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Sample records for adsorption reaction probing

  1. Probing adsorption sites for CO on ceria.

    PubMed

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Kim, Hyun You; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Baber, Ashleigh E; Liu, Ping; Stacchiola, Dario

    2013-10-14

    Ceria based catalysts show remarkable activity for CO conversion reactions such as CO oxidation and the water-gas shift reaction. The identification of adsorption sites on the catalyst surfaces is essential to understand the reaction mechanisms of these reactions, but the complexity of heterogeneous powder catalysts and the propensity of ceria to easily change oxidation states in the presence of small concentrations of either oxidizing or reducing agents make the process difficult. In this study, the adsorption of CO on CuOx/Cu(111) and CeOx/Cu(111) systems has been studied using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. IR peaks for the adsorbed CO on O/Cu(111) with only chemisorbed oxygen, well-ordered Cu2O/Cu(111) and disordered copper oxide [CuOx/Cu(111)] were observed at 2070-2072, 2097-2098 and 2101-2111 cm(-1), respectively. On CeOx/Cu(111) systems CO chemisorbs at 90 K only on Cu sites under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, whereas at elevated CO pressures and low temperatures adsorption of CO on Ce(3+) is observed, with a corresponding IR peak at 2162 cm(-1). These experimental results are further supported by DFT calculations, and help to unequivocally distinguish the presence of Ce(3+) cations on catalyst samples by using CO as a probe molecule. PMID:23942870

  2. Adsorption Isotherms and Surface Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, L. S.; Bernardo, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Explains an error that occurs in calculating the conditions for a maximum value of a rate expression for a bimolecular reaction. The rate expression is derived using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to relate gas pressures and corresponding surface coverages. (GS)

  3. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  4. Probing reaction dynamics with GDR decay

    SciTech Connect

    Beene, J.R.

    1994-10-01

    The giant dipole resonance (GDR) has been a prolific source of information on the physics of the nucleus. Mostly it has taught us about nuclear structure, but recently experiments have utilized the GDR as a probe of nuclear reaction dynamics. In this report two examples of such investigations are discussed involving very different reactions and probing time scales that differ by a factor of {approximately}10{sup 3}.

  5. Study of char gasification in a reaction/adsorption apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.; Crowley, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    The reaction of an activated carbon (coconut char) with CO/sub 2/ was studied in a reaction/adsorption apparatus which allows successive reactivity and physical adsorption measurements to be made on the same solid sample. Reaction and surface area evolution data were obtained in the temperature range from 800 to 900/sup 0/C. All reaction rate trajectories obtained in this study showed a maximum in the reaction rate, 2-3 times higher than the initial rate, at about 85% conversion. There was no correlation between these results and the evolution of the internal surface area although the reaction appeared to take place initially in the kinetically controlled regime.

  6. Phosphate alteration of chloride behavior at the boehmite-water interface: New insights from ion-probe flow adsorption microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Gale, S Adrian; Harvey, Omar R; Rhue, R Dean

    2015-10-01

    Surface complexation of phosphate to aluminum oxyhydroxides can alter surface reactivity depending on the time-scale and mode of attachment. The effects of phosphate adsorption on reactivity of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) particles were investigated using ion-probe flow adsorption microcalorimetry (ipFAMC). Consistent with previous studies on adsorption energetics, probing the surface of pristine γ-AlOOH with chloride ions yielded endothermically unimodal temperature signals with a measured molar heat of exchange (ΔH(exc)) of -3.1 kJ/mol. However, when the surface of γ-AlOOH was probed with chloride following phosphate complexation, significant changes in surface reactivity resulted. Irrespective of phosphate loading, the typical endothermic response of the chloride-surface hydroxyl interaction was replaced with a multi-modal energy signature consisting of exothermic and endothermic features. These features indicate that in the presence of phosphate, the overall nature of the interaction of chloride with specific surface hydroxyls located on different exposed planes and their subsequent reactivity was transformed to a more complex environment accompanied by two or more short-lived secondary reactions. It was also shown that phosphate-promoted surface alteration of γ-AlOOH was highly selective to probing with chloride since no changes in reactivity were observed when nitrate was employed as the primary ion probe under identical experimental conditions. PMID:26057105

  7. Adsorption and reaction of nitromethane (CH 3NO 2) on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Najat; Wang, Jiang; Bansenauer, Barbara A.; Koel, Bruce E.

    1997-11-01

    The adsorption of nitromethane (CH 3NO 2 and CD 3NO 2) on Pt(111) surfaces has been investigated. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) mass spectrometry, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) were used to probe the adsorption bond strength and bonding geometry of the chemisorbed state, and also thermal decomposition reactions on the Pt(111) surface. Nitromethane is weakly chemisorbed on Pt(111) with an adsorption energy of ca 11 kcal mol -1. Adsorption is mostly (> 75%) reversible, but some nitromethane decomposition on Pt(111) does occur at low coverages. HCN, H 2O, NO and CO were the primary gas phase products that were detected in TPD as a result of this decomposition. The principal decomposition pathway is via cleavage of N-O bonds, mostly leaving the C-N bond intact, rather than the isomerization of nitromethane to methyl nitrite (CH 3ONO) on the surface. Consistent with the small adsorption energy of molecular nitromethane, UPS and HREELS of the chemisorbed monolayer show only small changes in the electronic structure and vibrational spectra of nitromethane compared to condensed phase results. HREELS data indicate that chemisorbed nitromethane adopts a 'pseudo-bidentate' bonding geometry with C s( yz) symmetry in which the two oxygens are coordinated inequivalently to the surface with the molecular axis tilted within the molecular plane.

  8. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.

  9. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partialmore » pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.« less

  10. Adsorption of probe molecules in pillared interlayered clays: Experiment and computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, A. Guil, J. M.; Lomba, E.; Almarza, N. G.; Khatib, S. J.; Cabrillo, C.; Sanz, A.; Pires, J.

    2014-06-14

    In this paper we investigate the adsorption of various probe molecules in order to characterize the porous structure of a series of pillared interlayered clays (PILC). To that aim, volumetric and microcalorimetric adsorption experiments were performed on various Zr PILC samples using nitrogen, toluene, and mesitylene as probe molecules. For one of the samples, neutron scattering experiments were also performed using toluene as adsorbate. Various structural models are proposed and tested by means of a comprehensive computer simulation study, using both geometric and percolation analysis in combination with Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations in order to model the volumetric and microcalorimetric isotherms. On the basis of this analysis, we propose a series of structural models that aim at accounting for the adsorption experimental behavior, and make possible a microscopic interpretation of the role played by the different interactions and steric effects in the adsorption processes in these rather complex disordered microporous systems.

