lower affinity for the same adsorbents; the mean ratio of K(d) values of DEA to those of atrazine was 0.37 ?? 0.20. DEA adsorption did not correlate with organic C, surface area, clay content of the adsorbents, or with the pH of the suspensions. DEA adsorption, unlike atrazine, tended to be reversible. There was a linear relationship between the adsorption constants of atrazine and those of DEA.

  20. Fractionation of humic acids upon adsorption on montmorillonite and palygorskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseeva, T. V.; Zolotareva, B. N.

    2013-06-01

    The adsorption of three humic acid (HA) preparations by clays—montmorillonite (Wyoming, USA) and palygorskite (Kolomenskoe district, Moscow oblast)—has been studied. The HA preparations were isolated from samples of the humus-accumulative horizons of a leached chernozem (Voronezh) and a chestnut soil (Volgograd), and a commercial preparation of sodium humate (Aldrich) was also used. The solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy revealed the selective adsorption of structural HA fragments (alkyls, O-alkyls (carbohydrates), and acetal groups) on these minerals. As a result, the aromaticity of the organic matter (OM) in the organic-mineral complexes (OMCs) and the degree of its humification have been found to be lower compared to the original HA preparations. The fractionation of HAs is controlled by the properties of the mineral surfaces. The predominant enrichment of OMCs with alkyls has been observed for montmorillonite, as well as an enrichment with O-alkyls (carbohydrates) for palygorskite. A decrease in the C : N ratio has been noted in the elemental composition of the OM in complexes, which reflected its more aromatic nature and (or) predominant sorption of N-containing structural components of HA molecules. The adsorption of HA preparations by montmorillonite predominantly occurs on the external surface of mineral particles, and the interaction of nonpolar alkyl groups of HAs with this mineral belongs to weak (van der Waals, hydrophobic) interactions. The adsorption of HA preparations by palygorskite is at least partly of chemical nature: Si-OH groups of minerals are involved in the adsorption process. The formation of strong bonds between the OM and palygorskite explains the long-term (over 300 million years) retention of fossil fulvate-type OM in its complex with palygorskite, which we revealed previously.

  1. Tunable and sizable band gap in silicene by surface adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Quhe, Ruge; Fei, Ruixiang; Liu, Qihang; Zheng, Jiaxin; Li, Hong; Xu, Chengyong; Ni, Zeyuan; Wang, Yangyang; Yu, Dapeng; Gao, Zhengxiang; Lu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Opening a sizable band gap without degrading its high carrier mobility is as vital for silicene as for graphene to its application as a high-performance field effect transistor (FET). Our density functional theory calculations predict that a band gap is opened in silicene by single-side adsorption of alkali atom as a result of sublattice or bond symmetry breaking. The band gap size is controllable by changing the adsorption coverage, with an impressive maximum band gap up to 0.50 eV. The ab initio quantum transport simulation of a bottom-gated FET based on a sodium-covered silicene reveals a transport gap, which is consistent with the band gap, and the resulting on/off current ratio is up to 108. Therefore, a way is paved for silicene as the channel of a high-performance FET. PMID:23152944

  2. Modelling Cu(II) adsorption to ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite-bacteria composites: Deviation from additive adsorption in the composite sorption system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2013-03-01

    Bacterially associated iron (hydr)oxides are widespread in natural environments and are potent scavengers of dissolved metal ions. However, it is unclear whether metal sorption on these composites adheres to the additivity principle, and thus whether metal concentrations in environments where these composites comprise a significant proportion of the reactive iron phases can be modelled assuming component additivity. Here we address this issue for Cu adsorption on ferrihydrite-Bacillus subtilis composites. We precipitated pure ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite composites with different ferrihydrite:bacteria mass ratios, and measured Cu adsorption as a function of pH, Cu adsorbed concentration and composite mass ratio. We develop a molecular-level surface complexation model for Cu adsorption on pure ferrihydrite. We then combine our end-member models for Cu adsorption on B. subtilis (Moon and Peacock, 2011) and ferrihydrite to model the observed Cu adsorption on the composites, adopting a component linear additivity approach. By comparing observed Cu adsorption to that predicted by our composite model, constrained to the exact best fitting end-member stability constants, we find that Cu adsorption behaviour on ferrihydrite-B. subtilis composites deviates from additivity. Specifically, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite is enhanced across the adsorption pH edge (pH ˜3-6), while on our composite composed mainly of bacteria adsorption is enhanced at mid-high pH (pH ˜5-6) but diminished at mid-low pH (pH ˜5-3), compared to additivity. In current surface complexation modelling constructs, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite can be modelled in a component additivity approach, by optimising the stability constants for Cu adsorption on the ferrihydrite and bacteria fractions to values that are within the uncertainty on the end-member stability constant values. The deviation from additivity of these composites, apparent when

  3. Glucose oxidase adsorption performance of carbonaceous mesocellular foams prepared with different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fengjiao; Pu, Ximing; Luo, Dapeng; Yin, Guangfu; Zhuang, Kai; Liao, Xiaoming; Huang, Zhongbin; Chen, Xianchun; Yao, Yadong

    2015-07-01

    Several carbonaceous mesocellular foams (C-MCFs) were prepared with MCF-silica as template using the carbon precursors of sucrose, furfuryl alcohol and lab-made phenolic resin, and the corresponding C-MCFs were named as C-MCF-Suc, C-MCF-FA and C-MCF-PR, respectively. The results of SEM, transmission electron microscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption and energy-dispersive X-ray measurements indicated that the C-MCFs prepared from different carbon source appeared morphologically with different degree of order and different pore distribution. The C-MCF-FA exhibited the highest ordered structure and the smallest pore distribution among the foams. The optimum conditions for adsorption of C-MCFs on glucose oxidase (GOD) were also studied, and the maximum adsorbance was determined. The adsorption of GOD on C-MCF-FA was performed at different pH with different GOD concentrations. The maximum adsorption (423.3 mg g(-1)) was observed near the isoelectric point of the GOD (pI ≈ 5.0) with a GOD concentration of 6.0 mg mL(-1), suggesting that the GOD adsorption on C-MCFs might be affected strongly by the electric repulsion between the GOD molecules. Moreover, GOD adsorption performances on different C-MCFs revealed that both the pore size and the pore volume played important roles in the adsorption process, and the window size of C-MCFs dominated the residual immobilized amounts of GOD. Compared to the other two C-MCFs, the C-MCF-FA with a smaller window pore (10 nm) and higher volume (1.40 cm(3) g(-1)) exhibited the highest GOD adsorption and catalytic activity. Furthermore, the immobilized GOD exhibited improved thermal and storable stabilities. Thus the C-MCF-FA could be served as the prospective GOD carrier material used in enzymatic fuel cells.

  4. Adsorption of surfactants on sand surface in enhanced oil recovery: Isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Achinta; Kumar, T.; Ojha, Keka; Mandal, Ajay

    2013-11-01

    Adsorption of surfactants onto reservoir rock surface may result in the loss and reduction of their concentrations in surfactant flooding, which may render them less efficient or ineffective in practical applications of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques. Surfactant flooding for EOR received attraction due to its ability to increase the displacement efficiency by lowering the interfacial tension between oil and water and mobilizing the residual oil. This article highlights the adsorption of surfactants onto sand surface with variation of different influencing factors. It has been experimentally found that adsorption of cationic surfactant on sand surface is more and less for anionic surfactant, while non-ionic surfactant shows intermediate behaviour. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study of clean sand particles has been made to determine the main component present in the sand particles. The interaction between sand particles and surfactant has been studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the sand particles before and after aging with surfactant. Salinity plays an important role in adsorption of anionic surfactant. Batch experiments were also performed to understand the effects of pH and adsorbent dose on the sorption efficiency. The sand particles exhibited high adsorption efficiency at low pH for anionic and nonionic surfactants. But opposite trend was found for cationic surfactant. Adsorption data were analyzed by fitting with Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Sips isotherm models. Results show that the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetics models suit the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption on sand surface. Thermodynamics feasibility of the adsorption process was also studied to verify the spontaneity of the process.

  5. Trace adsorption of positively charged proteins onto Sepharose FF and Sepharose FF-based anion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Ling; Sun, Yan

    2012-08-31

    Agarose-based matrices have been widely used in ion exchange chromatography (IEC). We have herein observed that positively charged proteins (lysozyme and cytochrome c) are adsorbed on the agarose-based anion-exchangers (Q and DEAE Sepharose FF gels) in a capacity of 10-40 μg/mL. In contrast, negatively charged protein (bovine serum albumin) is not adsorbed to Sepharose FF and SP Sepharose FF gels. Elemental analysis of the gel indicated that the residual anionic sulfate groups in agarose would have worked as the cation exchange groups for the positively charged proteins. The trace adsorption behavior of lysozyme onto Sepharose FF and Sepharose FF-based anion exchangers was studied and the effects of NaCl concentration and cation group density on the adsorption were examined for better understanding of the trace adsorption in chromatographic processes. At NaCl concentrations less than 0.05 mol/L, which is the normal adsorption condition in IEC, the trace adsorption kept at a high level, so this trace adsorption cannot be avoided in the ionic strength range of routine IEC operations. Grafting poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) chain of 60 kDa to a cation group density of 700 mmol/L could reduce the adsorption capacity to about 20 μg/mL, but further reduction was not possible by increasing the cation group density to 1200 mmol/L. Therefore, attentions need to be paid to the phenomenon in protein purification practice using agarose-based matrices. The research is expected to call attentions to the trace adsorption on agarose-based matrices and to the importance in the selection of the suitable solid matrices in the production of high-purity protein products in large-scale bioprocesses.

  6. Adsorption air cleaning from ozone.

    PubMed

    Baltrenas, Pranas; Paliulis, Dainius; Vasarevicius, Saulius; Simaitis, Ramutis

    2003-01-01

    Not much has been written about air cleaning from ozone. The aim of this paper was to demonstrate the possibility of adsorption air cleaning from ozone. The second aim was to investigate the dependence of the efficiency of ozone removal from the air on the height of the adsorber layer and on concentrations of ozone, and to obtain empirical formulas for calculating the efficiency of ozone treatment. Equipment for air cleaning from ozone and nitrogen and sulphur dioxides is suggested.

  7. Studies on Vapor Adsorption Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamsundar, N.; Ramotowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The project consisted of performing experiments on single and dual bed vapor adsorption systems, thermodynamic cycle optimization, and thermal modeling. The work was described in a technical paper that appeared in conference proceedings and a Master's thesis, which were previously submitted to NASA. The present report describes some additional thermal modeling work done subsequently, and includes listings of computer codes developed during the project. Recommendations for future work are provided.

  8. Metals on graphene: correlation between adatom adsorption behavior and growth morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lu, Wencai; Tringides, Michael C.; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-05-19

    We present a systematic study of metal adatom adsorption on graphene by ab initio calculations. The calculations cover alkali metals, sp-simple metals, 3d and group 10 transition metals, noble metals, as well as rare earth metals. The correlation between the adatom adsorption properties and the growth morphology of the metals on graphene is also investigated. We show that the growth morphology is related to the ratio of the metal adsorption energy to its bulk cohesive energy (E(a)/E(c)) and the diffusion barrier (ΔE) of the metal adatom on graphene. Charge transfer, electric dipole and magnetic moments, and graphene lattice distortion induced by metal adsorption would also affect the growth morphologies of the metal islands. We also show that most of the metal nanostructures on graphene would be thermally stable against coarsening.

  9. Tunable band gap and doping type in silicene by surface adsorption: towards tunneling transistors.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zeyuan; Zhong, Hongxia; Jiang, Xinhe; Quhe, Ruge; Luo, Guangfu; Wang, Yangyang; Ye, Meng; Yang, Jinbo; Shi, Junjie; Lu, Jing

    2014-07-01

    By using first-principles calculations, we predict that a sizable band gap can be opened at the Dirac point of silicene without degrading silicene's electronic properties with n-type doping by Cu, Ag, and Au adsorption, p-type doping by Ir adsorption, and neutral doping by Pt adsorption. A silicene p-i-n tunneling field effect transistor (TFET) model is designed by the adsorption of different transition metal atoms on different regions of silicene. Quantum transport simulations demonstrate that silicene TFETs have an on-off ratio of 10(3), a small sub-threshold swing of 77 mV dec(-1), and a large on-state current of over 1 mA μm(-1) under a supply voltage of about 1.7 V.

  10. Elemental quantification of large gunshot residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, A.; Silva, L. M.; de Souza, C. T.; Stori, E. M.; Boufleur, L. A.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work we embarked on the evaluation of the Sb/Pb, Ba/Pb and Sb/Ba elemental ratios found in relatively large particles (of the order of 50-150 μm across) ejected in the forward direction when a gun is fired. These particles are commonly referred to as gunshot residues (GSR). The aim of this work is to compare the elemental ratios of the GSR with those found in the primer of pristine cartridges in order to check for possible correlations. To that end, the elemental concentration of gunshot residues and the respective ammunition were investigated through PIXE (Particle-Induced X-ray Emission) and micro-PIXE techniques. The ammunition consisted of a .38 SPL caliber (ogival lead type) charged in a Taurus revolver. Pristine cartridges were taken apart for the PIXE measurements. The shooting sessions were carried out in a restricted area at the Forensic Institute at Porto Alegre. Residues ejected at forward directions were collected on a microporous tape. The PIXE experiments were carried out employing 2.0 MeV proton beams with a beam spot size of 1 mm2. For the micro-PIXE experiments, the samples were irradiated with 2.2 MeV proton beams of 2 × 2 μm2. The results found for the ratios of Sb/Pb, Ba/Pb and Sb/Ba do not correlate with those stemming from the analysis of the primer.

  11. Emissions of PAHs from indoor crop residue burning in a typical rural stove: emission factors, size distributions, and gas-particle partitioning.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guofeng; Wang, Wei; Yang, Yifeng; Ding, Junnan; Xue, Miao; Min, Yujia; Zhu, Chen; Shen, Huizhong; Li, Wei; Wang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wang, Xilong; Tao, Shu; Russell, Armistead G

    2011-02-15

    Indoor combustion of crop residues for cooking or heating is one of the most important emission sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in developing countries. However, data on PAH emission factors (EFs) for burning crop residues indoor, particularly those measured in the field, were scarce, leading to large uncertainties in the emission inventories. In this study, EFs of PAHs for nine commonly used crop residues burned in a typical Chinese rural cooking stove were measured in a simulated kitchen. The measured EFs of total PAHs averaged at 63 ± 37 mg/kg, ranging from 27 to 142 mg/kg, which were higher than those measured in chamber experiments, implying that the laboratory experiment-based emission and risk assessment should be carefully reviewed. EFs of gaseous and particulate phase PAHs were 27 ± 13 and 35 ± 23 mg/kg, respectively. Composition profiles and isomer ratios of emitted PAHs were characterized. Stepwise regressions found that modified combustion efficiency and fuel moisture were the most important factors affecting the emissions. There was 80 ± 6% of PAHs associated with PM2.5, and the mass percentage of PAHs in fine particles increased as the molecular weight increased. For freshly emitted PAHs, absorption into organic carbon, rather than adsorption, dominated the gas-particle partitioning.

  12. Protein adsorption onto ceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Takami, Y; Yamane, S; Makinouchi, K; Otsuka, G; Glueck, J; Benkowski, R; Nosé, Y

    1998-04-01

    Ceramics seldom have been used as blood-contacting materials. However, alumina ceramic (Al2O3) and polyethylene are incorporated into the pivot bearings of the Gyro centrifugal blood pump. This material combination was chosen based on the high durability of the materials. Due to the stagnant flow that often occurs in a continuous flow condition inside a centrifugal pump, pivot bearing system is extremely critical. To evaluate the thombogenicity of pivot bearings in the Gyro pump, this study sought to investigate protein adsorption, particularly albumin, IgG, fibrinogen, and fibronectin onto ceramic surfaces. Al2O3 and silicon carbide ceramic (SiC) were compared with polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC). Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay revealed that the amount of adsorbed proteins onto Al2O3 and SiC was significantly less than that on PVC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicated that numerous proteins adsorbed onto PVC compared to PE, Al2O3, and SiC. Identification of adsorbed proteins by Western immunoblotting revealed that the adsorption of albumin was similar on all four materials tested. Western immunoblotting also indicated lesser amounts of IgG, fibrinogen, and fibronectin on Al2O3 and SiC than on PE and PVC. In conclusion, ceramics (Al2O3 and SiC) are expected to be thromboresistant from the viewpoint of protein adsorption. PMID:9511095

  13. Molecular-level understanding of the adsorption mechanism of a graphite-binding peptide at the water/graphite interface.

    PubMed

    Penna, M J; Mijajlovic, M; Tamerler, C; Biggs, M J

    2015-07-14

    The association of proteins and peptides with inorganic material has vast technological potential. An understanding of the adsorption of peptides at liquid/solid interfaces on a molecular-level is fundamental to fully realising this potential. Combining our prior work along with the statistical analysis of 100+ molecular dynamics simulations of adsorption of an experimentally identified graphite binding peptide, GrBP5, at the water/graphite interface has been used here to propose a model for the adsorption of a peptide at a liquid/solid interface. This bottom-up model splits the adsorption process into three reversible phases: biased diffusion, anchoring and lockdown. Statistical analysis highlighted the distinct roles played by regions of the peptide studied here throughout the adsorption process: the hydrophobic domain plays a significant role in the biased diffusion and anchoring phases suggesting that the initial impetus for association between the peptide and the interface may be hydrophobic in origin; aromatic residues dominate the interaction between the peptide and the surface in the adsorbed state and the polar region in the middle of the peptide affords a high conformational flexibility allowing strongly interacting residues to maximise favourable interactions with the surface. Reversible adsorption was observed here, unlike in our prior work focused on a more strongly interacting surface. However, this reversibility is unlikely to be seen once the peptide-surface interaction exceeds 10 kcal mol(-1).

  14. Activated carbons from waste biomass: an alternative use for biodiesel production solid residues.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Anne A; Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S

    2009-03-01

    Defective coffee press cake, a residue from coffee oil biodiesel production, was evaluated as raw material for production of an adsorbent for removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution. Batch adsorption tests were performed at 25 degrees C and the effects of particle size, contact time, adsorbent dosage and pH were investigated. Preliminary adsorption tests indicated that thermal treatment is necessary in order to improve adsorption capacity. Adsorption kinetics was determined by fitting first and second-order kinetic models to the experimental data, with the second-order model providing the best description of MB adsorption onto the prepared adsorbent. The experimental adsorption equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption models, with the last two providing the best fits. The experimental data obtained in the present study indicated that this type of waste material is a suitable candidate for use in the production of adsorbents for removal of cationic dyes, thus contributing for the implementation of sustainable development in both the coffee and biodiesel production chains.

  15. GIS-NaP1 zeolite microspheres as potential water adsorption material: Influence of initial silica concentration on adsorptive and physical/topological properties

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pankaj; Song, Ju-Sub; Han, Moon Hee; Cho, Churl-Hee

    2016-01-01

    GIS-NaP1 zeolite samples were synthesized using seven different Si/Al ratios (5–11) of the hydrothermal reaction mixtures having chemical composition Al2O3:xSiO2:14Na2O:840H2O to study the impact of Si/Al molar ratio on the water vapour adsorption potential, phase purity, morphology and crystal size of as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite crystals. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) observations reveal that Si/Al ratio does not affect the phase purity of GIS-NaP1 zeolite samples as high purity GIS-NaP1 zeolite crystals were obtained from all Si/Al ratios. Contrary, Si/Al ratios have remarkable effect on the morphology, crystal size and porosity of GIS-NaP1 zeolite microspheres. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) evaluations of individual GIS-NaP1 zeolite microsphere demonstrate the characteristic changes in the packaging/arrangement, shape and size of primary nano crystallites. Textural characterisation using water vapour adsorption/desorption, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption data of as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite predicts the existence of mix-pores i.e., microporous as well as mesoporous character. High water storage capacity 1727.5 cm3 g−1 (138.9 wt.%) has been found for as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite microsphere samples during water vapour adsorption studies. Further, the total water adsorption capacity values for P6 (1299.4 mg g−1) and P7 (1388.8 mg g−1) samples reveal that these two particular samples can absorb even more water than their own weights. PMID:26964638

  16. GIS-NaP1 zeolite microspheres as potential water adsorption material: Influence of initial silica concentration on adsorptive and physical/topological properties.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Song, Ju-Sub; Han, Moon Hee; Cho, Churl-Hee

    2016-01-01

    GIS-NaP1 zeolite samples were synthesized using seven different Si/Al ratios (5-11) of the hydrothermal reaction mixtures having chemical composition Al2O3:xSiO2:14Na2O:840H2O to study the impact of Si/Al molar ratio on the water vapour adsorption potential, phase purity, morphology and crystal size of as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite crystals. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) observations reveal that Si/Al ratio does not affect the phase purity of GIS-NaP1 zeolite samples as high purity GIS-NaP1 zeolite crystals were obtained from all Si/Al ratios. Contrary, Si/Al ratios have remarkable effect on the morphology, crystal size and porosity of GIS-NaP1 zeolite microspheres. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) evaluations of individual GIS-NaP1 zeolite microsphere demonstrate the characteristic changes in the packaging/arrangement, shape and size of primary nano crystallites. Textural characterisation using water vapour adsorption/desorption, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption data of as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite predicts the existence of mix-pores i.e., microporous as well as mesoporous character. High water storage capacity 1727.5 cm(3) g(-1) (138.9 wt.%) has been found for as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite microsphere samples during water vapour adsorption studies. Further, the total water adsorption capacity values for P6 (1299.4 mg g(-1)) and P7 (1388.8 mg g(-1)) samples reveal that these two particular samples can absorb even more water than their own weights. PMID:26964638

  17. GIS-NaP1 zeolite microspheres as potential water adsorption material: Influence of initial silica concentration on adsorptive and physical/topological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Song, Ju-Sub; Han, Moon Hee; Cho, Churl-Hee

    2016-03-01

    GIS-NaP1 zeolite samples were synthesized using seven different Si/Al ratios (5–11) of the hydrothermal reaction mixtures having chemical composition Al2O3:xSiO2:14Na2O:840H2O to study the impact of Si/Al molar ratio on the water vapour adsorption potential, phase purity, morphology and crystal size of as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite crystals. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) observations reveal that Si/Al ratio does not affect the phase purity of GIS-NaP1 zeolite samples as high purity GIS-NaP1 zeolite crystals were obtained from all Si/Al ratios. Contrary, Si/Al ratios have remarkable effect on the morphology, crystal size and porosity of GIS-NaP1 zeolite microspheres. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) evaluations of individual GIS-NaP1 zeolite microsphere demonstrate the characteristic changes in the packaging/arrangement, shape and size of primary nano crystallites. Textural characterisation using water vapour adsorption/desorption, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption data of as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite predicts the existence of mix-pores i.e., microporous as well as mesoporous character. High water storage capacity 1727.5 cm3 g‑1 (138.9 wt.%) has been found for as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite microsphere samples during water vapour adsorption studies. Further, the total water adsorption capacity values for P6 (1299.4 mg g‑1) and P7 (1388.8 mg g‑1) samples reveal that these two particular samples can absorb even more water than their own weights.

  18. GIS-NaP1 zeolite microspheres as potential water adsorption material: Influence of initial silica concentration on adsorptive and physical/topological properties.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Song, Ju-Sub; Han, Moon Hee; Cho, Churl-Hee

    2016-03-11

    GIS-NaP1 zeolite samples were synthesized using seven different Si/Al ratios (5-11) of the hydrothermal reaction mixtures having chemical composition Al2O3:xSiO2:14Na2O:840H2O to study the impact of Si/Al molar ratio on the water vapour adsorption potential, phase purity, morphology and crystal size of as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite crystals. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) observations reveal that Si/Al ratio does not affect the phase purity of GIS-NaP1 zeolite samples as high purity GIS-NaP1 zeolite crystals were obtained from all Si/Al ratios. Contrary, Si/Al ratios have remarkable effect on the morphology, crystal size and porosity of GIS-NaP1 zeolite microspheres. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) evaluations of individual GIS-NaP1 zeolite microsphere demonstrate the characteristic changes in the packaging/arrangement, shape and size of primary nano crystallites. Textural characterisation using water vapour adsorption/desorption, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption data of as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite predicts the existence of mix-pores i.e., microporous as well as mesoporous character. High water storage capacity 1727.5 cm(3) g(-1) (138.9 wt.%) has been found for as-synthesized GIS-NaP1 zeolite microsphere samples during water vapour adsorption studies. Further, the total water adsorption capacity values for P6 (1299.4 mg g(-1)) and P7 (1388.8 mg g(-1)) samples reveal that these two particular samples can absorb even more water than their own weights.

  19. An infrared study of CO adsorption on silica-supported Ru-Sn catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riguetto, B. A.; Bueno, J. M. C.; Petrov, L.; Marques, C. M. P.

    2003-07-01

    CO adsorption on Ru-Sn/SiO 2 catalysts of various Sn/(Ru+Sn) ratios was examined by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier-Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The catalysts were prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method. Catalysts were activated by H 2 reduction at 773 K. CO adsorbed on the catalysts shows spectra whose band frequencies are divided into three groups: (i) High Frequency Region (HFR), containing a band at 2065 cm -1, (ii) Low Frequency Region 1 (LFR 1), containing bands at 2040-2015 cm -1, (iii) Low Frequency Region 2 (LFR 2), containing bands at 1990 and 1945 cm -1. The types of adsorbed CO species formed strongly depend on the ratio Sn/(Ru+Sn) in the catalyst, CO pressure and temperature of adsorption. Adsorption of CO on Ru sites in the Ru/SiO 2 catalyst results in LFR 1 bands at 2040-2015 cm -1, which are independent of the CO pressure but the adsorption complexes are easily destroyed by raising the temperature. The addition of Sn to the catalyst creates new sites for CO adsorption. After adsorption at 298 K, the HFR band at 2065 cm -1 and LFR 2 bands at 1990-1950 cm -1 are observed. The relative intensities of these bands increase with increasing Sn-content in the samples. The LFR bands are thermally stable while the HFR band is not. The formation of the corresponding species is favored by increasing the CO pressure. Adsorbed CO species giving LFR 1 bands are assigned to linearly-adsorbed CO on the Ru 0 and/or on the Ru-Sn alloy sites. Adsorbed CO species giving HFR bands are assigned to CO adsorption on Ru δ+ -O-Sn sites. After low temperature CO adsorption on samples with high Sn-content, only species that show bands at 1990 and 1945 cm -1 in LFR 2 are observed.

  20. Optimization of mesoporous carbons for efficient adsorption of berberine hydrochloride from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Fu, Jie; Deng, Shuguang; Lu, Xiuyang

    2014-06-15

    Sixteen mesoporous carbon adsorbents were synthesized by varying the ratio of soft to hard templates in order to optimize the pore textural properties of these adsorbents. The mesoporous carbon adsorbents have a high BET specific surface area (1590.3-2193.5 m(2)/g), large pore volume (1.72-2.56 cm(3)/g), and uniform pore size distribution with a median pore diameter ranging from 3.51 nm to 4.52 nm. It was observed that pore textural properties of the carbon adsorbents critically depend on the molar ratio of carbon sources to templates, and the hard template plays a more important role than the soft template in manipulating the pore textures. Adsorption isotherms of berberine hydrochloride at 303 K were measured to evaluate the adsorption efficacy of these adsorbents. The adsorption of berberine hydrochloride from aqueous solutions on the sixteen mesoporous carbon adsorbents synthesized in this work is very efficient, and the adsorption equilibrium capacities on all samples are more than double the adsorption capacities of berberine hydrochloride of the benchmark adsorbents (polymer resins and spherical activated carbons) at similar conditions. It was observed from the adsorption experiments that the equilibrium adsorption amounts of berberine hydrochloride are strongly correlated with the BET specific surface area and pore volume of the adsorbents. The adsorbent with the highest BET of 2193.5 m(2)/g displayed the largest adsorption capacity of 574 mg/g at an equilibrium concentration of 0.10mg/mL of berberine hydrochloride in an aqueous solution. PMID:24767505

  1. Remediation of MTBE from drinking water: air stripping followed by off-gas adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Balaji; Sorial, George A; Speth, Thomas F; Clark, Patrick; Zaffiro, Alan; Patterson, Craig; Hand, David W

    2004-05-01

    The widespread use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as an oxygenate in gasoline has resulted in the contamination of a large number of ground and surface water sources. Even though air stripping has been proven to be an effective treatment technology for MTBE removal, off-gas treatment often is required in conjunction with it. This study evaluated the combined treatment technologies of air stripping followed by off-gas adsorption on a pilot scale for the treatment of MTBE-contaminated water. The effect of air/water ratios on the treatment efficiency was studied, and the mass transfer coefficient was determined. Air/water ratios of 105:1, 151:1, 177:1, 190:1, 202:1, and 206:1 were used, and a treatment efficiency of >99% was achieved for all the runs conducted. The depth of packing required to achieve maximum treatment efficiency decreased with increasing air/water ratio. Relative humidity (RH) impacts on the MTBE adsorption capacity of a granular activated carbon (GAC) and carbonaceous resin were determined from pilot plant studies. Breakthrough profiles obtained from the pilot plant studies conducted at 20, 30, and 50% RH indicated that GAC has a higher adsorptive capacity than resin. The adsorptive capacity of GAC decreased with increasing RH, whereas RH did not impact the resin adsorptive capacity.

  2. Adsorption of direct dye on palm ash: kinetic and equilibrium modeling.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, A A; Hameed, B H; Aziz, N

    2007-03-01

    Palm ash, an agriculture waste residue from palm-oil industry in Malaysia, was investigated as a replacement for the current expensive methods of removing direct blue 71 dye from an aqueous solution. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted well with Freundlich model in the range of 50-600mg/L. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of the palm ash was determined with the Langmuir equation and found to be 400.01mg dye per gram adsorbent at 30 degrees C. The rates of adsorption were found to conform to the pseudo-second-order kinetics with good correlation. The results indicate that the palm ash could be employed as a low-cost alternative to commercial activated carbon.

