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Sample records for adsorption ratio sar

  1. The effect of zeolite treatment by acids on sodium adsorption ratio of coal seam gas water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Ozdemir, Orhan; Hampton, Marc A; Nguyen, Anh V; Do, Duong D

    2012-10-15

    Many coal seam gas (CSG) waters contain a sodium ion concentration which is too high relative to calcium and magnesium ions for environment acceptance. Natural zeolites can be used as a cheap and effective method to control sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, which is a measure of the relative preponderance of sodium to calcium and magnesium) due to its high cation exchange capacity. In this study, a natural zeolite from Queensland was examined for its potential to treat CSG water to remove sodium ions to lower SAR and reduce the pH value. The results demonstrate that acid activated zeolite at 30%wt solid ratio can reduce the sodium content from 563.0 to 182.7 ppm; the pH from 8.74 to 6.95; and SAR from 70.3 to 18.5. Based on the results of the batch experiments, the sodium adsorption capacity of the acid-treated zeolite is three times greater than that of the untreated zeolite. Both the untreated and acid-treated zeolite samples were characterized using zeta potential, surface characterization, DTA/TG and particle size distribution in order to explain their adsorption behaviours.

  2. Infiltration into cropped soils: effect of rain and sodium adsorption ratio-impacted irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Donald L; Wood, James D; Lesch, Scott M

    2008-01-01

    The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and salinity criteria for water suitability for irrigation have been developed for conditions where irrigation water is the only water source. It is not clear that these criteria are applicable to environments where there is a combination of rain and irrigation during the growing season. The interaction of rainfall with irrigation water is expected to result in increased sodicity hazard because of the low electrical conductivity of rain. In this study we examined the effects of irrigation waters of SAR 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mmol(1/2) L(-1/2) and electrical conductivities of 1 and 2 dS m(-1) on the infiltration rate of two soils with alternating cycles of rain (simulated with a rainfall sprinkler) and irrigation water, separated by drying cycles. The infiltration rate of surface samples from two soils, Kobase silty clay (fine, smectitic, frigid, Torrertic Haplustept) and Glendive very fine sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed superactive, calcareous, frigid Aridic Ustifluvent) were evaluated under alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cropped conditions for over 140 d and under full canopy cover. Reductions in infiltration were observed for both soils for SAR above 2, and the reductions became more severe with increasing SAR. Saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements taken from undisturbed cores at the end of the experiment were highly variable, suggesting that in situ infiltration measurements may be preferred when evaluating SAR effects.

  3. Effect of polymer adsorption on mobility ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, A.E.

    1983-03-01

    Several properties of two of the viscous polymer fluids used in rheological control were investigated. Polymer adsorption on the rock surfaces of porous sandstones and its effect on permeability of producing formation was studied. A naturally occurring polymer, a Guar gum, was found greatly to reduce the permeability of the producing formation, although the use of a breaker solution was found to restore the permeability lost through polymer plugging. Use of appropriate breaker solution was found to reduce the permeability loss to only one or two per cent of the original value. Adsorption of the synthetic polymer, acrylamide, was found to be directly related to the shaliness of the porous sand. Deactivation of polymer due to adsorption was found to be significant in formations having large surface areas. The results indicate that polymer loss eventually results in a water bank ahead of the polymer solution and thus greatly reduces the polymer's effectiveness in water-flooding.

  4. Measured and Estimated Sodium-Adsorption Ratios for Tongue River and its Tributaries, Montana and Wyoming, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, M.R.; Nimick, David A.; Cleasby, Thomas E.; Kinsey, Stacy M.; Lambing, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The Tongue River drains an area of about 5,400 square miles and flows northward from its headwaters in the Bighorn National Forest of northeastern Wyoming to join the Yellowstone River at Miles City, Montana. Water from the Tongue River and its tributaries is extensively used for irrigation in both Wyoming and Montana. The Tongue River watershed contains vast coal deposits that are extracted at several surface mines. In some areas of the watershed, the coal beds also contain methane gas (coal-bed methane or natural gas), which has become the focus of intense exploration and development. Production of coal-bed methane requires the pumping of large volumes of ground water from the coal beds to reduce water pressure within the formation and release the stored gas. Water from the coal beds typically is high in sodium and low in calcium and magnesium, resulting in a high sodium-adsorption ratio (SAR). Disposal of ground water with high sodium concentrations into the Tongue River has the potential to increase salinity and SAR of water in the river, and potentially reduce the quality of water for irrigation purposes. This report documents SAR values measured in water samples collected at 12 monitoring sites in the Tongue River watershed and presents regression relations between specific conductance (SC) and SAR at each site for the years 2004-06. SAR in water samples was determined from laboratory-measured concentrations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium. The results of regression analysis indicated that SC and SAR were significantly related (p-values < 0.05) at most sites. The regression relations developed for most monitoring sites in the Tongue River watershed were used with continuous SC data to estimate daily SAR during the 2004 and 2005 irrigation seasons and to estimate 2006 provisional SAR values, which were displayed on the Web in real-time. Water samples were collected and analyzed from seven sites on the main stem of the Tongue River located at: (1) Monarch

  5. SARS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... coronavirus (SARS-CoV). SARS was first reported in Asia in February 2003. Over the next few months, ... countries in North America, South America, Europe, and Asia before the SARS global outbreak of 2003 was ...

  6. The Effects of Salinity and Sodium Adsorption Ratio on the Water Retention and Hydraulic Conductivity Curves of Soils From The Pampa del Tamarugal, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, M. S.; Munoz, J.; Suarez, F. I.; Fierro, V.; Moreno, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Pampa del Tamarugal is located in the Atacama Desert, the most arid desert of the world. It has important reserves of groundwater, which are probably fed by infiltration coming from the Andes Mountain, with groundwater levels fluctuating between 3 and 10-70 m below the land surface. In zones where shallow groundwater exists, the capillary rise allows to have a permanently moist vadose zone, which sustain native vegetation such as the Tamarugos (Prosopis tamarugo Phil.) and Algarrobos (Prosopis alba Griseb.). The native vegetation relies on the soil moisture and on the evaporative fluxes, which are controlled by the hydrodynamic characteristics of the soils. The soils associated to the salt flats of the Pampa del Tamarugal are a mixture of sands and clays, which have high levels of sulfates, chloride, carbonates, sodium, calcium, magnesium, and potassium, with high pH and electrical conductivity, and low organic matter and cationic exchange capacity. In this research, we are interested in evaluating the impact of salinity and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) on the hydrodynamic characteristics of the soil, i.e., water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves. Soils were collected from the Pampa del Tamarugal and brought to the laboratory for characterization. The evaporation method (HYPROP, UMS) was used to determine the water retention curve and the hydraulic conductivity curve was estimated combining the evaporation method with direct measurements using a variable head permeameter (KSAT, UMS). It was found that higher sodium concentrations increase the water retention capacity and decrease the soiĺs hydraulic conductivity. These changes occur in the moist range of the hydrodynamic characteristics. The soil's hydraulic properties have significant impact on evaporation fluxes, which is the mayor component of the water balance. Thus, it is important to quantify them and incorporate salt precipitation/dissolution effect on the hydrodynamic properties to correctly

  7. Non-parametric estimation of the case fatality ratio with competing risks data: an application to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

    PubMed

    Jewell, Nicholas P; Lei, Xiudong; Ghani, Azra C; Donnelly, Christl A; Leung, Gabriel M; Ho, Lai-Ming; Cowling, Benjamin J; Hedley, Anthony J

    2007-04-30

    For diseases with some level of associated mortality, the case fatality ratio measures the proportion of diseased individuals who die from the disease. In principle, it is straightforward to estimate this quantity from individual follow-up data that provides times from onset to death or recovery. In particular, in a competing risks context, the case fatality ratio is defined by the limiting value of the sub-distribution function, F(1)(t) = Pr(T infinity, where T denotes the time from onset to death (J = 1) or recovery (J = 2). When censoring is present, however, estimation of F(1)(infinity) is complicated by the possibility of little information regarding the right tail of F(1), requiring use of estimators of F(1)(t(*)) or F(1)(t(*))/(F(1)(t(*))+F(2)(t(*))) where t(*) is large, with F(2)(t) = Pr(T SARS) in Hong Kong in 2003.

  8. Improved selective cholesterol adsorption by molecularly imprinted poly(methacrylic acid)/silica (PMAA-SiO₂) hybrid material synthesized with different molar ratios.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Débora Nobile; Pires, Igor Matheus Ruiz; Tarley, César Ricardo Teixeira

    2014-11-01

    The present paper describes the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer - poly(methacrylic acid)/silica and reports its performance feasibility with desired adsorption capacity and selectivity for cholesterol extraction. Two imprinted hybrid materials were synthesized at different methacrylic acid (MAA)/tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) molar ratios (6:1 and 1:5) and characterized by FT-IR, TGA, SEM and textural data. Cholesterol adsorption on hybrid materials took place preferably in apolar solvent medium, especially in chloroform. From the kinetic data, the equilibrium time was reached quickly, being 12 and 20 min for the polymers synthesized at MAA/TEOS molar ratio of 6:1 and 1:5, respectively. The pseudo-second-order model provided the best fit for cholesterol adsorption on polymers, confirming the chemical nature of the adsorption process, while the dual-site Langmuir-Freundlich equation presented the best fit to the experimental data, suggesting the existence of two kinds of adsorption sites on both polymers. The maximum adsorption capacities obtained for the polymers synthesized at MAA/TEOS molar ratios of 6:1 and 1:5 were found to be 214.8 and 166.4 mg g(-1), respectively. The results from isotherm data also indicated higher adsorption capacity for both imprinted polymers regarding to corresponding non-imprinted polymers. Nevertheless, taking into account the retention parameters and selectivity of cholesterol in the presence of structurally analogue compounds (5-α-cholestane and 7-dehydrocholesterol), it was observed that the polymer synthesized at the MAA/TEOS molar ratio of 6:1 was much more selective for cholesterol than the one prepared at the ratio of 1:5, thus suggesting that selective binding sites ascribed to the carboxyl group from MAA play a central role in the imprinting effect created on MIP.

  9. Biodegradation and adsorption of C1- and C2-phenanthrenes and C1- and C2-dibenzothiophenes in the presence of clay minerals: effect on forensic diagnostic ratios.

    PubMed

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Head, Ian M; Manning, David A C

    2014-07-01

    The impact of modified montmorillonites on adsorption and biodegradation of crude oil C1-phenanthrenes, C1-dibenzothiophenes, C2-phenanthrenes and C2-dibenzothiophenes was investigated in aqueous clay/oil microcosm experiments with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community. Consequently, the effect on C1-dibenzothiophenes/C1-phenanthrenes, C2-dibenzothiophenes/C2-phenanthrenes, 2+3-methyldibenzothiophene/4-methyldibenzothiophene and 1-methyldibenzothiophene/4-methyldibenzothiophene ratios commonly used as diagnostic ratios for oil forensic studies was evaluated. The clay mineral samples were treated to produce acid activated montmorillonite, organomontmorillonite and homoionic montmorillonite which were used in this study. The different clay minerals (modified and unmodified) showed varied degrees of biodegradation and adsorption of the C1-phenanthrenes, C1-dibenzothiophenes, C2-phenanthrenes and C2-dibenzothiophenes. The study indicated that as opposed to biodegradation, adsorption has no effect on the diagnostic ratios. Among the diagnostic ratios reviewed, only C2-dibenzothiophenes/C2-phenanthrenes ratio was neither affected by adsorption nor biodegradation making this ratio very useful in forensic studies of oil spills and oil-oil correlation.

  10. Outstanding adsorption performance of high aspect ratio and super-hydrophobic carbon nanotubes for oil removal.

    PubMed

    Kayvani Fard, Ahmad; Mckay, Gordon; Manawi, Yehia; Malaibari, Zuhair; Hussien, Muataz A

    2016-12-01

    Oil removal from water is a highly important area due to the large production rate of emulsified oil in water, which is considered one of the major pollutants, having a negative effect on human health, environment and wildlife. In this study, we have reported the application of high quality carbon nanotube bundles produced by an injected vertical chemical vapor deposition (IV-CVD) reactor for oil removal. High quality, bundles, super hydrophobic, and high aspect ratio carbon nanotubes were produced. The average diameters of the produced CNTs ranged from 20 to 50 nm while their lengths ranged from 300 to 500 μm. Two types of CNTs namely, P-CNTs and C-CNTs, (Produced CNTs from the IV-CVD reactor and commercial CNTs) were used for oil removal from water. For the first time, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was conducted to measure maximum oil uptake using CNT and it was found that P-CNT can take oil up to 17 times their weight. The effect of adsorbent dosage, contact time, and agitation speed were examined on the oil spill clean-up efficiency using batch sorption experiments. Higher efficiency with almost 97% removal was achieved using P-CNTs compared to 87% removal using C-CNTs.

  11. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  12. Water-quality characteristics, including sodium-adsorption ratios, for four sites in the Powder River drainage basin, Wyoming and Montana, water years 2001-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Melanie L.; Mason, Jon P.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, monitors streams throughout the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming and parts of Montana for potential effects of coalbed natural gas development. Specific conductance and sodium-adsorption ratios may be larger in coalbed waters than in stream waters that may receive the discharge waters. Therefore, continuous water-quality instruments for specific conductance were installed and discrete water-quality samples were collected to characterize water quality during water years 2001-2004 at four sites in the Powder River drainage basin: Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming; Crazy Woman Creek near Arvada, Wyoming; Clear Creek near Arvada, Wyoming; and Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. During water years 2001-2004, the median specific conductance of 2,270 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius (?S/cm) in discrete samples from the Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming, was larger than the median specific conductance of 1,930 ?S/cm in discrete samples collected downstream from the Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. The median specific conductance was smallest in discrete samples from Clear Creek (1,180 ?S/cm), which has a dilution effect on the specific conductance for the Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. The daily mean specific conductance from continuous water-quality instruments during the irrigation season showed the same spatial pattern as specific conductance values for the discrete samples. Dissolved sodium, sodium-adsorption ratios, and dissolved solids generally showed the same spatial pattern as specific conductance. The largest median sodium concentration (274 milligrams per liter) and the largest range of sodium-adsorption ratios (3.7 to 21) were measured in discrete samples from the Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming. Median concentrations of sodium and sodium-adsorption ratios were substantially smaller in Crazy Woman Creek and Clear Creek, which tend to

  13. Modelling soil sodium and potassium adsorption ratio (SPAR) in the immediate period after a grassland fire in Lithuania.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerda, Artemi; Misiūnė, Ieva

    2015-04-01

    The soil sodium and potassium adsorption ratio (SPAR) is an index that measures the amount of sodium and potassium adsorbed onto clay and organic matter surfaces, in relation to calcium and magnesium. Assess the potential of soil dispersion or flocculation, a process which has implication in soil hydraulic properties and erosion (Sarah, 2004). Depending on severity and the type of ash produced, fire can changes in the immediate period the soil nutrient status (Bodi et al. 2014). Ash releases onto soil surface a large amount of cations, due the high pH. Previous works showed that SPAR from ash slurries is higher than solutions produced from litter (Pereira et al., 2014a). Normally the spatial distribution of topsoil nutrients in the immediate period after the fire is very heterogeneous, due to the different impacts of fire. Thus it is important to identify the most accurate interpolation method in order to identify with better precision the impacts of fire on soil properties. The objective of this work is to test several interpolation methods. The study area is located in near Vilnius (Lithuania) at 54° 42' N, 25° 08 E, 158 masl. Four days after the fire it was designed a plot in a burned area with near Vilnius (Lithuania) at 54° 42' N, 25° 08 E, 158 masl. Twenty five samples were collected from the topsoil. The SPAR index was calculated according to the formula: (Na++K+)/(Ca2++Mg2+)1/2 (Sarah, 2004). Data followed the normal distribution, thus no transformation was required previous to data modelling. Several well know interpolation models were tested, as Inverse Distance to a Weight (IDW) with the power of 1, 2, 3 and 4, Radial Basis Functions (RBF), Inverse Multiquadratic (IMT), Multilog (MTG), Multiquadratic (MTQ), Natural Cubic Spline (NCS) and Thin Plate Spline (TPS) and Local Polynomial (LP) with the power of 1 and 2 and Ordinary Kriging. The best interpolator was the one which had the lowest Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) (Pereira et al., 2014b). The

  14. Coating morphology and surface composition of acrylic terpolymers with pendant catechol, OEG and perfluoroalkyl groups in varying ratio and the effect on protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Ji, Hua; Duan, Jiang; Tu, Haiyang; Zhang, Aidong

    2016-04-01

    This work aims at developing versatile low-biofouling polymeric coatings by using acrylic terpolymers (DOFs) that bear pendant catechol (D), oligo(ethylene glycol) (O), and perfluoroalkyl (F) groups in varying ratios. The polymers were endowed with the ability to form firmly coatings on virtually any surfaces and undergo surface microphase separation and self-assembly, as revealed by the surface enrichment of F pendants and the morphology variation from irregular solid domains to discrete crater-type aggregates of different size. The effect on protein adsorption was investigated using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and adhesive fibrinogen (Fib) as model proteins. The coating of DOF164 (low F content), which has morphology of discrete crater-type aggregates of ∼ 400 nm in size, adsorbed a least amount of protein but with a highest protein unit activity as determined by SPR and immunosorbent assay; whereas the coating of DOF1612 (high F content) showed a 12.3-fold higher adsorption capacity toward Fib. Interestingly, a 2.2-fold lower adsorption amount but with a 1.8-fold higher unit activity was found for Fib adsorbed on the DOF164 surface than on DOF250 (without F fraction), whose OEG segments being a widely recognized protein compatible material. The features of the DOF164 terpolymer presenting a robust coating ability and a minimal protein adsorption capacity while with a high protein unit activity suggest its potential application as a non-fouling surface-modifier for medical antifouling coatings and as a matrix material for selective protein immobilization and activity preservation in biosensor construction.

  15. SAR based adaptive GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Guo, Bin; Xu, Luzhou; Li, Jian

    2010-04-01

    We consider ground moving target indication (GMTI) and target velocity estimation based on multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Via forming velocity versus cross-range images, we show that small moving targets can be detected even in the presence of strong stationary ground clutter. Moreover, the velocities of the moving targets can be estimated, and the misplaced moving targets can be placed back to their original locations based on the estimated velocities. Adaptive beamforming techniques, including Capon and generalizedlikelihood ratio test (GLRT), are used to form velocity versus cross-range images for each range bin of interest. The velocity estimation ambiguities caused by the multi-channel array geometry are analyzed. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of our approaches using the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) publicly-released Gotcha SAR based GMTI data set.

  16. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Yue, Jianping; Wang, Xueqin; Yue, Shun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR) research and application. PMID:26871446

  17. Effects of Averaging Mass on Predicted Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) Values

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    lung, liver , muscle, cerebral spinal fluid, nerve spinal, heart) in relation to various frequencies and orientations. This parametric study...relatively low ratios between spatial peak SAR and whole body SAR average were found in heart, liver , lung outer and lung inner (between 3 and 7) (see...MASS ON PREDICTED SAR 38 Figure 19. Ratios between peak localized SAR and whole body SAR average for liver for various mass intervals (1g and 10 g

  18. Terrain Measurement with SAR/InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deren; Liao, Mingsheng; Balz, Timo; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Tianliang

    2016-08-01

    Terrain measurement and surface motion estimation are the most important applications for commercial and scientific SAR missions. In Dragon-3, we worked on these applications, especially regarding DEM generation, surface motion estimation with SAR time- series for urban subsidence monitoring and landslide motion estimation, as well as developing tomographic SAR processing methods in urban areas.

  19. Effect of Fe(II)/Ce(III) dosage ratio on the structure and anion adsorptive removal of hydrothermally precipitated composites: Insights from EXAFS/XANES, XRD and FTIR.

    PubMed

    Chubar, Natalia; Gerda, Vasyl; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Yablokova, Ganna

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present material chemistry in the hydrothermal synthesis of new complex structure materials based on various dosage ratios of Fe and Ce (1:0, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 0:1), characterize them by the relevant methods that allow characterization of both crystalline and amorphous phases and correlate their structure/surface properties with the adsorptive performance of the five toxic anions. The applied synthesis conditions resulted in the formation of different compounds of Fe and Ce components. The Fe-component was dominated by various phases of Fe hydrous oxides, whereas the Ce-component was composed of various phases of Ce carbonates. The presence of two metal salts in raw materials resulted in the formation of a mesoporous structure and averaged the surface area compared to one metal-based material. The surface of all Fe-Ce composites was abundant in Fe component phases. Two-metal systems showed stronger anion removal performance than one-metal materials. The best adsorption was demonstrated by Fe-Ce based materials that had low crystallinity, that were rich in phases and that exhibited surfaces were abundant in greater number of surface functional groups. Notably, Fe extended fine structures simulated by EXAFS in these better adsorbents were rich from oscillations from both heavy and light atoms. This work provides new insights on the structure of composite inorganic materials useful to develop their applications in adsorption and catalysis. It also presents new inorganic anion exchangers with very high removal potential to fluoride and arsenate.

  20. Polarization Filtering of SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of polarization filtering of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) returns provide hybrid method applied to either (1) maximize signal-to-noise ratio of return from given target or (2) enhance contrast between targets of two different types (that have different polarization properties). Method valid for both point and extended targets and for both monostatic and bistatic radars as well as SAR. Polarization information in return signals provides more complete description of radar-scattering properties of targets and used to obtain additional information about targets for use in classifying them, discriminating between them, or enhancing features of radar images.

  1. SAR transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-06-01

    In the follow-on of the ESA contract 4122/79 it was intended to demonstrate on breadboard the feasibility of a modular EPC supplied by a multibus for a KLYSTRON power transmitter. The aim of this final report is to give details on the design and on test results of the electronics required to drive a KLYSTRON for a SAR system. The concept utilized for the DC/DC conversion is a Series Resonant type (SCHWARZ Converter). An elegant Breadboard of 2 Modules (over 4 required for the complete EPC) has been realized and the tests have demonstrated the envisaged feasibility of an active redundancy with modular EPC both for output voltage generation and for output power. Also the concept of the multibus has been implemented (2 bus over 4) and verified in the EPC breadboard.

  2. Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) supported by natural and acid-activated sepiolites: the effect of the nZVI/support ratio on the composite properties and Cd(2+) adsorption.

    PubMed

    Habish, Amal Juma; Lazarević, Slavica; Janković-Častvan, Ivona; Jokić, Bojan; Kovač, Janez; Rogan, Jelena; Janaćković, Đorđe; Petrović, Rada

    2017-01-01

    Natural (SEP) and partially acid-activated (AAS) sepiolites were used to prepare composites with nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) at different (SEP or AAS)/nZVI ratios in order to achieve the best nZVI dispersibility and the highest adsorption capacity for Cd(2+). Despite the higher surface area and pore volume of AAS, better nZVI dispersibility was achieved by using SEP as the support. On the other hand, a lower oxidation degree was achieved during the synthesis using AAS. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the composite with the best nZVI dispersibility, before and after Cd(2+) adsorption, confirmed that the surface of the nZVI was composed of oxidized iron species. Metallic iron was not present on the surface, but it was detected in the subsurface region after sputtering. The content of zerovalent iron decreased after Cd(2+) adsorption as a result of iron oxidation during Cd(2+) adsorption. The XPS depth profile showed that cadmium was present not only at the surface of the composite but also in the subsurface region. The adsorption isotherms for Cd(2+) confirmed that the presence of SEP and AAS decreased the agglomeration of the nZVI particles in comparison to the pure nZVI, which provided a higher adsorption capacity. The results showed that the prevention of both aggregation and oxidation during the synthesis was necessary for obtaining an SEP/AAS-nZVI composite with a high adsorption capacity, but oxidation during adsorption was beneficial for Cd(2+) removal. The formation of strong bonds between Cd(2+) and the adsorbents sites of different energy until monolayer formation was proposed according to modeling of the adsorption isotherms.

  3. Effects of Zeolite Structure and Si/Al Ratio on Adsorption Thermodynamics and Intrinsic Kinetics of Monomolecular Cracking and Dehydrogenation of Alkanes over Bronsted Acid Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janda, Amber Leigh

    butene products. Theoretical calculations suggest that this effect originates from the adsorption of isobutene at channel intersections, indicating that dehydrogenation occurs with stronger preference for these locations than does cracking. In order to analyze the effects of zeolite structure on monomolecular alkane activation reactions, it is necessary to separate the contributions of the adsorption and reaction steps to observed kinetics. A method is developed in Chapter 3 for obtaining the enthalpy and entropy changes for adsorption of n-alkanes from the gas phase onto Bronsted protons (DeltaH ads·H+ and DeltaSads·H+) using configurational-bias Monte Carlo (CBMC) simulations. In Chapter 4 the effects of zeolite structural confinement on n-butane cracking and dehydrogenation are characterized for zeolites that differ predominately in the size and abundance of cavities. Values of DeltaHads·H+ and DeltaSads·H+ are obtained from CBMC simulations and used to extract intrinsic rates and activation parameters. As DeltaS ads·H+ (a proxy for confinement) becomes more negative, DeltaH ‡int and DeltaS‡int decrease for terminal cracking and dehydrogenation when the channel topology (e.g., straight, sinusoidal) is fixed. This observation, as well as positive values for DeltaS‡int, indicate that the transition states for these reactions resemble the products. Finally, in Chapter 5 the influence of channel and cage topology on n-alkane adsorption are characterized for zeolites and zeotypes with one-dimensional pore systems. When cages are not present, DeltaHads·H+ and DeltaSads·H+ at fixed pore-limiting diameter (PLD; the diameter of the largest sphere that can traverse the pores) decrease in magnitude as the ratio of the smallest to largest channel diameter decreases and the pore become less circular. The higher entropy of alkanes in non-circular pores is attributed to greater freedom of movement and can cause the free energy to be lower in these environments relative

  4. STAP for SAR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP014042 TITLE: STAP for SAR DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release...compilation report: ADP014040 thru ADP014047 UNCLASSIFIED 3-1 STAP for SAR A. Farina Technical Directorate, Radar & Technology Division Alenia...Adaptive Processing) to Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) systems. SAR is a microwave sensor that allows us to have a high resolution mapping of

  5. SAR Ambiguity Study for the Cassini Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Im, Eastwood; Johnson, William T. K.

    1993-01-01

    The Cassini Radar's synthetic aperture radar (SAR) ambiguity analysis is unique with respect to other spaceborne SAR ambiguity analyses owing to the non-orbiting spacecraft trajectory, asymmetric antenna pattern, and burst mode of data collection. By properly varying the pointing, burst mode timing, and radar parameters along the trajectory this study shows that the signal-to-ambiguity ratio of better than 15 dB can be achieved for all images obtained by the Cassini Radar.

  6. Low-temperature adsorption/storage of hydrogen on FAU, MFI, and MOR zeolites with various Si/Al ratios: effect of electrostatic fields and pore structures.

    PubMed

    Jhung, Sung Hwa; Yoon, Ji Woong; Lee, Ji Sun; Chang, Jong-San

    2007-01-01

    Several zeolites, such as faujasite, mordenite, and ZSM-5, with various aluminum contents have been used to analyze the effect of aluminum or cation concentration (strength of electrostatic field) on hydrogen adsorption at low temperature. Irrespective of the zeolite structure, the adsorption capacity, isosteric heat of adsorption (-DeltaHads), surface coverage, and micropore occupancy increase with increasing aluminum content of a zeolite. Zeolites with a higher amount of aluminum favorably adsorb hydrogen at relatively low pressures. For zeolites with similar aluminum contents, the adsorption capacity, isosteric heat of adsorption, surface coverage, and micropore occupancy are in the order of mordenite>ZSM-5>faujasite, probably due to differing pore sizes and the presence or absence of pore intersections. This work demonstrates that zeolites with strong electrostatic fields and narrow pores without intersections are beneficial for high hydrogen uptake.

  7. SAR change detection MTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Steven; Lemanski, Christopher; Nichols, Howard; Owirka, Gregory; Minardi, Michael; Hale, Todd

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines the theory, application, and results of using single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data with Moving Reference Processing (MRP) to focus and geolocate moving targets. Moving targets within a standard SAR imaging scene are defocused, displaced, or completely missing in the final image. Building on previous research at AFRL, the SAR-MRP method focuses and geolocates moving targets by reprocessing the SAR data to focus the movers rather than the stationary clutter. SAR change detection is used so that target detection and focusing is performed more robustly. In the cases where moving target returns possess the same range versus slow-time histories, a geolocation ambiguity results. This ambiguity can be resolved in a number of ways. This paper concludes by applying the SAR-MRP method to high-frequency radar measurements from persistent continuous-dwell SAR observations of a moving target.

  8. Enhanced SAR Data Compressor for Sentinel-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algra, T.; Bierens, L.

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents a new on-board SAR data compressor which outperforms the conventionally used Block Adaptive Quantization (BAQ) compressor. The system applies improved entropy-constrained block adaptive quantization of raw Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data in the frequency domain. For advanced multi-mode satellite SAR instruments, such as the one to be implemented on-board of Sentinel- , the average compression ratio can be doubled as compared to BAQ. Space borne implementation with a high-speed data throughput is feasible due to the advent of advanced space FPGA's and ASIC's including the powerFFT, a fast FFT-oriented DSP. The complete compressor module can be implemented on a 6U Eurocard that fits in the SAR Electronics System crate of Sentinel-1.

  9. A fast, programmable hardware architecture for spaceborne SAR processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. R.; Cumming, I. G.; Lim, J.; Wedding, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The launch of spaceborne SARs during the 1980's is discussed. The satellite SARs require high quality and high throughput ground processors. Compression ratios in range and azimuth of greater than 500 and 150 respectively lead to frequency domain processing and data computation rates in excess of 2000 million real operations per second for C-band SARs under consideration. Various hardware architectures are examined and two promising candidates and proceeds to recommend a fast, programmable hardware architecture for spaceborne SAR processing are selected. Modularity and programmability are introduced as desirable attributes for the purpose of HTSP hardware selection.

  10. SAR Interferometry with TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eineder, M.; Runge, H.; Boerner, E.; Bamler, R.; Adam, N.; Schättler, B.; Breit, H.; Suchandt, S.

    2004-06-01

    The TerraSAR-X project is a public private partnership between Astrium GmbH and the German Aerospace Center DLR. Astrium will launch the satellite in late 2005 and holds the rights of commercial data exploitation. DLR is currently developing the ground segment and is responsible for the scientific exploitation of the data. Even if the mission goal is not primarily SAR interferometry, TerraSAR-X offers a number of new perspectives to SAR interferometry when compared to ERS and also ENVISAT: a) High resolution of 3 meters and better in stripmap and spotlight mode. b) The option for a burst synchronized ScanSAR mode. c) The high range bandwidth will allow large baselines and the option for highly precise DEM generation. d) X- Band will show new scattering properties. e) High observation frequency due to the short repeat cycle and variable incidence angles. f) An along track interferometric mode. The available products relevant for interferometry are presented and other relevant topics like orbit control and delta-k interferometry are discussed.

  11. Laboratory diagnosis of SARS.

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, A; Heinen, P; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Gray, J; Appleton, H; Zambon, M C

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of new viral infections of man requires the development of robust diagnostic tests that can be applied in the differential diagnosis of acute illness, or to determine past exposure, so as to establish the true burden of disease. Since the recognition in April 2003 of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as the causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), enormous efforts have been applied to develop molecular and serological tests for SARS which can assist rapid detection of cases, accurate diagnosis of illness and the application of control measures. International progress in the laboratory diagnosis of SARS-CoV infection during acute illness has led to internationally agreed World Health Organization criteria for the confirmation of SARS. Developments in the dissection of the human immune response to SARS indicate that serological tests on convalescent sera are essential to confirm SARS infection, given the sub-optimal predictive value of molecular detection tests performed during acute SARS illness. PMID:15306394

  12. Marine Targets Detection in Pol-SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Yang, Jingsong

    2016-08-01

    In this poster, we present a new method of marine target detection in Pol-SAR data. One band SAR image, like HH, VV or VH, can be used to find marine target using a Contant False Alarm Ratio (CFAR) algorithm. But some false detection may happen, as the sidelobe of antenna, Azimuth ambiguity, strong speckle noise and so on in the single band SAR image. Pol-SAR image can get more information of targets. After decomposition and false color composite, the sidelobe of antenna and Azimuth ambiguity could be deleted. So, the method presented include three steps, decomposion, false color composite and supervised classification. The result of Radarsat-2 SAR image test indicates a good accuracy. The detection results are compared with Automatic Indentify Sistem (AIS) data, the accuracy of right detection is above 95% and false detection ratio is below 5%.

  13. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  14. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  15. Flood Mapping Using InSAR Coherence Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmi, S.; Ben Abdallah, W.; Abdelfatteh, R.

    2014-09-01

    Classic approaches for the detection of flooded areas are based on a static analysis of optical images and/or SAR data during and after the event. In this paper, we aim to extract the flooded zones by using the SAR image coupled with the InSAR coherence. A new formulation of the ratio approach for flood detection is given considering InSAR coherence. Our contribution is to take advantage from the coherence map provided using the InSAR pairs (one before and one after the event) to enhance the detection of flooded areas. We explore the fact that the coherence values during and after the flood are mainly differents on the flooded zones and we give a more suitable flood decision rule using this assumption. The proposed approach is tested and validated in the case of the flood taken place in 2005 in the region of Kef in Tunisia.

  16. A stable auroral red (SAR) arc with multiple emission features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Michael; Finan, Robert; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Wroten, Joei; Martinis, Carlos; Casillas, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    Stable auroral red (SAR) arcs offer subvisible evidence for storm time linkages between the inner magnetosphere and the midlatitude ionosphere. A SAR arc's defining characteristics are horizon-to-horizon east-west extent, a few degrees of latitude in meridional extent, emission only at the oxygen 6300Å line, and minimal brightness changes during a night—effects readily provided by steady heat conduction from the ring current-plasmapause interaction region. Here we describe a typical SAR arc (brightness 300 rayleighs) with several superimposed patches of emission in two oxygen lines (with a 6300Å/5577Å ratio of 40). We find no evidence for highly localized heating effects but rather evidence from GPS satellites supporting low-energy electron precipitation as the SAR arc modulating mechanism. Seven brightness peaks with average longitude spacing of 4° define a new spatial pattern for SAR arc studies.

  17. Quad-Polarimetric SAR for Detection and Characterization of Icebergs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, V.; Brekke, C.; Doulgeris, A. P.; Storvold, R.; Silvertsen, A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of fully polarimetric SAR data in iceberg detection and characterization. The study aims to explore the potential of RADARSAT- 2 SAR data to detect icebergs and growlers in Svalbard that have broken off from the glaciers nearby. To be able to detect iceberg/growlers in a SAR image, a significant contrast between iceberg and background clutter is required. The sublook cross-correlation magnitude (SCM) is extracted from the complex cross-correlation between subapeture images and contrast between iceberg and sea clutter is measured. The results of target-to-clutter ratio from the SCM indicate that the sublook analysis has an impact on detection performance.

  18. A New SAR Image Segmentation Algorithm for the Detection of Target and Shadow Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shiqi; Huang, Wenzhun; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-01

    The most distinctive characteristic of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is that it can acquire data under all weather conditions and at all times. However, its coherent imaging mechanism introduces a great deal of speckle noise into SAR images, which makes the segmentation of target and shadow regions in SAR images very difficult. This paper proposes a new SAR image segmentation method based on wavelet decomposition and a constant false alarm rate (WD-CFAR). The WD-CFAR algorithm not only is insensitive to the speckle noise in SAR images but also can segment target and shadow regions simultaneously, and it is also able to effectively segment SAR images with a low signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). Experiments were performed to assess the performance of the new algorithm on various SAR images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and feasible and possesses good characteristics for general application.

  19. A New SAR Image Segmentation Algorithm for the Detection of Target and Shadow Regions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiqi; Huang, Wenzhun; Zhang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    The most distinctive characteristic of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is that it can acquire data under all weather conditions and at all times. However, its coherent imaging mechanism introduces a great deal of speckle noise into SAR images, which makes the segmentation of target and shadow regions in SAR images very difficult. This paper proposes a new SAR image segmentation method based on wavelet decomposition and a constant false alarm rate (WD-CFAR). The WD-CFAR algorithm not only is insensitive to the speckle noise in SAR images but also can segment target and shadow regions simultaneously, and it is also able to effectively segment SAR images with a low signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). Experiments were performed to assess the performance of the new algorithm on various SAR images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and feasible and possesses good characteristics for general application. PMID:27924935

  20. A New SAR Image Segmentation Algorithm for the Detection of Target and Shadow Regions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shiqi; Huang, Wenzhun; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-07

    The most distinctive characteristic of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is that it can acquire data under all weather conditions and at all times. However, its coherent imaging mechanism introduces a great deal of speckle noise into SAR images, which makes the segmentation of target and shadow regions in SAR images very difficult. This paper proposes a new SAR image segmentation method based on wavelet decomposition and a constant false alarm rate (WD-CFAR). The WD-CFAR algorithm not only is insensitive to the speckle noise in SAR images but also can segment target and shadow regions simultaneously, and it is also able to effectively segment SAR images with a low signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). Experiments were performed to assess the performance of the new algorithm on various SAR images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and feasible and possesses good characteristics for general application.

  1. SARS and Common Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Jill K.; Mark, Jennifer; Gavali, Shilpa S.; Yagi, Shigeo; Espinosa, Alex; Schnurr, David P.; Cossen, Cynthia K.; Isaacson, Erin R.; Glaser, Carol A.; Fischer, Marc; Reingold, Arthur L.; Vugia, Duc J.

    2004-01-01

    In California, molecular testing was useful in decreasing suspicion for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), by detecting common respiratory pathogens (influenza A/B, human metapneumovirus, picornavirus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia spp., parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in 23 (45%) of 51 patients with suspected SARS and 9 (47%) of 19 patients with probable SARS. PMID:15207072

  2. SARS: just another viral acronym?

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, L

    2003-08-01

    Recent observations and experimental evidence have purported that a virus causes SARS, but such viruses have been isolated in only less than half of SARS patients in some studies and virologist Vincent Plummer of Winnipeg's National Microbiology Laboratory found that indeed 1 in 5 perfectly healthy Canadians with a history of recent travel to Asia had the virus. Therefore SARS microbiologic origins remain unclear. Outbreaks of multi-drug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis and the atypical mycobacteria simulate SARS on clinical, radiologic, epidemiologic, and diagnostic laboratory grounds and it is only logical then to include them in the differential to find a definitive cause and cure for SARS.

  3. Simple SAR demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof; Misiurewicz, Jacek; Baranowski, Piotr; Wojdołowicz, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple SAR radar demonstrator build using commercially available (COTS) components. For the microwave analog front end, a standard police radar microwave head has been used. The Motorola DSP processor board, equipped with ADC and DAC, has been used for generating of modulating signal and for signal acquisition. The raw radar signal (I and Q components) have been recorded on 2.5" HDD. The signal processing has been performed on standard PC computer after copying the recorded data. The aim of constructing simple and relatively cheap demonstrator was to provide the students the real-life unclassified radar signals and motivate them to test and develop various kinds of SAR and ISAR algorithms, including image formation, motion compensation and autofocusing. The simple microwave frontend hardware has a lot of non-idealities, so for obtaining nice SAR image it was necessary to develop the number of correction algorithms at the calibration stage. The SAR demonstrator have been tested using car as a moving platform. The flight tests with a small airborne platform are planned for the summer.

  4. Recursive SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Randolph L.; Ash, Joshua N.

    2008-04-01

    We investigate a recursive procedure for synthetic aperture imaging. We consider a concept in which a SAR system persistently interrogates a scene, for example as it flies along or around that scene. In traditional SAR imaging, the radar measurements are processed in blocks, by partitioning the data into a set of non-overlapping or overlapping azimuth angles, then processing each block. We consider a recursive update approach, in which the SAR image is continually updated, as a linear combination of a small number of previous images and a term containing the current radar measurement. We investigate the crossrange sidelobes realized by such an imaging approach. We show that a first-order autoregression of the image gives crossrange sidelobes similar to a rectangular azimuth window, while a third-order autoregression gives sidelobes comparable to those obtained from widely-used windows in block-processing image formation. The computational and memory requirements of the recursive imaging approach are modest - on the order of M • N2 where M is the recursion order (typically <= 3) and N2 is the image size. We compare images obtained from the recursive and block processing techniques, both for a synthetic scene and for X-band SAR measurements from the Gotcha data set.

  5. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Doren, Neall E.; Bacon, Terry A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Jakowatz, Charles V,; Delaplain, Gilbert G.; Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.; White, Kyle R.

    2014-10-01

    Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

  6. SARS in Hospital Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yee-Chun; Huang, Li-Min; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Su, Chan-Ping; Chang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Mei-Ling; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chen, Wen-Jone; Lin, Fang-Yue; Lee, Yuan-Teh

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred after exposure in the emergency room at the National Taiwan University Hospital. The index patient was linked to an outbreak at a nearby municipal hospital. Three clusters were identified over a 3-week period. The first cluster (5 patients) and the second cluster (14 patients) occurred among patients, family members, and nursing aids. The third cluster (12 patients) occurred exclusively among healthcare workers. Six healthcare workers had close contact with SARS patients. Six others, with different working patterns, indicated that they did not have contact with a SARS patient. Environmental surveys found 9 of 119 samples of inanimate objects to be positive for SARS coronavirus RNA. These observations indicate that although transmission by direct contact with known SARS patients was responsible for most cases, environmental contamination with the SARS coronavirus may have lead to infection among healthcare workers without documented contact with known hospitalized SARS patients. PMID:15200809

  7. A Time Domain Along-Track SAR Interferometry Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, N.; Lee, H.; Jung, H. C.

    2015-12-01

    Differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR) has already been proven to be a useful technique for measuring ground displacement at millimeter level. One major drawback of traditional DInSAR technique is that only 1-D deformation in slant range direction can be detected. In order to obtain along-track displacement using a single InSAR pair, two major attempts have been made. The first one is based on cross-correlation between two SAR amplitude images. The second attempt is based on split-beam processing to generate two SAR images from forward- and backward-looking beams. Comparing with the former method, this multiple-aperture SAR interferometry (MAI) can achieve much better measurement accuracy. The major drawback of the MAI method is degraded signal to noise ratio (SNR) and along-track resolution since total along-track integration time decreases in the split-beam procedure. In order to improve the SNR and along-track resolution as well as to extract the terrain displacement in the along-track direction, a time domain along-track SAR interferometry method is proposed in this study. Using traditional time domain backprojection method, the phase component corresponding to slant range direction offset can be estimated and removed from the range compressed SAR signal. Then a phase estimation procedure is implemented to obtain the phase component in the along-track direction. Using ALOS PALSAR data over Kilauea Volcano area in Hawai'i, our experimental results demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed method in extracting 2-D terrain deformation map from one pair of SAR images.

  8. A comparative study of SAR data compression schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert-Nebout, C.; Besson, O.; Massonnet, D.; Rogron, B.

    1994-01-01

    The amount of data collected from spaceborne remote sensing has substantially increased in the last years. During same time period, the ability to store or transmit data has not increased as quickly. At this time, there is a growing interest in developing compression schemes that could provide both higher compression ratios and lower encoding/decoding errors. In the case of the spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) earth observation system developed by the French Space Agency (CNES), the volume of data to be processed will exceed both the on-board storage capacities and the telecommunication link. The objective of this paper is twofold: to present various compression schemes adapted to SAR data; and to define a set of evaluation criteria and compare the algorithms on SAR data. In this paper, we review two classical methods of SAR data compression and propose novel approaches based on Fourier Transforms and spectrum coding.

  9. Analysis of Multipath Pixels in SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Wu, J. C.; Ding, X. L.; Zhang, L.; Hu, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    As the received radar signal is the sum of signal contributions overlaid in one single pixel regardless of the travel path, the multipath effect should be seriously tackled as the multiple bounce returns are added to direct scatter echoes which leads to ghost scatters. Most of the existing solution towards the multipath is to recover the signal propagation path. To facilitate the signal propagation simulation process, plenty of aspects such as sensor parameters, the geometry of the objects (shape, location, orientation, mutual position between adjacent buildings) and the physical parameters of the surface (roughness, correlation length, permittivity)which determine the strength of radar signal backscattered to the SAR sensor should be given in previous. However, it's not practical to obtain the highly detailed object model in unfamiliar area by field survey as it's a laborious work and time-consuming. In this paper, SAR imaging simulation based on RaySAR is conducted at first aiming at basic understanding of multipath effects and for further comparison. Besides of the pre-imaging simulation, the product of the after-imaging, which refers to radar images is also taken into consideration. Both Cosmo-SkyMed ascending and descending SAR images of Lupu Bridge in Shanghai are used for the experiment. As a result, the reflectivity map and signal distribution map of different bounce level are simulated and validated by 3D real model. The statistic indexes such as the phase stability, mean amplitude, amplitude dispersion, coherence and mean-sigma ratio in case of layover are analyzed with combination of the RaySAR output.

  10. Very High Resolution SAR and Multichannel SAR/MTI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    single channel SAR system: • Detection outside the clutter bandwidth • Chirp slope analysis • Chirp filter bank • MTI via multilook images (change...53343 Wachtberg, Germany berens@fgan.de ABSTRACT SAR is widely used today in earth observation and is a potential means for military surveillance...However, systems only operating in the basic SAR mode will be superseded by new developments which fulfil much more user demands. Highest resolution

  11. Circular SAR GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Douglas; Owirka, Gregory; Nichols, Howard; Scarborough, Steven

    2014-06-01

    We describe techniques for improving ground moving target indication (GMTI) performance in multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. Our approach employs a combination of moving reference processing (MRP) to compensate for defocus of moving target SAR responses and space-time adaptive processing (STAP) to mitigate the effects of strong clutter interference. Using simulated moving target and clutter returns, we demonstrate focusing of the target return using MRP, and discuss the effect of MRP on the clutter response. We also describe formation of adaptive degrees of freedom (DOFs) for STAP filtering of MRP processed data. For the simulated moving target in clutter example, we demonstrate improvement in the signal to interference plus noise (SINR) loss compared to more standard algorithm configurations. In addition to MRP and STAP, the use of tracker feedback, false alarm mitigation, and parameter estimation techniques are also described. A change detection approach for reducing false alarms from clutter discretes is outlined, and processing of a measured data coherent processing interval (CPI) from a continuously orbiting platform is described. The results demonstrate detection and geolocation of a high-value target under track. The endoclutter target is not clearly visible in single-channel SAR chips centered on the GMTI track prediction. Detections are compared to truth data before and after geolocation using measured angle of arrival (AOA).

  12. Mixed jamming method for SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-feng; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Yong-sheng

    2007-11-01

    The mixed jamming method of synthetic aperture radar is analyzed and discussed. The methods of active noise and deception jamming and the signal model of transmitting is described. The raw echo signal of SAR and the model of jammed echo signal are expatiated, the characteristic of SAR and the evaluating method of jamming effect are established. Finally, the mixed jamming imaging of SAR is simulated.

  13. Wetland InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  14. SAR Educational Resources From ASF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gens, R.

    2006-12-01

    In parallel with developing software tools specifically for SAR data, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) has a long history of supporting users in the use of the tools and the data. Over the years a number of educational resources have been developed as well. ASF distributes a number of educational CDs (Glacier Power, Dynamic Planet, and Ends of the Earth) that cover a wide range of imagery and applications. In addition, an extensive and frequently updated SAR bibliograpy is made available to users through the ASF website. Summer courses in SAR/InSAR and its applications are offered for credit and are being well received by the user community. The summer courses allow users to get a complete overview about SAR and InSAR as well as all the relevant techniques within an intense two week time frame. In order to explain the various processing steps in a Range-Doppler SAR Processor in detail the SAR Training Processor (STP) has been developed. This enhanced debugging mode of the fully functional, regular SAR processor allows the user to save all the intermediate products and have full control over all processing steps and parameters. This way, the user can evaluate the results of omitting a processing step or changing Doppler parameters. For the future, tailor made offsite training courses and workshops are planned. Updates on these can be found at http://www.asf.alaska.edu/educational/index.html.

  15. A segmentation-based approach to SAR change detection and mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzelli, Andrea; Zoppetti, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    The potentials of SAR sensors in change detection applications have been recently strengthened by the high spatial resolution and the short revisit time provided by the new generation SAR-based missions, such as COSMO- SkyMed, TerraSAR-X, and RadarSat 3. Classical pixel-based change detection methods exploit first-order statistics variations in multitemporal acquisitions. Higher-order statistics may improve the reliability of the results, while plain object-based change detection are rarely applied to SAR images due to the low signal-to-noise ratio which characterizes 1-look VHR SAR image products. The paper presents a hybrid approach considering both a pixel-based selection of likely-changed pixels and a segmentation-driven step based on the assumption that structural changes correspond to some clusters in a multiscale amplitude/texture representation. Experiments on simulated and true SAR image pairs demonstrate the advantages of the proposed approach.

  16. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  17. Recovering Seasat SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, T. A.; Arko, S. A.; Rosen, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of orbital remote sensing for global ocean observations, NASA launched Seasat on June 27th, 1978. Being the first space borne SAR mission, Seasat produced the most detailed SAR images of Earth from space ever seen to that point in time. While much of the data collected in the USA was processed optically, a mere 150 scenes had been digitally processed by March 1980. In fact, only an estimated 3% of Seasat data was ever digitally processed. Thus, for over three decades, the majority of the SAR data from this historic mission has been dormant, virtually unavailable to scientists in the 21st century. Over the last year, researchers at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) have processed the Seasat SAR archives into imagery products. A telemetry decoding system was created and the data were filtered into readily processable signal files. Due to nearly 35 years of bit rot, the bit error rate (BER) for the ASF DAAC Seasat archives was on the order of 1 out of 100 to 1 out of 100,000. This extremely high BER initially seemed to make much of the data undecodable - because the minor frame numbers are just 7 bits and no range line numbers exist in the telemetry even the 'simple' tasks of tracking the minor frame number or locating the start of each range line proved difficult. Eventually, using 5 frame numbers in sequence and a handful of heuristics, the data were successfully decoded into full range lines. Concurrently, all metadata were stored into external files. Recovery of this metadata was also problematic, the BER making the information highly suspect and, initially at least, unusable in any sort of automated fashion. Because of the BER, all of the single bit metadata fields proved unreliable. Even fields that should be constant for a data take (e.g. receiving station, day of the year) showed high variability, each requiring a median filter to be usable. The most challenging, however, were the

  18. Extraction of linear features on SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junyi; Li, Deren; Mei, Xin

    2006-10-01

    Linear features are usually extracted from SAR imagery by a few edge detectors derived from the contrast ratio edge detector with a constant probability of false alarm. On the other hand, the Hough Transform is an elegant way of extracting global features like curve segments from binary edge images. Randomized Hough Transform can reduce the computation time and memory usage of the HT drastically. While Randomized Hough Transform will bring about a great deal of cells invalid during the randomized sample. In this paper, we propose a new approach to extract linear features on SAR imagery, which is an almost automatic algorithm based on edge detection and Randomized Hough Transform. The presented improved method makes full use of the directional information of each edge candidate points so as to solve invalid cumulate problems. Applied result is in good agreement with the theoretical study, and the main linear features on SAR imagery have been extracted automatically. The method saves storage space and computational time, which shows its effectiveness and applicability.

  19. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  20. The Alaska SAR processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carande, R. E.; Charny, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Alaska SAR processor was designed to process over 200 100 km x 100 km (Seasat like) frames per day from the raw SAR data, at a ground resolution of 30 m x 30 m from ERS-1, J-ERS-1, and Radarsat. The near real time processor is a set of custom hardware modules operating in a pipelined architecture, controlled by a general purpose computer. Input to the processor is provided from a high density digital cassette recording of the raw data stream as received by the ground station. A two pass processing is performed. During the first pass clutter-lock and auto-focus measurements are made. The second pass uses the results to accomplish final image formation which is recorded on a high density digital cassette. The processing algorithm uses fast correlation techniques for range and azimuth compression. Radiometric compensation, interpolation and deskewing is also performed by the processor. The standard product of the ASP is a high resolution four-look image, with a low resolution (100 to 200 m) many look image provided simultaneously.

  1. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  2. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  3. Spatial compression of Seasat SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Y.; Kwok, Ronald; Curlander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a study of techniques for spatial compression of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) imagery are summarized. Emphasis is on image-data volume reduction for archive and online storage applications while preserving the image resolution and radiometric fidelity. A quantitative analysis of various techniques, including vector quantization (VQ) and adaptive discrete cosine transform (ADCT), is presented. Various factors such as compression ratio, algorithm complexity, and image quality are considered in determining the optimal algorithm. The compression system requirements are established for electronic access of an online archive system based on the results of a survey of the science community. The various algorithms are presented and their results evaluated considering the effects of speckle noise and the wide dynamic range inherent in SAR imagery. The conclusion is that although the ADCT produces the best signal-to-distortion-noise ratio for a given compression ratio, the two-level tree-searched VQ technique is preferred due to its simplicity of decoding and near-optimal performance.

  4. ERS-1 SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, K.; Bicknell, T.; Vines, K.

    1986-01-01

    To take full advantage of the synthetic aperature radar (SAR) to be flown on board the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) (1989) and the Canadian Radarsat (1990), the implementation of a receiving station in Alaska is being studied to gather and process SAR data pertaining in particular to regions within the station's range of reception. The current SAR data processing requirement is estimated to be on the order of 5 minutes per day. The Interim Digital Sar Processor (IDP) which was under continual development through Seasat (1978) and SIR-B (1984) can process slightly more than 2 minutes of ERS-1 data per day. On the other hand, the Advanced Digital SAR Processore (ADSP), currently under development for the Shuttle Imaging Radar C (SIR-C, 1988) and the Venus Radar Mapper, (VMR, 1988), is capable of processing ERS-1 SAR data at a real time rate. To better suit the anticipated ERS-1 SAR data processing requirement, both a modified IDP and an ADSP derivative are being examined. For the modified IDP, a pipelined architecture is proposed for the mini-computer plus array processor arrangement to improve throughout. For the ADSP derivative, a simplified version is proposed to enhance ease of implementation and maintainability while maintaing real time throughput rates. These processing systems are discussed and evaluated.

  5. Newly Formed Sea Ice in Arctic Leads Monitored by C- and L-Band SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A. Malin; Brekke, Camilla; Spreen, Gunnar; King, Jennifer A.; Gerland, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the scattering entropy and co-polarization ratio for Arctic lead ice using C- and L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite scenes. During the Norwegian Young sea ICE (N-ICE2015) cruise campaign overlapping SAR scenes, helicopter borne sea ice thickness measurements and photographs were collected. We can therefore relate the SAR signal to sea ice thickness measurements as well as photographs taken of the sea ice. We show that a combination of scattering and co-polarization ratio values can be used to distinguish young ice from open water and surrounding sea ice.

  6. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckner, F. L.; Ahr, H. A.; Ausherman, D. A.; Cutrona, L. J.; Francisco, S.; Harrison, R. E.; Heuser, J. S.; Jordan, R. L.; Justus, J.; Manning, B.

    1978-01-01

    The available and optimal methods for generating SAR imagery for NASA applications were identified. The SAR image quality and data processing requirements associated with these applications were studied. Mathematical operations and algorithms required to process sensor data into SAR imagery were defined. The architecture of SAR image formation processors was discussed, and technology necessary to implement the SAR data processors used in both general purpose and dedicated imaging systems was addressed.