  11. Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

    2013-07-16

    A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

  12. Investigation of the problems with using gas adsorption to probe catalyst pore structure evolution during coking.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Navin; Greaves, Malcolm; Wood, Joseph; Rigby, Sean P

    2013-03-01

    A common approach to try to understand the mechanism of coking in heterogeneous catalysts is to monitor the evolution of the pore structure using gas adsorption analysis of discharged pellets. However, the standard methods of analysis of gas adsorption data, to obtain pore-size distributions, make the key assumption of thermodynamically-independent pores. This assumption neglects the possibility of co-operative adsorption phenomena, which will shown to be a critical problem when looking at coking catalysts. In this work the serial adsorption technique has been used to detect and assess the extent of co-operative effects in adsorption within coking catalysts. The reaction of decane over a hydroprocessing catalyst was used as a case study. It has been shown that the conventional analysis method would lead to a flawed picture of the pore structure changes during the coking process. For the case-study considered in this work, it was found that co-operative adsorption effects meant that 26% of the measured adsorption was occurring in pores up to three times larger than the size conventional analysis would presume. The serial adsorption technique was thus shown to provide important additional information on pore structure evolution during coking. A study of the kinetics of adsorption has been used to infer information about the general spatial location of the coking process within a pellet. PMID:23141698

  13. Immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the probe surface for molecular adsorption type endotoxin detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Katsutoshi; Tsuji, Akihito; Nishishita, Naoki; Hirano, Yoshiaki

    2007-04-01

    adsorption reaction between ɛ-polylysine and endotoxin. ɛ-polylysine has the structure of straight chain molecule composed by 25-30 residues made by lysine, and it is used as an antimicrobial agent, moreover, cellulose beads with immobilized ɛ-polylysine is used as the barrier filter for endotoxin removal. Therefore, it is expected that the endotoxin be adsorbed to the immobilized ɛ-polylysine onto the probe. As the result of this reaction, the mass of the probe is increased, and endotoxin can be detected by using of Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM). In our previous research, we have already acquired the proteins immobilization technique onto Au and Si surface. In this report, the proposal of molecular adsorption type endotoxin detection system, and the immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the probe are described. We use X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the ɛ-polylysine immobilization, and the adsorptive activity of immobilized ɛ-polylysine is measured by XPS and AFM. The purpose of this study is to bring about the realization of "Real-time endotoxin detection system".

  14. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  15. Particle-scale CO2 adsorption kinetics modeling considering three reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Dong-Myung; Sun, Xin

    2013-09-01

    In the presence of water (H2O), dry and wet adsorptions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and physical adsorption of H2O happen concurrently in a sorbent particle. The three reactions depend on each other and have a complicated, but important, effect on CO2 capturing via a solid sorbent. In this study, transport phenomena in the sorbent were modeled, including the tree reactions, and a numerical solving procedure for the model also was explained. The reaction variable distribution in the sorbent and their average values were calculated, and simulation results were compared with experimental data to validate the proposed model. Some differences, caused by thermodynamic parameters, were observed between them. However, the developed model reasonably simulated the adsorption behaviors of a sorbent. The weight gained by each adsorbed species, CO2 and H2O, is difficult to determine experimentally. It is known that more CO2 can be captured in the presence of water. Still, it is not yet known quantitatively how much more CO2 the sorbent can capture, nor is it known how much dry and wet adsorptions separately account for CO2 capture. This study addresses those questions by modeling CO2 adsorption in a particle and simulating the adsorption process using the model. As adsorption temperature changed into several values, the adsorbed amount of each species was calculated. The captured CO2 in the sorbent particle was compared quantitatively between dry and wet conditions. As the adsorption temperature decreased, wet adsorption increased. However, dry adsorption was reduced.

  16. An improved single crystal adsorption calorimeter for determining gas adsorption and reaction energies on complex model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer-Wolfarth, Jan-Henrik; Hartmann, Jens; Farmer, Jason A.; Flores-Camacho, J. Manuel; Campbell, Charles T.; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2011-02-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum microcalorimeter for measuring heats of adsorption and adsorption-induced surface reactions on complex single crystal-based model surfaces is described. It has been specifically designed to study the interaction of gaseous molecules with well-defined model catalysts consisting of metal nanoparticles supported on single crystal surfaces or epitaxial thin oxide films grown on single crystals. The detection principle is based on the previously described measurement of the temperature rise upon adsorption of gaseous molecules by use of a pyroelectric polymer ribbon, which is brought into mechanical/thermal contact with the back side of the thin single crystal. The instrument includes (i) a preparation chamber providing the required equipment to prepare supported model catalysts involving well-defined nanoparticles on clean single crystal surfaces and to characterize them using surface analysis techniques and in situ reflectivity measurements and (ii) the adsorption/reaction chamber containing a molecular beam, a pyroelectric heat detector, and calibration tools for determining the absolute reactant fluxes and adsorption heats. The molecular beam is produced by a differentially pumped source based on a multichannel array capable of providing variable fluxes of both high and low vapor pressure gaseous molecules in the range of 0.005-1.5 × 1015 molecules cm-2 s-1 and is modulated by means of the computer-controlled chopper with the shortest pulse length of 150 ms. The calorimetric measurements of adsorption and reaction heats can be performed in a broad temperature range from 100 to 300 K. A novel vibrational isolation method for the pyroelectric detector is introduced for the reduction of acoustic noise. The detector shows a pulse-to-pulse standard deviation ≤15 nJ when heat pulses in the range of 190-3600 nJ are applied to the sample surface with a chopped laser. Particularly for CO adsorption on Pt(111), the energy input of 15 nJ (or 120 nJ cm

  17. The adsorption and reaction of adenine nucleotides on montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, James P.; Hagan, William J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The binding of AMP to Zn(2+)-montmorillonite is investigated in the presence of salts and Good's zwitterion buffers, PIPES and MES. The initial concentrations of nucleotide and the percent adsorbtion are used to calculate the adsorption isotherms, and the Langmuir adsorption equation is used for the analysis of data. The adsorption coefficient was found to be three times greater in the presence of 0.2 M PIPES than in its absence. In addition, basal spacings measured by X-ray diffraction were increased by the buffer. These results are interpreted in terms of a model in which the adsorption of AMP is mediated by a Zn(2+) complex of PIPES in different orientations in the interlamellar region of the montmorillonite. Mixed ligand complexes of this type are reminiscent of the complexes observed between metal ions and biological molecules in living systems.

  18. An improved single crystal adsorption calorimeter for determining gas adsorption and reaction energies on complex model catalysts.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Wolfarth, Jan-Henrik; Hartmann, Jens; Farmer, Jason A; Flores-Camacho, J Manuel; Campbell, Charles T; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2011-02-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum microcalorimeter for measuring heats of adsorption and adsorption-induced surface reactions on complex single crystal-based model surfaces is described. It has been specifically designed to study the interaction of gaseous molecules with well-defined model catalysts consisting of metal nanoparticles supported on single crystal surfaces or epitaxial thin oxide films grown on single crystals. The detection principle is based on the previously described measurement of the temperature rise upon adsorption of gaseous molecules by use of a pyroelectric polymer ribbon, which is brought into mechanical∕thermal contact with the back side of the thin single crystal. The instrument includes (i) a preparation chamber providing the required equipment to prepare supported model catalysts involving well-defined nanoparticles on clean single crystal surfaces and to characterize them using surface analysis techniques and in situ reflectivity measurements and (ii) the adsorption∕reaction chamber containing a molecular beam, a pyroelectric heat detector, and calibration tools for determining the absolute reactant fluxes and adsorption heats. The molecular beam is produced by a differentially pumped source based on a multichannel array capable of providing variable fluxes of both high and low vapor pressure gaseous molecules in the range of 0.005-1.5 × 10(15) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) and is modulated by means of the computer-controlled chopper with the shortest pulse length of 150 ms. The calorimetric measurements of adsorption and reaction heats can be performed in a broad temperature range from 100 to 300 K. A novel vibrational isolation method for the pyroelectric detector is introduced for the reduction of acoustic noise. The detector shows a pulse-to-pulse standard deviation ≤15 nJ when heat pulses in the range of 190-3600 nJ are applied to the sample surface with a chopped laser. Particularly for CO adsorption on Pt(111), the energy input of 15 n

  19. Protein adsorption properties of OEG monolayers and dense PNIPAM brushes probed by neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouette, N.; Xue, C.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Fragneto, G.; Leckband, D. E.; Halperin, A.; Sferrazza, M.