  3. A Recipe for Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Many learners still struggled to appreciate, and understand the difference between, the concepts of fractions and ratio. This is not just a UK phenomenon, which is demonstrated here by the use of a resource developed by the Wisconsin Centre for Education, in association with the Freudenthal Institute of the University of Utrecht, with a group of…

  4. Area Ratios of Quadrilaterals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David R.; Arcidiacono, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Shows that the ratio of the area of the quadrilateral formed by joining the kth points to the area of the original quadrilateral is constant whether it is convex or concave quadrilateral. Presents many geoboard or dot paper diagrams and geometrical expresssions. (YP)

  5. Surface Structural Ion Adsorption Modeling of Competitive Binding of Oxyanions by Metal (Hydr)oxides.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra; Van Riemsdijk WH

    1999-02-01

    Spectroscopy has provided a progressive flow of information concerning the binding mechanism(s) of ions and their surface-complex structure. An important challenge in surface complexation models (SCM) is to connect the molecular microscopic reality to macroscopic adsorption phenomena. This is important because SCM alone provide insufficient insight in the binding mechanisms, and moreover, it is a priori not obvious that SCM, which describe the pH dependent adsorption correctly in simple systems, will predict the ion interaction under multicomponent conditions. This study elucidates the primary factor controlling the adsorption process by analysing the adsorption and competition of PO4, AsO4, and SeO3. We show that the structure of the surface-complex acting in the dominant electrostatic field can be ascertained as the primary controlling adsorption factor. The surface species of arsenate are identical with those of phosphate and the adsorption behavior is very similar. On the basis of the selenite adsorption, we show that the commonly used 2pK models are incapable to incorporate in the adsorption modeling the correct bidentate binding mechanism found by spectroscopy. The use of the bidentate mechanism leads to a proton-oxyanion ratio and corresponding pH dependency that are too large. The inappropriate intrinsic charge attribution to the primary surface groups and the condensation of the inner sphere surface complex to a point charge are responsible for this behavior of commonly used 2pK models. Both key factors are differently defined in the charge distributed multi site complexation (CD-MUSIC) model and are based in this model on a surface structural approach. The CD-MUSIC model can successfully describe the macroscopic adsorption phenomena using the surface speciation and binding mechanisms as found by spectroscopy. The model is also able to predict the anion competition well. The charge distribution in the interface is in agreement with the observed structure

  6. Characterization of cyclodextrin containing nanofilters for removal of pharmaceutical residues.

    PubMed

    Jurecska, Laura; Dobosy, Péter; Barkács, Katalin; Fenyvesi, Éva; Záray, Gyula

    2014-09-01

    Due to the increasing amount of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in general and pharmaceutical residues in particular in municipal wastewater, the efficiency of water treatment technologies should be improved. Following the biological treatment of wastewater nanofiltration offers a possible way for the removal of POPs. In this study β-cyclodextrin containing nanofilters having different chemical composition and thickness (1.5-3.5mm) were investigated. For their characterization, their adsorption capacity was determined applying ibuprofen containing model solution and total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer. It could be established that the regeneration of nanofilters with ethanol and the application of inorganic additives (NaCl, NaHCO3, NH4HCO3) increased the adsorption capacity of nanofilters. The best results were achieved with chemical composition of 30m/m% β-cyclodextrin polymer beads and 70m/m% ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene in the presence of 12mmol ammonium hydrogen carbonate/nanofilter.

  7. Adsorption of hydrocarbons on mesoporous SBA-15 and PHTS materials.

    PubMed

    Van Bavel, Ellen; Meynen, Vera; Cool, Pegie; Lebeau, Kurt; Vansant, Etienne F

    2005-03-15

    Plugged hexagonal templated silica (PHTS) materials are synthesized using a high TEOS/EO(20)PO(70)EO(20) ratio in the SBA-15 synthesis. This generates internal microporous nanocapsules or plugs in part of the channels, which could be inferred from the two-step desorption branch. These materials exhibit a tunable amount of open and plugged pores and a very high micropore volume (up to 0.24 mL/g) and are more stable than the conventional micellar templated structures known so far. In this study the adsorption properties of PHTS are investigated and compared to those of its plug-free analogue SBA-15. For this purpose nitrogen, n-hexane, n-heptane, c-hexane, 3-methylpentane, 1-hexene, and water were adsorbed on SBA-15 and PHTSs with a different ratio of open and plugged mesopores. The adsorption of n-hexane, c-hexane, n-heptane, and 3-methylpentane on SBA-15 and PHTS-A demonstrated that the presence of the plugs had an effect on the uptake of adsorbate in the low relative pressure region, the position of the capillary condensation step, and the total adsorbed amount of adsorbate. The results showed that n-heptane and 3-methylpentane cannot access part of the micropore system of SBA-15 and PHTS-A. Adsorption of c-hexane and n-hexane on PHTS-A indicated that not only the kinetic diameter but also the shape of the molecule is an important factor for being able to be adsorbed into the micropores or past the plugs. Moreover, these two adsorbates were the most efficient in filling up the available pore volume. From the adsorption of n-hexane on PHTSs with a different ratio of open and plugged pores, it was concluded that the size of the plugs differed, which depends on the synthesis conditions. Water adsorption isotherms proved SBA-15 and PHTS-B to be more hydrophobic than PHTS-A. n-Hexane, 1-hexene, and toluene were adsorbed on SBA-15 and the PHTSs to investigate the influence of the polarity of the adsorbate. The isotherms showed higher uptakes for polar adsorbates on more

  8. Preparation and characterization of zirconia-loaded lignocellulosic butanol residue as a biosorbent for phosphate removal from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Enmin; Liu, Xiaohuan; Jiang, Jinhua; Fu, Shenyuan; Chu, Fuxiang

    2016-11-01

    Zirconium(IV) loaded lignocellulosic butanol residue (LBR-Zr) used for the adsorption of phosphate (P) ions from aqueous solution was synthesized and evaluated. The adsorption isotherms were fitted well with the Freundlich and Temkin modes. Thermodynamic analyses indicated that phosphate adsorption on the LBR-Zr increased with increasing temperature from 298 to 338 K. The kinetic datas were described better by the pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic rate model. Increasing pH suppressed phosphate adsorption. Coexisting anions study exhibited that the incorporation of CO32- anion had the largest influence on the phosphate adsorption capacity. The mechanism of adsorption process on LBR-Zr was analyzed by FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an EDX (energy dispersive X-ray) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technologies, respectively. The above results confirmed that surface hydroxyl groups on biosorbent LBR-Zr were replaced by phosphate. The LBR-Zr with good specific affinity towards phosphate was a promising biosorbent for phosphate removal from aqueous solution. The research would be beneficial for developing a promising, eco-friendly phosphate biosorbent from plentiful lignocellulosic butanol residue.

  9. [Study on Kinetic of Hg2+ from Wastewater Absorbed by Lemon Residues].

    PubMed

    Shen, Wang-qing; Wang, Miao; Yang, Ting

    2016-03-01

    With low price and its superior adsorption performance after modification, currently agricultural waste is used as adsorbent of heavy metals in wastewater, which has become a hot research topic. To study on Hg2+ from wastewater absorbed by lemon residues that has been modified by 15% concentration of sulphuric acid. The pore volume, pore size and other properties of the adsorbent were test. The samples were characterized by differential thermal analysis, IR, electron microscopy and spectroscopy. The result showed that the adsorption rate was controlled by membrane diffusion kinetics that was viewed as the first order kinetics equation of the Lagergren, which was physically absorbed. The adsorption properties of modified lemon residues were improved greatly, and the pore size distribution mainly was medium. There were three losses-weight process. There was a endothermic peak around 66 degrees C and two exotherm near 316 degrees C and 494 degrees C. Basic framework of Lemon residues was not changed and structure of Lemon residues was amorphous; the surface of modified lemon residues loosen and many pores formed, and Hg2+ have been adsorbed effectively. PMID:27400525

  10. [Study on Kinetic of Hg2+ from Wastewater Absorbed by Lemon Residues].

    PubMed

    Shen, Wang-qing; Wang, Miao; Yang, Ting

    2016-03-01

    With low price and its superior adsorption performance after modification, currently agricultural waste is used as adsorbent of heavy metals in wastewater, which has become a hot research topic. To study on Hg2+ from wastewater absorbed by lemon residues that has been modified by 15% concentration of sulphuric acid. The pore volume, pore size and other properties of the adsorbent were test. The samples were characterized by differential thermal analysis, IR, electron microscopy and spectroscopy. The result showed that the adsorption rate was controlled by membrane diffusion kinetics that was viewed as the first order kinetics equation of the Lagergren, which was physically absorbed. The adsorption properties of modified lemon residues were improved greatly, and the pore size distribution mainly was medium. There were three losses-weight process. There was a endothermic peak around 66 degrees C and two exotherm near 316 degrees C and 494 degrees C. Basic framework of Lemon residues was not changed and structure of Lemon residues was amorphous; the surface of modified lemon residues loosen and many pores formed, and Hg2+ have been adsorbed effectively.

  11. Influence of temperature on the adsorption of α-tocopherol from ethanol solutions on acid-activated clinoptilolite tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, D. L.; Vasilyeva, S. Yu.; Krysanova, T. A.

    2014-08-01

    Patterns in the adsorption of α-tocopherol on acid-activated clinoptilolite tuff at 283, 295, 305, and 333 K are established and explained. It is found that the selectivity of the sorbent toward the vitamin rises as the temperature of the process falls. The adsorption of α-tocopherol from dilute solutions is described in terms of the Langmuir adsorption theory. It is shown that the fixing of vitamin E monolayers in the structural matrix of clinoptilolite tuff is due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between isolated silanol groups of the adsorbent and oxygen atoms of the chromane ring and the phenol residue of α-tocopherol. The thermodynamic functions of monolayer adsorption of the vitamin are estimated. It is concluded that the formation of polymolecular layers in the form of associates is due to hydrophobic interactions between side substituents of α-tocopherol.

  12. Adsorption study of low-cost and locally available organic substances and a soil to remove pesticides from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Raquel; Morillo, José; Usero, José; Vanderlinden, Eva; El Bakouri, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of chlorfenvinphos, chlorpyrifos, simazine and trifluralin on sunflower seed shells, rice husk, composted sewage sludge and an agricultural soil was studied. Film diffusion and sorption pointed to be related with pesticide physicochemical characteristics. Trifluralin and chlorpyrifos were the pesticides which showed the fastest sorption kinetics and the best sorption capacities when sorbed on all organic wastes. Rice husk revealed as the best adsorbent for simazine. Chlorfenvinphos showed comparable adsorption levels for all sorbents. Koc and Kf values suggested that not only the organic matter content but also the nature of the organic matter and other factors, such as physicochemical characteristics of the surface could be play a significant role in pesticide adsorption. Low desorption percentages were detected; nevertheless Kfd and H values reveal a weak and reversible adsorption. The studied organic residues can be used as an effective and alternative adsorbent for removing pesticides, because of their high adsorption capacity, being natural and economic.

  13. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  14. Influence of the nature and age of cover crop residues on the sorption of three pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassigneul, Ana; Alletto, Lionel; Chuette, Delphine; Le Gac, Anne-Laure; Hatier, Jules; Etievant, Veronique; Bergheaud, Valérie; Baumberger, Stéphanie; Méchin, Valérie; Justes, Eric; Benoit, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    In agricultural fields, soil and water quality preservation is strongly influenced by pesticides use and behavior. To limit the environmental impacts of agricultural activities, best management practices such as the use of cover crops are encouraged. Cover crops during the fallow period were found to be efficient in reducing nitrate leaching, controlling soil erosion, improving soil organic content and enhancing soil biological activity. This technique was also found to modify soil water dynamics in the following crop. According to these effects, modifications on pesticide behavior in soil, such as sorption, degradation and transport, are expected (Alletto et al., 2012 ; 2013). In this study, the impact of the nature and level of decomposition of cover crop was studied on the sorption characteristics of three pesticides. These pesticides differed in their physicochemical characteristics (hydrophobicity, solubility, persistence) and were two herbicides, S-metolachlor and glyphosate, which are largely used in maize production and predominantly found as pollutants in water; and one fungicide, epoxiconazole. Correlations between pesticide sorption and physicochemical characteristics of the cover crop residues were studied. Residues of oat, turnip rape, red clover and phacelia were collected in March 2011 and incubated at 28°C and at the water holding capacity during 0, 6, 28 or 56 days. For each date, adsorption of the three radiolabeled pesticides was measured in batch on the different cover crop residues, and their biochemical composition (Van Soest fractionation), hydrophobicity (contact angle measurement) and C/N ratio were determined. Results showed that the adsorption of the pesticides differed significantly according to (i) the pesticide, (ii) the nature of cover crop, (iii) the decomposition level of the cover crop and the interaction cover crop x decomposition time. Epoxiconazole was the most adsorbed molecule, with Kd values ranging from 161 ± 30 L/Kg (oat

  15. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... for Residual Fuel Characteristic Unit Category ISO-F- RMA 30 RMB 30 RMD 80 RME 180 RMF 180 RMG 380...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.705 - Residual and intermediate residual fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specifications for fuels meeting the definition of residual fuel in 40 CFR 80.2, including fuels marketed as... for Residual Fuel Characteristic Unit Category ISO-F- RMA 30 RMB 30 RMD 80 RME 180 RMF 180 RMG 380...

  17. Adsorption of goethite onto quartz and kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Weiner, Eugene R.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of colloidal goethite onto quartz and kaolinite substrates has been studied as a function of pH and NaCl concentration. Goethite adsorption was measured quantitatively by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that adsorption onto both substrates is due primarily to coulombic forces; however, the pH dependence of adsorption is very different for the two substrates. This is explained by the fact that the surface charge on quartz is entirely pH-dependent, while kaolinite has surface faces which carry a permanent negative charge. Adsorption of goethite on to kaolinite increases markedly with increasing NaCl concentration, while adsorption onto quartz is relatively independent of NaCl concentration. This can be explained by the influence of NaCl concentration upon the development of surface charge on the substrates. A method is described for separating surface-bound goethite from free goethite.

  18. SRC Residual fuel oils

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Krishna C.; Foster, Edward P.

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  19. Water treatment residuals

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    Solutions to an environmental problem often create other environmental problems. That surely is the case in the water supply field. By providing new or expanded water treatment systems to comply with the maximum contaminant levels and treatment mandates of the Safe Drinking Water Act, water purveyors are generating large volumes of residuals that must be managed, ultimately disposed of, or recycled. Numerous federal, state, and local laws govern the management, transport, disposal, and recycling of wastes produced by water treatment systems. Because these laws can result in exorbitant waste disposal costs, restricting some projects entirely, water suppliers need to consider residual disposal early in the siting, selection, and design of treatment projects. To inform water suppliers about residual laws, AWWA commissioned a study published as a Water Industry Technical Action Fund report. In addition to identifying and describing applicable laws at the federal level and in six of the states, the study revealed a series of findings as to the consequences of those laws to water suppliers. This article is a brief overview of the findings of the report.

  20. Textural properties of raw carbon nanotubes by nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossuot, Ch.; Bister, G.; Fonseca, A.; Nagy, J. B.; Pirard, J.-P.

    2001-11-01

    A sample of raw material made by catalytic decomposition of methane and containing a fraction of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was studied. Interpretation of mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms was difficult because the purity of carbon nanotubes, thermogravimetry revealed, was rather poor. Indeed, the raw material was made up by carbon soot, graphitic disordered carbon, damaged nanotubes, SWNTs and catalyst residues. The raw material was mainly microporous with some mesopores.

  1. Solution pH effects on arsenic removal by drinking water treatment residuals in presence of metals and ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, R.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Makris, K.

    2006-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a Group A carcinogen whose presence in soils in higher than background concentrations has become a serious concern with increasing suburban encroachment on former agricultural lands. One of the most promising methods to decrease the mobility of As in soil and water environments is by promoting its adsorption onto amorphous Fe/Al hydroxides. Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) are cost-effective sources of such Fe/Al hydroxides, and generated during the drinking water treatment process as a byproduct. Preliminary work in our laboratory showed that the WTRs are characterized by large specific surface and a net positive charge, ideal for retention of oxyanions such as those of As. However, the overall magnitude of As retention by the WTRs is a function of solution factors such as pH, presence of competing ions and complexing metals. A comprehensive understanding of the aforementioned parameters is, therefore, needed to quantify As mobility and bioaccessibility. The primary objective of the studying progress is to determine the effect of solution pH (range: 3-10) on the amount of As sorbed by the WTRs in the presence of competing ligands such as phosphate, sulfate and silicate as well as complexing metals (e.g., calcium and lead). Experiments are being conducted at 3 solid/solution ratios- 1:5, 1:10 and 1:20 and four initial As loads (375, 750, 1500 and 3000 mgAs L-1). Sodium arsenate is used as the As source. Arsenate adsorption is expected to decrease with increasing pH because generally when solution pH is less than pH of the zero point of charge, the positively charged surface on the soil prefers to complex with the negatively charged arsenate oxyanions. Furthermore, phosphate, sulfate and silicate are expected to compete with arsenate for sorption sites because like arsenate, these ions are typically sorbed via formation of inner-sphere complexes with suface functional groups. On the other hand, the presence of metals like lead and calcium

  2. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  3. The impact of coal combustion residue effluent on water resources: a North Carolina example.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Laura; Vengosh, Avner; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Schwartz, Grace; Romanski, Autumn; Smith, S Daniel

    2012-11-01

    The combustion of coal to generate electricity produces about 130 million tons of coal combustion residues (CCRs) each year in the United States; yet their environmental implications are not well constrained. This study systematically documents the quality of effluents discharged from CCR settling ponds or cooling water at ten sites and the impact on associated waterways in North Carolina, compared to a reference lake. We measured the concentrations of major and trace elements in over 300 samples from CCR effluents, surface water from lakes and rivers at different downstream and upstream points, and pore water extracted from lake sediments. The data show that CCR effluents contain high levels of contaminants that in several cases exceed the U.S. EPA guidelines for drinking water and ecological effects. This investigation demonstrates the quality of receiving waters in North Carolina depends on (1) the ratio between effluent flux and freshwater resource volumes and (2) recycling of trace elements through adsorption on suspended particles and release to deep surface water or pore water in bottom sediments during periods of thermal water stratification and anoxic conditions. The impact of CCRs is long-term, which influences contaminant accumulation and the health of aquatic life in water associated with coal-fired power plants. PMID:23020686

  4. The impact of coal combustion residue effluent on water resources: a North Carolina example.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Laura; Vengosh, Avner; Dwyer, Gary S; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Schwartz, Grace; Romanski, Autumn; Smith, S Daniel

    2012-11-01

    The combustion of coal to generate electricity produces about 130 million tons of coal combustion residues (CCRs) each year in the United States; yet their environmental implications are not well constrained. This study systematically documents the quality of effluents discharged from CCR settling ponds or cooling water at ten sites and the impact on associated waterways in North Carolina, compared to a reference lake. We measured the concentrations of major and trace elements in over 300 samples from CCR effluents, surface water from lakes and rivers at different downstream and upstream points, and pore water extracted from lake sediments. The data show that CCR effluents contain high levels of contaminants that in several cases exceed the U.S. EPA guidelines for drinking water and ecological effects. This investigation demonstrates the quality of receiving waters in North Carolina depends on (1) the ratio between effluent flux and freshwater resource volumes and (2) recycling of trace elements through adsorption on suspended particles and release to deep surface water or pore water in bottom sediments during periods of thermal water stratification and anoxic conditions. The impact of CCRs is long-term, which influences contaminant accumulation and the health of aquatic life in water associated with coal-fired power plants.

  5. Adsorption thermodynamics of Methylene Blue onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Hong, Song; Wen, Cheng; He, Jing; Gan, Fuxing; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2009-08-15

    The effect of temperature on the equilibrium adsorption of Methylene Blue dye from aqueous solution using bentonite was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using three widely applied isotherms: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson. A non-linear method was used for comparing the best fit of the isotherms. Best fit was found to be Redlich-Peterson isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees, and DeltaS degrees were calculated using adsorption equilibrium constant obtained from the Langmuir isotherm. Results suggested that the Methylene Blue adsorption on bentonite was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  6. Adsorption of phenol on wood surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of phenol on aspen and pine wood is investigated. It is shown that adsorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. The woods' specific surface areas and adsorption interaction constants are determined. It is found that the sorption of phenol on surfaces of aspen and pine is due to Van der Waals interactions ( S sp = 45 m2/godw for aspen and 85 m2/godw for pine). The difference between the adsorption characteristics is explained by properties of the wood samples' microstructures.

  7. Physical adsorption strength in open systems.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, M Todd; Stuart, Steven J; Cooper, Alan C; Pez, G P; Cheng, Hansong

    2006-11-23

    For a physical adsorption system, the distances of adsorbates from the surface of a substrate can vary significantly, depending on particle loading and interatomic interactions. Although the total adsorption energy is quantified easily, the normalized, per-particle adsorption energies are more ambiguous if some of these particles are far away from the surface and are interacting only weakly with the substrate. A simple analytical procedure is proposed to characterize the distance dependence of the physisorption strength and effective adsorption capacity. As an example, the method is utilized to describe H2 physisorption in a finite bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17107125

  8. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  9. [Preparation, characterization and adsorption performance of mesoporous activated carbon with acidic groups].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-Quan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng; Zhang, Yu-Xuan

    2013-06-01

    Mesoporous activated carbons containing acidic groups were prepared with cotton stalk based fiber as raw materials and H3PO4 as activating agent by one step carbonization method. Effects of impregnation ratio, carbonization temperature and heat preservation time on the yield, elemental composition, oxygen-containing acid functional groups and adsorptive capacity of activated carbon were studied. The adsorption capacity of the prepared activated carbon AC-01 for p-nitroaniline and Pb(II) was studied, and the adsorption mechanism was also suggested according to the equilibrium experimental results. The maximum yield of activated carbons prepared from cotton stalk fiber reached 35.5% when the maximum mesoporous volume and BET surface area were 1.39 cm3 x g(-1) and 1 731 m2 x g(-1), respectively. The activated carbon AC-01 prepared under a H3 PO4/precursor ratio of 3:2 and activated at 900 degrees C for 90 min had a total pore volume of 1.02 cm3 x g(-1), a micoporous ratio of 31%, and a mesoporous ratio of 65%. The pore diameter of the mesoporous activated carbon was mainly distributed in the range of 2-5 nm. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacities of Pb(II) and p-nitroaniline on cotton stalk fiber activated carbon were 123 mg x g(-1) and 427 mg x g(-1), respectively, which were both higher than those for commercial activated carbon fiber ACF-CK. The equilibrium adsorption experimental data showed that mesopore and oxygen-containing acid functional groups played an important role in the adsorption. PMID:23947073

  10. Potential of biomass residue availability; The case of Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, S.C.; Shrestha, R.M.; Ngamkajornvivat, S. )

    1989-01-01

    An acute shortage of fuel wood and charcoal prevails in many developing countries. A logical approach to the problem places emphasis on the development of alternative energy sources, including use of biomass residues. An assessment of the potential of biomass residues for energy and other uses calls for an estimation of their annual production. Also, because the residues are normally bulky they should be utilized near their place of origin whenever possible to avoid high transportation costs. Thus knowledge of the total national generation of residues per year does not provide enough information for planning residue utilization. This article illustrates a method of residue estimation that takes the case of Thailand as an example. It presents the annual generation of nine agricultural resides (paddy husk, paddy straw, bagasse, cotton stalk, corn cob, groundnut shell, cassava stalk and coconut husk and shell) and one forestry residue (sawdust) in different agroeconomic zones and regions of Thailand. The methodology used for the investigation of crop-to-residue ratios is outlined. The annual generation figures for the different residues along with observations about their traditional uses are presented.

  11. Charcoal/Nitrogen Adsorption Cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Refrigerator with no wear-related moving parts produces 0.5 W of cooling at 118 K. When fully developed, refrigerator needs no electrical power, and life expectancy of more than 10 yr, operates unattended to cool sensitive infrared detectors for long periods. Only moving parts in adsorption cryocooler are check valves. As charcoal is cooled in canister, gas pressure drops, allowing inlet check valve to open and admit more nitrogen. When canister is heated, pressure rises, closing inlet valve and eventually opening outlet valve.

  12. Moisture adsorption in optical coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, H. Angus

    1988-01-01

    The thin film filter is a very large aperture component which is exceedingly useful because of its small size, flexibility and ease of mounting. Thin film components, however, do have defects of performance and especially of stability which can cause problems in systems, particularly where long-term measurements are being made. Of all of the problems, those associated with moisture absorption are the most serious. Moisture absorption occurs in the pore-shaped voids inherent in the columnar structure of the layers. Ion-assisted deposition is a promising technique for substantially reducing moisture adsorption effects in thin film structures.

  13. An essential role for the baseplate protein Gp45 in phage adsorption to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuehua; Koç, Cengiz; Kühner, Petra; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Krismer, Bernhard; Enright, Mark C.; Penadés, José R.; Wolz, Christiane; Stehle, Thilo; Cambillau, Christian; Peschel, Andreas; Xia, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of phages in driving horizontal gene transfer (HGT) among pathogenic bacteria, the underlying molecular mechanisms mediating phage adsorption to S. aureus are still unclear. Phage ϕ11 is a siphovirus with a high transducing efficiency. Here, we show that the tail protein Gp45 localized within the ϕ11 baseplate. Phage ϕ11 was efficiently neutralized by anti-Gp45 serum, and its adsorption to host cells was inhibited by recombinant Gp45 in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that biotin-labelled Gp45 efficiently stained the wild-type S. aureus cell but not the double knockout mutant ΔtarM/S, which lacks both α- and β-O-GlcNAc residues on its wall teichoic acids (WTAs). Additionally, adsorption assays indicate that GlcNAc residues on WTAs and O-acetyl groups at the 6-position of muramic acid residues in peptidoglycan are essential components of the ϕ11 receptor. The elucidation of Gp45-involved molecular interactions not only broadens our understanding of siphovirus-mediated HGT, but also lays the groundwork for the development of sensitive affinity-based diagnostics and therapeutics for S. aureus infection. PMID:27212064

  14. Mineral-Surfactant Interaction for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2006-09-30

    In this project, fundamental studies were conducted to understand the mechanisms of the interactions between polymers/surfactants and minerals with the aim of minimizing chemical loss by adsorption. The effects of structures of the surface active molecules on critical solid/liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and surface tension in mineral/surfactant systems were investigated. The final aim is to build a guideline to design optimal polymer/surfactant formula based on the understanding of adsorption and orientation of surfactants and their aggregates at solid/liquid interfaces. During this period, the wettability of alumina was tested using two-phase extraction at different pHs. The results were explained using the adsorption data obtain previously. It was found that the wettability is determined by both the nano-structure of the hemimicelles and the surface coverage. It was found that pH plays a critical role in controlling the total adsorption and the mineral wettability. At pH 4, the alumina surface remains hydrophilic in the surfactant concentration range tested because of the low surface coverage, even though hemimicelles are formed. Adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on alumina and silica, the component minerals reservoir rocks, was conducted at different pHs. The adsorption of SDS on silica is negligible, while the adsorption on alumina is high due to the different charge of the latter. Tests of adsorption of a modified polymer S-19703-35HT on alumina were also conducted at different pHs. Adsorption density decreases with pH. The results suggest that alkaline pH range is more cost-effective for a SDS/polymer system because of the low adsorption density. A new term, reagent loss index (RLI), was used to analyze the adsorption data for different surfactants and minerals. It was shown that the chemical loss is very high in the case of SDS on gypsum and limestone, while it is low in the case of silica. The mixed Dodecyl maltoside

  15. Development of low-concentration mercury adsorbents from biohydrogen-generation agricultural residues using sulfur impregnation.

    PubMed

    Hsi, Hsing-Chengi; Tsai, Cheng-Yen; Kuo, Tien-Ho; Chiang, Cheng-Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Mercury adsorbents were derived from waste biohydrogen-generation barley husk and rice husk via carbonization, steam activation, and sulfur impregnation at 300-650°C. The samples derived from agricultural residues showed a greater Hg(0) adsorption than that of a coal-based activated carbon, confirming the feasibility of resource recovery of these agricultural residuals for low-concentration gaseous Hg adsorption. Sulfur impregnation reduced both the surface area and pore volume of the samples, with lower temperature causing a greater decrease. Elevating the impregnation temperature increased the organic sulfur contents, suggesting that in addition to elemental sulfur, organic sulfur may also act as active sites to improve Hg(0) adsorption. Oxygen and sulfur functional groups accompanying the microporous structures may account for the enhancing Hg(0) adsorption of the raw and sulfur-treated samples, respectively. The pseudo-second-order model can best describe the chemisorption characteristics, implying that Hg(0) adsorption on the samples was in a bimolecular reaction form.

  16. Fabrication of carbon/SiO2 composites from the hydrothermal carbonization process of polysaccharide and their adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinhui; Li, Kunyu; Su, Min; Ren, Yanmei; Li, Ying; Chen, Jianxin; Li, Liang

    2016-11-20

    In this work, carbon/SiO2 composites, using amylose and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as raw materials, were successfully prepared by a facial hydrothermal carbonization process. The carbon/SiO2 composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), N2 adsorption and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. The composites, which were made up of amorphous SiO2 and amorphous carbon, were found to have hierarchical porous structures. The mass ratios of amylose and SiO2 and the hydrothermal carbonization time had significant effects on the morphology of the composites, which had three shapes including monodispersed spheres, porous pieces and the nano-fibers combined with nano-spheres structures. The adsorption performance of the composites was studied using Pb(2+) as simulated contaminants from water. When the mass ratio of amylose and SiO2 was 9/1, the hydrothermal time was 30h and the hydrothermal temperature was 180°C, the adsorption capacity of the composites achieved to 52mg/g. Experimental data show that adsorption kinetics of the carbon/SiO2 composites can be fitted well by the Elovich model, while the isothermal data can be perfectly described by the Langmuir adsorption model and Freundlich adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the carbon/SiO2 composites is 56.18mgg(-1). PMID:27561502

  17. Fabrication of carbon/SiO2 composites from the hydrothermal carbonization process of polysaccharide and their adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinhui; Li, Kunyu; Su, Min; Ren, Yanmei; Li, Ying; Chen, Jianxin; Li, Liang

    2016-11-20

    In this work, carbon/SiO2 composites, using amylose and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as raw materials, were successfully prepared by a facial hydrothermal carbonization process. The carbon/SiO2 composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), N2 adsorption and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. The composites, which were made up of amorphous SiO2 and amorphous carbon, were found to have hierarchical porous structures. The mass ratios of amylose and SiO2 and the hydrothermal carbonization time had significant effects on the morphology of the composites, which had three shapes including monodispersed spheres, porous pieces and the nano-fibers combined with nano-spheres structures. The adsorption performance of the composites was studied using Pb(2+) as simulated contaminants from water. When the mass ratio of amylose and SiO2 was 9/1, the hydrothermal time was 30h and the hydrothermal temperature was 180°C, the adsorption capacity of the composites achieved to 52mg/g. Experimental data show that adsorption kinetics of the carbon/SiO2 composites can be fitted well by the Elovich model, while the isothermal data can be perfectly described by the Langmuir adsorption model and Freundlich adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the carbon/SiO2 composites is 56.18mgg(-1).

  18. Synthesis and characterization of pillared stevensites: application to chromate adsorption.

    PubMed

    Benhammou, A; Yaacoubi, A; Nibou, L; Bonnet, J P; Tanouti, B

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the synthesis of pillared interlayered clays from Moroccan stevensite called locally 'Ghassoul'. This clay has been intercalated with cetyltrimethylammonium surfactant (CTA-Stv) and aluminium hydroxypolycation (Al13-Stv). Characterization studies were performed using XRF, XRD, FTIR and DTA/TG analysis. Basal spacing values of Al13-Stv and CTA-Stv increased respectively from 13.5 A for natural stevensite to 17.5 and 17.6 A with increasing Al13(7+)/clay and CTA+/clay ratios. The DTA/TG results showed that Al13-Stv has a relatively high thermal stability compared with CTA-Stv. A quasi-irreversible intercalation by exchanging the interlayer inorganic cations with voluminous pillars Al13(7+) or CTA+ was observed. Batch adsorption of chromate anions from aqueous solutions was investigated and the results showed that both pillared clays had great affinity for the chromate compared with untreated stevensite. The Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR) model was selected to describe the adsorption isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacities for natural stevensite, Al13-Stv and CTA-Stv are 13.7, 75.4 and 195.6 mmol/kg, respectively. PMID:21780704

  19. 2-Hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium xylan adsorption onto rod-like cellulose nanocrystal.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jae Hyun; Dong, Shuping; Röemhild, Katrin; Kaya, Abdulaziz; Sohn, Daewon; Tanaka, Keiji; Roman, Maren; Heinze, Thomas; Esker, Alan R

    2015-02-15

    Chemical incompatibility and relatively weak interaction between lignocellulosic fibers and synthetic polymers have made studies of wood fiber-thermoplastic composite more challenging. In this study, adsorption of 2-hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium xylans onto rod-like cellulose nanocrystals are investigated by zeta-potential measurements, and polarized and depolarized dynamic light scattering as a factor for better understanding of lignocellulosic fibers and cellulose nanocrystals. Zeta-potential measurements show xylan derivative adsorption onto cellulose nanocrystals. Decay time distributions of the ternary system and binary system from dynamic light scattering show that aggregates exist in the binary system and they disappear in the ternary system. At low 2-hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium xylan concentrations relative to that of cellulose nanocrystal, xylan derivatives adsorbed onto some of the cellulose nanocrystal. Hence, more xylan derivatives adsorbed onto cellulose nanocrystal increased with increasing xylan derivative concentration. Also, the concentration dependence of the ratio of the rotational diffusion coefficient to the translational diffusion coefficient revealed a strong adsorptive interaction between xylan derivatives and the cellulose nanocrystals.