  7. SARS in Three Categories of Hospital Workers, Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xilin; Leung, Ping-Chung; Chan, Louis; Wong, Eliza; Fong, Carmen; Tsui, Hi-Yi

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed attack rates for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in three categories of hospital workers (nurses, nonmedical support staff, and other technical or medical staff) in all public hospitals in Hong Kong that had admitted SARS patients. Of 16 such hospitals, 14 had cases. The overall attack rate was 1.20%. Nonmedical support staff had the highest attack rate (2.73%). The odds ratios of group nonmedical support staff versus those of nurses and of nonmedical support staff versus other technical or medical staff were 2.30 (p < 0.001) and 9.78 (p < 0.001), respectively. The number of affected staff and attack rates were significantly correlated with the number of SARS patients admitted (r = 0.914 and 0.686, respectively). Affected patients were concentrated in three hospitals and in the earlier phase of the epidemic. Cleaning and clerical staff on hospital wards were at a much higher risk. PMID:15496240

  8. SAR imaging - Seeing the unseen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, M.

    1982-01-01

    The functional abilities and operations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are described. SAR employs long wavelength radio waves in bursts, imaging a target by 'listening' to the small frequency changes that result from the Doppler shift due to the relative motion of the imaging craft and the motions of the target. The time delay of the signal return allows a determination of the location of the target, leading to the build up of a two-dimensional image. The uses of both Doppler shifts and time delay enable detailed imagery which is independent of distance. The synthetic aperture part of the name of SAR derives from the beaming of multiple pulses, which result in a picture that is effectively the same as using a large antenna. Mechanisms contributing to the fineness of SAR images are outlined.

  9. TerraSAR-X mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werninghaus, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    The TerraSAR-X is a German national SAR- satellite system for scientific and commercial applications. It is the continuation of the scientifically and technologically successful radar missions X-SAR (1994) and SRTM (2000) and will bring the national technology developments DESA and TOPAS into operational use. The space segment of TerraSAR-X is an advanced high-resolution X-Band radar satellite. The system design is based on a sound market analysis performed by Infoterra. The TerraSAR-X features an advanced high-resolution X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar based on the active phased array technology which allows the operation in Spotlight-, Stripmap- and ScanSAR Mode with various polarizations. It combines the ability to acquire high resolution images for detailed analysis as well as wide swath images for overview applications. In addition, experimental modes like the Dual Receive Antenna Mode allow for full-polarimetric imaging as well as along track interferometry, i.e. moving target identification. The Ground Segment is optimized for flexible response to (scientific and commercial) User requests and fast image product turn-around times. The TerraSAR-X mission will serve two main goals. The first goal is to provide the strongly supportive scientific community with multi-mode X-Band SAR data. The broad spectrum of scientific application areas include Hydrology, Geology, Climatology, Oceanography, Environmental Monitoring and Disaster Monitoring as well as Cartography (DEM Generation) and Interferometry. The second goal is the establishment of a commercial EO-market in Europe which is driven by Infoterra. The commercial goal is the development of a sustainable EO-business so that the e.g. follow-on systems can be completely financed by industry from the profit. Due to its commercial potential, the TerraSAR-X project will be implemented based on a public-private partnership with the Astrium GmbH. This paper will describe first the mission objectives as well as the

  10. High-Level Performance Modeling of SAR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis

    2006-01-01

    SAUSAGE (Still Another Utility for SAR Analysis that s General and Extensible) is a computer program for modeling (see figure) the performance of synthetic- aperture radar (SAR) or interferometric synthetic-aperture radar (InSAR or IFSAR) systems. The user is assumed to be familiar with the basic principles of SAR imaging and interferometry. Given design parameters (e.g., altitude, power, and bandwidth) that characterize a radar system, the software predicts various performance metrics (e.g., signal-to-noise ratio and resolution). SAUSAGE is intended to be a general software tool for quick, high-level evaluation of radar designs; it is not meant to capture all the subtleties, nuances, and particulars of specific systems. SAUSAGE was written to facilitate the exploration of engineering tradeoffs within the multidimensional space of design parameters. Typically, this space is examined through an iterative process of adjusting the values of the design parameters and examining the effects of the adjustments on the overall performance of the system at each iteration. The software is designed to be modular and extensible to enable consideration of a variety of operating modes and antenna beam patterns, including, for example, strip-map and spotlight SAR acquisitions, polarimetry, burst modes, and squinted geometries.

  11. Focusing of bistatic SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bia, Pietro; Ricci, Nicola; Zonno, Mariantonietta; Nico, Giovanni; Catalao, Joao; Tesauro, Manlio

    2014-10-01

    The problems of simulation of bistatic SAR raw data and focusing are studied. A discrete target simulator is described. The simulator introduces the scene topography and compute the integration time of general bistatic configurations providing a means to derived maps of the range and azimuth spatial resolutions. The problem of focusing of bistatic SAR data acquired in a translational-invariant bistatic configuration is studied by deriving the bistatic Point Target Reference spectrum and presenting an analytical solution for its stationary points.

  12. Normal and Differential SAR Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Geudtner, B. Schättler, P. Vachon, U. Steinbrecher, J. Holzner, J. Mittermayer , H. Breit, A. Moreira. RADARSAT ScanSAR interferometry. In: Proc.IGARSS’99...IV, Ottawa, Vol. XXXIV, part 4, pp. 470-475 Krieger, G., Wendler, M., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J., Moreira, A., 2002. Performance analysis for...bistatic interferometric SAR configurations. In: Proc.IGARSS 2002, Toronto, Canada, vol. 1, pp. 650-652. Krieger, G., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J

  13. Normal and Differential SAR Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Geudtner, B. Schättler, P. Vachon, U. Steinbrecher, J. Holzner, J. Mittermayer , H. Breit, A. Moreira. RADARSAT ScanSAR interferometry. In: Proceedings of...part 4, pp. 470-475 Krieger, G., Wendler, M., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J., Moreira, A., 2002. Performance analysis for bistatic interferometric...SAR configurations. In: Proceedings of IGARSS 2002, Toronto, Canada, vol. 1, pp. 650-652. Krieger, G., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J., Papathanassiou, K

  14. Classification And Monitoring Of Salt Marsh Habitats With Multi-Polarimetric Airborne SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijma, Sybrand; Comber, Alexis; Lamb, Alistair

    2013-12-01

    Within the Copernicus programme there is much interest in the ability of remote sensing technology to deliver operational solutions to many areas of life including environmental management. This paper describes research focused on the application of Earth Observation for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. The main topic of this research is to explore to which extent salt marsh vegetation habitats can be identified from polarimetric SAR remotely sensed data. Multi- frequency, multi-polarimetric SAR images from airborne (S- and X-Band quad-polarimetric from the Astrium airborne SAR Demonstrator) is used to examine salt marsh habitat classification potential in the Llanrhidian salt marshes in South Wales, UK. This is achieved by (1) using both supervised and unsupervised classification routines, using several polarimetric SAR data layers as backscatter intensity, band ratios and polarimetric decomposition products, and by (2) statistical analysis by regression of these different SAR data layers and botanical parameters acquired from recent ecological fieldwork.

  15. X-SAR as high-performance interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Marian U.; Schandl, Josef

    1995-11-01

    In April and October 1994 the X-SAR radar has been flown twice onboard the Space Shuttle, as part of the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL-1 and SRL-2). This radar payload is the first synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system of its kind in space, with three frequencies, multi- polarization, variable incidence angle and variable modes of operation. SIR-C/X-SAR, the new generation of imaging microwave remote sensing sensors from space, demonstrated successfully repeat pass interferometry in all three frequencies with a one day repeat as well as a six month repeat orbit. The major problems with the repeat orbit interferometry are the temporal target decorrelation, unsuitable baseline and different squint angles for the two passes to be processed. Therefore, for the third mission of the Space Radar Lab which shall be called SRTM (shuttle radar topographic mapper), single pass interferometry with a second receive antenna is proposed to generate a topographic map of all land surfaces between +60 degrees and -56 degrees latitude. X-SAR's 12 meter long and 40 cm wide main transmit and receive antenna is mounted directly to a tiltable part of the SIR-C antenna truss structure in the Shuttle cargo bay. The second receive antenna is 6 meters long and is mounted together with the second C-band antenna to a 31 meter long deployable boom structure perpendicular to the velocity direction to build the baseline. X-SAR is not capable of operating in a scan SAR model like SIR-C to allow continuous coverage, but will operate in a high resolution mode with a swath width of 30 - 35 km. The engineering design of the interferometric configuration for X-SAR, the requirement specifications, and the predicted performance as well as the mission operation aspects are described in this paper. SIR-C/X- SAR is a cooperative project. The SIR-C instrument was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The X-band radar (X-SAR) was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio Companies for the German

  16. Atmospheric delay analysis from GPS meteorology and InSAR APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shilai; Perissin, Daniele; Lin, Hui; Chen, Fulong

    2012-09-01

    Radar atmospheric decorrelation due to inhomogeneity of atmospheric refractivity is a critical limitation of satellite SAR interferometry (InSAR) in the high accuracy retrieving of geophysical parameters. With mm precision, a water vapor tracing technique based on GPS meteorology was widely employed to mitigate InSAR atmospheric errors. However, a reliable comparison of atmospheric delay between GPS and InSAR is rarely touched, mainly due to the scarcity of stable and accurate InSAR atmospheric phases. In the paper we propose a comparison methodology between GPS Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) and SAR Atmospheric Phase Screen (APS) in both differential and pseudo-absolute modes. In the experiment, ENVISAT ASAR APS maps and synchronous GPS campaign measurements in Como, Italy were collected for consistency analysis. Furthermore, the stratification effect of atmospheric delay, in a form of delay-to-elevation ratios, was particularly analyzed for the purpose of separating different components within APSs. Finally, with the above stratification analysis, terms of stratification and assumed turbulence from SAR APS and GPS were compared in differential mode. Presented results show that the stratified ratios from GPS delays and SAR APS maps are in agreement with a std of 7.7 mm/km and a bias of 3.4 mm/km. Correlation coefficients of stratified ratios are higher than 0.7 in ascending case. In differential mode, the atmospheric total delays coincide with STandard Deviations (STDs) smaller than 4 mm (∼0.65 mm PWV) and with correlation coefficients higher than 0.6. The comparison of total delays in ‘pseudo-absolute’ mode is provided as an alternative vision of the agreement between GPS and InSAR. The agreement in this mode was slightly worse than that in differential mode. STDs of the difference are smaller than 6 mm (∼1 mm PWV), and the correlation coefficients are about 0.5 for different implementation approaches. Above comparison results in the work provide a

  17. On Ambiguities in SAR Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Ambiguities are an aliasing effect caused by the periodic sampling of the scene backscatter inherent to pulsed radar systems such as Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR). In this paper we take a fresh look at the relationship between SAR range and azimuth ambiguity constraints on the allowable pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the antenna length. We show that for high squint angles smaller antennas may be feasible in some cases. For some applications, the ability to form a synthetic aperture at high squint angles is desirable, but the size of the antenna causes problems in the design of systems capable of such operation. This is because the SAR system design is optimized for a side-looking geometry. In two examples design examples we take a suboptimum antenna size and examine the performance in terms of azimuth resolution and swath width as a function of squint angle. We show that for stripmap SARs, the swath width is usually worse for off-boresight squint angles, because it is severely limited by range walk, except in cases where we relax the spatial resolution. We consider the implications for the design of modest-resolution, narrow swath, scanning SAR scatterometers .

  18. Likelihood Ratio Test Polarimetric SAR Ship Detection Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    IHHI, green = IHV+ VHI , blue = IVVl) and the Pauli Decomposition (red - double bounce, green = volume scatter, blue = single bounce). On the right side...before, three files that combine to form a basic RGB composite representation of the image are generated (Red=IHHI, green=IHV+ VHI , blue-jVVI). Then, six...IHV- VHI . The image is then displayed in the main display. If the channel viewports are turned on, the HH channel is shown in the first viewport, the

  19. Optical and SAR data integration for automatic change pattern detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, B.; Susaki, J.

    2014-09-01

    Automatic change pattern mapping in urban and sub-urban area is important but challenging due to the diversity of urban land use pattern. With multi-sensor imagery, it is possible to generate multidimensional unique information of Earth surface features that allow developing a relationship between a response of each feature to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and optical sensors to track the change automatically. Thus, a SAR and optical data integration framework for change detection and a relationship for automatic change pattern detection were developed. It was carried out in three steps: (i) Computation of indicators from SAR and optical images, namely: normalized difference ratio (NDR) from multi-temporal SAR images and the normalized difference vegetation index difference (NDVI) from multi-temporal optical images, (ii) computing the change magnitude image from NDR and ΔNDVI and delineating the change area and (iii) the development of an empirical relationship, for automatic change pattern detection. The experiment was carried out in an outskirts part of Ho Chi Minh City, one of the fastest growing cities in the world. The empirical relationship between the response of surface feature to optical and SAR imagery has successfully delineated six changed classes in a very complex urban sprawl area that was otherwise impossible with multi-spectral imagery. The improvement of the change detection results by making use of the unique information on both sensors, optical and SAR, is also noticeable with a visual inspection and the kappa index was increased by 0.13 (0.75 to 0.88) in comparison to only optical images.

  20. Minimal-SAR RF pulse optimization for parallel transmission in MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinan; Ji, Jim X

    2008-01-01

    Parallel transmission is an emerging technique to achieve multi-dimensional spatially selective or modulated excitation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Minimizing Specific Absorption Ratio (SAR) is a critical issue in this technique for radio frequency power absorption safety. In this paper, we presented an automatic design method to minimize SAR in an optimization framework. The RF pulses and corresponding k-space trajectory are iteratively adjusted. The method is verified using computer simulations of a 4-channel parallel transmission system. The results showed significantly reduction in SAR can be achieved while the quality of the excited pattern is well preserved without enlonging the pulse duration.

  1. Basis for optronic ScanSAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Linda; Bourqui, Pascal; Turgeon, Sandra; Harnish, Bernd; Suess, Martin; Châteauneuf, François; Bergeron, Alain

    2011-11-01

    ScanSAR is an important imaging mode of operation for SAR systems. It allows extended range coverage albeit at the expense of azimuth resolution. Compared to stripmap, ScanSAR is used more for large swath coverage for mapping and monitoring over a wide area. Applications are numerous and include boreal forest mapping, wetland mapping and soil moisture monitoring. The goal of the present work was thus to explore the possibility of processing ScanSAR data optronicaly. Tests were performed with artificially bursted ASAR stripmap data demonstrating that reconstruction of ScanSAR data using the optronic SAR processor is feasible. This paper describes specifically how the data control and handling of ScanSAR data is performed to make it compatible with the optronic processor that was otherwise specifically designed for stripmap processing. As well, the ScanSAR images generated optronicaly are presented.

  2. SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheet for SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts Format: Select one PDF [256 KB] Recommend on ... that are not now known. What does "close contact" mean? In the context of SARS, close contact ...

  3. Method for removing RFI from SAR images

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2003-08-19

    A method of removing RFI from a SAR by comparing two SAR images on a pixel by pixel basis and selecting the pixel with the lower magnitude to form a composite image. One SAR image is the conventional image produced by the SAR. The other image is created from phase-history data which has been filtered to have the frequency bands containing the RFI removed.

  4. Registration of interferometric SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is a new way of performing topography mapping. Among the factors critical to mapping accuracy is the registration of the complex SAR images from repeated orbits. A new algorithm for registering interferometric SAR images is presented. A new figure of merit, the average fluctuation function of the phase difference image, is proposed to evaluate the fringe pattern quality. The process of adjusting the registration parameters according to the fringe pattern quality is optimized through a downhill simplex minimization algorithm. The results of applying the proposed algorithm to register two pairs of Seasat SAR images with a short baseline (75 m) and a long baseline (500 m) are shown. It is found that the average fluctuation function is a very stable measure of fringe pattern quality allowing very accurate registration.

  5. Monsoon '90 - Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Guerra, Abel G.

    1992-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  6. Monsoon 1990: Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Dubois, Pascale; Guerra, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  7. Kronecker STAP and SAR GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenewald, Kristjan H.; Zelnio, Edmund G.; Hero, Alfred O.

    2016-05-01

    As a high resolution radar imaging modality, SAR detects and localizes non-moving targets accurately, giving it an advantage over lower resolution GMTI radars. Moving target detection is more challenging due to target smearing and masking by clutter. Space-time adaptive processing (STAP) is often used on multiantenna SAR to remove the stationary clutter and enhance the moving targets. In (Greenewald et al., 2016),1 it was shown that the performance of STAP can be improved by modeling the clutter covariance as a space vs. time Kronecker product with low rank factors, providing robustness and reducing the number of training samples required. In this work, we present a massively parallel algorithm for implementing Kronecker product STAP, enabling application to very large SAR datasets (such as the 2006 Gotcha data collection) using GPUs. Finally, we develop an extension of Kronecker STAP that uses information from multiple passes to improve moving target detection.

  8. Registration Of SAR Images With Multisensor Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L.; Burnette, Charles F.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiautomated technique intended primarily to facilitate registration of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images with other images of same or partly overlapping terrain while preserving polarization information conveyed by SAR data. Technique generally applicable in sense one or both of images to be registered with each other generated by polarimetric or nonpolarimetric SAR, infrared radiometry, conventional photography, or any other applicable sensing method.

  9. System Turns SAR Images Into Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, J. C.; Kwok, Ronald; Pang, Shirley S. N.

    1988-01-01

    Postprocessing system for synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) transforms raw images from natural rotated and distorted SAR reference frame into geocoded images. Images automatically corrected to remove slant-range nonlinearities and Doppler skew. Produces multiple-frame mosaics for large-scale mapping. Does not require tedious manual registration of representative "tie" points in raw SAR imagery with known locations on Earth.

  10. A dense medium electromagnetic scattering model for the InSAR correlation of snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yang; Siqueira, Paul; Treuhaft, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Snow characteristics, such as snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow grain size, are important characteristics for the monitoring of the global hydrological cycle and as indicators of climate change. This paper derives an interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) scattering model for dense media, such as snow, which takes into account multiple scattering effects through the Quasi-Crystalline Approximation. The result of this derivation is a simplified version of the InSAR correlation model derived for relating the InSAR correlation measurements to the snowpack characteristics of grain size, volume fraction, and layer depth as well as those aspects of the volume-ground interaction that affects the interferometric observation (i.e., the surface topography and the ratio of ground-to-volume scattering). Based on the model, the sensitivity of the InSAR correlation measurements to the snow characteristics is explored by simulation. Through this process, it is shown that Ka-band InSAR phase has a good sensitivity to snow grain size and volume fraction, while for lower frequency signals (Ku-band to L-band), the InSAR correlation magnitude and phase have a sensitivity to snow depth. Since the formulation depends, in part, on the pair distribution function, three functional forms of the pair distribution function are implemented and their effects on InSAR phase measurements compared. The InSAR scattering model described in this paper is intended to be an observational prototype for future Ka-band and L-band InSAR missions, such as NASA's Surface Water and Ocean Topography and NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar missions, planned for launch in the 2020-2021 time frame. This formulation also enables further investigation of the InSAR-based snow retrieval approaches.

  11. Computerized ionospheric tomography based on geosynchronous SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng; Tian, Ye; Dong, Xichao; Wang, Rui; Long, Teng

    2017-02-01

    Computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) based on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an emerging technique to construct the three-dimensional (3-D) image of ionosphere. The current studies are all based on the Low Earth Orbit synthetic aperture radar (LEO SAR) which is limited by long repeat period and small coverage. In this paper, a novel ionospheric 3-D CIT technique based on geosynchronous SAR (GEO SAR) is put forward. First, several influences of complex atmospheric environment on GEO SAR focusing are detailedly analyzed, including background ionosphere and multiple scattering effects (induced by turbulent ionosphere), tropospheric effects, and random noises. Then the corresponding GEO SAR signal model is constructed with consideration of the temporal-variant background ionosphere within the GEO SAR long integration time (typically 100 s to 1000 s level). Concurrently, an accurate total electron content (TEC) retrieval method based on GEO SAR data is put forward through subband division in range and subaperture division in azimuth, obtaining variant TEC value with respect to the azimuth time. The processing steps of GEO SAR CIT are given and discussed. Owing to the short repeat period and large coverage area, GEO SAR CIT has potentials of covering the specific space continuously and completely and resultantly has excellent real-time performance. Finally, the TEC retrieval and GEO SAR CIT construction are performed by employing a numerical study based on the meteorological data. The feasibility and correctness of the proposed methods are verified.

  12. [Medical history from SARS to pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Zhen, Cheng

    2003-05-31

    SARS is a new kind of pneumonia. From the end of 2002 to the beginning of 2003, SARS broke in Guangdong province, Hong Kong and Beijing, and then gradually spread to the world. SARS is extremely contagious. The symptoms of SARS progress very quickly. SARS smashes the people's tranquil life and many people live in horror, worry and anxiety. But if we review the medical history of pneumonia, we would have a better understanding of SARS. This article focuses the history of people's understanding of pneumonia on the historical documents, diagnosis, etiology and treatment. Through the epidemic of SARS, the author hopes to express that contagion will live with us for a long time, but it is not a deadly disease. It is preventable and good care is essential for contagious patients. As Chinese people, we should have the best use of TCM in our combat with contagion.

  13. Spacecraft on-board SAR processing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.; Arens, W. E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides an assessment of the on-board SAR processing technology for Eos-type missions. The proposed Eos SAR sensor and flight data system are introduced, and the SAR processing requirements are described. The SAR on-board SAR processor architecture selection is discussed, and a baseline processor architecture using a frequency-domain processor for range correlation and a modular fault-tolerant VLSI time-domain parallel array for azimuth correlation are described. The mass storage and VLSI technologies needed for implementing the proposed SAR processing are assessed. It is shown that acceptable processor power and mass characteristics should be feasible for Eos-type applications. A proposed development strategy for the on-board SAR processor is presented.

  14. Bioelectromagnetic effects measurements - SAR and induced current.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses several theoretical and practical aspects of the application of currents flowing through the body of a radiotelephone operator and Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR is known as the physical quantity which is a perfect solution for biological experiments. Unfortunately, SAR cannot be measured directly. Contrary to SAR, which is limited to the penetration depth, a current induced in a point of a body is measurable in any other point of the body. The main objective of this paper is to show that the current induced in a human body when using a radiotelephone or mobile phone is significant and should be analyzed as widely as SAR is. Computer simulations of a human's hand with a radiotelephone were made. Experiments were also conducted. The results of the experiments show that induced current is also as important as SAR and it cannot be omitted in bioelectromagnetic experiments. In biomedical studies both parameters: induced current and SAR play a major role.

  15. Further SEASAT SAR coastal ocean wave analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.; Meadows, G. A.; Jackson, P. L.; Tseng, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis techniques used to exploit SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data of gravity waves are discussed and the SEASAT SAR's ability to monitor large scale variations in gravity wave fields in both deep and shallow water is evaluated. The SAR analysis techniques investigated included motion compensation adjustments and the semicausal model for spectral analysis of SAR wave data. It was determined that spectra generated from fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT) of SAR wave data were not significantly altered when either range telerotation adjustments or azimuth focus shifts were used during processing of the SAR signal histories, indicating that SEASAT imagery of gravity waves is not significantly improved or degraded by motion compensation adjustments. Evaluation of the semicausal (SC) model using SEASAT SAR data from Rev. 974 indicates that the SC spectral estimates were not significantly better than the FFT results.

  16. Late-summer sea ice segmentation with multi-polarisation SAR features in C and X band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fors, Ane S.; Brekke, Camilla; Doulgeris, Anthony P.; Eltoft, Torbjørn; Renner, Angelika H. H.; Gerland, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the potential of sea ice segmentation by C- and X-band multi-polarisation synthetic aperture radar (SAR) features during late summer. Five high-resolution satellite SAR scenes were recorded in the Fram Strait covering iceberg-fast first-year and old sea ice during a week with air temperatures varying around 0 °C. Sea ice thickness, surface roughness and aerial photographs were collected during a helicopter flight at the site. Six polarimetric SAR features were extracted for each of the scenes. The ability of the individual SAR features to discriminate between sea ice types and their temporal consistency were examined. All SAR features were found to add value to sea ice type discrimination. Relative kurtosis, geometric brightness, cross-polarisation ratio and co-polarisation correlation angle were found to be temporally consistent in the investigated period, while co-polarisation ratio and co-polarisation correlation magnitude were found to be temporally inconsistent. An automatic feature-based segmentation algorithm was tested both for a full SAR feature set and for a reduced SAR feature set limited to temporally consistent features. In C band, the algorithm produced a good late-summer sea ice segmentation, separating the scenes into segments that could be associated with different sea ice types in the next step. The X-band performance was slightly poorer. Excluding temporally inconsistent SAR features improved the segmentation in one of the X-band scenes.

  17. Conceptual adsorption models and open issues pertaining to performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R.J.

    1991-10-01

    Recently several articles have been published that question the appropriateness of the distribution coefficient, Rd, concept to quantify radionuclide migration. Several distinct issues are raised by various critics. In this paper I provide some perspective on issues surrounding the modeling of nuclide retardation. The first section defines adsorption terminology and discusses various adsorption processes. The next section describes five commonly used adsorption conceptual models, specifically emphasizing what attributes that affect adsorption are explicitly accommodated in each model. I also review efforts to incorporate each adsorption model into performance assessment transport computer codes. The five adsorption conceptual models are (1) the constant Rd model, (2) the parametric Rd model, (3) isotherm adsorption models, (4) mass-action adsorption models, and (5) surface-complexation with electrostatics models. The final section discusses the adequacy of the distribution ratio concept, the adequacy of transport calculations that rely on constant retardation factors and the status of incorporating sophisticated adsorption models into transport codes.

  18. Preliminary study for the long wavelength planetary SAR sensor design and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Rack; Sumantyo, Josaphat; Lin, Shih-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    The SAR observation over planetary surface has been conducted mainly in two ways. The first case is the subsurface monitoring of planetary surface, for examples Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding (MARSIS) and Shallow Surface Radar (SHARAD). In which the long wavelength electromagnetic wave for ground penetration was applied although the functionality for mining spatial distribution of subsurface substances was limited. Imaging SAR sensors using burst mode design, which is another case, have been employed to acquire planet/satellite's surface observations mostly with the presences thick atmosphere such as Venus and Titan's cases. However, the drawbacks of burst mode SAR for the extraction of topographic information of planet/satellite was obvious as shown in the CASSSINI and Magellan SAR missions, where the interferometric capability was absence in existing burst mode planetary SAR and the quality of radargrammetry is largely limited due to the insufficient resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of acquired images. Therefore, in this study, we proposed the exploitation of the long wavelength SAR system capable of extracting topographic information through both InSAR and radargrammetry techniques and monitoring shallow subsurface with the spatial resolving power. Although imaging SAR sensor has limited penetration depth compared with GPR such as MASIS and SHARAD, P and/or L band SARs will be certainly useful to observe a few meters depth subsurface which includes the most interesting layers in planet/satellite such as permafrost in Mars, underlying regolith of Moon, beneath of resurfacing topography of Venus, inner crust of ice satellite and bathymetry of Titan lakes. Meanwhile, those data can be used not only for the detailed surface imaging but also for the extraction of precise 3D topography reconstruction by either InSAR or stereo radargrammetry in the condition that sufficient orbital tracking accuracy is available. Based on the ideas

  19. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided.

  20. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-06-15

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided. 5 figs.

  1. Modeling the adsorption of mixed gases based on pure gas adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, N.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption-based Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers usually operate with pure gases. A sorption-based compressor has many benefits; however, it is limited by the pressure ratios it can provide. Using a mixed-refrigerant (MR) instead of a pure refrigerant in JT cryocoolers allows working at much lower pressure ratios. Therefore, it is attractive using MRs in sorption- based cryocoolers in order to reduce one of its main limitations. The adsorption of mixed gases is usually investigated under steady-state conditions, mainly for storage and separation processes. However, the process in a sorption compressor goes through various temperatures, pressures and adsorption concentrations; therefore, it differs from the common mixed gases adsorption applications. In order to simulate the sorption process in a compressor a numerical analysis for mixed gases is developed, based on pure gas adsorption characteristics. The pure gas adsorption properties have been measured for four gases (nitrogen, methane, ethane, and propane) with Norit-RB2 activated carbon. A single adsorption model is desired to describe the adsorption of all four gases. This model is further developed to a mixed-gas adsorption model. In future work more adsorbents will be tested using these four gases and the adsorption model will be verified against experimental results of mixed-gas adsorption measurements.

  2. Classification and Monitoring of Salt Marsh Habitats with Multi-Polarimetric and Multi-Frequency SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijma, Sybrand; Comber, Alexis; Lamb, Alistair; Brown, Sarah

    2013-08-01

    Within GMES there is much interest in the ability of remote sensing technology to deliver operational solutions to many areas of life including environmental management. This paper describes research focused on the application for Earth Observation for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. The main topic of this research is to explore to which extent salt marsh habitats from can be identified from SAR remotely sensed data. Multi-frequency, multi-polarimetric SAR images from airborne (S- and X-Band quad-polarimetric from the Astrium airborne SAR Demonstrator) is used to examine salt marsh habitat classification potential in the Llanrhidian salt marshes in South Wales, UK. This is achieved by characterizing their botanical and structural composition, flooding regimes as well as fluctuations in soil moisture. Different SAR features as backscatter coefficient, band ratios and polarimetric decomposition are extracted.

  3. Controlling Data Collection to Support SAR Image Rotation

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Cordaro, J. Thomas; Burns, Bryan L.

    2008-10-14

    A desired rotation of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image can be facilitated by adjusting a SAR data collection operation based on the desired rotation. The SAR data collected by the adjusted SAR data collection operation can be efficiently exploited to form therefrom a SAR image having the desired rotational orientation.

  4. Use of airborne polarimetric SAR, optical and elevation data for mapping and monitoring of salt marsh vegetation habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beijma, Sybrand; Comber, Alexis; Lamb, Alistair

    2014-10-01

    Within the Copernicus programme there is much interest in the ability of remote sensing technology to deliver operational solutions to many areas of life including environmental management. This paper describes research focused on the application of Earth Observation for Integrated Coastal Zone Management. The main topic of this research is to explore to which extent salt marsh vegetation habitats can be identified from polarimetric SAR remotely sensed data. Multi-frequency, multi-polarimetric SAR images from airborne (S- and X-Band quad-polarimetric from the Astrium airborne SAR Demonstrator) is used to examine salt marsh habitat classification potential in the Llanrhidian salt marshes in South Wales, UK. This is achieved by (1) using both supervised and unsupervised classification routines, using several polarimetric SAR data layers as backscatter intensity, band ratios and polarimetric decomposition products, and by (2) statistical analysis by regression of these different SAR data layers and botanical parameters acquired from recent ecological fieldwork.

  5. Advanced digital SAR processing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, L. W.; Gaffney, B. P.; Liu, B.; Perry, R. P.; Ruvin, A.

    1982-01-01

    A highly programmable, land based, real time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor requiring a processed pixel rate of 2.75 MHz or more in a four look system was designed. Variations in range and azimuth compression, number of looks, range swath, range migration and SR mode were specified. Alternative range and azimuth processing algorithms were examined in conjunction with projected integrated circuit, digital architecture, and software technologies. The advaced digital SAR processor (ADSP) employs an FFT convolver algorithm for both range and azimuth processing in a parallel architecture configuration. Algorithm performace comparisons, design system design, implementation tradeoffs and the results of a supporting survey of integrated circuit and digital architecture technologies are reported. Cost tradeoffs and projections with alternate implementation plans are presented.

  6. 5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. #2 TRANSMISSION LINES, MARCH 7, 1916. SCE drawing no. 4932. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Transmission Lines, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  8. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  9. SAR Object Change Detection Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    based techniques when applied to Synthetic Aperature Radar (SAR imagery. DOUGLA 3. PRASKA, 2LT, USAF Project Engineer viii Section 1 INTRODUCTION AND...to assess the applicability of three region-based change-detection methods to synthetic aperture radar imagery. I/ Ac .0ion For K:CTAB [ ft i . i...Section 2, the algorithms developed were applied to synthetic -aperture radar image data furnished by RADC. Some preprocessing of all images was required

  10. Parallel strategies for SAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segoviano, Jesus A.

    2004-12-01

    This article proposes a series of strategies for improving the computer process of the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal treatment, following the three usual lines of action to speed up the execution of any computer program. On the one hand, it is studied the optimization of both, the data structures and the application architecture used on it. On the other hand it is considered a hardware improvement. For the former, they are studied both, the usually employed SAR process data structures, proposing the use of parallel ones and the way the parallelization of the algorithms employed on the process is implemented. Besides, the parallel application architecture classifies processes between fine/coarse grain. These are assigned to individual processors or separated in a division among processors, all of them in their corresponding architectures. For the latter, it is studied the hardware employed on the computer parallel process used in the SAR handling. The improvement here refers to several kinds of platforms in which the SAR process is implemented, shared memory multicomputers, and distributed memory multiprocessors. A comparison between them gives us some guidelines to follow in order to get a maximum throughput with a minimum latency and a maximum effectiveness with a minimum cost, all together with a limited complexness. It is concluded and described, that the approach consisting of the processing of the algorithms in a GNU/Linux environment, together with a Beowulf cluster platform offers, under certain conditions, the best compromise between performance and cost, and promises the major development in the future for the Synthetic Aperture Radar computer power thirsty applications in the next years.

  11. SAR image registration based on Susan algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-bo; Fu, Shao-hua; Wei, Zhong-yi

    2011-10-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is an active remote sensing system which can be installed on aircraft, satellite and other carriers with the advantages of all day and night and all-weather ability. It is the important problem that how to deal with SAR and extract information reasonably and efficiently. Particularly SAR image geometric correction is the bottleneck to impede the application of SAR. In this paper we introduces image registration and the Susan algorithm knowledge firstly, then introduces the process of SAR image registration based on Susan algorithm and finally presents experimental results of SAR image registration. The Experiment shows that this method is effective and applicable, no matter from calculating the time or from the calculation accuracy.

  12. Building Detection in SAR Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, Ryan Matthew; Koch, Mark William; Moya, Mary M; Goold, Jeremy

    2014-08-01

    Current techniques for building detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery can be computationally expensive and/or enforce stringent requirements for data acquisition. The desire is to present a technique that is effective and efficient at determining an approximate building location. This approximate location can be used to extract a portion of the SAR image to then perform a more robust detection. The proposed technique assumes that for the desired image, bright lines and shadows, SAR artifact effects, are approximately labeled. These labels are enhanced and utilized to locate buildings, only if the related bright lines and shadows can be grouped. In order to find which of the bright lines and shadows are related, all of the bright lines are connected to all of the shadows. This allows the problem to be solved from a connected graph viewpoint. Where the nodes are the bright lines and shadows and the arcs are the connections between bright lines and shadows. Constraints based on angle of depression and the relationship between connected bright lines and shadows are applied to remove unrelated arcs. Once the related bright lines and shadows are grouped, their locations are combined to provide an approximate building location. Experimental results are provided showing the outcome of the technique.

  13. Building detection in SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, Ryan Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Current techniques for building detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery can be computationally expensive and/or enforce stringent requirements for data acquisition. I present two techniques that are effective and efficient at determining an approximate building location. This approximate location can be used to extract a portion of the SAR image to then perform a more robust detection. The proposed techniques assume that for the desired image, bright lines and shadows, SAR artifact effects, are approximately labeled. These labels are enhanced and utilized to locate buildings, only if the related bright lines and shadows can be grouped. In order to find which of the bright lines and shadows are related, all of the bright lines are connected to all of the shadows. This allows the problem to be solved from a connected graph viewpoint, where the nodes are the bright lines and shadows and the arcs are the connections between bright lines and shadows. For the first technique, constraints based on angle of depression and the relationship between connected bright lines and shadows are applied to remove unrelated arcs. The second technique calculates weights for the connections and then performs a series of increasingly relaxed hard and soft thresholds. This results in groups of various levels on their validity. Once the related bright lines and shadows are grouped, their locations are combined to provide an approximate building location. Experimental results demonstrate the outcome of the two techniques. The two techniques are compared and discussed.

  14. InSAR Forensics: Tracing InSAR Scatterers in High Resolution Optical Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, XiaoXiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a step towards a better interpretation of the scattering mechanism of different objects and their deformation histories in SAR interferometry (InSAR). The proposed technique traces individual SAR scatterer in high resolution optical images where their geometries, materials, and other properties can be better analyzed and classified. And hence scatterers of a same object can be analyzed in group, which brings us to a new level of InSAR deformation monitoring.

  15. Intelligent low rate compression of speckled SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.W.; Eichel, P.; Magotra, N.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a compression technique under development at Sandia National Laboratories for the compression of complex synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery at very low overall bit rates. The methods involved combine several elements of existing and new lossy and lossless compression schemes in order to achieve an overall compression ratio of large SAR scenes of at least 50:1, while maintaining reasonable image quality. It is assumed that the end user will be primarily interested in specific regions of interest within the image (called chips), but that the context in which these chips appear within the entire scene is also of importance to an image analyst. The term intelligent is used to signify an external cuer which locates the chips of interest.

  16. Satellite SAR geocoding with refined RPC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Balz, Timo; Liao, Mingsheng

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies have proved that the Rational Polynomial Camera (RPC) model is able to act as a reliable replacement of the rigorous Range-Doppler (RD) model for the geometric processing of satellite SAR datasets. But its capability in absolute geolocation of SAR images has not been evaluated quantitatively. Therefore, in this article the problems of error analysis and refinement of SAR RPC model are primarily investigated to improve the absolute accuracy of SAR geolocation. Range propagation delay and azimuth timing error are identified as two major error sources for SAR geolocation. An approach based on SAR image simulation and real-to-simulated image matching is developed to estimate and correct these two errors. Afterwards a refined RPC model can be built from the error-corrected RD model and then used in satellite SAR geocoding. Three experiments with different settings are designed and conducted to comprehensively evaluate the accuracies of SAR geolocation with both ordinary and refined RPC models. All the experimental results demonstrate that with RPC model refinement the absolute location accuracies of geocoded SAR images can be improved significantly, particularly in Easting direction. In another experiment the computation efficiencies of SAR geocoding with both RD and RPC models are compared quantitatively. The results show that by using the RPC model such efficiency can be remarkably improved by at least 16 times. In addition the problem of DEM data selection for SAR image simulation in RPC model refinement is studied by a comparative experiment. The results reveal that the best choice should be using the proper DEM datasets of spatial resolution comparable to that of the SAR images.

  17. Chirp Scaling Algorithms for SAR Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, M.; Cheng, T.; Chen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The chirp scaling SAR processing algorithm is both accurate and efficient. Successful implementation requires proper selection of the interval of output samples, which is a function of the chirp interval, signal sampling rate, and signal bandwidth. Analysis indicates that for both airborne and spaceborne SAR applications in the slant range domain a linear chirp scaling is sufficient. To perform nonlinear interpolation process such as to output ground range SAR images, one can use a nonlinear chirp scaling interpolator presented in this paper.

  18. A Modular and Configurable Instrument Electronics Architecture for "MiniSAR"- An Advanced Smallsat SAR Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Jaime; Pastena, Max; Bierens, Laurens

    2013-08-01

    MiniSAR is a Dutch program focused on the development of a commercial smallsat featuring a SAR instrument, led by SSBV as prime contractor. In this paper an Instrument Electronics (IEL) system concept to meet the MiniSAR demands is presented. This system has several specificities wrt similar initiatives in the European space industry, driven by our main requirement: keep it small.

  19. SIR-C/X-SAR free flyer concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, R.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SAR) - C/X- Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Free Flyer concept are presented. An overview, science objectives, science rationale, geophysical parameters from SAR, programmatic goals, concept description, and a candidate mission description are included.

  20. High resolution SAR applications and instrument design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionisio, C.; Torre, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has viewed, in the last two years, a huge increment of interest from many preset and potential users. The good spatial resolution associated to the all weather capability lead to considering SAR not only a scientific instrument but a tool for verifying and controlling the daily human relationships with the Earth Environment. New missions were identified for SAR as spatial resolution became lower than three meters: disasters, pollution, ships traffic, volcanic eruptions, earthquake effect are only a few of the possible objects which can be effectively detected, controlled and monitored by SAR mounted on satellites. High resolution radar design constraints and dimensioning are discussed.

  1. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  2. Multitemporal Spaceborne SAR Data For Urbanization Monitoring In China: Preliminary Result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yifang; Yousif, Osama Adam

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate multitemporal spaceborne SAR data for urbanization monitoring in China. A generalized version of Kittler- Illingworth minimum-error thresholding algorithm, that takes into account the non-Gaussian distribution of SAR images, was tested to automatically classify the change variable derived from SAR multitemporal images into two classes, change and no change. A modified ratio operator was examined for identifying both positive and negative changes by comparing the multitemporal SAR images on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Various probability density functions such as Log normal, Generalized Gaussian, Nakagami ratio, and Weibull ratio models were tested to model the distribution of the change and no change classes. The preliminary results showed that this unsupervised change detection algorithm is very effective in detecting temporal changes in urban areas using multitemporal SAR images. The initial findings indicated that change detection accuracy varies depending on how the assumed conditional class density function fits the histograms of change and no change classes.

  3. Adsorption of thorium from aqueous solutions by perlite.

    PubMed

    Talip, Z; Eral, M; Hiçsönmez, U

    2009-02-01

    The use of expanded perlite for the adsorption of thorium from aqueous solution by batch technique is presented. The effects of particle size, pH of the solution, initial thorium concentration, shaking time, V/m ratio and temperature were determined. It was found that the adsorption capacity increases by the increase in the pH of the suspensions. The rate of thorium adsorption on expanded perlite was observed to be fast in the first hour of the reaction time. Adsorption isotherms were expressed by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models and the adsorption experiments conducted at 30 +/- 1 degrees C showed that the adsorption isotherms correlated well with the Langmuir model. From the adsorption data, thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG(o), DeltaH(o) and DeltaS(o) were calculated as a function of temperature.

  4. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction from multistatic SAR images.

    PubMed

    Rigling, Brian D; Moses, Randolph L

    2005-08-01

    This paper discusses reconstruction of three-dimensional surfaces from multiple bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Techniques for surface reconstruction from multiple monostatic SAR images already exist, including interferometric processing and stereo SAR. We generalize these methods to obtain algorithms for bistatic interferometric SAR and bistatic stereo SAR. We also propose a framework for predicting the performance of our multistatic stereo SAR algorithm, and, from this framework, we suggest a metric for use in planning strategic deployment of multistatic assets.

  5. Corrections of stratified tropospheric delays in SAR interferometry: Validation with global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, Marie-Pierre; Lasserre, Cécile; Peltzer, Gilles; Cavalié, Olivier; Doubre, Cécile

    2010-05-01

    The main limiting factor on the accuracy of Interferometric SAR measurements (InSAR) comes from phase propagation delays through the troposphere. The delay can be divided into a stratified component, which correlates with the topography and often dominates the tropospheric signal, and a turbulent component. We use Global Atmospheric Models (GAM) to estimate the stratified phase delay and delay-elevation ratio at epochs of SAR acquisitions, and compare them to observed phase delay derived from SAR interferograms. Three test areas are selected with different geographic and climatic environments and with large SAR archive available. The Lake Mead, Nevada, USA is covered by 79 ERS1/2 and ENVISAT acquisitions, the Haiyuan Fault area, Gansu, China, by 24 ERS1/2 acquisitions, and the Afar region, Republic of Djibouti, by 91 Radarsat acquisitions. The hydrostatic and wet stratified delays are computed from GAM as a function of atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure e vertical profiles. The hydrostatic delay, which depends on ratio P/T, varies significantly at low elevation and cannot be neglected. The wet component of the delay depends mostly on the near surface specific humidity. GAM predicted delay-elevation ratios are in good agreement with the ratios derived from InSAR data away from deforming zones. Both estimations of the delay-elevation ratio can thus be used to perform a first order correction of the observed interferometric phase to retrieve a ground motion signal of low amplitude. We also demonstrate that aliasing of daily and seasonal variations in the stratified delay due to uneven sampling of SAR data significantly bias InSAR data stacks or time series produced after temporal smoothing. In all three test cases, the InSAR data stacks or smoothed time series present a residual stratified delay of the order of the expected deformation signal. In all cases, correcting interferograms from the stratified delay removes all these

  6. Corrections of stratified tropospheric delays in SAR interferometry: Validation with global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, M.-P.; Lasserre, C.; Peltzer, G.; Cavalié, O.; Doubre, C.

    2009-09-01

    The main limiting factor on the accuracy of Interferometric SAR measurements (InSAR) comes from phase propagation delays through the troposphere. The delay can be divided into a stratified component, which correlates with the topography and often dominates the tropospheric signal, and a turbulent component. We use Global Atmospheric Models (GAM) to estimate the stratified phase delay and delay-elevation ratio at epochs of SAR acquisitions, and compare them to observed phase delay derived from SAR interferograms. Three test areas are selected with different geographic and climatic environments and with large SAR archive available. The Lake Mead, Nevada, USA is covered by 79 ERS1/2 and ENVISAT acquisitions, the Haiyuan Fault area, Gansu, China, by 24 ERS1/2 acquisitions, and the Afar region, Republic of Djibouti, by 91 Radarsat acquisitions. The hydrostatic and wet stratified delays are computed from GAM as a function of atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure e vertical profiles. The hydrostatic delay, which depends on ratio P/ T, varies significantly at low elevation and cannot be neglected. The wet component of the delay depends mostly on the near surface specific humidity. GAM predicted delay-elevation ratios are in good agreement with the ratios derived from InSAR data away from deforming zones. Both estimations of the delay-elevation ratio can thus be used to perform a first order correction of the observed interferometric phase to retrieve a ground motion signal of low amplitude. We also demonstrate that aliasing of daily and seasonal variations in the stratified delay due to uneven sampling of SAR data significantly bias InSAR data stacks or time series produced after temporal smoothing. In all three test cases, the InSAR data stacks or smoothed time series present a residual stratified delay of the order of the expected deformation signal. In all cases, correcting interferograms from the stratified delay removes all these

  7. Factors affecting drug adsorption on beta zeolites.

    PubMed

    Pasti, Luisa; Sarti, Elena; Cavazzini, Alberto; Marchetti, Nicola; Dondi, Francesco; Martucci, Annalisa

    2013-05-01

    The adsorption behaviour of three commonly used drugs, namely ketoprofen, hydrochlorothiazide and atenolol, from diluted aqueous solutions on beta zeolites with different SiO2/Al2O3 ratio (i.e. 25, 38 and 360) was investigated by changing the ionic strength and the pH, before and after thermal treatment of the adsorbents. The selective adsorption of drugs was confirmed by thermogravimetry and X-ray diffraction. The adsorption capacity of beta zeolites was strongly dependent on both the solution pH and the alumina content of the adsorbent. Such a remarkable difference was interpreted as a function of the interactions between drug molecules and zeolite surface functional groups. Atenolol was readily adsorbed on the less hydrophobic zeolite, under pH conditions in which electrostatic interactions were predominant. On the other hand, ketoprofen adsorption was mainly driven by hydrophobic interactions. For undissociated molecules the adsorption capability increased with the increase of hydrophobicity.

  8. Occurrence rate of SAR arcs during the 23nd solar activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ievenko, Igor

    By data of photometric observations at the Maimaga station (57° N, 200° E, geomagnetic coordinates) at the Yakutsk meridian the occurrence rate of subauroral red (SAR) arcs for the 1997 to 2006 period has been analysed. The observations were carried out during winterspring periods at moonless nights under favorable atmospheric conditions. For˜370 nights of observations (total duration is˜3170 hours) 114 cases of SAR arcs occurrence (˜500 hours) have been registered. The occurrence rate of SAR arcs have been determined as a ratio of the number of registration hour intervals of SAR arcs to the summary observation time in hours for particular months. Subauroral red arcs have been registered every year both in the maximum and in the minimum of the solar activity cycle. The most observation occurrence of red arcs is registered on the rise (˜27%) and decay of the maximum of the solar activity cycle (˜36%). The average occurrence rate of SAR arcs during these years was less than in the 22nd solar activity cycle and is equal to ˜16% of the total observation time. The occurrence rate of SAR arcs observations corresponds to the changes of geomagnetic activity during the 23nd solar activity cycle.

  9. InfoTerra/TerraSAR initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Manfred W.

    2004-01-01

    The overarching goal of the InfoTerra/TerraSAR Initiative is to establish a self-sustaining operational/commercial business built on Europe"s know-how and experience in space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology, in SAR data processing as well as in SAR applications. InfoTerra stands for a new business concept based on supplying innovative geo-information products and services. TerraSAR is a space and ground system conceived to consist of an initial deployment and operation of 2 Radar satellites (one in X- and one in L-band) flying in a tandem configuration in the same orbit. The design of TerraSAR is driven by the market and is user-oriented. TerraSAR is key to capturing a significant proportion of the existing market and to opening new market opportunities, when it becomes operational. The InfoTerra/TerraSAR Initiative has evolved gradually. It started in 1997 as a joint venture between German (DSS) and British (MMS-UK) space industry, strongly supported by both space agencies, DLR and BNSC. In early 2001, DLR and BNSC submitted to ESA the Formal Programme Proposal for InfoTerra/TerraSAR to become an essential element of ESA"s Earth Watch Programme. In summer 2001, when it became evident that there was not yet sufficient support from the ESA Member States to allow immediate start entering into TerraSAR Phase C/D, it has been decided to implement first a TerraSAR consolidation phase. In early 2002, in order to avoid further delays, a contract was signed between DLR and Astrium GmbH on the development of one component of TerraSAR, the TerraSAR-X, in the frame of a national programme, governed by a Public Private Partnership Agreement. Even if now the different launch dates for TerraSAR-X and TerraSAR-L are narrowing down the window of common data acquisition, it is a reasonable starting point, but it should always be kept in mind that the utmost goal for the longterm is to achieve self sustainability by supplying geo-information products and services

  10. Geodetic integration of Sentinel-1A IW data using PSInSAR in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Péter; Hevér, Renáta; Grenerczy, Gyula

    2015-04-01

    ESA's latest Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission Sentinel-1 is a huge step forward in SAR interferometry. With its default acquisition mode called the Interferometric Wide Swath Mode (IW) areas through all scales can be mapped with an excellent return time of 12 days (while only the Sentinel-1A is in orbit). Its operational data policy is also a novelty, it allows scientific users free and unlimited access to data. It implements a new type of ScanSAR mode called Terrain Observation with Progressive Scan (TOPS) SAR. It has the same resolution as ScanSAR but with better signal-to-noise ratio distribution. The bigger coverage is achieved by rotation of the antenna in the azimuth direction, therefore it requires very precise co-registration because even errors under a pixel accuracy can introduce azimuth phase variations caused by differences in Doppler-centroids. In our work we will summarize the benefits and the drawbacks of the IW mode. We would like to implement the processing chain of GAMMA Remote Sensing of such data for mapping surface motion with special attention to the co-registration step. Not only traditional InSAR but the advanced method of Persistent Scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) will be performed and presented as well. PS coverage, along with coherence, is expected to be good due to the small perpendicular and temporal baselines. We would also like to integrate these measurements into national geodetic networks using common reference points. We have installed trihedral corner reflectors at some selected sites to aid precise collocation. Thus, we aim to demonstrate that Sentinel-1 can be effectively used for surface movement detection and monitoring and it can also provide valuable information for the improvement of our networks.

  11. Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, Jerome; Lucas, Bruno; DInardo, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    The prime objective of the SEOM (Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions) element is to federate, support and expand the large international research community that the ERS, ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have build up over the last 20 years for the future European operational Earth Observation missions, the Sentinels. Sentinel-3 builds directly on a proven heritage of ERS-2 and Envisat, and CryoSat-2, with a dual-frequency (Ku and C band) advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Altimeter (SRAL) that provides measurements at a resolution of ~300m in SAR mode along track. Sentinel-3 will provide exact measurements of sea-surface height along with accurate topography measurements over sea ice, ice sheets, rivers and lakes. The first of the two Sentinels is expected to be launched in early 2015. The current universal altimetry toolbox is BRAT (Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry mission's data, but it does not have the capabilities to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA will endeavour to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats, the BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with Matlab/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as netCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth

  12. SAR Altimetry in Coastal Zone: Performances, Limits, Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinardo, S.; Benveniste, J.

    2011-12-01

    Up to now, any effort to retrieve the coastal zone phenomena from the space has been hindered by the intrinsic incapacity of conventional radar altimeters to sample all but largest scales involved in the coastal processes due to its insufficient along- track resolution. However, nowadays, a new technology in Space-borne Altimetry has become reality: the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Altimeter. The acquisition of altimetric data in SAR mode ensures a higher resolving measurement power that shall enable scientists for the first time to aspire to measure even short-scale weak coastal phenomena, thanks to the 20- fold smaller along track radar resolution and 10 dB higher Signal to Noise ratio. The secondary, but significant in coastal zone, effect of the radar footprint shrinking is the expected reduced impact of land contamination on the radar waveforms in the proximity of the shore. As a consequence of this effect, the advent of SAR focusing promises to bring the satellite altimetry remote sensing closer to the shore up to around 500 meters. Anyway, this lower bound of 500 meter on coastal proximity is not always reachable, as the footprint shrinking occurs only in along track direction while the across track resolution shall remain basically unaltered. Hence, the orientation of the satellite ground-track with respect the coastline plays a role crucial for an effective filtering out of the off-nadir land-originated signals. In the present work, utilizing the current CryoSat-2 Altimeter Dataset (SAR L1b) acquired over coastal sea water, and by retracking the SAR L1b waveforms, a performances study of SAR altimetry in coastal zone will be addressed and the benefits and limits of this new technology highlighted. As particular study area, the Tyrrhenian Sea has been selected: statistics and metrics for sea surface height and significant wave height, as calculated from a cycle of passes, will be assessed, shown and interpreted. Finally, employing the Cryo

  13. BSA adsorption on bimodal PEO brushes.

    PubMed

    Bosker, W T E; Iakovlev, P A; Norde, W; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2005-06-15

    BSA adsorption onto bimodal PEO brushes at a solid surface was measured using optical reflectometry. Bimodal brushes consist of long (N=770) and short (N=48) PEO chains and were prepared on PS surfaces, applying mixtures of PS(29)-PEO(48) and PS(37)-PEO(770) block copolymers and using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Pi-A isotherms of (mixtures of) the block copolymers were measured to establish the brush regime. The isotherms of PS(29)-PEO(48) show hysteresis between compression and expansion cycles, indicating aggregation of the PS(29)-PEO(48) upon compression. Mixtures of PS(29)-PEO(48) and PS(37)-PEO(770) demonstrate a similar hysteresis effect, which eventually vanishes when the ratio of PS(37)-PEO(770) to PS(29)-PEO(48) is increased. The adsorption of BSA was determined at brushes for which the grafting density of the long PEO chains was varied, while the total grafting density was kept constant. BSA adsorption onto monomodal PEO(48) and PEO(770) brushes was determined for comparison. The BSA adsorption behavior of the bimodal brushes is similar to the adsorption of BSA at PEO(770) monomodal brushes. The maximum of BSA adsorption at low grafting density of PEO(770) can be explained by ternary adsorption, implying an attraction between BSA and PEO. The contribution of primary adsorption to the total adsorbed amount is negligible.

  14. Cross-calibration between airborne SAR sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Manfred; Olivier, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    As Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system performance and experience in SAR signature evaluation increase, quantitative analysis becomes more and more important. Such analyses require an absolute radiometric calibration of the complete SAR system. To keep the expenditure on calibration of future multichannel and multisensor remote sensing systems (e.g., X-SAR/SIR-C) within a tolerable level, data from different tracks and different sensors (channels) must be cross calibrated. The 1989 joint E-SAR/DC-8 SAR calibration campaign gave a first opportunity for such an experiment, including cross sensor and cross track calibration. A basic requirement for successful cross calibration is the stability of the SAR systems. The calibration parameters derived from different tracks and the polarimetric properties of the uncalibrated data are used to describe this stability. Quality criteria for a successful cross calibration are the agreement of alpha degree values and the consistency of radar cross sections of equally sized corner reflectors. Channel imbalance and cross talk provide additional quality in case of the polarimetric DC-8 SAR.

  15. A Simple Model for a SARS Epidemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Keng Cheng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the use of an ordinary differential equation in modelling the SARS outbreak in Singapore. The model provides an excellent example of using mathematics in a real life situation. The mathematical concepts involved are accessible to students with A level Mathematics backgrounds. Data for the SARS epidemic in Singapore are…

  16. Feature preserving compression of high resolution SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhigao; Hu, Fuxiang; Sun, Tao; Qin, Qianqing

    2006-10-01

    Compression techniques are required to transmit the large amounts of high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image data over the available channels. Common Image compression methods may lose detail and weak information in original images, especially at smoothness areas and edges with low contrast. This is known as "smoothing effect". It becomes difficult to extract and recognize some useful image features such as points and lines. We propose a new SAR image compression algorithm that can reduce the "smoothing effect" based on adaptive wavelet packet transform and feature-preserving rate allocation. For the reason that images should be modeled as non-stationary information resources, a SAR image is partitioned to overlapped blocks. Each overlapped block is then transformed by adaptive wavelet packet according to statistical features of different blocks. In quantifying and entropy coding of wavelet coefficients, we integrate feature-preserving technique. Experiments show that quality of our algorithm up to 16:1 compression ratio is improved significantly, and more weak information is reserved.