    2012-11-01

    The structure of dense poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) brushes and oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) monolayers has been probed using neutron reflectometry and ellipsometry. The PNIPAM brush is swollen below the Lower Critical Solution Temperature (LCST) of 32 ∘C and is collapsed at 37 ∘C. Neutron reflectivity shows that below the LCST, the brush is described by a two-layer model: an inner dense layer and a hydrated outer layer. Above the LCST the collapsed brush forms a homogenous layer. With a fully deuterated myoglobin protein to increase the neutron scattering length density contrast, the reflectivity data show no detectable primary adsorption on the grafted OEG surface. A bound on the ternary adsorption onto PNIPAM chains forming dense brushes below and above the LCST is obtained.

  20. Mechanism of cis-prenyltransferase reaction probed by substrate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yen-Pin; Liu, Hon-Ge; Teng, Kuo-Hsun; Liang, Po-Huang

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} The extremely slow trans-OPPS reaction using 2-Fluoro-FPP supports the sequential mechanism with the carbocation intermediate. {yields} The similar UPPS reaction rate under single turnover supports the concerted mechanism, without the carbocation intermediate. {yields} The secondary kinetic isotope effect also supports associate transition state for UPPS reaction, without the carbocation intermediate. -- Abstract: Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UPPS) is a cis-type prenyltransferases which catalyzes condensation reactions of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) with eight isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) units to generate C{sub 55} product. In this study, we used two analogues of FPP, 2-fluoro-FPP and [1,1-{sup 2}H{sub 2}]FPP, to probe the reaction mechanism of Escherichia coli UPPS. The reaction rate of 2-fluoro-FPP with IPP under single-turnover condition is similar to that of FPP, consistent with the mechanism without forming a farnesyl carbocation intermediate. Moreover, the deuterium secondary KIE of 0.985 {+-} 0.022 measured for UPPS reaction using [1,1-{sup 2}H{sub 2}]FPP supports the associative transition state. Unlike the sequential mechanism used by trans-prenyltransferases, our data demonstrate E. coli UPPS utilizes the concerted mechanism.

  1. Solid-gas reaction with adsorption as the rate limiting step.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Rafał; Arabczyk, Walerian

    2006-07-27

    The model of nucleation where adsorption of reactant is a rate-limiting step has been considered. Assuming the adsorption range model, a numerical simulation has been made. The dependency of bulk concentration and surface coverage versus time and thermogravimetric curves are presented. The crystallite size is suggested to be the key factor of the nucleation rate. Theoretical considerations have been compared with the experimental results of the iron nitriding reaction. PMID:16854036

  2. The adsorption and reaction of adenine nucleotides on montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Ferris, J P; Hagan, W J

    1986-01-01

    The binding of AMP to Zn(2+)-montmorillonite was investigated in the presence of buffers and salts. Good's buffers, piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonate) [PIPES] and morpholine-N-2-ethanesulfonate [MES], perturbed the exchangeable cations to a lesser extent (only 9% of Zn2+ displaced by 0.2 M buffer) than was observed with imidazole and lutidine buffers or NaCl and KCl salts (up to 80% of Zn2+ displaced). AMP adsorption isotherms measured in the presence of 0.2 M PIPES, MES, or Na2SO4 exhibited normal Langmuir-type behavior. The adsorption coefficient, KL, is 3-fold greater in the presence of HEPES or PIPES than it is in the absence of buffers. Basal spacings measured by X-ray diffraction for Zn(2+)-montmorillonite are 13 and 15 angstroms in the presence of PIPES, while a value of 12.8 angstroms was determined in the absence of PIPES. These data are interpreted in a model in which the adsorption of AMP is mediated by a Zn2+ complex of PIPES in different orientations in the interlamellar region of the montmorillonite. The type of exchangeable cation does not affect the ability of the lattice-bound Fe3+ in the montmorillonite to oxidize diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN). Exchangeable Cu2+ oxidizes DAMN, but exchangeable Fe3+ is nearly ineffective as an oxidant. The addition of DISN to 3'-AMP bound to Zn(2+)-montmorillonite in the presence of 0.2 M PIPES resulted in a higher yield of 2',3'-cAMP than is observed with a comparable concentration of Zn2+, a result which inplicates surface catalysis by the montmorillonite. PMID:11540864

  3. State resolved desorption measurements as a probe of surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, A.

    2000-01-01

    Surface reactions which lead directly to gas phase products can be investigated by using state resolved techniques to measure the energy released into the newly formed molecules. This technique has been used extensively to explore oxidation of CO and the dynamics of H 2 recombinative desorption at surfaces, but so far has been applied to few other reactions. Here we review the application of final state measurements and discuss the conditions under which dynamical information can be obtained for Langmuir-Hinshelwood type surface reactions. Combining resonance enhanced multiphoton ionisation with ion time of flight detection allows translational energy distributions to be measured for a wide range of products, with full quantum state resolution. The energy release reflects scattering from a thermally populated transition state, with the recombination dynamics determining how the product state distributions depart from a thermal distribution at the surface temperature. Using the principle of detailed balance the desorption dynamics can be related to the reverse process, dissociative chemisorption. Making the link between adsorption and desorption has two benefits. Firstly, it allows us to discuss quantitatively the influence of surface temperature on the product state distributions formed by surface reactions, allowing us to avoid naive models, which treat the transition state as having a unique, well-defined energy. Secondly, the desorption results can be used to obtain relative sticking probabilities with full quantum state and translational energy resolution, providing a way to determine how internal energy influences dissociation for both hydrogen and for heavy molecules, such as nitrogen. The conditions necessary to apply detailed balance successfully are discussed and the desorption distributions expected for different types of adsorption behaviour illustrated. The recombination/dissociation dynamics of hydrogen are summarised briefly and the energy

  4. Probing active electron transfer branch in photosystem I reaction center.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Xu, Wu; Martinsson, Peter; Chitnis, Parag

    2003-03-01

    Complimentary point mutations were introduced at the primary electron acceptor sites in A and B branches of the photosystem I (PS I) reaction center (RC) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and their effect on the kinetics of the electron transfer process was studied by means of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. The results indicate that in these species the electron transfer occurs primarily along the A-branch. Previous optical experiments on PS I complexes from Chlorella sorokiniana demonstrated that both branches of RC are equally active. That suggests that the directionality of electron transfer in PS I is species dependent.

  5. Studies on adsorption, reaction mechanisms and kinetics for photocatalytic degradation of CHD, a pharmaceutical waste.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Santanu; Bhattacharjee, Chiranjib; Curcio, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHD), a disinfectant and topical antiseptic and adsorption of CHD catalyst surface in dark condition has been studied. Moreover, the value of kinetic parameters has been measured and the effect of adsorption on photocatalysis has been investigated here. Substantial removal was observed during the photocatalysis process, whereas 40% removal was possible through the adsorption route on TiO2 surface. The parametric variation has shown that alkaline pH, ambient temperature, low initial substrate concentration, high TiO2 loading were favourable, though at a certain concentration of TiO2 loading, photocatalytic degradation efficiency was found to be maximum. The adsorption study has shown good confirmation with Langmuir isotherm and during the reaction at initial stage, it followed pseudo-first-order reaction, after that Langmuir Hinshelwood model was found to be appropriate in describing the system. The present study also confirmed that there is a significant effect of adsorption on photocatalytic degradation. The possible mechanism for adsorption and photocatalysis has been shown here and process controlling step has been identified. The influences of pH and temperature have been explained with the help of surface charge distribution of reacting particles and thermodynamic point of view respectively. PMID:25956186