  20. Equilibrium adsorption of hexahistidine on pH-responsive hydrogel nanofilms.

    PubMed

    Longo, Gabriel S; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Szleifer, Igal

    2014-12-23

    We present a molecular theory to study the adsorption of different species within pH-sensitive hydrogel nanofilms. The theoretical framework allows for a molecular-level description of all the components of the system, and it explicitly accounts for the acid-base equilibrium. We concentrate on the adsorption of hexahistidine, one of the most widely used tags in bio-related systems, particularly in chromatography of proteins. The adsorption of hexahistidine within a grafted polyacid hydrogel film shows a nonmonotonic dependence on the solution pH. Depending on the salt concentration, the density of the polymer network, and the bulk concentration of peptide, substantial adsorption is predicted in the intermediate pH range where both the network and the amino acids are charged. To enhance the electrostatic attractions, the acid-base equilibrium of adsorbed hexahistidine is shifted significantly, increasing the degree of charge of the residues as compared to the bulk solution. Such a shift depends critically on the conditions of the environment at the nanoscale. At the same time, the degree of dissociation of the network becomes that of the isolated acid group in a dilute solution, which means that the network is considerably more charged than when there is no adsorbate molecules. This work provides fundamental information on the physical chemistry behind the adsorption behavior and the response of the hydrogel film. This information can be useful in designing new materials for the purification or separation/immobilization of histidine-tagged proteins. PMID:25434993

  1. Comparative study of the adsorption of acetaminophen on activated carbons in simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Rey-Mafull, Carlos A; Tacoronte, Juan E; Garcia, Raquel; Tobella, Jorge; Llópiz, Julio C; Iglesias, Alberto; Hotza, Dachamir

    2014-01-01

    Samples of commercial activated carbons (AC) obtained from different sources: Norit E Supra USP, Norit B Test EUR, and ML (Baracoa, Cuba) were investigated. The adsorption of acetaminophen, Co = 2500 mg/L, occured in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.2 in contact with activated carbon for 4 h at 310 K in water bath with stirring. Residual acetaminophen was monitored by UV visible. The results were converted to scale adsorption isotherms using alternative models: Langmuir TI and TII, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) and Temkin. Linearized forms of the characteristic parameters were obtained in each case. The models that best fit the experimental data were Langmuir TI and Temkin with R(2) ≥0.98. The regression best fits followed the sequence: Langmuir TI = Temkin > DR > LangmuirTII > Freundlich. The microporosity determined by adsorption of CO2 at 273 K with a single term DR regression presented R(2) > 0.98. The adsorption of acetaminophen may occur in specific sites and also in the basal region. It was determined that the adsorption process of acetaminophen on AC in SGF is spontaneous (ΔG <0) and exothermic (-ΔHads.). Moreover, the area occupied by the acetaminophen molecule was calculated with a relative error from 7.8 to 50%.

  2. Comparative study of the adsorption of acetaminophen on activated carbons in simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Rey-Mafull, Carlos A; Tacoronte, Juan E; Garcia, Raquel; Tobella, Jorge; Llópiz, Julio C; Iglesias, Alberto; Hotza, Dachamir

    2014-01-01

    Samples of commercial activated carbons (AC) obtained from different sources: Norit E Supra USP, Norit B Test EUR, and ML (Baracoa, Cuba) were investigated. The adsorption of acetaminophen, Co = 2500 mg/L, occured in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.2 in contact with activated carbon for 4 h at 310 K in water bath with stirring. Residual acetaminophen was monitored by UV visible. The results were converted to scale adsorption isotherms using alternative models: Langmuir TI and TII, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) and Temkin. Linearized forms of the characteristic parameters were obtained in each case. The models that best fit the experimental data were Langmuir TI and Temkin with R(2) ≥0.98. The regression best fits followed the sequence: Langmuir TI = Temkin > DR > LangmuirTII > Freundlich. The microporosity determined by adsorption of CO2 at 273 K with a single term DR regression presented R(2) > 0.98. The adsorption of acetaminophen may occur in specific sites and also in the basal region. It was determined that the adsorption process of acetaminophen on AC in SGF is spontaneous (ΔG <0) and exothermic (-ΔHads.). Moreover, the area occupied by the acetaminophen molecule was calculated with a relative error from 7.8 to 50%. PMID:24570846

  3. [Investigation of pesticide residues in foods distributed in Kitakyushu City].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Seiichi; Naetoko, Eri; Kawamura, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Rika; Higuchi, Masayuki; Kojima, Tsutomu; Yamato, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Masaki

    2004-04-01

    We investigated 160 kinds of pesticide residues in 715 samples of 116 kinds of foods distributed in Kitakyushu city. Sixty kinds of pesticides were detected in 55 kinds of foods (204 samples) in the range of 0.002-22 mg/kg. Five kinds of pesticides in 7 samples violated the residue standards and the indication of "unused". The detection ratios of unregulated pesticide in domestic and imported foods were 27.8 and 33.0%, respectively. Iprodione, dicofol, diethofencarb, procymidone and chlorfenapyr (for domestic food) and total bromine, benomyl, chlorpyrifos, dicofol, fenvalerate, cypermethrin and dimethoate (for imported food) showed relatively high detection ratios. Chinese cabbage, garland chrysanthemum, tomatoes and green teas (domestic) and broccoli, bananas, grapefruit, lemons, oranges, frozen edamame and frozen kidney beans (imported) showed high relative pesticide detection ratios. Residual pesticides were detected with relatively high frequency in imported fruits, imported frozen foods and imported processed foods. PMID:15272606

  4. Sedentary behavior and residual-specific mortality

    PubMed Central

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Edwards, Meghan K.; Sng, Eveleen; Addoh, Ovuokerie

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the association of accelerometer-assessed sedentary behavior and residual-specific mortality. Methods: Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were used (N = 5536), with follow-up through 2011. Sedentary behavior was objectively measured over 7 days via accelerometry. Results: When expressing sedentary behavior as a 60 min/day increase, the hazard ratio across the models ranged from 1.07-1.40 (P < 0.05). There was evidence of an interaction effect between sedentary behavior and total physical activity on residual-specific mortality (Hazard ratiointeraction [HR] = 0.9989; 95% CI: 0.9982-0.9997; P = 0.008). Conclusion: Sedentary behavior was independently associated with residual-specific mortality. However, there was evidence to suggest that residual-specific mortality risk was a function of sedentary behavior and total physical activity. These findings highlight the need for future work to not only examine the association between sedentary behavior and health independent of total physical activity, but evaluate whether there is a joint effect of these two parameters on health. PMID:27766237

  5. Nanostructured Biointerfaces: Nanoarchitectonics of Thermoresponsive Polymer Brushes Impact Protein Adsorption and Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Psarra, Evmorfia; König, Ulla; Ueda, Yuichiro; Bellmann, Cornelia; Janke, Andreas; Bittrich, Eva; Eichhorn, Klaus-J; Uhlmann, Petra

    2015-06-17

    hydrophobic terminal residue to PNIPAAm. Cell adhesion studies with human mesenchymal stem cells reflected the results of the FGN adsorption.

  6. [Effect of SO2 volume fraction in flue gas on the adsorption behaviors adsorbed by ZL50 activated carbon and kinetic analysis].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ji-xian; Wang, Tie-feng; Wang, Jin-fu

    2010-05-01

    The influence of SO2 dynamic adsorption behaviors using ZL50 activated carbon for flue gas desulphurization and denitrification under different SO2 volume fraction was investigated experimentally, and the kinetic analysis was conducted by kinetic models. With the increase of SO2 volume fraction in flue gas, the SO2 removal ratio and the activity ratio of ZL50 activated carbon decreased, respectively, and SO2 adsorption rate and capacity increased correspondingly. The calculated results indicate that Bangham model has the best prediction effect, the chemisorption processes of SO2 was significantly affected by catalytic oxidative reaction. The adsorption rate constant of Lagergren's pseudo first order model increased with the increase of inlet SO, volume fraction, which indicated that catalytic oxidative reaction of SO2 adsorbed by ZL50 activated carbon may be the rate controlling step in earlier adsorption stage. The Lagergren's and Bangham's initial adsorption rate were deduced and defined, respectively. The Ho's and Elovich's initial adsorption rate were also deduced in this paper. The Bangham's initial adsorption rate values were defined in good agreement with those of experiments. The defined Bangham's adsorptive reaction kinetic model can describe the SO2 dynamic adsorption rate well. The studied results indicated that the SO2 partial order of initial reaction rate was one or adjacent to one, while the O2 and water vapor partial order of initial reaction rate were constants ranging from 0.15-0.20 and 0.45-0.50, respectively.

  7. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-05-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on water/air interfaces, the latter gives an impression of surfactant adsorption to a hydrophobic surface and illustrates the importance of the CMC for the adsorption process. Then attention is paid to the most important types of soil particles: humic and fulvic acids, silica, metal oxides and layered aluminosilicates. Information is provided on their structure, surface properties and primary (proton) charge characteristics, which are all important for surfactant binding. Subsequently, the adsorption of different types of surfactants on these individual soil components is discussed in detail, based on mainly experimental results and considering the specific (chemical) and electrostatic interactions, with hydrophobic attraction as an important component of the specific interactions. Adsorption models that can describe the features semi-quantitatively are briefly discussed. In the last part of the paper some trends of surfactant adsorption on soils are briefly discussed together with some complications that may occur and finally the consequences of surfactant adsorption for soil colloidal stability and permeability are considered. When we seek to understand the fate of surfactants in soil and aqueous environments, the hydrophobicity and charge density of the soil or soil particles, must be considered together with the structure, hydrophobicity and charge of the surfactants, because these factors affect the adsorption. The pH and ionic strength are important parameters with respect to the charge density of the particles. As surfactant adsorption influences soil structure and permeability, insight in surfactant adsorption to soil particles is useful for good soil management. PMID

  8. Adsorptive separation in bioprocess engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.W.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The invention and development of an energy-efficient separation technique for recovery of desired chemicals from biomass conversion would greatly enhance the economic viability of this bioprocess. Adsorptive separation of several chemicals from aqueous solution was studied in this thesis. The desired species were recovered from the dilute aqueous solution by using crosslinked polyvinylpyridine resin to effect selective sorption. The sorbed chemicals were then removed from the resin by either thermal regeneration or elution with some appropriate desorbents. The effects of temperature, pH value, and solute concentration on resin swelling were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms, resin capacities and resin selectivities of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, isopropanol, glycerol, acetone, 1-butanol, tert-butanol, and 2,3-butanediol were determined to study the homologies. Furthermore, acetic acid, butyric acid, hydrochloric acid, lactic acid, and sulfuric acid were recovered from very dilute aqueous solutions. The concentration of the sorbed chemical in the stationary phase can be many times higher than in the mobile phase for some acids. Finally, different types of equilibrium isotherms were used to fit the experimental data. A mathematical model was developed by using the theory of interference to predict the breakthrough curves and the process efficiency to provide information for large-scale process design and development.

  9. Adsorption in gas mass spectrometry. I. Effects on the measurement of individual isotopic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonfiantini, Roberto; Valkiers, Staf; Taylor, Philip D. P.; de Bièvre, Paul

    1997-05-01

    The adsorption-desorption process of gas molecules on the walls of the mass spectrometer inlet system was studied in order to assess quantitatively its influence on measurement results. The effects on individual isotopic species in SiF4 measurements required for the re-determination of the Avogadro constant are discussed in this paper, while the effects on isotope amount ratio determinations will be discussed in a companion paper. A model based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherm is developed, which fits well the experimental observations and provides the means to investigate adsorption and desorption kinetics in the inlet system. A parameter called the [`]apparent leak-rate coefficient' is introduced; this represents the relative variation with time of any isotopic species in the inlet system. All the adsorption parameters appearing in the balance equations are derived from the apparent leak-rate coefficient. Application of the model to long mass-spectrometric measurements of SiF4 yields a rate constant of 6.5 × 10-5 s-1 for SiF4 effusion through the molecular leak of the inlet system. Adsorption and desorption rate-constants are equal to 20-25% of the leak rate-constant, and the adsorption sites are about two orders of magnitude lower than the number of Ni and Cu atoms present on the inlet system walls.

  10. Selenate adsorption on pre-coordinated Fe3+-silane complexes grafted on mesoporous silicas.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ryo; Yoshitake, Hideaki

    2014-08-01

    Fe3+ was coordinated N-[2-(aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane], AEAPTES, followed by being grafted on MCM-41, SBA-15 and Cab-O-sil M7D. The mixing ratio, n = [AEAPTES]/[Fe], in the above coordination reaction was varied from 1 to 3. These nine functionalized silicas, denoted as Fe(en)n-silica (n = 1, 2, 3 and silica = MCM-41, SBA-15 and M7D), were used for the adsorption of aqueous selenate. The saturation of adsorption isotherm occurred at Se/Fe = 2 on Fe(en)2- MCM-41 and Fe(en)2-SBA-15, while Fe(en)- and Fe(en)3-MCM-41 and Fe(en)- and Fe(en)3-SBA-15 adsorbed selenate until Se/Fe = 1. The saturation at Se/Fe = 1 was obtained for all absorbents prepared with M7D substrate, suggesting a transformation of the adsorption sites realized on Fe(en)2-MCM-41 and Fe(en)2-SBA-15. The concave curvature of the surface of mesoporous silicas is possibly critical to retain the coordination structure of adsorption sites. The largest capacity obtained among these adsorbents was 1.1 mmol/g, found on Fe(en)2-SBA-15. The structure of adsorption sites was analysed by X-ray absorption spectroscopies in order to obtain the evidences for the distortion of coordination structure induced by grafting and the bond formation between Se and Fe after adsorption. PMID:25936127

  11. Adsorption of uranium by amidoximated chitosan-grafted polyacrylonitrile, using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Jingjing; Yang, Tilong; Chen, Xia; Liu, Xunyue; Ding, Xingcheng

    2015-05-01

    The amidoximated chitosan-grafted polyacrylonitrile (CTS-g-PAO) was prepared for the adsorption of uranium from water. The effects of pH, concentration of uranium and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of uranium by CTS-g-PAO were optimized using Doehlert design of response surface methodology (RSM). The adsorption capacity and removal efficiency achieved 312.06 mg/g and 86.02%, respectively. The adsorption process attained equilibrium only in 120 min. More than 80% of the absorbed uranium could be desorbed by 0.1 mol/l HCl or EDTA-Na, and CTS-g-PAO could be reused at least 3 times. The CTS-g-PAO and U(VI) ions formed a chelate complex due to FTIR spectral analysis. The surface morphology of CTS-g-PAO was also investigated by SEM. The adsorption process was better described by Langmuir isotherm and pseudo second order kinetic model. Results obtained indicated that CTS-g-PAO was very promising in adsorption of uranium from water.

  12. Adsorption mechanism of mixed cationic/anionic collectors in feldspar-quartz flotation system.

    PubMed

    Vidyadhar, A; Hanumantha Rao, K

    2007-02-15

    The adsorption mechanism of mixed cationic alkyl diamine and anionic sulfonate/oleate collectors at acidic pH values was investigated on microcline and quartz minerals through Hallimond flotation, electrokinetic and diffuse reflectance FTIR studies. In the presence of anionic collectors, neither of the minerals responded to flotation but the diamine flotation of the minerals was observed to be pH and concentration dependent. The presence of sulfonate enhanced the diamine flotation of the minerals by its co-adsorption. The difference in surface charge between the minerals at pH 2 was found to be the basis for preferential feldspar flotation from quartz in mixed diamine/sulfonate collectors. The infrared spectra revealed no adsorption of sulfonate collector when used alone but displayed its co-adsorption as diamine-sulfonate complex when used with diamine. The presence of sulfonate increased the diamine adsorption due to a decrease in the electrostatic head-head repulsion between the adjacent surface ammonium ions and thereby increasing the lateral tail-tail hydrophobic bonds. The mole ratio of diamine/sulfonate was found to be an important factor in the orientation of alkyl chains and thus the flotation response of minerals. The increase in sulfonate concentration beyond diamine concentration leads to the formation of soluble 1:2 diamine-sulfonate complex or precipitate and the adsorption of these species decreased the flotation since the alkyl chains are in chaotical orientation with a conceivable number of head groups directing towards the solution phase.

  13. Effects of composition and structure of alginates on adsorption of divalent metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nai-Yu, Zheng; Yan-Xia, Zhang; Xiao, Fan; Li-Jun, Han

    1994-03-01

    Results of a series of experiments (on the adsorption of divalent metal ions by dried alginic acid, Na and Ca alginates of different composition and block structure) conducted in this systematic study of the effects of the composition and structure of alginates on the static adsorption equilibrium of divalent metal ions indicate that the properties of alginate adsorption to divalent metal ions are highly different, depending not only on the cations used, but also on the form and structure of the alginates. There is close correlation between the adsorption properties and the structure of the alginates. The selectivity coefficient of Na alginate for Cd-Sr ion exchange tends to increase with the increase of the M/G ratio in alginate, whereas the adsorption capacity of Ca alginate for Cu2+ ion decrease with the increase of the G-block or the average length of the G-block(bar N_G ) and the total adsorption capacity of alginic acid is found to vary in the same order as the F MM(diad frequency) in alginate in the mixed solution of Sr2+, Ba2+ and Cd2+.

  14. Adsorption of uranium by amidoximated chitosan-grafted polyacrylonitrile, using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Jingjing; Yang, Tilong; Chen, Xia; Liu, Xunyue; Ding, Xingcheng

    2015-05-01

    The amidoximated chitosan-grafted polyacrylonitrile (CTS-g-PAO) was prepared for the adsorption of uranium from water. The effects of pH, concentration of uranium and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of uranium by CTS-g-PAO were optimized using Doehlert design of response surface methodology (RSM). The adsorption capacity and removal efficiency achieved 312.06 mg/g and 86.02%, respectively. The adsorption process attained equilibrium only in 120 min. More than 80% of the absorbed uranium could be desorbed by 0.1 mol/l HCl or EDTA-Na, and CTS-g-PAO could be reused at least 3 times. The CTS-g-PAO and U(VI) ions formed a chelate complex due to FTIR spectral analysis. The surface morphology of CTS-g-PAO was also investigated by SEM. The adsorption process was better described by Langmuir isotherm and pseudo second order kinetic model. Results obtained indicated that CTS-g-PAO was very promising in adsorption of uranium from water. PMID:25659674

  15. The role of particle-size soil fractions in the adsorption of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandzhieva, Saglara; Minkina, Tatiana; Pinsky, David; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Kalinitchenko, Valeriy; Sushkova, Svetlana; Chaplygin, Viktor; Dikaev, Zaurbek; Startsev, Viktor; Bakoev, Serojdin

    2014-05-01

    the process - the adsorption equilibrium constant (k).The ratio between the content of exchangeable cations displaced from the soil adsorbing complex (SAC) into the solution and the content of adsorbed HMs decreased with the increasing concentration of adsorbed HMs. These values could be higher (for Cu2+ and Pb2+), equal, or lower than 1 (for Zn2+) and depend on the properties of HMs. At the first case, this was due to the dissolution of readily soluble salts at low HM concentrations in the SAC. In the latter case, this was related to the adsorption of associated forms HMs and the formation of new phases localized on the surface of soil particles at high HM concentrations in the SAC. Soil solution equilibrium (SSE) accords to the soil fine fraction composition. SSE thermodynamics causes the ratio of free and associated forms of ions and ion's activity in soil solution influencing composition, concentration and adsorption of HMs salts by SAC. This study was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project no. 12-05-33078,14-05-00586_a, grant of President of MK-6448.2014.4

  16. Directional gear ratio transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafever, A. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Epicyclic gear transmissions which transmit output at a gear ratio dependent only upon the input's direction are considered. A transmission housing envelops two epicyclic gear assemblies, and has shafts extending from it. One shaft is attached to a sun gear within the first epicyclic gear assembly. Planet gears are held symmetrically about the sun gear by a planet gear carrier and are in mesh with both the sun gear and a ring gear. Two unidirectional clutches restrict rotation of the first planet gear carrier and ring gear to one direction. A connecting shaft drives a second sun gear at the same speed and direction as the first planet gear carrier while a connecting portion drives a second planet gear carrier at the same speed and direction as the first ring gear. The transmission's output is then transmitted by the second ring gear to the second shaft. Input is transmitted at a higher gear ratio and lower speed for all inputs in the first direction than in the opposite direction.

  17. Adsorption of amino acids (ALA, CYS, HIS, MET) on zeolites: fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy investigations.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Cristine E A; de Santana, Henrique; Casado, Clara; Coronas, Joaquin; Zaia, Dimas A M

    2011-06-01

    Minerals adsorb more amino acids with charged R-groups than amino acids with uncharged R-groups. Thus, the peptides that form from the condensation of amino acids on the surface of minerals should be composed of amino acid residues that are more charged than uncharged. However, most of the amino acids (74%) in today's proteins have an uncharged R-group. One mechanism with which to solve this paradox is the use of organophilic minerals such as zeolites. Over the range of pH (pH 2.66-4.50) used in these experiments, the R-group of histidine (His) is positively charged and neutral for alanine (Ala), cysteine (Cys), and methionine (Met). In acidic hydrothermal environments, the pH could be even lower than those used in this study. For the pH range studied, the zeolites were negatively charged, and the overall charge of all amino acids was positive. The conditions used here approximate those of prebiotic Earth. The most important finding of this work is that the relative concentrations of each amino acid (X=His, Met, Cys) to alanine (X/Ala) are close to 1.00. This is an important result with regard to prebiotic chemistry because it could be a solution for the paradox stated above. Pore size did not affect the adsorption of Cys and Met on zeolites, and the Si/Al ratio did not affect the adsorption of Cys, His, and Met. ZSM-5 could be used for the purification of Cys from other amino acids (Student-Newman-Keuls test, p<0.05), and mordenite could be used for separation of amino acids from each other (Student-Newman-Keuls test, p<0.05). As shown by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, Ala interacts with zeolites through the [Formula: see text] group, and methionine-zeolite interactions involve the COO, [Formula: see text], and CH(3) groups. FT-IR spectra show that the interaction between the zeolites and His is weak. Cys showed higher adsorption on all zeolites; however, the hydrophobic Van der Waals interaction between zeolites and Cys is too weak to produce any

  18. Adsorption of Amino Acids (Ala, Cys, His, Met) on Zeolites: Fourier Transform Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Cristine E. A.; de Santana, Henrique; Casado, Clara; Coronas, Joaquin; Zaia, Dimas A. M.

    2011-06-01

    Minerals adsorb more amino acids with charged R-groups than amino acids with uncharged R-groups. Thus, the peptides that form from the condensation of amino acids on the surface of minerals should be composed of amino acid residues that are more charged than uncharged. However, most of the amino acids (74%) in today's proteins have an uncharged R-group. One mechanism with which to solve this paradox is the use of organophilic minerals such as zeolites. Over the range of pH (pH 2.66-4.50) used in these experiments, the R-group of histidine (His) is positively charged and neutral for alanine (Ala), cysteine (Cys), and methionine (Met). In acidic hydrothermal environments, the pH could be even lower than those used in this study. For the pH range studied, the zeolites were negatively charged, and the overall charge of all amino acids was positive. The conditions used here approximate those of prebiotic Earth. The most important finding of this work is that the relative concentrations of each amino acid (X=His, Met, Cys) to alanine (X/Ala) are close to 1.00. This is an important result with regard to prebiotic chemistry because it could be a solution for the paradox stated above. Pore size did not affect the adsorption of Cys and Met on zeolites, and the Si/Al ratio did not affect the adsorption of Cys, His, and Met. ZSM-5 could be used for the purification of Cys from other amino acids (Student-Newman-Keuls test, p<0.05), and mordenite could be used for separation of amino acids from each other (Student-Newman-Keuls test, p<0.05). As shown by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, Ala interacts with zeolites through the group, and methionine-zeolite interactions involve the COO, , and CH3 groups. FT-IR spectra show that the interaction between the zeolites and His is weak. Cys showed higher adsorption on all zeolites; however, the hydrophobic Van der Waals interaction between zeolites and Cys is too weak to produce any structural changes in the Cys groups (amine

  19. Surface properties and adsorption characteristics to methylene blue and iodine of adsorbents from sludge.

    PubMed

    Deng, L Y; Xu, G R; Li, G B

    2010-01-01

    Adsorbent materials created from wastewater sludge have unique surface characteristics and could be effective in adsorption applications. In this research, the sludge-adsorbents were generated by pyrolyzing mixtures of sewage sludge and H(2)SO(4). Scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) were used to analyze the properties of sludge-adsorbent. XPS results show that the adsorbent surface functional groups with high contents of oxygen-containing groups serve as active sites for the adsorption and affect the surface characteristics; the adsorption mechanism of methylene blue (MB) is mainly Brönsted acid-base reaction between the adsorbent surface and MB; and iodine atoms are bonded to the surface of the adsorbent mainly by dispersive interactions rather than by electrostatic interactions. The results also show that H(2)SO(4) level, pyrolysis temperature and sulfuric acid/sludge weight ratio actually affected the adsorption characteristics. Using the conditions (H(2)SO(4) level of 1-18 M, pyrolysis temperature of 650°C, and weight ratio of 0.8), the adsorption capacities for MB and iodine were 74.7-62.3 mg g(-1) and 169.5-209.3 mg g(-1), respectively.

  20. Effects of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite on adsorption of arsenic in red soil.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhihong; Zhou, Li; Huang, Yifan; Song, Zhengguo; Qiu, Weiwen

    2015-11-01

    The arsenic adsorption capacity of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite (MBC), prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of potassium permanganate and biochar, was investigated in red soil. Adsorption experiments using batch procedures were used to estimate the arsenic adsorption capacities of the absorbent materials. Adsorption and desorption isotherms, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterise the prepared adsorbent materials, and a plausible mechanism for arsenic removal by MBC was proposed. Arsenic in red soil-MBC mixtures exhibited lower mobility than that in soils amended with pristine biochar. The improved removal performance of soil-MBC mixtures was attributed to a lower H/C ratio, higher O/C ratio, higher surface hydrophilicity, and higher surface sorption capacity, even though the impregnation of manganese oxide decreased the specific surface area of the biochar. Arsenic retention increased as the biochar content increased, mainly owing to an increase in soil pH. Several oxygenated functional groups, especially O-H, CO, Mn-O, and Si-O, participated in the adsorption process, and manganese oxides played a significant role in the oxidation of arsenic. This study highlights the potential of MBC as an absorbent to immobilise arsenic for use in contaminated land remediation in the red soils region. PMID:26320008

  1. Effects of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite on adsorption of arsenic in red soil.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhihong; Zhou, Li; Huang, Yifan; Song, Zhengguo; Qiu, Weiwen

    2015-11-01

    The arsenic adsorption capacity of a manganese oxide-modified biochar composite (MBC), prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of potassium permanganate and biochar, was investigated in red soil. Adsorption experiments using batch procedures were used to estimate the arsenic adsorption capacities of the absorbent materials. Adsorption and desorption isotherms, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterise the prepared adsorbent materials, and a plausible mechanism for arsenic removal by MBC was proposed. Arsenic in red soil-MBC mixtures exhibited lower mobility than that in soils amended with pristine biochar. The improved removal performance of soil-MBC mixtures was attributed to a lower H/C ratio, higher O/C ratio, higher surface hydrophilicity, and higher surface sorption capacity, even though the impregnation of manganese oxide decreased the specific surface area of the biochar. Arsenic retention increased as the biochar content increased, mainly owing to an increase in soil pH. Several oxygenated functional groups, especially O-H, CO, Mn-O, and Si-O, participated in the adsorption process, and manganese oxides played a significant role in the oxidation of arsenic. This study highlights the potential of MBC as an absorbent to immobilise arsenic for use in contaminated land remediation in the red soils region.

  2. Adsorption and synergism of cellobiohydrolase I and II of Trichoderma reesei during hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Medve, J.; Tjerneld, F. . Dept. of Biochemistry); Staahlberg, J. . Dept. of Molecular Biology)

    1994-11-05

    Hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) by cellobiohydrolase I and II (CBH I and II) from Trichoderma reesei has been studied. Adsorption and synergism of the enzymes were investigated. Experiments were performed at different temperatures and enzyme/substrate ratios using CBH I and CBH II alone and in reconstituted equimolar mixtures. Fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) analysis was found to be an accurate and reproducible method to follow the enzyme adsorption. A linear correlation was found between the conversion and the amount of adsorbed enzyme when Avicel was hydrolyzed by increasing amounts of CBH I and/or CBH II. CBH I had lower specific activity compared to CBH II although, over a wide concentration range, more CBH I was adsorbed than CBH II. Synergism between the cellobiohydrolases during hydrolysis of the amorphous fraction of Avicel showed a maximum as a function of total enzyme concentration. Synergism measured as a function of bound enzyme showed a continuous increase, which indicates that by decreasing the distance between the two enzymes the synergism is enhanced. The adsorption process for both enzymes was slow. Depending on the enzyme/substrate ratio it took 30--90 min to reach 95% of the equilibrium binding. The amount of bound enzyme decreased with increasing temperature. The two enzymes compete for the adsorption sites but also bind to specific sites. Stronger competition for adsorption sites was shown by CBH I.

  3. Isotope microscopy visualization of the adsorption profile of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin in powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Asuka; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-09-16

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon may enhance its equilibrium adsorption capacity for small molecules and micropollutants, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin, as well as for macromolecules and natural organic matter. Shell adsorption, in which adsorbates do not completely penetrate the adsorbent but instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the adsorbent, may explain this enhancement in equilibrium adsorption capacity. Here, we used isotope microscopy and deuterium-doped MIB and geosmin to directly visualize the solid-phase adsorbate concentration profiles of MIB and geosmin in carbon particles. The deuterium/hydrogen ratio, which we used as an index of the solid-phase concentration of MIB and geosmin, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of carbon particles. Solid-phase concentrations of MIB and geosmin obtained from the deuterium/hydrogen ratio roughly agreed with those predicted by shell adsorption model analyses of isotherm data. The direct visualization of the localization of micropollutant adsorbates in activated carbon particles provided direct evidence of shell adsorption. PMID:25162630

  4. Isotope microscopy visualization of the adsorption profile of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin in powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Asuka; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-09-16

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon may enhance its equilibrium adsorption capacity for small molecules and micropollutants, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin, as well as for macromolecules and natural organic matter. Shell adsorption, in which adsorbates do not completely penetrate the adsorbent but instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the adsorbent, may explain this enhancement in equilibrium adsorption capacity. Here, we used isotope microscopy and deuterium-doped MIB and geosmin to directly visualize the solid-phase adsorbate concentration profiles of MIB and geosmin in carbon particles. The deuterium/hydrogen ratio, which we used as an index of the solid-phase concentration of MIB and geosmin, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of carbon particles. Solid-phase concentrations of MIB and geosmin obtained from the deuterium/hydrogen ratio roughly agreed with those predicted by shell adsorption model analyses of isotherm data. The direct visualization of the localization of micropollutant adsorbates in activated carbon particles provided direct evidence of shell adsorption.