  17. SAR processing using SHARC signal processing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huxtable, Barton D.; Jackson, Christopher R.; Skaron, Steve A.

    1998-09-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is uniquely suited to help solve the Search and Rescue problem since it can be utilized either day or night and through both dense fog or thick cloud cover. Other papers in this session, and in this session in 1997, describe the various SAR image processing algorithms that are being developed and evaluated within the Search and Rescue Program. All of these approaches to using SAR data require substantial amounts of digital signal processing: for the SAR image formation, and possibly for the subsequent image processing. In recognition of the demanding processing that will be required for an operational Search and Rescue Data Processing System (SARDPS), NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and NASA/Stennis Space Center are conducting a technology demonstration utilizing SHARC multi-chip modules from Boeing to perform SAR image formation processing.

  18. Interferometric SAR imaging by transmitting stepped frequency chaotic noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Gu, Xiang; Zhai, Wenshuai; Dong, Xiao; Shi, Xiaojin; Kang, Xueyan

    2015-10-01

    Noise radar has been applied in many fields since it was proposed more than 50 years ago. However, it has not been applied to interferometric SAR imaging yet as far as we know. This paper introduces our recent work on interferometric noise radar. An interferometric SAR system was developed which can transmit both chirp signal and chaotic noise signal (CNS) at multiple carrier frequencies. An airborne experiment with this system by transmitting both signals was carried out, and the data were processed to show the capability of interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The results shows that although the interferometric phase quality of CNS is degraded due to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is lower compared with that of chirp signal, we still can get satisfied DEM after multi-looking processing. Another work of this paper is to apply compressed sensing (CS) theory to the interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The CS theory states that if a signal is sparse, then it can be accurately reconstructed with much less sampled data than that regularly required according to Nyquist Sampling Theory. To form a structured random matrix, if the transmitted signal is of fixed waveform, then random subsampling is needed. However, if the transmitted signal is of random waveform, then only uniform subsampling is needed. This is another advantage of noise signal. Both the interferometric phase images and the DEMs by regular method and by CS method are processed with results compared. It is shown that the degradation of interferometric phases due to subsampling is larger than that of amplitude image.

  19. Forest Information Extraction from Airborne P-Band PolSAR and X-Band InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Tian, Xin; Feng, Qi; Zhao, Lei; Li, Lan; Hong, Wen; Pottier, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The key research progress of forest information extraction from high resolution PolSAR/InSAR data acquired by one China airborne system were summarized. Firstly, the airborne campaign activities carried out in 2012, 2013, in China were introduced. Secondly, the key SAR/InSAR data processing steps, such as, InSAR processing, SAR image geocoding terrain correction (GTC),the methods used to derive forest height, forest above ground biomass (AGB)from LiDAR, CCD and ground plots data were described. Finally, we introduced the forest information extraction methods and preliminary validation results from P-band PolSAR data and single baseline X-band InSAR data: (1)Forest height inversion using high resolution X-band InSAR data;(2) Forest AGB estimation using P-band PolSAR data; (3) Forest land cover types classification using PolSAR data.

  20. Forest Information Extraction from Airborne P-Band PolSAR and X-Band InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Erxue; Li, Zengyuan; Tian, Xin; Feng, Qi; Zhao, Lei; Li, Lan; Hong, Wen; Pottier, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The key research progress of forest information extraction from high resolution PolSAR/InSAR data acquired by one China airborne system were summarized. Firstly, the airborne campaign activities carried out in 2012, 2013, in China were introduced. Secondly, the key SAR/InSAR data processing steps, such as, InSAR processing, SAR image geocoding terrain correction (GTC), the methods used to derive forest height, forest above ground biomass (AGB) from LiDAR, CCD and ground plots data were described. Finally, we introduced the forest information extraction methods and preliminary validation results from P-band PolSAR data and single baseline X-band InSAR data: (1) Forest height inversion using high resolution X-band InSAR data; (2) Forest AGB estimation using P-band PolSAR data; (3) Forest land cover types classification using PolSAR data.

  1. Validation of burst overlapping for ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 ScanSAR-ScanSAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsuaki, Ryo; Motohka, Takeshi; Ohki, Masato; Watanabe, Manabu; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2016-10-01

    The Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) aboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite- 2 (ALOS-2, "DAICHI-2") is the latest L-band spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). PALSAR-2 observes the world mainly with 10 m resolution / 70 km swath Stripmap mode and 25 m resolution / 350 km swath ScanSAR mode. The 3-m resolution Stripmap mode is mainly used upon Japan. 350 km ScanSAR observation could detect large scale deformation e.g., the Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake and its aftershocks in 2015. ALOS-2 ScanSAR is the first one that supports ScanSAR-ScanSAR interferometry in L-band spaceborne SAR. However, because of the parameter setting error for the orbit estimation, ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 ScanSAR could achieve little number of interferometric pair until the software modification on February 8, 2015. That is, the burst overlap timing required for the interferometric analysis was insufficient and it depends on the observation date. In this paper, we report the investigation results of this case and discuss the current status of the ALOS-2 ScanSAR InSAR. Some archives achieved before February 8, 2015 can be used for interferometric analysis with after Feb. 8. However, most of them have no interferometric pair. We also report that the archives acquired after February 8, have enough burst overlapping.

  2. Analysis of the local worst-case SAR exposure caused by an MRI multi-transmit body coil in anatomical models of the human body.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Esra; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Murbach, Manuel; Christ, Andreas; Cabot, Eugenia; Kuster, Niels

    2011-08-07

    Multi-transmit coils are increasingly being employed in high-field magnetic resonance imaging, along with a growing interest in multi-transmit body coils. However, they can lead to an increase in whole-body and local specific absorption rate (SAR) compared to conventional body coils excited in circular polarization for the same total incident input power. In this study, the maximum increase of SAR for three significantly different human anatomies is investigated for a large 3 T (128 MHz) multi-transmit body coil using numerical simulations and a (generalized) eigenvalue-based approach. The results demonstrate that the increase of SAR strongly depends on the anatomy. For the three models and normalization to the sum of the rung currents squared, the whole-body averaged SAR increases by up to a factor of 1.6 compared to conventional excitation and the peak spatial SAR (averaged over any 10 cm(3) of tissue) by up to 13.4. For some locations the local averaged SAR goes up as much as 800 times (130 when looking only at regions where it is above 1% of the peak spatial SAR). The ratio of the peak spatial SAR to the whole-body SAR increases by a factor of up to 47 and can reach values above 800. Due to the potentially much larger power deposition, additional, preferably patient-specific, considerations are necessary to avoid injuries by such systems.

  3. Updated progress in theories and applications of spaceborne SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan-Ling; Huang, Cheng; Ding, Xiao-Li; Li, Zhi-Wei

    2006-12-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) and D-InSAR (Differential InSAR) are rapidly developed new technologies of space geodesy during the late 20th century, and now obviously become hot research topics in the field of microwave remote sensing. Compared with the other sensors, InSAR possesses many incomparable advantages such as the capability to work at all-time and under all weather, very high spatial resolution and strong penetrability through the ground surface. This paper introduces general status of SAR, InSAR, D-InSAR technology, and the principles of InSAR and D-InSAR. New theories and the potential problems of (D-)InSAR technology are largely discussed, including multi-baseline interferometry, Pol-InSAR technique, the correction of atmospheric effects, permanent Scatterers method, the synthesization technique between InSAR and GPS, LIDAR etc., and the InSAR parallel algorithm. Then the new applications of InSAR and D-InSAR are described in detail including 3D topographic mapping, deformation monitoring (including surface subsidence, landside monitoring and ITRF's foundation and maintenance, etc.), thematic mapping (including agriculture and forestry, oceanic surveying and flood monitoring, etc.) and meteorology etc.. Finally, the prospect and future trends in InSAR development are summarized.

  4. Antenna motion errors in bistatic SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Yazıcı, Birsen; Cagri Yanik, H.

    2015-06-01

    Antenna trajectory or motion errors are pervasive in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. Motion errors typically result in smearing and positioning errors in SAR images. Understanding the relationship between the trajectory errors and position errors in reconstructed images is essential in forming focused SAR images. Existing studies on the effect of antenna motion errors are limited to certain geometries, trajectory error models or monostatic SAR configuration. In this paper, we present an analysis of position errors in bistatic SAR imagery due to antenna motion errors. Bistatic SAR imagery is becoming increasingly important in the context of passive imaging and multi-sensor imaging. Our analysis provides an explicit quantitative relationship between the trajectory errors and the positioning errors in bistatic SAR images. The analysis is applicable to arbitrary trajectory errors and arbitrary imaging geometries including wide apertures and large scenes. We present extensive numerical simulations to validate the analysis and to illustrate the results in commonly used bistatic configurations and certain trajectory error models.

  5. Graph mining for SAR transfer series.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Wawer, Mathias; Wassermann, Anne Mai; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2012-04-23

    The transfer of SAR information from one analog series to another is a difficult, yet highly attractive task in medicinal chemistry. At present, the evaluation of SAR transfer potential from a data mining perspective is still in its infancy. Only recently, a first computational approach has been introduced to evaluate SAR transfer events. Here, a substructure relationship-based molecular network representation has been used as a starting point to systematically identify SAR transfer series in large compound data sets. For this purpose, a methodology is introduced that consists of two stages. For graph mining, an algorithm has been designed that extracts all parallel series from compound data sets. A parallel series is formed by two series of analogs with different core structures but pairwise corresponding substitution patterns. The SAR transfer potential of identified parallel series is then evaluated using a scoring function that emphasizes corresponding potency progression over many analog pairs and large potency ranges. The substructure relationship-based molecular network in combination with the graph mining algorithm currently represents the only generally applicable approach to systematically detect SAR transfer events in large compound data sets. The combined approach has been evaluated on a large number of compound data sets and shown to systematically identify SAR transfer series.

  6. The Alaska SAR processor - Operations and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carande, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    The Alaska SAR (synthetic-aperture radar) Facility (ASF) will be capable of receiving, processing, archiving, and producing a variety of SAR image products from three satellite-borne SARs: E-ERS-1 (ESA), J-ERS-1 (NASDA) and Radarsat (Canada). Crucial to the success of the ASF is the Alaska SAR processor (ASP), which will be capable of processing over 200 100-km x 100-km (Seasat-like) frames per day from the raw SAR data, at a ground resolution of about 30 m x 30 m. The processed imagery is of high geometric and radiometric accuracy, and is geolocated to within 500 m. Special-purpose hardware has been designed to execute a SAR processing algorithm to achieve this performance. This hardware is currently undergoing acceptance testing for delivery to the University of Alaska. Particular attention has been devoted to making the operations semi-automated and to providing a friendly operator interface via a computer workstation. The operations and control of the Alaska SAR processor are described.

  7. SAR and LIDAR fusion: experiments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew C.; Zaugg, Evan C.; Bradley, Joshua P.; Bowden, Ryan D.

    2013-05-01

    In recent years ARTEMIS, Inc. has developed a series of compact, versatile Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems which have been operated on a variety of small manned and unmanned aircraft. The multi-frequency-band SlimSAR has demonstrated a variety of capabilities including maritime and littoral target detection, ground moving target indication, polarimetry, interferometry, change detection, and foliage penetration. ARTEMIS also continues to build upon the radar's capabilities through fusion with other sensors, such as electro-optical and infrared camera gimbals and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) devices. In this paper we focus on experiments and applications employing SAR and LIDAR fusion. LIDAR is similar to radar in that it transmits a signal which, after being reflected or scattered by a target area, is recorded by the sensor. The differences are that a LIDAR uses a laser as a transmitter and optical sensors as a receiver, and the wavelengths used exhibit a very different scattering phenomenology than the microwaves used in radar, making SAR and LIDAR good complementary technologies. LIDAR is used in many applications including agriculture, archeology, geo-science, and surveying. Some typical data products include digital elevation maps of a target area and features and shapes extracted from the data. A set of experiments conducted to demonstrate the fusion of SAR and LIDAR data include a LIDAR DEM used in accurately processing the SAR data of a high relief area (mountainous, urban). Also, feature extraction is used in improving geolocation accuracy of the SAR and LIDAR data.

  8. Land Subsidence Monitoring Using PS-InSAR Technique for L-Band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, S.; Chatterjee, R. S.; Singh, K. B.; Kumar, D.

    2016-10-01

    Differential SAR-Interferometry (D-InSAR) is one of the potential source to measure land surface motion induced due to underground coal mining. However, this technique has many limitation such as atmospheric in homogeneities, spatial de-correlation, and temporal decorrelation. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry synthetic aperture radar (PS-InSAR) belongs to a family of time series InSAR technique, which utilizes the properties of some of the stable natural and anthropogenic targets which remain coherent over long time period. In this study PS-InSAR technique has been used to monitor land subsidence over selected location of Jharia Coal field which has been correlated with the ground levelling measurement. This time series deformation observed using PS InSAR helped us to understand the nature of the ground surface deformation due to underground mining activity.

  9. First Results from an Airborne Ka-band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed SweepSAR technique that breaks typical Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) trade space using time-dependent multi-beam DBF on receive. Developing SweepSAR implementation using array-fed reflector for proposed DESDynI Earth Radar Mission concept. Performed first-of-a-kind airborne demonstration of the SweepSAR concept at Ka-band (35.6 GHz). Validated calibration and antenna pattern data sufficient for beam forming in elevation. (1) Provides validation evidence that the proposed Deformation Ecosystem Structure Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) SAR architecture is sound. (2) Functions well even with large variations in receiver gain / phase. Future plans include using prototype DESDynI SAR digital flight hardware to do the beam forming in real-time onboard the aircraft.

  10. Primary studies of Chinese spaceborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhen-Song; Wu, Guo-Xiang; Guo, Hua-Dong; Wei, Zhong-Quan; Zhu, Min-Hui

    1993-01-01

    The primary studies on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in China are discussed. The SAR will be launched aboard a Chinese satellite and operated at L-band with HH polarization. The purpose of the mission in consideration is dedicated to resources and environment uses, especially to natural disaster monitoring. The ground resolution is designed as 25 m x 25 m for detailed mode and 100 m x 100 m for wide scan-SAR mode. The off-nadir angle can be varied from 20 to 40 deg. The key system concepts are introduced.

  11. NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, N. (Editor); Evans, D. L. (Editor); Held, D. N. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Speaker-supplied summaries of the talks given at the NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop on February 4 and 5, 1985, are provided. These talks dealt mostly with composite quadpolarization imagery from a geologic or ecologic prespective. An overview and summary of the system characteristics of the L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) flown on the NASA CV-990 aircraft are included as supplementary information. Other topics ranging from phase imagery and interferometric techniques classifications of specific areas, and the potentials and limitations of SAR imagery in various applications are discussed.

  12. SAR observations of coastal zone conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, G. A.; Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology to the observation of coastal zones phenomena are detailed. The conditions observed include gravity wave detection, surf zone location, surface currents, and long-period 'surf beats'. Algorithms have been developed and successfully tested that determine significant wave and current parameters from the sea surface backscatter of microwave energy. Doppler information from the SAR optical correlator allows a rough estimation of near shore surface flow velocities that has been found in agreement with both theory and in situ observations as well. Seasat SAR data of the Scotland and North Carolina coasts are considered, as well as the results of bathymetric updating of coastal area charts.

  13. Imaging of Ocean Waves by SAR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    SAR o Contract N00014-87-C-0687N TDTIC R.L. Schult iZ L E C T E F.S. Henyey -JAN 2 4 1989 J.A. Wright Center for Studies of Nonlinear Dynamics La...Waves by SAR R.L. Schult F.S. Henyey J.A. Wright Center for Studies of Nonlinear Dynamics La Jolla Institute 7855 Fay Avenue, Suite 320 La Jolla...TOWARD data. 467.abstract 7-13-󈨜 Imaging of Ocean Waves by SAR 1. Introduction Synthetic Aperture Radar images of long-wavelength features on the

  14. Segmentation Of Multifrequency, Multilook SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Kwok, Ronald; Chellappa, Rama

    1993-01-01

    Segmentation of multifrequency, multilook synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) image intensity data into regions, within each of which backscattering characteristics of target scene considered homogeneous, enhanced by use of two statistical models. One represents statistics of multifrequency, multilook speckled intensities of SAR picture elements; other represents statistics of labels applied to regions into which picture elements grouped. Each region represents different type of terrain, terrain cover, or other surface; e.g., forest, agricultural land, sea ice, or water. Segmentation of image into regions of neighboring picture elements accomplished by method similar to that described in "Algorithms For Segmentation Of Complex-Amplitude SAR Data" (NPO-18524).

  15. Change Detection in a Short Time Sequence of Polarimetric C-Band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Based on an omnibus likelihood ratio test statistic for the equality of several variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution and a factorization of this test statistic with associated p-values, change analysis in a time series of multilook, polarimetric SAR data in the covariance matrix representation is carried out. The omnibus test statistic and its factorization detect if and when change(s) occur. The technique is demonstrated on airborne EMISAR C-band data but may be applied to ALOS, COSMO-SkyMed, RadarSat-2 Sentinel-1, TerraSAR-X, and Yaogan data also.

  16. Observation of Planetary Oceans with Fully Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Wooil M.

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most cost effective and powerful all weather tools for observation of planetary surface without sun light. The SAR systems can observe planetary surfaces with the very high resolution and large spatial coverage. We have developed and improved the algorithms for extracting quantitative information on geophysical parameters using various types of SAR data available on Earth's surface, both space-borne SAR (ERS-1/2, RADARSAT, and ENVISAT ASAR) and airborne SAR (NASA(JPL) AIRSAR). SAR is the only system that can provide a synoptic view of find wind fields near the coastal area on Earth. Many SAR images including RADARSAT and ENVISAT ASAR's alternating polarization mode and wide swath mode were to investigate the ability of retrieving sea surface wind field and the results are quite accurate and operationally acceptable. We installed corner reflectors on the nearby beach to calibrate the SAR data, and we obtained in-situ measurements from the several coast-based automatic weather systems and ocean buoys. Using the simultaneously acquired polarization ENVISAT ASAR data (HH and VV), the most appropriate polarization ratio was evaluated and applied for improving the wind retrieval model. In addition, the best combinations depending on given sea states and incidence angle ranges were investigated. The characteristics of short-period and long-period (near-inertial) internal waves are also investigated with several space-borne SAR systems. The possibility of inferring characteristics of the interior ocean dynamics from the SAR image associated with internal solitary waves was tested using a hydrodynamic interaction model (action balance equation) and a radar backscattering model (two-scale tilted Bragg model). These models were used iteratively to fit the observed SAR data to the simulated SAR. The estimated results were compared with in-situ measurements. The typical scales and the spatial and temporal characteristics of internal

  17. Atmosphere Observations by Geosynchronous SARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti guarnieri, Andrea; Rocca, Fabio; Wadge, Geoff; Schulz, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    We analyze different geosynchronous Synthetic Aperture RADAR concepts aimed to get both tropospheric and ionospheric delay maps with a revisit time of minutes and sub-continental coverage. Such products could be used either to compensate the delay in LEO-SAR missions and GNSS, or to generate integrated water-vapor maps to be used for Numerical Weather Forecast. The system exploits the principle of RADAR location, by transmitting a pulse with a suitable bandwidth, and the residual non-zero eccentricity of COMmunication SATellites. Different concepts are proposed as payload in COMSAT, or constellations of small satellites, that is monostatic or bistatic/multistatic RADARS. The selection of the best frequency, from L to Ku, and the analysis of performances is presented.

  18. Combined DEM Extration Method from StereoSAR and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Zhang, J. X.; Duan, M. Y.; Huang, G. M.; Yang, S. C.

    2015-06-01

    A pair of SAR images acquired from different positions can be used to generate digital elevation model (DEM). Two techniques exploiting this characteristic have been introduced: stereo SAR and interferometric SAR. They permit to recover the third dimension (topography) and, at the same time, to identify the absolute position (geolocation) of pixels included in the imaged area, thus allowing the generation of DEMs. In this paper, StereoSAR and InSAR combined adjustment model are constructed, and unify DEM extraction from InSAR and StereoSAR into the same coordinate system, and then improve three dimensional positioning accuracy of the target. We assume that there are four images 1, 2, 3 and 4. One pair of SAR images 1,2 meet the required conditions for InSAR technology, while the other pair of SAR images 3,4 can form stereo image pairs. The phase model is based on InSAR rigorous imaging geometric model. The master image 1 and the slave image 2 will be used in InSAR processing, but the slave image 2 is only used in the course of establishment, and the pixels of the slave image 2 are relevant to the corresponding pixels of the master image 1 through image coregistration coefficient, and it calculates the corresponding phase. It doesn't require the slave image in the construction of the phase model. In Range-Doppler (RD) model, the range equation and Doppler equation are a function of target geolocation, while in the phase equation, the phase is also a function of target geolocation. We exploit combined adjustment model to deviation of target geolocation, thus the problem of target solution is changed to solve three unkonwns through seven equations. The model was tested for DEM extraction under spaceborne InSAR and StereoSAR data and compared with InSAR and StereoSAR methods respectively. The results showed that the model delivered a better performance on experimental imagery and can be used for DEM extraction applications.

  19. Fast, facile and ethidium bromide-free assay based on the use of adsorption indicator for the estimation of polyethylenimine to nucleic acid ratio of complete polyplex assembly for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Plianwong, Samarwadee; Opanasopit, Praneet; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak

    2013-10-15

    A new method was developed for the estimation of polyethylenimine (PEI) to nucleic acid ratio at which the polyplex was completely formed. The assay relied on the attraction of dichlorofluoresceinate dye to adsorb on self-assembling particles as counterions, as induced by the surface charge of the polyplex which became positive once PEI associated equivalently with nucleic acid. This phenomenon resulted in the appearance of pink colored pellets of the polyplex after centrifugation. By the other means, sodium hydroxide solution might be added to free the adsorbed dye into the solution, producing conspicuous green fluorescence under UV light (366 nm). The assay was well applied to the polyplex formulations of PEI and plasmid DNA or siRNA with satisfactory detectability and gave the results in agreement with those from gel retardation method and zeta potential analysis. Importantly, the proposed method required no sophisticated instruments, time-consuming gel electrophoresis, carcinogenic ethidium bromide as well as costly dyes and the analysis could be accomplished within less than 10 min. Hence, it was a fast, facile, cost-effective and safe-for-operator alternative method, suited for the investigation of the optimal PEI to nucleic acid ratio for gene delivery.

  20. Wavelet Compression of Complex SAR Imagery Using Complex- and Real-Valued Wavelets: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.W.; Kiser, C.; Magotra, N.

    1998-10-27

    While many synthetic aperture radar (SAR) applications use only detected imagery, dramatic improvements in resolution and employment of algorithms requiring complex-valued SAR imagery suggest the need for compression of complex data. Here, we investigate the benefits of using complex- valued wavelets on complex SAR imagery in the embedded zerotree wavelet compression algorithm, compared to using real-valued wavelets applied separately to the real and imaginary components. This compression is applied at low ratios (4:1-12:1) for high fidelity output. The complex spatial correlation metric is used to numerically evaluate quality. Numerical results are tabulated and original and decompressed imagery are presented as well as correlation maps to allow visual comparisons.

  1. Change detection in high resolution SAR images based on multiscale texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Caihuan; Gao, Ziqiang

    2011-12-01

    This paper studied on change detection algorithm of high resolution (HR) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images based on multi-scale texture features. Firstly, preprocessed multi-temporal Terra-SAR images were decomposed by 2-D dual tree complex wavelet transform (DT-CWT), and multi-scale texture features were extracted from those images. Then, log-ratio operation was utilized to get difference images, and the Bayes minimum error theory was used to extract change information from difference images. Lastly, precision assessment was done. Meanwhile, we compared with the result of method based on texture features extracted from gray-level cooccurrence matrix (GLCM). We had a conclusion that, change detection algorithm based on multi-scale texture features has a great more improvement, which proves an effective method to change detect of high spatial resolution SAR images.

  2. SAR Imagery Applied to the Monitoring of Hyper-Saline Deposits: Death Valley Example (CA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasne, Yannick; Paillou, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony; Chapman, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims at understanding the influence of salinity on the dielectric constant of soils and then on the backscattering coeff cients recorded by airborne/spaceborne SAR systems. Based on dielectric measurements performed over hyper-saline deposits in Death Valley (CA), as well as laboratory electromagnetic characterization of salts and water mixtures, we used the dielectric constants as input parameters of analytical IEM simulations to model both the amplitude and phase behaviors of SAR signal at C, and L-bands. Our analytical simulations allow to reproduce specif c copolar signatures recorded in SAR data, corresponding to the Cottonball Basin saltpan. We also propose the copolar backscattering ratio and phase difference as indicators of moistened and salt-affected soils. More precisely, we show that these copolar indicators should allow to monitor the seasonal variations of the dielectric properties of saline deposits.

  3. Statistical modeling of SAR images: a survey.

    PubMed

    Gao, Gui

    2010-01-01

    Statistical modeling is essential to SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) image interpretation. It aims to describe SAR images through statistical methods and reveal the characteristics of these images. Moreover, statistical modeling can provide a technical support for a comprehensive understanding of terrain scattering mechanism, which helps to develop algorithms for effective image interpretation and creditable image simulation. Numerous statistical models have been developed to describe SAR image data, and the purpose of this paper is to categorize and evaluate these models. We first summarize the development history and the current researching state of statistical modeling, then different SAR image models developed from the product model are mainly discussed in detail. Relevant issues are also discussed. Several promising directions for future research are concluded at last.

  4. Tracking ocean wave spectrum from SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A. D.; Beal, R. C.; Monaldo, F. M.; Tilley, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    An end to end algorithm for recovery of ocean wave spectral peaks from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is described. Current approaches allow precisions of 1 percent in wave number, and 0.6 deg in direction.

  5. Formation Flying for Distributed InSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel P.; Murray, Emmanuell A.; Ploen, Scott R.; Gromov, Konstantin G.; Chen, Curtis W.

    2006-01-01

    We consider two spacecraft flying in formation to create interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Several candidate orbits for such in InSar formation have been previously determined based on radar performance and Keplerian orbital dynamics. However, with out active control, disturbance-induced drift can degrade radar performance and (in the worst case) cause a collision. This study evaluates the feasibility of operating the InSAR spacecraft as a formation, that is, with inner-spacecraft sensing and control. We describe the candidate InSAR orbits, design formation guidance and control architectures and algorithms, and report the (Delta)(nu) and control acceleration requirements for the candidate orbits for several tracking performance levels. As part of determining formation requirements, a formation guidance algorithm called Command Virtual Structure is introduced that can reduce the (Delta)(nu) requirements compared to standard Leader/Follower formation approaches.

  6. Polarimetric SAR Interferometry Evaluation in Mangroves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung-Kuk; Fatoyinbo,Temilola; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sun, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    TanDEM-X (TDX) enables to generate an interferometric coherence without temporal decorrelation effect that is the most critical factor for a successful Pol-InSAR inversion, as have recently been used for forest parameter retrieval. This paper presents mangrove forest height estimation only using single-pass/single-baseline/dual-polarization TDX data by means of new dual-Pol-InSAR inversion technique. To overcome a lack of one polarization in a conventional Pol- InSAR inversion (i.e. an underdetermined problem), the ground phase in the Pol-InSAR model is directly estimated from TDX interferograms assuming flat underlying topography in mangrove forest. The inversion result is validated against lidar measurement data (NASA's G-LiHT data).

  7. SAR/LANDSAT image registration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphrey, S. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Temporal registration of synthetic aperture radar data with LANDSAT-MSS data is both feasible (from a technical standpoint) and useful (from an information-content viewpoint). The greatest difficulty in registering aircraft SAR data to corrected LANDSAT-MSS data is control-point location. The differences in SAR and MSS data impact the selection of features that will serve as a good control points. The SAR and MSS data are unsuitable for automatic computer correlation of digital control-point data. The gray-level data can not be compared by the computer because of the different response characteristics of the MSS and SAR images.

  8. SAR Indicators for Morphological Changes and Bivalve Beds on Intertidal Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, Martin; Melchionna, Sabrina; Kemme, Linnea

    2016-08-01

    We analysed a large amount of high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of dry-fallen intertidal flats on the German North Sea coast with respect to the imaging of sediments, macrophytes, and mussels. TerraSAR-X and Radarsat-2 images of four test areas acquired from 2008 to 2013 form the basis for the present investigation and are used to demonstrate that pairs of SAR images, if combined through basic algebraic operations, can already provide indicators for morphological changes and for bivalve (oyster and mussel) beds. Multi-temporal analyses of series of SAR images allow detecting bivalve beds, since the radar backscattering from those beds is generally high, whereas that from sediments may vary with imaging geometry and environmental conditions. Our results further show evidence that also single-acquisition, dual- polarization SAR imagery can be used in this respect. The polarization coefficient (i.e., the ratio of the difference and the sum of both co-polarizations) can be used to infer indicators for oyster and blue-mussel beds.

  9. Structural classification of marshes with Polarimetric SAR highlighting the temporal mapping of marshes exposed to oil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey III, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical relationships between field-derived Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Leaf Angle Distribution (LAD) and polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) based biophysical indicators were created and applied to map S. alterniflora marsh canopy structure. PolSAR and field data were collected near concurrently in the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012 in coastal marshes, and PolSAR data alone were acquired in 2009. Regression analyses showed that LAI correspondence with the PolSAR biophysical indicator variables equaled or exceeded those of vegetation water content (VWC) correspondences. In the final six regressor model, the ratio HV/VV explained 49% of the total 77% explained LAI variance, and the HH-VV coherence and phase information accounted for the remainder. HV/HH dominated the two regressor LAD relationship, and spatial heterogeneity and backscatter mechanism followed by coherence information dominated the final three regressor model that explained 74% of the LAD variance. Regression results applied to 2009 through 2012 PolSAR images showed substantial changes in marsh LAI and LAD. Although the direct cause was not substantiated, following a release of freshwater in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the fairly uniform interior marsh structure of 2009 was more vertical and dense shortly after the oil spill cessation. After 2010, marsh structure generally progressed back toward the 2009 uniformity; however, the trend was more disjointed in oil impact marshes.             

  10. SARS: Down But Still a Threat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    economic and political impact. • Although SARS has killed far fewer people than die each year from more common maladies such as pneumonia, influenza...is not necessarily authoritative. DI Cartography Center/MPG 764135AI 8-03 All of these diseases, except cholera , dengue, and diphtheria, are... Cholera O1 Dengue/Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Cholera O139 Dengue 9 Discussion SARS: Down But Still a Threat The Global Health Challenge

  11. Introduction to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Lynx 1999 10 cm × 10 cm Ku MISAR 2003 0.5 m × 0.5 m Ka RAMSES 1994 10 cm × 10 cm P,L,S,C,X,Ku,Ka,W MEMPHIS 1997 20 cm × 20 cm Ka,W E-SAR 1994 1.5...Bamler, I. G. Cumming and F. H. Wong , Precision SAR processing using chirp scaling, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 32, No. 4

  12. Classification Of Terrain In Polarimetric SAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Kong, Jin A.; Shin, Robert T.; Lim, Harold; Swartz, Albert; Yueh, Simon H.

    1993-01-01

    Two algorithms processing polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar data found effective in assigning various parts of SAR images to classes representing different types of terrain. Partially automate interpretation of SAR imagery, reducing amount of photointerpretation needed and putting whole interpretation process on more quantitative and systematic basis. First algorithm implements Bayesian classification scheme "supervised" by use of training data. Second algorithm implements classification procedure unsupervised.

  13. Bacteriorhodopsin Film For Processing SAR Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jeffrey W.; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Margalit, Ruth; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1992-01-01

    "Instant" photographic film based on semisynthetic retinal pigment bacteriorhodopsin proposed for optical processing of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) signals. Input image recorded on film by laser operating at writing wavelength of bacteriorhodopsin, and output image recorded on computer by standard frame-grabber. Because it requires no chemical development, enables processing in nearly real time. Fast response and high resolution well suited for application. Film reusable, with concomitant reduction in cost of SAR processing.

  14. Optimization of a DNA vaccine against SARS.

    PubMed

    Zakhartchouk, Alexander N; Viswanathan, Sathiyanarayanan; Moshynskyy, Igor; Petric, Martin; Babiuk, Lorne A

    2007-10-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) first appeared in Southern China in November 2002, and then quickly spread to 33 countries on five continents along international air travel routes. Although the SARS epidemic has been contained, there is a clear need for a safe and effective vaccine should an outbreak of a SARS-CoV infection reappear in human population. In this study, we tested four DNA-vaccine constructs: (1) pLL70, containing cDNA for the SARS-CoV spike (S) gene; (2) pcDNA-SS, containing codon-optimized S gene for SARS-CoV S protein (residues 12-1255) fused with a leader sequence derived from the human CD5 gene; (3) pcDNA-St, containing the gene encoding the N-portion of the codon-optimized S gene (residues 12-532) with the CD5 leader sequence; (4) pcDNA-St-VP22C, containing the gene encoding the N-portion of the codon-optimized S protein with the CD5 leader sequence fused with the C-terminal 138 amino acids of the bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) major tegument protein VP22. Each of these plasmids was intradermally administered to C57BL/6 mice in three separate immunizations. Analysis of humoral and cellular immune responses in immunized mice demonstrated that pcDNA-SS and pcDNA-St-VP22C are the most immunogenic SARS vaccine candidates.

  15. SARS: Key factors in crisis management.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsin-Chao; Chen, Thai-Form; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted at a single hospital selected in Taipei during the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak from March to July, 2003 in Taiwan. During this period of time, 104 SARS patients were admitted to the hospital. There were no negative reports related to the selected hospital despite its being located right in the center of an area struck by the epidemic. The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors enabling the hospital to survive SARS unscathed. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with the nursing directors and nursing managers of the SARS units, along with a review of relevant hospital documents. The five key elements identified as survival factors during this SARS crisis are as follows: 1. good control of timing for crisis management, 2. careful decision-making, 3. thorough implementation, 4. effective communication, and 5. trust between management and employees. The results of this study reconfirmed the selected hospital as a model for good crisis management during the SARS epidemic.

  16. Ionospheric Specifications for SAR Interferometry (ISSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Chapman, Bruce D; Freeman, Anthony; Szeliga, Walter; Buckley, Sean M.; Rosen, Paul A.; Lavalle, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The ISSI software package is designed to image the ionosphere from space by calibrating and processing polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data collected from low Earth orbit satellites. Signals transmitted and received by a PolSAR are subject to the Faraday rotation effect as they traverse the magnetized ionosphere. The ISSI algorithms combine the horizontally and vertically polarized (with respect to the radar system) SAR signals to estimate Faraday rotation and ionospheric total electron content (TEC) with spatial resolutions of sub-kilometers to kilometers, and to derive radar system calibration parameters. The ISSI software package has been designed and developed to integrate the algorithms, process PolSAR data, and image as well as visualize the ionospheric measurements. A number of tests have been conducted using ISSI with PolSAR data collected from various latitude regions using the phase array-type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) onboard Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Advanced Land Observing Satellite mission, and also with Global Positioning System data. These tests have demonstrated and validated SAR-derived ionospheric images and data correction algorithms.

  17. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  18. UAVSAR: InSAR and PolSAR Test Bed for the Proposed NI-SAR Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Hensley, S.; Lou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    UAVSAR, which first became operational in 2009, has served as an operational testbed for the NI-SAR L-band radar concept and a unique instrument in its own right. UAVSAR supports a broad array of basic and applied geoscience, covering on smaller scale all the disciplines NI-SAR would be able to address on a global scale. Although designed specifically to provide high accuracy repeated flight tracks and precise imaging geometry for InSAR-based solid earth studies, its fully polarimetric operation, low noise, and consistent calibration accuracy has made it a premier instrument for PolSAR-based studies also. Since 2009 it has successfully imaged more than 16 million km2 and >4300 quad-polarimetric data products are now publicly available online. Upgrades made in the last year to automate the repeat track processing serve as a model for generating large volumes of InSAR products: Since January 2014 more than 700 interferometric products have been released, exceeding the output of all previous years combined. Standardly available products now include browse images of all InSAR acquisitions and coregistered single-look complex image stacks suitable for standard time series analysis. Here we present an overview of the wide range of studies utilizing UAVSAR data including those based on polarimetry and pair-wise and times series interferometry, highlighting both the unique capabilities of UAVSAR and the ways in which NI-SAR would be able to dramatically extend the capabilities. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Online Health Education on SARS to University Students during the SARS Outbreak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Mee Lian; Koh, David; Iyer, Prasad; Seow, Adeline; Goh, Lee Gan; Chia, Sin Eng; Lim, Meng Kin; Ng, Daniel; Ong, Choon Nam; Phua, Kai Hong; Tambyah, Paul; Chow, Vincent T K; Chew, Suok Kai; Chandran, Ravi; Lee, Hin Peng

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how online learning may be used to disseminate health information rapidly and widely to large university populations if there is an infectious disease outbreak. During the SARS outbreak in Singapore in 2003, a six-lesson elearning module on SARS was developed for a large university population of 32,000 students. The module…

  20. 20. OVERVIEW OF SAR3 COMPLEX, SHOWING FORMER RESIDENTIAL AREA, SAR3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. OVERVIEW OF SAR-3 COMPLEX, SHOWING FORMER RESIDENTIAL AREA, SAR-3 SWITCH RACK, MAINTENANCE YARD, AND GREENSPOT BRIDGE. NOTE ALSO LARGE PIPE CONDUCTING TAILRACE WATER INTO IRRIGATION SYSTEM. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. 23. OVERVIEW OF SAR3 AREA, SHOWING CORNER OF SAR3 WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. OVERVIEW OF SAR-3 AREA, SHOWING CORNER OF SAR-3 WITH TAILRACE, ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, TOILET SHED, AND RETAINING WALLS AT FORMER EMPLOYEE HOUSING SITE. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. PANORAMA 1/2. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  2. Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, A. L.; Rojas, S.; Dias-Droguett, D. E.; Bhuyan, H.; Aomoa, N.; Kakati, M.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanoparticles using a quartz crystal microbalance. The carbon nanoparticles were synthesized from a thermal plasma jet at different pressure (15 - 263 torr) of the reactants and different current (50 - 250 A) to generate the plasma. The as-prepared carbon nanoparticles were directly deposited on top of the gold electrode of a quartz crystal and we monitored in-situ the changes in resonance frequency while the chamber was pressurized at different hydrogen pressures. These changes enabled determination of absorbed hydrogen mass in order to get H/C mass ratio curves as a function of H2 pressure. Adsorption curves obtained in some carbon nanoparticles indicated the formation of hydrogen monolayer inside the pores of the carbon nanoparticles. Using the value of the jump due to the formation of a H2\\ monolayer, a surface area was estimated between 40-60 m2/g for hydrogen adsorption. In other carbon samples, hydrogen uptake curves indicated that H2 was filling the sample's pores when pore volume was large. These observations will be discussed in detail for several carbon nanoparticles samples. Funds provided by VRI Puente 9/2012 and 10/2012

  3. Performance evaluation of SAR/GMTI algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, Wendy; Pierson, William; Mcginnis, Ryan; Majumder, Uttam; Minardi, Michael; Sobota, David

    2016-05-01

    There is a history and understanding of exploiting moving targets within ground moving target indicator (GMTI) data, including methods for modeling performance. However, many assumptions valid for GMTI processing are invalid for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. For example, traditional GMTI processing assumes targets are exo-clutter and a system that uses a GMTI waveform, i.e. low bandwidth (BW) and low pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Conversely, SAR imagery is typically formed to focus data at zero Doppler and requires high BW and high PRF. Therefore, many of the techniques used in performance estimation of GMTI systems are not valid for SAR data. However, as demonstrated by papers in the recent literature,1-11 there is interest in exploiting moving targets within SAR data. The techniques employed vary widely, including filter banks to form images at multiple Dopplers, performing smear detection, and attempting to address the issue through waveform design. The above work validates the need for moving target exploitation in SAR data, but it does not represent a theory allowing for the prediction or bounding of performance. This work develops an approach to estimate and/or bound performance for moving target exploitation specific to SAR data. Synthetic SAR data is generated across a range of sensor, environment, and target parameters to test the exploitation algorithms under specific conditions. This provides a design tool allowing radar systems to be tuned for specific moving target exploitation applications. In summary, we derive a set of rules that bound the performance of specific moving target exploitation algorithms under variable operating conditions.

  4. Investigation of ionospheric effects on SAR Interferometry (InSAR): A case study of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Ding, Xiao-Li; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Bo-Chen; Qu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has demonstrated its potential for high-density spatial mapping of ground displacement associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic processes. However, this technique may be affected by the ionosphere, which can result in the distortions of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, phases, and polarization. Moreover, ionospheric effect has become and is becoming further significant with the increasing interest in low-frequency SAR systems, limiting the further development of InSAR technique. Although some research has been carried out, thorough analysis of ionospheric influence on true SAR imagery is still limited. Based on this background, this study performs a thorough investigation of ionospheric effect on InSAR through processing L-band ALOS-1/PALSAR-1 images and dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) data over Hong Kong, where the phenomenon of ionospheric irregularities often occurs. The result shows that the small-scale ionospheric irregularities can cause the azimuth pixel shifts and phase advance errors on interferograms. Meanwhile, it is found that these two effects result in the stripe-shaped features in InSAR images. The direction of the stripe-shaped effects keep approximately constant in space for our InSAR dataset. Moreover, the GPS-derived rate of total electron content change index (ROTI), an index to reflect the level of ionospheric disturbances, may be a useful indicator for predicting the ionospheric effect for SAR images. This finding can help us evaluate the quality of SAR images when considering the ionospheric effect.

  5. Coulometric Study of Ethanol Adsorption at a Polycrystalline Platinum Electrode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    value of the ratio Ian/Icalc: 1. The minimal ratio would be 1, corresponding to a one- electron oxidation of one-site attached CH3CH2O surface...Coulometric Study of Ethanol Adsorption at a Polycrystalline Platinum Electrode Sol Gilman Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...noble metals and noble metal alloys that can provide what amounts to an adsorbed oxygen “valve” for initiating adsorption/reaction on a clean and

  6. A novel framework for change detection in bi-temporal polarimetric SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrone, Davide; Bovolo, Francesca; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    Last years have seen relevant increase of polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data availability, thanks to satellite sensors like Sentinel-1 or ALOS-2 PALSAR-2. The augmented information lying in the additional polarimetric channels represents a possibility for better discriminate different classes of changes in change detection (CD) applications. This work aims at proposing a framework for CD in multi-temporal multi-polarization SAR data. The framework includes both a tool for an effective visual representation of the change information and a method for extracting the multiple-change information. Both components are designed to effectively handle the multi-dimensionality of polarimetric data. In the novel representation, multi-temporal intensity SAR data are employed to compute a polarimetric log-ratio. The multitemporal information of the polarimetric log-ratio image is represented in a multi-dimensional features space, where changes are highlighted in terms of magnitude and direction. This representation is employed to design a novel unsupervised multi-class CD approach. This approach considers a sequential two-step analysis of the magnitude and the direction information for separating non-changed and changed samples. The proposed approach has been validated on a pair of Sentinel-1 data acquired before and after the flood in Tamil-Nadu in 2015. Preliminary results demonstrate that the representation tool is effective and that the use of polarimetric SAR data is promising in multi-class change detection applications.

  7. Study on sea ice thickness estimation using the latest space-borne polarimetric SAR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Hwang, B.

    2010-12-01

    Variation of sea ice is one of the most evident indicators of climate change on our planet. Thinning of sea ice has been regarded as the major contributing factor that leads to the massive sea ice loss in Arctic sea. Direct measurement of sea ice can be made available by drilling a hole through the ice and/or by using Electromagnetic Induction system. Although these methods are accurate, they are time consuming and limited in space and time. We investigated the usability of polarimetric parameters (backscattering coefficient, VV-to-HH backscattering coefficient ratio, depolarization factors, and target decomposition theorems) of X-, C- and L-band space-borne SAR data in estimating sea ice thickness in Arctic sea. Acquisitions of the latest high-resolution SAR data (i.e. TerraSAR-X, RADARSAT-2, and ALOS PALSAR) were coordinated with sea ice field campaigns at the coast of Greenland. We found that the backscattering coefficients and VV-to-HH backscattering coefficient ratio (BCR) of C- and X-band SAR data had a weak and insignificant correlation with sea ice thickness, while the BCR of L-band SAR data had a perceptible correlation with sea ice thickness. We also found that a strong correlation between sea ice thickness and depolarization factors (co-polarized correlation and cross-polarized ratio). This suggests that target depolarization factors can be effective parameters in estimating sea ice thickness in Arctic sea. It is known that the target depolarization is strongly related to changes in surface roughness. Sensitivity study has shown that the observed ice thickness to depolarization relationship was partly explained by surface roughness effects.

  8. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  9. Single and binary adsorption of proteins on ion-exchange adsorbent: The effectiveness of isothermal models.

    PubMed

    Liang, Juan; Fieg, Georg; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous and sequential adsorption equilibria of single and binary adsorption of bovine serum albumin and bovine hemoglobin on Q Sepharose FF were investigated in different buffer constituents and initial conditions. The results in simultaneous adsorption showed that both proteins underwent competitive adsorption onto the adsorbent following greatly by protein-surface interaction. Preferentially adsorbed albumin complied with the universal rule of ion-exchange adsorption whereas buffer had no marked influence on hemoglobin adsorption. Moreover, an increase in initial ratios of proteins was benefit to a growth of adsorption density. In sequential adsorption, hemoglobin had the same adsorption densities as single-component adsorption. It was attributed to the displacement of preadsorbed albumin and multiple layer adsorption of hemoglobin. Three isothermal models (i.e. extended Langmuir, steric mass-action, and statistical thermodynamic (ST) models) were introduced to describe the ion-exchange adsorption of albumin and hemoglobin mixtures. The results suggested that extended Langmuir model gave the lowest deviation in describing preferential adsorption of albumin at a given salt concentration while steric mass-action model could very well describe the salt effect in albumin adsorption. For weaker adsorbed hemoglobin, ST model was the preferred choice. In concert with breakthrough data, the research further revealed the complexity in ion-exchange adsorption of proteins.

  10. Representations of SARS in the British newspapers.

    PubMed

    Washer, Peter

    2004-12-01

    In the Spring of 2003, there was a huge interest in the global news media following the emergence of a new infectious disease: severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This study examines how this novel disease threat was depicted in the UK newspapers, using social representations theory and in particular existing work on social representations of HIV/AIDS and Ebola to analyse the meanings of the epidemic. It investigates the way that SARS was presented as a dangerous threat to the UK public, whilst almost immediately the threat was said to be 'contained' using the mechanism of 'othering': SARS was said to be unlikely to personally affect the UK reader because the Chinese were so different to 'us'; so 'other'. In this sense, the SARS scare, despite the remarkable speed with which it was played out in the modern global news media, resonates with the meanings attributed to other epidemics of infectious diseases throughout history. Yet this study also highlights a number of differences in the social representations of SARS compared with earlier epidemics. In particular, this study examines the phenomena of 'emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases' over the past 30 or so years and suggests that these have impacted on the faith once widely held that Western biomedicine could 'conquer' infectious disease.

  11. Automated rectification and geocoding of SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.; Curlander, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    An automated post-processing system has been developed for rectification and geocoding of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery. The system uses as input a raw uncorrected image from the operational SAR correlator, and produces as a standard output a rectified and geocoded product. The accurate geolocation of SAR image pixels is provided by a spatial transformation model which maps the slant range-azimuth SAR image pixels into their location on a prespecified map grid. This model predicts the geodetic location of each pixel by utilizing: the sensor platform position; a geoid model; the parameters of the data collection system and the processing parameters used in the SAR correlator. Based on their geodetic locations, the pixels are mapped by using the desired cartographic projection equations. This rectification and geocoding technique has been tested with Seasat and SIR-B images. The test results demonstrate absolute location uncertainty of less than 50 m and relative distortion (scale factor and skew) of less than 0.1 percent relative to local variations from the assumed geoid.

  12. ICAO's anti-SARS airport activities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Silvio; Curdt-Christiansen, Claus M

    2003-11-01

    To prevent SARS from spreading through air travel and in order to rebuild the confidence of the traveling public in the safety of air travel, ICAO has set up an "Anti-SARS Airport Evaluation Project." The first phase of this project was to develop a set of protective measures for international airports in affected areas to adopt and implement and then to send out, on the request of Contracting States, a team of inspectors to evaluate and assess airports and issue a "statement of evaluation" that the airport inspected complies with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. In cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO), the first part of phase 1 was completed in early June this year, and the second part of phase 1 followed soon after. By mid-July, five international airports in Southeast Asia had been inspected and found to be in full compliance with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. The success of this ICAO project is believed to have contributed significantly to the recovery of international air travel and related industries now taking place. Phase 2 of the project is now being developed. It is aimed at preventing a resurgence of SARS, but it also contains elements to make the methodology developed applicable to future outbreaks of any other communicable disease in which the mode of transmission could involve aviation and/or the need to prevent the spread of the disease by air travel.

  13. A comparative evaluation of SAR and SLAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mastin, G.A.; Manson, J.J.; Bradley, J.D.; Axline, R.M.; Hover, G.L.

    1993-11-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was evaluated as a potential technological improvement over the Coast Guard`s existing side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for oil-spill surveillance applications. The US Coast Guard Research and Development Center (R&D Center), Environmental Branch, sponsored a joint experiment including the US Coast Guard, Sandia National Laboratories, and the Naval Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hazardous Materials Division. Radar imaging missions were flown on six days over the coastal waters off Santa Barbara, CA, where there are constant natural seeps of oil. Both the Coast Guard SLAR and the Sandia National Laboratories SAR were employed to acquire simultaneous images of oil slicks and other natural sea surface features that impact oil-spill interpretation. Surface truth and other environmental data were also recorded during the experiment. The experiment data were processed at Sandia National Laboratories and delivered to the R&D Center on a computer workstation for analysis by experiment participants. Issues such as optimal spatial resolution, single-look vs. multi-look SAR imaging, and the utility of SAR for oil-spill analysis were addressed. Finally, conceptual design requirements for a possible future Coast Guard SAR were outlined and evaluated.

  14. Sparse and accurate high resolution SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Zhao, Kexin; Rowe, William; Li, Jian

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the usage of an adaptive method, the Iterative Adaptive Approach (IAA), in combination with a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate to reconstruct high resolution SAR images that are both sparse and accurate. IAA is a nonparametric weighted least squares algorithm that is robust and user parameter-free. IAA has been shown to reconstruct SAR images with excellent side lobes suppression and high resolution enhancement. We first reconstruct the SAR images using IAA, and then we enforce sparsity by using MAP with a sparsity inducing prior. By coupling these two methods, we can produce a sparse and accurate high resolution image that are conducive for feature extractions and target classification applications. In addition, we show how IAA can be made computationally efficient without sacrificing accuracies, a desirable property for SAR applications where the size of the problems is quite large. We demonstrate the success of our approach using the Air Force Research Lab's "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set Version 1.0" challenge dataset. Via the widely used FFT, individual vehicles contained in the scene are barely recognizable due to the poor resolution and high side lobe nature of FFT. However with our approach clear edges, boundaries, and textures of the vehicles are obtained.

  15. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus ORF8 Protein Is Acquired from SARS-Related Coronavirus from Greater Horseshoe Bats through Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Feng, Yun; Chen, Honglin; Luk, Hayes K. H.; Yang, Wei-Hong; Li, Kenneth S. M.; Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Huang, Yi; Song, Zhi-Zhong; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Ahmed, Syed Shakeel; Yeung, Hazel C.; Lam, Carol S. F.; Cai, Jian-Piao; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the identification of horseshoe bats as the reservoir of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-related coronaviruses (SARSr-CoVs), the origin of SARS-CoV ORF8, which contains the 29-nucleotide signature deletion among human strains, remains obscure. Although two SARS-related Rhinolophus sinicus bat CoVs (SARSr-Rs-BatCoVs) previously detected in Chinese horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus sinicus) in Yunnan, RsSHC014 and Rs3367, possessed 95% genome identities to human and civet SARSr-CoVs, their ORF8 protein exhibited only 32.2 to 33% amino acid identities to that of human/civet SARSr-CoVs. To elucidate the origin of SARS-CoV ORF8, we sampled 348 bats of various species in Yunnan, among which diverse alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses, including potentially novel CoVs, were identified, with some showing potential interspecies transmission. The genomes of two betacoronaviruses, SARSr-Rf-BatCoV YNLF_31C and YNLF_34C, from greater horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum), possessed 93% nucleotide identities to human/civet SARSr-CoV genomes. Although these two betacoronaviruses displayed lower similarities than SARSr-Rs-BatCoV RsSHC014 and Rs3367 in S protein to civet SARSr-CoVs, their ORF8 proteins demonstrated exceptionally high (80.4 to 81.3%) amino acid identities to that of human/civet SARSr-CoVs, compared to SARSr-BatCoVs from other horseshoe bats (23.2 to 37.3%). Potential recombination events were identified around ORF8 between SARSr-Rf-BatCoVs and SARSr-Rs-BatCoVs, leading to the generation of civet SARSr-CoVs. The expression of ORF8 subgenomic mRNA suggested that the ORF8 protein may be functional in SARSr-Rf-BatCoVs. The high Ka/Ks ratio among human SARS-CoVs compared to that among SARSr-BatCoVs supported that ORF8 is under strong positive selection during animal-to-human transmission. Molecular clock analysis using ORF1ab showed that SARSr-Rf-BatCoV YNLF_31C and YNLF_34C diverged from civet/human SARSr-CoVs in approximately 1990. SARS

  16. An improved MIMO-SAR simulator strategy with ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xingyu; Mo, Zijian; Wang, Zhonghai; Chen, Genshe; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    High resolution and wide-swath imaging can be obtained by Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) with the state of the art technologies. The time division multiple access (TDMA) MIMO SAR mimics the motion of the antenna of SAR systems by switching the array channels to transmit the radar signals at different time slots. In this paper, we develop a simulation tool with ray tracing techniques to retrieve high resolution and accurate SAR images for development of MIMO SAR imaging methods. Without loss of generality, in the proposed simulator, we apply a TDMA MIMO SAR system with 13 transmitting antennas and 8 receiving antennas, where all transmitting antennas share a single transmitter and the receiving antennas share a single receiver. By comparing with the normal simulation MIMO SAR strategies, the simulation image using ray tracing results validate that the proposed method provides more accurate and higher resolution SAR images.

  17. Orchitis: a complication of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Qi, Lihua; Chi, Xiaochun; Yang, Jingjing; Wei, Xiaohong; Gong, Encong; Peh, Suatcheng; Gu, Jiang

    2006-02-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus has been known to damage multiple organs; however, little is known about its impact on the reproductive system. In the present study, we analyzed the pathological changes of testes from six patients who died of SARS. Results suggested that SARS caused orchitis. All SARS testes displayed widespread germ cell destruction, few or no spermatozoon in the seminiferous tubule, thickened basement membrane, and leukocyte infiltration. The numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes and CD68+ macrophages increased significantly in the interstitial tissue compared with the control group (P < 0.05). SARS viral genomic sequences were not detected in the testes by in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated abundant IgG precipitation in the seminiferous epithelium of SARS testes, indicating possible immune response as the cause for the damage. Our findings indicated that orchitis is a complication of SARS. It further suggests that the reproductive functions should be followed and evaluated in recovered male SARS patients.

  18. Processing pharus data with the generic SAR processor

    SciTech Connect

    Otten, M.P.G.