  6. UV-induced photocatalytic degradation of aqueous acetaminophen: the role of adsorption and reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Basha, Shaik; Keane, David; Nolan, Kieran; Oelgemöller, Michael; Lawler, Jenny; Tobin, John M; Morrissey, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructured titania supported on activated carbon (AC), termed as integrated photocatalytic adsorbents (IPCAs), were prepared by ultrasonication and investigated for the photocatalytic degradation of acetaminophen (AMP), a common analgesic and antipyretic drug. The IPCAs showed high affinity towards AMP (in dark adsorption studies), with the amount adsorbed proportional to the TiO2 content; the highest adsorption was at 10 wt% TiO2. Equilibrium isotherm studies showed that the adsorption followed the Langmuir model, indicating the dependence of the reaction on an initial adsorption step, with maximum adsorption capacity of 28.4 mg/g for 10 % TiO2 IPCA. The effects of initial pH, catalyst amount and initial AMP concentration on the photocatalytic degradation rates were studied. Generally, the AMP photodegradation activity of the IPCAs was better than that of bare TiO2. Kinetic studies on the photocatalytic degradation of AMP under UV suggest that the degradation followed Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) kinetics, with an adsorption rate constant (K) that was considerably higher than the photocatalytic rate constant (k r), indicating that the photocatalysis of AMP is the rate-determining step during the adsorption/photocatalysis process. PMID:25173973

  7. Competitive adsorption-desorption reactions of two hazardous heavy metals in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Davari, Masoud; Rahnemaie, Rasoul; Homaee, Mehdi

    2015-09-01

    Investigating the interactions of heavy metals is imperative for sustaining environment and human health. Among those, Cd is toxic for organisms at any concentration. While Ni acts as a micronutrient at very low concentration but is hazardous toxic above certain threshold value. In this study, the chemical adsorption and desorption reactions of Ni and Cd in contaminated soils were investigated in both single and binary ion systems. Both Ni and Cd experimental data demonstrated Langmuir type adsorption. In the competitive systems, an antagonistic effect was observed, implying that both ions compete for same type of adsorption sites. Adverse effect of Cd on Ni adsorption was slightly stronger than that of opposite system, consistent with adsorption isotherms in single ion systems. Variation in ionic strength indicated that Ca, a much weaker adsorbate, could also compete with Cd and Ni for adsorption on soil particles. Desorption data indicated that Cd and Ni are adsorbed very tightly such that after four successive desorption steps, less than 0.5 % of initially adsorbed ions released into the soil solution. This implies that Ca, at concentration in equilibrium with calcite mineral, cannot adequately compete with and replace adsorbed Ni and Cd ions. This adsorption behavior was led to considerable hysteresis between adsorption and desorption in both single and binary ion systems. In the binary ion systems, desorption of Cd and Ni was increased by increase in both equilibrium concentration of adsorbed ion and concentration of competitor ion. The overall results obtained in this research indicate that Cd and Ni are strongly adsorbed in calcareous soil and Ca, the major dissolved ion, insignificantly influences metal ions adsorption. Consequently, the contaminated soils by Ni and Cd can simultaneously be remediated by environmentally oriented technologies such as phytoremediation. PMID:25921756

  8. Adsorption and reaction of methanethiol on Ru(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, D.R.; Lyman, P.F. )

    1993-11-18

    Methanethiol (CH[sub 3]SH) adsorbs dissociatively on Ru(0001) at 100 K forming two molecular intermediates. These species have been identified by S 2p soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) as methylthiolate moieties adsorbed in different bonding sites. At low coverages only a high coordination adsorption site is occupied. The high coordination site is saturated at about 0.20 monolayer of CH[sub 3]SH, and then a low coordination site is populated. Upon heating, the thiolates totally decompose into atomic C, S, and gaseous H[sub 2] with a competing pathway producing atomic S and gaseous CH[sub 4] at high coverage. The methylthiolate in the low coordination site decomposes more readily than the methylthiolate in the high coordination site. Some surface hydrocarbon fragments are formed following C-S bond scission which totally decompose at higher temperatures. Isotopic labeling indicates that the desorption of the sulfhydryl hydrogen precedes the decomposition of the thiolate at high coverage and that there is exchange of hydrogen between the surface and the methyl group. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Adsorption and reaction of methanethiol on Pt(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. H.; Huang, T. P.; Liu, Y. L.; Yeh, C. C.; Lai, Y. H.; Hung, W. H.

    2005-03-01

    Adsorption and thermal decomposition of H 3CSH on Pt(1 1 1) is studied with temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with synchrotron radiation. A H 3CSH molecule undergoes dehydrogenation via formation of H xCS ( x ⩽ 3) intermediates. The catalytic reactivity of Pt for dehydrogenation, which depends on interaction between the surface and the CH x moiety of H xCS, varies with coverage. At large coverage, H 3CSH decomposes through desorbing hydrogen via stepwise dehydrogenation (H 3CS → H 2CS → HCS → S + C). H 2CS is proposed to be an intermediate for dehydrogenation of H 3CS below 240 K, and subsequently undergoes disproportionation to form HCS with desorption of CH 4 at 400 K. The HCS species further decomposes to desorb hydrogen at 475 K and to form C and S adatoms; these adatoms show a mixed (√{3}×√{3})R30° and dim c(2 × 2) LEED pattern at saturation exposure. At small coverage, surface Pt exhibits a catalytic effect on dehydrogenation of H xCS via interaction of the CH x moiety with surface Pt atoms. Dehydrogenation of H 3CSH is completed below 370 K and is proposed to form a surface C sbnd S species; this species entirely decomposes to form C and S adatoms at 570 K.

  10. Probing protein adsorption on a nanoparticle surface using second harmonic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Das, A; Chakrabarti, A; Das, P K

    2016-09-21

    A new application of second harmonic light scattering to probe protein physisorption on a gold nanoparticle surface in aqueous buffer is reported. The free energies of adsorption, the number of protein molecules adsorbed on the surface and the binding affinity of a moderate size protein, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and a small protein, insulin, have been determined using the change in the second harmonic scattered light signal as a function of binding. Four different size gold nanoparticles from 15 to 60 nm were used to determine the effect of size on the free energy change, the affinity constant and the number of protein molecules adsorbed on the surface. All were shown to increase with an increase in size. The binding can be reversed by centrifugation, and the protein molecules can be desorbed quantitatively. The application of this method for studying thermodynamic parameters of weakly interacting biomolecules with nanoparticles for nanoparticle based diagnostic and therapeutic formulations is important. PMID:27530608

  11. Asphaltene adsorption mechanism under shear flow probed by in situ neutron reflectivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvis, Y.; Barré, L.; Jestin, J.; Gummel, J.; Cousin, F.

    2012-11-01

    We propose here a method to adapt a rheometer with a cone/plate geometry to a neutron reflectometer in order to perform in situ reflectivity measurements. This study allowed us to probe the influence of the shear rate on the mechanism of asphaltenes adsorption, the heaviest and most polar compounds of crude oil, using bad solvent conditions. Such experiment aims at describing at a local scale the surface modifications induced by flowing crude oils (pipe transportation or production through porous media). Without shearing, in a 34%/66% xylene/dodecane mixture for which the asphaltenes flocculation is achieved in bulk, the nanoaggregates are able to be adsorbed on a hydrophilic surface as multilayers, with a surface excess much larger than for good solvent conditions. Moreover, the thickness of these multilayers increases almost linearly with time, in accordance with QCM experiments. In shear rate conditions, the adsorption process is however strongly limited since the surface excess of the adsorbed layers is around twice lower at 2600 s-1 than at 1200 s-1.