  5. Comparative analysis of mono- and polyelement adsorption of copper, lead, and zinc by an ordinary chernozem from nitrate and acetate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinskii, D. L.; Minkina, T. M.; Gaponova, Yu. I.

    2010-07-01

    Isotherms of mono- and polyelement adsorption of Cu2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+ by an ordinary chernozem were described by the Langmuir equation. The values of the adsorption constant k decreased in the range Cu2+ > Pb2+ ≫ Zn2+ for the monoelement adsorption from nitrate and acetate salt solutions, Cu2+ > Pb2+ > Zn2+ for the polyelement adsorption from nitrate solutions, and Pb2+ > Cu2+ ≫ Zn2+ for the polyelement adsorption from acetate solutions. The maximum adsorption ( C max, ∞) of individual cations at the polyelement contamination was always lower than at the monoelement contamination because of the mutual competition. At the same time, the values of k for the polyelement adsorption were higher than those for the monoelement adsorption because heavy metals (HMs) interact with most of the specific adsorption centers. It was shown that the ratio between the content of exchangeable cations displaced from the soil exchangeable complex (SEC) into the solution and the content of adsorbed HMs decreased with the increasing concentration of adsorbed HMs. These values could be higher (for Cu2+), equal, or lower than 1 (for Pb2+ and Zn2+). In the former case, this was due to the dissolution of readily soluble salts at low HM concentrations in the SEC. In the latter case, this was related to the adsorption of associated HMs and the formation of new phases localized on the surface of soil particles at high HM concentrations in the SEC.

  6. Electronic properties of a graphene device with peptide adsorption: insight from simulation.

    PubMed

    Akdim, Brahim; Pachter, Ruth; Kim, Steve S; Naik, Rajesh R; Walsh, Tiffany R; Trohalaki, Steven; Hong, Gongyi; Kuang, Zhifeng; Farmer, Barry L

    2013-08-14

    In this work, to explain doping behavior of single-layer graphene upon HSSYWYAFNNKT (P1) and HSSAAAAFNNKT (P1-3A) adsorption in field-effect transistors (GFETs), we applied a combined computational approach, whereby peptide adsorption was modeled by molecular dynamics simulations, and the lowest energy configuration was confirmed by density functional theory calculations. On the basis of the resulting structures of the hybrid materials, electronic structure and transport calculations were investigated. We demonstrate that π-π stacking of the aromatic residues and proximate peptide backbone to the graphene surface in P1 have a role in the p-doping. These results are consistent with our experimental observation of the GFET's p-doping even after a 24-h annealing procedure. Upon substitution of three of the aromatic residues to Ala in (P1-3A), a considerable decrease from p-doping is observed experimentally, demonstrating n-doping as compared to the nonadsorbed device, yet not explained based on the atomistic MD simulation structures. To gain a qualitative understanding of P1-3A's adsorption over a longer simulation time, which may differ from aromatic amino acid residues' swift anchoring on the surface, we analyzed equilibrated coarse-grain simulations performed for 500 ns. Desorption of the Ala residues from the surface was shown computationally, which could in turn affect charge transfer, yet a full explanation of the mechanism of n-doping will require elucidation of differences between various aromatic residues as dependent on peptide composition, and inclusion of effects of the substrate and environment, to be considered in future work.

  7. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  8. Surface structural ion adsorption modeling of competitive binding of oxyanions by metal (hydr)oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-02-01

    An important challenge in surface complexation models (SCM) is to connect the molecular microscopic reality to macroscopic adsorption phenomena. This study elucidates the primary factor controlling the adsorption process by analyzing the adsorption and competition of PO{sub 4}, AsO{sub 4}, and SeO{sub 3}. The authors show that the structure of the surface-complex acting in the dominant electrostatic field can be ascertained as the primary controlling adsorption factor. The surface species of arsenate are identical with those of phosphate and the adsorption behavior is very similar. On the basis of the selenite adsorption, The authors show that the commonly used 1pK models are incapable to incorporate in the adsorption modeling the correct bidentate binding mechanism found by spectroscopy. The use of the bidentate mechanism leads to a proton-oxyanion ratio and corresponding pH dependence that are too large. The inappropriate intrinsic charge attribution to the primary surface groups and the condensation of the inner sphere surface complex to a point charge are responsible for this behavior of commonly used 2pK models. Both key factors are differently defined in the charge distributed multi-site complexation (CD-MUSIC) model and are based in this model on a surface structural approach. The CD-MUSIC model can successfully describe the macroscopic adsorption phenomena using the surface speciation and binding mechanisms as found by spectroscopy. The model is also able to predict the anion competition well. The charge distribution in the interface is in agreement with the observed structure of surface complexes.

  9. Effect of pH and Electrolytes on Adsorption of 2,4-D onto Kaolinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Kawamoto, K.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2006-12-01

    The fate and transport of pesticides in soil can be greatly influenced by adsorption onto clay minerals such as kaolinite. The ionic pesticide 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) is one of the most commonly used herbicides. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of electrolytes and pH on the adsorption of 2,4- D onto kaolinite. The adsorption coefficient (Kd) of 2,4-D on two types of kaolinite was measured in batch experiments using water and 4 different electrolytes (0.005M CaSO4, 0.005M CaCl2, 0.01M KCl, and 0.01M NaCl). The experiments were carried out with 0.5 g kaolinite at a solid:liquid ratio of 1:20 and at different pH (1.9-6.3). The pH of the solution was controlled by addition of 0.2N of HCl. X-ray diffraction analysis of both kaolinite with and without adsorbed 2,4-D was also done to understand the location of 2,4-D adsorption. The effects of pH and electrolytes on Kd were compared and possible adsorption mechanisms were revealed for 2,4-D adsorption onto the two different types of kaolinite. The results implied that 2,4-D adsorption was higher for an electrolyte solution with monovalent cation than with divalent cation for one type of kaolinite, while no such trend was observed for the other kaolinite. The adsorption of 2,4-D increased significantly with decreasing pH for both types of kaolinite.

  10. Adsorption of Ba2+ by Ca-exchange clinoptilolite tuff and montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Chávez, M L; de Pablo, L; García, T A

    2010-03-15

    The adsorption of barium by Ca-exchanged clinoptilolite and montmorillonite is presented. The kinetics of adsorption of Ba(2+) were evaluated contacting 1g portion of each adsorber with 100mL 0.1N BaCl(2) for 200 h. Adsorption by Ca-clinoptilolite is defined by second-order kinetics of rate constant K(v) 8.232 x 10(-2) g mg(-1)h(-1) and maximum removal of 71.885 mg g(-1). It is a two-stage process initiated by a rapid uptake of Ba(2+) followed by more moderate kinetics. The adsorption isotherms were determined contacting 0.2g of each adsorber with 10 mL 0.1-0.005N BaCl(2)+CaCl(2) solution, Ba(2+)/Ca(2+) ratio 1, for periods of 7 days for the tuff and 2 days for the clay. The equilibrium adsorption is described by the Langmuir model, of equilibrium constant K 0.0151 L mg(-1) and maximum adsorption of 15.29 mg g(-1). The adsorption of Ba(2+) by Ca-exchanged montmorillonite also follows a second-order reaction of rate constant K(v) 3.179 x 10(-2) g mg(-1)h(-1), and calculated separation of 36.74 mg g(-1); the Langmuir isotherm is defined by the constant K 0.034 L mg(-1) and maximum adsorption of 15.29 mg g(-1). X-ray diffraction shows that the exchange of Ba(2+) modifies the d(001) of Ca-montmorillonite from 15.4 to 12.4A. PMID:19926210

  11. Micro/nanostructured porous Fe-Ni binary oxide and its enhanced arsenic adsorption performances.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengwen; Kang, Shenghong; Wang, Guozhong; Zhao, Huijun; Cai, Weiping

    2015-11-15

    A simple method is presented to synthesize micro/nano-structured Fe-Ni binary oxides based on co-precipitation and subsequent calcination. It has been found that the Fe-Ni binary oxides are composed of the porous microsized aggregates built with nanoparticles. When the atomic ratio of Fe to Ni is 2 to 1 the binary oxide is the micro-scaled aggregates consisting of the ultrafine NiFe2O4 nanoparticles with 3-6nm in size, and shows porous structure with pore diameter of 3nm and a specific surface area of 245m(2)g(-1). Such material is of abundant surface functional groups and has exhibited high adsorption performance to As(III) and As(V). The kinetic adsorption can be described by pseudo-second order model and the isothermal adsorption is subject to Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity on such Fe-Ni porous binary oxide is up to 168.6mgg(-1) and 90.1mgg(-1) for As(III) and As(V), respectively, which are much higher than the arsenic adsorption capacity for most commercial adsorbents. Such enhanced adsorption ability for this material is mainly attributed to its porous structure and high specific surface area as well as the abundant surface functional groups. Further experiments have revealed that the influence of the anions such as sulfate, carbonate, and phosphate, which commonly co-exist in water, on the arsenic adsorption is insignificant, exhibiting strong adsorption selectivity to arsenic. This micro/nano-structured porous Fe-Ni binary oxide is hence of good practicability to be used as a highly efficient adsorbent for arsenic removal from the real arsenic-contaminated waters.

  12. Alkali activation processes for incinerator residues management.

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, Isabella; Ponzoni, Chiara; Barbieri, Luisa; Leonelli, Cristina

    2013-08-01

    Incinerator bottom ash (BA) is produced in large amount worldwide and in Italy, where 5.1 millionstons of municipal solid residues have been incinerated in 2010, corresponding to 1.2-1.5 millionstons of produced bottom ash. This residue has been used in the present study for producing dense geopolymers containing high percentage (50-70 wt%) of ash. The amount of potentially reactive aluminosilicate fraction in the ash has been determined by means of test in NaOH. The final properties of geopolymers prepared with or without taking into account this reactive fraction have been compared. The results showed that due to the presence of both amorphous and crystalline fractions with a different degree of reactivity, the incinerator BA geopolymers exhibit significant differences in terms of Si/Al ratio and microstructure when reactive fraction is considered. PMID:23756039

  13. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  14. The residual caries dilemma.

    PubMed

    Weerheijm, K L; Groen, H J

    1999-12-01

    Restorative dentistry is based on the assumption that bacterial infection of demineralized dentine should prompt operative intervention. One of the concepts of practical dentistry is to create a favourable environment for caries arrest with minimal operative intervention. The progress of remaining primary caries is key to any discussion of this concept. This discussion is important for the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) approach, since the removal of all carious dentine is sometimes difficult using hand instruments only. In this paper the results of possible measures to guard against the effects of residual carious and its consequences are reviewed, in order to obtain an impression of the justification for (in)complete excavation of occlusal dentinal caries. Three types of measure are considered: isolating the caries process from the oral environment, excavating the carious dentine, and using a cariostatic filling material. Each of these measures contributes to the arrest of the caries process. However, none of these measures can arrest this process by itself. A combination of all three seems necessary. It is concluded that although residual caries does not seem to be the criterion for rerestoration, one has to strive for as complete caries removal as possible. If this cannot be fulfilled the sealing capacities of the filling material seem to be more important than its cariostatic properties. PMID:10600078

  15. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  16. Adsorption kinetics of methyl violet onto perlite.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Mehmet; Alkan, Mahir

    2003-01-01

    This study examines adsorption kinetics and activation parameters of methyl violet on perlite. The effect of process parameters like contact time, concentration of dye, temperature and pH on the extent of methyl violet adsorption from solution has been investigated. Results of the kinetic studies show that the adsorption reaction is first order with respect to dye solution concentration with activation energy of 13.2 kJ mol(-1). This low activation energy value indicates that the adsorption reaction is diffusion controlled. The activation parameters using Arrhenius and Eyring equations have been calculated. Adsorption increases with increase of variables such as contact time, initial dye concentration, temperature and pH.

  17. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  18. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  19. Adsorption of crude oil from aqueous solution by hydrogel of chitosan based polyacrylamide prepared by radiation induced graft polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sokker, H H; El-Sawy, Naeem M; Hassan, M A; El-Anadouli, Bahgat E

    2011-06-15

    The adsorption of crude oil (initial concentration 0.5-30 g/L) from aqueous solution using hydrogel of chitosan based polyacrylamide (PAM) prepared by radiation induced graft polymerization has been investigated. The prepared hydrogel was characterized by FTIR and SEM micrographs. The experiments were carried out as a function of different initial concentrations of oil residue, acrylamide concentration, contact time and pH to determine the optimum condition for the adsorption of residue oil from aqueous solution and sea water. The results obtained showed that the hydrogel prepared at concentration of 40% acrylamide (AAm) and at a radiation dose of 5 kGy has high removal efficiency of crude oil 2.3g/g at pH 3. Equilibrium studies have been carried out to determine the capacity of the hydrogel for adsorption of crude oil, Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the experimental isotherms and isotherms constants. Equilibrium data were found to fit very well with both Freundlich and Langmuir models. Also the adsorption of oil onto the hydrogel behaves as a pseudo-second-order kinetic models rather than the pseudo-first-order kinetic model.

  20. Evaluating the long-term performance of low-cost adsorbents using small-scale adsorption column experiments.

    PubMed

    Callery, O; Healy, M G; Rognard, F; Barthelemy, L; Brennan, R B

    2016-09-15

    This study investigated a novel method of predicting the long-term phosphorus removal performance of large-scale adsorption filters, using data derived from short-term, small-scale column experiments. The filter media investigated were low-cost adsorbents such as aluminum sulfate drinking water treatment residual, ferric sulfate drinking water treatment residual, and fine and coarse crushed concretes. Small-bore adsorption columns were loaded with synthetic wastewater, and treated column effluent volume was plotted against the mass of phosphorus adsorbed per unit mass of filter media. It was observed that the curve described by the data strongly resembled that of a standard adsorption isotherm created from batch adsorption data. Consequently, it was hypothesized that an equation following the form of the Freundlich isotherm would describe the relationship between filter loading and media saturation. Moreover, the relationship between filter loading and effluent concentration could also be derived from this equation. The proposed model was demonstrated to accurately predict the performance of large-scale adsorption filters over a period of up to three months with a very high degree of accuracy. Furthermore, the coefficients necessary to produce said model could be determined from just 24 h of small-scale experimental data. PMID:27295617

  1. Use of post-harvest sugarcane residue for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Letha; Boopathy, Raj

    2007-07-01

    Agricultural residues are produced in large quantities throughout the world. Approximately, 1kg of residue is produced for each kilogram of grains harvested. This ratio of grain/residue translates into an excess of 40 billion ton of crop residue produced each year in the USA. These residues are renewable resources that could be used to produce ethanol and many other value added products. In this study, we demonstrate that the post-harvest sugar cane residue could be used to produce fuel grade ethanol. A chemical pre-treatment process using alkaline peroxide or acid hydrolysis was applied to remove lignin, which acts as physical barrier to cellulolytic enzymes. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC strain 765 was used in the experiment. The pre-treatment process effectively removed lignin. Ethanol production in the culture sample was monitored using high performance liquid chromatography. The results indicate that ethanol can be made from the sugarcane residue. The fermentation system needs to be optimized further to scale up the process for large-scale production of ethanol from sugar cane residue.

  2. MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2005-04-30

    The aim of this project is to delineate the role of mineralogy of reservoir rocks in determining interactions between reservoir minerals and externally added reagents (surfactants/polymers) and its effect on critical solid-liquid and liquid-liquid interfacial properties such as adsorption, wettability and interfacial tension in systems relevant to reservoir conditions. Previous studies have suggested that significant surfactant loss by precipitation or adsorption on reservoir minerals can cause chemical schemes to be less than satisfactory for enhanced oil recovery. Both macroscopic adsorption, wettability and microscopic orientation and conformation studies for various surfactant/polymer mixtures/reservoir rocks systems were conducted to explore the cause of chemical loss by means of precipitation or adsorption, and the effect of rock mineralogy on the chemical loss. During this period, the adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) has been studied. The effects of solution pH, surfactant mixing ratio and different salts on surfactant adsorption on alumina have been investigated in detail. Along with these adsorption studies, changes in mineral wettability due to the adsorption of the mixtures were determined under relevant conditions to identify the nano-structure of the adsorbed layers. Solution properties of C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na/DM mixtures were also studied to identify surfactant interactions that affect the mixed aggregate formation in solution. Adsorption of SDS on gypsum and limestone suggested stronger surfactant/mineral interaction than on alumina, due to the precipitation of surfactant by dissolved calcium ions. The effects of different salts such as sodium nitrate, sodium sulfite and sodium chloride on DM adsorption on alumina have also been determined. As surfactant hemimicelles at interface and micelles in solution have drastic effects on oil recovery processes, their microstructures in

  3. Neptunium(V) Adsorption to Bacteria at Low and High Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, D.; Swanson, J. S.; Reed, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO2+ aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, interacts weakly with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface containment. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO2+) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacteria/Np mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria used were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. The observed adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities and differences in the characteristics of the moieties between the cell walls of common gram-negative soil and halophilic bacteria. Moreover, differences in adsorption behavior may also reflect ionic

  4. Neptunium(V) adsorption to bacteria at low and high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ams, David A; Swanson, Juliet S; Reed, Donald T; Fein, Jeremy B

    2010-12-08

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO{sub 2}{sup +} aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, weakly interacting with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface contaminant. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacterialNp mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight the key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. Similarities in adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities in the characteristics of the moieties between all bacterial cell walls. Differences in adsorption behavior may reflect differences in ionic strength effects, rather than

  5. Influence of in situ biofilm coverage on the radionuclide adsorption capacity of subsurface granite.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Craig; Jakobsson, Anna-Maria; Pedersen, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    Any migration of radionuclides from nuclear waste repositories is expected to be mitigated by adsorption to the host rocks surrounding hydraulically conductive fractures. Fluid rock interfaces are considered to be important barriers for nuclear waste disposal schemes but their adsorptive capacity can be affected by the growth of microbial biofilms. This study indicates that biofilms growing on fracture surfaces decrease the rocks adsorption capacity for migrating radionuclides except for trivalent species. Potential suppression of adsorption by biofilms should, therefore, be accounted for in performance safety assessment models. In this study, the adsorptive capacity of in situ anaerobic biofilms grown 450 m underground on either glass or granite slides was compared to the capacity of the same surfaces without biofilms. Surfaces were exposed to the radiotracers 60Co(II), 147Pm(III), 241Am(III), 234Th(IV), and 237Np(V) for a period of 660 h in a pH neutral anaerobic synthetic groundwater. Adsorption was investigated at multiple time points over the 660 h using liquid scintillation and ICP-MS. Results indicate that these surfaces adsorb between 0 and 85% of the added tracers under the conditions of the specific experiments. After 660 h, the distribution coefficients, R (ratio between what is sorbed and what is left in the aqueous phase), approached 3 x 10(4) m for 60Co, 3 x 10(5) m for 147Pm and 241Am, 1 x 10(6)m for 234Th, and 1 x 10(3) m for 237Np. The highest rate of adsorption was during the first 200 h of the adsorption experiments and started to approach equilibrium after 500 h. Adsorption to colloids and precipitates contributed to decreases of up to 20% in the available 60Co, 147Pm, 241Am, and 237Np in the adsorption systems. In the 234Th system 95% of the aqueous 234Th was removed by adsorbing to colloids. Although the range of Rvalues for each surface tested generally overlapped, the biofilms consistently demonstrated lower R values except for the trivalant

  6. Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.

    2001-01-01

    Closing the oxygen loop in an air revitalization system based on four-bed molecular sieve and Sabatier reactor technology requires a vacuum pump-compressor that can take the low-pressure CO, from the 4BMS and compress and store for use by a Sabatier reactor. NASA Ames Research Center proposed a solid-state temperature-swing adsorption (TSA) compressor that appears to meet performance requirements, be quiet and reliable, and consume less power than a comparable mechanical compressor/accumulator combination. Under this task, TSA compressor technology is being advanced through development of a complete prototype system. A liquid-cooled TSA compressor has been partially tested, and the rest of the system is being fabricated. An air-cooled TSA compressor is also being designed.

  7. Compression ratio effect on methane HCCI combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S. M.; Pitz, W.; Smith, J. R.; Westbrook, C.

    1998-09-29

    We have used the HCT (Hydrodynamics, Chemistry and Transport) chemical kinetics code to simulate HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) combustion of methane-air mixtures. HCT is applied to explore the ignition timing, bum duration, NOx production, gross indicated efficiency and gross IMEP of a supercharged engine (3 atm. Intake pressure) with 14:1, 16:l and 18:1 compression ratios at 1200 rpm. HCT has been modified to incorporate the effect of heat transfer and to calculate the temperature that results from mixing the recycled exhaust with the fresh mixture. This study uses a single control volume reaction zone that varies as a function of crank angle. The ignition process is controlled by adjusting the intake equivalence ratio and the residual gas trapping (RGT). RGT is internal exhaust gas recirculation which recycles both thermal energy and combustion product species. Adjustment of equivalence ratio and RGT is accomplished by varying the timing of the exhaust valve closure in either 2-stroke or 4-stroke engines. Inlet manifold temperature is held constant at 300 K. Results show that, for each compression ratio, there is a range of operational conditions that show promise of achieving the control necessary to vary power output while keeping indicated efficiency above 50% and NOx levels below 100 ppm. HCT results are also compared with a set of recent experimental data for natural gas.

  8. Continuum random sequential adsorption of polymer on a flat and homogeneous surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał

    2013-05-01

    Random sequential adsorption (RSA) of polymer, modeled as a chain of identical spheres, is systematically studied. In order to control precisely anisotropy and number of degrees of freedom, two different kinds of polymers are used. In the first one, monomers are placed along a straight line, whereas in the second, relative orientations of particles are random. Such polymers fill a flat homogeneous surface randomly. The paper focuses on maximal random coverage ratio and adsorption kinetics dependence on polymer size, shape anisotropy, and numbers of degrees of freedom. Obtained results were discussed and compared with other numerical experiments and theoretical predictions.

  9. Sequential shape-selective adsorption and photocatalytic transformation of acrylonitrile production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunrong; Song, Yonghui; Tu, Xiang; Jiang, Yanpeng; Yuan, Yu

    2015-11-15

    Acrylonitrile production wastewater has been widely recognized as one type of refractory organic wastewater because of its complicated composition and low bioavailability. It usually contains plenty of micromolecular nitrile and pyridine, resulting in high chemical oxygen demand (CODCr), total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations. In this study, a novel microporous zeolite, CS-Z1, was developed as an adsorbent for rapidly shape-selective adsorption of the micromolecular pollutants from the acrylonitrile production wastewater, and a visible light-driven Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis was introduced to sequentially treat the residual macromolecular pollutants for complete purification. The adsorption processes by CS-Z1 were mostly achieved within the first 5 min, and the equilibrium was reached quickly after 30 min, where the CODCr, TOC and TN removal efficiencies of the wastewater were as high as 93.5%, 92.2% and 96.8%, respectively, much higher than those by other adsorbents. Furthermore, the adsorption efficiencies of CS-Z1 were barely affected by the variation of pH value and temperature, which was mainly attributed to the shape-selective adsorption mechanism of the CS-Z1 zeolite. The Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis could remove more than 95% of the residual macromolecular pollutants in the wastewater, where a synergistic mechanism of reduction-oxidation/polymerization was proposed. In a 108 h of CS-Z1 adsorption and Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis sequential process, the CODCr, TOC and TN concentrations was reduced to below 20, 7 and 5 mg L(-1), respectively, demonstrating the excellent practical potential of the sequential treatment system for acrylonitrile production wastewater.

  10. High-Ratio Gear Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed arrangement of two connected planetary differentials results in gear ratio many times that obtainable in conventional series gear assembly of comparable size. Ratios of several thousand would present no special problems. Selection of many different ratios is available with substantially similar gear diameters. Very high gear ratios would be obtained from small mechanism.

  11. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  12. Variable compression ratio control

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.

    1988-04-19

    In a four cycle engine that includes a crankshaft having a plural number of main shaft sections defining the crankshaft rotational axis and a plural number of crank arms defining orbital shaft sections, a plural number of combustion cylinders, a movable piston within each cylinder, each cylinder and its associated piston defining a combustion chamber, a connecting rod connecting each piston to an orbital shaft section of the crankshaft, and a plural number of stationary support walls spaced along the crankshaft axis for absorbing crankshaft forces: the improvement is described comprising means for adjustably supporting the crankshaft on the stationary walls such that the crankshaft rotational axis is adjustable along the piston-cylinder axis for the purpose of varying a resulting engine compression ratio; the adjustable support means comprising a circular cavity in each stationary wall. A circular disk swivably is seated in each cavity, each circular disk having a circular opening therethrough eccentric to the disk center. The crankshaft is arranged so that respective ones of its main shaft sections are located within respective ones of the circular openings; means for rotating each circular disk around its center so that the main shaft sections of the crankshaft are adjusted toward and away from the combustion chamber; a pinion gear on an output end of the crankshaft in axial alignment with and positioned beyond the respective ones of the main shaft sections, and a rotary output gear located about and engaged with teeth extending from the pinion gear.

  13. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  14. Experimental determination of residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Milton W.

    1991-01-01

    Residual stresses in finished parts have often been regarded as factors contributing to premature part failure and geometric distortions. Currently, residual stresses in welded structures and railroad components are being investigated. High residual stresses formed in welded structures due primarily to the differential contractions of the weld material as it cools and solidifies can have a profound effect on the surface performance of the structure. In railroad wheels, repeated use of the brakes causes high residual stresses in the rims which may lead to wheel failure and possible derailment. The goals of the study were: (1) to develop strategies for using x-ray diffraction to measure residual stress; (2) to subject samples of Inconel 718 to various mechanical and heat treatments and to measure the resulting stress using x-ray diffraction; and (3) to measure residual stresses in ferromagnetic alloys using magnetoacoustics.

  15. Compositions and sorptive properties of crop residue-derived chars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chun, Y.; Sheng, G.; Chiou, G.T.; Xing, B.

    2004-01-01

    Chars originating from the burning or pyrolysis of vegetation may significantly sorb neutral organic contaminants (NOCs). To evaluate the relationship between the char composition and NOC sorption, a series of char samples were generated by pyrolyzing a wheat residue (Triticum aestivum L) for 6 h at temperatures between 300 ??C and 700 ??C and analyzed for their elemental compositions, surface areas, and surface functional groups. The samples were then studied for their abilities to sorb benzene and nitrobenzene from water. A commercial activated carbon was used as a reference carbonaceous sample. The char samples produced at high pyrolytic temperatures (500-700 ??C) were well carbonized and exhibited a relatively high surface area (>300 m2/g), little organic matter (20% oxygen). The char samples exhibited a significant range of surface acidity/basicity because of their different surface polar-group contents, as characterized by the Boehm titration data and the NMR and FTIR spectra. The NOC sorption by high-temperature chars occurred almost exclusively by surface adsorption on carbonized surfaces, whereas the sorption by low-temperature chars resulted from the surface adsorption and the concurrent smaller partition into the residual organic-matter phase. The chars appeared to have a higher surface affinity for a polar solute (nitrobenzene) than for a nonpolar solute (benzene), the difference being related to the surface acidity/basicity of the char samples.

  16. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from sunflower seed oil residue via microwave assisted K2CO3 activation.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2011-10-01

    Sunflower seed oil residue, a by-product of sunflower seed oil refining, was utilized as a feedstock for preparation of activated carbon (SSHAC) via microwave induced K(2)CO(3) chemical activation. SSHAC was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption and elemental analysis. Surface acidity/basicity was examined with acid-base titration, while the adsorptive properties of SSHAC were quantified using methylene blue (MB) and acid blue 15 (AB). The monolayer adsorption capacities of MB and AB were 473.44 and 430.37 mg/g, while the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, Langmuir surface area and total pore volume were 1411.55 m(2)/g, 2137.72 m(2)/g and 0.836 cm(3)/g, respectively. The findings revealed the potential to prepare high surface area activated carbon from sunflower seed oil residue by microwave irradiation.

  17. Comments on D/H ratios in chondritic organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. W.; Rigby, D.

    1981-06-01

    D/H ratios in chondritic organic matter are investigated. Demineralized organic residues obtained from previous experiments were dried in a quartz reaction vessel under vacuum for 60 minutes at 250-300 C and then combusted in oxygen for 20 minutes at 850 C. The apparatus is described and the results of the experiments such as D/H ratios in water and measurements on total carbon dioxide are given. Atomic H/C ratios calculated directly from the quantities of carbon dioxide and water recovered, are reported according to Standard Mean Ocean Water and Pee Dee Belemnite, using the customary notation.

  18. [Coagulation and adsorption on treating the Yellow River and the impact on chlorine decay during chlorination process].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiao; Gao, Bao-yu; Liu, Bin; Xu, Chun-hua; Yue, Qin-yan

    2010-05-01

    Two types of inorganic polymer coagulants, polyferric chloride (PFC) and polyaluminum chloride (PAC), were chosen to treat the Yellow River water. Different dosages were investigated in order to investigate the turbidity, UV24, DOC and permanganate index removal efficiency and their coagulation mechanisms based on the Zeta potentials. The natural organic matter removal by the combination of coagulation and adsorption with powder activated carbon were analyzed based on different coagulant and adsorbent dosages and dosing orders. The effects of combination of coagulation and adsorption on the residual chlorine decay were analyzed. The results showed that the two coagulants had high turbidity removal efficiency ( > 90%). The UV254, DOC, permanganate index removal efficiency were 29.2%, 26.1% and 27.9% respectively for PAC coagulation and were 32.3%, 23.3% and 32.9% respectively for PFC. Electric neutralization played an important role in the PAC coagulation process while both adsorption bridging and electric neutralization performed when PFC was used. The removal percentage of organic matter increased with the increase coagulant and adsorbent. The adsorption after coagulation process gave the better UV254 and DOC removal efficiency than the coagulation after adsorption. The UV254 and DOC removal efficiency were 95.2% and 99.9% for PAC coagulation after adsorption and were 90.1% and 99.9% for PFC coagulation first. But adding powder activated carbon can improve floc settlement performance and maintained persistent disinfection effect.

  19. Materials recovery from shredder residues

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J., Jr.

    2000-07-24

    Each year, about five (5) million ton of shredder residues are landfilled in the US. Similar quantities are landfilled in Europe and the Pacific Rim. Landfilling of these residues results in a cost to the existing recycling industry and also represents a loss of material resources that are otherwise recyclable. In this paper, the authors outline the resources recoverable from typical shredder residues and describe technology that they have developed to recover these resources.