    1996-11-01

    The Generic SAR Processor (GSP) is a SAR processing environment created to process airborne and spaceborne SAR data with a maximum amount of flexibility, while at the same time providing a user friendly and powerful environment for handling and analyzing SAR, including polarimetric calibration. PHARUS is an airborne polarimetric C-band SAR, utilizing an active (solid state) phased array. The absence of mechanical antenna stabilization, the use of electronic beam steering, in combination with high PRF, polarimetric operation, under motion condition which can be severe, requires a very large flexibility of the SAR processor. The GSP is designed to handle this type of SAR data with a very flexible motion compensation-, azimuth compression-, and radiometric correction approach. First experiences with the processing of PHARUS data show that this is a valid approach to obtain high quality polarimetric imagery with a phased array SAR. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Characterizing hydrologic changes of Great Dismal Swamp using SAR/InSAR technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lu, Z.; Zhu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Great Dismal Swamp is one of the largest, northernmost peatlands on the Atlantic Coastal Plain, and the swamp is underlain by a thick water-logged organic soil layer (peat) made up of dead and decaying plant material. The peatlands play a role as the sink of large amount of soil organic carbon and methane. However, the disturbance of the peatland negatively impacted the ecosystem and contributed to the climate change caused by the released greenhouse gas. Our SAR/InSAR methods observed the hydrologic changes in the peatlands, which is a key factor to conserve the wetland, through several methods. First, we compared averaged SAR intensity from C- and L-band SAR sensors with groundwater level changes, and deduced a linear relationship between the SAR backscattering intensity and the groundwater level change. Second, we extracted the inundated area during wet season from InSAR coherence. Third, we measured the relative water level changes in the inundated area using the interferometric phases. Finally, we estimated the groundwater level changes corresponding to the soil moisture changes from time-series InSAR method. Our results can provide the unique opportunity to understand the occurring hydrologic and vegetation changes in the Great Dismal Swamp.

  20. PRF Ambiguity Detrmination for Radarsat ScanSAR System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Michael Y.

    1998-01-01

    PRF ambiguity is a potential problem for a spaceborne SAR operated at high frequencies. For a strip mode SAR, there were several approaches to solve this problem. This paper, however, addresses PRF ambiguity determination algorithms suitable for a burst mode SAR system such as the Radarsat ScanSAR. The candidate algorithms include the wavelength diversity algorithm, range look cross correlation algorithm, and multi-PRF algorithm.

  1. Development of InSAR technology on deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Ming-lian; Jiang, Ting-chen; Zong, Yu-yu

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, application of InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture, Radar) to deformation monitoring has become a hotspot in research of geological hazards. This paper introduces the basic principles and data processing procedures of InSAR and summarizes main progresses made in InSAR technology and its application to deformation monitoring. Through actual examples of application and research at home and abroad, the article figures out existing problems and the future of application of InSAR.

  2. Segmentation of Multilook, Multifrequency, and Multipolarimetric SAR Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-20

    1995 Final Technical 02/01/92-07/31/95 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Segmentation of Multilook , Multifrequency, and Multipolarimetric SAR Data...Maximum 200 worth) This final report summarizes the findings of the research, "Segmentation of Multi-look, Multi-frequency and Multi- polarimetric SAR ...segmentation of high resolution SAR images, b) detection of man-made features in SAR images and c) labeling, as well as, grouping algorithms. These

  3. Classification of Targets in SAR Images Using ISAR Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Classification of Targets in SAR Images Using ISAR Data J. J. M. de Wit, R. J. Dekker, and A. C. van den Broek TNO Defence, Security, and Safety...classification of targets in SAR images by using ISAR measurements was studied, based on polarimetric SAR and ISAR data acquired with the MEMPHIS...interest in synthetic aperture radar ( SAR ) systems is increasing as well, mainly due to their all-weather capability. A study for the Dutch Ministry of

  4. Coastal Sea Level From CRYOSAT-2 SAR and SAR-In Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, O. B.; Abulaitijiang, A.; Knudsen, P.; Stenseng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Cryosat-2 offers the first ever possibility to perform coastal altimetric studies using bor SAR-altimetry and SAR-In altimetry. With this technological leap forward Cryosat-2 is now able to observe sea level in very small water bodies and also to provide coastal sea level very close to the shore. We perform an investigation into the retrieval of sea surface height around Denmark and Greenland. These regions have been chosen as the coastal regions around Denmark falls within the SAR mask and the coastal regions of Greenland falls in under the SAR-in mask employed on Cryosat-2. SAR-in was mainly used in coastal regions of Greenland because of its huge topographic changes as Cryosat-2 is designed to map the margins of the ice-sheet. The coastal region around Denmark is a test region of the EU FP7 sponsored project LOTUS esablishing SAR altimetry product in preparation for Sentinel-3. With the increased spatial resolution of Cryosat-2 SAR we provide valuable sea level observations within the Straits around Denmark which are crucial to constrain the waterflow in and out of the Baltic Sea. The investigation of SAR-in data in Greenland adds an entire new dimension to coastal altimetry. An amazing result of the investigation is the ability of Cryosat-2 to detect and recover sea level even though the coast (sealevel) is up to 15 km away from the nadir location of the satellite. This ability of capture and use returns from outside the main (-3Db) loop in theory enables Cryosat-2 SAR-in to map sea level height of fjords more frequently than the 369 days repeat.

  5. SAR image segmentation using MSER and improved spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Yang; Zhang, Xiaohu; Shang, Yang

    2012-12-01

    A novel approach is presented for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image segmentation. By incorporating the advantages of maximally stable extremal regions (MSER) algorithm and spectral clustering (SC) method, the proposed approach provides effective and robust segmentation. First, the input image is transformed from a pixel-based to a region-based model by using the MSER algorithm. The input image after MSER procedure is composed of some disjoint regions. Then the regions are treated as nodes in the image plane, and a graph structure is applied to represent them. Finally, the improved SC is used to perform globally optimal clustering, by which the result of image segmentation can be generated. To avoid some incorrect partitioning when considering each region as one graph node, we assign different numbers of nodes to represent the regions according to area ratios among the regions. In addition, K-harmonic means instead of K-means is applied in the improved SC procedure in order to raise its stability and performance. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is effective on SAR image segmentation and has the advantage of calculating quickly.

  6. A P-band SAR interference filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Victor B.

    1992-01-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interference filter is an adaptive filter designed to reduce the effects of interference while minimizing the introduction of undesirable side effects. The author examines the adaptive spectral filter and the improvement in processed SAR imagery using this filter for Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne SAR (JPL AIRSAR) data. The quality of these improvements is determined through several data fidelity criteria, such as point-target impulse response, equivalent number of looks, SNR, and polarization signatures. These parameters are used to characterize two data sets, both before and after filtering. The first data set consists of data with the interference present in the original signal, and the second set consists of clean data which has been coherently injected with interference acquired from another scene.

  7. Verification of L-band SAR calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Jackson, P. L.; Kasischke, E.

    1985-01-01

    Absolute calibration of a digital L-band SAR system to an accuracy of better than 3 dB has been verified. This was accomplished with a calibration signal generator that produces the phase history of a point target. This signal relates calibration values to various SAR data sets. Values of radar cross-section (RCS) of reference reflectors were obtained using a derived calibration relationship for the L-band channel on the ERIM/CCRS X-C-L SAR system. Calibrated RCS values were compared to known RCS values of each reference reflector for verification and to obtain an error estimate. The calibration was based on the radar response to 21 calibrated reference reflectors.

  8. Stop outbreak of SARS with infrared cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yigang M.

    2004-04-01

    SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, commonly known as Atypical Pneumonia in mainland China) caused 8422 people affected and resulting in 918 deaths worldwide in half year. This disease can be transmitted by respiratory droplets or by contact with a patient's respiratory secretions. This means it can be spread out very rapidly through the public transportations by the travelers with the syndrome. The challenge was to stop the SARS carriers traveling around by trains, airplanes, coaches and etc. It is impractical with traditional oral thermometers or spot infrared thermometers to screen the tens of travelers with elevated body temperature from thousands of normal travelers in hours. The thermal imager with temperature measurement function is a logical choice for this special application although there are some limitations and drawbacks. This paper discusses the real SARS applications of industrial infrared cameras in China from April to July 2003.

  9. Viral load distribution in SARS outbreak.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chung-Ming; Cheng, Vincent C C; Hung, Ivan F N; Chan, Kin-Sang; Tang, Bone S F; Tsang, Thomas H F; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2005-12-01

    An unprecedented community outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred in the Amoy Gardens, a high-rise residential complex in Hong Kong. Droplet, air, contaminated fomites, and rodent pests have been proposed to be mechanisms for transmitting SARS in a short period. We studied nasopharyngeal viral load of SARS patients on admission and their geographic distribution. Higher nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living in adjacent units of the same block inhabited by the index patient, while a lower but detectable nasopharyngeal viral load was found in patients living further away from the index patient. This pattern of nasopharyngeal viral load suggested that airborne transmission played an important part in this outbreak in Hong Kong. Contaminated fomites and rodent pests may have also played a role.

  10. Mine drainage water from the Sar Cheshmeh porphyry copper mine, Kerman, IR Iran.

    PubMed

    Shahabpour, J; Doorandish, M

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on stream and mine waters in the area of one of the world largest porphyry copper deposit located in the southeastern Iran, the Sar Cheshmeh porphyry copper mine. Trace metals are present as adsorption on Fe and Mn oxide and hydroxide particles, as sulfate, simple metal ions, and scarcely as adsorption on clay particles and hydrous aluminium oxides. Mean pH decreases and the mean concentration of trace elements, EC and SO4(2-) increases from the maximum discharge period (MXDP) during snow melt run off (May), through the moderate discharge period (MDDP; March and July) to the minimum discharge period (MNDP; September). Water samples have sulfatic character essentially, however, from the MNDP through the MDDP towards the MXDP they show a bicarbonate tendency. This study indicates that the surface waters draining the Sar Cheshmeh open pit have a higher pH and lower concentration of trace metals compared with some other porphyry copper deposits.

  11. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that the GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.

  12. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; ...

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that themore » GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.« less

  13. Probing Mechanical Properties of Rock with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jónsson, S.

    2012-04-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations from satellites have revolutionized our crustal deformation measurement capabilities with its high spatial resolution, global coverage, and low cost. The high spatial resolution (typically 5-20 m) allows us to map many small-scale surface deformation phenomena in great detail. These include surface faulting, fissuring, fault creep, and other strain localization phenomena. Another advantage of the small-scale deformation mapping is that it can provide information about mechanical properties of near-surface rocks. Several studies have already been published on using InSAR to probe material properties of rock. Strain localizations at fault zones have been observed in co-seismic deformation fields near to large earthquakes and interpreted as expressions of weak fault zone materials that are a factor of two more compliant than the surrounding unbroken rock [Fialko et al., 2002]. Peltzer et al. [1999] argued that asymmetries in coseismic deformation patterns observed by InSAR showed evidence for non-linear elasticity, i.e. that the elastic moduli of shallow crustal material are different for compression and extension, due to small-scale cracks in the medium. This interpretation was later disputed by Funning et al. [2007], who provided an alternative explanation for observed deformation pattern based on along-strike variations in fault geometry and slip. In addition, observations and modeling of poro-elastic rebound after earthquakes have provided information about the difference in undrained and drained Poisson's ratio values of the near-surface rocks [Peltzer et al., 1996; Jónsson et al., 2003]. More recently we have used InSAR observations to put bounds on the tensional bulk strength of surface rocks. A dyke intrusion that took place in western Saudi Arabia in 2009 caused many moderate-sized earthquakes and extensive surface faulting. InSAR data of the area show that large-scale (40 km x 40 km) east

  14. High adsorption capacity NaOH-activated carbon for dye removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-Chin; Tseng, Ru-Ling

    2008-04-15

    In this study, the surface coverage ratio (Sc/Sp) and monolayer cover adsorption amount per unit surface area (qmon/Sp) were employed to investigate the adsorption isotherm equilibrium of the adsorption of dyes (AB74, BB1 and MB) on NaOH-activated carbons (FWNa2, FWNa3 and FWNa4); the adsorption rate of the Elovich equation (1/b) and the ratio of 1min adsorption amount of adsorbate to the monolayer cover amount of adsorbate (q1/qmon) were employed to investigate adsorption kinetics. The qmon/Sp of NaOH-activated carbons was better than that of KOH-activated carbons prepared from the same raw material (fir wood). The Sc/Sp values of the adsorption of all adsorbates on adsorbent FWNa3 in this study were found to be higher than those in related literature. Parameters 1/b and q1 of the adsorption of dyes on activated carbons in this study were higher than those on KOH-activated carbons; the q1/qmon value of FWNa3 was the highest. The pore structure and the TPD measurement of the surface oxide groups were employed to explain the superior adsorption performance of FWNa3. A high surface activated carbon (FWNa3) with excellent adsorption performance on dyes with relation to adsorption isotherm equilibrium and kinetics was obtained in this study. Several adsorption data processing methods were employed to describe the adsorption performance.

  15. First Results from an Airborne Ka-Band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    SweepSAR is a wide-swath synthetic aperture radar technique that is being studied for application on the future Earth science radar missions. This paper describes the design of an airborne radar demonstration that simulates an 11-m L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) reflector geometry at Ka-band (35.6 GHz) using a 40-cm reflector. The Ka-band SweepSAR Demonstration system was flown on the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory and used to study engineering performance trades and array calibration for SweepSAR configurations. We present an instrument and experiment overview, instrument calibration and first results.

  16. Efficacy of various disinfectants against SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Rabenau, H F; Kampf, G; Cinatl, J; Doerr, H W

    2005-10-01

    The recent severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in Asia and Northern America led to broad use of various types of disinfectant in order to control the public spread of the highly contagious virus. However, only limited data were available to demonstrate their efficacy against SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We therefore investigated eight disinfectants for their activity against SARS-CoV according to prEN 14476. Four hand rubs were tested at 30s (Sterillium, based on 45% iso-propanol, 30% n-propanol and 0.2% mecetronium etilsulphate; Sterillium Rub, based on 80% ethanol; Sterillium Gel, based on 85% ethanol; Sterillium Virugard, based on 95% ethanol). Three surface disinfectants were investigated at 0.5% for 30 min and 60 min (Mikrobac forte, based on benzalkonium chloride and laurylamine; Kohrsolin FF, based on benzalkonium chloride, glutaraldehyde and didecyldimonium chloride; Dismozon pur, based on magnesium monoperphthalate), and one instrument disinfectant was investigated at 4% for 15 min, 3% for 30 min and 2% for 60 min [Korsolex basic, based on glutaraldehyde and (ethylenedioxy)dimethanol]. Three types of organic load were used: 0.3% albumin, 10% fetal calf serum, and 0.3% albumin with 0.3% sheep erythrocytes. Virus titres were determined by a quantitative test (endpoint titration) in 96-well microtitre plates. With all tested preparations, SARS-CoV was inactivated to below the limit of detection (reduction factor mostly > or =4), regardless of the type of organic load. In summary, SARS-CoV can be inactivated quite easily with many commonly used disinfectants.

  17. Calibration of dual-frequency SAR ocean imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Larson, R. W.; Lyzenga, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    A calibration procedure for digital aircraft SAR imagery is presented. Techniques to utilize internal and external calibration references are discussed. Examples of calibrated intensity scans from an oceanographic test site are presented. The relationship of the aircraft SAR calibration procedure to future spaceborne SAR systems is discussed.

  18. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  19. SAR imagery using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaojian; Feng, Xiangzhi

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are getting more and more applications in both civilian and military remote sensing missions. With the increasing deployment of electronic countermeasures (ECM) on modern battlefields, SAR encounters more and more interference jamming signals. The ECM jamming signals cause the SAR system to receive and process erroneous information which results in severe degradations in the output SAR images and/or formation of phony images of nonexistent targets. As a consequence, development of the electronic counter-countermeasures (ECCM) capability becomes one of the key problems in SAR system design. This paper develops radar signaling strategies and algorithms that enhance the ability of synthetic aperture radar to image targets under conditions of electronic jamming. The concept of SAR using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses (CCFAP-SAR) is first proposed. Then the imaging procedure for CCFAP-SAR is discussed in detail. The ECCM performance of CCFAP-SAR for both depressive noise jamming and deceptive repeat jamming is analyzed. The impact of the carrier frequency agility range on the image quality of CCFAP-SAR is also studied. Simulation results demonstrate that, with adequate agility range of the carrier frequency, the proposed CCFAP-SAR performs as well as conventional radar with linear frequency modulation (LFM) waveform in image quality and slightly better in anti-noise depressive jamming; while performs very well in anti-deception jamming which cannot be rejected by LFM-SAR.

  20. Estimating tropospheric phase delay in SAR interferograms using Global Atmospheric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doin, M.; Lasserre, C.; Peltzer, G.; Cavalie, O.; Doubre, C.

    2008-12-01

    The main limiting factor on the accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) measurements comes from phase propagation delays through the Earth's troposphere. The delay can be divided into a stratified component, which correlates with the topography and often dominates the tropospheric signal in InSAR data, and a turbulent component. The stratified delay can be expressed as a function of atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure e vertical profiles. We compare the stratified delay computed using results from global atmospheric models with the topography-dependent signal observed in interferograms covering three test areas in different geographic and climatic environments: Lake Mead, Nevada, USA, the Haiyuan fault area, Gansu, China, and Afar, Republic of Djibouti. For each site we compute a multi-year series of interferograms. The phase-elevation ratio is estimated for each interferogram and the series is inverted to form a timeline of delay-elevation ratios characterizing each epoch of data acquisition. InSAR derived ratios are in good agreement with the ratios computed from global atmospheric models. This agreement shows that both estimations of the delay-elevation ratio can be used to perform a first order correction of the InSAR phase. Seasonal variations of the atmosphere significantly affect the phase delay throughout the year, aliasing the results of time series inversions using temporal smoothing or data stacking when the acquisitions are not evenly distributed in time. This is particularly critical when the spatial shape of the signal of interest correlates with topography. In the Lake Mead area, the irregular temporal sampling of our SAR data results in an interannual bias of amplitude ~2~cm on range change estimates. In the Haiyuan Fault area, the coarse and uneven data sampling results in a bias of up to ~0.5~cm/yr on the line of sight velocity across the fault. In the Afar area, the seasonal signal exceeds the deformation

  1. Geocoding of AIRSAR/TOPSAR SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holecz, Francesco; Lou, Yun-Ling; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated and recognized that radar interferometry is a promising method for the determination of digital elevation information and terrain slope from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. An important application of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) data in areas with topographic variations is that the derived elevation and slope can be directly used for the absolute radiometric calibration of the amplitude SAR data as well as for scattering mechanisms analysis. On the other hand polarimetric SAR data has long been recognized as permitting a more complete inference of natural surfaces than a single channel radar system. In fact, imaging polarimetry provides the measurement of the amplitude and relative phase of all transmit and receive polarizations. On board the NASA DC-8 aircraft, NASA/JPL operates the multifrequency (P, L and C bands) multipolarimetric radar AIRSAR. The TOPSAR, a special mode of the AIRSAR system, is able to collect single-pass interferometric C- and/or L-band VV polarized data. A possible configuration of the AIRSAR/TOPSAR system is to acquire single-pass interferometric data at C-band VV polarization and polarimetric radar data at the two other lower frequencies. The advantage of this system configuration is to get digital topography information at the same time the radar data is collected. The digital elevation information can therefore be used to correctly calibrate the SAR data. This step is directly included in the new AIRSAR Integrated Processor. This processor uses a modification of the full motion compensation algorithm described by Madsen et al. (1993). However, the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with the additional products such as local incidence angle map, and the SAR data are in a geometry which is not convenient, since especially DEMs must be referred to a specific cartographic reference system. Furthermore, geocoding of SAR data is important for multisensor and/or multitemporal purposes. In this paper, a procedure to

  2. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  3. Unsupervised Segmentation Of Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Dubois, Pascale; Van Zyl, Jakob; Kwok, Ronald; Chellappa, Rama

    1994-01-01

    Method of unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) image data into classes involves selection of classes on basis of multidimensional fuzzy clustering of logarithms of parameters of polarimetric covariance matrix. Data in each class represent parts of image wherein polarimetric SAR backscattering characteristics of terrain regarded as homogeneous. Desirable to have each class represent type of terrain, sea ice, or ocean surface distinguishable from other types via backscattering characteristics. Unsupervised classification does not require training areas, is nearly automated computerized process, and provides nonsubjective selection of image classes naturally well separated by radar.

  4. Single-cell genomics reveal low recombination frequencies in freshwater bacteria of the SAR11 clade

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The SAR11 group of Alphaproteobacteria is highly abundant in the oceans. It contains a recently diverged freshwater clade, which offers the opportunity to compare adaptations to salt- and freshwaters in a monophyletic bacterial group. However, there are no cultivated members of the freshwater SAR11 group and no genomes have been sequenced yet. Results We isolated ten single SAR11 cells from three freshwater lakes and sequenced and assembled their genomes. A phylogeny based on 57 proteins indicates that the cells are organized into distinct microclusters. We show that the freshwater genomes have evolved primarily by the accumulation of nucleotide substitutions and that they have among the lowest ratio of recombination to mutation estimated for bacteria. In contrast, members of the marine SAR11 clade have one of the highest ratios. Additional metagenome reads from six lakes confirm low recombination frequencies for the genome overall and reveal lake-specific variations in microcluster abundances. We identify hypervariable regions with gene contents broadly similar to those in the hypervariable regions of the marine isolates, containing genes putatively coding for cell surface molecules. Conclusions We conclude that recombination rates differ dramatically in phylogenetic sister groups of the SAR11 clade adapted to freshwater and marine ecosystems. The results suggest that the transition from marine to freshwater systems has purged diversity and resulted in reduced opportunities for recombination with divergent members of the clade. The low recombination frequencies of the LD12 clade resemble the low genetic divergence of host-restricted pathogens that have recently shifted to a new host. PMID:24286338

  5. Comparison of multiple methods for detecting changes in urban areas in TerraSAR-X data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Horst; Dubois, Clémence; Boldt, Markus; Kuny, Silvia; Cadario, Erich; Thiele, Antje

    2016-10-01

    The current generation of SAR satellites such as TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X and COSMO-SkyMed provide resolutions below one meter, permitting the detailed analysis of urban areas while covering large zones. Furthermore, as they are deployable independently of daylight and weather, such remote sensing SAR data are particularly popular for purposes such as rapid damage assessment at building level after a natural disaster. The purpose of our study is the investigation of techniques for the detection of changes based on one pre-event and one post-event SAR amplitude image. We provide a comparison of several methods for detecting changes in urban areas. Especially, changes at building locations are looked for. We analyzed two areas affected differently in detail. First, a suburban area of Paris, France, was considered due to changes caused by an urbanization project. Here, we have two TanDEM-X acquisitions available, before (November 4, 2012) and after (May 10, 2013) the changes. Second, we investigated changes that happened in Kathmandu, Nepal, after the April 25, 2015 earthquake. For this analysis, we have two TerraSAR-X acquisitions, one before (October 13, 2013) and one immediately after (April 27, 2015) the earthquake. Both areas differ by the building types, the image resolution and the available reference, which makes it an interesting challenge. In this paper, we compare six different methods for change detection. The investigated methods contain both standard criteria such as Log Ratio, Kullback-Leibler and the Difference of Entropies detector, and methods developed by the authors such as a Log Ratio combined with an Alternating Sequential Filter. All change detection results are presented and discussed by considering the available ground truth.

  6. Quantum-SAR extension of the spectral-SAR algorithm: application to polyphenolic anticancer bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Putz, Ana-Maria; Lazea, Marius; Ienciu, Luciana; Chiriac, Adrian

    2009-03-01

    Aiming to assess the role of individual molecular structures in the molecular mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction correlation analysis, the recent Spectral-SAR approach is employed to introduce the Quantum-SAR (QuaSAR) "wave" and "conversion factor" in terms of difference between inter-endpoint inter-molecular activities for a given set of compounds; this may account for inter-conversion (metabolization) of molecular (concentration) effects while indicating the structural (quantum) based influential/detrimental role on bio-/eco- effect in a causal manner rather than by simple inspection of measured values; the introduced QuaSAR method is then illustrated for a study of the activity of a series of flavonoids on breast cancer resistance protein.

  7. Quantum-SAR Extension of the Spectral-SAR Algorithm. Application to Polyphenolic Anticancer Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Putz, Ana-Maria; Lazea, Marius; Ienciu, Luciana; Chiriac, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Aiming to assess the role of individual molecular structures in the molecular mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction correlation analysis, the recent Spectral-SAR approach is employed to introduce the Quantum-SAR (QuaSAR) “wave” and “conversion factor” in terms of difference between inter-endpoint inter-molecular activities for a given set of compounds; this may account for inter-conversion (metabolization) of molecular (concentration) effects while indicating the structural (quantum) based influential/detrimental role on bio-/eco- effect in a causal manner rather than by simple inspection of measured values; the introduced QuaSAR method is then illustrated for a study of the activity of a series of flavonoids on breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:19399244

  8. Design and realization of an active SAR calibrator for TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dummer, Georg; Lenz, Rainer; Lutz, Benjamin; Kühl, Markus; Müller-Glaser, Klaus D.; Wiesbeck, Werner

    2005-10-01

    TerraSAR-X is a new earth observing satellite which will be launched in spring 2006. It carries a high resolution X-band SAR sensor. For high image data quality, accurate ground calibration targets are necessary. This paper describes a novel system concept for an active and highly integrated, digitally controlled SAR system calibrator. A total of 16 active transponder and receiver systems and 17 receiver only systems will be fabricated for a calibration campaign. The calibration units serve for absolute radiometric calibration of the SAR image data. Additionally, they are equipped with an extra receiver path for two dimensional satellite antenna pattern recognition. The calibrator is controlled by a dedicated digital Electronic Control Unit (ECU). The different voltages needed by the calibrator and the ECU are provided by the third main unit called Power Management Unit (PMU).

  9. An Optical Flow Method Applied to Co-Registration of Remote Sensing Images: Example for SAR/SAR, SAR/LIDAR, SAR/Optical Images of BIOSAR 2010 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin-Koeniguer, Elise

    2016-08-01

    This article proposes an optical flow type method for coregistration of forest remote sensing images. The principle of the algorithm called GeFolki is first explained. Results are shown on the images of the BioSAR 3 campaign, for the production of SAR interferograms, the coregistration a SAR and LIDAR image, and the coregistration an optical image and SAR image.The advantages of such an algorithm over conventional algorithms are explained. Finally, we propose various applications within the operating data for future BIOMASS mission: massive interferometry, ground truth production, upscaling by fusion of LIDAR and SAR data, and image mining.

  10. Cryosat-2 SAR and SAR-In Altimetry for Coastal Sea Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltazar Andersen, Ole; Knudsen, Per; Abulaitijiang, Adil; Stenseng, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Cryosat-2 offers the first ever possibility to perform coastal altimetric studies using SAR-Interferometry as well as SAR altimetry. With this technological leap forward Cryosat-2 is now able to observe sea level in very small water bodies and also to provide coastal sea level very close to the shore. We perform an investigation into the retrieval of sea surface height around Denmark and Greenland. These regions have been chosen as the coastal regions around Denmark falls within the SAR mask and the coastal regions of Greenland falls in under the SAR-in mask employed on Cryosat-2. SAR-in was mainly used in coastal regions of Greenland because of its huge topographic changes as Cryosat-2 is designed to map the margins of the ice-sheet. The coastal region around Denmark is a test region of the EU sponsored project LOTUS in which With the increased spatial resolution of Cryosat-2 SAR we provide valuable sea level observations within the Straits around Denmark which are crucial to constrain the waterflow in and out of the Baltic Sea. The investigation of SAR-in data in Greenland adds an entire new dimension to coastal altimetry. An amazing result of the investigation is the ability of Cryosat-2 to detect and recover sea level even though the coast (sealevel) is up to 15 km away from the nadir location of the satellite. This ability of capture and use returns from outside the main (-3Db) loop in theory enables Cryosat-2 SAR-in to map sea level height of fjords more frequently than the 369 days repeat.

  11. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  12. Generalized random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarjus, G.; Schaaf, P.; Talbot, J.

    1990-12-01

    Adsorption of hard spherical particles onto a flat uniform surface is analyzed by using generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) models. These models are defined by releasing the condition of immobility present in the usual RSA rules to allow for desorption or surface diffusion. Contrary to the simple RSA case, generalized RSA processes are no longer irreversible and the system formed by the adsorbed particles on the surface may reach an equilibrium state. We show by using a distribution function approach that the kinetics of such processes can be described by means of an exact infinite hierarchy of equations reminiscent of the Kirkwood-Salsburg hierarchy for systems at equilibrium. We illustrate the way in which the systems produced by adsorption/desorption and by adsorption/diffusion evolve between the two limits represented by ``simple RSA'' and ``equilibrium'' by considering approximate solutions in terms of truncated density expansions.

  13. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  14. Compressed Sensing for Millimeter-wave Ground Based SAR/ISAR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiğit, Enes

    2014-11-01

    Millimeter-wave (MMW) ground based (GB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and inverse SAR (ISAR) imaging are the powerful tools for the detection of foreign object debris (FOD) and concealed objects that requires wide bandwidths and highly frequent samplings in both slow-time and fast-time domains according to Shannon/Nyquist sampling theorem. However, thanks to the compressive sensing (CS) theory GB-SAR/ISAR data can be reconstructed by much fewer random samples than the Nyquist rate. In this paper, the impact of both random frequency sampling and random spatial domain data collection of a SAR/ISAR sensor on reconstruction quality of a scene of interest was studied. To investigate the feasibility of using proposed CS framework, different experiments for various FOD-like and concealed object-like targets were carried out at the Ka and W band frequencies of the MMW. The robustness and effectiveness of the recommend CS-based reconstruction configurations were verified through a comparison among each other by using integrated side lobe ratios (ISLR) of the images.

  15. Decorrelating Clutter Statistics for Long Integration Time SAR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leanza, Antonio; Monti Guarnieri, Andrea; Recchia, Andrea; Broquetas Ibars, Antoni; Ruiz Rodon, Josep

    2015-05-01

    It is presented an experiment aimed to assess and eventually complement the Billingsley Internal Clutter Motion (ICM) model for long integration time SAR imaging. Exploiting a real-aperture rotating antenna Ground-Based RADAR, observations of rural areas in different periods of the year have been performed. The collected data, obtained from two different acquisition modes, have been processed to obtain short-term and long-term clutter de-correlation analysis. The results obtained revealed interesting aspects of the phenomenon. In particular, it can be observed that the process is non-stationary with time, say minutes to hours, and that DC/AC ratio follows a day/night characteristic. Moreover, the results showed values of the AC component decay rate β higher than the foreseen ones in the considered spectral interval, which is quite below the one analyzed in the Billingsley experiment.

  16. Support Detection for SAR Tomographic Reconstructions from Compressive Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Budillon, Alessandra; Schirinzi, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    The problem of detecting and locating multiple scatterers in multibaseline Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) tomography, starting from compressive measurements and applying support detection techniques, is addressed. Different approaches based on the detection of the support set of the unknown sparse vector, that is, of the position of the nonzero elements in the unknown sparse vector, are analyzed. Support detection techniques have already proved to allow a reduction in the number of measurements required for obtaining a reliable solution. In this paper, a support detection method, based on a Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test (Sup-GLRT), is proposed and compared with the SequOMP method, in terms of probability of detection achievable with a given probability of false alarm and for different numbers of measurements. PMID:26495434

  17. Reconditioning fault slip inversions via InSAR data discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziv, Alon

    2016-10-01

    A major difficulty in inverting geodetic data for fault slip distribution is that measurement errors are mapped from the data space onto the solution space. The amplitude of this mapping is sensitive to the condition number of the inverse problem, i.e., the ratio between the largest and smallest singular value of the forward matrix. Thus, unless the problem is well-conditioned, slip inversions cannot reveal the actual fault slip distribution. In this study, we describe a new iterative algorithm that optimizes the condition of the slip inversion through discretization of InSAR data. We present a numerical example that demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach. We show that the condition number of the reconditioned data sets are not only much smaller than those of uniformly spaced data sets with the same dimension but are also much smaller than non-uniformly spaced data sets, with data density that increases towards the model fault.

  18. Ambiguity noise analysis of a SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Haishan; Chang, Wenge; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-12-01

    The presence of range and azimuth (or Doppler) ambiguities in synthetic aperture radars (SARs) is well known. The ambiguity noise is related to the antenna pattern and the value of pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Because a new frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) SAR has the characters of low cost and small size, and the capacity of real-time signal processing, the antenna will likely vibrate or deform due to a lack of the stabilized platform. And the value of PRF cannot be much high because of the high computation burden for the real-time processing. The aim of this study is to access and improve the performance of a new FMCW SAR system based on the ambiguity noise. First, the quantitative analysis of the system's ambiguity noise level is performed; an antenna with low sidelobes is designed. The conclusion is that the range ambiguity noise is small; the azimuth ambiguity noise is somewhat increased, however, it is sufficiently small to have marginal influence on the image quality. Finally, the ambiguity noise level is measured using the imaging data from a Ku-band FMCW SAR. The results of this study show that the measured noise level coincides with the theoretical noise level.

  19. SAR Image Texture Analysis of Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Long; Li, Ying; Liu, Yu

    Oil spills are seriously affecting the marine ecosystem and cause political and scientific concern since they have serious affect on fragile marine and coastal ecosystem. In order to implement an emergency in case of oil spills, it is necessary to monitor oil spill using remote sensing. Spaceborne SAR is considered a promising method to monitor oil spill, which causes attention from many researchers. However, research in SAR image texture analysis of oil spill is rarely reported. On 7 December 2007, a crane-carrying barge hit the Hong Kong-registered tanker "Hebei Spirit", which released an estimated 10,500 metric tons of crude oil into the sea. The texture features on this oil spill were acquired based on extracted GLCM (Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix) by using SAR as data source. The affected area was extracted successfully after evaluating capabilities of different texture features to monitor the oil spill. The results revealed that the texture is an important feature for oil spill monitoring. Key words: oil spill, texture analysis, SAR

  20. SAR observations of waves in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carolis, Giacomo

    2003-03-01

    Ocean waves properties propagating in grease ice composed of frazil and pancakes as observed by SAR images are discussed. An ERS-2 SAR scene relevant to the Greenland Sea in an area where the Odden ice tongue developed in 1997 is considered as case study. The scene includes open sea and ice covered waters where a wave field is traveling from the open sea region. Wind induced features known as "wind rolls" can be distinguished, allowing the estimation of the wind vector. Hence the related wind generated ocean waves can be retrieved using a SAR spectral inversion procedure. The wave field is tracked while it propagates inside the ice field, thus allowing the estimation of the wave changes. Under the assumption of continuum medium, physical ice properties are then retrieved using a special SAR inversion procedure in conjunction with a recently developed wave propagation model in sea ice. The model assumes both the ice layer and the water beneath it as a system of viscous fluids. As a result, the changes suffered by the ocean wave spectrum in terms of wave dispersion and energy attenuation are related to sea ice properties such as concentration and thickness. Although the free parameters to be inverted are the ice thickness and viscosity and the water viscosity, the ice thickness is the only parameter of geophysical interest. Results are finally compared with external ice parameters information.

  1. Epidemic Models for SARS and Measles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozema, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Recent events have led to an increased interest in emerging infectious diseases. This article applies various deterministic models to the SARS epidemic of 2003 and a measles outbreak in the Netherlands in 1999-2000. We take a historical approach beginning with the well-known logistic curve and a lesser-known extension popularized by Pearl and Reed…

  2. SAR Image Despeckling Via Structural Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ting; Li, Shutao; Fang, Leyuan; Benediktsson, Jón Atli

    2016-12-01

    A novel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image despeckling method based on structural sparse representation is introduced. The proposed method utilizes the fact that different regions in SAR images correspond to varying terrain reflectivity. Therefore, SAR images can be split into a heterogeneous class (with a varied terrain reflectivity) and a homogeneous class (with a constant terrain reflectivity). In the proposed method, different sparse representation based despeckling schemes are designed by combining the different region characteristics in SAR images. For heterogeneous regions with rich structure and texture information, structural dictionaries are learned to appropriately represent varied structural characteristics. Specifically, each patch in these regions is sparsely coded with the best fitted structural dictionary, thus good structure preservation can be obtained. For homogenous regions without rich structure and texture information, the highly redundant photometric self-similarity is exploited to suppress speckle noise without introducing artifacts. That is achieved by firstly learning the sub-dictionary, then simultaneously sparsely coding for each group of photometrically similar image patches. Visual and objective experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over the-state-of-the-art methods.

  3. JERS SAR interferometry for land subsidence monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Tazio; Wegmüller, Urs; Werner, Charles; Wiesmann, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the potential of L-Band repeat-pass differential SAR interferometry for land subsidence monitoring is evaluated using JERS SAR data. Bologna, Mexico City and the Ruhrgebiet were selected as application sites representing slow to fast deformation velocities. The investigation includes feasibility aspects as the data availability, the temporal decorrelation over different landcover classes and the range of useful spatial baselines, an analysis of the achieved deformation accuracy and considerations on the complementarity to ERS SAR interferometry and levelling surveys. In spite of the rather limited data availability, land subsidence maps could be generated for the three selected application sites. Unlike with ERS C-Band SAR data, JERS L-Band interferometry permitted to retrieve subsidence values also over vegetated areas and forest when using interferograms of less than one year acquisition time interval and short baseline. In addition, the longer L-Band wavelength was found to be superior in the case of large deformation gradients that lead to phase unwrapping problems in C-Band interferometry.

  4. Herc SAR Task 106: AIMS Feature Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    of the recommendations should be implemented, and discuss with Greenley & Associates any other features or capabilities needed. Herc-SAR Task 106...2001-029; Greenley & Associates, Ottawa, Ontario. 2. Schoenborn, O. (2006). AIMSsim User Manual. DRDC Toronto CR 2001-030; Greenley & Associates

  5. Model-based 3D SAR reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chad; Gunther, Jake; Moon, Todd

    2014-06-01

    Three dimensional scene reconstruction with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is desirable for target recognition and improved scene interpretability. The vertical aperture, which is critical to reconstruct 3D SAR scenes, is almost always sparsely sampled due to practical limitations, which creates an underdetermined problem. This papers explores 3D scene reconstruction using a convex model-based approach. The approach developed is demonstrated on 3D scenes, but can be extended to SAR reconstruction of sparsely sampled signals in the spatial and, or, frequency domains. The model-based approach enables knowledge-aided image formation (KAIF) by incorporating spatial, aspect, and sparsity magnitude terms into the image reconstruction. The incorporation of these terms, which are based on prior scene knowledge, will demonstrate improved results compared to traditional image formation algorithms. The SAR image formation problem is formulated as a second order cone program (SOCP) and the results are demonstrated on 3D scenes using simulated data and data from the GOTCHA data collect.1 The model-based results are contrasted against traditional backprojected images.

  6. A 1 V 186-μW 50-MS/s 10-bit subrange SAR ADC in 130-nm CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingyuan, Yu; Ting, Li; Jiaqi, Yang; Shuangshuang, Zhang; Fujiang, Lin; Lin, He

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a 10-bit 50-MS/s subrange successive-approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) composed of a 4-bit SAR coarse ADC and a 6-bit SAR fine ADC. In the coarse ADC, multi-comparator SAR architecture is used to reduce the digital logic propagation delay, and a traditional asynchronous SAR ADC with monotonic switching method is used as the fine ADC. With that combination, power dissipation also can be much reduced. Meanwhile, a modified SAR control logic is adopted in the fine ADC to speed up the conversion and other techniques, such as splitting capacitors array, are borrowed to reduce the power consumption. Fabricated with 1P8M 130-nm CMOS technology, the proposed SAR ADC achieves 51.6-dB signal to noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) and consumes 186 μW at 50 MS/s with a 1-V supply, resulting in a figure of merit (FOM) of 12 fJ/conversion-step. The core area is only 0.045 mm2. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61204033, 61331015), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. WK2100230015), and the Funds of Science and Technology on Analog Integrated Circuit Laboratory (No. 9140C090111150C09041).

  7. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): knowledge, attitudes, practices and sources of information among physicians answering a SARS fever hotline service.

    PubMed

    Deng, J-F; Olowokure, B; Kaydos-Daniels, S C; Chang, H-J; Barwick, R S; Lee, M-L; Deng, C-Y; Factor, S H; Chiang, C-E; Maloney, S A

    2006-01-01

    In June 2003, Taiwan introduced a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) telephone hotline service to provide concerned callers with rapid access to information, advice and appropriate referral where necessary. This paper reports an evaluation of the knowledge, attitude, practices and sources of information relating to SARS among physicians who staffed the SARS fever hotline service. A retrospective survey was conducted using a self-administered postal questionnaire. Participants were physicians who staffed a SARS hotline during the SARS epidemic in Taipei, Taiwan from June 1 to 10, 2003. A response rate of 83% was obtained. All respondents knew the causative agent of SARS, and knowledge regarding SARS features and preventive practices was good. However, only 54% of respondents knew the incubation period of SARS. Hospital guidelines and news media were the major information sources. In responding to two case scenarios most physicians were likely to triage callers at high risk of SARS appropriately, but not callers at low risk. Less than half of all respondents answered both scenarios correctly. The results obtained suggest that knowledge of SARS was generally good although obtained from both medical and non-medical sources. Specific knowledge was however lacking in certain areas and this affected the ability to appropriately triage callers. Standardized education and assessment of prior knowledge of SARS could improve the ability of physicians to triage callers in future outbreaks.

  8. [Adsorption of perchlorate by calcined Mg/Zn/Al layered double hydroxides].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Liu, Yan

    2014-07-01

    The adsorption capacity of perchlorate by Mg/Zn/Al layered double hydroxides was investigated. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the adsorption isothermal model and dynamic model were discussed. The effect of calcination temperature, Mg/Zn/Al molar ratio, pH value of solution, adsorption time and dosage on the adsorption capacity of samples were studied. The experiment results showed that the removal ratio and adsorption capacity reached the highest and the pH value had good applicability when the molar ratio was Mg/Zn/Al = 2: 1 : 1. The adsorption of perchlorate basically conformed to the pseudo-second kinetics and Langmuir, Freundlich isotherm model.

  9. Characterizing and estimating noise in InSAR and InSAR time series with MODIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhart, William D.; Lohman, Rowena B.

    2013-01-01

    InSAR time series analysis is increasingly used to image subcentimeter displacement rates of the ground surface. The precision of InSAR observations is often affected by several noise sources, including spatially correlated noise from the turbulent atmosphere. Under ideal scenarios, InSAR time series techniques can substantially mitigate these effects; however, in practice the temporal distribution of InSAR acquisitions over much of the world exhibit seasonal biases, long temporal gaps, and insufficient acquisitions to confidently obtain the precisions desired for tectonic research. Here, we introduce a technique for constraining the magnitude of errors expected from atmospheric phase delays on the ground displacement rates inferred from an InSAR time series using independent observations of precipitable water vapor from MODIS. We implement a Monte Carlo error estimation technique based on multiple (100+) MODIS-based time series that sample date ranges close to the acquisitions times of the available SAR imagery. This stochastic approach allows evaluation of the significance of signals present in the final time series product, in particular their correlation with topography and seasonality. We find that topographically correlated noise in individual interferograms is not spatially stationary, even over short-spatial scales (<10 km). Overall, MODIS-inferred displacements and velocities exhibit errors of similar magnitude to the variability within an InSAR time series. We examine the MODIS-based confidence bounds in regions with a range of inferred displacement rates, and find we are capable of resolving velocities as low as 1.5 mm/yr with uncertainties increasing to ∼6 mm/yr in regions with higher topographic relief.

  10. High-Performance Anti-Retransmission Deception Jamming Utilizing Range Direction Multiple Input and Multiple Output (MIMO) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruijia; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xing; Sun, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Retransmission deception jamming seriously degrades the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) detection efficiency and can mislead SAR image interpretation by forming false targets. In order to suppress retransmission deception jamming, this paper proposes a novel multiple input and multiple output (MIMO) SAR structure range direction MIMO SAR, whose multiple channel antennas are vertical to the azimuth. First, based on the multiple channels of range direction MIMO SAR, the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) linear frequency modulation (LFM) signal was adopted as the transmission signal of each channel, which is defined as a sub-band signal. This sub-band signal corresponds to the transmission channel. Then, all of the sub-band signals are modulated with random initial phases and concurrently transmitted. The signal form is more complex and difficult to intercept. Next, the echoes of the sub-band signal are utilized to synthesize a wide band signal after preprocessing. The proposed method will increase the signal to interference ratio and peak amplitude ratio of the signal to resist retransmission deception jamming. Finally, well-focused SAR imagery is obtained using a conventional imaging method where the retransmission deception jamming strength is degraded and defocused. Simulations demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:28075367

  11. High-Performance Anti-Retransmission Deception Jamming Utilizing Range Direction Multiple Input and Multiple Output (MIMO) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruijia; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xing; Sun, Bing

    2017-01-09

    Retransmission deception jamming seriously degrades the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) detection efficiency and can mislead SAR image interpretation by forming false targets. In order to suppress retransmission deception jamming, this paper proposes a novel multiple input and multiple output (MIMO) SAR structure range direction MIMO SAR, whose multiple channel antennas are vertical to the azimuth. First, based on the multiple channels of range direction MIMO SAR, the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) linear frequency modulation (LFM) signal was adopted as the transmission signal of each channel, which is defined as a sub-band signal. This sub-band signal corresponds to the transmission channel. Then, all of the sub-band signals are modulated with random initial phases and concurrently transmitted. The signal form is more complex and difficult to intercept. Next, the echoes of the sub-band signal are utilized to synthesize a wide band signal after preprocessing. The proposed method will increase the signal to interference ratio and peak amplitude ratio of the signal to resist retransmission deception jamming. Finally, well-focused SAR imagery is obtained using a conventional imaging method where the retransmission deception jamming strength is degraded and defocused. Simulations demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Adsorption of star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, A.; Joanny, J. F.

    1991-06-01

    The adsorption of star polymers on a flat solid surface is analyzed by means of scalling arguments based on the Daoud-Cotton blob model. For the adsorption of a single star, consisting of f arms comprising each N monomers, we distinguish three regimes determined by the adsorption energy of a monomer at the surface, δ kT. 1) Strong adsorption characterized by the full adsorption of all arms occurs for δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) A “Sombrero” like structure comprising f_ads fully adsorbed arms and f{-}f_ads free arms is obtained for (f/N)^{3/5}> δ > f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. 3) Weakly adsorbed stars retain, essentially, the structure of a free star. This regime occurs for δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. The weakly adsorbed structure may also exist as a metastable state if δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}. Nous étudions l'adsorption de polymères en étoile sur une surface solide en utilisant une approche de lois d'échelles basée sur le modèle de blobs de Daoud et Cotton. Pour une étoile formée de f bras contenant chacun N monomères, nous distinguons trois régimes suivant la valeur de l'énergie d'adsorption d'un monomère sur la surface δ kT. 1) L'adsorption forte caractérisée par une adsorption complète de tous les bras se produit lorsque δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) Une structure en “sombrero” avec f_ads bras adsorbés et f{-}f_ads bras libres est obtenue si f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}δ < (f/N)^{3/5}. 3) Les étoiles faiblement adsorbées gardent une structure très similaire à celle des étoiles libres en solution. Ce régime existe si δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. La structure correspondant aux étoiles faiblement adsorbées peut aussi exister comme un état métastable si δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}.

  13. Simulation of SAR backscatter for forest vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Richa; Kumar, Shashi; Agrawal, Shefali

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most recent imaging technology to study the forest parameters. The invincible characteristics of microwave acquisition in cloudy regions and night imaging makes it a powerful tool to study dense forest regions. A coherent combination of radar polarimetry and interferometry (PolInSAR) enhances the accuracy of retrieved biophysical parameters. This paper attempts to address the issue of estimation of forest structural information caused due to instability of radar platforms through simulation of SAR image. The Terai Central Forest region situated at Haldwani area in Uttarakhand state of India was chosen as the study area. The system characteristics of PolInSAR dataset of Radarsat-2 SAR sensor was used for simulation process. Geometric and system specifications like platform altitude, center frequency, mean incidence angle, azimuth and range resolution were taken from metadata. From the field data it was observed that average tree height and forest stand density were 25 m and 300 stems/ha respectively. The obtained simulated results were compared with the sensor acquired master and slave intensity images. It was analyzed that for co-polarized horizontal component (HH), the mean values of simulated and real master image had a difference of 0.3645 with standard deviation of 0.63. Cross-polarized (HV) channel showed better results with mean difference of 0.06 and standard deviation of 0.1 while co-polarized vertical component (VV) did not show similar values. In case of HV polarization, mean variation between simulated and real slave images was found to be the least. Since cross-polarized channel is more sensitive to vegetation feature therefore better simulated results were obtained for this channel. Further the simulated images were processed using PolInSAR inversion modelling approach using three different techniques DEM differencing, Coherence Amplitude Inversion and Random Volume over Ground Inversion. DEM differencing

  14. Possibility of using adsorption refrigeration unit in district heating network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzebielec, Andrzej; Rusowicz, Artur; Jaworski, Maciej; Laskowski, Rafał

    2015-09-01

    Adsorption refrigeration systems are able to work with heat sources of temperature starting with 50 °C. The aim of the article is to determine whether in terms of technical and economic issues adsorption refrigeration equipment can work as elements that produce cold using hot water from the district heating network. For this purpose, examined was the work of the adsorption air conditioning equipment cooperating with drycooler, and the opportunities offered by the district heating network in Warsaw during the summer. It turns out that the efficiency of the adsorption device from the economic perspective is not sufficient for production of cold even during the transitional period. The main problem is not the low temperature of the water supply, but the large difference between the coefficients of performance, COPs, of adsorption device and a traditional compressor air conditioning unit. When outside air temperature is 25 °C, the COP of the compressor type reaches a value of 4.49, whereas that of the adsorption device in the same conditions is 0.14. The ratio of the COPs is 32. At the same time ratio between the price of 1 kWh of electric power and 1 kWh of heat is only 2.85. Adsorption refrigeration equipment to be able to compete with compressor devices, should feature COPads efficiency to be greater than 1.52. At such a low driving temperature and even changing the drycooler into the evaporative cooler it is not currently possible to achieve.

  15. Retrieval of phase history parameters from distributed scatterers in urban areas using very high resolution SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Bamler, Richard

    2012-09-01

    In a recent contribution Ferretti and co-workers (Ferretti, A., Fumagalli, A., Novali, F., Prati, C., Rocca, F., Rucci, A., 2011. A new algorithm for processing interferometric data-stacks: SqueeSAR IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 49(9), pp. 3460-3470) have proposed the SqueeSAR method, a way to exploit temporally coherent distributed scatterers in coherent SAR data stacks. Elevation and deformation or subsidence estimates are obtained with accuracy similar as in the well known persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI). In this paper we propose an alternative approach and provide a first demonstration of the optimal estimation of distributed scatterers' phase histories in urban areas. Different to SqueeSAR, we derive phase histories for each distributed scatterer pixel rather than for groups of pixels. We use the Anderson-Darling statistical test to identify neighboring samples of the same distribution. Prior to covariance matrix estimation required for maximum likelihood estimation we apply a multi-resolution defringe technique. By using TerraSAR-X high resolution spotlight data, it is demonstrated that we are able to retrieve reliable phase histories and motion parameter estimates from distributed scatterers with signal-to-noise-ratio far below the common range.

  16. Chandrayaan-2 dual-frequency SAR: Further investigation into lunar water and regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putrevu, Deepak; Das, Anup; Vachhani, J. G.; Trivedi, Sanjay; Misra, Tapan

    2016-01-01

    The Space Applications Centre (SAC), one of the major centers of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), is developing a high resolution, dual-frequency Synthetic Aperture Radar as a science payload on Chandrayaan-2, ISRO's second moon mission. With this instrument, ISRO aims to further the ongoing studies of the data from S-band MiniSAR onboard Chandrayaan-1 (India) and the MiniRF of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (USA). The SAR instrument has been configured to operate with both L- and S-bands, sharing a common antenna. The S-band SAR will provide continuity to the MiniSAR data, whereas L-band is expected to provide deeper penetration of the lunar regolith. The system will have a selectable slant-range resolution from 2 m to 75 m, along with standalone (L or S) and simultaneous (L and S) modes of imaging. Various features of the instrument like hybrid and full-polarimetry, a wide range of imaging incidence angles (∼10° to ∼35°) and the high spatial resolution will greatly enhance our understanding of surface properties especially in the polar regions of the Moon. The system will also help in resolving some of the ambiguities in interpreting high values of Circular Polarization Ratio (CPR) observed in MiniSAR data. The added information from full-polarimetric data will allow greater confidence in the results derived particularly in detecting the presence (and estimating the quantity) of water-ice in the polar craters. Being a planetary mission, the L&S-band SAR for Chandrayaan-2 faced stringent limits on mass, power and data rate (15 kg, 100 W and 160 Mbps respectively), irrespective of any of the planned modes of operation. This necessitated large-scale miniaturization, extensive use of on-board processing, and devices and techniques to conserve power. This paper discusses the scientific objectives which drive the requirement of a lunar SAR mission and presents the configuration of the instrument, along with a description of a number of features of the

  17. Investigating long-term subsidence at Medicine Lake Volcano, CA, using multitemporal InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Amy L.; Biggs, Juliet; Lu, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Long-term volcanic subsidence provides insight into intereruptive processes, which comprise the longest portion of the eruptive cycle. Ground-based geodetic surveys of Medicine Lake Volcano (MLV), northern CA, document subsidence at rates of ˜-10 mm yr-1 between 1954 and 2004. The long observation period plus the duration and stable magnitude of this signal presents an ideal opportunity to study long-term volcanic deformation, but this first requires accurate knowledge of the geometry and magnitude of the source. Best-fitting analytical source models to past levelling and GPS data sets show conflicting source parameters-primarily the model depth. To overcome this, we combine multiple tracks of InSAR data, each with a different look angle, to improve upon the spatial resolution of ground-based measurements. We compare the results from InSAR to those of past geodetic studies, extending the geodetic record to 2011 and demonstrating that subsidence at MLV continues at ˜-10 mm yr-1. Using geophysical inversions, we obtain the best-fitting analytical source model-a sill located at 9-10 km depth beneath the caldera. This model geometry is similar to those of past studies, providing a good fit to the high spatial density of InSAR measurements, while accounting for the high ratio of vertical to horizontal deformation derived from InSAR and recorded by existing levelling and GPS data sets. We discuss possible causes of subsidence and show that this model supports the hypothesis that deformation at MLV is driven by tectonic extension, gravitational loading, plus a component of volume loss at depth, most likely due to cooling and crystallization within the intrusive complex that underlies the edifice. Past InSAR surveys at MLV, and throughout the Cascades, are of variable success due to dense vegetation, snow cover and atmospheric artefacts. In this study, we demonstrate how InSAR may be successfully used in this setting by applying a suite of multitemporal analysis methods

  18. Comparison of the Adsorption of Original and Biosimilar Preparations of Filgrastim on Infusion Sets and the Inhibition of Adsorption by Polysorbate 80.

    PubMed

    Tange, Mio; Matsumoto, Akino; Yoshida, Miyako; Kojima, Honami; Haraguchi, Tamami; Uchida, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the adsorption of filgrastim on infusion sets (comprising infusion bag, line and filter) and to compare the adsorption of the original filgrastim preparation with biosimilar preparations using HPLC. The inhibitory effect of polysorbate 80 on this adsorption was also evaluated. Filgrastim was mixed with isotonic sodium chloride solution or 5% (w/v) glucose solution in the infusion fluid. Filgrastim adsorption on infusion sets was observed with all preparations and with both types of infusion solution. The adsorption ratio was about 30% in all circumstances. Filgrastim adsorption on all parts of the infusion set (bag, line and filter) was dramatically decreased by the addition of polysorbate 80 solution at concentrations at or over its critical micelle concentration (CMC). The filgrastim adsorption ratio was highest at a solution pH of 5.65, which is the isoelectric point (pI) of filgrastim. This study showed that the degree of filgrastim adsorption on infusion sets is similar for original and biosimilar preparations, but that the addition of polysorbate 80 to the infusion solution at concentrations at or above its CMC is effective in preventing filgrastim adsorption. The addition of a total-vitamin preparation with a polysorbate 80 concentration over its CMC may be an effective way of preventing filgrastim adsorption on infusion sets.