  12. Volatile emission in dry seeds as a way to probe chemical reactions during initial asymptomatic deterioration.

    PubMed

    Mira, Sara; Hill, Lisa M; González-Benito, M Elena; Ibáñez, Miguel Angel; Walters, Christina

    2016-03-01

    The nature and kinetics of reactions in dry seeds determines how long the seeds survive. We used gas chromatography to assay volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from seeds of three unrelated species as a means to non-invasively probe chemical changes during very dry, dry, and humid storage (seeds were dried to 5.5, 33, and 75% relative humidity at room temperature). VOCs emitted from seeds stored in humid conditions reflected fermentation-type reactions, with methanol and ethanol being predominant in Lactuca sativa and Carum carvi, and acetaldehyde and acetone being predominant in Eruca vesicaria. Dried C. carvi seeds continued to emit fermentation-type products, although at slower rates than the seeds stored in humid conditions. In contrast, drying caused a switch in VOC emission in L. sativa and E. vesicaria seeds towards higher emission of pentane and hexanal, molecules considered to be byproducts from the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Longevity correlated best with the rate of fermentation-type reactions and appeared unrelated to the rate of lipid peroxidation. Emission of VOCs decreased when seed species were mixed together, indicating that seeds adsorbed VOCs. Adsorption of VOCs did not appear to damage seeds, as longevity was not affected in seed mixtures. Collectively, the study shows similarity among species in the types of reactions that occur in dry seeds, but high diversity in the substrates, and hence the byproducts, of the reactions. Moreover, the study suggests that the most abundant VOCs arise from degradation of storage reserves within seed cells, and that these reactions and their byproducts are not, in themselves, damaging. PMID:26956506

  13. Volatile emission in dry seeds as a way to probe chemical reactions during initial asymptomatic deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Mira, Sara; Hill, Lisa M.; González-Benito, M. Elena; Ibáñez, Miguel Angel; Walters, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The nature and kinetics of reactions in dry seeds determines how long the seeds survive. We used gas chromatography to assay volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from seeds of three unrelated species as a means to non-invasively probe chemical changes during very dry, dry, and humid storage (seeds were dried to 5.5, 33, and 75% relative humidity at room temperature). VOCs emitted from seeds stored in humid conditions reflected fermentation-type reactions, with methanol and ethanol being predominant in Lactuca sativa and Carum carvi, and acetaldehyde and acetone being predominant in Eruca vesicaria. Dried C. carvi seeds continued to emit fermentation-type products, although at slower rates than the seeds stored in humid conditions. In contrast, drying caused a switch in VOC emission in L. sativa and E. vesicaria seeds towards higher emission of pentane and hexanal, molecules considered to be byproducts from the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Longevity correlated best with the rate of fermentation-type reactions and appeared unrelated to the rate of lipid peroxidation. Emission of VOCs decreased when seed species were mixed together, indicating that seeds adsorbed VOCs. Adsorption of VOCs did not appear to damage seeds, as longevity was not affected in seed mixtures. Collectively, the study shows similarity among species in the types of reactions that occur in dry seeds, but high diversity in the substrates, and hence the byproducts, of the reactions. Moreover, the study suggests that the most abundant VOCs arise from degradation of storage reserves within seed cells, and that these reactions and their byproducts are not, in themselves, damaging. PMID:26956506

  14. Direct coupling between stress, strain and adsorption reactions - A study on coal-CO2 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, S.; Peach, C. J.; Spiers, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Though it is well-known that adsorption reactions frequently assist deformation of porous rocks, very little understanding exists on the direct coupling with stress state and strain. One of the materials in which adsorption plays a large role is coal, as is observed in the particular case of Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production (ECBM), which involves the geological storage of CO2 and the recovery of CH4. In this case, adsorption and the associated swelling cause significant injectivity problems, which is experienced in almost all pilot field projects to date. This suggests that indeed a strong fundamental coupling exists between CO2 sorption, changes in the mechanical state of the coal matrix and changes in the transport properties of the system, and illustrates the need to understand coupled stress-strain-sorption behaviour. In this contribution, we describe several important observations made on coal-CO2 systems that can learn us about many other natural, stressed adsorbate-adsorbent systems. In our experiments, first of all, the adsorption of CO2 in the coal matrix gave rise to swelling. Although this is well-known, we found that the total volumetric strain occurring under unconfined conditions can be realistically modelled (up to at least 100 MPa) as the sum of an adsorption-related expansion term and an elastic compression term. Second, effective in situ stresses will directly reduce the sorption capacity, and associated swelling of the coal matrix significantly. Our general thermodynamic model for the effect of a 3D stress state on adsorbed CO2 concentration supports this observation, and also shows that "self-stressing", as a result of CO2 adsorption occurring under conditions of restricted or zero strain (i.e. fully constrained conditions), will more than double the expected in situ stresses. A constitutive equation was developed to describe the full coupling between stress state, total strain (i.e. combined strain of adsorption processes and poroelasticity

  15. Correlations probed in direct two-nucleon removal reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, E. C.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2010-10-15

    Final-state-exclusive momentum distributions of fast, forward-traveling residual nuclei, following two-nucleon removal from fast secondary radioactive beams of projectile nuclei, can and have now been measured. Assuming that the most important reaction mechanism is the sudden direct removal of a pair of nucleons from a set of relatively simple, active shell-model orbital configurations, such distributions were predicted to depend strongly on the total angular momentum I carried by the two nucleons--the final-state spin for spin 0{sup +} projectiles. The sensitivity of these now-accessible observables to specific details of the (correlated) two-nucleon wave functions is of importance. We clarify that it is the total orbital angular momentum L of the two nucleons that is the primary factor in determining the shapes and widths of the calculated momentum distributions. It follows that, with accurate measurements, this dependence upon the L makeup of the two-nucleon wave functions could be used to assess the accuracy of (shell- or many-body-) model predictions of these two-nucleon configurations. By using several tailored examples, with specific combinations of active two-nucleon orbitals, we demonstrate that more-subtle structure aspects may be observed, allowing such reactions to probe and/or confirm the details of theoretical model wave functions.

  16. The immediate effects of keyboard-based music therapy on probe reaction time.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Songhuai

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the immediate effects of keyboard-based music therapy on Probe Reaction Time. [Subjects and Methods] Probe Reaction Time was determined in 10 subjects by self-evaluation before and after music therapy intervention. The Probe Reaction Time was separately measured 4 times. [Results] After completion of music therapy intervention, the Probe Reaction Time in the 10 subjects was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] The results suggest that keyboard-based music therapy is an effective and novel treatment, and should be applied in clinical practice. PMID:27512274

  17. The immediate effects of keyboard-based music therapy on probe reaction time

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Songhuai

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the immediate effects of keyboard-based music therapy on Probe Reaction Time. [Subjects and Methods] Probe Reaction Time was determined in 10 subjects by self-evaluation before and after music therapy intervention. The Probe Reaction Time was separately measured 4 times. [Results] After completion of music therapy intervention, the Probe Reaction Time in the 10 subjects was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] The results suggest that keyboard-based music therapy is an effective and novel treatment, and should be applied in clinical practice. PMID:27512274

  18. DFT Study of Oxygen Reduction Reaction on N-substituted Carbon Electrodes. Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Tomoya, Nakzono; Miyazaki, Soichi; Miura, Toshiko; Takeuchi, Nobuyuki; Yamabe, Tokio

    2011-05-01

    Carbon alloys attract attention as metal-free cathode catalysts. Mechanisms of oxygen reduction reactions are investigated using the DFT calculations and molecular models such as N-substituted coronene, circum pyrene, and corannulene. The overall oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is decomposed into five elementary reactions. Adsorption of O2 is important as the first step of reduction, and it depends strongly on the spin density on C atoms, introduced by the N atom. Secondly the peripheral C atoms have an advantage due to the rehybridization freedom to the sp3 configuration. Based on the reversible electrode potential (REP) for each elementary reaction, the overpotential is expected for the first reduction of O2 to OOH and the final reduction of OH to H2O. These features indicate that N-substituted carbon electrode resembles Pt electrode compared to other less active metals, such as Au.