  20. Novel fluidized bed reactor for integrated NOx adsorption-reduction with hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Terris T. Yang; Hsiaotao T. Bi

    2009-07-01

    In order to avoid the negative impact of excessive oxygen in the combustion flue gases on the selectivity of most hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (HC-SCR) catalysts, an integrated NOx adsorption-reduction process has been proposed in this study for the treatment of flue gases under lean burn conditions by decoupling the adsorption and reduction into two different zones. The hypothesis has been validated in a novel internal circulating fluidized bed (ICFB) reactor using Fe/ZSM-5 as the catalyst and propylene as the reducing agent. Effects of propylene to the NOx molar ratio, flue gas oxygen concentration, and gas velocity on NOx conversion were studied using simulated flue gases. The results showed that increasing the ratio of HC:NO improved the reduction performance of Fe/ZSM-5 in the ICFB reactor. NOx conversion decreased with an increasing flue gas flow velocity in the annulus U{sub A} but increased with an increasing reductant gas flow velocity in the draft tube U{sub D}. The NOx adsorption ratio decreased with increasing U{sub A}. In most cases, NOx conversion was higher than the adsorption ratio due to the relatively poor adsorption performance of the catalyst. Fe/ZSM-5 showed a promising reduction performance and a strong inhibiting ability on the negative impact of excessive O{sub 2} in the ICFB reactor, proving that such an ICFB reactor possessed the ability to overcome the negative impact of excessive O{sub 2} in the flue gas using Fe/ZSM-5 as the deNOx catalyst. 22 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Adsorption of lead over graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-24

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb(2+) was found to be 98%, 91% and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water.

  2. Thermodynamics of binary gas adsorption in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sujeet; Lefort, Ronan; Morineau, Denis; Mhanna, Ramona; Merdrignac-Conanec, Odile; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Leclercq, Théo

    2016-09-21

    MCM-41 nanoporous silicas show a very high selectivity for monoalcohols over aprotic molecules during adsorption of a binary mixture in the gas phase. We present here an original use of gravimetric vapour sorption isotherms to characterize the role played by the alcohol hydrogen-bonding network in the adsorption process. Beyond simple selectivity, vapour sorption isotherms measured for various compositions help to completely unravel at the molecular level the step by step adsorption mechanism of the binary system in the nanoporous solid, from the first monolayers to the complete liquid condensation. PMID:27532892

  3. Adsorption in sparse networks. 2: Silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.; Calas, S.; Sempere, R.

    1998-06-15

    The model developed in Part 1 is applied to nitrogen adsorption isotherms obtained for a series of silica aerogels whose densities are varied by partial sintering. The isotherms are adequately described by a cubic network model, with all of the pores falling in the mesopore range; the adsorption and desorption branches are fit by the same pore size distribution. For the least dense gels, a substantial portion of the pore volume is not detected by condensation. The model attributes this effect to the shape of the adsorbate/adsorptive interface, which can adopt zero curvature even in mesopores, because of the shape of the network.

  4. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  5. Radium Adsorption to Iron Bearing Minerals in Variable Salinity Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Kocar, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Radium is a common, naturally occurring radioactive metal found in many subsurface environments. Radium isotopes are a product of natural uranium and thorium decay, and are particularly abundant within groundwaters where minimal flux leads to accumulation within porewaters. Radium has been used as a natural tracer to estimate submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) [1], where the ratios of various radium isotopes are used to estimate total groundwater flux to and from the ocean [2]. Further, it represents a substantial hazard in waste water produced after hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction [3], resulting in a significant risk of environmental release and increased cost for water treatment or disposal. Adsorption to mineral surfaces represents a primary pathway of radium retention within subsurface environments. For SGD studies, it is important to understand adsorption processes to correctly estimate GW fluxes, while in hydraulic fracturing, radium adsorption to aquifer solids will mediate the activities of radium within produced water. While some studies of radium adsorption to various minerals have been performed [4], there is a limited understanding of the surface chemistry of radium adsorption, particularly to iron-bearing minerals such as pyrite, goethite and ferrihydrite. Accordingly, we present the results of sorption experiments of radium to a suite of iron-bearing minerals representative of those found within deep saline and near-surface (freshwater) aquifers, and evaluate impacts of varying salinity solutions through the use of artificial groundwater, seawater, and shale formation brine. Further, we explore the impacts of pyrite oxidation and ferrihydrite transformation to other iron-bearing secondary minerals on the retention of radium. This work lays the groundwork for further study of radium use as a tracer for SGD, as well as understanding mechanisms of radium retention and release from deep aquifer materials following hydraulic fracturing

  6. Predictive hydrogeochemical modelling of bauxite residue sand in field conditions.

    PubMed

    Wissmeier, Laurin; Barry, David A; Phillips, Ian R

    2011-07-15

    The suitability of residue sand (the coarse fraction remaining from Bayer's process of bauxite refining) for constructing the surface cover of closed bauxite residue storage areas was investigated. Specifically, its properties as a medium for plant growth are of interest to ensure residue sand can support a sustainable ecosystem following site closure. The geochemical evolution of the residue sand under field conditions, its plant nutrient status and soil moisture retention were studied by integrated modelling of geochemical and hydrological processes. For the parameterization of mineral reactions, amounts and reaction kinetics of the mineral phases natron, calcite, tricalcium aluminate, sodalite, muscovite and analcime were derived from measured acid neutralization curves. The effective exchange capacity for ion adsorption was measured using three independent exchange methods. The geochemical model, which accounts for mineral reactions, cation exchange and activity corrected solution speciation, was formulated in the geochemical modelling framework PHREEQC, and partially validated in a saturated-flow column experiment. For the integration of variably saturated flow with multi-component solute transport in heterogeneous 2D domains, a coupling of PHREEQC with the multi-purpose finite-element solver COMSOL was established. The integrated hydrogeochemical model was applied to predict water availability and quality in a vertical flow lysimeter and a cover design for a storage facility using measured time series of rainfall and evaporation from southwest Western Australia. In both scenarios the sand was fertigated and gypsum-amended. Results show poor long-term retention of fertilizer ions and buffering of the pH around 10 for more than 5 y of leaching. It was concluded that fertigation, gypsum amendment and rainfall leaching alone were insufficient to render the geochemical conditions of residue sand suitable for optimal plant growth within the given timeframe. The

  7. Reduced mobility of fomesafen through enhanced adsorption in biochar-amended soil.

    PubMed

    Khorram, Mahdi Safaei; Wang, Yun; Jin, Xiangxiang; Fang, Hua; Yu, Yunlong

    2015-06-01

    The residual soil material resulting from biomass thermochemical transformation during carbon separation, known as biochar, has been introduced as a soil amendment because of its numerous environmental benefits, including uses for contaminated land management. Adsorption and leaching of fomesafen in soils amended with 3 different rates of rice hull biochar (0.5%, 1%, and 2% w/w) under laboratory conditions were investigated, and studies were performed following a batch equilibration adsorption-desorption procedure and a column experiment for leaching. Adsorption-desorption data fit with the Freundlich equation well. The adsorption coefficient of fomesafen sharply increased from 0.59 to 0.99 to 8.02 to 22.23 when the amount of biochar amendment in the soil increased from 0% to 2% (w/w). In addition, a strong correlation was found between the amount of adsorbed fomesafen and the rate of amended biochar (r > 0.992, p < 0.01). Furthermore, biochar amendments reduced the desorption percentage of fomesafen in the soils. The outcomes of the leaching experiment also illustrated that the lowest fomesafen concentration in the leachate (21.4%) occurred in the soil amended with 2% (w/w) biochar. Moreover, the adsorption coefficients (K(f)(ads)) of the soil were positively correlated with the total amount of adsorbed fomesafen in the corresponding soil columns (r = 0.990, p < 0.01) and negatively correlated with the leachate percentage (r = 0.987, p < 0.05). The results of the present study suggest that biochar amendments in agricultural soils likely alter the fate of herbicides by decreasing their transport through enhanced adsorption.

  8. Capture and recovery of isobutane by electrothermal swing adsorption with post-desorption liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Mallouk, Kaitlin E; Johnsen, David L; Rood, Mark J

    2010-09-15

    A bench-scale capture and recovery system to convert a low concentration organic gas to a liquid is described here. Adsorption of isobutane onto activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) followed by electrothermal desorption and subsequent liquefaction is demonstrated. Experimental conditions to condense desorbed isobutane were determined based on Dalton's law and Antoine's equation. Breakthrough curves for a gas stream containing 2000 ppm(v) isobutane in air adsorbing onto ACFC-15 demonstrate an adsorption capacity of 0.094 ± 0.017 g of isobutane/g of ACFC with >98% capture efficiency. The system described here utilizes two adsorbers, which operate cyclically to allow for continuous treatment of the isobutane. Adsorption followed by electrothermal desorption provided a concentration ratio of 240, which facilitates condensation of the isobutane after compression and cooling and is an order of magnitude greater than what has been previously demonstrated. PMID:20722439

  9. Dyes adsorption using a synthetic carboxymethyl cellulose-acrylic acid adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Genlin; Yi, Lijuan; Deng, Hui; Sun, Ping

    2014-05-01

    Removal of noxious dyes is gaining public and technological attention. Herein grafting polymerization was employed to produce a novel adsorbent using acrylic acid and carboxymethyl cellulose for dye removal. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy verified the adsorbent formed under optimized reaction conditions. The removal ratio of adsorbent to Methyl Orange, Disperse Blue 2BLN and malachite green chloride reached to 84.2%, 79.6% and 99.9%, respectively. The greater agreement between the calculated and experimental results suggested that pseudo second-order kinetic model better represents the kinetic adsorption data. Equilibrium adsorptions of dyes were better explained by the Temkin isotherm. The results implied that this new cellulose-based absorbent had the universality for removal of dyes through the chemical adsorption mechanism. PMID:25079652

  10. Capture and recovery of isobutane by electrothermal swing adsorption with post-desorption liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Mallouk, Kaitlin E; Johnsen, David L; Rood, Mark J

    2010-09-15

    A bench-scale capture and recovery system to convert a low concentration organic gas to a liquid is described here. Adsorption of isobutane onto activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) followed by electrothermal desorption and subsequent liquefaction is demonstrated. Experimental conditions to condense desorbed isobutane were determined based on Dalton's law and Antoine's equation. Breakthrough curves for a gas stream containing 2000 ppm(v) isobutane in air adsorbing onto ACFC-15 demonstrate an adsorption capacity of 0.094 ± 0.017 g of isobutane/g of ACFC with >98% capture efficiency. The system described here utilizes two adsorbers, which operate cyclically to allow for continuous treatment of the isobutane. Adsorption followed by electrothermal desorption provided a concentration ratio of 240, which facilitates condensation of the isobutane after compression and cooling and is an order of magnitude greater than what has been previously demonstrated.

  11. Albumin (BSA) Adsorption over Graphene in Aqueous Environment: Influence of Orientation, Adsorption Protocol, and Solvent Treatment.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vellosillo, Perceval; Serena, P A; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-02-23

    We report 150 ns explicit solvent MD simulations of the adsorption on graphene of albumin (BSA) in two orientations and using two different adsorption protocols, i.e., free and forced adsorption. Our results show that free adsorption occurs with little structural rearrangements. Even taking adsorption to an extreme, by forcing it with a 5 nN downward force applied during the initial 20 ns, we show that along a particular orientation BSA is able to preserve the structural properties of the majority of its binding sites. Furthermore, in all the cases considered in this work, the ibuprofen binding site has shown a strong resilience to structural changes. Finally, we compare these results with implicit solvent simulations and find that the latter predicts an extreme protein unfolding upon adsorption. The origin of this discrepancy is attributed to a poor description of the water entropic forces at interfaces in the implicit solvent methods.

  12. Albumin (BSA) Adsorption over Graphene in Aqueous Environment: Influence of Orientation, Adsorption Protocol, and Solvent Treatment.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vellosillo, Perceval; Serena, P A; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-02-23

    We report 150 ns explicit solvent MD simulations of the adsorption on graphene of albumin (BSA) in two orientations and using two different adsorption protocols, i.e., free and forced adsorption. Our results show that free adsorption occurs with little structural rearrangements. Even taking adsorption to an extreme, by forcing it with a 5 nN downward force applied during the initial 20 ns, we show that along a particular orientation BSA is able to preserve the structural properties of the majority of its binding sites. Furthermore, in all the cases considered in this work, the ibuprofen binding site has shown a strong resilience to structural changes. Finally, we compare these results with implicit solvent simulations and find that the latter predicts an extreme protein unfolding upon adsorption. The origin of this discrepancy is attributed to a poor description of the water entropic forces at interfaces in the implicit solvent methods. PMID:26799950

  13. Relationship between tumor necrosis factor-α release and granulocyte and monocyte adsorption to cellulose acetate beads.

    PubMed

    Nishise, Shoichi; Abe, Yasuhiko; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Sasaki, Yu; Iwano, Daisuke; Yoshizawa, Kazuya; Yagi, Makoto; Nishise, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α, (TNF)-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, is produced by activated granulocytes and monocytes (GMs) and implicated as a major factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathogenesis. Reduction of TNF-α should improve IBD pathology. GM adsorptive apheresis (GMA) is an effective therapy for inflammatory disorders including IBD. GM adsorption to cellulose acetate (CA) beads induces anti-inflammatory cytokine release, although these effects on TNF-α release are not clarified. We hypothesized that GMA may inhibit TNF-α release. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of GM adsorption to CA beads on TNF-α release in vitro. Peripheral blood was incubated with and without CA beads and TNF-α was measured. For comparison, TNF-α was measured in another lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-containing peripheral blood sample incubated similarly. The amount of TNF-α in blood samples incubated with CA beads was significantly higher than in those incubated without beads, although it was significantly lower than TNF-α incubated with LPS-containing sample without beads. The amount of TNF-α after incubation with CA beads positively correlated with GM adsorption ratio. GM adsorption to CA beads induced a small amount of TNF-α release. This is the first report on TNF-α release induced via GM adsorption stimuli. The biological effects of TNF-α release during GM adsorption need to be clarified.

  14. Relationship between the adsorption species of cesium and radiocesium interception potential in soils and minerals: an EXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiaohui; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Tanaka, Masato; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the radiocesium (RCs) interception potential (RIP), cation exchange capacity (CEC), total organic carbon (TOC) content, and adsorption species in soils and minerals by using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The RIP related to Cs(+) adsorption by frayed-edge site (FES) has often been used to measure the mobility and bioavailability of RCs in the environment. This study found that the presence of organic matter (OM) can reduce RIP to a certain extent. The adsorption amount (=Q(T)) in soil was obviously correlated to RIP at a small [Cs(+)] region, whereas a linear relationship between Q(T) and CEC was observed at a large [Cs(+)] region. Both the inner-sphere (IS) and outer-sphere (OS) complexes of Cs(+) were observed through EXAFS at a molecular scale. The linear correlation between log (RIP/CEC) and the ratio of the coordination number (CN) of IS (=CNIS) and OS (=CNOS) complexes noted as CNIS/(CNIS + CNOS) suggested that the ratio of CN is very sensitive to Cs(+) adsorption species with variable RIP and CEC. The adsorption species of Cs(+) in soil was mainly dependent on the clay mineral content of soil. RIP was affected not only by FES but also by other strong adsorption sites, such as the interlayers and cavities identified as the IS complex in EXAFS analysis. Findings indicated that the EXAFS approach is a powerful and efficient tool to explore the behavior of Cs(+) in a given environment.

  15. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  16. Residual stresses in cross-ply composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, D.; Hyer, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    The residual thermal stresses in 4-layer cross-ply tubes are studied. The tubes considered has a small radius to wall-thickness ratios and so elasticity solutions were used. The residual thermal stress problem was considered to be axisymmetric and three elasticity solutions were derived and the results compared with the results using classical lamination theory. The comparison illustrates the limitations of classical lamination theory. The three elasticity solutions derived were: plane stress, plane strain, and generalized plane strain, the latter being the most realistic. Residual stresses in both the hoop and axial direction is significant. Stacking arrangement effects the residual stress to some extent, as do the material properties of the individual lamina. The benefits of hybrid construction are briefly discussed.

  17. Mechanism of Methylene Blue adsorption on hybrid laponite-multi-walled carbon nanotube particles.

    PubMed

    Manilo, Maryna; Lebovka, Nikolai; Barany, Sandor

    2016-04-01

    The kinetics of adsorption and parameters of equilibrium adsorption of Methylene Blue (MB) on hybrid laponite-multi-walled carbon nanotube (NT) particles in aqueous suspensions were determined. The laponite platelets were used in order to facilitate disaggregation of NTs in aqueous suspensions and enhance the adsorption capacity of hybrid particles for MB. Experiments were performed at room temperature (298 K), and the laponite/NT ratio (Xl) was varied in the range of 0-0.5. For elucidation of the mechanism of MB adsorption on hybrid particles, the electrical conductivity of the system as well as the electrokinetic potential of laponite-NT hybrid particles were measured. Three different stages in the kinetics of adsorption of MB on the surface of NTs or hybrid laponite-NT particles were discovered to be a fast initial stage I (adsorption time t=0-10 min), a slower intermediate stage II (up to t=120 min) and a long-lasting final stage III (up to t=24hr). The presence of these stages was explained accounting for different types of interactions between MB and adsorbent particles, as well as for the changes in the structure of aggregates of NT particles and the long-range processes of restructuring of laponite platelets on the surface of NTs. The analysis of experimental data on specific surface area versus the value of Xl evidenced in favor of the model with linear contacts between rigid laponite platelets and NTs. It was also concluded that electrostatic interactions control the first stage of adsorption at low MB concentrations.

  18. The effects of oil on As(V) adsorption on illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite and chlorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainipee, Wimolporn; Cuadros, Javier; Sephton, Mark A.; Unsworth, Catherine; Gill, Martin G.; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Weiss, Dominik J.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of oil on As(V) adsorption on clay minerals has been investigated using batch experiments at low and high pH, NaCl concentration and oil contents. Four clay minerals were chosen because of their abundance in sediments and their different crystal chemistry: illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, and chlorite. The values for pH were 4 and 8 and salt concentrations were 0.001 and 0.7 M NaCl to appreciate the effects of changing salinity, e.g. from fresh water to seawater conditions. For the coating experiments, a well-characterised oil was used to survey the main effects of complex organic mixtures on adsorption and oil to clay mineral (w/w) ratios were 0.0325 and 0.3250. As(V) adsorption increased with increasing NaCl concentration, suggesting that the mechanisms of As(V) adsorption are related to the formation of surface complexes in which Na+ ions act as bridges between the clay surface and the As(V) anions. Cation bridging is also indicated by zeta potential measurements which show that higher NaCl concentrations along with the presence of As(V) can cause the clay particles and adsorbed ions to have a more negative overall charge. Adsorption is lower at higher pH due to the reduced number of positively charged sites on the edge of clay mineral layers. Oil coating reduces As(V) adsorption by decreasing the available surface area of clay minerals, except in the case of oil-coated montmorillonite, where surface area following dispersion in water is increased. The main variables controlling As(V) adsorption are surface area and surface charge density, as confirmed by a simplified quantitative model. These findings advance our ability to predict the effects of complex pollution events in various freshwater and marine settings.

  19. Use of in situ solid-phase adsorption in microbial natural product fermentation development.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Thomas; Chase, Matthew; Wagner, Stephanie; Renzi, Chris; Powell, Marcella; DeAngelo, Joseph; Michels, Peter

    2013-05-01

    It has been half a century since investigators first began experimenting with adding ion exchange resins during the fermentation of microbial natural products. With the development of nonionic polymeric adsorbents in the 1970s, the application of in situ product adsorption in bioprocessing has grown slowly, but steadily. To date, in situ product adsorption strategies have been used in biotransformations, plant cell culture, the production of biofuels, and selected bulk chemicals, such as butanol and lactic acid, as well as in more traditional natural product fermentation within the pharmaceutical industry. Apart from the operational gains in efficiency from the integration of fermentation and primary recovery, the addition of adsorbents during fermentation has repeatedly demonstrated the capacity to significantly increase titers by sequestering the product and preventing or mitigating degradation, feedback inhibition and/or cytotoxic effects. Adoption of in situ product adsorption has been particularly valuable in the early stages of natural product-based drug discovery programs, where quickly and cost-effectively generating multigram quantities of a lead compound can be challenging when using a wild-type strain and fermentation conditions that have not been optimized. While much of the literature involving in situ adsorption describes its application early in the drug development process, this does not imply that the potential for scale-up is limited. To date, commercial-scale processes utilizing in situ product adsorption have reached batch sizes of at least 30,000 l. Here we present examples where in situ product adsorption has been used to improve product titers or alter the ratios among biosynthetically related natural products, examine some of the relevant variables to consider, and discuss the mechanisms by which in situ adsorption may impact the biosynthesis of microbial natural products.

  20. Adsorption of selected endocrine disrupting compounds and pharmaceuticals on activated biochars.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chanil; Park, Junyeong; Lim, Kwang Hun; Park, Sunkyu; Heo, Jiyong; Her, Namguk; Oh, Jeill; Yun, Soyoung; Yoon, Yeomin

    2013-12-15

    Chemically activated biochar produced under oxygenated (O-biochar) and oxygen-free (N-biochar) conditions were characterized and the adsorption of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs): bisphenol A (BPA), atrazine (ATR), 17 α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs); sulfamethoxazole (SMX), carbamazepine (CBM), diclofenac (DCF), ibuprofen (IBP) on both biochars and commercialized powdered activated carbon (PAC) were investigated. Characteristic analysis of adsorbents by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was conducted to determine better understanding about the EDCs/PhACs adsorption. N-biochar consisted of higher polarity moieties with more alkyl (0-45 ppm), methoxyl (45-63 ppm), O-alkyl (63-108 ppm), and carboxyl carbon (165-187 ppm) content than other adsorbents, while aromaticity of O-biochar was higher than that of N-biochar. O-biochar was composed mostly of aromatic moieties, with low H/C and O/C ratios compared to the highly polarized N-biochar that contained diverse polar functional groups. The higher surface area and pore volume of N-biochar resulted in higher adsorption capacity toward EDCs/PhACs along with atomic-level molecular structural property than O-biochar and PAC. N-biochar had a highest adsorption capacity of all chemicals, suggesting that N-biochar derived from loblolly pine chip is a promising sorbent for agricultural and environmental applications. The adsorption of pH-sensitive dissociable SMX, DCF, IBP, and BPA varied and the order of adsorption capacity was correlated with the hydrophobicity (Kow) of adsorbates throughout the all adsorbents, whereas adsorption of non-ionizable CBM, ATR, and EE2 in varied pH allowed adsorbents to interact with hydrophobic property of adsorbates steadily throughout the study. PMID:24231319

  1. Use of in situ solid-phase adsorption in microbial natural product fermentation development.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Thomas; Chase, Matthew; Wagner, Stephanie; Renzi, Chris; Powell, Marcella; DeAngelo, Joseph; Michels, Peter

    2013-05-01

    It has been half a century since investigators first began experimenting with adding ion exchange resins during the fermentation of microbial natural products. With the development of nonionic polymeric adsorbents in the 1970s, the application of in situ product adsorption in bioprocessing has grown slowly, but steadily. To date, in situ product adsorption strategies have been used in biotransformations, plant cell culture, the production of biofuels, and selected bulk chemicals, such as butanol and lactic acid, as well as in more traditional natural product fermentation within the pharmaceutical industry. Apart from the operational gains in efficiency from the integration of fermentation and primary recovery, the addition of adsorbents during fermentation has repeatedly demonstrated the capacity to significantly increase titers by sequestering the product and preventing or mitigating degradation, feedback inhibition and/or cytotoxic effects. Adoption of in situ product adsorption has been particularly valuable in the early stages of natural product-based drug discovery programs, where quickly and cost-effectively generating multigram quantities of a lead compound can be challenging when using a wild-type strain and fermentation conditions that have not been optimized. While much of the literature involving in situ adsorption describes its application early in the drug development process, this does not imply that the potential for scale-up is limited. To date, commercial-scale processes utilizing in situ product adsorption have reached batch sizes of at least 30,000 l. Here we present examples where in situ product adsorption has been used to improve product titers or alter the ratios among biosynthetically related natural products, examine some of the relevant variables to consider, and discuss the mechanisms by which in situ adsorption may impact the biosynthesis of microbial natural products. PMID:23526181

  2. Adsorption Isotherms and Surface Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, L. S.; Bernardo, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Explains an error that occurs in calculating the conditions for a maximum value of a rate expression for a bimolecular reaction. The rate expression is derived using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to relate gas pressures and corresponding surface coverages. (GS)

  3. Adsorption of nisin and pediocin on nanoclays.

    PubMed

    Meira, Stela Maris Meister; Jardim, Arthur Izé; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-01

    Three different nanoclays (bentonite, octadecylamine-modified montmorillonite and halloysite) were studied as potential carriers for the antimicrobial peptides nisin and pediocin. Adsorption occurred from peptide solutions in contact with nanoclays at room temperature. Higher adsorption of nisin and pediocin was obtained on bentonite. The antimicrobial activity of the resultant bacteriocin-nanoclay systems was analyzed using skimmed milk agar as food simulant and the largest inhibition zones were observed against Gram-positive bacteria for halloysite samples. Bacteriocins were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonites as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) assay. Infrared spectroscopy suggested non-electrostatic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding between siloxane groups from clays and peptide molecules. Transmission electron microscopy did not show any alteration in morphologies after adsorption of antimicrobial peptides on bentonite and halloysite. These results indicate that nanoclays, especially halloysite, are suitable nanocarriers for nisin and pediocin adsorption.

  4. Adsorption of nisin and pediocin on nanoclays.

    PubMed

    Meira, Stela Maris Meister; Jardim, Arthur Izé; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-01

    Three different nanoclays (bentonite, octadecylamine-modified montmorillonite and halloysite) were studied as potential carriers for the antimicrobial peptides nisin and pediocin. Adsorption occurred from peptide solutions in contact with nanoclays at room temperature. Higher adsorption of nisin and pediocin was obtained on bentonite. The antimicrobial activity of the resultant bacteriocin-nanoclay systems was analyzed using skimmed milk agar as food simulant and the largest inhibition zones were observed against Gram-positive bacteria for halloysite samples. Bacteriocins were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonites as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) assay. Infrared spectroscopy suggested non-electrostatic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding between siloxane groups from clays and peptide molecules. Transmission electron microscopy did not show any alteration in morphologies after adsorption of antimicrobial peptides on bentonite and halloysite. These results indicate that nanoclays, especially halloysite, are suitable nanocarriers for nisin and pediocin adsorption. PMID:26041178

  5. Argon adsorption and the lunar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of Ar adsorption experiments on a terrestrial labradorite and lunar rock 15415 crushed in vacuo are reported. The experiments were designed to test lunar atmosphere simulation models for the behavior of Ar on the lunar surface, as determined from the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer results. These models (Hodges, 1980, 1982) used a single adsorption potential to characterize the surfaces of lunar soil grains, with the result that high (6-7 kcal/mol) heats of adsorption were inferred. The present experimental results show that very high adsorption potentials are indeed associated with fresh mineral surfaces, but that these energetic surfaces occupy only small fractions of the total surface area. Nonetheless, these small fractions of surface, if they can be maintained in the lunar regolith in steady-state condition, could be sufficient to account for the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer observations.

  6. H2O Adsorption Kinetics on Smectites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Howard, J.; Quinn, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    The adsorptive equilibration of H2O with montomorillonite has been measured. At low temperatures and pressures equilibration can require many hours, effectively preventing smectites at the martian surface from responding to diurnal pressure and temperature variations.

  7. Fluorocarbon Adsorption in Hierarchical Porous Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Vijayakumar, M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Martin, P F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-09

    The adsorption behavior of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives was examined on a set of microporous metal organic framework (MOF) sorbents and another set of hierarchical mesoporous MOFs. The microporous M-DOBDC (M = Ni, Co) showed a saturation uptake capacity for R12 of over 4 mmol/g at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous MOF MIL-101 showed an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching over 14 mmol/g at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption were found to generally correlate with the polarizability of the refrigerant with R12 > R22 > R13 > R14 > methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting MOFs for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling and refrigeration applications.

  8. Krypton based adsorption type cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Schember, Helene R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Krypton and a monolithic porous carbon such as Saran carbon are used respectively as the sorbate and sorbent of an adsorption type refrigerator to improve refrigeration efficiency and operational longevity.

  9. Mineral-Surfactant Interactions for Minimum Reagents Precipitation and Adsorption for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2008-09-20

    /conformation of the adsorbed layers), as well as precipitation/abstraction characteristics. (3) Investigation of the role of dissolved species, especially multivalent ions, on interactions between reservoir minerals and surfactants and/or polymers leading to surfactant precipitation or activated adsorption. (4) Solution behavior tests--surface tension, interaction, ultra filtration, and other tests. (5) Surfactant-mineral interactions relative to adsorption, wettability, and electrophoresis. (6) Work on the effects of multivalent ions, pH, temperature, salinity, and mixing ratio on the adsorption. Developments of adsorption models to explain interactions between surfactants/polymers/minerals. (7) General guidelines for the use of certain surfactants, polymers and their mixtures in micelle flooding processes.

  10. Zn(II) adsorption from synthetic solution and kaolin wastewater onto vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Jordão, Cláudio Pereira; Fernandes, Raphael Bragança Alves; de Lima Ribeiro, Kamilla; de Souza Nascimento, Bruna; de Barros, Priscila Martins

    2009-03-15

    The adsorption of Zn(II) from both synthetic solution and kaolin industry wastewater by cattle manure vermicompost was studied. The adsorption process was dependent on the various operating variables, viz., solution pH, particle size of the vermicompost, mass of vermicompost/volume of the Zn(II) solution ratio, contact time and temperature. The optimum conditions for Zn adsorption were pH 6.0, particle size of < or = 250 microm, 1 g per 10 mL adsorbent dose, contact time of 4h and temperature of 25 degrees C. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms fit well in the experimental data and their constants were evaluated, with R(2) values from 0.95 to 0.99. In synthetic solution, the maximum adsorption capacity of the vermicompost for Zn(2+) ions was 20.48 mg g(-1) at 25 degrees C when the vermicompost dose was 1 g 10 mL(-1) and the initial adjusted pH was 2. The batch adsorption studies of Zn(II) on vermicompost using kaolin wastewater have shown the maximum adsorption capacity was 2.49 mg g(-1) at pH 2 (natural pH of the wastewater). The small values of the constant related to the energy of adsorption (from 0.07 to 0.163 L mg(-1)) indicated that Zn(2+) ions were binded strongly to vermicompost. The values of the separation factor, R(L), which has been used to predict affinity between adsorbate and adsorbent were between 0 and 1, indicating that sorption was very favorable for Zn(II) in synthetic solution and kaolin wastewater. The thermodynamic parameter, the Gibbs free energy, was calculated for each system and the negative values obtained confirm that the adsorption processes are spontaneous. The DeltaG degrees values were -19.656 kJ mol(-1) and -16.849 kJ mol(-1) for Zn(II) adsorption on vermicompost in synthetic solution at pH 6 and 2, respectively, and -13.275 kJ mol(-1) in kaolin wastewater at pH 2.

  11. Evaluation of the potassium adsorption capacity of a potassium adsorption filter during rapid blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, H; Akatsuka, Y; Muramatsu, C; Isogai, S; Sugiura, Y; Arakawa, S; Murayama, M; Kurahashi, M; Takasuga, H; Oshige, T; Yuba, T; Mizuta, S; Emi, N

    2015-05-01

    The concentration of extracellular potassium in red blood cell concentrates (RCCs) increases during storage, leading to risk of hyperkalemia. A potassium adsorption filter (PAF) can eliminate the potassium at normal blood transfusion. This study aimed to investigate the potassium adsorption capacity of a PAF during rapid blood transfusion. We tested several different potassium concentrations under a rapid transfusion condition using a pressure bag. The adsorption rates of the 70-mEq/l model were 76·8%. The PAF showed good potassium adsorption capacity, suggesting that this filter may provide a convenient method to prevent hyperkalemia during rapid blood transfusion.