  19. Animal models for SARS and MERS coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gretebeck, Lisa M; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), two strains of animal coronaviruses that crossed the species barrier to infect and cause severe respiratory infections in humans within the last 12 years, have taught us that coronaviruses represent a global threat that does not recognize international borders. We can expect to see other novel coronaviruses emerge in the future. An ideal animal model should reflect the clinical signs, viral replication and pathology seen in humans. In this review, we present factors to consider in establishing an animal model for the study of novel coronaviruses and compare the different animal models that have been employed to study SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. PMID:26184451

  20. International collaboration in SAR ground data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, John C.

    1993-01-01

    A set of considerations that are pertinent to future international cooperation in the area of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) ground data systems are presented. The considerations are as follows: (1) success of future spaceborne SAR missions will require multi-agency and/or multi-national collaboration; (2) ground processing is typically performed by each agency for their user base; (3) international standards are required to achieve a uniform data product independent of the processing center; (4) to reduce the aggregate cost of the ground data systems, collaboration is required in design and development; (5) effective utilization of the data by an international user community; (6) commercialization of data products; and (7) security of data systems.

  1. Neuromusculoskeletal disorders following SARS: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Stainsby, Brynne; Howitt, Scott; Porr, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To detail the presentation of three health care workers diagnosed with sudden acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) who later presented to a CMCC teaching clinic with neuromusculoskeletal sequelae and underwent conservative treatments. This case series aims to inform practitioners of the potential pathogenesis of these neuromuscular complaints and describes their treatment in a chiropractic practice. Clinical Features: Three patients presented with a variety of neurological, muscular and joint findings. Conservative treatment was aimed at decreasing hypertonic muscles, increasing joint mobility, and improving ability to perform activities of daily living. Intervention and Outcome: The conservative treatment approach utilized in these cases involved spinal manipulative therapy, soft tissue therapy, modalities, and rehabilitation. Outcome measures included subjective pain ratings, disability indices, and return to work. Conclusion: Three patients previously diagnosed with SARS presented with neuromusculoskeletal complaints and subjectively experienced intermittent relief of pain and improvement in disability status after conservative treatments. PMID:21403780

  2. Animal models for SARS and MERS coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Gretebeck, Lisa M; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-08-01

    The emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), two strains of animal coronaviruses that crossed the species barrier to infect and cause severe respiratory infections in humans within the last 12 years, have taught us that coronaviruses represent a global threat that does not recognize international borders. We can expect to see other novel coronaviruses emerge in the future. An ideal animal model should reflect the clinical signs, viral replication and pathology seen in humans. In this review, we present factors to consider in establishing an animal model for the study of novel coronaviruses and compare the different animal models that have been employed to study SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV.

  3. SAR impulse response with residual chirps.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-06-01

    A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

  4. Comparison of several techniques to obtain multiple-look SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, F.-K.; Held, D. N.; Croft, C.

    1983-01-01

    In order to improve image interpretability when SAR imagery is contaminated by coherent speckle noise, multiple look images are often generated. The performance levels of techniques for the generation of such multiple look imagery are presently assessed, with attention to the detailed impulse responses and signal-to-speckle noise ratios obtainable. The speckle-reduction technique considered are those of the discrete mixed integrator and the image domain filter. It is found that, by using several types of image domain filters, the signal-to-speckle noise ratio can be improved over the conventional discrete mixed integrator method's results while maintaining the equivalent rectangular resolution constant.

  5. A sea ice concentration estimation algorithm utilizing radiometer and SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvonen, J.

    2014-09-01

    We have studied the possibility of combining the high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) segmentation and ice concentration estimated by radiometer brightness temperatures. Here we present an algorithm for mapping a radiometer-based concentration value for each SAR segment. The concentrations are estimated by a multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network which has the AMSR-2 (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2) polarization ratios and gradient ratios of four radiometer channels as its inputs. The results have been compared numerically to the gridded Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) ice chart concentrations and high-resolution AMSR-2 ASI (ARTIST Sea Ice) algorithm concentrations provided by the University of Hamburg and also visually to the AMSR-2 bootstrap algorithm concentrations, which are given in much coarser resolution. The differences when compared to FMI daily ice charts were on average small. When compared to ASI ice concentrations, the differences were a bit larger, but still small on average. According to our comparisons, the largest differences typically occur near the ice edge and sea-land boundary. The main advantage of combining radiometer-based ice concentration estimation and SAR segmentation seems to be a more precise estimation of the boundaries of different ice concentration zones.

  6. RISAT: first planned SAR mission of ISRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Tapan; Rana, S. S.; Tyagi, R. N.; Thyagarajan, K.

    2006-12-01

    SAR Payload of RISAT (Radar Imaging Satellite), the first SAR satellite from ISRO, is currently under development. This payload is based on active antenna technology, and it supports variety of resolution and swath requirements in C-band. Both conventional stripmap and scanSAR modes are supported with dual polarization operation. Additionally a quad polarization stripmap mode is provided for availing additional resource classification. In all these modes resolutions from 3m-50 m can be achieved with swath ranging 30 km -240 km. On experimental basis, a sliding spotlight mode is also available. The payload hardware is organized in such a way that that co and cross polarization images are available for any operating modes. Additionally, a quad polarization mode is also supported. Active array configuration of this payload called for development of many new technologies ranging from MMICS, TR modules, miniaturised power supplies, high speed digitisers, dual polarized printed antenna and distributed control systems. A completely new bus is being designed for aiding the payload operation. The RISAT spacecraft is configured around the payload to minimize the spacecraft weight, suitable for launching by ISRO's PSLV launcher. RISAT will be placed on dawn to dusk sunsynchronous polar orbit to ensure maximum solar power availability. All the basic building blocks have already crossed design stage and have undergone rigorous space qualification program. Presently a complete SAR with one tile has been integrated as design verification model and is under rigorous testing. This development ensured demonstration of end to end hardware, on-board control software and beam control behavior.

  7. Alaska SAR Facility mass storage, current system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddy, David; Chu, Eugene; Bicknell, Tom

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the mass storage systems that are currently in place at the Alaska SAR Facility (SAF). The architecture of the facility will be presented including specifications of the mass storage media that are currently used and the performances that we have realized from the various media. The distribution formats and media are also discussed. Because the facility is expected to service future sensors, the new requirements and possible solutions to these requirements are also discussed.

  8. Processing of polarametric SAR images. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Warrick, A.L.; Delaney, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a systematic method of combining multifrequency polarized SAR images. It is shown that the traditional methods of correlation, hard targets, and template matching fail to produce acceptable results. Hence, a new algorithm was developed and tested. The new approach combines the three traditional methods and an interpolation method. An example is shown that demonstrates the new algorithms performance. The results are summarized suggestions for future research are presented.

  9. Second Order Bragg Scattering in a SAR,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    accept the notion that the short- wave components of the ship wake are slightly distorted versions of the Kelvin wake, then there is the possibility of...scattering, at a given place, from a spectrum of waves . The Dabob Bay data indicates that there is little energy in the wake having wave numbers capable...observations do show considerable enhancement of waves of twice the Bragg wavelength at the angle where a SAR wake is observed.. Second order Bragg

  10. Polarization filtering of SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of polarization filtering for the bistatic case is developed for optimum discrimination between two types of targets. The resulting method is half analytical and half numerical. Because it is based on the Stokes matrix representation, the targets of interest can be extended targets. The scattered field from such targets is partially polarized. This method is then applied to the monostatic case with numerical examples relying on the JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) full-polarimetric L-band radar data. A matched filter to maximize the power ratio between urban and natural targets is developed. The results show that the same filter is optimal for both ocean and forest targets as natural targets.

  11. A 3-D SAR approach to IFSAR processing

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.; BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-03-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super-resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  12. Low-SAR metamaterial-inspired printed monopole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. I.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.; Ali, M. T.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a low-SAR metamaterial-embedded planar monopole antenna is introduced for a wireless communication system. A printed monopole antenna is designed for modern mobile, which operates in GSM, UMTS, LTE, WLAN, and Bluetooth frequency bands. A metamaterial structure is designed to use in the mobile handset with a multi-band printed monopole antenna. The finite integration technique of the CST microwave studio is used in this study. The measurement of antenna performances is taken in an anechoic chamber, and the SAR values are measured using COMOSAR system. The results indicate that metamaterial structure leads to reduce SAR without affecting antenna performance significantly. According to the measured results, the metamaterial attachment leads to reduce 87.7% peak SAR, 68.2% 1-g SAR, and 46.78% 10-g SAR compared to antenna without metamaterial.

  13. SAR image simulation and verification for urban structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijie, Xia; Xiaojie, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The application of high-resolution space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) becomes more and more popular because of its all-weather and all-time data acquisition capability. However, the interpretation of SAR image can be rather difficult since there are tremendous differences between SAR images and optical images. SAR image simulation is helpful for interpreting SAR images. In this article, a practical approach of SAR image simulation is proposed for urban structures based on Incremental Length Diffraction Coefficients and Shooting and Bouncing Rays (SBR). SBR adopts both GO (Geometrical Optics) and PO (Physical Optics) to calculate the scattered field of targets. Models of buildings with slope roof and flat roof are simulated and inversed. Inversion results coincide well with models and verify the high precision of our approach.

  14. [Effect of concomitant substances and addition order on the adsorption of Tween 80 on sand].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Zhao, Yong-sheng; Li, Sui; Dai, Ning

    2008-08-01

    Adsorption of Tween 80 on sand was investigated, and the effect of inorganic salts (CaCl2), anionic surfactant (SDS) and lignosulphonates (sodium lignosulphonate or ammonium lignosulphonate) on the adsorption of Tween 80 on sand were evaluated at 25 degrees C. The results show that saturated adsorption amount of Tween 80 on sand enhance when CaCl2 or SDS is added into flushing solution of Tween 80. And the adsorption of Tween 80 on sand increase with the increase of molar fraction of CaCl2 or SDS in mixed flushing solution. And adsorption amount of Tween 80 on sand also enhance when SDS is added into sand firstly. The effects of mixing ratios and addition order of lignosulphonates on adsorption of Tween 80 were considered. The results show that with the increase of molar fraction of lignosulphonates in mixing flushing solution, adsorption amount of Tween 80 on sand decrease. The adsorption amount of Tween 80 reduce 20%-75% due to the exist of ammonium lignosulphonate is superior to sodium lignosulphonate (10%-60%) when mix the lignosulphonates-Tween 80 at the total mass ratios of 1:10, while the adsorption amount of Tween 80 reduce 70%-90% at the total mass ratios of 1:2. Lignosulphonates added into sand firstly is more efficient than that together. Therefore,use of lignosulphonates as a preflush can reduce the adsorption of surfactants on sand and is a better method to applied in in situ flushing.

  15. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Gurrola, Eric; Sacco, Gian Franco; Zebker, Howard

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a flexible and extensible Interferometric SAR (InSAR) Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) for geodetic image processing. ISCE was designed from the ground up as a geophysics community tool for generating stacks of interferograms that lend themselves to various forms of time-series analysis, with attention paid to accuracy, extensibility, and modularity. The framework is python-based, with code elements rigorously componentized by separating input/output operations from the processing engines. This allows greater flexibility and extensibility in the data models, and creates algorithmic code that is less susceptible to unnecessary modification when new data types and sensors are available. In addition, the components support provenance and checkpointing to facilitate reprocessing and algorithm exploration. The algorithms, based on legacy processing codes, have been adapted to assume a common reference track approach for all images acquired from nearby orbits, simplifying and systematizing the geometry for time-series analysis. The framework is designed to easily allow user contributions, and is distributed for free use by researchers. ISCE can process data from the ALOS, ERS, EnviSAT, Cosmo-SkyMed, RadarSAT-1, RadarSAT-2, and TerraSAR-X platforms, starting from Level-0 or Level 1 as provided from the data source, and going as far as Level 3 geocoded deformation products. With its flexible design, it can be extended with raw/meta data parsers to enable it to work with radar data from other platforms

  16. Formation geometries for multistatic SAR tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, Giancarmine; Renga, Alfredo; D'Errico, Marco

    2014-03-01

    This paper analyzes relative orbit design for multi-satellite radar missions aimed at multistatic SAR tomography. To this end, formation requirements and performance parameters are derived by adapting existing models for SAR tomography to single pass techniques. Then, relative trajectory design is carried out on the basis of an analytical relative motion model including secular J2 effects. By properly scaling the differences in orbital parameters, different formation geometries enable uniform sampling of the effective baseline along the whole orbit. The difference among the possible choices lies in latitude coverage, formation stability, and collision avoidance aspects. A numerical example of relative trajectory design is discussed considering L-band as operating frequency. In particular, achievable height resolution and unambiguous height along the orbit are pointed out for a multi-cartwheel, a multi-pendulum, and a multi-helix formation. In view of future implementation of a multi-satellite SAR tomography mission, new concepts aimed at the reduction of required satellites, and long term evolution of designed formations, are also discussed.

  17. Airborne SAR imagery to support hydraulic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, S.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite images and airborne SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery are increasingly widespread and they are effective tools for measuring the size of flood events and for assessment of damage. The Hurricane Katrina disaster and the tsunami catastrophe in Indian Ocean countries are two recent and sadly famous examples. Moreover, as well known, the inundation maps can be used as tools to calibrate and validate hydraulic model (e.g. Horritt et al., Hydrological Processes, 2007). We carry out an application of a 1D hydraulic model coupled with a high resolution DTM for predicting the flood inundation processes. The study area is a 16 km reach of the River Severn, in west-central England, for which, four maps of inundated areas, obtained through airborne SAR images, and hydrometric data are available. The inundation maps are used for the calibration/validation of a 1D hydraulic model through a comparison between airborne SAR images and the results of hydraulic simulations. The results confirm the usefulness of inundation maps as hydraulic modelling tools and, moreover, show that 1D hydraulic model can be effectively used when coupled with high resolution topographic information.

  18. SAR Image Segmentation Using Morphological Attribute Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, M.; Thiele, A.; Schulz, K.; Hinz, S.

    2014-08-01

    In the last years, the spatial resolution of remote sensing sensors and imagery has continuously improved. Focusing on spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors, the satellites of the current generation (TerraSAR-X, COSMO-SykMed) are able to acquire images with sub-meter resolution. Indeed, high resolution imagery is visually much better interpretable, but most of the established pixel-based analysis methods have become more or less impracticable since, in high resolution images, self-sufficient objects (vehicle, building) are represented by a large number of pixels. Methods dealing with Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) provide help. Objects (segments) are groupings of pixels resulting from image segmentation algorithms based on homogeneity criteria. The image set is represented by image segments, which allows the development of rule-based analysis schemes. For example, segments can be described or categorized by their local neighborhood in a context-based manner. In this paper, a novel method for the segmentation of high resolution SAR images is presented. It is based on the calculation of morphological differential attribute profiles (DAP) which are analyzed pixel-wise in a region growing procedure. The method distinguishes between heterogeneous and homogeneous image content and delivers a precise segmentation result.

  19. Monitoring The Dynamics Of Hyper-Saline Environments With Polarimetric SAR: Death Valley, California Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasne, Y.; McDonald, K.; Paillou, P.; Freeman, A.; Chapman, B.; Farr, T.; Ruffié, G.; Malézieux, J.

    2008-12-01

    Soil salinization in arid and semi-arid regions still remains one of the most important threats not only for socio-economical issues when dealing with water ressources management, but also for ecological matters such as: desertification, climate changes, and biomass reduction. Then, monitoring and mapping of soil salinity distribution represent today a key challenge in our understanding of such environmental processes. Being highly dependent on the dielectric properties of soils, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) appears to be an efficient tool for the remote sensing of hyper-saline environments. More precisely, the influence of saline deposits on SAR imagery lies in the solubility and ionic properties of the minerals which strongly influence both real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity of such deposits, and thus the radar backscattering coefficient. Based on temporal series acquired with spaceborne SAR systems (ALOS/PALSAR, SIR-C) over the Death Valley (CA), we show that the copolarized backscattering ratio and phase difference derived from SAR data can be used as suitable indicators to monitor the dynamics of hyper-saline deposits. In particular, we propose these copolar parameters to follow the variations in the dielectric properties of moistened and salt-affected soils on a seasonal time scale because of the close relationship between the salinity (governed by the soil moisture content) and the complex permittivity of the soils. We also highlight a strong temporal correlation between the copolar parameters and weather data since precipitation events control the soil moisture and salinity. In order to allow for a better interpretation of the saline deposits signatures observed on SAR data, we also perform analytical simulations of the radar backscattering associated with saline deposits by means of the IEM scattering model. Using laboratory and in~ situ dielectric measurements as input parameters, we simulate the copolar ratio and phase difference as

  20. A new maximum-likelihood change estimator for two-pass SAR coherent change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V.; Simonson, Katherine Mary

    2016-01-11

    In past research, two-pass repeat-geometry synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD) predominantly utilized the sample degree of coherence as a measure of the temporal change occurring between two complex-valued image collects. Previous coherence-based CCD approaches tend to show temporal change when there is none in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio. Instead of employing the sample coherence magnitude as a change metric, in this paper, we derive a new maximum-likelihood (ML) temporal change estimate—the complex reflectance change detection (CRCD) metric to be used for SAR coherent temporal change detection. The new CRCD estimator is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and optimal in the ML sense. As a result, this new estimate produces improved results in the coherent pair collects that we have tested.

  1. A new maximum-likelihood change estimator for two-pass SAR coherent change detection

    DOE PAGES

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V.; ...

    2016-01-11

    In past research, two-pass repeat-geometry synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD) predominantly utilized the sample degree of coherence as a measure of the temporal change occurring between two complex-valued image collects. Previous coherence-based CCD approaches tend to show temporal change when there is none in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio. Instead of employing the sample coherence magnitude as a change metric, in this paper, we derive a new maximum-likelihood (ML) temporal change estimate—the complex reflectance change detection (CRCD) metric to be used for SAR coherent temporal change detection. The new CRCD estimatormore » is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and optimal in the ML sense. As a result, this new estimate produces improved results in the coherent pair collects that we have tested.« less

  2. The Potential of Polarimetric and Compact SAR Data in Rice Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Y.; Li, K.; Brisco, B.; Liu, L.; Yang, Z.

    2014-03-01

    Rice is a major food staple in the world, and provides food for more than one-third of the global population. The monitoring and mapping of paddy rice in a timely and efficient manner is very important for governments and decision makers. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has been proved to be a significant data source in rice monitoring. In this study, RADARSAT-2 polarimetric data were used to simulate compact polarimetry data. The simulated compact data and polarimetric data were then used to evaluate the information content for rice identification. The results indicate that polarimetric SAR can be used for rice identification based on the scattering mechanisms. The compact polarization RH and the RH/RL ratio are very promising for the discrimination of transplanted rice and direct-sown rice. These results require verification in further research.

  3. A novel technique for unsupervised change detection in multitemporal SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazi, Y.; Bruzzone, L.; Melgani, F.

    The detection of changes that occur on the Earth surface by using multitemporal remote sensing images is one of the most important applications of the remote sensing technology. This depends on the fact that the knowledge of the dynamics of either natural resources or man-made structures is a valuable source of information in decision-making. In this context, optical remote sensing sensors have been used for addressing change-detection applications for many years. Unlike the optical sensors, images acquired by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) have been less exploited in the context of change detection. This is explained by the fact that SAR images suffer from the presence of the speckle noise that renders their analysis complex. However, the use of SAR sensors in change detection is attractive from the operational view-point, since they present the advantage to be independent on atmospheric and sunlight conditions. In the context of multitemporal SAR image analysis, the problem of change detection has been addressed with focus on different aspects, which include the choice of the comparison operator, the image despeckling and the optimal threshold selection. Despite some interesting works have been proposed in the literature, the main problem still open with SAR data is the lack of accurate and reliable methods capable to perform unsupervised change detection in a completely automatic way. In this paper, we propose to face the aforementioned issue by developing an automatic and unsupervised change-detection method specifically oriented to the analysis of multitemporal single-channel single-polarization SAR images. Such a method is based on three main steps: 1) controlled pre-processing based on adaptive filtering (despeckling); 2) comparison of a pair of multitemporal images according to a log-ratio operator; 3) automatic analysis of the log-ratio image. The first step aims at reducing the speckle noise in a controlled way in order to maximize the discrimination

  4. SAR Assimilation for Near-Shore Spectral Wave Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    completed during the six months since the inception of the program includes development of the mathematical framework for the assimilation procedure and...improvements in the convergence properties of the basic SAR assimilation procedure . RESULTS The expression for the predicted SAR-image spectrum...and hydrodynamic effects. The above SAR model along with the SWAN model form the basis for the assimilation procedure used in this study. The

  5. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus SarA binding sites.

    PubMed

    Sterba, Kristen M; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Blevins, Jon S; Hurlburt, Barry K; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2003-08-01

    The staphylococcal accessory regulator locus (sarA) encodes a DNA-binding protein (SarA) that modulates expression of over 100 genes. Whether this occurs via a direct interaction between SarA and cis elements associated with its target genes is unclear, partly because the definitive characteristics of a SarA binding site have not been identified. In this work, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) were used to identify a SarA binding site(s) upstream of the SarA-regulated gene cna. The results suggest the existence of multiple high-affinity binding sites within the cna promoter region. Using a SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) procedure and purified, recombinant SarA, we also selected DNA targets that contain a high-affinity SarA binding site from a random pool of DNA fragments. These fragments were subsequently cloned and sequenced. Randomly chosen clones were also examined by EMSA. These DNA fragments bound SarA with affinities comparable to those of recognized SarA-regulated genes, including cna, fnbA, and sspA. The composition of SarA-selected DNAs was AT rich, which is consistent with the nucleotide composition of the Staphylococcus aureus genome. Alignment of selected DNAs revealed a 7-bp consensus (ATTTTAT) that was present with no more than one mismatch in 46 of 56 sequenced clones. By using the same criteria, consensus binding sites were also identified upstream of the S. aureus genes spa, fnbA, sspA, agr, hla, and cna. With the exception of cna, which has not been previously examined, this 7-bp motif was within the putative SarA binding site previously associated with each gene.

  6. Processing of TerraSAR-X payload data: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breit, H.; Balss, U.; Bamler, R.; Fritz, T.; Eineder, M.

    2007-10-01

    TerraSAR-X is Germany's new radar remote sensing flagship. It carries an advanced high-resolution X-band SAR instrument. The key element of the system is the active phased array antenna nominally operated with a bandwidth of 100 MHz or 150 MHz and an experimental 300 MHz capability. The instrument's flexibility with respect to electronic beam steering and pulse-to-pulse polarization switching allows the acquisition of SAR data in Stripmap, Spotlight and ScanSAR imaging configurations in different polarization modes for a wide range of incidence angles. The mission is implemented in the framework of a public-private partnership between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and EADS Astrium GmbH Germany and will provide high resolution SAR data products for commercial use and scientific exploitation. Processing of the payload data will be performed at DLR's Payload Ground Segment (PGS) for TerraSAR-X. The central part of PGS is the TerraSAR Multi-Mode SAR Processor (TMSP) focusing the SAR data in a unified way for the different imaging configurations. A wide range of processing options spanning from phase preserving complex products in slant range geometry to orthorectified terrain corrected intensity images lead to a comprehensive collection of SAR product types and variants. During the 5 months lasting commissioning phase the complete processing chain will be properly tuned and adjusted. The TMSP algorithms have to be configured, e.g. thresholds for calibration pulse analysis, estimation window sizes for SAR data analysis, parameterization of estimation algorithms. Also the configuration of product variants with respect to resolution and radiometric quality will be checked and refined. This paper shortly reviews the different imaging configurations and product variants and gives a report on the SAR processor checkout activities and presents the first results.

  7. Monitoring Building Deformation with InSAR: Experiments and Validation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kui; Yan, Li; Huang, Guoman; Chen, Chu; Wu, Zhengpeng

    2016-12-20

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) techniques are increasingly applied for monitoring land subsidence. The advantages of InSAR include high accuracy and the ability to cover large areas; nevertheless, research validating the use of InSAR on building deformation is limited. In this paper, we test the monitoring capability of the InSAR in experiments using two landmark buildings; the Bohai Building and the China Theater, located in Tianjin, China. They were selected as real examples to compare InSAR and leveling approaches for building deformation. Ten TerraSAR-X images spanning half a year were used in Permanent Scatterer InSAR processing. These extracted InSAR results were processed considering the diversity in both direction and spatial distribution, and were compared with true leveling values in both Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression and measurement of error analyses. The detailed experimental results for the Bohai Building and the China Theater showed a high correlation between InSAR results and the leveling values. At the same time, the two Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) indexes had values of approximately 1 mm. These analyses show that a millimeter level of accuracy can be achieved by means of InSAR technique when measuring building deformation. We discuss the differences in accuracy between OLS regression and measurement of error analyses, and compare the accuracy index of leveling in order to propose InSAR accuracy levels appropriate for monitoring buildings deformation. After assessing the advantages and limitations of InSAR techniques in monitoring buildings, further applications are evaluated.

  8. Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to UXO Delineation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) to UXO Delineation May 2004 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) to UXO Delineation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 39 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified

  9. A Generalizable Hierarchical Bayesian Model for Persistent SAR Change Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    6] K. Ranney and M. Soumekh, “Signal subspace change detection in averaged multilook sar imagery,” Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on...A Generalizable Hierarchical Bayesian Model for Persistent SAR Change Detection Gregory E. Newstadta, Edmund G. Zelniob, and Alfred O. Hero IIIa...Base, OH, 45433, USA ABSTRACT This paper proposes a hierarchical Bayesian model for multiple-pass, multiple antenna synthetic aperture radar ( SAR

  10. Monitoring Building Deformation with InSAR: Experiments and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kui; Yan, Li; Huang, Guoman; Chen, Chu; Wu, Zhengpeng

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) techniques are increasingly applied for monitoring land subsidence. The advantages of InSAR include high accuracy and the ability to cover large areas; nevertheless, research validating the use of InSAR on building deformation is limited. In this paper, we test the monitoring capability of the InSAR in experiments using two landmark buildings; the Bohai Building and the China Theater, located in Tianjin, China. They were selected as real examples to compare InSAR and leveling approaches for building deformation. Ten TerraSAR-X images spanning half a year were used in Permanent Scatterer InSAR processing. These extracted InSAR results were processed considering the diversity in both direction and spatial distribution, and were compared with true leveling values in both Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression and measurement of error analyses. The detailed experimental results for the Bohai Building and the China Theater showed a high correlation between InSAR results and the leveling values. At the same time, the two Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) indexes had values of approximately 1 mm. These analyses show that a millimeter level of accuracy can be achieved by means of InSAR technique when measuring building deformation. We discuss the differences in accuracy between OLS regression and measurement of error analyses, and compare the accuracy index of leveling in order to propose InSAR accuracy levels appropriate for monitoring buildings deformation. After assessing the advantages and limitations of InSAR techniques in monitoring buildings, further applications are evaluated. PMID:27999403

  11. Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-12-01

    Proper waveform parameter selection allows collecting Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) phase history data on a rotated grid in the Fourier Space of the scene being imaged. Subsequent image formation preserves the rotated geometry to allow SAR images to be formed at arbitrary rotation angles without the use of computationally expensive interpolation or resampling operations. This should be useful where control of image orientation is desired such as generating squinted stripmaps and VideoSAR applications, among others.

  12. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Xochilt; Schiavi, Federica; Keppler, Hans

    2016-03-01

    data provided here, the gas compositions in equilibrium with the ash surfaces can be calculated. In particular, for dacitic composition, the molar ratio of S/Cl adsorbed to the ash surface is related to the molar S/Cl ratio in the gas phase according to the equation ln ⁡(S / Cl) adsorbed = 2855T-1 + 0.28 ln ⁡(S / Cl) gas - 11.14. Our data also show that adsorption on ash will significantly reduce the fraction of HCl reaching the stratosphere, only if the initial HCl content in the volcanic gas is low (<1 mol%). For higher initial HCl concentrations, adsorption on ash has only a minor effect. While HCl scavenging by hydrometeors may remove a considerable fraction of HCl from the eruption column, recent models suggest that this process is much less efficient than previously thought. Our experimental data therefore support the idea that the HCl loading from major explosive eruptions may indeed cause severe depletions of stratospheric ozone.

  13. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrola, E. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.; Simons, M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a software development effort in its second year within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program. The ISCE will provide a new computing environment for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors that will enable scientists to reduce measurements directly from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products without first requiring them to develop detailed expertise in radar processing methods. The environment can serve as the core of a centralized processing center to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but is adaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested in new and different ways to exploit mission data. The NRC Decadal Survey-recommended DESDynI mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystem. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment is planned to become a key element in processing DESDynI data into higher level data products and it is expected to enable a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data, than current approaches. At the core of ISCE is both legacy processing software from the JPL/Caltech ROI_PAC repeat-pass interferometry package as well as a new InSAR processing package containing more efficient and more accurate processing algorithms being developed at Stanford for this project that is based on experience gained in developing processors for missions such as SRTM and UAVSAR. Around the core InSAR processing programs we are building object-oriented wrappers to enable their incorporation into a more modern, flexible, extensible software package that is informed by modern programming methods, including rigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization of data models, and a robust, intuitive user interface with

  14. Coastline detection in SAR images using discriminant cuts segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xianwen; Zou, Xiaolin; Yu, Tan

    2016-11-01

    The discriminant cut algorithm is used to detect coastlines in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The proposed approach is a region-based one, which is able to capture and utilize spatial information in the image. The real SAR images, e.g. ALOS-1 PALSAR and COSMO-SkyMed SAR images, together with in-situ GPS data were collected and used to validate the performance of the proposed approach for coastline detection in SAR images. The accuracy is better than 4 times the image resolution. The efficiency is also tested.

  15. Motion measurement errors and autofocus in bistatic SAR.

    PubMed

    Rigling, Brian D; Moses, Randolph L

    2006-04-01

    This paper discusses the effect of motion measurement errors (MMEs) on measured bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) phase history data that has been motion compensated to the scene origin. We characterize the effect of low-frequency MMEs on bistatic SAR images, and, based on this characterization, we derive limits on the allowable MMEs to be used as system specifications. Finally, we demonstrate that proper orientation of a bistatic SAR image during the image formation process allows application of monostatic SAR autofocus algorithms in postprocessing to mitigate image defocus.

  16. Applications of SAR Interferometry in Earth and Environmental Science Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Chang, Ni-Bin; Li, Shusun

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the progress in regard to the InSAR remote sensing technique and its applications in earth and environmental sciences, especially in the past decade. Basic principles, factors, limits, InSAR sensors, available software packages for the generation of InSAR interferograms were summarized to support future applications. Emphasis was placed on the applications of InSAR in seismology, volcanology, land subsidence/uplift, landslide, glaciology, hydrology, and forestry sciences. It ends with a discussion of future research directions. PMID:22573992

  17. Relationships between autofocus methods for SAR and self-survey techniques for SONAR. [Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, D.E.; Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Ghiglia, D.C.; Eichel, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    Autofocus methods in SAR and self-survey techniques in SONAR have a common mathematical basis in that they both involve estimation and correction of phase errors introduced by sensor position uncertainties. Time delay estimation and correlation methods have been shown to be effective in solving the self-survey problem for towed SONAR arrays. Since it can be shown that platform motion errors introduce similar time-delay estimation problems in SAR imaging, the question arises as to whether such techniques could be effectively employed for autofocus of SAR imagery. With a simple mathematical model for motion errors in SAR, we will show why such correlation/time-delay techniques are not nearly as effective as established SAR autofocus algorithms such as phase gradient autofocus or sub-aperture based methods. This analysis forms an important bridge between signal processing methodologies for SAR and SONAR. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Curvelet-based compressive sensing for InSAR raw data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Marcello G.; da Silva Pinho, Marcelo; Fernandes, David

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the compression performance of SAR raw data for interferometry applications collected by airborne from BRADAR (Brazilian SAR System operating in X and P bands) using the new approach based on compressive sensing (CS) to achieve an effective recovery with a good phase preserving. For this framework is desirable a real-time capability, where the collected data can be compressed to reduce onboard storage and bandwidth required for transmission. In the CS theory, a sparse unknown signals can be recovered from a small number of random or pseudo-random measurements by sparsity-promoting nonlinear recovery algorithms. Therefore, the original signal can be significantly reduced. To achieve the sparse representation of SAR signal, was done a curvelet transform. The curvelets constitute a directional frame, which allows an optimal sparse representation of objects with discontinuities along smooth curves as observed in raw data and provides an advanced denoising optimization. For the tests were made available a scene of 8192 x 2048 samples in range and azimuth in X-band with 2 m of resolution. The sparse representation was compressed using low dimension measurements matrices in each curvelet subband. Thus, an iterative CS reconstruction method based on IST (iterative soft/shrinkage threshold) was adjusted to recover the curvelets coefficients and then the original signal. To evaluate the compression performance were computed the compression ratio (CR), signal to noise ratio (SNR), and because the interferometry applications require more reconstruction accuracy the phase parameters like the standard deviation of the phase (PSD) and the mean phase error (MPE) were also computed. Moreover, in the image domain, a single-look complex image was generated to evaluate the compression effects. All results were computed in terms of sparsity analysis to provides an efficient compression and quality recovering appropriated for inSAR applications

  19. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  20. SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, C.S.

    1959-06-16

    Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

  1. Ibuprofen adsorption in four agricultural volcanic soils.

    PubMed

    Estevez, Esmeralda; Hernandez-Moreno, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Vera, Juan Ramon; Palacios-Diaz, Maria Pino

    2014-01-15

    Ibuprofen (IB) is a high environmental risk drug and one of the most frequently prescribed in human medicine. Recently, IB has been detected in Gran Canaria in reclaimed water for irrigation and in groundwater. Adsorption was studied in four volcanic soils from three islands of the Canarian Archipelago. Once the biodegradation process has been excluded from the experimental conditions, a batch method was applied using initial concentrations of 1-5-10-20-50-100-200 mg L(-1) and two soil/water ratios (w/V): 1:5 (OECD, 2000) and 1:1. Non-linear and linearized Langmuir and Freundlich equations were well fitted. The wide IB range tested in our batch studies allowed us to measure experimental adsorption values close to the maximum adsorption capacity (S(max)) as estimated by Langmuir, making it possible thereby to validate the use of the Langmuir equation when there is a burst of contamination at high concentration. The distribution coefficient (Kd), S(max) and Retardation Factor (RF) varied from 0.04 to 0.5 kg L(-1), 4-200 mgk g(-1) and 1.2-1.9, respectively. The lowest S(max) and Kd values were found for the 1:1S/W ratio whereas most batch studies employ 1:5S/W ratios, thus obtaining higher adsorption parameters than when considering field conditions (1:1). Despite the high anion retention of andic soils, similar Kd and RF to those reported for other soils were obtained in 1:5, while high S(max) was found. Our results demonstrate that IB adsorption in volcanic areas responds not only to the soil properties commonly cited in adsorption studies, but also depends on andic properties, sorbent concentration and Dissolved Organic Carbon, the higher values of which are related to the lower Kd and S(max). The low RF and low detection frequency of the IB in groundwater suggests that a) reclaimed water irrigation is not the main source of IB, and b) the existence of some uncontrolled water disposal points in the zone.

  2. Advances in principal factors influencing carbon dioxide adsorption on zeolites

    PubMed Central

    Bonenfant, Danielle; Kharoune, Mourad; Niquette, Patrick; Mimeault, Murielle; Hausler, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We report the advances in the principal structural and experimental factors that might influence the carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption on natural and synthetic zeolites. The CO2 adsorption is principally govern by the inclusion of exchangeable cations (countercations) within the cavities of zeolites, which induce basicity and an electric field, two key parameters for CO2 adsorption. More specifically, these two parameters vary with diverse factors including the nature, distribution and number of exchangeable cations. The structure of framework also determines CO2 adsorption on zeolites by influencing the basicity and electric field in their cavities. In fact, the basicity and electric field usually vary inversely with the Si/Al ratio. Furthermore, the CO2 adsorption might be limited by the size of pores within zeolites and by the carbonates formation during the CO2 chemisorption. The polarity of molecules adsorbed on zeolites represents a very important factor that influences their interaction with the electric field. The adsorbates that have the most great quadrupole moment such as the CO2, might interact strongly with the electric field of zeolites and this favors their adsorption. The pressure, temperature and presence of water seem to be the most important experimental conditions that influence the adsorption of CO2. The CO2 adsorption increases with the gas phase pressure and decreases with the rise of temperature. The presence of water significantly decreases adsorption capacity of cationic zeolites by decreasing strength and heterogeneity of the electric field and by favoring the formation of bicarbonates. The optimization of the zeolites structural characteristics and the experimental conditions might enhance substantially their CO2 adsorption capacity and thereby might give rise to the excellent adsorbents that may be used to capturing the industrial emissions of CO2. PMID:27877925

  3. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  4. Multi-Temporal SAR Interferometry for Landslide Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, R.; Narayan, A. B.; Tiwari, A.; Dikshit, O.; Singh, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    In the past few years, SAR Interferometry specially InSAR and D-InSAR were extensively used for deformation monitoring related applications. Due to temporal and spatial decorrelation in dense vegetated areas, effectiveness of InSAR and D-InSAR observations were always under scrutiny. Multi-temporal InSAR methods are developed in recent times to retrieve the deformation signal from pixels with different scattering characteristics. Presently, two classes of multi-temporal InSAR algorithms are available- Persistent Scatterer (PS) and Small Baseline (SB) methods. This paper discusses the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterer (StaMPS) based PS-InSAR and the Small Baselines Subset (SBAS) techniques to estimate the surface deformation in Tehri dam reservoir region in Uttarkhand, India. Both PS-InSAR and SBAS approaches used sixteen ENVISAT ASAR C-Band images for generating single master and multiple master interferograms stack respectively and their StaMPS processing resulted in time series 1D-Line of Sight (LOS) mean velocity maps which are indicative of deformation in terms of movement towards and away from the satellites. From 1D LOS velocity maps, localization of landslide is evident along the reservoir rim area which was also investigated in the previous studies. Both PS-InSAR and SBAS effectively extract measurement pixels in the study region, and the general results provided by both approaches show a similar deformation pattern along the Tehri reservoir region. Further, we conclude that StaMPS based PS-InSAR method performs better in terms of extracting more number of measurement pixels and in the estimation of mean Line of Sight (LOS) velocity as compared to SBAS method. It is also proposed to take up a few major landslides area in Uttarakhand for slope stability assessment.

  5. Impact of the Regulators SigB, Rot, SarA and sarS on the Toxic Shock Tst Promoter and TSST-1 Expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Maite; Renzoni, Adriana; Monod, Antoinette; Barras, Christine; Rodriguez, Natalia; Kelley, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen manifesting virulence through diverse disease forms, ranging from acute skin infections to life-threatening bacteremia or systemic toxic shock syndromes. In the latter case, the prototypical superantigen is TSST-1 (Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1), encoded by tst(H), and carried on a mobile genetic element that is not present in all S. aureus strains. Transcriptional regulation of tst is only partially understood. In this study, we dissected the role of sarA, sarS (sarH1), RNAIII, rot, and the alternative stress sigma factor sigB (σB). By examining tst promoter regulation predominantly in the context of its native sequence within the SaPI1 pathogenicity island of strain RN4282, we discovered that σB emerged as a particularly important tst regulator. We did not detect a consensus σB site within the tst promoter, and thus the effect of σB is likely indirect. We found that σB strongly repressed the expression of the toxin via at least two distinct regulatory pathways dependent upon sarA and agr. Furthermore rot, a member of SarA family, was shown to repress tst expression when overexpressed, although its deletion had no consistent measurable effect. We could not find any detectable effect of sarS, either by deletion or overexpression, suggesting that this regulator plays a minimal role in TSST-1 expression except when combined with disruption of sarA. Collectively, our results extend our understanding of complex multifactorial regulation of tst, revealing several layers of negative regulation. In addition to environmental stimuli thought to impact TSST-1 production, these findings support a model whereby sporadic mutation in a few key negative regulators can profoundly affect and enhance TSST-1 expression. PMID:26275216

  6. Impact of the Regulators SigB, Rot, SarA and sarS on the Toxic Shock Tst Promoter and TSST-1 Expression in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Andrey, Diego O; Jousselin, Ambre; Villanueva, Maite; Renzoni, Adriana; Monod, Antoinette; Barras, Christine; Rodriguez, Natalia; Kelley, William L

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen manifesting virulence through diverse disease forms, ranging from acute skin infections to life-threatening bacteremia or systemic toxic shock syndromes. In the latter case, the prototypical superantigen is TSST-1 (Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1), encoded by tst(H), and carried on a mobile genetic element that is not present in all S. aureus strains. Transcriptional regulation of tst is only partially understood. In this study, we dissected the role of sarA, sarS (sarH1), RNAIII, rot, and the alternative stress sigma factor sigB (σB). By examining tst promoter regulation predominantly in the context of its native sequence within the SaPI1 pathogenicity island of strain RN4282, we discovered that σB emerged as a particularly important tst regulator. We did not detect a consensus σB site within the tst promoter, and thus the effect of σB is likely indirect. We found that σB strongly repressed the expression of the toxin via at least two distinct regulatory pathways dependent upon sarA and agr. Furthermore rot, a member of SarA family, was shown to repress tst expression when overexpressed, although its deletion had no consistent measurable effect. We could not find any detectable effect of sarS, either by deletion or overexpression, suggesting that this regulator plays a minimal role in TSST-1 expression except when combined with disruption of sarA. Collectively, our results extend our understanding of complex multifactorial regulation of tst, revealing several layers of negative regulation. In addition to environmental stimuli thought to impact TSST-1 production, these findings support a model whereby sporadic mutation in a few key negative regulators can profoundly affect and enhance TSST-1 expression.

  7. Power Transmission Tower Series Extraction in PolSAR Image Based on Time-Frequency Analysis and A-Contrario Theory

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Dongqing; Zhang, Haijian; Guo, Wei; Yang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Based on Time-Frequency (TF) analysis and a-contrario theory, this paper presents a new approach for extraction of linear arranged power transmission tower series in Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) images. Firstly, the PolSAR multidimensional information is analyzed using a linear TF decomposition approach. The stationarity of each pixel is assessed by testing the maximum likelihood ratio statistics of the coherency matrix. Then, based on the maximum likelihood log-ratio image, a Cell-Averaging Constant False Alarm Rate (CA-CFAR) detector with Weibull clutter background and a post-processing operator is used to detect point-like targets in the image. Finally, a searching approach based on a-contrario theory is applied to extract the linear arranged targets from detected point-like targets. The experimental results on three sets of PolSAR data verify the effectiveness of this approach. PMID:27827966

  8. Power Transmission Tower Series Extraction in PolSAR Image Based on Time-Frequency Analysis and A-Contrario Theory.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dongqing; Zhang, Haijian; Guo, Wei; Yang, Wen

    2016-11-05

    Based on Time-Frequency (TF) analysis and a-contrario theory, this paper presents a new approach for extraction of linear arranged power transmission tower series in Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) images. Firstly, the PolSAR multidimensional information is analyzed using a linear TF decomposition approach. The stationarity of each pixel is assessed by testing the maximum likelihood ratio statistics of the coherency matrix. Then, based on the maximum likelihood log-ratio image, a Cell-Averaging Constant False Alarm Rate (CA-CFAR) detector with Weibull clutter background and a post-processing operator is used to detect point-like targets in the image. Finally, a searching approach based on a-contrario theory is applied to extract the linear arranged targets from detected point-like targets. The experimental results on three sets of PolSAR data verify the effectiveness of this approach.

  9. [Adsorption behavior of exogenous thorium on soil contaminated by rare earth industries].

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng-ran; Jia, Xiao-yu; Duan, Tai-cheng; Qiu, Rong-liang; Chen, Hang-ting

    2009-10-15

    The adsorption behavior of exogenous thorium on soil was studied to evaluate the contaminated risk on soil. The adsorption capacity, equilibrium time, distribution coefficient and desorption ability were investigated by the experiments of static adsorption. The strong adsorption ability of exogenous thorium on soil samples was observed by high adsorption ratio (> 92%) and low desorption ratio (< 5%) in equilibrium, and the biggest distribution coefficient was over 10(4). The adsorption capacity and equilibrium time were related to soil properties. According to the results of adsorption, Freundlich equation (r > or = 0.9167) and Elovich equation (R2 > or = 0.8980) were primely fit for describing the thermodynamics and kinetics of the adsorption of exogenous thorium on soil samples, respectively, which indicated that the adsorption was belonged to the nonlinear adsorption, and was affected by the diffusion of thorium on soil surface and in mineral interbed. Sequential extraction procedure was employed to evaluate the bound fractions of exogenous thorium adsorbed on soil samples. Based on the extracted results of thorium fractions, exogenous thorium was presented in the labile nonresidual fractions (over 58%) at the low initial concentration (10(-7) - 10(-6) mol x L(-1)), and nonresidual fractions enhanced with the increase of the initial amount, meanwhile more exogenous throium was transferred to the stable residual fractions.

  10. Classification and monitoring of reed belts using dual-polarimetric TerraSAR-X time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Iris; Jagdhuber, Thomas; Itzerott, Sibylle

    2016-04-01

    The shorelines of lakes in northeastern Germany are often covered by reed. These reed belts fulfill an important function as erosion protection, biotope for animals, carbon storage, and as cleaning filter for lake water. However, despite their importance for the limnic ecosystem, reed vegetation in northeastern Germany is not regularly monitored. In this research study we investigate the potential of synthetic aperture radar polarimetry (PolSAR) for seasonal monitoring of reed vegetation. SAR imagery enables sunlight- and (almost) weather-independent monitoring. Polarimetric decomposition techniques allow the physical characterization of the scattering scenario and the involved scatterers. Our study is based on 19 dual-polarimetric (HH/VV) TerraSAR-X images acquired between August 2014 and May 2015. We calculated different polarimetric indices comprising the HH and VV intensities, the dual-polarimetric coherency matrix with dominant and mean alpha scattering angles, entropy and anisotropy (normalized eigen-value difference) as well as combinations of entropy and anisotropy for the analysis of the scattering scenarios. The reed areas in the TerraSAR-X images were classified using a random forest algorithm and validated with high-resolution digital orthophotos. The time series analysis of the reed belts revealed significant seasonal changes in the double bounce sensitive parameters (intensity ratio HH/VV and intensity difference HH-VV, the co-polarimetric coherence phase and the dominant and mean alpha scattering angles). Additionally, the dual-polarimetric coherence (amplitude), anisotropy, entropy, and anisotropy-entropy-combinations showed seasonal changes of reed. In summer, the reed areas are characterized within the X-band SAR data by volume scattering, whereas in winter double-bounce scattering dominates. The volume scattering in summer is caused predominantly by reed leaves. In autumn, the leaves start to wither and fall off, so that in winter predominately

  11. [Effect of SDS on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto amphoteric modified bentonites].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Tao; Meng, Zhao-Fu; Yang, Ya-Ti; Yang, Shu-Ying; Li, Bin; Xu, Shao-e

    2014-07-01

    Under different modified ratios, temperatures, pH and ionic strengths, the effect of sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto bentonites which modified with amphoteric modifier dodecyl dimethyl betaine (BS-12) was studied by batch experiments, and the adsorption mechanism was also discussed. Results showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ on amphoteric bentonites can be enhanced significantly by SDS combined modification, Cd2+ adsorption decreases in the order: BS + 150SDS (BS-12 + 150% SDS) > BS + 100SDS (BS-12 + 100% SDS) > BS +50SDS(BS-12 + 50% SDS) > BS + 25SDS (BS-12 + 25% SDS) > BS (BS-12) > CK (unmodified soil). The adsorption isotherm can be described by the Langmuir equation. The change of temperature effect from positive on CK and amphoteric bentonites to negative on BS + 150SDS bentonites is observed with an increase of SDS modified ratio. The pH has little influence on Cd2+ adsorption on bentonites. The adsorption of Cd2+ on bentonites decreases with ionic strength rise, but the effect of ionic strength can be reduced with an increase of SDS modified ratio also. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites was spontaneously controlled by entropy increment. When the SDS modified ratio is lower than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites is a process with characteristics of both enthalpy increment and entropy increment, while the SDS modified ratio is equal to or higher than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites becomes a process of enthalpy decrement and entropy increment.

  12. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Gurrola, E. M.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.; Simons, M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2009-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a new development effort within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program, with the intent of recasting the JPL/Caltech ROI_PAC repeat-pass interferometry package into a modern, reconfigurable, open-source computing environment. The new capability initiates the next generation of geodetic imaging processing technology for InSAR sensors, providing flexibility and extensibility in reducing measurements from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products. The NRC Decadal Survey recommended DESDynI mission will deliver to the science community data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth’s ecosystem. DESDynI will provide time series and multi-image measurements that permit four-dimensional models of Earth surface processes so that, for example, climate-induced changes over time become apparent and quantifiable. In this paper, we describe the Environment, and illustrate how it can facility space-based geodesy from InSAR. The ISCE invokes object oriented scripts to control legacy and new codes, and abstracts and generalizes the data model for efficient manipulation of objects among modules. The module interfaces are suitable for command-line execution or GUI-programming. It exposes users gradually to its levels of capability, allowing novices to apply it readily for simple tasks and for experienced users to mine the data with great facility. The intent of the effort is to encourage user contributions to the code, creating an open source community that will extend its life and utility.

  13. A theoretical basis and methodology for the quantitative evaluation of thematic map series from SAR/InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Paula Jean

    2001-07-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR (InSAR) data are increasingly being used for specific operational purposes such as detailed elevation maps, detection of military targets, and coastline mapping of perpetually cloud-covered areas. One topic that has been studied extensively since the 1970's is the generation of thematic maps from this data. However, most of the relevant literature relies on highly labor-intensive approaches to yield "accurate" results for a particular scene, by fine-tuning parameters to minimize the "error" in the scene (as compared to sampled ground truth for the same scene). Consequently, it remains to be seen whether or how these data can be used to produce thematic map series efficiently and reliably in the face of varying landscapes, sensors, processors, classifiers, and output requirements. To the best of our knowledge, no one has yet examined the linked, complex, and multi-faceted issues involved in using SAR/InSAR data for this purpose; indeed, even a basis for conducting such a study has not been determined. This study adapts recent ISO (International Organization of Standardization) standards on measurand, repeatability, and reproducibility and applies them to the study of these issues. The standards are applied to analyze the range of measurement uncertainties associated with the end-to-end processes that are involved in generating thematic maps. These processes are: (1) the physical interaction of the SAR/InSAR signal with various terrain and landscape characteristics; (2) antenna characteristics and signal processing steps in generating an image; (3) image classification models and algorithms; and (4) standard map output requirements. The primary outcome is the development of a methodology through applying the ISO principles to thematic map classification of SAR/InSAR data. The methodology is expected to aid in determining the expected quality of a SAR/InSAR-based thematic map series and its fitness for intended

  14. The SAR of brain penetration for a series of heteroaryl urea FAAH inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Keith, John M; Tichenor, Mark S; Apodaca, Richard L; Xiao, Wei; Jones, William M; Seierstad, Mark; Pierce, Joan M; Palmer, James A; Webb, Michael; Karbarz, Mark J; Scott, Brian P; Wilson, Sandy J; Wennerholm, Michelle L; Rizzolio, Michele; Rynberg, Raymond; Chaplan, Sandra R; Breitenbucher, J Guy

    2016-07-01

    The SAR of brain penetration for a series of heteroaryl piperazinyl- and piperadinyl-urea fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors is described. Brain/plasma (B/P) ratios ranging from >4:1 to as low as 0.02:1 were obtained through relatively simple structural changes to various regions of the heteroaryl urea scaffold. It was not possible to predict the degree of central nervous system (CNS) penetration from the volumes of distribution (Vd) obtained from pharmacokinetic (PK) experiments as very high Vds did not correlate with high B/P ratios. Similarly, calculated topological polar surface areas (TPSAs) did not consistently correlate with the degree of brain penetration. The lowest B/P ratios were observed for those compounds that were significantly ionized at physiological pH. However, as this class of compounds inhibits the FAAH enzyme through covalent modification, low B/P ratios did not preclude effective central target engagement.

  15. SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss

    PubMed Central

    Tsementzi, Despina; Wu, Jieying; Deutsch, Samuel; Nath, Sangeeta; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Burns, Andrew S.; Ranjan, Piyush; Sarode, Neha; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Padilla, Cory C.; Stone, Benjamin K.; Bristow, Laura A.; Larsen, Morten; Glass, Jennifer B.; Thamdrup, Bo; Woyke, Tanja; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Stewart, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria of the SAR11 clade constitute up to one half of all microbial cells in the oxygen-rich surface ocean. DNA sequences from SAR11 are also abundant in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) where oxygen falls below detection and anaerobic microbes play important roles in converting bioavailable nitrogen to N2 gas. Evidence for anaerobic metabolism in SAR11 has not yet been observed, and the question of how these bacteria contribute to OMZ biogeochemical cycling is unanswered. Here, we identify the metabolic basis for SAR11 activity in anoxic ocean waters. Genomic analysis of single cells from the world’s largest OMZ revealed diverse and previously uncharacterized SAR11 lineages that peak in abundance at anoxic depths, but are largely undetectable in oxygen-rich ocean regions. OMZ SAR11 contain adaptations to low oxygen, including genes for respiratory nitrate reductases (Nar). SAR11 nar genes were experimentally verified to encode proteins catalyzing the nitrite-producing first step of denitrification and constituted ~40% of all OMZ nar transcripts, with transcription peaking in the zone of maximum nitrate reduction rates. These results redefine the ecological niche of Earth’s most abundant organismal group and suggest an important contribution of SAR11 to nitrite production in OMZs, and thus to pathways of ocean nitrogen loss. PMID:27487207

  16. System and SAR Characterization in Parallel RF Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yudong; Alon, Leeor; Deniz, Cem M.; Brown, Ryan; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2011-01-01

    The markedly increased degrees of freedom introduced by parallel RF transmission present both opportunities and challenges for SAR management. On the one hand they enable E field tailoring and SAR reduction while facilitating excitation profile control. On the other hand they increase the complexity of SAR behavior and the risk of inadvertently exacerbating SAR by improper design or playout of RF pulses. The substantial subject-dependency of SAR in high field MR can be a compounding factor. Building upon a linear system concept and a calibration scheme involving a finite number of in situ measurements, the present work establishes a clinically applicable method for characterizing global SAR behavior as well as channel-by-channel power transmission. The method offers a unique capability of predicting, for any excitation, the SAR and power consequences that are specific to the subject to be scanned and the MRI hardware. The method was validated in simulation and experimental studies, showing promise as the foundation to a prospective paradigm where power and SAR are not only monitored but, through prediction-guided optimization, proactively managed. PMID:22139808

  17. The Yellowstone Fires as Observed by SIR-C SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric; Despain, Don; Holecz, Francesco

    1996-01-01

    Covers SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar C) SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imaging of the 1988 Yellowstone National Forest fires. Discusses some of the images and data collected, and some conclusions drawn from them about both the fires, and SIR-C SAR imaging capabilities.

  18. a New Approach for Optical and SAR Satellite Image Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkle, N.; Müller, R.; Schwind, P.; Palubinskas, G.; Reinartz, P.

    2015-03-01

    Over the last years several research studies have shown the high geometric accuracy of high resolution radar satellites like TerraSARX. Due to this fact, the impact of high resolution SAR images for image registration has increased. An aim of high accuracy image registration is the improvement of the absolute geometric accuracy of optical images by using SAR images as references. High accuracy image registration is required for different remote sensing applications and is an on-going research topic. The registration of images acquired by different sensor types, like optical and SAR images, is a challenging task. In our work, a novel approach is proposed, which is a combination of the classical feature-based and intensity-based registration approaches. In the first step of the method, spatial features, here roundabouts, are detected in the optical image. In the second step, the detected features are used to generate SAR like roundabout templates. In the third step, the templates are matched with the corresponding parts of the SAR image by using an intensitybased matching process. The proposed method is tested for a pair of TerraSAR-X and QuickBird images and a pair of TerraSAR-X and WorldView-2 images of a suburban area. The results show that the proposed method offers an alternative approach compared to the common optical and SAR images registration methods and it can be used for the geometric accuracy improvement of optical images.