  19. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navin, Chelliah V.; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S.; Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors.Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06752a

  20. The adsorption and reaction of vinyl acetate on Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhenjun; Calaza, Florencia C; Tysoe, Wilfred

    2012-01-01

    The surface chemistry of vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) is studied on Au/Pd(100) alloys as a function of alloy composition using temperature-programmed desorption and reflection adsorption infrared spectroscopy. VAM adsorbs weakly on isolated palladium sites on the alloy with a heat of adsorption of ~55 kJ/mol, with the plane of the VAM adsorbed close to parallel to the surface. The majority of the VAM adsorbed on isolated sites desorbs molecularly with only a small portion decomposing. At lower gold coverages (below ~0.5 ML of gold), where palladium palladium bridge sites are present, VAM binds to the surface in a distorted geometry via a rehybridized vinyl group. A larger proportion of this VAM decomposes and this reaction is initiated by C\\O bond scission in the VAM to form adsorbed acetate and vinyl species. The implication of this surface chemistry for VAM synthesis on Au/Pd(100) alloys is discussed.

  1. Monte Carlo Simulations Probing the Adsorptive Separation of Hydrogen Sulfide/Methane Mixtures Using All-Silica Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mansi S; Tsapatsis, Michael; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2015-11-10

    Selective removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from sour natural gas mixtures is one of the key challenges facing the natural gas industry. Adsorption and pervaporation processes utilizing nanoporous materials, such as zeolites, can be alternatives to highly energy-intensive amine-based absorption processes. In this work, the adsorption behavior of binary mixtures containing H2S and methane (CH4) in seven different all-silica zeolite frameworks (CHA, DDR, FER, IFR, MFI, MOR, and MWW) is investigated using Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations at two temperatures (298 and 343 K) and pressures ranging from 1 to 50 bar. The simulations demonstrate high selectivities that, with the exception of MOR, increase with increasing H2S concentration due to favorable sorbate-sorbate interactions. The simulations indicate significant inaccuracies of predictions using unary adsorption data and ideal adsorbed solution theory. In addition, the adsorption of binary H2S/H2O mixtures in MFI is considered to probe whether the presence of H2S induces coadsorption and reduces the hydrophobic character of all-silica zeolites. The simulations show preferential adsorption of H2S from moist gases with a selectivity of about 18 over H2O. PMID:26473306

  2. Protein Adsorption and Reorganization on Nanoparticles Probed by the Coffee-Ring Effect: Application to Single Point Mutation Detection.

    PubMed

    Devineau, Stéphanie; Anyfantakis, Manos; Marichal, Laurent; Kiger, Laurent; Morel, Mathieu; Rudiuk, Sergii; Baigl, Damien

    2016-09-14

    The coffee-ring effect denotes the accumulation of particles at the edge of an evaporating sessile drop pinned on a substrate. Because it can be detected by simple visual inspection, this ubiquitous phenomenon can be envisioned as a robust and cost-effective diagnostic tool. Toward this direction, here we systematically analyze the deposit morphology of drying drops containing polystyrene particles of different surface properties with various proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA) and different forms of hemoglobin). We show that deposit patterns reveal information on both the adsorption of proteins onto particles and their reorganization following adsorption. By combining pattern analysis with adsorption isotherm and zeta potential measurements, we show that the suppression of the coffee-ring effect and the formation of a disk-shaped pattern is primarily associated with particle neutralization by protein adsorption. However, our findings also suggest that protein reorganization following adsorption can dramatically invert this tendency. Exposure of hydrophobic (respectively charged) residues can lead to disk (respectively ring) deposit morphologies independently of the global particle charge. Surface tension measurements and microscopic observations of the evaporating drops show that the determinant factor of the deposit morphology is the accumulation of particles at the liquid/gas interface during evaporation. This general behavior opens the possibility to probe protein adsorption and reorganization on particles by the analysis of the deposit patterns, the formation of a disk being the robust signature of particles rendered hydrophobic by protein adsorption. We show that this method is sensitive enough to detect a single point mutation in a protein, as demonstrated here by the distinct patterns formed by human native hemoglobin h-HbA and its mutant form h-HbS, which is responsible for sickle cell anemia. PMID:27562632

  3. Modelling active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in boron-containing zeolites and their interaction with probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Lezcano-González, Inés; Vidal-Moya, Alejandro; Boronat, Mercedes; Blasco, Teresa; Corma, Avelino

    2010-06-28

    Theoretical calculations and in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy have been combined to get insight on the nature of the active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in borosilicate zeolites. The interaction of a B site in zeolite Beta with a series of probe molecules (ammonia, pyridine, acetone and water) has been modelled and the (15)N and (11)B NMR isotropic chemical shift of the resulting complexes calculated and compared with experimental in situ NMR results. This approach has allowed validation of the methodology to model the adsorption on a zeolite boron site of molecules of varying basicity which are either protonated or non-protonated. The limitation is that theoretical calculations overestimate the effect of molecular adsorption through hydrogen bonds on the calculated isotropic (11)B NMR chemical shift.Theoretical and experimental results on the adsorption of acetophenone and cyclohexanone oximes on zeolite B-Beta indicate that Brønsted acid sites protonate the oximes, changing the boron coordination from trigonal to tetrahedral. Comparison of theoretical and experimental (15)N NMR chemical shifts of the adsorbed amides (acetanilide and epsilon-caprolactam) indicates that they are non-protonated, and the (11)B NMR spectra show that, as expected, boron remains in trigonal coordination with an isotropic delta(11)B(exp) which differs from the calculated value delta(11)B(calc). PMID:20454729

  4. Protein adsorption on piezoelectric poly(L-lactic) acid thin films by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroca, Nathalie; Vilarinho, Paula M.; Daniel-da-Silva, Ana Luisa; Wu, Aiying; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Gruverman, Alexei

    2011-03-01

    Up until now, no direct evidence of protein adsorption processes associated with polar activity of a piezoelectric has been reported. This work presents the experimental evidence of the protein adsorption process' dependence on the surface polarization of a piezoelectric by showing at the local scale that the process of protein adsorption is highly favored in the poled areas of a piezoelectric polymer such as poly(L-lactic) acid.

  5. Adsorption and Reaction of Methanethiol on Thin-Film Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; McDonald, Tom S

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and reaction of methanethiol, CH{sub 3}SH, have been studied on cerium oxide thin films that were vapor deposited on Ru(0 0 0 1). The behavior of the CH{sub 3}SH was examined as a function of the Ce oxidation state. CH{sub 3}SH weakly interacts with fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(1 1 1) forming both chemisorbed CH{sub 3}SH and CH{sub 3}S + OH. OH forms through the reaction of the sulfhydrol H with the surface O. These species recombine and desorb near 180 K leaving the surface virtually clean. When the ceria is ca. 50% reduced, the chemisorbed CH{sub 3}SH desorbs near 150 K while the CH{sub 3}S + OH are stable to 400 K. These species react above 450 K to produce predominantly CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 3}SH. A small amount of CH{sub 2}O and water are also formed through reaction with the O in the ceria. Atomic S is left on the surface. S 2p, C 1s and O 1s soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the nature of the chemisorbed species and the adsorption site of the CH{sub 3}S or S.