  12. Utilization of oil palm biodiesel solid residue as renewable sources for preparation of granular activated carbon by microwave induced KOH activation.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2013-02-01

    In this work, preparation of granular activated carbon from oil palm biodiesel solid residue, oil palm shell (PSAC) by microwave assisted KOH activation has been attempted. The physical and chemical properties of PSAC were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, volumetric adsorption analyzer and elemental analysis. The adsorption behavior was examined by performing batch adsorption experiments using methylene blue as dye model compound. Equilibrium data were simulated using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. Kinetic modeling was fitted to the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and Elovich kinetic models, while the adsorption mechanism was determined using the intraparticle diffusion and Boyd equations. The result was satisfactory fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 343.94mg/g at 30°C. The findings support the potential of oil palm shell for preparation of high surface area activated carbon by microwave assisted KOH activation.

  13. Fluorescence of crop residue: postmortem analysis of crop conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrey, James E., III; Kim, Moon S.; Daughtry, Craig S. T.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Chappelle, Emmett W.

    1997-07-01

    Fluorescence of crop residues at the end of the growing season may provide an indicator of the past crop's vegetative condition. Different levels of nitrogen (N) fertilization were applied to field grown corn and wheat at Beltsville, Maryland. The N fertilizer treatments produce a range of physiological conditions, pigment concentrations, biomass levels, and grain yields that resulted in varying growth and stress conditions in the living crops. After normal harvesting procedures the crop residues remained. The fluorescence spectral characteristics of the plant residues from crops grown under different levels of N nutrition were analyzed. The blue-green fluorescence response of in-vitro residue biomass of the N treated field corn had different magnitudes. A blue-green- yellow algorithm, (460/525)*600 nm, gave the best separations between prior corn growth conditions at different N fertilization levels. Relationships between total dry biomass, the grain yield, and fluorescence properties in the 400 - 670 nm region of the spectrum were found in both corn and wheat residues. The wheat residue was analyzed to evaluate the constituents responsible for fluorescence. A ratio of the blue-green, 450/550 nm, images gave the best separation among wheat residues at different N fertilization levels. Fluorescence of extracts from wheat residues showed inverse fluorescence intensities as a function of N treatments compared to that of the intact wheat residue or ground residue samples. The extracts also had an additional fluorescence emission peak in the red, 670 nm. Single band fluorescence intensity in corn and wheat residues is due mostly to the quantity of the material on the soil surface. Ratios of fluorescence bands varied as a result of the growth conditions created by the N treatments and are thought to be indicative of the varying concentrations of the plant residues fluorescing constituents. Estimates of the amount and cost effectiveness of N fertilizers to satisfy

  14. Protein Adsorption on Surfaces with Grafted Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Szleifer, I.

    1997-01-01

    A general theoretical framework for studying the adsorption of protein molecules on surfaces with grafted polymers is presented. The approach is a generalization of the single-chain mean-field theory, in which the grafted polymer-protein-solvent layer is assumed to be inhomogeneous in the direction perpendicular to the grafting surface. The theory enables the calculation of the adsorption isotherms of the protein as a function of the surface coverage of grafted polymers, concentration of protein in bulk, and type of solvent molecules. The potentials of mean force of the protein with the surface are calculated as a function of polymer surface coverage and amount of protein adsorbed. The theory is applied to model lysozyme on surfaces with grafted polyethylene oxide. The protein is modeled as spherical in solution, and it is assumed that the protein-polymer, protein-solvent, and polymer-solvent attractive interactions are all equal. Therefore, the interactions determining the structure of the layer (beyond the bare polymer-surface and protein-surface interactions) are purely repulsive. The bare surface-protein interaction is taken from atomistic calculations by Lee and Park. For surfaces that do not have preferential attractions with the grafted polymer segments, the adsorption isotherms of lysozyme are independent of the polymer length for chains with more than 50 ethylene oxide units. However, the potentials of mean force show strong variations with grafted polymer molecular weight. The competition between different conformations of the adsorbed protein is studied in detail. The adsorption isotherms change qualitatively for surfaces with attractive interactions with ethylene oxide monomers. The protein adsorption is a function of chain length—the longer the polymer the more effective it is in preventing protein adsorption. The structure of the layer and its deformation upon protein adsorption are very important in determining the adsorption isotherms and the

  15. Dependence of the adsorption of chiral compounds on their enantiomeric composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Alexander D.; Karakalos, Stavros; Zaera, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption of two different chiral molecules on platinum surfaces has been explored as a function of enantiomeric composition. In the first case, the saturation monolayers obtained by the adsorption of 1-(naphthyl)ethylamine (NEA) from CCl4 solutions were characterized in situ by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). It was found that racemic mixtures yield different IR spectra than those obtained from enantiopure monolayers, a behavior that was interpreted as the result of the formation of racemate pairs via hydrogen bonding at the amine moiety also responsible for bonding to the surface. NEA adsorption under these conditions is reversible and can be modified by subsequent exposures to solutions of different chiral compositions, but that appears to take place only via changes in the relative fractions of enantiopure versus racemic domains on the surface; no other enantiomeric ratios are apparent in the IR data. The second study focused on the uptake of propylene oxide (PO) on Pt(111) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. In that case, racemic monolayers show densities up to ~ 20% lower than those obtained with one single enantiomer. This can be explained by kinetic arguments, since data from isothermal molecular-beam experiments indicated that the PO sticking coefficient depends on the chirality of the incoming PO molecules relative to that of the neighboring adsorbed PO species. Monte Carlo simulations could reproduce the experimental data by assuming adsorbate-assisted adsorption and enantiospecific adsorption geometries for molecules impinging on sites adjacent to previously adsorbed surface species.

  16. Adsorption of HMF from water/DMSO solutions onto hydrophobic zeolites: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ruichang; León, Marta; Nikolakis, Vladimiros; Sandler, Stanley I; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), DMSO, and water from binary and ternary mixtures in hydrophobic silicalite-1 and dealuminated Y (DAY) zeolites at ambient conditions was studied by experiments and molecular modeling. HMF and DMSO adsorption isotherms were measured and compared to those calculated using a combination of grand canonical Monte Carlo and expanded ensemble (GCMC-EE) simulations. A method based on GCMC-EE simulations for dilute solutions combined with the Redlich-Kister (RK) expansion (GCMC-EE-RK) is introduced to calculate the isotherms over a wide range of concentrations. The simulations, using literature force fields, are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. In HMF/water binary mixtures, large-pore hydrophobic zeolites are much more effective for HMF adsorption but less selective because large pores allow water adsorption because of H2 O-HMF attraction. In ternary HMF/DMSO/water mixtures, HMF loading decreases with increasing DMSO fraction, rendering the separation of HMF from water/DMSO mixtures by adsorption difficult. The ratio of the energetic interaction in the zeolite to the solvation free energy is a key factor in controlling separation from liquid mixtures. Overall, our findings could have an impact on the separation and catalytic conversion of HMF and the rational design of nanoporous adsorbents for liquid-phase separations in biomass processing. PMID:24106213

  17. Strain engineering of selective chemical adsorption on monolayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liangzhi; Du, Aijun; Chen, Changfeng; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2014-05-21

    Nanomaterials are prone to influence by chemical adsorption because of their large surface to volume ratios. This enables sensitive detection of adsorbed chemical species which, in turn, can tune the properties of the host material. Recent studies discovered that single and multi-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) films are ultra-sensitive to several important environmental molecules. Here we report new findings from ab inito calculations that reveal substantially enhanced adsorption of NO and NH3 on strained monolayer MoS2 with significant impact on the properties of the adsorbates and the MoS2 layer. The magnetic moment of adsorbed NO can be tuned between 0 and 1 μB; strain also induces an electronic phase transition between the half-metal and the metal. Adsorption of NH3 weakens the MoS2 layer considerably, which explains the large discrepancy between the experimentally measured strength and breaking strain of MoS2 films and previous theoretical predictions. On the other hand, adsorption of NO2, CO, and CO2 is insensitive to the strain conditions in the MoS2 layer. This contrasting behavior allows sensitive strain engineering of selective chemical adsorption on MoS2 with effective tuning of mechanical, electronic, and magnetic properties. These results suggest new design strategies for constructing MoS2-based ultrahigh-sensitivity nanoscale sensors and electromechanical devices.

  18. Enhancing atrazine biodegradation by Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP adsorption to Layered Double Hydroxide bionanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, Tatiana; Prevot, Vanessa; Sancelme, Martine; Forano, Claude; Besse-Hoggan, Pascale

    2011-07-15

    To mimic the role of hydroxide minerals and their humic complex derivatives on the biodegradability of pesticides in soils, synthetic Mg(R)Al Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH) and Mg(R)Al modified by Humic substances (LDH-HA) were prepared for various R values (2, 3 and 4) and fully characterized. Adsorption properties of LDH and LDH-HA toward Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP were evaluated. The adsorption kinetics were very fast (<5 min to reach equilibrium). The adsorption capacities were greater than previously reported (13.5×10(11), 41×10(11) and 45.5×10(11) cells/gLDH for Mg(2)Al, Mg(3)Al and Mg(4)Al, respectively) and varied with both surface charge and textural properties. Surface modification by HA reduced the adsorption capacities of cells by 2-6-fold. Biodegradation kinetics of atrazine by Pseudomonas sp. adsorbed on both LDHs and LDH-HA complexes were measured for various solid/liquid ratios and adsorbed cell amounts. Biodegradation activity of bacterial cells was strongly boosted after adsorption on LDHs, the effect depending on the quantity and properties of the LDH matrix. The maximum biodegradation rate was obtained in the case of a 100 mg/mL Mg(2)Al LDH suspension (26 times higher than that obtained with cells alone). PMID:21596476

  19. ADSORPTION MECHANISMS AND TRANSPORT BEHAVIOR BETWEEN SELENATE AND SELENITE ON DIFFERENT SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Um, Wooyong

    2014-04-30

    Adsorption of different oxidation species of selenium (Se), selenate (SeO42-) and selenite (SeO32-), with varying pHs (2 - 10) and ionic strengths (I = 0.01 M, 0.1 M and 1.0 M NaNO3) was measured on quartz, aluminum oxide, and synthetic iron oxide (ferrihydrite) using batch reactors to obtain a more detailed understanding of the adsorption mechanisms (e.g., inner- and outer-sphere complex). In addition to the batch experiments with single minerals contained in native Hanford Site sediment, additional batch adsorption studies were conducted with native Hanford Site sediment and groundwater as a function of 1) total Se concentration (from 0.01 to 10 mg L-1) and 2) soil to solution ratios (1:20 and 1:2 grams per mL). Results from these batch studies were compared to a set of saturated column experiments that were conducted with natural Hanford sediment and groundwater spiked with either selenite or selenate to observe the transport behavior of these species. Both batch and column results indicated that selenite adsorption was consistently higher than that of selenate in all experimental conditions used. These different adsorption mechanisms between selenite and selenate result in the varying mobility of Se in the subsurface environment and explain the dependence on the oxidation species.

  20. Adsorption of HMF from water/DMSO solutions onto hydrophobic zeolites: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ruichang; León, Marta; Nikolakis, Vladimiros; Sandler, Stanley I; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), DMSO, and water from binary and ternary mixtures in hydrophobic silicalite-1 and dealuminated Y (DAY) zeolites at ambient conditions was studied by experiments and molecular modeling. HMF and DMSO adsorption isotherms were measured and compared to those calculated using a combination of grand canonical Monte Carlo and expanded ensemble (GCMC-EE) simulations. A method based on GCMC-EE simulations for dilute solutions combined with the Redlich-Kister (RK) expansion (GCMC-EE-RK) is introduced to calculate the isotherms over a wide range of concentrations. The simulations, using literature force fields, are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. In HMF/water binary mixtures, large-pore hydrophobic zeolites are much more effective for HMF adsorption but less selective because large pores allow water adsorption because of H2 O-HMF attraction. In ternary HMF/DMSO/water mixtures, HMF loading decreases with increasing DMSO fraction, rendering the separation of HMF from water/DMSO mixtures by adsorption difficult. The ratio of the energetic interaction in the zeolite to the solvation free energy is a key factor in controlling separation from liquid mixtures. Overall, our findings could have an impact on the separation and catalytic conversion of HMF and the rational design of nanoporous adsorbents for liquid-phase separations in biomass processing.

  1. Adsorption and recovery of alkylphenol polyethoxylates from synthetic wastewater using hexagonal mesoporous silicate.

    PubMed

    Punyapalakul, P; Takizawa, S

    2006-01-01

    A large amount of alkylphenol polyethoxylate (APnEOs), one of endocrine disrupters, is disposed of directly to biological wastewater treatment plants. But microbial oxidation processes cannot completely degrade these molecules to nontoxic forms. Adsorption and recovery efficiency of APnEOs was investigated using four different types of Hexagonal Mesoporous Silicate (HMSs) and powdered activated carbon (PAC). HMSs were synthesized by surfactant-templating methods, and two of them were subsequently grafted with surface functional groups. The two types of organic functional groups grafted on the surface were n-octyldimethyl- and 3-mercaptopropyl- groups. Titanium substituted HMS was also made in the same way as HMS. Adsorption of APnEOs on synthesized HMSs was higher than that on PAC. Larger pore sizes of HMS and Ti-HMS enhanced accessibility of APnEOs to active surface sites in mesopores, which realized higher adsorption capacities and L-shape (Langmuir) adsorption isotherms. Adsorption capacities of APnEOs are influenced by water solubility of APnEOs. APnEOs adsorbed on HMSs can be completely recovered by a mixture of alcohol and water at 5:5 ratio, which is more effective than the recovery from PAC. PMID:16749450

  2. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, A.; Bi, X. T.

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challengingmore » due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.« less

  3. Defluoridation of drinking water using adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Kandasamy, Jaya; Naidu, Ravi

    2013-03-15

    Excessive intake of fluoride (F), mainly through drinking water, is a serious health hazard affecting humans worldwide. There are several methods used for the defluoridation of drinking water, of which adsorption processes are generally considered attractive because of their effectiveness, convenience, ease of operation, simplicity of design, and for economic and environmental reasons. In this paper, we present a comprehensive and a critical literature review on various adsorbents used for defluoridation, their relative effectiveness, mechanisms and thermodynamics of adsorption, and suggestions are made on choice of adsorbents for various circumstances. Effects of pH, temperature, kinetics and co-existing anions on F adsorption are also reviewed. Because the adsorption is very weak in extremely low or high pHs, depending on the adsorbent, acids or alkalis are used to desorb F and regenerate the adsorbents. However, adsorption capacity generally decreases with repeated use of the regenerated adsorbent. Future research needs to explore highly efficient, low cost adsorbents that can be easily regenerated for reuse over several cycles of operations without significant loss of adsorptive capacity and which have good hydraulic conductivity to prevent filter clogging during the fixed-bed treatment process.

  4. Fungicide residues in strawberry processing.

    PubMed

    Will, F; Krüger, E

    1999-03-01

    The fate of three fungicides (dichlofluanid, procymidone, and iprodione) applied under field conditions was studied during strawberry processing to juice, wine, and jam. An untreated control was compared to raw material treated with fungicides according to recommended doses and to a sample with 6-fold higher application rates. The highest residue values were found in the pomace after pressing. Residue values in readily produced juices and fruit wines were very low and did not exceed legally required maximum residue levels. Generally, processing steps such as pressing and clarification diminished fungicide residues from 50 to 100%. If the whole fruit is processed, as in fruit preparations or jam, the residue levels remain higher due to missing processing steps. PMID:10552381

  5. Residual Viremia in Treated HIV+ Individuals

    DOE PAGES

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2016-01-06

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectively controls HIV infection, suppressing HIV viral loads. However, some residual virus remains, below the level of detection, in HIV-infected patients on ART. Furthermore, the source of this viremia is an area of debate: does it derive primarily from activation of infected cells in the latent reservoir, or from ongoing viral replication? Our observations seem to be contradictory: there is evidence of short term evolution, implying that there must be ongoing viral replication, and viral strains should thus evolve. The phylogenetic analyses, and rare emergent drug resistance, suggest no long-term viral evolution, implying that virus derived frommore » activated latent cells must dominate. We use simple deterministic and stochastic models to gain insight into residual viremia dynamics in HIV-infected patients. Our modeling relies on two underlying assumptions for patients on suppressive ART: that latent cell activation drives viral dynamics and that the reproductive ratio of treated infection is less than 1. Nonetheless, the contribution of viral replication to residual viremia in patients on ART may be non-negligible. However, even if the portion of viremia attributable to viral replication is significant, our model predicts (1) that latent reservoir re-seeding remains negligible, and (2) some short-term viral evolution is permitted, but long-term evolution can still be limited: stochastic analysis of our model shows that de novo emergence of drug resistance is rare. Thus, our simple models reconcile the seemingly contradictory observations on residual viremia and, with relatively few parameters, recapitulates HIV viral dynamics observed in patients on suppressive therapy.« less

  6. The special features of protein adsorption isotherms on silica adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukhrai, E. S.; Atyaksheva, L. F.; Pilipenko, O. S.

    2011-05-01

    The adsorption isotherms of hemoglobin, peroxidase, and β-galactosidase on silochrome and mesoporous and biporous silicas were comparatively studied. Adsorption developed in two stages, including fast "reversible" protein adsorption (equilibrium was reached in t ≤ 1-2 h) and a "slow stage" of irreversible binding in t ≫ 24 h (multipoint adsorption). The corresponding equilibrium constants were determined. The mechanism of unlimited linear association of peroxidase in the adsorption layer on the surface of silochrome was established.

  7. Adsorption effects of activated charcoal on metaldehyde toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Shintani, S; Goto, K; Endo, Y; Iwamoto, C; Ohata, K

    1999-02-01

    Metaldehyde has been widely used as a main ingredient of solid fuel for making fire and slug baits in Japan. It is also marketed as a color flame tablet for party goods (ENGELFIRE). Consequently, children have been poisoned by eating such tablets which they mistook for candy. As a result, poison information center calls are increasing. According to POISINDEX, the treatment for metaldehyde poisoning consists in prevention of adsorption by activated charcoal, seizure control and airway protection. However, the optimum dose of charcoal is not established. We studied the quantitative adsorption capacity of activated charcoal for acute oral toxicity of metaldehyde in rats. In vivo toxicity and absorption tests for metaldehyde in Wister rats were done. The detoxifying effect of activated charcoal on metaldehyde toxicity and inhibition of metaldehyde absorption were investigated. Ratios used of po activated charcoal given 30 min after dosing to 400 mg metaldehyde/kg po were 5:1, 2:1, 1:1, 0.5:1. Serum metaldehyde was determined by gas chromatography in the control group (no charcoal) and the various experimental groups. Metaldehyde mortality was completely prevented at the ratio of 5:1. Gastrointestinal absorption of metaldehyde was reduced significantly by 45.3% in comparison to the control rats. There was no acetaldehyde detected in the serum of the metaldehyde-dosed rats. Metaldehyde poisoning may be prevented by early po administration of activated charcoal in a ratio of > 5:1 compared to metaldehyde. The theory that acetaldehyde is the primary toxic agent in metaldehyde poisoning should be re-evaluated.

  8. Adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid on activated bleaching earth-chitosan-SDS composites: Optimization, kinetics, isotherms.

    PubMed

    Naowanat, Nitiya; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich; Pongstabodee, Sangobtip

    2016-03-15

    The adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid (MWF) on activated bleaching earth (BE)-chitosan-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) composites (BE/MCS) was investigated under a statistical design of experiments at a 95% confidence interval to identify the critical factors and to optimize the adsorption capacity. The BE/MCS adsorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle analysis (sessile drop technique) and their zeta potential. From the results of a full 2(5) factorial design with three center points, the adsorbent weight and initial pH of the MWF had a significant antagonistic effect on the adsorption capacity while the initial MWF concentration and BE:chitosan:SDS weight ratio had a synergistic influence. Temperature factor has no discernible effect on the capacity. From the FCCC-RSM design, the optimal capacity range of 2840-2922.5 mg g(-1) was achieved at sorbent weight of 1.6-1.9 g, pH of 5.5-6.5, initial MWF concentration of 52-55 g l(-1) and BE:chitosan:SDS (w/w/w) ratio of 4.7:1:1-6.2:1:1. To test the validation and sensitivity of RSM model, the results showed that the estimated adsorption capacity was close to the experimental capacity within an error range of ±3%, suggesting that the RSM model was acceptable and satisfied. From three kinetics models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order model and Avrami's equation) and two adsorption isotherms (Langmuir model and Freundlich model), assessed using an error function (Err) and the coefficient of determination (R(2)), Avrami's equation and Freundlich isotherm model provided a good fitting for the data, suggesting the presence of more than one reaction pathway in the MWF adsorption process and the heterogeneous surface adsorption of the BC/ABE-5.5 composite. PMID:26731309

  9. Adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid on activated bleaching earth-chitosan-SDS composites: Optimization, kinetics, isotherms.

    PubMed

    Naowanat, Nitiya; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich; Pongstabodee, Sangobtip

    2016-03-15

    The adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid (MWF) on activated bleaching earth (BE)-chitosan-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) composites (BE/MCS) was investigated under a statistical design of experiments at a 95% confidence interval to identify the critical factors and to optimize the adsorption capacity. The BE/MCS adsorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle analysis (sessile drop technique) and their zeta potential. From the results of a full 2(5) factorial design with three center points, the adsorbent weight and initial pH of the MWF had a significant antagonistic effect on the adsorption capacity while the initial MWF concentration and BE:chitosan:SDS weight ratio had a synergistic influence. Temperature factor has no discernible effect on the capacity. From the FCCC-RSM design, the optimal capacity range of 2840-2922.5 mg g(-1) was achieved at sorbent weight of 1.6-1.9 g, pH of 5.5-6.5, initial MWF concentration of 52-55 g l(-1) and BE:chitosan:SDS (w/w/w) ratio of 4.7:1:1-6.2:1:1. To test the validation and sensitivity of RSM model, the results showed that the estimated adsorption capacity was close to the experimental capacity within an error range of ±3%, suggesting that the RSM model was acceptable and satisfied. From three kinetics models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order model and Avrami's equation) and two adsorption isotherms (Langmuir model and Freundlich model), assessed using an error function (Err) and the coefficient of determination (R(2)), Avrami's equation and Freundlich isotherm model provided a good fitting for the data, suggesting the presence of more than one reaction pathway in the MWF adsorption process and the heterogeneous surface adsorption of the BC/ABE-5.5 composite.

  10. Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on San Juan Basin Coal

    SciTech Connect

    K. A. M. Gasem; R. L. Robinson; S. R. Reeves

    2002-03-01

    The major objectives of this project were to (a) measure the adsorption behavior of pure methane, nitrogen, CO{sub 2} and their binary and ternary mixtures on wet Tiffany coal at 130 F and pressures to 2000 psia; (b) correlate the equilibrium adsorption isotherm data using the extended Langmuir model, the Langmuir model, the loading ratio correlation and the Zhou-Gasem-Robinson equation of state; and (c) establish sorption-time estimates for the pure components. Specific accomplishments are summarized below regarding the complementary tasks involving experimental work and data correlation. Representative coal samples from BP Amoco Tiffany Injection Wells No.1 and No.10 were prepared, as requested. The equilibrium moisture content and particle size distribution of each coal sample were determined. Compositional coal analyses for both samples were performed by Huffman Laboratories, Inc. Pure gas adsorption for methane on wet Tiffany coal samples from Injection Wells No.1 and No.10 was measured separately at 130 F (327.6 K) and pressures to 2000 psia (13.7 MPa). The average expected uncertainty in these data is about 3% (9 SCF/ton). Our measurements indicate that the adsorption isotherms of the two coal samples exhibit similar Langmuir-type behavior. For the samples from the two wells, a maximum variation of about 5% in the amount adsorbed is observed at 2000 psia. Gas adsorption isotherms were measured for pure methane, nitrogen and CO{sub 2} on a wet, mixed Tiffany coal sample. The coal sample was an equal-mass mixture of coals from Well No.1 and Well No.10. The adsorption measurements were conducted at 130 F at pressures to 2000 psia. The adsorption isotherms have average expected experimental uncertainties of 3% (9 SCF/ton), 6% (8 SCF/ton), and 7% (62 SCF/ton) for methane, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}, respectively. Adsorption isotherms were measured for methane/nitrogen, methane/CO{sub 2} and nitrogen/CO{sub 2} binary mixtures on wet, mixed Tiffany coal at 130 F and

  11. In vitro investigation of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion on inorganic biomaterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Lü, Xiaoying; Jingwu, Ma; Huang, Nan

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the surface properties, protein adsorption and platelet adhesion behaviors of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium (Ti) films. The surface energy and microstructures of these films were characterized by contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A modified Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) protein assay was used to study the amount of adsorbed proteins. Platelet adhesion was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The AFM results show that the DLC film is smoother than Ti. Protein adsorption results from CBB protein assay show that the ratio of adsorbed albumin (Alb) to IgG ( RA/I) on DLC is larger than Ti, which coincide with the sequence of the ratio of interfacial tension between solid surface and Alb ( γS,Alb) to interfacial tension between surface and IgG ( γS,IgG) ( γS,Alb/ γS,IgG). The DLC film has a preferential adsorption for Alb. The results suggest that the ratio of γS,Alb/ γS,IgG may indicate an Alb/IgG affinity ratio of materials. More platelets adhere on Ti film than on DLC, which may correspond to the surface roughness of materials. The conclusion is the blood compatibility of DLC seems to be better than Ti.

  12. Properties of Fe-organic matter associations via coprecipitation versus adsorption.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunmei; Dynes, James J; Wang, Jian; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-12-01

    The association of organic matter (OM) with minerals is recognized as the most important stabilization mechanism for soil organic matter. This study compared the properties of Fe-OM complexes formed from adsorption (reaction of OM to postsynthesis ferrihydrite) versus coprecipitation (formation of Fe solids in the presence of OM). Coprecipitates and adsorption complexes were synthesized using dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracts from a forest little layer at varying molar C/Fe ratios of 0.3-25.0. Sample properties were studied by N2 gas adsorption, XRD, FTIR, Fe EXAFS, and STXM-NEXAFS techniques. Coprecipitation resulted in much higher maximum C contents (∼130 mg g(-1) C difference) in the solid products than adsorption, which may be related to the formation of precipitated insoluble Fe(III)-organic complexes at high C/Fe ratios in the coprecipitates as revealed by Fe EXAFS analysis. Coprecipitation led to a complete blockage of mineral surface sites and pores with ≥177 mg g(-1) C and molar C/Fe ratios ≥2.8 in the solid products. FTIR and STXM-NEXAFS showed that the coprecipitated OM was similar in composition to the adsorbed OM. An enrichment of aromatic C was observed at low C/Fe ratios. Association of carboxyl functional groups with Fe was shown with FTIR and STXM-NEXAFS analysis. STXM-NEXAFS analysis showed a continuous C distribution on minerals. Desorption of the coprecipitated OM was less than that of the adsorbed OM at comparable C/Fe ratios. These results are helpful to understand C and Fe cycling in the natural environments with periodically fluctuating redox conditions, where coprecipitation can occur.

  13. Adsorptive separation of rhodium(III) using Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.S.; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu; Ishibashi, Hideaki

    1998-03-01

    The oxine type of chemically modified chitosan was prepared by the template crosslinking method using Fe(III) as a template ion. Batchwise adsorption of rhodium(III) on this chemically modified chitosan was examined from chloride media in the absence and presence of a large amount of tin(II). It was observed that the Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan shows better performance for rhodium adsorption than that of the original chitosan. When Sn(II) is absent from the solution, Rh(III) is hardly adsorbed on the modified chitosan and the order of selectivity of the adsorption of Rh(III), Pt(IV), and Cu(II) was found to be Pt(IV) > Cu(II) {approx} Rh(III). On the other hand, adsorption of rhodium is significantly increased in the presence of Sn(II) and the selectivity order of the adsorption was drastically changed to Rh(III) > Pt(IV) {much_gt} Cu(II), which ensures selective separation of Rh(III) from their mixture. Adsorption of Rh(III) increases with an increase in the concentration of Sn(II) in the aqueous solution, and maximum adsorption is achieved at a molar ratio, [Sn]/[Rh], of >6. The adsorption of Rh(III) decreases at a high concentration of hydrochloric acid. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 0.92 mol/kg-dry adsorbent. Stripping tests of rhodium from the loaded chemically modified chitosan were carried out using different kinds of stripping agents containing some oxidizing agent. The maximum stripping of rhodium under these experimental conditions was found to be 72.5% by a single contact with 0.5 M HCl + 8 M HNO{sub 3}.

  14. Competitive adsorption of Cu(II)-EDTA and Cd(II)-EDTA onto TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.K.; Davis, A.P.

    1999-08-01

    Cu(II), EDTA, Cu(II)-EDTA, Cd(II)-EDTA, and Cu(II)/Cd(II) and Cu(II)-EDTA/Cd(II)-EDTA competitive adsorption onto TiO{sub 2} has been studied with variation of pH and concentration. For Cu(II) and EDTA, typical cationic and anionic types of adsorption are noted, respectively. Ligand-type adsorption is found for Cu(II)-EDTA and Cd(II)-EDTA under both single and competitive conditions. Surface complexation modeling considered inner-sphere complexation and the diffuse layer model employing MINTEQA2; surface complexes used include Ti-(OH{sub 2})O-Cu{sup +}, Ti-(OH)EDTAH{sub 2}{sup {minus}2}, Ti-(OH)EDTA-Cu{sup {minus}2}, and Ti-(OH)EDTA-Cd{sup {minus}2}. Experimental and model predictions suggest no competitive adsorption between Cu(II) and Cd(II) at 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M. On the other hand, adsorption data and model predictions indicate that Cd(II)-EDTA adsorption is favored over that of Cu(II)-EDTA with some competition for adsorption sites. Cd(II)-EDTA Adsorption was only slightly affected by the presence of Cu(II)-EDTA; however, Cu(II)-EDTA adsorption was strongly influenced by the presence of Cd(II)-EDTA, especially as the molar ratio of Cd(II)-EDTA/Cu(II)-EDTA increased. A modified surface complexation constant for Cd(II)-EDTA is required to explain the competitive data, suggesting surface site heterogeneity.

  15. Adsorption Studies of Chromium(VI) on Activated Carbon Derived from Mangifera indica (Mango) Seed Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mise, Shashikant; Patil, Trupti Nagendra

    2015-09-01

    The removal of chromium(VI) from synthetic sample by adsorption on activated carbon prepared from Mangifera indica (mango) seed shell have been carried out at room temperature 32 ± 1 °C. The removal of chromium(VI) from synthetic sample by adsorption on two types of activated carbon, physical activation and chemical activation (Calcium chloride and Sodium chloride), Impregnation Ratio's (IR) 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 for optimum time, optimum dosages and variation of pH were studied. It is observed that contact time differs for different carbons i.e. for physically and chemically activated carbons. The contact time decreases for chemically activated carbon compared to the physically activated carbon. It was observed that as dosage increases the adsorption increased along with the increase in impregnation ratio. It was also noted that as I.R. increases the surface area of Mangifera indica shell carbon increased. These dosage data were considered in the construction of isotherms and it was found that adsorption obeys Freundlich Isotherm and does not obey Langmuir Isotherm. The maximum removal of chromium (VI) was obtained in highly acidic medium at a pH of 1.50.