  19. An Adaptive Ship Detection Scheme for Spaceborne SAR Imagery.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiangguang; Ji, Kefeng; Zhou, Shilin; Xing, Xiangwei; Zou, Huanxin

    2016-08-23

    With the rapid development of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and the increasing need of ship detection, research on adaptive ship detection in spaceborne SAR imagery is of great importance. Focusing on practical problems of ship detection, this paper presents a highly adaptive ship detection scheme for spaceborne SAR imagery. It is able to process a wide range of sensors, imaging modes and resolutions. Two main stages are identified in this paper, namely: ship candidate detection and ship discrimination. Firstly, this paper proposes an adaptive land masking method using ship size and pixel size. Secondly, taking into account the imaging mode, incidence angle, and polarization channel of SAR imagery, it implements adaptive ship candidate detection in spaceborne SAR imagery by applying different strategies to different resolution SAR images. Finally, aiming at different types of typical false alarms, this paper proposes a comprehensive ship discrimination method in spaceborne SAR imagery based on confidence level and complexity analysis. Experimental results based on RADARSAT-1, RADARSAT-2, TerraSAR-X, RS-1, and RS-3 images demonstrate that the adaptive scheme proposed in this paper is able to detect ship targets in a fast, efficient and robust way.

  20. Wave retrieval from SAR imagery in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xiulin; Chang, Junfang; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) plays an important role in measuring directional ocean wave spectra with continuous and global coverage. In this article, satellite SAR images were used to estimate the wave parameters in the East China Sea. The Max-Planck Institut (MPI) method was applied to retrieve directional wave spectra from the SAR imagers with the Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) model data as the first guess wave spectra. In order to validate the SAR retrieved wave spectra, a set of buoy measurements during the SAR imaging times was collected and used. The SAR retrieved significant wave heights (SWHs) were analyzed against the buoy measurements to assess the wave retrieval of this study. The root-mean-square error between the SAR SWHs and the buoy measurements is 0.25 m, which corresponds to a relative error of 12%. The case study here shows that the SWAN model data is a potential first guess wave spectra source to the MPI method to retrieve ocean wave spectra from SAR imagery.

  1. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-09-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development.

  2. P3 SAR exploration of biphenyl carbamate based Legumain inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Catherine; Bouazzaoui, Samira; Gaddale, Kishore; D'Costa, Zenobia; Templeman, Amy; O'Rourke, Martin; Young, Andrew; Scott, Christopher; Harrison, Tim; Mullan, Paul; Williams, Rich

    2014-06-01

    This Letter describes the further development and SAR exploration of a novel series of Legumain inhibitors. Based upon a previously identified Legumain inhibitor from our group, we explored the SAR of the carbamate phenyl ring system to probe the P3 pocket of the enzyme. This led to the identification of a sub-nanomolar inhibitor of Legumain.

  3. An Adaptive Ship Detection Scheme for Spaceborne SAR Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xiangguang; Ji, Kefeng; Zhou, Shilin; Xing, Xiangwei; Zou, Huanxin

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and the increasing need of ship detection, research on adaptive ship detection in spaceborne SAR imagery is of great importance. Focusing on practical problems of ship detection, this paper presents a highly adaptive ship detection scheme for spaceborne SAR imagery. It is able to process a wide range of sensors, imaging modes and resolutions. Two main stages are identified in this paper, namely: ship candidate detection and ship discrimination. Firstly, this paper proposes an adaptive land masking method using ship size and pixel size. Secondly, taking into account the imaging mode, incidence angle, and polarization channel of SAR imagery, it implements adaptive ship candidate detection in spaceborne SAR imagery by applying different strategies to different resolution SAR images. Finally, aiming at different types of typical false alarms, this paper proposes a comprehensive ship discrimination method in spaceborne SAR imagery based on confidence level and complexity analysis. Experimental results based on RADARSAT-1, RADARSAT-2, TerraSAR-X, RS-1, and RS-3 images demonstrate that the adaptive scheme proposed in this paper is able to detect ship targets in a fast, efficient and robust way. PMID:27563902

  4. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    SciTech Connect

    Bielek, Timothy P.; Thompson, Douglas G.; Walker, Bruce C.

    2009-03-03

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  5. Infection Control and SARS Transmission among Healthcare Workers, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yee-Chun; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Kao, Chiang-Lian; Wang, Shiou-Hwa; Wang, Li-Hua

    2004-01-01

    This study found infrequent transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus to healthcare workers involved in the care of the first five case-patients in Taiwan, despite a substantial number of unprotected exposures. Nonetheless, given that SARS has been highly transmissible on some occasions, we still recommend strict precautions. PMID:15200825

  6. A short note on calculating the adjusted SAR index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple algebraic technique is presented for computing the adjusted SAR Index proposed by Suarez (1981). The statistical formula presented in this note facilitates the computation of the adjusted SAR without the use of either a look-up table, custom computer software or the need to compute exact a...

  7. Detection of land degradation with polarimetric SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Terrill W.; Farr, Tom G.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1992-01-01

    Multispectral radar polarimeter data were collected over the Manix Basin Area of the Mojave desert using an airborne SAR. An analysis of the data reveals unusual polarization responses which are attributed to the formation of wind ripples on the surfaces of fields that have been abandoned for more than 5 years. This hypothesis has been confirmed through field observations, and a second-order perturbation model is shown to effectively model the polarization responses. The results demonstrate the usefulness of remote sensing techniques for the study of land degradation at synoptic scales.

  8. Compression of Complex-Valued SAR Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Eichel P.; Ives, R.W.

    1999-03-03

    Synthetic Aperture Radars are coherent imaging systems that produce complex-valued images of the ground. Because modern systems can generate large amounts of data, there is substantial interest in applying image compression techniques to these products. In this paper, we examine the properties of complex-valued SAR images relevant to the task of data compression. We advocate the use of transform-based compression methods but employ radically different quantization strategies than those commonly used for incoherent optical images. The theory, methodology, and examples are presented.

  9. Millimeter-wave interferometric SAR and polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehmsdorff, Stephan; Essen, Helmut; Schimpf, Hartmuf; Wahlen, Alfred

    1998-07-01

    Using synthetic aperture radars with appropriate signal processing algorithms is a recognized technique for remote sensing applications. A wide spectrum of radar frequencies is used and a high degree of sophistication implies polarimetric and further multichannel approaches. Each frequency band used, exhibits special sensitivities to features of the earth's surface or man-made targets. This is mostly due to the coupling of the electromagnetic waves to backscattering geometries which are related to the radarwavelength. A part of the spectrum which has been covered not very intensely is the millimeterwave region. This may be mostly due to the relatively high atmospheric absorption at millimeterwaves which obstructs the use of such sensors for long range applications. On the other hand for military applications IR-imaging sensors are widely used which suffer even more from adverse transmission properties of the atmosphere. Application of multichannel techniques as polarimetry, multifrequency techniques and interferometry are also done with more ease due to compactness of the hardware and simplicity of processing. As there exist no data which would allow to investigate the potential of multifrequency polarimetric and interferometric mmW-SAR the Millimeterwave Experimental Multifrequency Polarimetric High Resolution Interferometric Imaging System was installed into an aircraft C-160 `Transall' to gather respective data over different land scenarios. The off-line evaluation of the radar data starts with off-line track, calibration and reformatting procedures. Afterwards synthetic aperture processing is applied to these data to generate radar images for co- and cross-polarization at 35 GHz and 94 GHz. As already mentioned above, SAR-processing at millimeterwavelengths requires a considerable lower amount of sophistication in comparison with algorithms applied at lower radar-frequencies. This can mainly be attributed to the short aperture length at mm-wave frequencies

  10. Salt Kinematics and InSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftabi, Pedarm; Talbot, hristopher; Fielding, Eric

    2005-01-01

    As part of a long-term attempt to learn how the climatic and tectonic signal interact to shape a steady state mountain monitored displacement of a markers in SE termination and also near the summit of a small viscous salt fountain extruding onto the Central plateau of Iran. The marker displacements relate to the first InSAR interferograms of salt extrusion (980913 to 990620) calculated Earth tides, winds, air pressures and temperatures. In the first documented staking exercise, hammered wooden stakes vertically through the surgical marl (c. 1 Ocm deep) onto the top of crystalline salt. These stakes installed in an irregular array elongate E-W along the c.50 m high cliff marking the effective SE terminus of the glacier at Qum Kuh(Centra1 Iran) ,just to the E of a NE trending river cliff about 40 m high. We merely measured the distances between pairs of stakes with known azimuth about 2 m apart to calculate sub horizontal strain in a small part of Qum Kuh. Stakes moved and micro strains for up to 46 pairs of stakes (p strain= ((lengthl-length2)/1engthl) x 10-1) was calculated for each seven stake epochs and plotted against their azimuth on simplified array maps. The data fit well the sine curves cxpected of the maximum and minimum strain ellipses. The first documented stakes located on the SE where the InSAR image show -1 1 to 0 mm pink to purple, 0 to lOmm purple to blue, and show high activity of salt in low activity area of the InSAR image (980913 to 990620).Short term micro strains of stake tie lines record anisotropic expansions due to heating and contraction due to cooling. All epochs changed between 7 to 1 17 days (990928 to000 1 16), showed 200 to 400 micro strain lengthening and shortening. The contraction and extension existed in each epoch, but the final strain was extension in E-W in Epoch land 6, contraction in E-W direction during epochs 2-3-4-5 and 7. The second pair of stakes hammered about 20 cm deep into the deep soils(more than 1 m) , near summit

  11. Automatic Transfer of SAR Patterns for AUXSAR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Need: Near real-time Search and Rescue (SAR) patterns for forward assets to effectively execute mission Project Objectives...Demonstrate and evaluate the near real-time transport of Search and Rescue Patterns to forward assets . POSITION 36:50.190N / 076:17.907W 36:50.190N / 076... Asset Notes • Many Auxiliary units are using AUXSAR C tibl N i ti t i d• ompa e e av ga on sys ems requ re • Post sortie feedback loop C tibl N i ti t

  12. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil and its components. III. Influence of clay acidity, humic acid coating and herbicide structure on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-ping; Fang, Zhuo; Liu, Hui-jun; Yang, Wei-chun

    2002-04-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite, soil humic acid, and their mixtures was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption isotherms of acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on Ca(2+)-, Mg(2+)-, Al(3+)- and Fe(3+)-saturated clays were well described by the Freundlich equation. Regardless of the type of exchange cations, Kf decreased in the order of metolachlor > acetolachlor > alachlor > propachlor on the same clay. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in binding, probably via H-bond with water molecules in the clay interlayer. The type and position of substitutions around the carbonyl group may have affected the electronegativity of oxygen, thus influencing the relative adsorption of these herbicides. For the same herbicide, adsorption on clay increased in the order of Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Al3+ < or = Fe3+ which coincided with the increasing acidity of homoionic clays. Acidity of cations may have affected the protonation of water, and thus the strength of H-bond between the clay water and herbicide. Complexation of clay and humic acid resulted in less adsorption than that expected from independent adsorption by the individual constituents. The effect varied with herbicides, but the greatest decrease in adsorption occurred at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio for all the herbicides. Causes for the decreased adsorption need to be characterized to better understand adsorption mechanisms and predict adsorption from soil compositions.

  13. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  14. [Adsorption characteristics of f2 bacteriophages by four substrates in constructed wetland].

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Zheng, Xiang; Wei, Yuan-Song; Yang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Performance of f2 phages adsorption by four substrates including anthracite coal, steel slag, zeolite and forsterite was investigated through batch and dynamic experiments. Results of batch experiments showed that the removal efficiency of f2 phages by these four substrates was in the order of anthracite > steel slag > forsterite approximately zeolite. The adsorption of f2 phages by anthracite experienced fast, medium and slow stages, and the removal efficiency of f2 phages increased gradually with the increase of anthracite dosage, e. g. the optimized dosage of anthracite was 8.0 g at a solid/liquid ratio of 1:12.5 (m/V). The isothermal adsorption of all four substrates was described with Freundlich and Langmuir isothermal adsorption equation very well, and the adsorption of f2 phages by both anthracite and steel slag fitted pseudo-second order adsorption kinetics at their theoretical adsorption capacities of 3. 35 x 10(8) PFU.g-1 and 2.56 x 10(8) PFU.g-1, respectively, nearly the same as the equilibrium adsorption capacities obtained under the experiment conditions. And the liquid diffusion process was a rate-limiting step of the adsorption of f2 phage by both anthracite and steel slag, but not the only one. The results of dynamic adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption process of f2 phages in the three adsorption columns including anthracite, steel slag and zeolite experienced four stages of adaption, adsorption, pulse adsorption and adsorption equilibrium, and the total removal rates of f2 phages were more than 2. 55 Ig.

  15. The Accuratre Signal Model and Imaging Processing in Geosynchronous SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) application, the disadvantage of low earth orbit (LEO) SAR becomes more and more apparent. The increase of orbit altitude can shorten the revisit time and enlarge the coverage area in single look, and then satisfy the application requirement. The concept of geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) SAR system is firstly presented and deeply discussed by K.Tomiyasi and other researchers. A GEO SAR, with its fine temporal resolution, would overcome the limitations of current imaging systems, allowing dense interpretation of transient phenomena as GPS time-series analysis with a spatial density several orders of magnitude finer. Until now, the related literatures about GEO SAR are mainly focused in the system parameter design and application requirement. As for the signal characteristic, resolution calculation and imaging algorithms, it is nearly blank in the related literatures of GEO SAR. In the LEO SAR, the signal model analysis adopts the `Stop-and-Go' assumption in general, and this assumption can satisfy the imaging requirement in present advanced SAR system, such as TerraSAR, Radarsat2 and so on. However because of long propagation distance and non-negligible earth rotation, the `Stop-and-Go' assumption does not exist and will cause large propagation distance error, and then affect the image formation. Furthermore the long propagation distance will result in the long synthetic aperture time such as hundreds of seconds, therefore the linear trajectory model in LEO SAR imaging will fail in GEO imaging, and the new imaging model needs to be proposed for the GEO SAR imaging processing. In this paper, considering the relative motion between satellite and earth during signal propagation time, the accurate analysis method for propagation slant range is firstly presented. Furthermore, the difference between accurate analysis method and `Stop-and-Go' assumption is analytically obtained. Meanwhile based on the derived

  16. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  17. Advanced Antenna Design for NASA's EcoSAR Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Toit, Cornelis F.; Deshpande, Manohar; Rincon, Rafael F.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced antenna arrays were designed for NASA's EcoSAR airborne radar instrument. EcoSAR is a beamforming synthetic aperture radar instrument designed to make polarimetric and "single pass" interferometric measurements of Earth surface parameters. EcoSAR's operational requirements of a 435MHz center frequency with up to 200MHz bandwidth, dual polarization, high cross-polarization isolation (> 30 dB), +/- 45deg beam scan range and antenna form-factor constraints imposed stringent requirements on the antenna design. The EcoSAR project successfully developed, characterized, and tested two array antennas in an anechoic chamber. EcoSAR's first airborne campaign conducted in the spring of 2014 generated rich data sets of scientific and engineering value, demonstrating the successful operation of the antennas.

  18. Polarimetric SAR Interferometry to Monitor Land Subsidence in Tehran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Zahra; Valadan Zoej, Mohammad Javad; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-08-01

    This letter uses a combination of ADInSAR with a coherence optimization method. Polarimetric DInSAR is able to enhance pixel phase quality and thus coherent pixel density. The coherence optimization method is a search-based approach to find the optimized scattering mechanism introduced by Navarro-Sanchez [1]. The case study is southwest of Tehran basin located in the North of Iran. It suffers from a high-rate of land subsidence and is covered by agricultural fields. Usually such an area would significantly decorrelate but applying polarimetric ADInSAR it is possible to obtain a more coherent pixel coverage. A set of dual-pol TerraSAR-X images was ordered for polarimetric ADInSAR procedure. The coherence optimization method is shown to have increased the density and phase quality of coherent pixels significantly.

  19. Receptor recognition and cross-species infections of SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang

    2013-10-01

    Receptor recognition is a major determinant of the host range, cross-species infections, and pathogenesis of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). A defined receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the SARS-CoV spike protein specifically recognizes its host receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This article reviews the latest knowledge about how RBDs from different SARS-CoV strains interact with ACE2 from several animal species. Detailed research on these RBD/ACE2 interactions has established important principles on host receptor adaptations, cross-species infections, and future evolution of SARS-CoV. These principles may apply to other emerging animal viruses, including the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses".

  20. Rate allocation for spotlight SAR phase history data compression.

    PubMed

    Owens, J W; Marcellin, M W

    1999-01-01

    Complex phase history data in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems require extensive processing before useful images can be obtained. In spotlight mode SAR systems, useful images can be obtained by applying aperture weighting and inverse Fourier transform operations to SAR phase history data. In this paper, we are concerned with the compression of the complex phase history data obtained by a spotlight SAR system. We exploit knowledge of the aperture weighting function along with Fourier transform processing to attach a "gain" factor to each complex phase history data sample. This gain factor is then used to efficiently allocate bits to the phase history data during quantization. Performance evaluations are presented for this compression system relative to other existing SAR phase history data compression systems.

  1. Real-time optical processor prototype for remote SAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Linda; Doucet, Michel; Harnisch, Bernd; Suess, Martin; Bourqui, Pascal; Legros, Mathieu; Desnoyers, Nichola; Guillot, Ludovic; Mercier, Luc; Savard, Maxime; Martel, Anne; Châteauneuf, François; Bergeron, Alain

    2009-09-01

    A Compact Real-Time Optical SAR Processor has been successfully developed and tested. SAR, or Synthetic Aperture Radar, is a powerful tool providing enhanced day and night imaging capabilities. SAR systems typically generate large amounts of information generally in the form of complex data that are difficult to compress. Specifically, for planetary missions and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) systems with limited communication data rates this is a clear disadvantage. SAR images are typically processed electronically applying dedicated Fourier transformations. This, however, can also be performed optically in real-time. Indeed, the first SAR images have been optically processed. The optical processor architecture provides inherent parallel computing capabilities that can be used advantageously for the SAR data processing. Onboard SAR image generation would provide local access to processed information paving the way for real-time decision-making. This could eventually benefit navigation strategy and instrument orientation decisions. Moreover, for interplanetary missions, onboard analysis of images could provide important feature identification clues and could help select the appropriate images to be transmitted to Earth, consequently helping bandwidth management. This could ultimately reduce the data throughput requirements and related transmission bandwidth. This paper reviews the design of a compact optical SAR processor prototype that would reduce power, weight, and size requirements and reviews the analysis of SAR image generation using the table-top optical processor. Various SAR processor parameters such as processing capabilities, image quality (point target analysis), weight and size are reviewed. Results of image generation from simulated point targets as well as real satellite-acquired raw data are presented.

  2. Comparison and Analysis of Geometric Correction Models of Spaceborne SAR

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weihao; Yu, Anxi; Dong, Zhen; Wang, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Following the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR), SAR images have become increasingly common. Many researchers have conducted large studies on geolocation models, but little work has been conducted on the available models for the geometric correction of SAR images of different terrain. To address the terrain issue, four different models were compared and are described in this paper: a rigorous range-doppler (RD) model, a rational polynomial coefficients (RPC) model, a revised polynomial (PM) model and an elevation derivation (EDM) model. The results of comparisons of the geolocation capabilities of the models show that a proper model for a SAR image of a specific terrain can be determined. A solution table was obtained to recommend a suitable model for users. Three TerraSAR-X images, two ALOS-PALSAR images and one Envisat-ASAR image were used for the experiment, including flat terrain and mountain terrain SAR images as well as two large area images. Geolocation accuracies of the models for different terrain SAR images were computed and analyzed. The comparisons of the models show that the RD model was accurate but was the least efficient; therefore, it is not the ideal model for real-time implementations. The RPC model is sufficiently accurate and efficient for the geometric correction of SAR images of flat terrain, whose precision is below 0.001 pixels. The EDM model is suitable for the geolocation of SAR images of mountainous terrain, and its precision can reach 0.007 pixels. Although the PM model does not produce results as precise as the other models, its efficiency is excellent and its potential should not be underestimated. With respect to the geometric correction of SAR images over large areas, the EDM model has higher accuracy under one pixel, whereas the RPC model consumes one third of the time of the EDM model. PMID:27347973

  3. An introduction to the interim digital SAR processor and the characteristics of the associated Seasat SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C.; Barkan, B.; Huneycutt, B.; Leang, C.; Pang, S.

    1981-01-01

    Basic engineering data regarding the Interim Digital SAR Processor (IDP) and the digitally correlated Seasat synthetic aperature radar (SAR) imagery are presented. The correlation function and IDP hardware/software configuration are described, and a preliminary performance assessment presented. The geometric and radiometric characteristics, with special emphasis on those peculiar to the IDP produced imagery, are described.

  4. Relations of SARS-Related Stressors and Coping to Chinese College Students' Psychological Adjustment during the 2003 Beijing SARS Epidemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Alexandra; Zhou, Qing; Ma, Yue; Luecken, Linda J.; Liu, Xin

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the main and interactive relations of stressors and coping related to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) with Chinese college students' psychological adjustment (psychological symptoms, perceived general health, and life satisfaction) during the 2003 Beijing SARS epidemic. All the constructs were assessed by self-report…

  5. Discrimination of crop types with TerraSAR-X-derived information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonobe, Rei; Tani, Hiroshi; Wang, Xiufeng; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Shimamura, Hideki

    Although classification maps are required for management and for the estimation of agricultural disaster compensation, those techniques have yet to be established. This paper describes the comparison of three different classification algorithms for mapping crops in Hokkaido, Japan, using TerraSAR-X (including TanDEM-X) dual-polarimetric data. In the study area, beans, beets, grasslands, maize, potatoes and winter wheat were cultivated. In this study, classification using TerraSAR-X-derived information was performed. Coherence values, polarimetric parameters and gamma nought values were also obtained and evaluated regarding their usefulness in crop classification. Accurate classification may be possible with currently existing supervised learning models. A comparison between the classification and regression tree (CART), support vector machine (SVM) and random forests (RF) algorithms was performed. Even though J-M distances were lower than 1.0 on all TerraSAR-X acquisition days, good results were achieved (e.g., separability between winter wheat and grass) due to the characteristics of the machine learning algorithm. It was found that SVM performed best, achieving an overall accuracy of 95.0% based on the polarimetric parameters and gamma nought values for HH and VV polarizations. The misclassified fields were less than 100 a in area and 79.5-96.3% were less than 200 a with the exception of grassland. When some feature such as a road or windbreak forest is present in the TerraSAR-X data, the ratio of its extent to that of the field is relatively higher for the smaller fields, which leads to misclassifications.

  6. Estimation of Biomass Carbon Stocks over Peat Swamp Forests using Multi-Temporal and Multi-Polratizations SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaya, A.; Liesenberg, V.; Susanti, A.; Karyanto, O.; Verchot, L. V.

    2015-04-01

    The capability of L-band radar backscatter to penetrate through the forest canopy is useful for mapping the forest structure, including above ground biomass (AGB) estimation. Recent studies confirmed that the empirical AGB models generated from the L-band radar backscatter can provide favourable estimation results, especially if the data has dual-polarization configuration. Using dual polarimetry SAR data the backscatter signal is more sensitive to forest biomass and forest structure because of tree trunk scattering, thus showing better discriminations of different forest successional stages. These SAR approaches, however, need to be further studied for the application in tropical peatlands ecosystem We aims at estimating forest carbon stocks and stand biophysical properties using combination of multi-temporal and multi-polarizations (quad-polarimetric) L-band SAR data and focuses on tropical peat swamp forest over Kampar Peninsula at Riau Province, Sumatra, Indonesia which is one of the most peat abundant region in the country. Applying radar backscattering (Sigma nought) to model the biomass we found that co-polarizations (HH and VV) band are more sensitive than cross-polarization channels (HV and VH). Individual HH polarization channel from April 2010 explained > 86% of AGB. Whereas VV polarization showed strong correlation coefficients with LAI, tree height, tree diameter and basal area. Surprisingly, polarimetric anisotropy feature from April 2007 SAR data show relatively high correlations with almost all forest biophysical parameters. Polarimetric anisotropy, which explains the ratio between the second and the first dominant scattering mechanism from a target has reduced at some extent the randomness of scattering mechanism, thus improve the predictability of this particular feature in estimating the forest properties. These results may be influenced by local seasonal variations of the forest as well as moisture, but available quad-pol SAR data were unable to

  7. Multi-scale InSAR analysis of aseismic creep across the San Andreas, Calevaras,and Hayward Fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agram, P. S.; Simons, M.

    2011-12-01

    We apply the Multi-scale Interferometric Time-series (MInTS) technique, developed at Caltech,to study spatial variations in aseismic creep across the San Andreas, Calaveras and Hayward Faultsystems in Central California.Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Time-series methods estimate the spatio-temporal evolution of surface deformation using multiple SAR interferograms. Traditional time-series analysis techniques like persistent scatterers and short baseline methods assume the statistical independence of InSAR phase measurements over space and time when estimating deformation. However, existing atmospheric phase screen models clearly show that noise in InSAR phase observations is correlated over the spatial domain. MInTS is an approach designed to exploit the correlation of phase observations over space to significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the estimated deformation time-series compared to the traditional time-series InSAR techniques. The MInTS technique reduces the set of InSAR observations to a set of almost uncorrelated observations at various spatial scales using wavelets. Traditional inversion techniques can then be applied to the wavelet coefficients more effectively. Creep across the Central San Andreas Fault and the Hayward Fault has been studied previously using C-band (6 cm wavelength) ERS data, but detailed analysis of the transition zone between the San Andreas and Hayward Faults was not possible due to severe decorrelation. Improved coherence at L-band (24 cm wavelength) significantly improves the spatial coverage of the estimated deformation signal in our ALOS PALSAR data set. We analyze 450 ALOS PALSAR interferograms processed using 175 SAR images acquired between Dec 2006 and Dec 2010 that cover the area along the San Andreas Fault System from Richmond in the San Francisco Bay Area to Maricopa in the San Joaquin Valley.We invert the InSAR phase observations to estimate the constant Line-of-Sight (LOS) deformation

  8. Geological applications of multipolarization SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L.

    1986-01-01

    Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired by SEASAT and the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A/B) operating at L-band with HH polarization were found to be useful in conjunction with other sensors for lithologic discrimination in arid environments with limited vegetation cover. In order to assess the utility of more advanced sensors for geologic research and define the unique contributions each sensor makes, remote sensing data were collected over the Deadman Butte area of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. The Wind River Basin is an asymmetric sedimentary basin in central Wyoming created during the early Eocene Laramide orogeny. The stratigraphic section of the Deadman Butte study area, which was measured by Woodward is made up of Paleozoic and Mesozoic marine shales, siltstones, limestones, and sandstones. Sensor systems included LANDSAT 4 Thematic Mapper (TM), Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) and the Multipolarization, L-band airborne SAR, a prototype for the next Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-C). Sensor parameters are given.

  9. Geocoding of AIRSAR/TOPSAR SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holecz, Francesco; Lou, Yungling; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that radar interferometry is a promising method for determination of digital elevation information and terrain slope from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. A multipolarimetric radar AIRSAR operates in the P, L, and C bands on board the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The TOPSAR, a special mode of the AIRSAR system, is able to collect single pass interferometric C and/or L band VV polarized data. A possible configuration of the AIRSAR/TOPSAR system is to acquire single pass interferometric data at C-band VV polarization and polarimetric radar data at the two other lower frequencies. The advantage of this configuration is to acquire digital topographic information at the same time the radar data is collected. The digital elevation information can therefore be used to correctly calibrate the SAR data. In this paper, a procedure to geocode the new AIRSAR/TOPSAR data is presented and an earlier AIRSAR/TOPSAR image is geocoded and evaluated in terms of geometric accuracy.

  10. Rapid inactivation of SARS-like coronaviruses.

    SciTech Connect

    Kapil, Sanjay; Oberst, R. D.; Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David; Souza, Caroline Ann; Williams, Cecelia Victoria

    2004-03-01

    Chemical disinfection and inactivation of viruses is largely understudied, but is very important especially in the case of highly infectious viruses. The purpose of this LDRD was to determine the efficacy of the Sandia National Laboratories developed decontamination formulations against Bovine Coronavirus (BCV) as a surrogate for the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in humans. The outbreak of SARS in late 2002 resulted from a highly infectious virus that was able to survive and remain infectious for extended periods. For this study, preliminary testing with Escherichia coli MS-2 (MS-2) and Escherichia coli T4 (T4) bacteriophages was conducted to develop virucidal methodology for verifying the inactivation after treatment with the test formulations following AOAC germicidal methodologies. After the determination of various experimental parameters (i.e. exposure, concentration) of the formulations, final testing was conducted on BCV. All experiments were conducted with various organic challenges (horse serum, bovine feces, compost) for results that more accurately represent field use condition. The MS-2 and T4 were slightly more resistant than BCV and required a 2 minute exposure while BCV was completely inactivated after a 1 minute exposure. These results were also consistent for the testing conducted in the presence of the various organic challenges indicating that the test formulations are highly effective for real world application.

  11. Automatic change detection in spaceborne SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, Douglas G.; Whitehouse, Simon W.; Mott, David H.; Baldwin, Jim F.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes a new technique of the automatic detection of change within synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images produced from satellite data. The interpretation of this type of imagery is difficult due to the combined effect of speckle, low resolution and the complexity of the radar signatures. The change detection technique that has been developed overcomes these problems by automatically measuring the degree of change between two images. The principle behind the technique used is that when satellite repeat orbits are at almost the same position in space then unless the scene has changed, the speckle pattern in the image will be unchanged. Comparison of images therefore reveals real change, not change due to fluctuating speckle patterns. The degree of change between two SAR images was measured by using the coherence function. Coherence has been studied for a variety of scene types: agricultural, forestry, domestic housing, small and large scale industrial complexes. Fuzzy set techniques, as well as direct threshold methods, have bee applied to the coherence data to determine places where change has occurred. The method has been validated using local information on building changes due to construction or demolition.

  12. Remote topographic sensing using polarimetric SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Dale L.; Ainsworth, Thomas L.; Lee, Jong-Sen; Grunes, Mitchell R.; de Grandi, Gianfranco D.

    1997-12-01

    A new remote sensing technique using polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data has been developed which can measure terrain slopes in the azimuthal, or along-track, direction. Terrain elevation maps can then be generated by integrating these slopes. The processing of both single- pass, and orthogonal two-pass, datasets is investigated. When single-pass SAR data is used elevation groundtruth must be available for at least one point of each profile formed in the azimuthal direction. When orthogonal two-pass slope data is employed, the elevation surface may be generated as an iterative solution of the Poisson equation and only a single elevation tie-point is required. The study presented uses orthogonal two-pass NASA/JPL AIRSAR P-band data as a test of the Poisson equation approach for an area in Death Valley National Park, California. The orthogonal two-pass results have been compared with a co-registered, conventional, U.S. Geological Survey product. Technique accuracy and potential applications are discussed.

  13. The Ecosystems SAR (EcoSAR) an Airborne P-band Polarimetric InSAR for the Measurement of Vegetation Structure, Biomass and Permafrost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Ranson, K. Jon; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sun, Guoqing; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Perrine, Martin L.; Du Toit, Cornelis F.; Bonds, Quenton; Beck, Jaclyn; Lu, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    EcoSAR is a new synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument being developed at the NASA/ Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the polarimetric and interferometric measurements of ecosystem structure and biomass. The instrument uses a phased-array beamforming architecture and supports full polarimetric measurements and single pass interferometry. This Instrument development is part of NASA's Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program (ESTO IIP).

  14. Competitive adsorption of VOCs and BOM: The role of molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Sorial, G.A.; Cerminara, P.; Papadimas, S.P.; Suidan, M.T. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering); Speth, T.F. )

    1994-03-01

    In this study, the presence of background organic matter (BOM) was seen to reduce the adsorptive capacity of carbon for chloroform, chlorobenzene, and dibromochloropropane. Adsorption of these compounds was further reduced under oxic conditions. This additional reduction in capacity was likely due to conglomeration of BOM on the carbon surface, which reduced the available surface area for the target volatile organic chemical (VOC). Adsorption isotherms conducted with constant initial concentration ratios of VOC to BOM showed similar behavior. The ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) was found to accurately describe anoxic adsorption isotherms for VOCs in water containing BOM but failed to predict this competition for data collected under oxic conditions.

  15. 76 FR 35949 - Agency Information Collection Activity (Servicer's Staff Appraisal Reviewer (SAR) Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... Collection Activity (Servicer's Staff Appraisal Reviewer (SAR) Application) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans...: Servicer's Staff Appraisal Reviewer (SAR) Application, VA Form 26-0829. OMB Control Number: 2900-0715. Type... servicers to nominate employees for approval as Staff Appraisal Reviewer (SAR). Servicers SAR's will...

  16. A 100 MS/s 9 bit 0.43 mW SAR ADC with custom capacitor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jingjing, Wang; Zemin, Feng; Rongjin, Xu; Chixiao, Chen; Fan, Ye; Jun, Xu; Junyan, Ren

    2016-05-01

    A low power 9 bit 100 MS/s successive approximation register analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC) with custom capacitor array is presented. A brand-new 3-D MOM unit capacitor is used as the basic capacitor cell of this capacitor array. The unit capacitor has a capacitance of 1 fF. Besides, the advanced capacitor array structure and switch mode decrease the power consumption a lot. To verify the effectiveness of this low power design, the 9 bit 100 MS/s SAR ADC is implemented in TSMC IP9M 65 nm LP CMOS technology. The measurement results demonstrate that this design achieves an effective number of bits (ENOB) of 7.4 bit, a signal-to-noise plus distortion ratio (SNDR) of 46.40 dB and a spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) of 62.31 dB at 100 MS/s with 1 MHz input. The SAR ADC core occupies an area of 0.030 mm2 and consumes 0.43 mW under a supply voltage of 1.2 V. The figure of merit (FOM) of the SAR ADC achieves 23.75 fJ/conv. Project supported by the National High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (No. 2013AA014101).

  17. The Effect of Sub-Aperture in DRIA Framework Applied on Multi-Aspect PolSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Feiteng; Yin, Qiang; Lin, Yun; Hong, Wen

    2016-08-01

    Multi-aspect SAR is a new remote sensing technology, achieves consecutive data in large look angle as platform moves. Multi- aspect observation brings higher resolution and SNR to SAR picture. Multi-aspect PolSAR data can increase the accuracy of target identify and classification because it contains the 3-D polarimetric scattering properties.DRIA(detecting-removing-incoherent-adding)framework is a multi-aspect PolSAR data processing method. In this method, the anisotropic and isotropic scattering is separated by maximum- likelihood ratio test. The anisotropic scattering is removed to gain a removal series. The isotropic scattering is incoherent added to gain a high resolution picture. The removal series describes the anisotropic scattering property and is used in features extraction and classification.This article focuses on the effect brought by difference of sub-aperture numbers in anisotropic scattering detection and removal. The more sub-apertures are, the less look angle is. Artificial target has anisotropic scattering because of Bragg resonances. The increase of sub-aperture number brings more accurate observation in azimuth though the quality of each single image may loss. The accuracy of classification in agricultural fields is affected by the anisotropic scattering brought by Bragg resonances. The size of the sub-aperture has a significant effect in the removal result of Bragg resonances.

  18. A 12-bit 1 MS/s SAR-ADC for multi-channel CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Liu; Tingcun, Wei; Bo, Li; Panjie, Guo; Yongcai, Hu

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a low power, area-efficient and radiation-hardened 12-bit 1 MS/s successive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for multi-channel CdZnTe (CZT) detector applications. In order to improve the SAR-ADC's accuracy, a novel comparator is proposed in which the offset voltage is self-calibrated and also a new architecture for the unit capacitor array is proposed to reduce the capacitance mismatches in the charge-redistribution DAC. The ability to radiation-harden the SAR-ADC is enhanced through circuit and layout design technologies. The prototype chip was fabricated using a TSMC 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS process. At a 3.3/5 V power supply and a sampling rate of 1 MS/s, the proposed SAR-ADC achieves a peak signal to noise and distortion ratio (SINAD) of 67.64 dB and consumes only 10 mW power. The core of the prototype chip occupies an active area of 1180 × 1080 μm2. Project supported by the Special-Funded Program on National Key Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development (No. 2011YQ040082).

  19. A New Maximum-Likelihood Change Estimator for Two-Pass SAR Coherent Change Detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a new optimal change metric to be used in synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD). Previous CCD methods tend to produce false alarm states (showing change when there is none) in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio (CNR). The new estimator does not suffer from this shortcoming. It is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and is optimal in the maximum-likelihood (ML) sense. The estimator produces very impressive results on the CCD collects that we have tested.

  20. Feature separability analysis for SAR ATR using data description method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weiwei; Du, Xiaoyong; Hu, WeiDong; Yu, Wenxian

    2007-11-01

    Feature extraction and selection play an important role in radar target recognition. This paper focuses on evaluating feature separability for SAR ATR and selecting the best subset of features. In details, fifteen features extracted from T72, BTR70 and BMP2 in MSTAR standard public dataset are examined, which are divided into seven categories: standard deviation, fractal dimension, weighted-rank fill ratio, size-related features, contrast-based features, count feature, projection feature, and moment features. Since the number of samples is small, a new separability criterion based on the overlap degree of each two class regions is proposed to assess the separability of these features. Here the class region is described by support vector data description (SVDD) method for good generalization. Based on the proposed criterion, a forward feature selection method is adopted to choose the best subset of features. Because of the strong variability of the feature against aspect, the features are analyzed under different aspect sectors within 360°angle range stepped by 15°, 30 °, and 60°, respectively. Experiments using MSTAR dataset validate the criterion, and the best subset of features is determined.

  1. Adsorption of Cadmium, Nickel and Zinc in a Brazilian Oxisoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, José Carlos; Martins, Susian Christian; Soares, Marcio Roberto

    2010-05-01

    The adsorption reactions mechanisms provide the understanding of the pollutant fate metals and often control the bioavailability and transport of heavy metals ions in soil, indicating the preventive environmental control. The cadmium, nickel and zinc behavior in the soils are explained by the reactions of adsorption, influenced by pH and ionic strength. The objective of this work was to study the influence of those factors on cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption in an oxisol. It was studied the Cd, Ni and Zn adsorption in soil samples of the State of São Paulo (Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox), collected in surface and in depth and submitted to solutions of Ca(NO3)2 1,0; 0,1 and 0,01 mol L-1. The pH of the samples from 3,0 to 10,0 was varied adding NaOH or HCl 4 mol L-1 not surpassing 2% of the electrolyte volume. The soil samples received 5,0 mg dm-3 of cadmium, nickel and zinc, ratio 1:10 (2,0 g of soil: 20 solution ml) and were shacked for 24 hours. The cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption increased with pH, reaching it picks at pH 7,0 for cadmium and approximately at pH 6,0 for nickel and zinc. This indicates that zinc and nickel have higher affinity than cadmium with the soil colloids, because it reached the maximum adsorption in a small pH value. In other words, the amount of negative charges necessary to promote the maximum adsorption was small for zinc. The influence of ionic strengths was small for cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption, being similar from pH 3,0 to 10,0, in surface soil layer and in depth, demonstrating that competition with Ca2+ for the retention colloid sites of the soils didn't interfere in the adsorption. In that way, it is supposed that cadmium, nickel and zinc binding energy is high in a soil rich in Fe and Al oxides. Adsorption of cadmium, nickel and zinc was similar for the ionic strengths, not depending on PZSE. The cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption increased with pH elevation, with small ionic strength influence. Nickel and zinc have

  2. Tight formation flying for an along-track SAR interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Eberhard; Runge, Hartmut

    2004-08-01

    While space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has evolved into a mature technology over the past two decades, there is a growing interest in interferometric SAR applications. Especially along-track interferometry with its capability to resolve the velocity of on-ground objects and ocean currents is of high interest for scientific applications. The accuracy of the resolved velocity on ground scales directly with the along-track separation between adjacent SAR antennas. Since space vehicles are quite limited in size, a formation flying approach with two SAR instruments distributed onto two spacecraft thus appears to be an innovative approach to along-track SAR interferometry. In the framework of an ESA study, this paper discusses the potential benefits, drawbacks and problems associated with a close formation flight for an along-track interferometry SAR mission. To this end, the absolute and relative orbit reconstruction requirements for the SAR processing chain are derived from basic interferometric principles as well as appropriate baselines of the satellite formation in L-Band and X-Band. A discussion of potential space-borne navigation sensors is presented along with the accuracy of state-of-the-art relative orbit reconstruction. Finally, appropriate thrusters for formation acquisition and control are discussed together with approaches to formation flying guidance and control as well as fuel consumption.

  3. Aseismic events in Southern California: Detection with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Lundgren, P.

    2007-05-01

    Aseismic slow slip events are usually studied using data types that have a dense temporal sampling rate, such as continuous GPS or tremor analysis using seismic data. However, even the sparser temporal coverage of InSAR data can further our understanding of these events in three significant ways - First, in areas where aseismic transients have been detected on geodetic arrays, InSAR may be able to provide a spatially denser image of the extent and magnitude of deformation. Second, InSAR observations are complementary to GPS because of the differing sensitivities to horizontal and vertical motions. Thirdly, in areas with no ground-based geodetic instrumentation, InSAR can be used in survey mode to detect deformation signals that are not associated with any observed seismicity. The temporal constraints on such signals may not be tight enough to allow for dynamics models of how aseismic transients occur, but InSAR-only detections can improve our understanding of the spatial extent of these types of events and can also identify key areas for future instrumentation and observation. Here, I summarize some of the contributions of InSAR observations of slow slip events, including data spanning the 2005 Obsidian Buttes swam in the Salton Trough, CA, and InSAR time-series results for the Salton Trough using both traditional interferometry and the persistent scatterer method.

  4. The SARS-like coronaviruses: the role of bats and evolutionary relationships with SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Andrea; Battilani, Mara; Prosperi, Santino

    2012-01-01

    Bats represent an order of great evolutionary success, with elevated geographical diffusion and species diversity. This order harbors viruses of high variability which have a great possibility of acquiring the capacity of infecting other animals,including humans. Bats are the natural reservoir for several viruses genetically closely related to the SARScoronavirus which is the etiological agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a human epidemic which emerged in China in 2002-2003. In the last few years, it has been discovered that the association between coronaviruses and bats is a worldwide phenomenon, and it has been hypothesised that all mammalian coronaviruses were derived from ancestral viruses residing in bats. This review analyzes the role of bats as a reservoir of zoonotic viruses focusing more extensively on SARS-related coronaviruses and taking into account the role of African and European strains in the evolutionary history of these viruses.

  5. ADSORPTION AND CATALYTIC DESTRUCTION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN HYDROPHOBIC ZEOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several chromium exchanged ZSM-5 zeolites of varying SiO2/Al2O3 ratio were prepared and investigated for ambient (23 ?C) adsorption and subsequent oxidative destruction (250-400 ?C) of gaseous trichloroethylene (TCE, Cl2C=CHCl) in a humid air stream. With an increase in the SiO2...

  6. ENTRAINED-FLOW ADSORPTION OF MERCURY USING ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted in a flow reactor to simulate entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hg) by activated carbon. Adsorption of Hg by several commercial activated carbons was examined at different carbon-to-mercury (C:Hg) ratios (by weight) (600:1 - 29000...

  7. SARS Grid--an AG-based disease management and collaborative platform.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shu-Hui; Hung, Tsung-Chieh; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the NCHC's Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Grid project-An Access Grid (AG)-based disease management and collaborative platform that allowed for SARS patient's medical data to be dynamically shared and discussed between hospitals and doctors using AG's video teleconferencing (VTC) capabilities. During the height of the SARS epidemic in Asia, SARS Grid and the SARShope website significantly curved the spread of SARS by helping doctors manage the in-hospital and in-home care of quarantined SARS patients through medical data exchange and the monitoring of the patient's symptoms. Now that the SARS epidemic has ended, the primary function of the SARS Grid project is that of a web-based informatics tool to increase pubic awareness of SARS and other epidemic diseases. Additionally, the SARS Grid project can be viewed and further studied as an outstanding model of epidemic disease prevention and/or containment.

  8. Multisite adsorption of cadmium on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Venema, P.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1996-11-10

    Recently a new general ion adsorption model has been developed for ion binding to mineral surfaces (Hiemstra and van Riemsdijk, 1996). The model uses the Pauling concept of charge distribution (CD) and is an extension of the multi-site complexation (MUSIC) approach. In the CD-MUSIC model the charge of an adsorbing ion that forms an inner sphere complex is distributed over its ligands, which are present in two different electrostatic planes. In this paper the authors have applied the CD-MUSIC model to the adsorption of metal cations, using an extended data set for cadmium adsorbing on goethite. The adsorption of cadmium and the cadmium-proton exchange ratio were measured as function of metal ion concentration, pH, and ionic strength. The data could be described well, taking into account the surface heterogeneity resulting from the presence of two different crystal planes (the dominant 110 face and the minor 021 face). The surface species used in the model are consistent with recent EXAFS data. In accordance with the EXAFS results, high-affinity complexes at the 021 face were used in the model.

  9. (abstract) The SIR-C/X-SAR Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, JoBea; Evans, Diane; Elachi, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is a cooperative experiment between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the German Space Agency (DARA), and the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The experiment is the next evolutionary step in NASA's Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR) program that began with the Seasat SAR in 1978, and continued with SAR -A in 1981 and SAR-B in 1984. The program will eventually lead to the Earth Observing System (EOS) SAR later in this decade. SIR-C will provide increased capability over Seasat, SIR-A, and SIR-B by acquiring polarimetric images simultaneously at two microwave frequencies: L-band (wavelength 24 cm) and C-band (wavelength 6 cm). X-SAR will operate at X-band (wavelength 3 cm) with VV polarization, resulting in a three-frequency capability. Because radar backscatter is most strongly influenced by objects comparable in size to the radar wavelength, this multifrequency capability will provide information about the Earth's surface over a wide range of scales not discernable with single-frequency experiments. The polarimetric data will yield quantitative information about the surface geometric structure, vegetation dielectric properties, and surface discontinuities. The first SIR-C/X-SAR flight is planned for early in 1994, with two subsequent flights in different seasons to enable data aquisition under different environmental conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR will collect data for a period of 6 to 9 days during each flight. The instrument will be flown in a 57(deg) inclination orbit with a nomimal orbit altitude of 215 km. This altitude will result in a slightly drifting orbit. The latest status of the SIR-C/X-SAR mission and instrument design, science activities, and expected results will be presented.

  10. The experience of SARS-related stigma at Amoy Gardens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sing; Chan, Lydia Y Y; Chau, Annie M Y; Kwok, Kathleen P S; Kleinman, Arthur

    2005-11-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) possesses characteristics that render it particularly prone to stigmatization. SARS-related stigma, despite its salience for public health and stigma research, has had little examination. This study combines survey and case study methods to examine subjective stigma among residents of Amoy Gardens (AG), the first officially recognized site of community outbreak of SARS in Hong Kong. A total of 903 residents of AG completed a self-report questionnaire derived from two focus groups conducted toward the end of the 3-month outbreak. Case studies of two residents who lived in Block E, the heart of the SARS epidemic at AG, complement the survey data. Findings show that stigma affected most residents and took various forms of being shunned, insulted, marginalized, and rejected in the domains of work, interpersonal relationships, use of services and schooling. Stigma was also associated with psychosomatic distress. Residents' strategies for diminishing stigma varied with gender, age, education, occupation, and proximity to perceived risk factors for SARS such as residential location, previous SARS infection and the presence of ex-SARS household members. Residents attributed stigma to government mismanagement, contagiousness of the mysterious SARS virus, and alarmist media reporting. Stigma clearly decreased, but never completely disappeared, after the outbreak. The findings confirm and add to existing knowledge on the varied origins, correlates, and impacts of stigma. They also highlight the synergistic roles of inconsistent health policy responses and risk miscommunication by the media in rapidly amplifying stigma toward an unfamiliar illness. While recognizing the intrinsically stigmatizing nature of public health measures to control SARS, we recommend that a consistent inter-sectoral approach is needed to minimize stigma and to make an effective health response to future outbreaks.

  11. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  12. Interferometric Processing of Spaceborne SAR Data in Advanced SAR Imaging Modes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    Mittermayer and Alberto Moreira Deutsches Zentrum fiur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) Institut fuir Hochfrequenztechnik und Radarsysteme 82234 Oberpfaffenhofen...34, IEEE Transactions on Geosc., Vol. 32, No. 4, July 1994, pp. 855-865. [4] J. Mittermayer , A. Moreira, 0. Lofeld: "Spotlight SAR Data Processing Using the...Frequency Scaling Algo- rithm", IEEE Trans. on Geosc. and Remote Sensing, Vol. 37, No. 5, September 1999. [51 Mittermayer , J., A. Moreira and 0

  13. Imaging Ocean Waves with SAR, a SAR Ocean Wave Algorithm Development Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    document is Remote sensing D lital progessing unlimited. Data processing S ,ctral analysis SAR imagery Sei-causal Multi-frequency synthetic aperture ra...111 39. Speckle Pattern Decorrelation vs. Change in Processed Center Frequency for a Processed Bandwidth of 2 MHz .. ...... 114 40. Speckle...defining or processing the true ocean-wave frequency. A cubic expression for the slant-to-ground distortion was derived. This expression was then

  14. Batch adsorption of phenol onto physiochemical-activated coconut shell.

    PubMed

    Mohd Din, Azam T; Hameed, B H; Ahmad, Abdul L

    2009-01-30

    The liquid-phase adsorption of phenol onto coconut shell-based activated carbon, CS850A was investigated for its equilibrium studies and kinetic modeling. Coconut shell was converted into high quality activated carbon through physiochemical activation at 850 degrees C under the influence of CO(2) flow. Beforehand, the coconut shell was carbonized at 700 degrees C and the resulted char was impregnated with KOH at 1:1 weight ratio. In order to evaluate the performance of CS850A, a series of batch adsorption experiments were conducted with initial phenol concentrations ranging from 100 to 500 mg l(-1), adsorbent loading of 0.2g and the adsorption process was maintained at 30+/-1 degrees C. The adsorption isotherms were in conformation to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Chemical reaction was found to be a rate-controlling parameter to this phenol-CS850A batch adsorption system due to strong agreement with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Adsorption capacity for CS850A was found to be 205.8 mg g(-1).

  15. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-decorated silicon carbide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ram Sevak; Solanki, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen storage for fuel cell is an active area of research and appropriate materials with excellent hydrogen adsorption properties are highly demanded. Nanotubes, having high surface to volume ratio, are promising storage materials for hydrogen. Recently, silicon carbide nanotubes have been predicted as potential materials for future hydrogen storage application, and studies in this area are ongoing. Here, we report a systematic study on hydrogen adsorption properties in metal (Pt, Ni and Al) decorated silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The hydrogen adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of adsorption energy, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that hydrogen adsorptions on Pt, Ni and Al-decorated SiCNTs undergo spontaneous exothermic reactions with significant modulation of electronic structure of SiCNTs in all cases. Importantly, according to the Mulliken charge population analysis, dipole-dipole interaction causes chemisorptions of hydrogen in Pt, Ni and Al decorated SiCNTs with formation of chemical bonds. The study is a platform for the development of metal decorated SiCNTs for hydrogen adsorption or hydrogen storage application.

  16. Adsorption characterizations of fulvic acid fractions onto kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Li, Aimin; Xu, Minjuan; Li, Wenhui; Wang, Xuejun; Dai, Jingyu

    2008-01-01

    Fulvic acids extracted from a typical rice-production region near Taihu Lake of China were fractionated into three fractions including F4.8, F7.0 and F11.0 (eluted by pH 4.8 buffer, pH 7.0 buffer and pH 11.0 buffer, respectively). Sorption of fulvic acid (FA) fractions onto kaolinite was studied by batch adsorption experiments, and characterizations of kaolinite before and after adsorption were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Adsorption isotherms of kaolinite for three FA fractions fit well with the Langmuir adsorption model. The adsorption density of the three fractions was positively correlated with the ratio of the amount of the alkyl carbon to that of carboxyl and carbonyl carbon in FA fractions and followed an order of F11.0 > F7.0 > F4.8. Hydrophobic interaction was one of the control mechanisms for the sorption of FA fraction onto kaolinite. SEM images confirmed that compared to blank kaolinite samples, kaolinite samples coated by a FA fraction displayed an opener and more dispersed conformation resulting from the disruption of the floc structure in complex. Dispersion of kaolinite after adsorption was due to the repulsion between negatively charged FA-coated particles, which is closely related to the amount of FA fractions absorbed on kaolinite.

  17. Impact of focusing of Ground Based SAR data on the quality of interferometric SAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonno, Mariantonietta; Mascolo, Luigi; Guccione, Pietro; Nico, Giovanni; Di Pasquale, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    A Ground-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (GB-SAR) is nowadays employed in several applications. The processing of ground-based, space and airborne SAR data relies on the same physical principles. Nevertheless specific algorithms for the focusing of data acquired by GB-SAR system have been proposed in literature. In this work the impact of the main focusing methods on the interferometric phase dispersion and on the coherence has been studied by employing a real dataset obtained by carrying out an experiment. Several acquisitions of a scene with a corner reflector mounted on a micrometric screw have been made; before some acquisitions the micrometric screw has been displaced of few millimetres in the Line-of-Sight direction. The images have been first focused by using two different algorithms and correspondently, two different sets of interferograms have been generated. The mean and standard deviation of the phase values in correspondence of the corner reflector have been compared to those obtained by knowing the real displacement of the micrometric screw. The mean phase and its dispersion and the coherence values for each focusing algorithm have been quantified and both the precision and the accuracy of the interferometic phase measurements obtained by using the two different focusing methods have been assessed.

  18. FlexSAR, a high-quality, flexible, cost-effective, prototype SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Mark; Knight, Chad; Haslem, Brent

    2015-05-01

    The FlexSAR radar system was designed to be a high quality, low-cost, flexible prototype instrument. Many radar researchers and practitioners desire the ability to efficiently prototype novel configurations. However, the cost and time required to modify existing radar systems is a challenging hurdle that can be prohibitive. The FlexSAR system couples an RF design that leverages connectorized components with digital commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) cards. This design allows for a scalable system that supports software defined radio (SDR) capabilities. This paper focuses on the RF and digital system design, discussing the advantages and disadvantages. The FlexSAR system design objective was to support diverse configurations with minimal non-recurring engineering (NRE) costs. Multiple diverse applications are examined, demonstrating the flexible system nature. The configurations discussed utilize different system parameters (e.g., number of phase-centers, transmit configurations, etc.). The resultant products are examined, illustrating that high-quality data products are still attained.

  19. Controlling the adsorption enthalpy of CO(2) in zeolites by framework topology and composition.

    PubMed

    Grajciar, Lukáš; Čejka, Jiří; Zukal, Arnošt; Otero Areán, Carlos; Turnes Palomino, Gemma; Nachtigall, Petr

    2012-10-01

    Zeolites are often investigated as potential adsorbents for CO(2) adsorption and separation. Depending on the zeolite topology and composition (Si/Al ratio and extra-framework cations), the CO(2) adsorption heats at low coverages vary from -20 to -60 kJ mol(-1), and with increasing surface coverage adsorption heats either stay approximately constant or they quickly drop down. Experimental adsorption heats obtained for purely siliceous porous solids and for ion-exchanged zeolites of the structural type MFI, FER, FAU, LTA, TUN, IMF, and -SVR are discussed in light of results of periodic density functional theory calculations corrected for the description of dispersion interactions. Key factors influencing the stability of CO(2) adsorption complexes are identified and discussed at the molecular level. A general model for CO(2) adsorption in zeolites and related materials is proposed and data reported in literature are evaluated with regard to the proposed model.