  6. Adsorption and reaction of methanethiol on thin-film cerium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, D. R.; McDonald, T. S.

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption and reaction of methanethiol, CH 3SH, have been studied on cerium oxide thin films that were vapor deposited on Ru(0 0 0 1). The behavior of the CH 3SH was examined as a function of the Ce oxidation state. CH 3SH weakly interacts with fully oxidized CeO 2(1 1 1) forming both chemisorbed CH 3SH and CH 3S + OH. OH forms through the reaction of the sulfhydrol H with the surface O. These species recombine and desorb near 180 K leaving the surface virtually clean. When the ceria is ca. 50% reduced, the chemisorbed CH 3SH desorbs near 150 K while the CH 3S + OH are stable to 400 K. These species react above 450 K to produce predominantly CH 4 and CH 3SH. A small amount of CH 2O and water are also formed through reaction with the O in the ceria. Atomic S is left on the surface. S 2p, C 1s and O 1s soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the nature of the chemisorbed species and the adsorption site of the CH 3S or S.

  7. Some studies on successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) grown indium sulphide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Pathan, H.M.; Lokhande, C.D. . E-mail: l_chandrakant@yahoo.com; Kulkarni, S.S.; Amalnerkar, D.P.; Seth, T.; Han, Sung-Hwan . E-mail: shhan@hanyang.ac.kr

    2005-06-15

    Indium sulphide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) thin films were grown on amorphous glass substrate by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. X-ray diffraction, optical absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Rutherford back scattering (RBS) were applied to study the structural, optical, surface morphological and compositional properties of the indium sulphide thin films. Utilization of triethanolamine and hydrazine hydrate complexed indium sulphate and sodium sulphide as precursors resulted in nanocrystalline In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin film. The optical band gap was found to be 2.7 eV. The film appeared to be smooth and homogeneous from SEM study.

  8. Effect of UV and electrochemical surface treatments on the adsorption and reaction of linear alcohols on non-porous carbon fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbeck, S.; Ward, S.; Idriss, H.

    2013-04-01

    The adsorption properties of untreated, electrochemically treated and ultra-violet/ozone treated polyacrylonitrile based carbon fibres were investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) on a series of linear alcohols as probes in order to understand its surface properties. Surface uptake was found to be sensitive to both the surface treatment and the nature of the adsorbates. Surface coverage increased with increasing alcohol chain due to the increase in their polarizability. It also increased with the level of surface oxygen of the fibres most likely because it facilitates the Osbnd H bond dissociation of the alcohol functional group. In addition, the desorption temperature (during TPD) tracked the surface oxygen levels (as determined from XPS O1s signal) suggesting increasing in the adsorption energy. The reactions of C1-C4 linear alcohols were also investigated on the surface of the fibre carbon. The main reaction was dehydrogenation to the corresponding aldehydes; the dehydration reaction to olefins was not observed. The dehydrogenation reaction was sensitive to the length of the alky chain. It was highest for methanol (to formaldehyde) and decreased with increasing the carbon number. Overall TPD of linear alcohols was shown to be a promising method for quantifying the level and strength of bonding occurring on carbon fibre surfaces.

  9. Probing Isotope Effects in Chemical Reactions Using Single Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Staanum, Peter F.; Hoejbjerre, Klaus; Drewsen, Michael; Wester, Roland

    2008-06-20

    Isotope effects in reactions between Mg{sup +} in the 3p {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} excited state and molecular hydrogen at thermal energies are studied through single reaction events. From only {approx}250 reactions with HD, the branching ratio between formation of MgD{sup +} and MgH{sup +} is found to be larger than 5. From an additional 65 reactions with H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} we find that the overall fragmentation probability of the intermediate MgH{sub 2}{sup +}, MgHD{sup +}, or MgD{sub 2}{sup +} complexes is the same. Our study shows that few single ion reactions can provide quantitative information on ion-neutral reactions. Hence, the method is well suited for reaction studies involving rare species, e.g., rare isotopes or short-lived unstable elements.

  10. Probing Isotope Effects in Chemical Reactions Using Single Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staanum, Peter F.; Højbjerre, Klaus; Wester, Roland; Drewsen, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Isotope effects in reactions between Mg+ in the 3p P3/22 excited state and molecular hydrogen at thermal energies are studied through single reaction events. From only ˜250 reactions with HD, the branching ratio between formation of MgD+ and MgH+ is found to be larger than 5. From an additional 65 reactions with H2 and D2 we find that the overall fragmentation probability of the intermediate MgH2+, MgHD+, or MgD2+ complexes is the same. Our study shows that few single ion reactions can provide quantitative information on ion-neutral reactions. Hence, the method is well suited for reaction studies involving rare species, e.g., rare isotopes or short-lived unstable elements.

  11. Acetaldehyde Adsorption and Reaction onCeO2(100) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Albrecht, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    This study reports and compares the adsorption and dissociation of acetaldehyde on oxidized and reduced CeOX(100) thin films. Acetaldehyde reacts and decomposes on fully oxidized CeO2(100) whereas it desorbs molecularly at low temperature on CeO2(111). The primary products are CO, CO2 and water along with trace amounts of crotonaldehyde and acetylene. The acetaldehyde adsorbs as the 2-acetaldehyde species, dioxyethylene. Decomposition proceeds by dehydrogenation through acetate and enolate intermediates. The reaction pathway is similar on the reduced CeO2-X(100) surface however the inability to react with surface O on the reduced surface results in H2 rather than H2O desorption and C is left on the surface rather than producing CO and CO2. C-O bond cleavage in the enolate intermediate followed by reaction with surface H results in ethylene desorption.

  12. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde on Stoichiometric and Defective SrTiO₃(100) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li Q.; Ferris, Kim F.; Azad, Samina; Engelhard, Mark H.; Peden, Charles HF.

    2004-02-05

    The adsorption and reaction of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), on stoichiometric (TiO{sub 2}-terminated) and reduced SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surfaces, have been investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Acetaldehyde adsorbs molecularly on the stoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface that contains predominantly Ti{sup 4+} cations. The Ti{sup 4+} sites on the stoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface are not sufficiently active for surface reactions such as aldol condensation, as opposed to the Ti{sup 4+} ions on the TiO{sub 2}(001) surface. However, decomposition and redox reactions of acetaldehyde occur in the presence of surface defects created by Ar{sup +} sputtering. The decomposition products following reactions of acetaldehyde on the defective surface include H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, CO, C{sub 4}H{sub 6}, and C{sub 4}H{sub 8}. Reductive coupling, to produce C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 4}H{sub 8} is the main reaction pathway for decomposition of acetaldehyde on the sputter reduced SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface.