  16. Adsorption of aqueous copper on peanut hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kanika Octavia

    A method was established for measuring the adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution to unmodified and modified peanut hulls at constant temperature and pH. Modification of the hulls was performed by oxidation with alkaline hydrogen peroxide. During the modification process, the hydrogen peroxide solubilizes the lignin component, making the surface more porous which increases the availability of binding sites, while simultaneously oxidizing the cellulose. The oxidation of alcohol groups creates more binding sites by creating functional groups such as COO-, which increases chelation to metal ions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms delignification of the peanut hulls by the disappearance of carboxyl peaks of the modified hulls, which were originally produced from the lignin content. Although, oxidation is not fully confirmed, it is not ruled out because the expected carboxylate peak (1680 cm-1) maybe overshadowed by a broad peak due to OH bending of water adsorbed to the hulls. Hulls adsorbed copper from solutions in the concentration range of 50-1000 ppm of CuCl2. Concentrations of pre- and post-adsorption solutions were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms were fit to known two and three-parameter models, evaluated and the binding mechanism was inferred. Maximum surface coverage was 3.5 +/- 0.6 mg Cu2+ /g hull for unmodified hulls and 11 +/- 1 mg Cu2+/g hull for modified hulls. The adsorption for the hulls is best described by the Langmuir model, suggesting monolayer, homogeneous adsorption. With a free energy of adsorption of 10.5 +/- 0.9 kJ/mol for unmodified hulls and 14.5 +/-0.4 kJ/mol for modified hulls, the process is categorized as chemisorption for both types of hulls. The adsorption for both hulls is also described by the Redlich-Peterson model, giving beta nearer to 1 than 0, which further suggests homogeneous adsorption described by the Langmuir model. After rinsing the hulls

  17. Assessing the Adsorption Properties of Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, R.

    2014-12-01

    Fine-grained rocks, such as shales, contain a significant amount of nanopores that can significantly contribute to their storage capacity through the mechanism of adsorption. The current ability to extract natural gas that is adsorbed in the rock's matrix is limited and current technology focuses primarily on the free gas in the fractures, thus leading to very low recovery efficiencies. Shales constitute also a great portion of so-called caprocks above potential CO2 sequestration sites; hereby, the adsorption process may limit the CO2 mobility within the cap-rock, thus minimizing leakage phenomena. Whether it is a reservoir or a caprock, understanding and quantifying the mechanisms of adsorption in these natural materials is key to improve the engineering design of subsurface operations. Results will be presented from a laboratory study that combines conventional techniques for the measurement of adsorption isotherms with novel methods that allows for the imaging of adsorption using x-rays. Various nanoporous materials are considered, thus including rocks, such as shales and coals, pure clay minerals and engineered adsorbents with well-defined nanopore structures, such as zeolites. Supercritical CO2 adsorption isotherms have been measured with a Rubotherm Magnetic Suspension balance by covering the pressure range 0.1-20~MPa. A medical x-ray CT scanner has been used to identify three-dimensional patterns of the adsorption properties of a packed-bed of adsorbent, thus enabling to assess the spatial variability of the adsorption isotherm. The data are analyzed by using thermodynamically rigorous measures of adsorption and a graphical method is applied for their interpretation. The density of the adsorbed phase is estimated and compared to data reported in the literature; the latter is key to disclose gas-reserves and/or potential storage capacity estimates. When evaluated against classic adsorbent materials, the adsorption mechanism in shales is further complicated by

  18. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  19. Sequential and simultaneous adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on ferrihydrite: Implications for oxidation and competition.

    PubMed

    Qi, Pengfei; Pichler, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a naturally occurring element of growing environmental concern whose toxicity, adsorption behavior and other chemical properties are similar to that of arsenic (As). However, less is known about Sb compared to As. Individual and simultaneous adsorption experiments with Sb(III) and Sb(V) were conducted in batch mode with focus on the Sb speciation of the remaining liquid phase during individual Sb(III) adsorption experiments. The simultaneous adsorption and oxidation of Sb(III) was confirmed by the appearance of Sb(V) in the solution at varying Fe/Sb ratios (500, 100 and 8) and varying pH values (3.8, 7 and 9). This newly formed Sb(V) was subsequently removed from solution at a Fe/Sb ratio of 500 or at a pH of 3.8. However, more or less only Sb(V) was observed in the liquid phase at the end of the experiments at lower Fe/Sb ratios and higher pH, indicating that competition took place between the newly formed Sb(V) and Sb(III), and that Sb(III) outcompeted Sb(V). This was independently confirmed by simultaneous adsorption experiments of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in binary systems. Under such conditions, the presence of Sb(V) had no influence on the adsorption of Sb(III) while Sb(V) adsorption was significantly inhibited by Sb(III) over a wide pH range (4-10). Thus, in the presence of ferrihydrite and under redox conditions, which allow the presence of both Sb species, Sb(V) should be the dominant species in aquatic environments, since Sb(III) is adsorbed preferentially and at the same time oxidized to Sb(V).

  20. Removal of element mercury by medicine residue derived biochars in presence of various gas compositions.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoliang; Shen, Boxiong; Li, Yongwang; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Fumei; He, Chuan; Wang, Yinyin; Zhang, Min

    2015-11-15

    Pyrolyzed biochars from an industrial medicinal residue waste were modified by microwave activation and NH4Cl impregnation. Mercury adsorption of different modified biochars was investigated in a quartz fixed-bed reactor. The results indicated that both physisorption and chemisorption of Hg(0) occurred on the surface of M6WN5 which was modified both microwave and 5wt.% NH4Cl loading, and exothermic chemisorption process was a dominant route for Hg(0) removal. Microwave activation improved pore properties and NH4Cl impregnation introduced good active sites for biochars. The presence of NO and O2 increased Hg(0) adsorption whereas H2O inhibited Hg(0) adsorption greatly. A converse effect of SO2 was observed on Hg(0) removal, namely, low concentration of SO2 promoted Hg(0) removal obviously whereas high concentration of SO2 suppressed Hg(0) removal. The Hg(0) removal by M6WN5 was mainly due to the reaction of the C−Cl with Hg(0) to form HgCl2, and the active state of C−Cl(*) groups might be an intermediate group in this process. Thermodynamic analysis showed that mercury adsorption by the biochars was exothermic process and apparent adsorption energy was 43.3 kJ/mol in the range of chemisorption. In spite of low specific surface area, M6WN5 proved to be a promising Hg(0) sorbent in flue gas when compared with other sorbents.

  1. Mechanisms on formation of hierarchically porous carbon and its adsorption behaviors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Hao, Lingxia; Qian, Wenzhen; He, Yu-Feng; Wang, Rong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Using simple one-step carbonization-activation, the residues of paulownia flowers are employed as a precursor to prepare hierarchically porous activated carbon. After investigating the optimum conditions, the obtained paulownia flowers based activated carbon (PFAC) is characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area analysis (S(BET)), thermo gravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The PFAC owns a high specific surface area of 1,053 m(2)/g as well as a hierarchically porous structure with a combination of micro-, meso- and macropores. The pore-forming mechanism is discussed according to results of characterization. Using methylene blue as model dye, the adsorption behaviors of PFAC were investigated. We found that the dye could be rapidly adsorbed by hierarchically porous PFAC, and the adsorption capacity of PFAC reached 300 mg/g. PMID:27387005

  2. Two-dimensional self-assembly of amphiphilic peptides; adsorption-induced secondary structural transition on hydrophilic substrate.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Abiko, Souhei; Himeiwa, Takahiro; Kinoshita, Takatoshi

    2015-03-15

    Adsorption of sequential amphiphilic peptides on solid substrates triggered the spontaneous construction of nanoscaled architecture. An amphiphilic peptide designed with a cationic amino acid as a hydrophilic residue turned an anionic mica substrate into a water-repellent surface, simply by adsorbing it on the substrate surface. In contrast, an amphiphilic peptide designed with an anionic amino-acid residue formed a precisely controlled fiber array comprising a β-sheet fiber monolayer at the anionic substrate/water interface. This phenomenon was based on the secondary structural transition from random-coil to β-sheet, which occurred specifically when amphiphilic peptide adsorbed on the substrate surface. Such surface-specific nonorder/order transition was implemented by exploiting the strength of adsorption between the peptide and the substrate. A strategic design exploiting weak bonding such as hydrophobic interactions is essential for constructing precisely controlled nano-architectures in two dimensions.

  3. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  4. Heavy metal adsorption changes of EAF steel slag after phosphorus adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Guanling; Cao, Lijing; Chen, Xiao; Hou, Wenhua; Wang, Qunhui

    2012-01-01

    A kind of electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag was phosphated, and its isothermal and dynamic adsorptions of copper, cadmium, and lead ions were measured to determine if heavy metal adsorption changes after phosphorus adsorption. The surface area increased greatly after the slag was phosphated. Isothermal adsorption experiments showed that the theoretical Q(max) of the EAF steel slag on Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) improved 59, 50, and 89% respectively after it was phosphated. Dynamic adsorption results showed that the greatest adsorption capacities of unit volume of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) were 2.2, 1.8, and 1.8 times that of the column packed with original EAF steel slag when the column was packed with phosphate EAF steel slag at the same heavy metal ion concentration. The breakthrough time, the exhaustion time and elution efficiency of the column also increased when the column was packed with phosphated EAF steel slag compared with that packed with original EAF steel slag. Phosphorus adsorption could further improve the heavy metal ion adsorption of the EAF steel slag.

  5. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane. PMID:23684695

  6. Poliovirus Adsorption by 34 Minerals and Soils

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Rebecca S.; Taylor, Dene H.; Sturman, Lawrence S.; Reddy, Michael M.; Fuhs, G. Wolfgang

    1981-01-01

    The adsorption of radiolabeled infectious poliovirus type 2 by 34 well-defined soils and mineral substrates was analyzed in a synthetic freshwater medium containing 1 mM CaCl2 and 1.25 mM NaHCO3 at pH 7. In a model system, adsorption of poliovirus by Ottawa sand was rapid and reached equilibrium within 1 h at 4°C. Near saturation, the adsorption could be described by the Langmuir equation; the apparent surface saturation was 2.5 × 106 plaque-forming units of poliovirus per mg of Ottawa sand. At low surface coverage, adsorption was described by the Freundlich equation. The soils and minerals used ranged from acidic to basic and from high in organic content to organic free. The available negative surface charge on each substrate was measured by the adsorption of a cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. Most of the substrates adsorbed more than 95% of the virus. In general, soils, in comparison with minerals, were weak adsorbents. Among the soils, muck and Genesee silt loam were the poorest adsorbents; among the minerals, montmorillonite, glauconite, and bituminous shale were the least effective. The most effective adsorbents were magnetite sand and hematite, which are predominantly oxides of iron. Correlation coefficients for substrate properties and virus adsorption revealed that the elemental composition of the adsorbents had little effect on poliovirus uptake. Substrate surface area and pH, by themselves, were not significantly correlated with poliovirus uptake. A strong negative correlation was found between poliovirus adsorption and both the contents of organic matter and the available negative surface charge on the substrates as determined by their capacities for adsorbing the cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. PMID:6274259

  7. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  8. Adding adsorption to a geothermal simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.; Pingol, A.

    1992-01-01

    Physical adsorption of steam has increasingly become recognized as an important storage mechanism in vapor dominated geothermal reservoirs. A method has been developed which allows the effects of adsorption to be modeled using TETRAD, a commercially available geothermal simulator. The method consists of replacing the standard steam table with a new steam table which has been derived to include adsorptive effects. The TETRAD simulator, when run with the pseudo steam table, approximately matches the pressure, production, and saturation behavior of a desorbing geothermal system. Adsorption can be described as the existence of an immobile layer of liquid on the surfaces within a porous medium. The presence of an adsorbed liquid water layer in rocks has been shown experimentally to cause the vapor pressure of steam to be lower than its flat surface vapor pressure for a particular The pseudo steam table accounts for this vapor pressure lowering effect. A test run was made with TETRAD using the pseudo steam table and a low porosity, low permeability reservoir matrix. This test run was compared to an equivalent run made with Stanford Geothermal Program's simulator, ADSORB. The program ADSORB is a one dimensional simulator which has adsorption effects built into its difference equations. The comparison of these runs shows that the pseudo steam table allows TETRAD to match the behavior of the ADSORB simulator. Injection was not investigated in this study. A convenient method of modeling adsorption with TETRAD is to use standard steam tables while allowing for the vapor pressure lowering effect of adsorption. This will require modifications of the equations in the code that describe the partial pressure of the steam phase.

  9. Safety assessment of drug residues

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.A.

    1980-05-15

    The safety assessment of drug residues is part of the process for defining the conditions for the safe use of drugs in food-producing animals. The information needed to assess the safety of drug residues is provided by chemical and toxicity tests. Toxicity tests are conducted to identify the type of effect produced and to determine the exposure concentrations that would be expected not to produce the effect. These tests include acute, subacute, and chronic toxicity tests, as well as reproduction studies and other special tests. The results are used to find an acceptable daily intake for drug residues that can be used to set a tolerance.

  10. Potential of mean force calculation of the free energy of adsorption of Type I winter flounder antifreeze protein on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Keith; Alan Salter, E.; Wesley Edmunds, R.; Wierzbicki, Andrzej

    2010-04-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that inhibit ice growth without changing the melting point of ice. In this work, we study the detailed molecular mechanism of interactions between the hydrophobic side of the winter flounder (WF) AFP and two mutants, AAAA and SSSS, in which threonine residues are substituted by serines and alanines, respectively. Umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations of the separation of the proteins from the (2 0 1) surface in an explicit water box is carried out to calculate the potential of mean force free energies of adsorption using AMBER10i. We estimate wild-type WF's free energy of adsorption to ice to be about -12.0 kcal/mol. Gas-phase pseudopotential plane-wave calculations of methane adsorption onto select surfaces of ice are also carried out under periodic boundary conditions to address the possible enthalpic role of WF's methyl groups in binding. The contributions of hydrophobic residues to the free energy of adsorption are discussed.

  11. Product distribution from pyrolysis of wood and agricultural residues

    SciTech Connect

    Di Blasi, C.; Signorelli, G.; Di Russo, C.; Rea, G.

    1999-06-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of agricultural residues (wheat straw, olive husks, grape residues, and rice husks) and wood chips have been investigated on a bench scale. The experimental system establishes the conditions encountered by a thin (4 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} m diameter) packed bed of biomass particles suddenly exposed in a high-temperature environment, simulated by a radiant furnace. Product yields (gases, liquids, and char) and gas composition, measured for surface bed temperatures in the range 650--1000 K, reproduce trends already observed for wood. However, differences are quantitatively large. Pyrolysis of agricultural residues is always associated with much higher solid yields (up to a factor of 2) and lower liquid yields. Differences are lower for the total gas, and approximate relationships exist among the ratios of the main gas species yields, indicating comparable activation energies for the corresponding apparent kinetics of formation. However, while the ratios are about the same for wood chips, rice husks, and straw, much lower values are shown by olive and grape residues. Large differences have also been found in the average values of the specific devolatilization rates. The fastest (up to factors of about 1.5 with respect to wood) have been observed for wheat straw and the slowest (up to factors of 2) for grape residues.

  12. Amitriptyline, clomipramine, and doxepin adsorption onto sodium polystyrene sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the study Comparative in vitro studies were carried out to determine the adsorption characteristics of 3 drugs on activated charcoal (AC) and sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS). Activated charcoal (AC) has been long used as gastric decontamination agent for tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). Methods Solutions containing drugs (amitriptyline, clomipramine, or doxepin) and variable amount of AC or SPS were incubated for 30 minutes. Results At pH 1.2 the adsorbent: drug mass ratio varied from 2 : 1 to 40 : 1 for AC, and from 0.4 : 1 to 8 : 1 for SPS. UV–VIS spectrophotometer was used for the determination of free drug concentrations. The qmax of amitriptyline was 0.055 mg/mg AC and 0.574 mg/mg SPS, qmax of clomipramine was 0.053 mg/mg AC and 0.572 mg/mg SPS, and qmax of doxepin was 0.045 mg/mg AC and 0.556 mg/mg SPS. The results of adsorption experiments with SPS revealed higher values for the qmax parameters in comparison with AC. Conclusion In vitro gastric decontamination experiments for antidepressant amitriptyline, clomipramine, and doxepin showed that SPS has higher qmax values than the corresponding experiments with AC. Therefore, we suggest SPS is a better gastric decontaminating agent for the management of acute TCA intoxication. PMID:24450391

  13. Method and apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Drost, Kevin; Vishwanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2004-06-08

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. In another aspect, the apparatus or methods utilize heat exchange channels of varying lengths that have volumes controlled to provide equal heat fluxes. Methods of fuel cell startup are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  14. Method for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  15. Apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2005-12-13

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  16. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals.

  17. The effectiveness of the head-turn-plus-chin-down maneuver for eliminating vallecular residue.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Ahmed; Peladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Valenzano, Teresa Josephine; Namasivayam, Ashwini Marini; Steele, Catriona Margaret

    2016-04-01

    Purpose When swallowing efficiency is impaired, residue accumulates in the pharynx. Cued or spontaneous swallows in the head neutral position do not always successfully clear residue. We investigated the impact of a novel maneuver on residue clearance by combining a head turn with the chin down posture. Methods Data were collected from 26 participants who demonstrated persistent vallecular residue after an initial head neutral clearance swallow in videofluoroscopy. Participants were cued to perform a head-turn-plus-chin-down swallow, with the direction of head turn randomized. Pixel-based measures of residue in the vallecular space before and after the maneuver were made on still frame lateral images using ImageJ software. Measures of % full and the Normalized Residue Ratio Scale (NRRS) were extracted. Univariate analyses of variance were used to detect significant reductions in residue. Results On average, pre-maneuver measures showed residue filling 56-73% of the valleculae, depending on stimulus consistency (NRRS scores: 0.2-0.4). More than 80% of pre-swallow measures displayed NRRS ratios > 0.06, a threshold previously linked to increased risk of post-swallow aspiration. Conclusion The head-turn-plus-chin-down maneuver achieved significant reductions in residue for thin and nectar-thick fluids, suggesting that this maneuver can be effective in reducing persistent vallecular residue with these consistencies. PMID:27191873

  18. Adsorption of phenolic compound by aged-refuse.

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Chai; Youcai, Zhao

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol by aged-refuse has been studied. Adsorption isotherms have been determined for phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol and the data fits well to the Freundlich equation. The chlorinated phenols are absorbed more strongly than the phenol and the adsorption capacity has an oblivious relationship with the numbers and the position of chlorine subsistent. The experiment data suggests that both the partition function and the chemical adsorption involve in the adsorption process. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model were applied to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption and the results show that it fit the pseudo-second-order model. More than one step involves in the adsorption process and the overall rate of the adsorption process appears to be controlled by the chemical reaction. The thermodynamic analysis indicates that the adsorption is spontaneous and endothermic.

  19. Molecular mechanics of the cooperative adsorption of a Pro-Hyp-Gly tripeptide on a hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110) surface mediated by calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ting; Wu, Chunya; Chen, Mingjun; Zhang, Yu; Cummings, Peter T

    2016-07-20

    The interaction of amino acids with inorganic materials at interfaces plays an important role in enhancing the biocompatibility of titanium-based alloys. The adsorption of a tripeptide, i.e. Pro-Hyp-Gly, on the hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110) surface was investigated by the MD simulations. The changes in free energy during the adsorption of both the tripeptide and calcium ions were calculated by using the PMF method in order to obtain the adsorption strength. The results suggested that the adsorption of the tripeptide on the TiO2 surface through the carboxyl groups in glycine residues can be more stable compared with other binding conformations. Special attention was focused on the cooperative adsorption of the tripeptide with the assistance of calcium ions. Calcium ions preferred to absorb at the tetradentate or monodentate sites on the negatively charged TiO2 surface. As a result of the strong attraction between the carboxyl group and calcium ions, the tripeptide can be pulled down to the surface by following the trajectory of the calcium ions, forming an indirect interaction with a sandwich structure of peptide-cation-TiO2. However, this indirect interaction could eventually transform to the direct adsorption of the tripeptide on the TiO2 surface with higher binding energy. The results may help to interpret the adsorption of peptides on inorganic materials in aqueous solution with ions. PMID:27383367

  20. Laboratory study on the adsorption of Mn(2+) on suspended and deposited amorphous Al(OH)(3) in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendong; Zhang, Xiaoni; Wang, Hongping; Wang, Xiaochang; Zhou, Lichuan; Liu, Rui; Liang, Yuting

    2012-09-01

    Manganese (II) is commonly present in drinking water. This paper mainly focuses on the adsorption of manganese on suspended and deposited amorphous Al(OH)(3) solids. The effects of water flow rate and water quality parameters, including solution pH and the concentrations of Mn(2+), humic acid, and co-existing cations on adsorption were investigated. It was found that chemical adsorption mainly took place in drinking water with pHs above 7.5; suspended Al(OH)(3) showed strong adsorption capacity for Mn(2+). When the total Mn(2+) input was 3 mg/L, 1.0 g solid could accumulate approximately 24.0 mg of Mn(2+) at 15 °C. In drinking water with pHs below 7.5, because of H(+) inhibition, active reaction sites on amorphous Al(OH)(3) surface were much less. The adsorption of Mn(2+) on Al(OH)(3) changed gradually from chemical coordination to physical adsorption. In drinking water with high concentrations of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(3+), and HA, the removal of Mn(2+) was enhanced due to the effects of co-precipitation and adsorption. In solution with 1.0 mg/L HA, the residual concentration of Mn(2+) was below 0.005 mg/L, much lower than the limit value required by the Chinese Standard for Drinking Water Quality. Unlike suspended Al(OH)(3), deposited Al(OH)(3) had a much lower adsorption capacity of 0.85 mg/g, and the variation in flow rate and major water quality parameters had little effect on it. Improved managements of water age, pipe flushing and mechanical cleaning were suggested to control residual Mn(2+).

  1. Adsorption studies of methylene blue and phenol onto vetiver roots activated carbon prepared by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Altenor, Sandro; Carene, Betty; Emmanuel, Evens; Lambert, Jacques; Ehrhardt, Jean-Jacques; Gaspard, Sarra

    2009-06-15

    Vetiver roots have been utilized for the preparation of activated carbon (AC) by chemical activation with different impregnation ratios of phosphoric acid, X(P) (gH(3)PO(4)/g precursor): 0.5:1; 1:1 and 1.5:1. Textural characterization, determined by nitrogen adsorption at 77K shows that mixed microporous and mesoporous structures activated carbons (ACs) with high surface area (>1000 m(2)/g) and high pore volume (up to 1.19 cm(3)/g) can be obtained. The surface chemical properties of these ACs were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Boehm titration. Their textural and chemical characteristics were compared to those of an AC sample obtained by steam activation of vetiver roots. Classical molecules used for characterizing liquid phase adsorption, phenol and methylene blue (MB), were used. Adsorption kinetics of MB and phenol have been studied using commonly used kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the intraparticle diffusion model and as well the fractal, BWS (Brouers, Weron and Sotolongo) kinetic equation. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) and the normalized standard deviation Deltaq (%) were determined showing globally, that the recently derived fractal kinetic equation could best describe the adsorption kinetics for the adsorbates tested here, indicating a complex adsorption mechanism. The experimental adsorption isotherms of these molecules on the activated carbon were as well analysed using four isotherms: the classical Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson equations, but as well the newly published deformed Weibull Brouers-Sotolongo isotherm. The results obtained from the application of the equations show that the best fits were achieved with the Brouers-Sotolongo equation and with the Redlich-Peterson equation. Influence of surface functional groups towards MB adsorption is as well studied using various ACs prepared from vetiver roots and sugar cane bagasse. Opposite effects governing MB

  2. Neptunium(V) adsorption to calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heberling, Frank; Brendebach, Boris; Bosbach, Dirk

    2008-12-01

    The migration behavior of the actinyl ions U(VI)O 22+, Np(V)O 2+ and Pu(V,VI)O 2(+,2+) in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption reactions (inner- or outer-sphere adsorption, ion-exchange, coprecipitation/structural incorporation) with minerals. Here NpO 2+ adsorption onto calcite is studied in batch type experiments over a wide range of pH (6.0-9.4) and concentration (0.4 μM-40 μM) conditions. pH is adjusted by variation of CO 2 partial pressure. Adsorption is found to be pH dependent with maximal adsorption at pH 8.3 decreasing with increasing and decreasing pH. pH dependence of adsorption decreases with increasing Np(V) concentration. EXAFS data of neptunyl adsorbed to calcite and neptunyl in the supernatant shows differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance, 1.85 ± 0.01 Å for the adsorbed and 1.82 ± 0.01 Å for the solution species. The equatorial environment of the neptunyl in solution shows about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.45 ± 0.02 Å. For adsorbed neptunyl there are also about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.46 ± 0.01 Å. An additional feature in the adsorbed species' R-space spectrum can be related to carbonate neighbours, 3 to 6 carbon backscatterers (C-eq) at 3.05 ± 0.03 Å and 3 to 6 oxygen backscatterers (O-eq2) at 3.31 ± 0.02 Å. The differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance and the C-eq and O-eq2 backscatterers which are only present for the adsorbed species indicate inner-sphere bonding of the adsorbed neptunyl species to the calcite surface. Experiments on adsorption kinetics indicate that after a fast surface adsorption process a continuous slow uptake occurs which may be explained by incorporation via surface dissolution and reprecipitation processes. This is also indicated by the part irreversibility of the adsorption as shown by increased KD values after desorption compared to adsorption.

  3. Adsorption of gases on carbon molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vijayalakshmi, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Ganesh, K.S. )

    1994-12-01

    Adsorption on carbon molecular sieves (CMS) prepared by coke deposition has become an interesting area of adsorption due to its microporous nature and favorable separation factor on size and shape selectivity basis for many gaseous systems. In the present work CMS was synthesized from coconut shell through three major steps, namely, carbonization, activation, and coke deposition by hydrocarbon cracking. The crushed, washed, and sieved granules of coconut shell (particle size 2--3 mm) were pretreated with sodium silicate solution and oven-dried at 150 C to create the inorganic sites necessary for coke deposition. Carbonization and activation of the dried granules were carried out at 800 C, for 30 min each. The activated char thus produced was subjected to hydrocarbon cracking at 600 C for periods varying from 30 to 180 min. The product samples were characterized in terms of adsorption isotherm, kinetic adsorption curve, surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and characteristic energy for adsorption by using O[sub 2], N[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], C[sub 3]H[sub 6], and CH[sub 4].

  4. Adsorption behavior of heavy metals on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Minamisawa, Mayumi; Minamisawa, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Shoichiro; Takai, Nobuharu

    2004-09-01

    We have investigated adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) at pH 2-6.7 onto the biomaterials chitosan, coffee, green tea, tea, yuzu, aloe, and Japanese coarse tea, and onto the inorganic adsorbents, activated carbon and zeolite. High adsorptive capabilities were observed for all of the biomaterials at pH 4 and 6.7. In the adsorption of Cd(II), blend coffee, tea, green tea, and coarse tea have comparable loading capacities to activated carbon and zeolite. Although activated carbon, zeolite, and chitosan are utilized in a variety of fields such as wastewater treatment, chemical and metallurgical engineering, and analytical chemistry, these adsorbents are costly. On the other hand, processing of the test biomaterials was inexpensive, and all the biomaterials except for chitosan were able to adsorb large amounts of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions after a convenient pretreatment of washing with water followed by drying. The high adsorption capability of the biomaterials prepared from plant materials is promising in the development of a novel, low-cost adsorbent. From these results, it is concluded that heavy metal removal using biomaterials would be an effective method for the economic treatment of wastewater. The proposed adsorption method was applied to the determination of amounts of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water samples.

  5. Adsorption of small organic molecules on graphene.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Petr; Karlický, František; Jurečka, Petr; Kocman, Mikuláš; Otyepková, Eva; Šafářová, Klára; Otyepka, Michal

    2013-04-24

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical quantification of the adsorption enthalpies of seven organic molecules (acetone, acetonitrile, dichloromethane, ethanol, ethyl acetate, hexane, and toluene) on graphene. Adsorption enthalpies were measured by inverse gas chromatography and ranged from -5.9 kcal/mol for dichloromethane to -13.5 kcal/mol for toluene. The strength of interaction between graphene and the organic molecules was estimated by density functional theory (PBE, B97D, M06-2X, and optB88-vdW), wave function theory (MP2, SCS(MI)-MP2, MP2.5, MP2.X, and CCSD(T)), and empirical calculations (OPLS-AA) using two graphene models: coronene and infinite graphene. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory calculations indicated that the interactions were governed by London dispersive forces (amounting to ∼60% of attractive interactions), even for the polar molecules. The results also showed that the adsorption enthalpies were largely controlled by the interaction energy. Adsorption enthalpies obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics employing non-local optB88-vdW functional were in excellent agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the functional can cover physical phenomena behind adsorption of organic molecules on graphene sufficiently well.

  6. Adsorption of reovirus by minerals and soils.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R S; Taylor, D H; Reddy, M M; Sturman, L S

    1982-01-01

    Adsorption of [35S]methionine-labeled reovirus by 30 dry soils, minerals, and finely ground rocks suspended in synthetic freshwater at pH 7 was investigated to determine the conditions necessary for optimum virus removal during land application of wastewaters. All of the minerals and soils studied were excellent adsorbents of reovirus, with greater than 99% of the virus adsorbed after 1 h at 4 degrees C. Thereafter, virus remaining in suspension was significantly inactivated, and within 24 h a three to five log10 reduction in titer occurred. The presence of divalent cations, i.e., Ca2+ and Mg2+, in synthetic freshwater enhanced removal, whereas soluble organic matter decreased the amount of virus adsorbed in secondary effluent. The amount of virus adsorbed by these substrates was inversely correlated with the amount of organic matter, capacity to adsorb cationic polyelectrolyte, and electrophoretic mobility. Adsorption increased with increasing available surface area, as suspended infectivity was reduced further by the more finely divided substrates. However, the organic content of the soils reduced the level of infectious virus adsorbed below that expected from surface area measurements alone. The inverse correlation between virus adsorption and substrate capacity for cationic polyelectrolyte indicates that the adsorption of infectious reovirus particles is predominately a charged colloidal particle-charged surface interaction. Thus, adsorption of polyelectrolyte may be useful in predicting the fate of viruses during land application of sewage effluents and sludges. PMID:7149717

  7. Membrane Potential Generated by Ion Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Morita, Sachi

    2014-01-01

    It has been widely acknowledged that the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz (GHK) equation fully explains membrane potential behavior. The fundamental facet of the GHK equation lies in its consideration of permeability of membrane to ions, when the membrane serves as a separator for separating two electrolytic solutions. The GHK equation describes that: variation of membrane permeability to ion in accordance with ion species results in the variation of the membrane potential. However, nonzero potential was observed even across the impermeable membrane (or separator) separating two electrolytic solutions. It gave rise to a question concerning the validity of the GHK equation for explaining the membrane potential generation. In this work, an alternative theory was proposed. It is the adsorption theory. The adsorption theory attributes the membrane potential generation to the ion adsorption onto the membrane (or separator) surface not to the ion passage through the membrane (or separator). The computationally obtained potential behavior based on the adsorption theory was in good agreement with the experimentally observed potential whether the membrane (or separator) was permeable to ions or not. It was strongly speculated that the membrane potential origin could lie primarily in the ion adsorption on the membrane (or separator) rather than the membrane permeability to ions. It might be necessary to reconsider the origin of membrane potential which has been so far believed explicable by the GHK equation. PMID:24957176

  8. [Lead adsorption and arsenite oxidation by cobalt doped birnessite].