  20. Dynamic and static adsorption and desorption of Hg(II) ions on chitosan membranes and spheres.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Rodrigo S; Beppu, Marisa M

    2006-05-01

    The adsorption and desorption of Hg(II) ions was studied using static and dynamic methods, employing membranes and spheres of chitosan as the adsorbent. The quantity of adsorption was influenced by chitosan crosslinking and by the adsorbent shape. The Langmuir model was applied to fit the experimental equilibrium data. Glutaraldehyde-crosslinked membranes presented a lower desorption capacity, when compared to natural membranes, but could be regenerated for use in successive cycles. Dynamic adsorption experiments suggested that the adsorption capacity depended mainly on adsorbent geometry, due to differences between surface area to mass ratio and initial concentration of Hg(II) ions. The adsorption capacity determined by the dynamic method was 65% and 77% for membranes and spheres, respectively of the value obtained static method results. A process combining dynamic adsorption and static desorption can be used to concentrate the Hg(II) ions by a factor of nearly seven (7x), when compared to the initially treated volume.

  1. Carbon dioxide and nitrogen adsorption on cation-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolites.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong D; Liu, Qingling; Lobo, Raul F

    2013-01-15

    Samples of high-silica SSZ-13, ion exchanged with protons and alkali-metal cations Li(+), Na(+), and K(+), were investigated using adsorption isotherms of CO(2) and N(2). The results show that Li-, Na-SSZ-13 have excellent CO(2) capacity at ambient temperature and pressure; in general, Li-SSZ-13 shows the highest capacity for N(2), CO(2) particularly in the low-pressure region. The effect of cation type and Si/Al ratio (6 and 12) on the adsorption properties was investigated through analysis of adsorption isotherms and heats of adsorption. The separation of CO(2) in a flue gas mixture was evaluated for these adsorbents in the pressure swing adsorption and vacuum pressure adsorption processes.

  2. Adsorption of phenanthrene by quaternary ammonium surfactant modified peat and the mechanism involved.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y B; Chen, L; Wang, X Q; Xu, Y X; Lu, J

    2012-01-01

    Removal of phenanthrene (PHE) from aqueous solution by adsorption onto quaternary ammonium surfactant modified peat was studied. The results show that surfactant modification enhanced the PHE adsorption capacity of peat. Low temperature and neutral pH favored PHE adsorption. Peat modified with long carbon chain surfactant performed better than peat modified with short carbon chain surfactant. The magnitude of PHE adsorption capacity followed the order of MP-HPB>MP-HTAB>MP-TBAB>RP, ranged from 924 to 1,228 μg g(-1). A negative trend between adsorption capacity (y) and (O+N)/C ratio of biosorbent (x) was observed (y = -1,369.6x + 2,176), which confirmed the negative effect of polarity on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) removal. The study provides a guide to modify raw materials to enhance adsorption of hydrophobic organics.

  3. Modification of porous starch for the adsorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaofei; Liu, Xueyuan; Anderson, Debbie P; Chang, Peter R

    2015-08-15

    Porous starch xanthate (PSX) and porous starch citrate (PSC) were prepared in anticipation of the attached xanthate and carboxylate groups respectively forming chelation and electrostatic interactions with heavy metal ions in the subsequent adsorption process. The lead(II) ion was selected as the model metal and its adsorption by PSX and PSC was characterized. The adsorption capacity was highly dependent on the carbon disulfide/starch and citric acid/starch mole ratios used during preparation. The adsorption behaviors of lead(II) ion on PSXs and PSCs fit both the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir isotherm equation reached 109.1 and 57.6 mg/g for PSX and PSC when preparation conditions were optimized, and the adsorption times were just 20 and 60 min, respectively. PSX and PSC may be used as effective adsorbents for removal of heavy metals from contaminated liquid.

  4. Use of SAR in Regional Methane Exchange Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, L. A.; Livingston, G. P.; Durden, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    Significant sources of uncertainty in global trace gas budgets are due to lack of knowledge concerning the areal and temporal extent of source and sink areas. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is particularly suited to studies of northern ecosystems because of its all-weather operating capability which enables the acquisition of seasonal data. As key controls on methane exchange, the ability to differentiate major vegetation communities, inundation, and leaf area index (LAI) with satellite and airborne SAR data would increase the accuracy and precision of regional and seasonal estimates of methane exchange. The utility of SAR data for monitoring key controls on methane emissions from Arctic and boreal ecosystems is examined.

  5. SAR image effects on coherence and coherence estimation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Radar coherence is an important concept for imaging radar systems such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This document quantifies some of the effects in SAR which modify the coherence. Although these effects can disrupt the coherence within a single SAR image, this report will focus on the coherence between separate images, such as for coherent change detection (CCD) processing. There have been other presentations on aspects of this material in the past. The intent of this report is to bring various issues that affect the coherence together in a single report to support radar engineers in making decisions about these matters.

  6. InSAR captures rifting and volcanism in East Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    In the past decade, synthetic aperture radar interferometric (InSAR) has enjoyed increasing use as a tool for detecting and characterizing surface deformation associated with volcanoes, earthquakes, glaciers, and other geological processes. Though InSAR can only image deformation that occurs along the radar line-of-sight and is subject to atmospheric, orbital, and other errors that can be difficult to quantify, the method has the advantage of high spatial resolution (especially in arid, unvegetated environments) without requiring equipment on the ground. As a result, InSAR is extremely useful for mapping deformation in poorly accessible or unmonitored parts of the world.

  7. Antenna trajectory error analysis in backprojection-based SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Yazıcı, Birsen; Yanik, H. Cagri

    2014-06-01

    We present an analysis of the positioning errors in Backprojection (BP)-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images due to antenna trajectory errors for a monostatic SAR traversing a straight linear trajectory. Our analysis is developed using microlocal analysis, which can provide an explicit quantitative relationship between the trajectory error and the positioning error in BP-based SAR images. The analysis is applicable to arbitrary trajectory errors in the antenna and can be extended to arbitrary imaging geometries. We present numerical simulations to demonstrate our analysis.

  8. Compact polarimetric SAR product and calibration considerations for target analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabry, Ramin

    2016-10-01

    Compact polarimetric (CP) data exploitation is currently of growing interest considering the new generation of such Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems. These systems offer target detection and classification capabilities comparable to those of polarimetric SARs (PolSAR) with less stringent requirements. A good example is the RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM). In this paper, some characteristic CP products are described and effects of CP mode deviation from ideal circular polarization transmit on classifications are modeled. The latter is important for operation of typical CP modes (e.g., RCM). The developed model can be used to estimate the ellipticity variation from CP measured data, and hence, calibrate the classification products.

  9. Applications of the EOS SAR to monitoring global change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schier, Marguerite; Way, Jobea; Holt, Benjamin

    1991-01-01

    The SAR employed by NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is a multifrequency multipolarization radar which can conduct global monitoring of geophysical and biophysical parameters. The present discussion of the EOS SAR's role in global monitoring emphasizes geophysical product variables applicable to global hydrologic, biogeochemical, and energy cycle models. EOS SAR products encompass biomass, wetland areas, and phenologic and environmental states, in the field of ecosystem dynamics; soil moisture, snow moisture and extent, and glacier and ice sheet extent and velocity, in hydrologic cycle studies; surface-wave fields and sea ice properties, in ocean/atmosphere circulation; and the topography, erosion, and land forms of the solid earth.

  10. Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Facility science data processing architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, Jeffrey E.; Bicknell, Thomas; Miller, Carol L.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the architecture of the Alaska SAR Facility (ASF) at Fairbanks, being developed to generate science data products for supporting research in sea ice motion, ice classification, sea-ice-ocean interaction, glacier behavior, ocean waves, and hydrological and geological study areas. Special attention is given to the individual substructures of the ASF: the Receiving Ground Station (RGS), the SAR Processor System, and the Interactive Image Analysis System. The SAR data will be linked to the RGS by the ESA ERS-1 and ERS-2, the Japanese ERS-1, and the Canadian Radarsat.

  11. Mapping and monitoring renewable resources with space SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Brisco, B.; Dobson, M. C.; Moezzi, S.

    1983-01-01

    The SEASAT-A SAR and SIR-A imagery was examined to evaluate the quality and type of information that can be extracted and used to monitor renewable resources on Earth. Two tasks were carried out: (1) a land cover classification study which utilized two sets of imagery acquired by the SEASAT-A SAR, one set by SIR-A, and one LANDSAT set (4 bands); and (2) a change detection to examine differences between pairs of SEASAT-A SAR images and relates them to hydrologic and/or agronomic variations in the scene.

  12. Process for combining multiple passes of interferometric SAR data

    DOEpatents

    Bickel, Douglas L.; Yocky, David A.; Hensley, Jr., William H.

    2000-11-21

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) is a promising technology for a wide variety of military and civilian elevation modeling requirements. IFSAR extends traditional two dimensional SAR processing to three dimensions by utilizing the phase difference between two SAR images taken from different elevation positions to determine an angle of arrival for each pixel in the scene. This angle, together with the two-dimensional location information in the traditional SAR image, can be transformed into geographic coordinates if the position and motion parameters of the antennas are known accurately.

  13. TerraSAR-X for CSCDA: Interface Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlar, Selin; Mayhew, Ben; Doeberl, Michael; Langhans, Daniel; Arndt, Wolf-Christian; Bach, Katja

    2016-08-01

    The TerraSAR-X mission has been contributing to Copernicus Space Component Data Access (CSCDA) Data Warehouse (DWH) project since 2009. For this purpose, the mission has established specific interfaces to the ESA Coordinated Data Access System (CDS).This paper gives a background about the past activities performed by TerraSAR-X Copernicus Contributing Mission (TerraSAR-X CCM), provides a detailed overview of ongoing activities, and discusses lessons learnt as well as future opportunities in terms of Heterogeneous Missions Accessibility (HMA) interfaces.

  14. Segmentation Of Multifrequency Complex-Amplitude SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Chellappa, Ramalingam

    1994-01-01

    Several mathematical models and associated algorithms implement method of segmenting multifrequency, highly speckled, high-resolution, complex-amplitude (amplitude and phase) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) digitized image into regions, within each of which radar backscattering characteristics are similar or homogeneous from place to place. Typically, each region represents different type of terrain or other surface; e.g., forest, agricultural land, sea ice, or water. Method of segmentation of SAR scene into regions is product of generalization, to multifrequency case, of single-frequency method described in "Algorithms for Segmentation of Complex-Amplitude SAR Data" (NPO-18524).

  15. Geologic process studies using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    The use of SAR data to study geologic processes for better understanding of recent tectonic activity and climate change as well as the mitigation of geologic hazards and exploration for nonrenewable resources is discussed. The geologic processes that are particularly amenable to SAR-based data include volcanism; soil erosion, degradation, and redistribution; coastal erosion and inundation; glacier fluctuations; permafrost; and crustal motions. When SAR data are combined with data from other planned spaceborne sensors including ESA ERS, the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite, and the Canadian Radarsat, it will be possible to build a time-series view of temporal changes over many regions of earth.

  16. Metal adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose/carboxymethyl chitosan blend hydrogels prepared by Gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, A.; Tran, H. T.; Nagasawa, N.; Yagi, T.; Tamada, M.

    2009-12-01

    Blend hydrogels based on the carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCts) were prepared by γ-irradiation of a high concentrated CMC/CMCts aqueous solution. Properties of the hydrogels, such as gel fraction, swelling ratio, gel strength, and metal adsorption for Pb and Au were investigated. The gel fraction increased with increasing dose, while the swelling ratio decreased with increasing it. The obtained blend hydrogels had high adsorption performance which was controlled by adjusting the composition of CMC/CMCts.

  17. Image Enhancement and Display Techniques Applied to SAR580 Images of Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    applied to the images. This report discusses tht properties of SAR ship returns, reviews the various types of image enhancement techniques applied to...Figures , , a . . . . , , , . . . , . . . . , . . iii I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . I 2. PROPERTIES OF SAR SHIP IMAGES ... ... ...... I 3...Page 1 Original Ship Photos 5 2 Ship Profile and Plan Views 9 3 SAR Ship Images 14 4 SAR Contour Plots 16 5 SAR Three-Dimensional Plots 19 6 Container

  18. An overall picture of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) genome-encoded major proteins: structures, functions and drug development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Luo, Haibin; Chen, Lili; Chen, Jing; Shen, Jianhua; Zhu, Weiliang; Chen, Kaixian; Shen, Xu; Jiang, Hualiang

    2006-01-01

    A severe atypical pneumonia designated as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) by The World Health Organization broke out in China and menaced to more than other 30 countries between the end of the year 2002 and June of the year 2003. A novel coronavirus called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been recently identified as the etiological agent responsible for the infectious SARS disease. Based on extensively scientific cooperation and almost two-year's studies, remarkable achievements have been made in the understanding of the phylogenetic property and the genome organization of SARS-CoV, as well as the detailed characters of the major proteins involved in SARS-CoV life cycle. In this review, we would like to summarize the substantial scientific progress that has been made towards the structural and functional aspects of SARS-CoV associated key proteins. The progress focused on the corresponding key proteins' structure-based drug and vaccine developments has been also highlighted. The concerted and cooperative response for the treatment of the SARS disease has been proved to be a triumph of global public health and provides a new paradigm for the detection and control of future emerging infectious disease threats.

  19. EXCESS FIBRINOGEN ADSORPTION TO MONOLAYERS OF MIXED LIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, V.; Britt, D.W.; Hlady, V.

    2010-01-01

    Adsorption of fibrinogen to the monolayers of mixed lipids, dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) and eicosylamine (EA) was measured at a surface pressure of 20 mN/m by an in situ surface plasmon resonance technique. Pressure-area isotherms of DPPC+EA mixtures on water and buffer subphases indicated good lipid miscibility and some contraction of the monolayers at intermediate and higher surface pressures. Surface electric potential of the DPPC+EA monolayers showed excess values for intermediate DPPC:EA ratios. Fibrinogen adsorption and its adsorption rates from a dilute solution (0.03 mg/ml) were proportional to the fraction of EA in the monolayer indicating that protein binding was primarily driven by electrostatic interactions between positive EA charges in the monolayer and a net negative protein charge. At a higher protein concentration (0.06 mg/ml) both the fibrinogen adsorbed amount and its maximum adsorption rate showed excess values relative to the pure EA for 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1 DPPC+EA monolayers. This excess adsorption could be explained, in part, by the contraction of the monolayers with intermediate DPPC:EA ratios which resulted in an excess surface electric potential. PMID:20829000

  20. SAR Agriculture Rice Production Estimation (SARPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimadoya, M.

    2013-12-01

    The study of SAR Agriculture Rice Production Estimation (SARPE) was held in Indonesia on 2012, as part of Asia-Rice Crop Estimation & Monitoring (Asia-RiCE), which is a component for the GEO Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) initiative. The study was expected to give a breakthrough result, by using radar technology and paradigm shift of the standard production estimation system from list frame to area frame approach. This initial product estimation system is expected to be refined (fine tuning) in 2013, by participating as part of Technical Demonstration Site (Phase -1A) of Asia-RICE. The implementation period of this initial study was from the date of March 12 to December 10, 2012. The implementation of the study was done by following the approach of the BIMAS-21 framework, which has been developed since 2008. The results of this study can be briefly divided into two major components, namely: Rice-field Baseline Mapping (PESBAK - Peta Sawah Baku) and Crop Growth Monitoring. Rice-fields were derived from the mapping results of the Ministry of Agriculture (Kemtan), and validated through Student Extension Campaign of the Faculty of Agriculture, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB). While for the crop growth, it was derived from the results of image analysis process. The analysis was done, either on radar/Radarsat-2 (medium resolution) or optical/ MODIS (low resolution), based on the Planting Calendar (KATAM) of Kemtan. In this case, the planting season II/2012-2013 of rice production centers in West Java Province (Karawang, Subang and Indramayu counties). The selection of crop season and county were entirely dependent on the quality of the available PESBAK and procurement process of radar imagery. The PESBAK is still in the form of block instead of fields, so it can not be directly utilized in this study. Efforts to improve the PESBAK can not be optimal because the provided satellite image (ECW format) is not the original one. While the procurement process of

  1. Effect of ambiguities on SAR picture quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korwar, V. N.; Lipes, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    The degradation of picture quality in a high-resolution, large-swath SAR mapping system caused by speckle, additive white Gaussian noise and range and azimuthal ambiguities occurring because of the nonfinite antenna pattern produced by a square aperture antenna was studied and simulated. The effect of the azimuth antenna pattern was accounted for by calculating the azimuth ambiguity function. Range ambiguities were accounted for by adding, to each pixel of interest, appropriate pixels at a range separation corresponding to one pulse repetition period, but attenuated by the antenna pattern. It is concluded that azimuth ambiguities do not cause any noticeable degradation (for large time bandwidth product systems, at least) but range ambiguities might.

  2. Effect of ambiguities on SAR picture quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korwar, V. N.; Lipes, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    The degradation of picture quality is studied for a high-resolution, large-swath SAR mapping system subjected to speckle, additive white Gaussian noise, and range and azimuthal ambiguities occurring because of the non-finite antenna pattern produced by a square aperture antenna. The effect of the azimuth antenna pattern was accounted for by calculating the aximuth ambiguity function. Range ambiguities were accounted for by adding appropriate pixels at a range separation corresponding to one pulse repetition period, but attenuated by the antenna pattern. A method of estimating the range defocussing effect which arises from the azimuth matched filter being a function of range is shown. The resulting simulated picture was compared with one degraded by speckle and noise but no ambiguities. It is concluded that azimuth ambiguities don't cause any noticeable degradation but range ambiguities might.

  3. SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2005-11-01

    Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

  4. SAR data compression: Application, requirements, and designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, John C.; Chang, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of reducing data volume and data rate is evaluated for the Earth Observing System (EOS) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). All elements of data stream from the sensor downlink data stream to electronic delivery of browse data products are explored. The factors influencing design of a data compression system are analyzed, including the signal data characteristics, the image quality requirements, and the throughput requirements. The conclusion is that little or no reduction can be achieved in the raw signal data using traditional data compression techniques (e.g., vector quantization, adaptive discrete cosine transform) due to the induced phase errors in the output image. However, after image formation, a number of techniques are effective for data compression.

  5. A snow wetness retrieval algorithm for SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Dozier, Jeff

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (1) to evaluate the backscattering signals response to snow wetness; and (2) to develop an algorithm for snow wetness measurement using C-band polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR). In hydrological investigations, modeling and forecasting of snowmelt runoff requires information about snowpack properties and their spatial variability. In particular, timely measurement of snow parameters is needed for operational hydrology. The liquid water content of snowpack is one of the important parameters. Active microwave sensors are highly sensitive to liquid water in the snowpack because of the large dielectric contrast between ice and water in the microwave spectrum. They are not affected by weather and have a spatial resolution compatible with the topographic variation in alpine regions. However, a quantitative algorithm for retrieval snow wetness has not yet been developed.

  6. Hi-res SAR data processing report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyzenga, D. R.; Malinas, N. P.; Pantalone, P. A.; Wackerman, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the digital processing activities which have been carried out on the SAR data sets collected during the two ONR/NRL High Resolution field experiments held in September 1991 and June 1993. Features associated with the Gulf Stream boundary are observed in these data sets, with signatures that are dependent on the wind speed, radar frequency and polarization. Estimation of currents using the displacement of features observed on multiple passes appears to be possible. A simplified procedure for large-scale INSAR data processing has been developed and applied to one of the data sets collected in June 1993. Preliminary comparisons with OSCR measurements indicate that similar features are observed in both data sets. A capability was also developed during this contract to plot image locations on a Transverse Mercator map using the navigation data and radar operating parameters recorded on the P3 engineering data disks.

  7. Two microstrip arrays for interferometric SAR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.

    1993-01-01

    Two types of C-band aircraft interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) are being developed at JPL to measure the ocean wave characteristics. Each type requires two identical antennas with each having a long rectangular aperture to radiate fan-shaped beam(s). One type of these radars requires each of its antennas to radiate a broadside beam that will measure the target's cross-track velocity. The other type, having each of its antennas to radiate two off-broadside pointed beams, will allow the measurement of both the cross-track and the along-track velocities of the target. Because flush mounting of the antenna on the aircraft fuselage is desirable, microstrip patch array is selected for these interferometric SAR antennas. To meet the radar system requirement, each array needs a total of 76 microstrip patches which are arranged in a 38 x 2 rectangular aperture with a physical size of 1.6m x 16.5cm. To minimize the insertion loss and physical real estate of this relatively long array, a combined series/parallel feed technique is used. Techniques to suppress cross-pol radiation and to effectively utilize the RF power are also implemented. Cross-pol level of lower than -30 dB from the co-pol peak and low insertion loss of 0.36 dB have been achieved for both types of arrays. For the type of radar that requires two off-braodside pointed beams, a simple phasing technique is used to achieve this dual-beam capability with adequate antenna gain (20 dBi) and sidelobe level (-14 dB). Both radar arrays have been flight tested on aircraft with excellent antenna performance demonstrated.

  8. Sea bottom topography imaging with SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderkooij, M. W. A.; Wensink, G. J.; Vogelzang, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that under favorable meteorological and hydrodynamical conditions the bottom topography of shallow seas can be mapped with airborne or spaceborne imaging radar. This phenomenon was observed for the first time in 1969 by de Loor and co-workers in Q-band Side Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) imagery of sandwaves in the North Sea. It is now generally accepted that the imaging mechanism consists of three steps: (1) interaction between (tidal) current and bottom topography causes spatial modulations in the surface current velocity; (2) modulations in the surface current velocity give rise to variations in the spectrum of wind-generated waves, as described by the action balance equation; and (3) variations in the wave spectrum show up as intensity modulations in radar imagery. In order to predict radar backscatter modulations caused by sandwaves, an imaging model, covering the three steps, was developed by the Dutch Sea Bottom Topography Group. This model and some model results will be shown. On 16 Aug. 1989 an experiment was performed with the polarimetric P-, L-, and C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) of NASA/JPL. One scene was recorded in SAR mode. On 12 Jul. 1991 another three scenes were recorded, of which one was in the ATI-mode (Along-Track Interferometer). These experiments took place in the test area of the Sea Bottom Topography Group, 30 km off the Dutch coast, where the bottom topography is dominated by sand waves. In-situ data were gathered by a ship in the test area and on 'Measuring Platform Noordwijk', 20 km from the center of the test area. The radar images made during the experiment were compared with digitized maps of the bottom. Furthermore, the profiles of radar backscatter modulation were compared with the results of the model. During the workshop some preliminary results of the ATI measurements will be shown.

  9. Autofocus algorithm for curvilinear SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleszynski, E.; Bleszynski, M.; Jaroszewicz, T.

    2012-05-01

    We describe an approach to autofocusing for large apertures on curved SAR trajectories. It is a phase-gradient type method in which phase corrections compensating trajectory perturbations are estimated not directly from the image itself, but rather on the basis of partial" SAR data { functions of the slow and fast times { recon- structed (by an appropriate forward-projection procedure) from windowed scene patches, of sizes comparable to distances between distinct targets or localized features of the scene. The resulting partial data" can be shown to contain the same information on the phase perturbations as that in the original data, provided the frequencies of the perturbations do not exceed a quantity proportional to the patch size. The algorithm uses as input a sequence of conventional scene images based on moderate-size subapertures constituting the full aperture for which the phase corrections are to be determined. The subaperture images are formed with pixel sizes comparable to the range resolution which, for the optimal subaperture size, should be also approximately equal the cross-range resolution. The method does not restrict the size or shape of the synthetic aperture and can be incorporated in the data collection process in persistent sensing scenarios. The algorithm has been tested on the publicly available set of GOTCHA data, intentionally corrupted by random-walk-type trajectory uctuations (a possible model of errors caused by imprecise inertial navigation system readings) of maximum frequencies compatible with the selected patch size. It was able to eciently remove image corruption for apertures of sizes up to 360 degrees.

  10. Synthesization, characterization and adsorption properties of sulfonic cellulose.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenjian; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Yuanzhang; Li, Liang; Yang, Qinlin

    2012-01-01

    The synthesization and characterization of a new environmental functional material-sulfonic cellulose - were studied in this paper. The preparation conditions were optimized through an orthogonal experiment. The modified cellulose was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The adsorption rules of cationic organic pollutants and heavy metal ions by this new material were discussed. Regeneration and recycling performances of the sulfonic cellulose were also investigated. At the temperature of 323 K, sulfonic cellulose was prepared by grafting 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS) onto alkali-treated cellulose for 4 h with the employing of ceric ammonium nitrate as initiator. The mass ratio of AMPS to cellulose was 3:1 and the concentration of ceric ammonium nitrate was 63.8 mmol/L. The sulfur content of sulfonic cellulose was 7.32 wt%. The peaks of 1,303 and 1,159 cm⁻¹ in IR suggested the existence of the sulfonic group in sulfonic cellulose. The XRD and SEM results showed that the crystallinity decreased while the specific surface area increased after modification. Batch adsorption results showed that sulfonic cellulose had a favorable adsorption capacity for model contaminants at pH 6.0-7.0. The adsorption process was endothermic and reached equilibrium in 180 min. The adsorption rules of cationic organic pollutants and heavy metal ions indicated that sulfonic cellulose had high adsorption capacity for the cationic dyes with a coplanar macromolecule structure and organic compounds carrying the amino group. Under room temperature, 1.0 mol/L HCl can be used as a desorption solution and the equilibrium adsorption capacity had little decrease (less than 7%) after six adsorption-desorption cycles.

  11. [Modification of natural siderite and enhanced adsorption of arsenic].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Guo, Hua-Ming; Li, Yuan; Ren, Yan

    2012-02-01

    Groundwater with high arsenic concentration has widely been found in China. More attention has been paid to economic and efficient arsenic removal technology. Natural siderite, which was abundant and relatively cheap, was used as the main raw material for arsenic adsorption by batch methods. Modified conditions of natural siderite, including temperature and time of calcination and adhesive addition, were carried out for arsenic removal. Results showed that the maximum removal efficiency was reached with the calcination temperature of 350 degrees C for 90 minutes and an adhesive dosage of 10 mg x g(-1). With the ratio of solid to liquid of 0.5 g: 50 mL and the initial concentration of 5 mg x L(-1) for either As(III) or As(V) at 25 degrees C, arsenic concentrations at equilibrium time were lower than 10 microg x L(-1). Characteristics of adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherm on the optimal modified adsorbent were also evaluated. It was found that the arsenic adsorption kinetics fitted pseudo-second order kinetics equation, and the adsorption achieved equilibrium at about 12 h. The adsorption isotherm could be well described by Langmuir and Freundlich models. The maximum adsorption capacity was 1039 microg x g(-1) for As(III) and 1 026 microg x g(-1) for As(V). Furthermore, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and BET method were used to investigate main mechanisms of arsenic removal. Results showed that modified adsorbent had higher specific surface area and contained the spherical coating of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on the surface, in comparison with pristine material, which were believed to contribute to the high adsorption capacity of the modified material. The modified natural siderite appears to be a promising adsorbent that is worthy of further studies and practical application for arsenic removal.

  12. A Comparative Study of the Adsorption of Water and Methanol in Zeolite BEA: A Molecular Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Van T.; Nguyen, Phuong T.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Wick, Collin D.; Do, Duong D.

    2014-09-15

    Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were carried out to study the equilibrium adsorption concentration of methanol and water in all-silica zeolite BEA over the wide temperature and pressure ranges. For both water and methanol, their adsorptive capacity increases with increasing pressure and decreasing temperature. The onset of methanol adsorption occurs at much lower pressures than water adsorption at all temperatures. Our GCMC simulation results also indicate that the adsorption isotherms of methanol exhibit a gradual change with pressure while water adsorption shows a sharp first-order phase transition at low temperatures. To explore the effects of Si/Al ratio on adsorption, a series of GCMC simulations of water and methanol adsorption in zeolites HBEA with Si/Al=7, 15, 31, 63 were performed. As the Si/Al ratio decreases, the onsets of both water and methanol adsorption dramatically shift to lower pressures. The type V isotherm obtained for water adsorption in hydrophobic BEA progressively changes to type I isotherm with decreasing Si/Al ratio in hydrophilic HBEA. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  13. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  14. Adsorptive removal of methylene blue by CuO-acid modified sepiolite as effective adsorbent and its regeneration with high-temperature gas stream.

    PubMed

    Su, Chengyuan; Wang, Liang; Chen, Menglin; Huang, Zhi; Lin, Xiangfeng

    In this study, the dynamic adsorption of methylene blue dye onto CuO-acid modified sepiolite was investigated. Meanwhile, the equilibrium and kinetic data of the adsorption process were studied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Furthermore, a high-temperature gas stream was applied to regenerate the adsorbent. The results showed that the Langmuir isotherm model was applied to describe the adsorption process. The positive value of enthalpy change indicated that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. In the dynamic adsorption process, the best adsorption performance was achieved when the ratio of column height to diameter was 2.56 and the treatment capacity was 6 BV/h. The optimal scenario for regeneration experiments was the regeneration temperature of 550-650 °C, the space velocity of 100 min(-1) and the regeneration time of 10 min. The effective adsorption of CuO-acid modified sepiolite was kept for 12 cycles of adsorption and regeneration.

  15. Decreasing range resolution of a SAR image to permit correction of motion measurement errors beyond the SAR range resolution

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Heard, Freddie E.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    2010-07-20

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  16. MINERAL-SURFACTANT INTERACTIONS FOR MINIMUM REAGENTS PRECIPITATION AND ADSORPTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2006-04-30

    During this reporting period, further fundamental studies were conducted to understand the mechanism of the interactions between surfactants and minerals with the aim of minimizing chemical loss by adsorption. The effects of pH and mixing ratio on the chemical loss by adsorption were investigated. Some preliminary modeling work has been done towards the aim of developing a guide book to design optimal polymer/surfactant formula based on the understanding of adsorption and orientation of surfactants and their aggregates at solid/liquid interfaces. The study of adsorption of mixed system of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside (DM) and dodecyl sulfonate (C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na) was continued during this period. Based on the adsorption results, the effects of pH and mixing ratio on reagent loss were quantitatively evaluated. Adsorption of dodecyl maltoside showed a maximum at certain mixing ratio at low pH (3{approx}5), while adsorption of dodecyl maltoside steadily decreased with the increase in C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na. Analytical ultracentrifuge technique was employed to study the micellization of DM/C{sub 12}SO{sub 3}Na mixtures. Compositional changes of the aggregates were observed the mixing ratio of the components. Surfactant mixture micellization affects the conformation and orientation of adsorption layer at mineral/water interface and thus the wettability and as a result, the oil release efficiency of the chemical flooding processes. A preliminary term, Reagent Loss Index (RLI), has been proposed to represent the adsorption of all the surfactants in a standardized framework for the development of the models. Previously reported adsorption data have been analyzed using the theoretical framework for the preparation of a guidebook to help optimization of chemical combinations and selection of reagent scheme for enhanced oil recovery.

  17. Rabi cropped area forecasting of parts of Banaskatha District,Gujarat using MRS RISAT-1 SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, R. A.; Mehta, R. L.; Vyas, A.

    2016-10-01

    Radar sensors can be used for large-scale vegetation mapping and monitoring using backscatter coefficients in different polarisations and wavelength bands. Due to cloud and haze interference, optical images are not always available at all phonological stages important for crop discrimination. Moreover, in cloud prone areas, exclusively SAR approach would provide operational solution. This paper presents the results of classifying the cropped and non cropped areas using multi-temporal SAR images. Dual polarised C- band RISAT MRS (Medium Resolution ScanSAR mode) data were acquired on 9thDec. 2012, 28thJan. 2013 and 22nd Feb. 2013 at 18m spatial resolution. Intensity images of two polarisations (HH, HV) were extracted and converted into backscattering coefficient images. Cross polarisation ratio (CPR) images and Radar fractional vegetation density index (RFDI) were created from the temporal data and integrated with the multi-temporal images. Signatures of cropped and un-cropped areas were used for maximum likelihood supervised classification. Separability in cropped and umcropped classes using different polarisation combinations and classification accuracy analysis was carried out. FCC (False Color Composite) prepared using best three SAR polarisations in the data set was compared with LISS-III (Linear Imaging Self-Scanning System-III) image. The acreage under rabi crops was estimated. The methodology developed was for rabi cropped area, due to availability of SAR data of rabi season. Though, the approach is more relevant for acreage estimation of kharif crops when frequent cloud cover condition prevails during monsoon season and optical sensors fail to deliver good quality images.

  18. Diverse deformation patterns of Aleutian volcanoes from InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Dzurisin, D.; Wicks, C.; Power, J.

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter-to-subcentimeter precision at a spatial resolution of tens of meters over an area of hundreds to thousands of square kilometers. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, InSAR has become an increasingly important measurement technique for constraining magma dynamics of volcanoes over remote regions such as the Aleutian Islands. The spatial pattern of surface deformation data derived from InSAR images enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. This paper summarizes the diverse deformation patterns of the Aleutian volcanoes observed with InSAR and demonstrates that deformation patterns and associated magma supply mechanisms in the Aleutians are diverse and vary between volcanoes. These findings provide a basis for improved models and better understanding of magmatic plumbing systems.

  19. Copernicus Sentinel-1 Satellite And C-SAR Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetti, Aniceto; Rostan, Friedhelm; L'Abbate, Michelangelo; Bruno, Claudio; Bauleo, Antonio; Catalano, Toni; Cotogni, Marco; Galvagni, Luigi; Pietropaolo, Andrea; Taini, Giacomo; Venditti, Paolo; Huchler, Markus; Torres, Ramon; Lokaas, Svein; Bibby, David

    2013-12-01

    The Copernicus Sentinel-1 Earth Radar Observatory, a mission funded by the European Union and developed by ESA, is a constellation of two C-band radar satellites. The satellites have been conceived to be a continuous and reliable source of C-band SAR imagery for operational applications such as mapping of global landmasses, coastal zones and monitoring of shipping routes. The Sentinel-1 satellites are built by an industrial consortium led by Thales Alenia Space Italia as Prime Contractor and with Astrium GmbH as SAR Instrument Contractor. The paper describes the general satellite architecture, the spacecraft subsystems, AIT flow and the satellite key performances. It provides also an overview on the C-SAR Instrument, its development status and pre- launch SAR performance prediction.

  20. Suspect SARS patient puts hospital's plan on defense.

    PubMed

    Huser, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    A patient possibly infected with SARS posed issues for protecting healthcare workers and others that had not been faced before. The article gives the results of an internal critique of problems that arose and their solution.

  1. A beamforming algorithm for bistatic SAR image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2010-04-01

    Beamforming is a methodology for collection-mode-independent SAR image formation. It is essentially equivalent to backprojection. The authors have in previous papers developed this idea and discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the approach to monostatic SAR image formation vis-à-vis the more standard and time-tested polar formatting algorithm (PFA). In this paper we show that beamforming for bistatic SAR imaging leads again to a very simple image formation algorithm that requires a minimal number of lines of code and that allows the image to be directly formed onto a three-dimensional surface model, thus automatically creating an orthorectified image. The same disadvantage of beamforming applied to monostatic SAR imaging applies to the bistatic case, however, in that the execution time for the beamforming algorithm is quite long compared to that of PFA. Fast versions of beamforming do exist to help alleviate this issue. Results of image reconstructions from phase history data are presented.

  2. Modeling of SAR signatures of shallow water ocean topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kozma, A.; Kasischke, E. S.; Lyzenga, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrodynamic/electromagnetic model was developed to explain and quantify the relationship between the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observed signatures and the bottom topography of the ocean in the English Channel region of the North Sea. The model uses environmental data and radar system parameters as inputs and predicts SAR-observed backscatter changes over topographic changes in the ocean floor. The model results compare favorably with the actual SEASAT SAR observed backscatter values. The developed model is valid for only relatively shallow water areas (i.e., less than 50 meters in depth) and suggests that for bottom features to be visible on SAR imagery, a moderate to high velocity current and a moderate wind must be present.

  3. Airborne X-band SAR tomography for forest volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, Fiona; Woodhouse, Iain H.; Mulgrew, Bernard

    2016-10-01

    We evaluate the usefulness of X-band, airborne (helicopter) data for tomography over forestry regions and discuss the use of compressive sensing algorithms to aid X-band airborne tomography. This work examines if there is any information that can be gained from forest volumes when analysing forestry sites using X-band data. To do so, different forest scenarios were simulated and a fast SAR simulator was used to model airborne multipass SAR data, at X-band, with parameters based on Leonardo's PicoSAR instrument. Model simulations considered varying factors that affect the height determination when using tomography. The main parameters that are considered here are: motion errors of the platform, the spacing of the flight paths, the resolution of the SAR images and plant life being present under the canopy (an understory). It was found that residual motion errors from the airborne platform cause the largest error in the tomographic profile.

  4. 3. DETAIL, LIGHTNING ARRESTER ON SAR TRANSMISSION LINE. EEC print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL, LIGHTNING ARRESTER ON SAR TRANSMISSION LINE. EEC print no. S-C-01-00478, no date. Photographer unknown. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Transmission Lines, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  5. A Study of Linear Approximation Techniques for SAR Azimuth Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, L. W.; Perry, R. P.; Liu, B.

    1979-01-01

    The application of the step transform subarray processing techniques to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was studied. The subarray technique permits the application of efficient digital transform computational techniques such as the fast Fourier transform to be applied while offering an effective tool for range migration compensation. Range migration compensation is applied at the subarray level, and with the subarray size based on worst case range migration conditions, a minimum control system is achieved. A baseline processor was designed for a four-look SAR system covering approximately 4096 by 4096 SAR sample field every 2.5 seconds. Implementation of the baseline system was projected using advanced low power technologies. A 20 swath is implemented with approximately 1000 circuits having a power dissipation of from 70 to 195 watts. The baseline batch step transform processor is compared to a continuous strip processor, and variations of the baseline are developed for a wide range of SAR parameters.

  6. Reconstruction of interrupted SAR imagery for persistent surveillance change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanovic, Ivana; Karl, W. C.; Novak, Les

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we apply a sparse signal recovery technique for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation from interrupted phase history data. Timeline constraints imposed on multi-function modern radars result in interrupted SAR data collection, which in turn leads to corrupted imagery that degrades reliable change detection. In this paper we extrapolate the missing data by applying the basis pursuit denoising algorithm (BPDN) in the image formation step, effectively, modeling the SAR scene as sparse. We investigate the effects of regular and random interruptions on the SAR point spread function (PSF), as well as on the quality of both coherent (CCD) and non-coherent (NCCD) change detection. We contrast the sparse reconstruction to the matched filter (MF) method, implemented via Fourier processing with missing data set to zero. To illustrate the capabilities of the gap-filling sparse reconstruction algorithm, we evaluate change detection performance using a pair of images from the GOTCHA data set.

  7. Infrastructure stability surveillance with high resolution InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balz, Timo; Düring, Ralf

    2017-02-01

    The construction of new infrastructure in largely unknown and difficult environments, as it is necessary for the construction of the New Silk Road, can lead to a decreased stability along the construction site, leading to an increase in landslide risk and deformation caused by surface motion. This generally requires a thorough pre-analysis and consecutive surveillance of the deformation patterns to ensure the stability and safety of the infrastructure projects. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) and the derived techniques of multi-baseline InSAR are very powerful tools for a large area observation of surface deformation patterns. With InSAR and deriver techniques, the topographic height and the surface motion can be estimated for large areas, making it an ideal tool for supporting the planning, construction, and safety surveillance of new infrastructure elements in remote areas.

  8. A beamforming algorithm for bistatic SAR image formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David Alan; Wahl, Daniel Eugene; Jakowatz, Charles V., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    Beamforming is a methodology for collection-mode-independent SAR image formation. It is essentially equivalent to backprojection. The authors have in previous papers developed this idea and discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the approach to monostatic SAR image formation vis--vis the more standard and time-tested polar formatting algorithm (PFA). In this paper we show that beamforming for bistatic SAR imaging leads again to a very simple image formation algorithm that requires a minimal number of lines of code and that allows the image to be directly formed onto a three-dimensional surface model, thus automatically creating an orthorectified image. The same disadvantage of beamforming applied to monostatic SAR imaging applies to the bistatic case, however, in that the execution time for the beamforming algorithm is quite long compared to that of PFA. Fast versions of beamforming do exist to help alleviate this issue. Results of image reconstructions from phase history data are presented.

  9. The Staphylococcus aureus protein-coding gene gdpS modulates sarS expression via mRNA-mRNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Zhang, Xu; Shang, Fei; Sun, Haipeng; Sun, Baolin; Xue, Ting

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important Gram-positive pathogen responsible for numerous diseases ranging from localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic infections. The virulence of S. aureus is essentially determined by a wide spectrum of factors, including cell wall-associated proteins and secreted toxins that are precisely controlled in response to environmental changes. GGDEF domain protein from Staphylococcus (GdpS) is the only conserved staphylococcal GGDEF domain protein that is involved not in c-di-GMP synthesis but in the virulence regulation of S. aureus NCTC8325. Our previous study showed that the inactivation of gdpS generates an extensive change of virulence factors together with, in particular, a major Spa (protein A) surface protein. As reported, sarS is a direct positive regulator of spa. The decreased transcript levels of sarS in the gdpS mutant compared with the parental NCTC8325 strain suggest that gdpS affects spa through interaction with sarS. In this study, site mutation and complementary experiments showed that the translation product of gdpS was not involved in the regulation of transcript levels of sarS. We found that gdpS functioned through direct RNA-RNA base pairing with the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of sarS mRNA and that a putative 18-nucleotide region played a significant role in the regulatory process. Furthermore, the mRNA half-life analysis of sarS in the gdpS mutant showed that gdpS positively regulates the mRNA levels of sarS by contributing to the stabilization of sarS mRNA, suggesting that gdpS mRNA may regulate spa expression in an RNA-dependent pathway.

  10. Developments in LFM-CW SAR for UAV Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringham, Craig

    Opportunities to use synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in scientific studies and military operations are expanding with the development of small SAR systems that can be operated on small unmanned air vehicles (UAV)s. While the nimble nature of small UAVs make them an attractive platform for many reasons, small UAVs are also more prone to deviate from a linear course due autopilot errors and external forces such as turbulence and wind. Thus, motion compensation and improved processing algorithms are required to properly focus the SAR images. The work of this dissertation overcomes some of the challenges and addresses some of the opportunities of operating SAR on small UAVs. Several contributions to SAR backprojection processing for UAV SARs are developed including: 1. The derivation of a novel SAR backprojection algorithm that accounts for motion during the pulse that is appropriate for narrow or ultra-wide-band SAR. 2. A compensation method for SAR backprojection to enable radiometrically accurate image processing. 3. The design and implementation of a real-time backprojection processor on a commercially available GPU that takes advantage of the GPU texture cache. 4. A new autofocus method that improves the image focus by estimating motion measurement errors in three dimensions, correcting for both amplitude and phase errors caused by inaccurate motion parameters. 5. A generalization of factorized backprojection, which we call the Dually Factorized Backprojection method, that factorizes the correlation integral in both slow-time and fast-time in order to efficiently account for general motion during the transmit of an LFM-CW pulse. Much of this work was conducted in support of the Characterization of Arctic Sea Ice Experiment (CASIE), and the appendices provide substantial contributions for this project as well, including: 1. My work in designing and implementing the digital receiver and controller board for the microASAR which was used for CASIE. 2. A description of

  11. Experimental 3-D SAR Human Target Signature Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-21

    through the wall structure that the radar signal must travel to get to the target, such as through and around studs . The different features from the...drywall made of wood stud , gypsum, insulating material, and vinyl coating. The second wall structure is made of cinder blocks and is a more challenging... wall synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging from an experimental L-band through- wall SAR prototype. Tools and algorithms for 3-D visualization are

  12. Using airborne and satellite SAR for wake mapping offshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Merete B.; Hasager, Charlotte B.

    2006-09-01

    Offshore wind energy is progressing rapidly around Europe. One of the latest initiatives is the installation of multiple wind farms in clusters to share cables and maintenance costs and to fully exploit premium wind resource sites. For siting of multiple nearby wind farms, the wind turbine wake effect must be considered. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an imaging remote sensing technique which offers a unique opportunity to describe spatial variations of wind speed offshore. For the first time an airborne SAR instrument was used for data acquisition over a large offshore wind farm. The aim was to identify the turbine wake effect from SAR-derived wind speed maps as a downstream region of reduced wind speed. The aircraft SAR campaign was conducted on 12 October 2003 over the wind farm at Horns Rev in the North Sea. Nearly simultaneous measurements were acquired over the area by the SAR on board the ERS-2 satellite. In addition, meteorological data were collected. Both aircraft and satellite SAR-derived wind speed maps showed significant velocity deficits downstream of the wind farm. Wind speed maps retrieved from aircraft SAR suggested deficits of up to 20% downstream of the last turbine, whereas satellite SAR-derived maps showed deficits of the order of 10%. The difference originated partly from the two different reference methods used for normalization of measured wind speeds. The detected region of reduced wind speed had the same width as the wind turbine array, indicating a low degree of horizontal wake dispersion. The downstream wake extent was approximately 10 km, which corresponds well with results from previous studies and with wake model predictions. Copyright

  13. SAR Imaging through the Earth’s Ionosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-06

    SAR performance in range. These corrections can 4The rotation is named after Michael Faraday , a prominent 19th century scientist and pioneer in the...dispersion and Faraday rotation in the ionospheric plasma, and their ungarbled form assumed by the SAR signal processing algorithm known as the matched...autocorrelation analysis allows us to evaluate the parameters that control the Faraday rotation. Knowing all those parameters, we can correct the matched

  14. SAR image formation with azimuth interpolation after azimuth transform

    DOEpatents

    Doerry; Armin W. , Martin; Grant D. , Holzrichter; Michael W.

    2008-07-08

    Two-dimensional SAR data can be processed into a rectangular grid format by subjecting the SAR data to a Fourier transform operation, and thereafter to a corresponding interpolation operation. Because the interpolation operation follows the Fourier transform operation, the interpolation operation can be simplified, and the effect of interpolation errors can be diminished. This provides for the possibility of both reducing the re-grid processing time, and improving the image quality.

  15. A SAR ATR algorithm based on coherent change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Harmony, D.W.

    2000-12-01

    This report discusses an automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithm for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery that is based on coherent change detection techniques. The algorithm relies on templates created from training data to identify targets. Objects are identified or rejected as targets by comparing their SAR signatures with templates using the same complex correlation scheme developed for coherent change detection. Preliminary results are presented in addition to future recommendations.

  16. Archived 1976-1985 JPL Aircraft SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.; Blom, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    This report describes archived data from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) aircraft radar expeditions in the mid-1970s through the mid-1980s collected by Ron Blom, JPL Radar Geologist. The dataset was collected during Ron's career at JPL from the 1970s through 2015. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data in the 1970s and 1980s were recorded optically on long strips of film. SAR imagery was produced via an optical, holographic technique that resulted in long strips of film imagery.

  17. Fusion of LADAR with SAR for precision strike

    SciTech Connect

    Cress, D.H.; Muguira, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents a concept for fusing 3-dimensional image reconnaissance data with LADAR imagery for aim point refinement. The approach is applicable to fixed or quasi-fixed targets. Quasi-fixed targets are targets that are not expected to be moved between the time of reconnaissance and the time of target engagement. The 3-dimensional image data is presumed to come from standoff reconnaissance assets tens to hundreds of kilometers from the target area or acquisitions prior to hostilities. Examples are synthetic aperture radar (SAR) or stereoprocessed satellite imagery. SAR can be used to generate a 3-dimensional map of the surface through processing of data acquired with conventional SAR acquired using two closely spaced, parallel reconnaissance paths, either airborne or satellite based. Alternatively, a specialized airborne SAR having two receiving antennas may be used for data acquisition. The data sets used in this analysis are: (1) LADAR data acquired using a Hughes-Danbury system flown over a portion of Kirtland AFB during the period September 15--16, 1993; (2) two pass interferometric SAR data flown over a terrain-dominated area of Kirtland AFB; (3) 3-dimensional mapping of an urban-dominated area of the Sandia National Laboratories and adjacent cultural area extracted from aerial photography by Vexcel Corporation; (4) LADAR data acquired at Eglin AFB under Wright Laboratory`s Advanced Technology Ladar System (ATLAS) program using a 60 {mu}J, 75 KHz Co{sub 2} laser; and (5) two pass interferometric SAR data generated by Sandia`s STRIP DCS (Data Collection System) radar corresponding to the ATLAS LADAR data. The cultural data set was used in the urban area rather than SAR because high quality interferometric SAR data were not available for the urban-type area.

  18. Taiga forest stands and SAR: Monitoring for subarctic global change

    SciTech Connect

    Way, J.; Kwok, R.; Viereck, L.; Slaughter, C.; Dobson, C.

    1992-03-01

    In preparation for the first European Earth Remote Sensing (ERS-1) mission, a series of multitemporal, multifrequency, multipolarization aircraft synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data sets were acquired over the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest near Fairbanks, Alaska in March 1988. Significant change in radar backscatter was observed over the two-week experimental period due to changing environmental conditions. These preliminary results are presented to illustrate the opportunity afforded by the ERS-1 SAR to monitor temporal change in forest ecosystems.

  19. InSAR Monitoring of Landslides using RADARSAT and Alos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhroy, V.; Pierre-Jean, A.; Pavlic, G.

    2009-05-01

    We present the results of InSAR monitoring of several landslides using RADARDAT, and ALOS satellites. InSAR techniques are increasingly being used in slope stability assessment. Our research has shown that differential InSAR and coherent target monitoring techniques using field corner reflectors are useful to monitor landslide activity along strategic transportation and energy corridors. The Mackenzie Valley in northern Canada is experiencing one of the highest rates on mean annual air temperature for any region in Canada, thereby triggering melting in the permafrost, which results in active layer detachment slides. There are approximately 2000 landslides along the proposed Mackenzie Valley pipeline route. In addition, the Trans Canada Highway in the Canadian Rockies are affected by several rock avalanches and slow retrogressive slides. The ALOS PALSAR InSAR results show that we can observe deformation on both vegetated and exposed rock areas on the Little Smokey slide and the Frank Slide. RADARSAT-1 InSAR images indicate the different level of activity of the slopes (large and small) during different periods of the year. RADARSAT-2 is providing the high resolution rapid revisit capabilities needed to continuously monitor these active slopes along Canadian strategic energy and transportation corridors. The information produced by our InSAR activity maps on various landslides are used to realign the pipeline route in sensitive permafrost areas, and to install slope stability measures along the Trans-Canada and Provincial Highways. Using these different satellites we are able to develop guidelines for more reliable uses of these SAR missions Keywords: InSAR, landslides, RADARSAT, ALOS .

  20. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  1. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  2. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  3. Potentials of polarimetric SAR interferometry for agriculture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Juan M.; Ballester-Berman, J. David

    2009-04-01

    This paper is aimed to define the main specifications and system requirements of a future spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mission with polarimetric and interferometric capabilities, to be applied in agriculture monitoring. Firstly, a previous discussion concerning the applications of remote sensing to agriculture and the requirements demanded by end users is introduced. Then, a review of polarimetric SAR and interferometric SAR techniques employed in agriculture is performed in order to explore and justify the potential contributions to crop parameter retrieval of polarimetric SAR interferometry (PolInSAR). The current status of the research about PolInSAR when applied to the retrieval of biophysical parameters of agricultural crops is also addressed, covering recent advances in theoretical modeling aspects (both direct and inverse models), the validation carried out so far with indoor data, and complementary information provided by other different but related experiments. From this experience, we describe some system specifications that will be important for the success of this technique. Among them it is emphasized the need of baselines larger than usual, medium-high frequency band, and a mandatory single-pass mode for overcoming temporal decorrelation. Finally, a set of future experiments is also proposed for additional testing and confirmation of observations made so far regarding minimum baseline requirements, temporal evolution of observables and modeling issues, among others.

  4. Hybrid space-airborne bistatic SAR geometric resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moccia, Antonio; Renga, Alfredo

    2009-09-01

    Performance analysis of Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) characterized by arbitrary geometric configurations is usually complex and time-consuming since system impulse response has to be evaluated by bistatic SAR processing. This approach does not allow derivation of general equations regulating the behaviour of image resolutions with varying the observation geometry. It is well known that for an arbitrary configuration of bistatic SAR there are not perpendicular range and azimuth directions, but the capability to produce an image is not prevented as it depends only on the possibility to generate image pixels from time delay and Doppler measurements. However, even if separately range and Doppler resolutions are good, bistatic SAR geometries can exist in which imaging capabilities are very poor when range and Doppler directions become locally parallel. The present paper aims to derive analytical tools for calculating the geometric resolutions of arbitrary configuration of bistatic SAR. The method has been applied to a hybrid bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar formed by a spaceborne illuminator and a receiving-only airborne forward-looking Synthetic Aperture Radar (F-SAR). It can take advantage of the spaceborne illuminator to dodge the limitations of monostatic FSAR. Basic modeling and best illumination conditions have been detailed in the paper.

  5. From Maxwell's Equations to Polarimetric SAR Images: A Simulation Approach.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Sidnei J S; Da S Lacava, J C; Fernandes, David

    2008-11-19

    A new electromagnetic approach for the simulation of polarimetric SAR images is proposed. It starts from Maxwell's equations, employs the spectral domain full-wave technique, the moment method, and the stationary phase method to compute the far electromagnetic fields scattered by multilayer structures. A multilayer structure is located at each selected position of a regular rectangular grid of coordinates, which defines the scene area under imaging. The grid is determined taking into account the elementary scatter size and SAR operational parameters, such as spatial resolution, pixel spacing, look angle and platform altitude. A two-dimensional separable "sinc" function to represent the SAR spread point function is also considered. Multifrequency sets of single-look polarimetric SAR images are generated, in L-, C- and X-bands and the images are evaluated using several measurements commonly employed in SAR data analysis. The evaluation shows that the proposed simulation process is working properly, since the obtained results are in accordance with those presented in the literature. Therefore, this new approach becomes suitable for carrying out theoretical and practical studies using polarimetric SAR images.

  6. From Maxwell's Equations to Polarimetric SAR Images: A Simulation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Sidnei J. S.; da S. Lacava, J. C.; Fernandes, David

    2008-01-01

    A new electromagnetic approach for the simulation of polarimetric SAR images is proposed. It starts from Maxwell's equations, employs the spectral domain full-wave technique, the moment method, and the stationary phase method to compute the far electromagnetic fields scattered by multilayer structures. A multilayer structure is located at each selected position of a regular rectangular grid of coordinates, which defines the scene area under imaging. The grid is determined taking into account the elementary scatter size and SAR operational parameters, such as spatial resolution, pixel spacing, look angle and platform altitude. A two-dimensional separable “sinc” function to represent the SAR spread point function is also considered. Multifrequency sets of single-look polarimetric SAR images are generated, in L-, C- and X-bands and the images are evaluated using several measurements commonly employed in SAR data analysis. The evaluation shows that the proposed simulation process is working properly, since the obtained results are in accordance with those presented in the literature. Therefore, this new approach becomes suitable for carrying out theoretical and practical studies using polarimetric SAR images. PMID:27873935

  7. (abstract) The EOS SAR Mission: A New Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, JoBea

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Earth Orbiting System Synthetic Aperture Radar (EOS SAR) program is to help develop the modeling and observational capabilities to predict and monitor terrestrial and oceanic processes that are either causing global change or resulting from global change. Specifically, the EOS SAR will provide important geophysical products to the EOS data set to improve our understanding of the state and functioning of the Earth system. The strategy for the EOS SAR program is to define the instrument requirements based on required input to geophysical algorithms, provide the processing capability and algorithms to generate such products on the required spatial (global) and temporal (3-5 days) scales, and to provide the spaceborne instrumentation with international partnerships. Initially this partnership has been with Germany; currently we are exploring broader international partnerships. A MultiSAR approach to the EOS SAR which includes a number of SARs provided by Japan, ESA, Germany, Canada, and the US in synergistic orbits could be used to attain a truly global monitoring capability using multifrequency polarimetric signatures. These concepts and several options for mission scenarios will be presented.

  8. SAR11 Bacteria: The Most Abundant Plankton in the Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    SAR11 is a group of small, carbon-oxidizing bacteria that reach a global estimated population size of 2.4×1028 cells—approximately 25% of all plankton. They are found throughout the oceans but reach their largest numbers in stratified, oligotrophic gyres, which are an expanding habitat in the warming oceans. SAR11 likely had a Precambrian origin and, over geological time, evolved into the niche of harvesting labile, low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM). SAR11 cells are minimal in size and complexity, a phenomenon known as streamlining that is thought to benefit them by lowering the material costs of replication and maximizing transport functions that are essential to competition at ultralow nutrient concentrations. One of the surprises in SAR11 metabolism is their ability to both oxidize and produce a variety of volatile organic compounds that can diffuse into the atmosphere. SAR11 cells divide slowly and lack many forms of regulation commonly used by bacterial cells to adjust to changing environmental conditions. As a result of genome reduction, they require an unusual range of nutrients, which leads to complex biochemical interactions with other plankton. The study of SAR11 is providing insight into the biogeochemistry of labile DOM and is affecting microbiology beyond marine science by providing a model for understanding the evolution and function of streamlined cells.

  9. SAR11 Bacteria: The Most Abundant Plankton in the Oceans.

    PubMed

    Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2017-01-03

    SAR11 is a group of small, carbon-oxidizing bacteria that reach a global estimated population size of 2.4×10(28) cells-approximately 25% of all plankton. They are found throughout the oceans but reach their largest numbers in stratified, oligotrophic gyres, which are an expanding habitat in the warming oceans. SAR11 likely had a Precambrian origin and, over geological time, evolved into the niche of harvesting labile, low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM). SAR11 cells are minimal in size and complexity, a phenomenon known as streamlining that is thought to benefit them by lowering the material costs of replication and maximizing transport functions that are essential to competition at ultralow nutrient concentrations. One of the surprises in SAR11 metabolism is their ability to both oxidize and produce a variety of volatile organic compounds that can diffuse into the atmosphere. SAR11 cells divide slowly and lack many forms of regulation commonly used by bacterial cells to adjust to changing environmental conditions. As a result of genome reduction, they require an unusual range of nutrients, which leads to complex biochemical interactions with other plankton. The study of SAR11 is providing insight into the biogeochemistry of labile DOM and is affecting microbiology beyond marine science by providing a model for understanding the evolution and function of streamlined cells.

  10. Rapid Urban Mapping Using SAR/Optical Imagery Synergy.

    PubMed

    Corbane, Christina; Faure, Jean-François; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Petit, Michel

    2008-11-12

    This paper highlights the potential of combining Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and optical data for operational rapid urban mapping. An algorithm consisting of a completely unsupervised procedure for processing pairs of co-registered SAR/optical images is proposed. In a first stage, a texture analysis is conducted independently on the two images using eight different chain-based Gaussian models. In a second stage, the resulting texture images are partitioned by an unsupervised fuzzy K-means approach. Finally, a fuzzy decision rule is used to aggregate the results provided by the classification of texture images obtained from the pair of SAR and optical images. The method was tested and validated on images of Bucharest (Romania) and Cayenne (French Guiana). These two study areas are of different terrain relief, urban settlement structure and land cover complexity. The data set included Radarsat-1/ENVISAT and SPOT-4/5 images. The developed SAR/optical information fusion scheme improved the capabilities of urban areas extraction when compared with the separate use of SAR and optical sensors. It also proved to be suitable for monitoring urbanization development. The encouraging results thus confirm the potential of combining information from SAR and optical sensors for timely urban area analysis, as required in cases of disaster management and planning in urban sprawl areas.

  11. SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsementzi, Despina; Wu, Jieying; Deutsch, Samuel; Nath, Sangeeta; Rodriguez-R, Luis M.; Burns, Andrew S.; Ranjan, Piyush; Sarode, Neha; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Padilla, Cory C.; Stone, Benjamin K.; Bristow, Laura A.; Larsen, Morten; Glass, Jennifer B.; Thamdrup, Bo; Woyke, Tanja; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Stewart, Frank J.

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria of the SAR11 clade constitute up to one half of all microbial cells in the oxygen-rich surface ocean. SAR11 bacteria are also abundant in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), where oxygen falls below detection and anaerobic microbes have vital roles in converting bioavailable nitrogen to N2 gas. Anaerobic metabolism has not yet been observed in SAR11, and it remains unknown how these bacteria contribute to OMZ biogeochemical cycling. Here, genomic analysis of single cells from the world’s largest OMZ revealed previously uncharacterized SAR11 lineages with adaptations for life without oxygen, including genes for respiratory nitrate reductases (Nar). SAR11 nar genes were experimentally verified to encode proteins catalysing the nitrite-producing first step of denitrification and constituted ~40% of OMZ nar transcripts, with transcription peaking in the anoxic zone of maximum nitrate reduction activity. These results link SAR11 to pathways of ocean nitrogen loss, redefining the ecological niche of Earth’s most abundant organismal group.

  12. ISRO's dual frequency airborne SAR pre-cursor to NISAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujam, V. Manavala; Suneela, T. J. V. D.; Bhan, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have jointly embarked on NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) operating in L-band and S-band, which will map Earth's surface every 12 days. As a pre-cursor to the NISAR mission, ISRO is planning an airborne SAR (L&S band) which will deliver NISAR analogue data products to the science community. ISRO will develop all the hardware with the aim of adhering to system design aspects of NISAR to the maximum extent possible. It is a fully polarimetric stripmap SAR and can be operated in single, dual, compact, quasi-quad and full polarimetry modes. It has wide incidence angle coverage from 24°-77° with swath coverage from 5.5km to 15 km. Apart from simultaneous imaging operations, this system can also operate in standalone L/S SAR modes. This system is planned to operate from an aircraft platform with nominal altitude of 8000meters. Antenna for this SAR will be rigidly mounted to the aircraft, whereas, motion compensation will be implemented in the software processor to generate data products. Data products for this airborne SAR will be generated in slant & ground range azimuth dimension and geocoded in HDF5/Geotiff formats. This airborne SAR will help to prepare the Indian scientific community for optimum utilization of NISAR data. In-order to collect useful science data, airborne campaigns are planned from end of 2016 onwards.

  13. Rapid Urban Mapping Using SAR/Optical Imagery Synergy

    PubMed Central

    Corbane, Christina; Faure, Jean-François; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Petit, Michel

    2008-01-01

    This paper highlights the potential of combining Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and optical data for operational rapid urban mapping. An algorithm consisting of a completely unsupervised procedure for processing pairs of co-registered SAR/optical images is proposed. In a first stage, a texture analysis is conducted independently on the two images using eight different chain-based Gaussian models. In a second stage, the resulting texture images are partitioned by an unsupervised fuzzy K-means approach. Finally, a fuzzy decision rule is used to aggregate the results provided by the classification of texture images obtained from the pair of SAR and optical images. The method was tested and validated on images of Bucharest (Romania) and Cayenne (French Guiana). These two study areas are of different terrain relief, urban settlement structure and land cover complexity. The data set included Radarsat-1/ENVISAT and SPOT-4/5 images. The developed SAR/optical information fusion scheme improved the capabilities of urban areas extraction when compared with the separate use of SAR and optical sensors. It also proved to be suitable for monitoring urbanization development. The encouraging results thus confirm the potential of combining information from SAR and optical sensors for timely urban area analysis, as required in cases of disaster management and planning in urban sprawl areas. PMID:27873921

  14. Characteristics of Forests in Western Sayani Mountains, Siberia from SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. Jon; Sun, Guoqing; Kharuk, V. I.; Kovacs, Katalin

    1998-01-01

    This paper investigated the possibility of using spaceborne radar data to map forest types and logging in the mountainous Western Sayani area in Siberia. L and C band HH, HV, and VV polarized images from the Shuttle Imaging Radar-C instrument were used in the study. Techniques to reduce topographic effects in the radar images were investigated. These included radiometric correction using illumination angle inferred from a digital elevation model, and reducing apparent effects of topography through band ratios. Forest classification was performed after terrain correction utilizing typical supervised techniques and principal component analyses. An ancillary data set of local elevations was also used to improve the forest classification. Map accuracy for each technique was estimated for training sites based on Russian forestry maps, satellite imagery and field measurements. The results indicate that it is necessary to correct for topography when attempting to classify forests in mountainous terrain. Radiometric correction based on a DEM (Digital Elevation Model) improved classification results but required reducing the SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) resolution to match the DEM. Using ratios of SAR channels that include cross-polarization improved classification and

  15. Delta-K Wideband SAR Interferometry for DEM Generation and Persistent Scatterers Using TeraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brcic, Ramon; Eineder, Michael; Bamler, Richard; Steinbrecher, Ulrich; Schulze, Daniel; Metzig, Robert; Papathanassiou, Konstantinos; Nagler, Thomas; Mueller, Florian; Suess, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Wideband SAR systems such as TerraSAR-X allow estimation of the absolute interferometric phase without resorting to error prone phase unwrapping. This is achieved through the delta-k technique that exploits frequency diversity within the range bandwidth to simulate a SAR system with a much longer carrier wavelength. This benefits all interferometric applications including DEM generation and land surface motion determination. Here we present the results of an ESA study (21318/07/NL/HE) into using delta-k absolute phase estimation for DEM generation and PSI (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry). Using TerraSAR- X data, examples from a delta-k DEM generation system are shown which avoid the errors induced by conventional phase unwrapping. For PSI, the possibilities of absolute phase estimation for a single PS are explored in theory and examples where wideband estimation is compared to conventional PSI processing for a stack of acquisitions over Paris.

  16. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and its applications to study volcanoes, part 1: Principles of InSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Zhang, Jixian; Zhang, Yonghong

    2006-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar is an ability to measure the surface deformation of remote sensing technology, in a huge area, its deformation measurement with sub-centimeter accuracy, and spatial resolution in the tens of meters or less. In this paper, the basic theory of InSAR technology is reviewed, its working principle is clarified, and the related problems of surface deformation measurement using InSAR technology are discussed.

  17. Psychosocial effects of SARS on hospital staff: survey of a large tertiary care institution

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Leslie A.; Crighton, Eric J.; Tracy, C. Shawn; Al-Enazy, Hadi; Bolaji, Yemisi; Hanjrah, Sagina; Hussain, Ayesha; Makhlouf, Samia; Upshur, Ross E.G.

    2004-01-01

    Background The outbreak of SARS in 2003 had a dramatic effect on the health care system in Toronto. The main objective of this study was to investigate the psychosocial effects associated with working in a hospital environment during this outbreak. Methods Questionnaires were distributed to all willing employees of Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre between Apr. 10 and 22, 2003. The survey included questions regarding concern about SARS, precautionary measures, personal well-being and sociodemographic characteristics; a subsample also received the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Results Of the 4283 questionnaires distributed, 2001 (47%) were returned, representing 27% of the total hospital employee population of 7474. The proportions of respondents who were allied health care professionals, nurses and doctors and who worked in areas other than patient care were representative of the hospital staff population as a whole. Of the 2001 questionnaires, 510 contained the GHQ-12. Two-thirds of the respondents reported SARS-related concern for their own or their family's health. A total of 148 respondents (29%) scored above the threshold point on the GHQ-12, indicating probable emotional distress; the rate among nurses was 45%. Masks were reported to be the most bothersome infection control precaution. Logistic regression analysis identified 4 factors as being significantly associated with increased levels of concern for personal or family health: perception of a greater risk of death from SARS (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 5.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.6–9.6), living with children (adjusted OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.5–2.3), personal or family lifestyle affected by SARS outbreak (adjusted OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.5–4.3) and being treated differently by people because of working in a hospital (adjusted OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2–2.1). Four factors were identified as being significantly associated with the presence of emotional distress

  18. SAR backscatter from coniferous forest gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John L.; Davis, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    A study is in progress comparing Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) backscatter from coniferous forest plots containing gaps to backscatter from adjacent gap-free plots. Issues discussed are how do gaps in the range of 400 to 1600 sq m (approximately 4-14 pixels at intermediate incidence angles) affect forest backscatter statistics and what incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations are most sensitive to forest gaps. In order to visualize the slant-range imaging of forest and gaps, a simple conceptual model is used. This strictly qualitative model has led us to hypothesize that forest radar returns at short wavelengths (eg., C-band) and large incidence angles (e.g., 50 deg) should be most affected by the presence of gaps, whereas returns at long wavelengths and small angles should be least affected. Preliminary analysis of 1989 AIRSAR data from forest near Mt. Shasta supports the hypothesis. Current forest backscatter models such as MIMICS and Santa Barbara Discontinuous Canopy Backscatter Model have in several cases correctly predicted backscatter from forest stands based on inputs of measured or estimated forest parameters. These models do not, however, predict within-stand SAR scene texture, or 'intrinsic scene variability' as Ulaby et al. has referred to it. For instance, the Santa Barbara model, which may be the most spatially coupled of the existing models, is not truly spatial. Tree locations within a simulated pixel are distributed according to a Poisson process, as they are in many natural forests, but tree size is unrelated to location, which is not the case in nature. Furthermore, since pixels of a simulated stand are generated independently in the Santa Barbara model, spatial processes larger than one pixel are not modeled. Using a different approach, Oliver modeled scene texture based on an hypothetical forest geometry. His simulated scenes do not agree well with SAR data, perhaps due to the simple geometric model used. Insofar as texture

  19. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Sacco, Gian Franco; Gurrola, Eric M.; Zabker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    This computing environment is the next generation of geodetic image processing technology for repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) sensors, identified by the community as a needed capability to provide flexibility and extensibility in reducing measurements from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products. This software allows users of interferometric radar data the flexibility to process from Level 0 to Level 4 products using a variety of algorithms and for a range of available sensors. There are many radar satellites in orbit today delivering to the science community data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible large-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and the Earth's ecosystem. The proposed DESDynI mission, now under consideration by NASA for launch later in this decade, would provide time series and multiimage measurements that permit 4D models of Earth surface processes so that, for example, climate-induced changes over time would become apparent and quantifiable. This advanced data processing technology, applied to a global data set such as from the proposed DESDynI mission, enables a new class of analyses at time and spatial scales unavailable using current approaches. This software implements an accurate, extensible, and modular processing system designed to realize the full potential of InSAR data from future missions such as the proposed DESDynI, existing radar satellite data, as well as data from the NASA UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar), and other airborne platforms. The processing approach has been re-thought in order to enable multi-scene analysis by adding new algorithms and data interfaces, to permit user-reconfigurable operation and extensibility, and to capitalize on codes already developed by NASA and the science community. The framework incorporates modern programming methods based on recent research, including object-oriented scripts controlling legacy and

  20. Galactose adsorption on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, Matti; Puisto, Mikko

    2014-03-01

    In order to understand the valorisation of biomass, it is essential to study the behavior of sugar molecules on catalytic surfaces. We have studied the adsorption of galactose molecules on the Ru(0001) surface using first principles calculations. We present results for the fully relaxed configurations of the molecule at different adsorption sites. We also compare the effect of the inclusion of the van der Waals interactions on both the energetics of the free galactose molecule and the adsorption energy of galactose on Ru(0001). We compare our results, obtained using periodically repeated supercells, to those obtained with cluster calculations.

  1. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  2. Generalized energy-aperture product limit for multi-beam and spotlight SARs

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, T.J.

    1995-12-21

    The SAR energy-aperture product limit is extended to multi-beam SARS, Spotlight and moving spotlight SARS. This fundamental limit bounds the tradeoff between energy and antenna size. The kinematic relations between design variables such as platform speed, pulse repetition frequency, beam width and area rate are analyzed in a unified framework applicable to a wide variety of SARs including strip maps, spotlights, vermer arrays and multi-beam SARS, both scanning and swept-beam. Then the energy-aperture product limit is derived from the signal-to noise requirement and the kinematic constraints. The derivation clarifies impact of multiple beams and spotlighting on SAR performance.

  3. Mitigating illumination gradients in a SAR image based on the image data and antenna beam pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2013-04-30

    Illumination gradients in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of a target can be mitigated by determining a correction for pixel values associated with the SAR image. This correction is determined based on information indicative of a beam pattern used by a SAR antenna apparatus to illuminate the target, and also based on the pixel values associated with the SAR image. The correction is applied to the pixel values associated with the SAR image to produce corrected pixel values that define a corrected SAR image.

  4. [Thermodynamics adsorption and its influencing factors of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on the bentonite and humus].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Chi; Zai, De-Xin; Zhao, Rong

    2010-11-01

    The adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite and humus was investigated by using the equilibrium oscillometry. The adsorption capacity of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on humus was great higher than bentonite at the same concentration. Equilibrium data of Langmuir, Freundlich isotherms showed significant relationship to the adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on humus (chlorpyrifos: R2 0.996 4, 0.996 3; triazophos: R2 0.998 9, 0.992 4). Langmuir isotherm was the best for chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite (chlorpyrifos: R2 = 0.995 7, triazophos: R2 = 0.998 9). The pH value, adsorption equilibrium time and temperature were the main factors affecting adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite and humus. The adsorption equilibrium time on mixed adsorbent was 12h for chlorpyrifos and 6h for triazophos respectively. The mass ratio of humus and bentonite was 12% and 14% respectively, the adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos was the stronglest and tended to saturation. At different temperatures by calculating the thermodynamic parameters deltaG, deltaH and deltaS, confirmed that the adsorption reaction was a spontaneous exothermic process theoretically. The adsorption was the best when the pH value was 6.0 and the temperature was 15 degrees C.

  5. Change detection from synthetic aperture radar images based on neighborhood-based ratio and extreme learning machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Dong, Junyu; Li, Bo; Xu, Qizhi; Xie, Cui

    2016-10-01

    Change detection is of high practical value to hazard assessment, crop growth monitoring, and urban sprawl detection. A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is the ideal information source for performing change detection since it is independent of atmospheric and sunlight conditions. Existing SAR image change detection methods usually generate a difference image (DI) first and use clustering methods to classify the pixels of DI into changed class and unchanged class. Some useful information may get lost in the DI generation process. This paper proposed an SAR image change detection method based on neighborhood-based ratio (NR) and extreme learning machine (ELM). NR operator is utilized for obtaining some interested pixels that have high probability of being changed or unchanged. Then, image patches centered at these pixels are generated, and ELM is employed to train a model by using these patches. Finally, pixels in both original SAR images are classified by the pretrained ELM model. The preclassification result and the ELM classification result are combined to form the final change map. The experimental results obtained on three real SAR image datasets and one simulated dataset show that the proposed method is robust to speckle noise and is effective to detect change information among multitemporal SAR images.

  6. Bromide Adsorption by Reference Minerals and Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bromide, Br-, adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous Al and Fe oxide, montmorillonite, kaolinite, and temperate and tropical soils. Bromide adsorption decreased with increasing solution pH with minimal adsorption occurring above pH 7. Bromide adsorption was higher for amorphous oxides t...

  7. TerraSAR-X for Oceanography- Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, S.; Horstmann, J.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Roth, A.; Eineder, M.

    2004-06-01

    TerraSAR-X is a new generation, high resolution radar satellite to be launched at the end of 2005. The objective of the mission is the setup of an operational spaceborne X-Band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system in order to produce remote sensing products for commercial and scientific use. TerraSAR-X is the scientific and technological continuation of the highly successful Space Shuttle missions Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X- SAR) in 1994 (Evans and Plaut, 1996) and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) in 2000 (Werner, 2000). After an in-orbit commissioning period of approximately 5 month, in which the instrument will be calibrated and the system performance will be verified, TerraSAR-X will be fully operational for an active lifetime of 5 years.The German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the ASTRIUM GmbH have agreed on an innovative co- operation scheme for the implementation of Earth observation satellites by realizing Germany's first Earth observation space project based on public-private partnership with considerable contributions from industry.The TerraSAR-X mission will serve two main objectives:• to provide the scientific community with high-quality, multi-mode X-band SAR-data forscientific research and applications• to support the establishment of a commercial EO-market; and• to develop a sustainable EO-service business inEurope, based on TerraSAR-X derivedinformation products.The broad spectrum of scientific applications, include: Hydrology, Geology, Climatology, Oceanography, Environmental- and Disaster Monitoring as well as Cartography. The scientific potential of TerraSAR-X is based on a combination of unprecedented features of the SAR instrument, which have never before been operational in space (Roth et al., 2002, Suess et al., 2002, Mittermayer et al., 2003). • High geometric and radiometric resolution with an experimental very high resolution ( 1 m) in 300 MHz mode• Single-, Dual- and Full

  8. Adsorption of cadmium ions on oxygen surface sites in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.F.; Thomas, K.M.

    2000-02-08

    Various types of oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the surface of coconut shell derived activated carbon by oxidation using nitric acid. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and selective neutralization were used to characterize the surface oxygen functional groups. The oxidized carbons were also heat treated to provide a suite of carbons where the oxygen functional groups of various thermal stabilities were varied progressively. The adsorption of cadmium ions was enhanced dramatically by oxidation of the carbon. The ratio of released protons to adsorbed cadmium ions on oxidized carbon was approximately 2, indicating cation exchange was involved in the process of adsorption. Na{sup +} exchange studies with the oxidized carbon gave a similar ratio. After heat treatment of the oxidized carbons to remove oxygen functional groups, the ratio of H{sup +} released to Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed and the adsorption capacity decreased significantly. Both reversible and irreversible processes were involved in cadmium ion adsorption with reversible adsorption having higher enthalpy. The irreversible adsorption resulted from cation exchange with carboxylic acid groups, whereas the reversible adsorption probably involved physisorption of the partially hydrated cadmium ion.

  9. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  10. Software Processes SAR Motion-Measurement Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Adam; Hensley, Scott; Kroger, Peter; Le, Charles T. C.

    2004-01-01

    Motion Measurement Processor (MMP) is one of three computer programs that are used together in the operation of a terrain-mapping dual-frequency interferometric synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) system. The other two programs - Jurassicprok and Calibration Processor - are described in the two immediately preceding articles. MMP acquires all the motion and attitude data collected by onboard instrumentation systems, including radar, laser and camera metrology, inertial navigation systems, and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers. MMP combines all this information and processes it into all the trajectory information needed to run Jurassicprok, which performs the interferometric processing and mapping functions. MMP includes several Kalman filters for combining and smoothing aircraft motion and attitude data, and least-squares inversion and filtering software tools for solving for interferometric baseline lengths. MMP synchronizes the motion and radar data. It combines the various measurement data into a unified, seven-dimensional reference system and puts out the resulting filtered trajectory and attitude data along with instructions for use of the data by Jurassicprok, as well as the command files used to operate Jurassicprok.

  11. Bandwidth requirements for fine resolution squinted SAR

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.

    2000-03-01

    The conventional rule-of-thumb for Synthetic Aperture Radar is that an RF bandwidth of c/(2{rho}{sub r}) is required to image a scene at the desired slant-range resolution {rho}{sub r}, and perhaps a little more to account for window functions and sidelobe control. This formulation is based on the notion that the total bandwidth required is the same bandwidth that is required for a single pulse. What is neglected is that efficient processing of an entire synthetic aperture of pulses will often require different frequency content for each of the different pulses that makeup a synthetic aperture. Consequently, the total RF bandwidth required of a Synthetic Aperture Radar may then be substantially wider than the bandwidth of any single pulse. The actual RF bandwidth required depends strongly on flight geometry, owing to the desire for a radar to maintain a constant projection of the Fourier space collection surface onto the {omega}{sub y} axis. Long apertures required for fine azimuth resolution, and severe squint angles with steep depression angles may require total RF bandwidths well beyond the minimum bandwidth required of any single transmitted pulse, perhaps even by a factor of two or more. Accounting for this is crucial to designing efficient versatile high-performance imaging radars. This paper addresses how a data set conducive to efficient processing might increase the total RF bandwidth, and presents examples of how a fixed RF bandwidth might then limit SAR geometries.

  12. Enhancing adsorption of U(VI) onto EDTA modified L. cylindrica using epichlorohydrin and ethylenediamine as a bridge

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shouzheng; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Hongsen; Li, Rumin; Jing, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Benefiting from strong coordination ability and unique vascular structure, EDTA modified L. cylindrica opens up an alternative way for uranium recovery from seawater. However, limitations, such as poor adsorption capacity and slow adsorption rate due to low graft ratio of EDTA via one-step esterification block its practical application. Here, a strategy for increasing the graft ratio is proposed in order to improve the adsorption performance. The strategy initially involves immobilization of epichlorohydrin (EPI) onto L. cylindrica and then ethylenediamine (EDA) is introduced via facile ring-opening reaction. EPI and EDA serve as a bridge between L. cylindrica and EDTA. The graft ratio is promoted (15.01 to 21.44%) contributing to the smaller steric hindrance of EPI and EDA than EDTA and improvement in adsorption performance. In addition, the adsorbent prepared by the new strategy exhibits excellent adsorption properties in simulated seawater. PMID:28272435

  13. Enhancing adsorption of U(VI) onto EDTA modified L. cylindrica using epichlorohydrin and ethylenediamine as a bridge.

    PubMed

    Su, Shouzheng; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Hongsen; Li, Rumin; Jing, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun

    2017-03-08

    Benefiting from strong coordination ability and unique vascular structure, EDTA modified L. cylindrica opens up an alternative way for uranium recovery from seawater. However, limitations, such as poor adsorption capacity and slow adsorption rate due to low graft ratio of EDTA via one-step esterification block its practical application. Here, a strategy for increasing the graft ratio is proposed in order to improve the adsorption performance. The strategy initially involves immobilization of epichlorohydrin (EPI) onto L. cylindrica and then ethylenediamine (EDA) is introduced via facile ring-opening reaction. EPI and EDA serve as a bridge between L. cylindrica and EDTA. The graft ratio is promoted (15.01 to 21.44%) contributing to the smaller steric hindrance of EPI and EDA than EDTA and improvement in adsorption performance. In addition, the adsorbent prepared by the new strategy exhibits excellent adsorption properties in simulated seawater.

  14. Enhancing adsorption of U(VI) onto EDTA modified L. cylindrica using epichlorohydrin and ethylenediamine as a bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shouzheng; Liu, Qi; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Hongsen; Li, Rumin; Jing, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Benefiting from strong coordination ability and unique vascular structure, EDTA modified L. cylindrica opens up an alternative way for uranium recovery from seawater. However, limitations, such as poor adsorption capacity and slow adsorption rate due to low graft ratio of EDTA via one-step esterification block its practical application. Here, a strategy for increasing the graft ratio is proposed in order to improve the adsorption performance. The strategy initially involves immobilization of epichlorohydrin (EPI) onto L. cylindrica and then ethylenediamine (EDA) is introduced via facile ring-opening reaction. EPI and EDA serve as a bridge between L. cylindrica and EDTA. The graft ratio is promoted (15.01 to 21.44%) contributing to the smaller steric hindrance of EPI and EDA than EDTA and improvement in adsorption performance. In addition, the adsorbent prepared by the new strategy exhibits excellent adsorption properties in simulated seawater.

  15. Multilayer adsorption on fractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Péter; Felinger, Attila

    2014-01-10

    Multilayer adsorption is often observed in liquid chromatography. The most frequently employed model for multilayer adsorption is the BET isotherm equation. In this study we introduce an interpretation of multilayer adsorption measured on liquid chromatographic stationary phases based on the fractal theory. The fractal BET isotherm model was successfully used to determine the apparent fractal dimension of the adsorbent surface. The nonlinear fitting of the fractal BET equation gives us the estimation of the adsorption equilibrium constants and the monolayer saturation capacity of the adsorbent as well. In our experiments, aniline and proline were used as test molecules on reversed phase and normal phase columns, respectively. Our results suggest an apparent fractal dimension 2.88-2.99 in the case of reversed phase adsorbents, in the contrast with a bare silica column with a fractal dimension of 2.54.

  16. The challenge of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Testarelli, L; D' Aversa, L; Dolci, G

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is caused by a newly identified coronavirus, called SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that appears to be transmitted primarily through droplets of saliva. This is the reason why the most important international organizations recommend that the dentists adopt a unique preventive approach to the problem: SARS patients should not be treated in the dental office. This is possible only if a suspected case of SARS is correctly and promptly identified. But a correct identification is made difficult by several factors, such as the incubation period, a possibly asymptomatic onset of the illness, the still low specificity and sensitivity of laboratory and instrumental tests. A case or suspected case of SARS may thus unwillingly be treated at the dental office. It is therefore necessary to adopt protective measures for the dental personnel and to implement and enforce infection control measures in order to eliminate the risk of viral contamination. Nonetheless, these procedures do not ensure a complete elimination of SARS-CoV contamination risk since a major risk is represented by blood-borne infection, which is originated by the mouth of patients, and the contamination of dental units water lines (DUWLs) is most difficult to control. Blood-borne contamination may be achieved only by adopting a high level, between-patients disinfection protocol of the DUWLs based on the use of chemical agents with biocidal activity against spores, viruses, bacteria and fungi (Autosteril method). In conclusion a fully effective control of the cross-infection risk will be obtained only by adopting a correct, integrated use of different infection control procedures.

  17. Measuring Thermokarst Subsidence Using InSAR: Potential and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Chen, A. C.; Gusmeroli, A.; Zebker, H. A.; Zhang, T.

    2014-12-01

    Thawing of ice-rich permafrost results in irregular, depressed landforms known as thermokarst terrain. The significant subsidence leading to thermokarst features can expand lakes, drain lakes, accelerate thaw, disturb the soil column, and promote erosion. Consequently, it affects many permafrost-region processes including vegetation succession, hydrology, and carbon storage and cycling. Many remote sensing studies identify thermokarst landforms and catalog their ever-changing areas. Yet the intrinsic dynamic thermokarst process, namely surface subsidence, remains a challenge to map and is seldom examined using remote sensing methods. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a remote sensing technique that uses a time-series of satellite SAR images to measure cm-level land surface deformation. We demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of space-borne InSAR data to map thermokarst subsidence at a site located near Prudhoe Bay, on the North Slope of Alaska. A pipeline access road was constructed at this site in the 1970s, and is likely to have triggered the thawing of the region's permafrost, causing subsequent expansion of thermokarst-landform terrain. Our InSAR analysis using ALOS PALSAR images reveals that the thermokarst landforms in this region have undergone up to 10 cm of surface subsidence each summer from 2007 to 2010. This pilot study demonstrates the application of InSAR to map localized mass movement in permafrost terrain. We also illustrate how the effectiveness and accuracy of InSAR measurements are limited by several factors such as loss of interferometric coherence due to fast changes of ground surface conditions, spatial and temporal resolutions of InSAR data, and difficulty separating long-term and seasonal deformation signals.

  18. The Golden Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2004-01-01

    The Golden Ratio is sometimes called the "Golden Section" or the "Divine Proportion", in which three points: A, B, and C, divide a line in this proportion if AC/AB = AB/BC. "Donald in Mathmagicland" includes a section about the Golden Ratio and the ratios within a five-pointed star or pentagram. This article presents two computing exercises that…

  19. UAVSAR and TerraSAR-X Based InSAR Detection of Localized Subsidence in the New Orleans Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, R. G.; An, K.; Jones, C. E.; Latini, D.

    2014-12-01

    Vulnerability of the US Gulf coast to inundation has received increased attention since hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Compounding effects of sea level rise, wetland loss, and regional and local subsidence makes flood protection a difficult challenge, and particularly for the New Orleans area. Key to flood protection is precise knowledge of elevations and elevation changes. Analysis of historical and continuing geodetic measurements show surprising complexity, including locations subsiding more rapidly than considered during planning of hurricane protection and coastal restoration projects. Combining traditional, precise geodetic data with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations can provide geographically dense constraints on surface deformation. The Gulf Coast environment is challenging for InSAR techniques, especially with systems not designed for interferometry. We use two InSAR capable systems, the L- band (24 cm wavelength) airborne JPL/NASA UAVSAR, and the DLR/EADS Astrium spaceborne TerraSAR X-band (3 cm wavelength), and compare results. First, we are applying pair-wise InSAR to the longer wavelength UAVSAR data to detect localized elevation changes potentially impacting flood protection infrastructure from 2009 - 2014. We focus on areas on and near flood protection infrastructure to identify changes indicative of subsidence, structural deformation, and/or seepage. The Spaceborne TerraSAR X-band SAR system has relatively frequent observations, and dense persistent scatterers in urban areas, enabling measurement of very small displacements. We compare L-band UAVSAR results with permanent scatterer (PS-InSAR) and Short Baseline Subsets (SBAS) interferometric analyses of a stack composed by 28 TerraSAR X-band images acquired over the same period. Thus we can evaluate results from the different radar frequencies and analyses techniques. Preliminary results indicate subsidence features potentially of a variety of causes, including ground water

  20. Robust design of binary countercurrent adsorption separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Storti, G. ); Mazzotti, M.; Morbidelli, M.; Carra, S. )

    1993-03-01

    The separation of a binary mixture, using a third component having intermediate adsorptivity as desorbent, in a four section countercurrent adsorption separation unit is considered. A procedure for the optimal and robust design of the unit is developed in the frame of Equilibrium Theory, using a model where the adsorption equilibria are described through the constant selectivity stoichiometric model, while mass-transfer resistances and axial mixing are neglected. By requiring that the unit achieves complete separation, it is possible to identify a set of implicity constraints on the operating parameters, that is, the flow rate ratios in the four sections of the unit. From these constraints explicit bounds on the operating parameters are obtained, thus yielding a region in the operating parameters space, which can be drawn a priori in terms of the adsorption equilibrium constants and the feed composition. This result provides a very convenient tool to determine both optimal and robust operating conditions. The latter issue is addressed by first analyzing the various possible sources of disturbances, as well as their effect on the separation performance. Next, the criteria for the robust design of the unit are discussed. Finally, these theoretical findings are compared with a set of experimental results obtained in a six port simulated moving bed adsorption separation unit operated in the vapor phase.

  1. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  2. Adsorption hysteresis in nanopores

    PubMed

    Neimark; Ravikovitch; Vishnyakov

    2000-08-01

    Capillary condensation hysteresis in nanopores is studied by Monte Carlo simulations and the nonlocal density functional theory. Comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data on low temperature sorption of nitrogen and argon in cylindrical channels of mesoporous siliceous molecular sieves of MCM-41 type, we have revealed four qualitatively different sorption regimes depending on the temperature and pore size. As the pore size increases at a given temperature, or as the temperature decreases at a given pore size, the following regimes are consequently observed: volume filling without phase separation, reversible stepwise capillary condensation, irreversible capillary condensation with developing hysteresis, and capillary condensation with developed hysteresis. We show that, in the regime of developed hysteresis (pores wider than 5 nm in the case of nitrogen sorption at 77 K), condensation occurs spontaneously at the vaporlike spinodal while desorption takes place at the equilibrium. A quantitative agreement is found between the modeling results and the experimental hysteresis loops formed by the adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results obtained provide a better understanding of the general behavior of confined fluids and the specifics of sorption and phase transitions in nanomaterials.

  3. A stable realization of apodization filtering applied to noise SAR and SAR range sidelobe suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin; Wang, Yanfei; Li, Shu; Liu, Chang

    2012-12-01

    Pulse response of radar system always suffers from high sidelobe level resulting in resolution degradation. Investigated here is a sidelobe suppression method based on apodization filtering technique for range responses of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and noise SAR systems. The core of apodization filtering is finding an appropriate filtering vector in time domain. Compared with original apodization filtering, the proposed method could be realized stably because it could get correct filtering vector efficiently. This method contains three important steps: constructing coefficient matrix and desired response vector; performing ill-posed analysis; and solving equation to find filtering vector. In these steps, convolution kernel method is adopted to construct coefficient matrix; spectral condition is introduced as an indicating function for ill-posed analysis; and total variation method is used to resolve ill-posed equation for getting filtering vector. Elaborate theoretical derivation is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. In order to test its effect, simulation experiments are implemented. Simulation results show that there is a great suppression of range sidelobes after processed by this method. With increasing filter length, the performance of filtered output is improved but time cost is increasing correspondingly. Furthermore, the proposed method is also effective with noise disturbance.

  4. Volumetric interpretation of protein adsorption: Partition coefficients, interphase volumes, and free energies of adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A

    2006-12-01

    The solution-depletion method of measuring protein adsorption is implemented using SDS gel electrophoresis as a separation and quantification tool. Experimental method is demonstrated using lysozyme (15kDa), alpha-amylase (51kDa), human serum albumin (66kDa), prothrombin (72kDa), immunoglobulin G (160kDa), and fibrinogen (341kDa) adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to hydrophobic octyl-sepharose and silanized-glass particles. Interpretive mass-balance equations are derived from a model premised on the idea that protein reversibly partitions from bulk solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase volume separating the physical-adsorbent surface from bulk solution. Theory both anticipated and accommodated adsorption of all proteins to the two test surfaces, suggesting that the underlying model is descriptive of the essential physical chemistry of protein adsorption. Application of mass balance equations to experimental data quantify partition coefficients P, interphase volumes V(I), and the number of hypothetical layers M occupied by protein adsorbed within V(I). Partition coefficients quantify protein-adsorption avidity through the equilibrium ratio of interphase and bulk-solution-phase w/v (mg/mL) concentrations W(I) and W(B), respectively, such that P identical withW(I)/W(B). Proteins are found to be weak biosurfactants with 45adsorption -6RT<(DeltaG(adsphobic)(0)=-RTlnP)<-4RT. These measurements corroborate independent estimates obtained from interfacial energetics of adsorption (tensiometry) and are in agreement with thermochemical measurements for related proteins by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. Proteins with molecular weight MW<100kDa occupy a single layer at surface saturation whereas the larger proteins IgG and fibrinogen required two layers.

  5. Memory T cell responses targeting the SARS coronavirus persist up to 11 years post-infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Chia, Adeline; Tan, Anthony T; Jadi, Ramesh S; Leong, Hoe Nam; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-04-12

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious infectious disease which first emerged in late 2002, caused by a then novel human coronavirus, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The virus is believed to have originated from bats and transmitted to human through intermediate animals such as civet cats. The re-emergence of SARS-CoV remains a valid concern due to the continual persistence of zoonotic SARS-CoVs and SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs) in bat reservoirs. In this study, the screening for the presence of SARS-specific T cells in a cohort of three SARS-recovered individuals at 9 and 11 years post-infection was carried out, and all memory T cell responses detected target the SARS-CoV structural proteins. Two CD8(+) T cell responses targeting the SARS-CoV membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins were characterized by determining their HLA restriction and minimal T cell epitope regions. Furthermore, these responses were found to persist up to 11 years post-infection. An absence of cross-reactivity of these CD8(+) T cell responses against the newly-emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was also demonstrated. The knowledge of the persistence of SARS-specific celullar immunity targeting the viral structural proteins in SARS-recovered individuals is important in the design and development of SARS vaccines, which are currently unavailable.

  6. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  7. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  8. Numerical estimation of adsorption energy distributions from adsorption isotherm data with the expectation-maximization method

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, B.J.; Guiochon, G. |

    1993-08-01

    The expectation-maximization (EM) method of parameter estimation is used to calculate adsorption energy distributions of molecular probes from their adsorption isotherms. EM does not require prior knowledge of the distribution function or the isotherm, requires no smoothing of the isotherm data, and converges with high stability towards the maximum-likelihood estimate. The method is therefore robust and accurate at high iteration numbers. The EM algorithm is tested with simulated energy distributions corresponding to unimodal Gaussian, bimodal Gaussian, Poisson distributions, and the distributions resulting from Misra isotherms. Theoretical isotherms are generated from these distributions using the Langmuir model, and then chromatographic band profiles are computed using the ideal model of chromatography. Noise is then introduced in the theoretical band profiles comparable to those observed experimentally. The isotherm is then calculated using the elution-by-characteristic points method. The energy distribution given by the EM method is compared to the original one. Results are contrasted to those obtained with the House and Jaycock algorithm HILDA, and shown to be superior in terms of robustness, accuracy, and information theory. The effect of undersampling of the high-pressure/low-energy region of the adsorption is reported and discussed for the EM algorithm, as well as the effect of signal-to-noise ratio on the degree of heterogeneity that may be estimated experimentally.

  9. Performance of PolSAR backscatter and PolInSAR coherence for scattering characterization of forest vegetation using TerraSAR-X data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Sushil K.; Kumar, Shashi; Agrawal, Shefali

    2016-05-01

    Airborne SAR data has been successfully used for forest height inversion, however there is limited applicability in space borne scenario due to high temporal decorrelation. This study investigates the potential of high resolution fully polarimetric pair of TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X SAR data acquired over Barkot forest region of Uttarakhand state in India to analyze the backscatter and coherence and to test the height inversion algorithms. Yamaguchi decomposition was implemented onto the dataset to express total backscatter as a sum of different scattering components from a single SAR resolution cell. Coherency matrix was used to compute complex coherence for different polarization channels. Forest areas suffered from low coherence due to volume decorrelation whereas dry river bed had shown high coherence. Appropriate perpendicular baseline and hence the interferometric vertical wavenumber was selected in forest height estimation. Coherence amplitude inversion (CAI) approach overestimated the forest height and also resulted in false heights for dry river bed. This limitation was overcome by implementing three stage inversion modeling (TSI) which assumes polarization independent volume coherence and the heights in dry river bed were completely eliminated. The results were validated using ground truth data available for 49 plots, and TSI was found to be more accurate with an average accuracy of 90.15% and RMSE of 2.42 m.

  10. Adsorption of B. Subtilis and P. Mendocina Onto Fe-Oxide Coated Quartz and Pure Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, D.; Fein, J. B.

    2002-12-01

    Understanding the controls on bacterial adsorption onto mineral surfaces is crucial in order to model a range of processes, such as contaminant transport, mineral dissolution behavior, and bioremediation techniques. At present, little is known concerning the adsorption behavior of bacteria, even onto some of the most common mineral surfaces present in near-surface environments. In this study, we measured the adsorption of a Gram positive bacterial species (B. subtilis) and a Gram negative species (P. mendocina) onto a quartz sand, and onto an Fe-oxide coated quartz sand, both as functions of time, pH and bacteria:mineral mass ratio. The extent of adsorption was determined by measuring the concentration of free bacteria in the mineral-bacteria systems both before, and after, reaction, using a uv-vis spectrophotometric approach. pH and bacteria:mineral ratio exert strong controls on the extent of bacterial adsorption of both species onto Fe-coated quartz. The extent of adsorption of B. subtilis onto the Fe-coated quartz increases with decreasing pH from close to 0% at pH 10 to a plateau of approximately 80% adsorption between pH 6 and 4. Below pH 4, adsorption of B. subtilis decreases to 50% at pH 2. Adsorption of P. mendocina is similar to that observed for B. subtilis, only it is significantly less extensive under otherwise identical conditions. These adsorption behaviors are in marked contrast to that observed for both species onto the uncoated quartz. There is little to no adsorption of either species onto the uncoated quartz sand over most of the pH range studied. We use a thermodynamic approach to model the adsorption behavior of each species onto the Fe-coated quartz sand, determining equilibrium constants for the dominant adsorption reactions. Our results demonstrate that bacterial adsorption within geologic systems can be strongly dependent on mineralogy, fluid composition, and on the bacterial species present. However, our modeling approach enables the

  11. Multitemporal observations of sugarcane by TerraSAR-X images.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Nicolas; Cresson, Rémi; Todoroff, Pierre; Moinet, Soizic

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the potential of TerraSAR-X (X-band) in monitoring sugarcane growth on Reunion Island (located in the Indian Ocean). Multi-temporal TerraSAR data acquired at various incidence angles (17°, 31°, 37°, 47°, 58°) and polarizations (HH, HV, VV) were analyzed in order to study the behaviour of SAR (synthetic aperture radar) signal as a function of sugarcane height and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index). The potential of TerraSAR for mapping the sugarcane harvest was also studied. Radar signal increased quickly with crop height until a threshold height, which depended on polarization and incidence angle. Beyond this threshold, the signal increased only slightly, remained constant, or even decreased. The threshold height is slightly higher with cross polarization and higher incidence angles (47° in comparison with 17° and 31°). Results also showed that the co-polarizations channels (HH and VV) were well correlated. High correlation between SAR signal and NDVI calculated from SPOT-4/5 images was observed. TerraSAR data showed that after strong rains the soil contribution to the backscattering of sugarcane fields can be important for canes with heights of terminal visible dewlap (htvd) less than 50 cm (total cane heights around 155 cm). This increase in radar signal after strong rains could involve an ambiguity between young and mature canes. Indeed, the radar signal on TerraSAR images acquired in wet soil conditions could be of the same order for fields recently harvested and mature sugarcane fields, making difficult the detection of cuts. Finally, TerraSAR data at high spatial resolution were shown to be useful for monitoring sugarcane harvest when the fields are of small size or when the cut is spread out in time. The comparison between incidence angles of 17°, 37° and 58° shows that 37° is more suitable to monitor the sugarcane harvest. The cut is easily detectable on TerraSAR images for data acquired

  12. Multitemporal Observations of Sugarcane by TerraSAR-X Images

    PubMed Central

    Baghdadi, Nicolas; Cresson, Rémi; Todoroff, Pierre; Moinet, Soizic

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the potential of TerraSAR-X (X-band) in monitoring sugarcane growth on Reunion Island (located in the Indian Ocean). Multi-temporal TerraSAR data acquired at various incidence angles (17°, 31°, 37°, 47°, 58°) and polarizations (HH, HV, VV) were analyzed in order to study the behaviour of SAR (synthetic aperture radar) signal as a function of sugarcane height and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index). The potential of TerraSAR for mapping the sugarcane harvest was also studied. Radar signal increased quickly with crop height until a threshold height, which depended on polarization and incidence angle. Beyond this threshold, the signal increased only slightly, remained constant, or even decreased. The threshold height is slightly higher with cross polarization and higher incidence angles (47° in comparison with 17° and 31°). Results also showed that the co-polarizations channels (HH and VV) were well correlated. High correlation between SAR signal and NDVI calculated from SPOT-4/5 images was observed. TerraSAR data showed that after strong rains the soil contribution to the backscattering of sugarcane fields can be important for canes with heights of terminal visible dewlap (htvd) less than 50 cm (total cane heights around 155 cm). This increase in radar signal after strong rains could involve an ambiguity between young and mature canes. Indeed, the radar signal on TerraSAR images acquired in wet soil conditions could be of the same order for fields recently harvested and mature sugarcane fields, making difficult the detection of cuts. Finally, TerraSAR data at high spatial resolution were shown to be useful for monitoring sugarcane harvest when the fields are of small size or when the cut is spread out in time. The comparison between incidence angles of 17°, 37° and 58° shows that 37° is more suitable to monitor the sugarcane harvest. The cut is easily detectable on TerraSAR images for data acquired

  13. Design of a 12-bit 2 MS/s 12 mW pipelined SAR ADC in CMOS 0.18 μm technology for CZT-based imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, F.; Gao, W.; Wei, X.; Liu, W.; Hu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a 12-bit 2 MS/s pipelined successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for CZT-based imaging system. The proposed ADC is divided into a first-stage 6-bit SAR-based Multiplying Digital Analog Converter (MDAC) and a second-stage 8-bit SAR ADC. The first-stage MDAC has a gain of 16 instead of the usual gain of 64, which considerably minimizes the power dissipation of residue amplifier. The second-stage 8-bit SAR ADC employs unit bridge capacitor split-capacitor architecture aiming to reduce the load capacitance of residue amplifier so as to minimize the power dissipation of the proposed ADC. Moreover, a code-randomized calibration algorithm is proposed to improve the linearity of the second-stage 8-bit split-capacitor SAR ADC. In addition, several radiation-hardened-by-design techniques are adopted in the layout design against space radiation effects. The prototype chip was fabricated in 0.18 μ m mixed-signal 1.8 V/3.3 V process and occupied a core area of 0.71 mm2. The proposed pipelined SAR ADC achieves a peak signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratio (SNDR) of 63.2 dB at 2 MS/s sampling rate and consumes 12 mW power in total. The figure of merit (FoM) of the proposed ADC is 5.06 pJ/conversion-step.

  14. Detecting and monitoring UCG subsidence with InSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R J; Foxall, W; Yang, X

    2012-03-23

    The use of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to measure surface subsidence caused by Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) is tested. InSAR is a remote sensing technique that uses Synthetic Aperture Radar images to make spatial images of surface deformation and may be deployed from satellite or an airplane. With current commercial satellite data, the technique works best in areas with little vegetation or farming activity. UCG subsidence is generally caused by roof collapse, which adversely affects UCG operations due to gas loss and is therefore important to monitor. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of InSAR in measuring surface subsidence related to coal mining and surface deformation caused by a coal mining roof collapse in Crandall Canyon, Utah is imaged as a proof-of-concept. InSAR data is collected and processed over three known UCG operations including two pilot plants (Majuba, South Africa and Wulanchabu, China) and an operational plant (Angren, Uzbekistan). A clear f eature showing approximately 7 cm of subsidence is observed in the UCG field in Angren. Subsidence is not observed in the other two areas, which produce from deeper coal seams and processed a smaller volume. The results show that in some cases, InSAR is a useful tool to image UCG related subsidence. Data from newer satellites and improved algorithms will improve effectiveness.

  15. Atmospheric Effects on InSAR Measurements and Their Mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiao-li; Li, Zhi-wei; Zhu, Jian-jun; Feng, Guang-cai; Long, Jiang-ping

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful technology for observing the Earth surface, especially for mapping the Earth's topography and deformations. InSAR measurements are however often significantly affected by the atmosphere as the radar signals propagate through the atmosphere whose state varies both in space and in time. Great efforts have been made in recent years to better understand the properties of the atmospheric effects and to develop methods for mitigating the effects. This paper provides a systematic review of the work carried out in this area. The basic principles of atmospheric effects on repeat-pass InSAR are first introduced. The studies on the properties of the atmospheric effects, including the magnitudes of the effects determined in the various parts of the world, the spectra of the atmospheric effects, the isotropic properties and the statistical distributions of the effects, are then discussed. The various methods developed for mitigating the atmospheric effects are then reviewed, including the methods that are based on PSInSAR processing, the methods that are based on interferogram modeling, and those that are based on external data such as GPS observations, ground meteorological data, and satellite data including those from the MODIS and MERIS. Two examples that use MODIS and MERIS data respectively to calibrate atmospheric effects on InSAR are also given. PMID:27873822

  16. Determining Titan surface topography from Cassini SAR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stiles, Bryan W.; Hensley, Scott; Gim, Yonggyu; Bates, David M.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Hayes, Alex; Radebaugh, Jani; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Mitchell, Karl L.; Callahan, Philip S.; Zebker, Howard; Johnson, William T.K.; Wall, Stephen D.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Wood, Charles A.; Janssen, Michael; Pelletier, Frederic; West, Richard D.; Veeramacheneni, Chandini

    2009-01-01

    A technique, referred to as SARTopo, has been developed for obtaining surface height estimates with 10 km horizontal resolution and 75 m vertical resolution of the surface of Titan along each Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) swath. We describe the technique and present maps of the co-located data sets. A global map and regional maps of Xanadu and the northern hemisphere hydrocarbon lakes district are included in the results. A strength of the technique is that it provides topographic information co-located with SAR imagery. Having a topographic context vastly improves the interpretability of the SAR imagery and is essential for understanding Titan. SARTopo is capable of estimating surface heights for most of the SAR-imaged surface of Titan. Currently nearly 30% of the surface is within 100 km of a SARTopo height profile. Other competing techniques provide orders of magnitude less coverage. We validate the SARTopo technique through comparison with known geomorphological features such as mountain ranges and craters, and by comparison with co-located nadir altimetry, including a 3000 km strip that had been observed by SAR a month earlier. In this area, the SARTopo and nadir altimetry data sets are co-located tightly (within 5-10 km for one 500 km section), have similar resolution, and as expected agree closely in surface height. Furthermore the region contains prominent high spatial resolution topography, so it provides an excellent test of the resolution and precision of both techniques.

  17. Developing an interactive teleradiology system for SARS diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhuang, Jun; Chen, Xiaomeng; Yong, Yuanyuan; Tan, Yongqiang; Chen, Liu; Lian, Ping; Meng, Lili; Huang, H. K.

    2004-04-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a respiratory illness that had been reported in Asia, North America, and Europe in last spring. Most of the China cases of SARS have occurred by infection in hospitals or among travelers. To protect the physicians, experts and nurses from the SARS during the diagnosis and treatment procedures, the infection control mechanisms were built in SARS hospitals. We built a Web-based interactive teleradiology system to assist the radiologists and physicians both in side and out side control area to make image diagnosis. The system consists of three major components: DICOM gateway (GW), Web-based image repository server (Server), and Web-based DICOM viewer (Viewer). This system was installed and integrated with CR, CT and the hospital information system (HIS) in Shanghai Xinhua hospital to provide image-based ePR functions for SARS consultation between the radiologists, physicians and experts inside and out side control area. The both users inside and out side the control area can use the system to process and manipulate the DICOM images interactively, and the system provide the remote control mechanism to synchronize their operations on images and display.

  18. A Localization Method for Multistatic SAR Based on Convex Optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xuqi; Wu, Junjie; Yang, Jianyu; Sun, Zhichao; Huang, Yuling; Li, Zhongyu

    2015-01-01

    In traditional localization methods for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), the bistatic range sum (BRS) estimation and Doppler centroid estimation (DCE) are needed for the calculation of target localization. However, the DCE error greatly influences the localization accuracy. In this paper, a localization method for multistatic SAR based on convex optimization without DCE is investigated and the influence of BRS estimation error on localization accuracy is analysed. Firstly, by using the information of each transmitter and receiver (T/R) pair and the target in SAR image, the model functions of T/R pairs are constructed. Each model function's maximum is on the circumference of the ellipse which is the iso-range for its model function's T/R pair. Secondly, the target function whose maximum is located at the position of the target is obtained by adding all model functions. Thirdly, the target function is optimized based on gradient descent method to obtain the position of the target. During the iteration process, principal component analysis is implemented to guarantee the accuracy of the method and improve the computational efficiency. The proposed method only utilizes BRSs of a target in several focused images from multistatic SAR. Therefore, compared with traditional localization methods for SAR, the proposed method greatly improves the localization accuracy. The effectivity of the localization approach is validated by simulation experiment.

  19. MAX-91: Polarimetric SAR results on Montespertoli site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baronti, S.; Luciani, S.; Moretti, S.; Paloscia, S.; Schiavon, G.; Sigismondi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a powerful sensor for high resolution ocean and land mapping and particularly for monitoring hydrological parameters in large watersheds. There is currently much research in progress to assess the SAR operational capability as well as to estimate the accuracy achievable in the measurements of geophysical parameters with the presently available airborne and spaceborne sensors. An important goal of this research is to improve our understanding of the basic mechanisms that control the interaction of electro-magnetic waves with soil and vegetation. This can be done both by developing electromagnetic models and by analyzing statistical relations between backscattering and ground truth data. A systematic investigation, which aims at a better understanding of the information obtainable from the multi-frequency polarimetric SAR to be used in agro-hydrology, is in progress by our groups within the framework of SIR-C/X-SAR Project and has achieved a most significant milestone with the NASA/JPL Aircraft Campaign named MAC-91. Indeed this experiment allowed us to collect a large and meaningful data set including multi-temporal multi-frequency polarimetric SAR measurements and ground truth. This paper presents some significant results obtained over an agricultural flat area within the Montespertoli site, where intensive ground measurements were carried out. The results are critically discussed with special regard to the information associated with polarimetric data.

  20. Atmospheric Effects on InSAR Measurements and Their Mitigation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao-Li; Li, Zhi-Wei; Zhu, Jian-Jun; Feng, Guang-Cai; Long, Jiang-Ping

    2008-09-03

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful technology for observing the Earth surface, especially for mapping the Earth's topography and deformations. InSAR measurements are however often significantly affected by the atmosphere as the radar signals propagate through the atmosphere whose state varies both in space and in time. Great efforts have been made in recent years to better understand the properties of the atmospheric effects and to develop methods for mitigating the effects. This paper provides a systematic review of the work carried out in this area. The basic principles of atmospheric effects on repeat-pass InSAR are first introduced. The studies on the properties of the atmospheric effects, including the magnitudes of the effects determined in the various parts of the world, the spectra of the atmospheric effects, the isotropic properties and the statistical distributions of the effects, are then discussed. The various methods developed for mitigating the atmospheric effects are then reviewed, including the methods that are based on PSInSAR processing, the methods that are based on interferogram modeling, and those that are based on external data such as GPS observations, ground meteorological data, and satellite data including those from the MODIS and MERIS. Two examples that use MODIS and MERIS data respectively to calibrate atmospheric effects on InSAR are also given.