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui; Feng, Xiong-Han; Qiu, Guo-Hong; Tan, Wen-Feng; Liu, Fan

    2011-07-01

    In order to study the effects of transition metal ions on the physic-chemical properties of manganese dioxides as environmental friendly materials, three-dimensional nano-microsphere cobalt-doped birnessite was synthesized by reduction of potassium permanganate by mixtures of concentrated hydrochloride and cobalt (II) chloride. Powder X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis, N2 physical adsorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) were used to characterize the crystal structure, chemical composition and micro-morphologies of products. In the range of molar ratios from 0.05 to 0.20, birnessite was fabricated exclusively. It was observed that cobalt incorporated into the layers of birnessite and had little effect on the crystal structure and micromorpholgy, but crystallinity decreased after cobalt doping. Both chemical analysis and XPS results showed that manganese average oxidation state decreased after cobalt doping, and the percentage of Mn3+ increased. Co(III) OOH existed mainly in the structure. With the increase of cobalt, hydroxide oxygen percentage in molar increased from 12.79% for undoped birnessite to 13.05%, 17.69% and 17.79% for doped samples respectively. Adsorption capacity for lead and oxidation of arsenite of birnessite were enhanced by cobalt doping. The maximum capacity of Pb2+ adsorption increased in the order HB (2 538 mmol/kg) < CoB5 (2798 mmol/kg) < CoB10 (2932 mmol/kg) < CoB20 (3 146 mmol/kg). Oxidation percentage of arsenite in simulated waste water by undoped birnessite was 76.5%, those of doped ones increased by 2.0%, 12.8% and 18.9% respectively. Partial of Co3+ substitution for Mn4+ results in the increase of negative charge of the layer and the content of hydroxyl group, which could account for the improved adsorption capacity of Pb2+. After substitution of manganese by cobalt, oxidation capacity of arsenite by birnessite increases likely due to the higher standard redox potential of

  9. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  10. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  11. Associating gunpowder and residues from commercial ammunition using compositional analysis.

    PubMed

    MacCrehan, William A; Reardon, Michelle R; Duewer, David L

    2002-03-01

    Qualitatively identifying and quantitatively determining the additives in smokeless gunpowder to calculate a numerical propellant to stabilizer (P/S) ratio is a new approach to associate handgun-fired organic gunshot residues (OGSR) with unfired powder. In past work, the P/S values of handgun OGSR and cartridges loaded with known gunpowders were evaluated. In this study, gunpowder and residue samples were obtained from seven boxes of commercial 38 caliber ammunition with the goals of associating cartridges within a box and matching residues to unfired powders, based on the P/S value and the qualitative identity of the additives. Gunpowder samples from four of the seven boxes of ammunition could be easily differentiated. When visual comparisons of the cartridge powders were considered in addition to composition, powder samples from all seven boxes of ammunition could be reliably differentiated. Handgun OGSR was also collected and evaluated in bulk as well as for individual particles. In some cases, residues could be reliably differentiated based on P/S and additive identity. It was instructive to evaluate the composition of individual unfired gunpowder and OGSR particles. We determined that both the numerical centroid and dispersity of the P/S measurements provide information for associations and exclusions. Associating measurements from residue particles with those of residue samples collected from a test firing of the same weapon and ammunition appears to be a useful approach to account for any changes in composition that occur during the firing process.

  12. Co-non-solvency: Depletion forces or preferential adsorption?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Carlos; Oliveira, Tiago; Netz, Paulo; Stuehn, Torsten; Mukherji, Debashish; Kremer, Kurt

    Co-non-solvency is a phenomenon that occurs when a polymer is added to a mixture of two (perfectly) miscible and competing good solvents. As a result, the same polymer collapses into a globule within intermediate mixing ratios. More interestingly, polymer collapses despite the fact that the solvent quality remains good or even gets increasingly better by the addition of the better cosolvent. This puzzling phenomenon, where the solvent quality is completely decoupled from the polymer conformation, is driven by strong local preferential adsorption of the better cosolvent to the polymer. Because a polymer collapses in good solvent, the depletion forces, that are responsible for standard poor solvent collapse, do not play any role in describing co-non-solvency.

  13. Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-09-01

    The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 μg/g for the two Tusaar materials.

  14. Total radioactive residues and residues of [36Cl]chlorate in market size broilers.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Byrd, James A; Anderson, Robin C

    2007-07-11

    convert chlorate residues to an innocuous metabolite, chloride ion, and that chlorate residues in excreta remain fairly high during the time around slaughter. Because the target tissue of chlorate is the lower gastrointestinal tract, the relatively high distribution of parent chlorate to inedible gastrointestinal tissues and low distribution to edible tissues is favorable for the biological activity and for food safety considerations. These data, when used in conjunction with a toxicological assessment of chlorate, can be used to determine a likely risk/benefit ratio for chlorate.

  15. Total radioactive residues and residues of [36Cl]chlorate in market size broilers.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Byrd, James A; Anderson, Robin C

    2007-07-11

    convert chlorate residues to an innocuous metabolite, chloride ion, and that chlorate residues in excreta remain fairly high during the time around slaughter. Because the target tissue of chlorate is the lower gastrointestinal tract, the relatively high distribution of parent chlorate to inedible gastrointestinal tissues and low distribution to edible tissues is favorable for the biological activity and for food safety considerations. These data, when used in conjunction with a toxicological assessment of chlorate, can be used to determine a likely risk/benefit ratio for chlorate. PMID:17571900

  16. Soil nitrous oxide emissions following crop residue addition: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaihai; Li, Xuechao; Hu, Feng; Shi, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Annual production of crop residues has reached nearly 4 billion metric tons globally. Retention of this large amount of residues on agricultural land can be beneficial to soil C sequestration. Such potential impacts, however, may be offset if residue retention substantially increases soil emissions of N(2)O, a potent greenhouse gas and ozone depletion substance. Residue effects on soil N(2)O emissions have gained considerable attention since early 1990s; yet, it is still a great challenge to predict the magnitude and direction of soil N(2)O emissions following residue amendment. Here, we used a meta-analysis to assess residue impacts on soil N(2)O emissions in relation to soil and residue attributes, i.e., soil pH, soil texture, soil water content, residue C and N input, and residue C : N ratio. Residue effects were negatively associated with C : N ratios, but generally residue amendment could not reduce soil N(2)O emissions, even for C : N ratios well above ca. 30, the threshold for net N immobilization. Residue effects were also comparable to, if not greater than, those of synthetic N fertilizers. In addition, residue effects on soil N(2)O emissions were positively related to the amounts of residue C input as well as residue effects on soil CO(2) respiration. Furthermore, most significant and stimulatory effects occurred at 60-90% soil water-filled pore space and soil pH 7.1-7.8. Stimulatory effects were also present for all soil textures except sand or clay content ≤10%. However, inhibitory effects were found for soils with >90% water-filled pore space. Altogether, our meta-analysis suggests that crop residues played roles beyond N supply for N(2)O production. Perhaps, by stimulating microbial respiration, crop residues enhanced oxygen depletion and therefore promoted anaerobic conditions for denitrification and N(2)O production. Our meta-analysis highlights the necessity to connect the quantity and quality of crop residues with soil properties for predicting

  17. Physicochemical Characterization of various Vietnamese Biomass Residue-derived Biochars (wood, bamboo and risk husk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hien

    2016-04-01

    This study compares the physico-chemical characteristics of various biocchars produced from biomass residues in Vietnam such as fired wood, rice husk, and bamboo. Wood biochar (WBC), rice husk biochar (RHBC), and bamboo biochar (BBC) were produced under limited oxygen conditions using equipment available locally in Vietnam, known as a Top-Lift Updraft Drum (TLUD). The three biochars are alkaline with pH around 10, but were found to have quite significantly different physico-chemical characteristics. Surface areas (measured by BET) were found to be very significantly higher for WBC and BBC with 479.34 m2/g and 434.53 m2/g, respectively, compared to RHBC (3.29 m2/g). The SEM images correspond with the BET surface area, showing a smooth surface for RHBC, a hollow surface for BBC, and a rough surface for WBC. Total carbon (TC) of WBC and BBC are above 80%, while RHBC has only 47.95% TC. Despite having different TC, the content of hydrogen among the biochars is similar, ranging from 2.07% to 2.34%, and the ratio of H/C also follows the same trend. Thus, although the biochars are produced by the same method, the various feedstocks lead to different physico-chemical properties. Ongoing work is linking these physico-chemical properties to fertiliser efficiencies in terms of nitrate and ammonia adsorption and retention capacities, in order to design optimal biochar properties for use in fertilisation. Key words: physico-chemical characteristic, biochar, surface area, SEM, total carbon, feedstock

  18. Recycling cellulases by pH-triggered adsorption-desorption during the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yaping; Su, Rongxin; Huang, Renliang; Yang, Yang; Qi, Wei; Li, Qiujin; He, Zhimin

    2014-06-01

    Recycling of cellulases is an effective way to reduce the cost of enzymatic hydrolysis for the production of cellulosic ethanol. In this study, we examined the adsorption and desorption behaviors of cellulase at different pH values and temperatures. Furthermore, we developed a promising way to recover both free and bound cellulases by pH-triggered adsorption-desorption. The results show that acidic pH (e.g., pH 4.8) was found to favor adsorption, whereas alkaline pH (e.g., pH 10) and low temperature (4-37 °C) favored desorption. The adsorption of cellulases reached an equilibrium within 60 min at pH 4.8 and 25 °C, leading to approximately 50 % of the added cellulases bound to the substrate. By controlling the pH of eluent (citrate buffer, 25 °C), we were able to increase the desorption efficiency of bound cellulases from 15 % at pH 4.8 to 85 % at pH 10. To recover cellulases after enzymatic hydrolysis, we employed adsorption by fresh substrate and desorption at pH 10 to recover the free cellulases in supernatant and the bound cellulases in residue, respectively. The recycling performance (based on the glucose yield) of this simple strategy could reach near 80 %. Our results provided a simple, low-cost, and effective approach for cellulase recycling during the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

  19. The adsorption of lead(II) ions by dynamic high pressure micro-fluidization treated insoluble soybean dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Huang, Tao; Tu, Zong-Cai; Ruan, Chuan-Ying; Lin, Derong

    2016-06-01

    Insoluble dietary fiber from soybean residue (SIDF) was treated with dynamic high-pressure microfluidization (DHPM) and used as adsorbent for Pb(II) ion. The effects of pressure on the Pb(II) adsorption capacity, primary cilia structure and surface topography of SIDF were determined using a gastrointestinal simulated model in vitro. SIDF (at pH 7.0) showed maximum binding capacity (261.42 ± 2.77 μmol/g), which was about 1.13 times higher than that of untreated sample (233.47 ± 1.84 μmol/g), when pressure reached 80 MPa. However, the net adsorption value of SIDF in a simulated small intestine (~ 9 μmol/g) was significantly lower than that in the stomach (~ 48 μmol/g), because of the competitive adsorption of Pb(2+) by pancreatin, cholate and several enzymes in the small intestine. In addition, the adsorption capacity of SIDF exhibited good linear relationship with the physicochemical properties of total negative charges, and the adsorption behavior presumably occurred on the surface area of granules fiber. PMID:27478208

  20. Altering the characteristics of a leaf litter-derived humic substance by adsorptive fractionation versus simulated solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Jung, Ka-Young; Schlautman, Mark A

    2011-11-15

    Changes in the characteristics of a leaf litter-derived humic substance (LLHS) that resulted from its adsorption onto kaolinite or exposure to simulated solar irradiation were tracked using selected spectroscopic descriptors, apparent weight-average molecular weight (MW(w)) and pyrene binding. Heterogeneity within the original bulk LLHS was confirmed by a range of different characteristics obtained from ultrafiltration-based size fractions. In general, trends of some changing LLHS characteristics were similar for the adsorption and irradiation processes when tracked against percent carbon removal. For example, the overall values of specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), MW(w), and humification index (HIX) all decreased with increasing irradiation time and with increasing concentration of mineral adsorbent in the respective experiments, indicating that both processes resulted in less aromatic and smaller-sized LLHS components remaining in solution. In addition, both the adsorption and irradiation experiments resulted in enrichment of the relative distribution of protein-like fluorescence (PLF), implying the PLF-related components had low affinities for phototransformation and mineral surface adsorption. Despite these apparently similar overall trends in LLHS characteristics caused by the adsorption and irradiation processes, closer examination revealed considerable differences in how the two processes altered the original material. Net production of intermediate-sized constituents was observed only with the irradiation experiments. In addition, residual LLHS resulting from the adsorptive fractionation experiments exhibited consistently higher pyrene binding versus the irradiated LLHS despite having comparable MW(w) values. Changes in LLHS characteristics due to adsorption by kaolinite were likely caused by physical mechanisms (primarily hydrophobic interactions between LLHS components and the kaolinite surface) whereas the irradiation-induced changes appear to have

  1. Protein Adsorption and Reorganization on Nanoparticles Probed by the Coffee-Ring Effect: Application to Single Point Mutation Detection.

    PubMed

    Devineau, Stéphanie; Anyfantakis, Manos; Marichal, Laurent; Kiger, Laurent; Morel, Mathieu; Rudiuk, Sergii; Baigl, Damien

    2016-09-14

    The coffee-ring effect denotes the accumulation of particles at the edge of an evaporating sessile drop pinned on a substrate. Because it can be detected by simple visual inspection, this ubiquitous phenomenon can be envisioned as a robust and cost-effective diagnostic tool. Toward this direction, here we systematically analyze the deposit morphology of drying drops containing polystyrene particles of different surface properties with various proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA) and different forms of hemoglobin). We show that deposit patterns reveal information on both the adsorption of proteins onto particles and their reorganization following adsorption. By combining pattern analysis with adsorption isotherm and zeta potential measurements, we show that the suppression of the coffee-ring effect and the formation of a disk-shaped pattern is primarily associated with particle neutralization by protein adsorption. However, our findings also suggest that protein reorganization following adsorption can dramatically invert this tendency. Exposure of hydrophobic (respectively charged) residues can lead to disk (respectively ring) deposit morphologies independently of the global particle charge. Surface tension measurements and microscopic observations of the evaporating drops show that the determinant factor of the deposit morphology is the accumulation of particles at the liquid/gas interface during evaporation. This general behavior opens the possibility to probe protein adsorption and reorganization on particles by the analysis of the deposit patterns, the formation of a disk being the robust signature of particles rendered hydrophobic by protein adsorption. We show that this method is sensitive enough to detect a single point mutation in a protein, as demonstrated here by the distinct patterns formed by human native hemoglobin h-HbA and its mutant form h-HbS, which is responsible for sickle cell anemia. PMID:27562632

  2. Measuring the Mass Ratio of the Deuteron to the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Thomas; Nicholas, Rebecca

    1998-03-01

    An experiment was conducted to measure the ratio of the mass of the deuterium nucleus to the mass of the proton. This was done using a monochromator to record the spectral lines emitted from a deuterium source containing some residual hydrogen. The spectral lines of this source were detected by a photomultiplier and recorded by a computer. The software program LabView was used to graph and record data so that the isotropic shift in the alpha emission could be extracted.

  3. Preliminary Report on Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1998-12-11

    The Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team identified the adsorption kinetics of actinides and strontium onto monosodium titanate (MST) as a technical risk for several of the processing alternatives selected for additional evaluation in Phase III of their effort. The Flow Sheet Team requested that the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) examine the adsorption kinetics of MST for several process alternatives.This study consisted of a statistically designed set of tests to determine the rate of adsorption of strontium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium as a function of temperature, MST concentration, and concentrations of sodium, strontium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium. Additional tests incorporated into the design assess the effects of mixing as well as the influence from the presence of sludge solids and sodium tetraphenylborate.

  4. GENERAL: Cluster Growth Through Monomer Adsorption Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jian-Hong; Lin, Zhen-Quan; Chen, Xiao-Shuang

    2010-02-01

    We propose a monomer adsorption model, in which only the monomers are allowed to diffuse and adsorb onto other clusters. By means of the generalized rate equation we investigate the kinetic behavior of the system with a special rate kernel. For the system without monomer input, the concentration aj(t) of the Aj clusters (j > 1) asymptotically retains a nonzero quantity, while for the system with monomer input, it decays with time and vanishes finally. We also investigate the kinetics of an interesting model with fixed-rate monomer adsorption. For the case without monomer source, the evolution of the system will halt at a finite time; while the system evolves infinitely in time in the case with monomer source. Finally, we also suggest a connection between the fixed-rate monomer adsorption systems and growing networks.

  5. Novel nano bearings constructed by physical adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-09-01

    The paper proposes a novel nano bearing formed by the physical adsorption of the confined fluid to the solid wall. The bearing is formed between two parallel smooth solid plane walls sliding against one another, where conventional hydrodynamic lubrication theory predicted no lubricating effect. In this bearing, the stationary solid wall is divided into two subzones which respectively have different interaction strengths with the lubricating fluid. It leads to different physical adsorption and slip properties of the lubricating fluid at the stationary solid wall respectively in these two subzones. It was found that a significant load-carrying capacity of the bearing can be generated for low lubricating film thicknesses, because of the strong physical adsorption and non-continuum effects of the lubricating film.

  6. Adsorption of hydroxyacetone on pure ice surfaces.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, Mélanie; Darvas, Maria; Picaud, Sylvain; Jedlovszky, Pál; Le Calvé, Stéphane

    2010-12-17

    The adsorption of hydroxyacetone molecules at the surface of ice is investigated by means of flow-tube reactor measurements in the temperature range: 213-253 K. The number of molecules adsorbed per surface unit is conventionally plotted as a function of the absolute gas concentration of hydroxyacetone and is compared to that previously obtained for acetone and ethanol. The enthalpy of adsorption and the monolayer capacity at the ice surface are determined. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to support the experimental results. However, it is shown that the available interaction potential between hydroxyacetone and ice is not accurate enough to allow a robust detailed analysis of the adsorption process. Finally, a rapid estimation of the hydroxyacetone partitioning between the gas phase and ice shows that in the densest ice clouds, up to 29% of hydroxyacetone could be adsorbed on pure ice surfaces at 203 K.

  7. Cotton cellulose: enzyme adsorption and enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrame, P.L.; Carniti, P.; Focher, B.; Marzetti, A.; Cattaneo, M.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of a crude cellulase complex from Trichoderma viride on variously pretreated cotton cellulose samples was studied in the framework of the Langmuir approach at 2-8 degrees. The saturation amount of adsorbed enzyme was related to the susceptibility of the substrates to hydrolysis. In every case the adsorption process was faster by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the hydrolysis step to give end products. For ZnCl/sub 2/-treated cotton cellulose the Langmuir parameters correlated fairly well with the value of the Michaelis constant, measured for its enzymic hydrolysis, and the adsorptive complex was indistinguishable from the complex of the Michaelis-Menten model for the hydrolysis.

  8. Porous silicon functionalization for possible arsenic adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-Valadez, Ruth Fabiola; Agarwal, Vivechana

    2014-09-01

    Thiol-functionalized porous silicon (PS) monolayer was evaluated for its possible application in As (III) adsorption. Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) attached to mesoporous silicon via amide bond linkages was used as a chelate for As (III). Two different aminosilanes namely 3-(aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-aminopropyl (diethoxy)-methylsilane (APDEMS) were tested as linkers to evaluate the relative response for DMSA attachment. The aminosilane-modified PS samples were attached to DMSA by wet impregnation followed by the adsorption of As (III). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to identify the functional groups and to estimate the As (III) content, respectively. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the covalent bonding of DMSA with amide and R-COOH groups on the nanostructured porous surface. XPS confirms the preferred arsenic adsorption on the surface of PS/DMSA samples as compared to the aminosilane-modified and bare PS substrates.

  9. Utilisation of chitinous materials in pigment adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, San-Lang; Chen, Yan-Cheng; Yen, Yue-Horng; Liang, Tzu-Wen

    2012-12-01

    The effect of adding the cells of four lactobacilli to a squid pen powder (SPP)-containing medium on prodigiosin (PG) production by Serratia marcescens TKU011 is examined. The best increase in PG productivity was shown by strain TKU012. Among the samples of strain TKU012 and the chitinous materials of cicada casting powder (CCP), shrimp shell powder (SSP), squid pen powder (SPP), α-chitin, and β-chitin, TKU012 cells displayed the best adsorption rate (84%) for PG, followed by CCP, SSP, SPP, α-chitin, and β-chitin. As for the water-soluble food colourants, Allura Red AC (R40) and Tartrazne (Y4), SPP and SSP had better adsorptive powers than pure chitin preparations, strain TKU012, and CCP. Treatment with organic solvents, hot alkali, or proteases (papain, bromelain) diminished the adsorption rates of the biosorbents.

  10. Adsorption properties of thermally sputtered calcein film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglenko, I.; Burlachenko, J.; Kravchenko, S.; Savchenko, A.; Slabkovska, M.; Shirshov, Yu.

    2014-05-01

    High humidity environments are often found in such areas as biotechnology, food chemistry, plant physiology etc. The controlling of parameters of such ambiences is vitally important. Thermally deposited calcein films have extremely high adsorptivity at exposure to water vapor of high concentration. This feature makes calcein a promising material for humidity sensing applications. The aim of this work is to explain high sensitivity and selectivity of calcein film to high humidity. Quartz crystal microbalance sensor, AFM and ellipsometry were used for calcein film characterization and adsorption properties investigation. The proposed model takes into account both the molecular properties of calcein (the presence of several functional groups capable of forming hydrogen bonds, and their arrangement) and the features of structure of thermally deposited calcein film (film restructuring due to the switching of bonds "calcein-calcein" to "calcein-water" in the course of water adsorption).

  11. Porous silicon functionalization for possible arsenic adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Thiol-functionalized porous silicon (PS) monolayer was evaluated for its possible application in As (III) adsorption. Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) attached to mesoporous silicon via amide bond linkages was used as a chelate for As (III). Two different aminosilanes namely 3-(aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-aminopropyl (diethoxy)-methylsilane (APDEMS) were tested as linkers to evaluate the relative response for DMSA attachment. The aminosilane-modified PS samples were attached to DMSA by wet impregnation followed by the adsorption of As (III). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to identify the functional groups and to estimate the As (III) content, respectively. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the covalent bonding of DMSA with amide and R-COOH groups on the nanostructured porous surface. XPS confirms the preferred arsenic adsorption on the surface of PS/DMSA samples as compared to the aminosilane-modified and bare PS substrates. PMID:25249826

  12. Adsorption on Highly Ordered Porous Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistura, Giampaolo; Bruschi, Lorenzo; Lee, Woo

    2016-10-01

    Porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is characterized by a regular arrangement of the pores with a narrow pore size distribution over extended areas, uniform pore depth, and solid pore walls without micropores. Thanks to significant improvements in anodization techniques, structural engineering of AAO allows to accurately tailor the pore morphology. These features make porous AAO an excellent substrate to study adsorption phenomena. In this paper, we review recent experiments involving the adsorption in porous AAO. Particular attention will be devoted to adsorption in straight and structured pores with a closed end which shed new light on fundamental issues like the origin of hysteresis in closed end pores and the nature of evaporation from ink-bottle pores. The results will be compared to those obtained in other synthetic materials like porous silicon and silica.

  13. Adsorption and release of amino acids mixture onto apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Rhilassi, A.; Mourabet, M.; El Boujaady, H.; Bennani-Ziatni, M.; Hamri, R. El; Taitai, A.

    2012-10-01

    Study focused on the interaction of adsorbate with poorly crystalline apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral. Calcium phosphates prepared in water-ethanol medium at physiological temperature (37 °C) and neutral pH, their Ca/P ratio was between 1.33 and 1.67. Adsorbate used in this paper takes the mixture form of two essential amino acids L-lysine and DL-leucine which have respectively a character hydrophilic and hydrophobic. Adsorption and release are investigated experimentally; they are dependent on the phosphate type and on the nature of adsorbate L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture. Adsorption of mixture of amino acids on the apatitic calcium phosphates is influenced by the competition between the two amino acids: L-lysine and DL-leucine which exist in the medium reaction. The adsorption kinetics is very fast while the release kinetics is slow. The chemical composition of apatite has an influence on both adsorption and release. The interactions adsorbate-adsorbent are electrostatic type. Adsorption and release reactions of the amino acid mixture are explained by the existence of the hydrated surface layer of calcium phosphate apatite. The charged sbnd COOsbnd and sbnd NH3+ of adsorbates are the strongest groups that interact with the surface of apatites, the adsorption is mainly due to the electrostatic interaction between the groups sbnd COOsbnd of amino acids and calcium Ca2+ ions of the apatite. Comparative study of interactions between adsorbates (L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture) and apatitic calcium phosphates is carried out in vitro by using UV-vis and infrared spectroscopy IR techniques.

  14. A spectroscopic study of the effects of a microbial siderophore on Pb adsorption to kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Maurice, Patricia A.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2010-11-12

    Batch adsorption experiments were combined with X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) analysis to determine the mechanism(s) whereby the microbial trihydroxamate siderophore ligand desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B) affects Pb sorption to kaolinite at pH 4, 6, and 7.5 (in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4}, 22 C; Pb:DFO-B ratio 120:240 {micro}M). In the absence of DFO-B, Pb adsorbs only slightly to kaolinite at pH 4, by a combination of inner- and outer-sphere complexation. Adsorption increases at pH 6, and sorption (adsorption/surface precipitation) further increases at pH 7.5. At pH 4, DFO-B does not bind Pb in solution appreciably, and the Pb adsorption mechanism(s) is unchanged by the presence of DFO-B. At pH 6, DFO-B slightly enhances Pb adsorption, due at least in part to formation of a DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite type A ternary surface complex. At pH 7.5, DFO-B decreases Pb sorption and Pb adsorption is dominated by a DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite type A ternary surface complex. Although XAS and thermodynamic speciation modeling indicate that Pb is bound by multiple DFO-B functional groups in solution at pH 7.5, the DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite surface complex appears to involve only a single hydroxamate group. This study thus demonstrates that the detailed structure of a ternary surface complex cannot necessarily be predicted from the structure of the solution organic-metal complex.

  15. [Study of adsorption and desorption of behaviors of Pb2+ on thiol-modified bentonite by flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Xiong, Qiong-Xian; Pang, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Xia-Ping; Han, Mei; Zhao, Qiu-Xiang; Liu, Wen-Hua

    2013-03-01

    A comparative analysis of the functional groups and surface structure of the Ca-bentonite (RB) and thiol-modified bentonite (TMB) were characterized by means of FTIR and SEM. The absorptive property of Pb2+ on TMB and RB and its influential factors was studied and the conditions for the adsorption were optimized by using FAAS method. Then the conditions for desorption of Pb2+ from the TMB by using simulated acid rain were studied and the contrast analysis of absorptive stability of Pb2+ on TMB and RB was given. The results showed that the adsorption rate of Pb2+ by TMB could reach more than 98%, when the initial Pb2+ concentration was 100 mg.L-1, the liquid-solid ratio was 5 g.L-1, pH was 6. 0, KNO3 ionic strength was 0. 1 mol.L-1 and adsorption period was 60min at 25 C. The saturated adsorption capacity of TMB was 67.27 mg.g-1; it's much more than that of RB (9.667 mg.g-1). The adsorption of Pb2+ on TMB follows Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models well. Desorption experiments of Pb2+ from TMB with simulated acid rain (pH 3. 50) were done, and the desorption rate was 0. The results showed that TMB has a strong adsorption and fixation capacity for PbZ+; it is adapted to lead contaminated soil for chemical remediation. PMID:23705461

  16. Adsorption and growth morphology of rare-earth metals on graphene studied by ab initio calculations and scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, C. Z.; Hupalo, M.; Yao, Y. X.; Tringides, M. C.; Lu, W. C.; Ho, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    Adsorption of rare-earth (RE) adatoms (Nd, Gd, Eu, and Yb) on graphene was studied by first-principles calculations based on the density-functional theory. The calculations show that the hollow site of graphene is the energetically favorable adsorption site for all the RE adatoms studied. The adsorption energies and diffusion barriers of Nd and Gd on graphene are found to be larger than those of Eu and Yb. Comparison with scanning tunneling microscopy experiments for Gd and Eu epitaxially grown on graphene confirms these calculated adsorption and barrier differences, since fractal-like islands are observed for Gd and flat-topped crystalline islands for Eu. The formation of flat Eu islands on graphene can be attributed to its low diffusion barrier and relatively larger ratio of adsorption energy to its bulk cohesive energy. The interactions between the Nd and Gd adatoms and graphene cause noticeable in-plane lattice distortions in the graphene layer. Adsorption of the RE adatoms on graphene also induces significant electric dipole and magnetic moments.

  17. Modeling of thorium (IV) ions adsorption onto a novel adsorbent material silicon dioxide nano-balls using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Ümit H; Şabikoğlu, Israfil; Kaynar, Sermin Çam; Eral, Meral

    2016-09-01

    The silicon dioxide nano-balls (nano-SiO2) were prepared for the adsorption of thorium (IV) ions from aqueous solution. The synthesized silicon dioxide nano-balls were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray, X-ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared and BET surface area measurement spectroscopy. The effects of pH, concentration, temperature and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of thorium by nano-balls were optimized using central composite design of response surface methodology. The interaction between four variables was studied and modelled. Furthermore, the statistical analysis of the results was done. Analysis of variance revealed that all of the single effects found statistically significant on the sorption of Th(IV). Probability F-values (F=4.64-14) and correlation coefficients (R(2)=0.99 for Th(IV)) indicate that model fit the experimental data well. The ability of this material to remove Th(IV) from aqueous solution was characterized by Langmuir, Freunlinch and Temkin adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity of thorium (IV) achieved 188.2mgg(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were determined and discussed. The batch adsorption condition with respect to interfering ions was tested. The results indicated that silicon dioxide nano-balls were suitable as sorbent material for adsorption and recovery of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions. PMID:27451112

  18. Adsorptive interaction of bisphenol A with mesoporous titanosilicate/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite materials: FT-IR and Raman analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Huy, Chinh; Kim, Nayoung; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Woo Shin, Eun

    2014-09-01

    Nanocomposite materials containing graphene oxide have attracted tremendous interest as catalysts and adsorbents for water purification. In this study, mesoporous titanosilicate/reduced graphene oxide composite materials with different Ti contents were employed as adsorbents for removing bisphenol A (BPA) from water systems. The adsorptive interaction between BPA and adsorption sites on the composite materials was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy. Adsorption capacities of BPA at equilibrium, q e (mg/g), decreased with increasing Ti contents, proportional to the surface area of the composite materials. FT-IR observations for fresh and spent adsorbents indicated that BPA adsorbed onto the composite materials by the electrostatic interaction between OH functional groups contained in BPA and on the adsorbents. The electrostatic adsorption sites on the adsorbents were categorized into three hydroxyl groups: Si-OH, Ti-OH, and graphene-OH. In Raman spectra, the intensity ratios of D to G band were decreased after the adsorption of BPA, implying adsorptive interaction of benzene rings of BPA with the sp2 hybrid structure of the reduced graphene oxide.