  13. Adsorption and reactions of atmospheric constituents and pollutants on ice particles: an FTIR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakova, A. V.; Marinov, I. L.; Poretskiy, M. S.; Tsyganenko, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    Processes on icy particles attract much attention due to their importance for atmospheric science, ecology and astrophysics. In this work, adsorption and ecologically important reactions of some molecules on pure and mixed water icy films by means of FTIR spectroscopy have been investigated. The cell for spectral studies of adsorbed molecules at variable temperatures (55-370 K), described elsewhere1, enables one to run the spectra in the presence of gaseous adsorbate, and even to perform adsorption from the solution in some cryogenic solvents. For the studies of ice films, it was equipped with a device for water vapour sputtering from the heated capillaries and deposition onto the inner BaF2 or ZnSe windows of the cell, cooled by liquid nitrogen. Lower temperatures were obtained by pumping off evaporating nitrogen from the coolant volume. The estimated specific surface area of freshly deposited at 77 K water ice film was about 160 m2/g and decreases on raising the temperature together with the diminishing intensity of the bands of dangling OH (OD) groups at 3696 (2727) cm-1 until the latter disappear at 130 - 160 K when the changes of bulk absorption provide evidence for a phase transition from amorphous to polycrystalline ice. CO adsorption at 77 K results in two bands at 2153 and 2137 cm-1 assigned to molecules forming weak H-bond with the dangling hydroxyl groups and bound to unsaturated surface oxygen atoms, respectively2. The band of dangling hydroxyl groups moves to lower wavenumbers on adsorption of different molecules (hydrogen, nitrogen, methane, ozone, NO, ethane or chlorinated ethenes, etc.). The shift value depends on the nature of adsorbate. Besides this shift, spectra of adsorbed nitrogen and methane registered at 55 K reveal the adsorption intensity decrease at ~ 2650 cm-1 at the high-frequency slope of bulk adsorption, and increase at about 25 cm-1 below. We interpret this perturbation as a strengthening of H-bonds between surface water molecules

  14. Detection of glucose via enzyme-coupling reaction based on a DT-diaphorase fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xinghui; Li, Xiaohua; Wan, Qiongqiong; Li, Zhao; Ma, Huimin

    2014-03-01

    Enzyme-coupling reactions play an important role in the assay of analytes. In this manuscript, we developed a new fluorescent probe for the detection of glucose through the enzyme-coupling reaction of DT-diaphorase (DTD). The probe was synthesized through a mild and simple synthetic procedure, and showed good fluorescence response to DTD. The reactions for the detection of glucose proceed as follows: glucose dehydrogenase oxidizes glucose to gluconolactone with NAD(+) as the electron acceptor to yield NADH, and NADH can be utilized by DTD to further react with the probe releasing resorufin. As a result of these tandem reactions, fluorescence off-on response will occur. The method showed high selectivity for glucose with a detection limit of 0.2 µM, which may provide a potential way for fluorescence detection of glucose through enzyme-coupling reactions. Furthermore, the applicability of the method has been demonstrated by detecting glucose in human urine samples. PMID:24468396

  15. Space and time-resolved probing of heterogeneous catalysis reactions using lab-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Navin, Chelliah V; Krishna, Katla Sai; Theegala, Chandra S; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2016-03-01

    Probing catalytic reactions on a catalyst surface in real time is a major challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of a continuous flow millifluidic chip reactor coated with a nanostructured gold catalyst as an effective platform for in situ investigation of the kinetics of catalytic reactions by taking 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) conversion as a model reaction. The idea conceptualized in this paper can not only dramatically change the ability to probe the time-resolved kinetics of heterogeneous catalysis reactions but also used for investigating other chemical and biological catalytic processes, thereby making this a broad platform for probing reactions as they occur within continuous flow reactors. PMID:26888331

  16. The Adsorption and Reactions of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) on Metal Oxides - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, J.H.

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to provide a fundamental understanding of the adsorption and catalytic reactions of CCl{sub 4} on metal oxide surfaces with a view to developing strategies for its remediation. The scientific knowledge generated by this project should enable environmental engineers to evaluate the potential of destructive adsorption of CCl{sub 4} and the catalytic reaction of CCl{sub 4} with H{sub 2}O as an alternative for the remediation of carbon tetrachloride. Emphasis was placed on the alkaline earth metal oxides, i.e., MgO, CaO, SrO and BaO because it had previously been demonstrated that MgO and CaO reacted with CCl{sub 4} to form the corresponding metal chloride and carbon dioxide. This process was named destructive adsorption. It was found that the activity toward CCl{sub 4} parallels the basicity of the alkaline earth metal oxide, i.e., the activity decreased in the order BaO>SrO>CaO>MgO. It was found that MgO is active as a catalyst for the reaction of CCl{sub 4} with H{sub 2}O to form CO{sub 2} and HCl. The HCl could be neutralized in aqueous NaOH, and the resulting dilute salt solution could be easily disposed of. Among the alkaline earth oxides, MgO is the only active catalyst at moderate temperatures. Thus, nearly complete removal of CCl{sub 4} can be achieved over a long period. The favorable catalytic activity of MgO relative to the other alkaline earth oxides is attributed to two factors; first, MgO is not as readily converted to MgCl{sub 2}, and, second, the decomposition temperature of MgCO{sub 3} ({approximately}430 C) is substantially less than that of the other carbonates. As a consequence, chloride and carbonate phases do not substantially inhibit the catalytic activity.

  17. Probing Hydrothermal Organic Reaction Mechanisms with Hydrothermal Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Gould, I.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    In most hydrothermal organic experiments the emphasis is on reaction product distributions and kinetic measurements, with mechanistic information or the direct evidence of proposed reaction intermediates rare or lacking. We believe that greater mechanistic insight will yield greater predictive power. Previously, we studied the reactions of a model ketone, dibenzylketone (DBK) in aqueous media at 300°C and 700 bars for durations up to several days [1], and found that many of the reaction products arise from coupling of benzyl and related radicals generated through homolytic bond cleavage of DBK. In the present work, we find that in situ photochemical generation of the radicals can provide independent evidence for radical intermediates in the hydrothermal reaction of DBK, yielding valuable insights into the thermal reactions. Hydrothermal photochemical experiments of DBK were conducted in water in sealed fused silica glass tubes at 300°C and 86 bars under UV irradiation for minutes. The short timescale of the experiments allows the primary radical coupling products of DBK to be generated and identified, and their follow-up reactions to be monitored directly. The primary hydrothermal photolysis products include toluene, bibenzyl, a three-benzene-ring product (with isomers), and two four-benzene-ring products (with isomers), which represent a much simpler version of the products obtained through thermal reactions under similar conversions. Most of the observed photolysis products were identical to the ones in the thermal reactions, and those not observed in thermal reactions were found to be the short-lived precursors of the thermal products. As an example, the transformation of one four-ring product to the other was attained and monitored by experiments in which hydrothermal photolysis of DBK was followed by thermolysis at 300°C for a further few hours. The transformation steps included dehydration and isomerization, which were known to be thermodynamically

  18. Adsorption, thermal reaction, and desorption of disilane on Ge(111)-[ital c](2[times]8)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Hirschorn, E.S.; Miller, T.; Chiang, T. Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801-2902 )

    1994-01-15

    Room-temperature adsorption of disilane (Si[sub 2]H[sub 6]) on Ge(111)-[ital c](2[times]8) and subsequent thermal reactions and desorption at elevated temperatures were studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and core-level photoemission. The initial adsorption results in the formation of various surface radicals, and the reacted areas on the surface grow laterally for increasing exposures. The sticking coefficient is rather low, and an exposure greater than about 30 000 langmuirs is needed to saturate the surface. The net amount of Si deposited for the saturated surface is about one-half of an atomic layer. Thermal annealing causes the hydrogen atoms to desorb and the Si atoms to move below the surface. For annealing temperatures beyond about 630 K, the desorption of hydrogen becomes complete, all of the Si atoms move below the surface, and the resulting surface resembles the starting clean Ge(111)-[ital c](2[times]8) surface except that the [ital c](2[times]8) long-range order is partially destroyed. Step flow and island coarsening, similar to growth by molecular-beam epitaxy, are observed.

  19. The adsorption and reaction of Acetonitrile on clean and oxygen covered Ag(110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, Armand J.; Hamza, Alex V.; Canning, Nicholas D. S.; Madix, Robert J.

    1986-10-01

    The adsorption and reaction of acetonitrile (CH 3CN) on clean and oxygen covered Ag(110) surfaces has been studied using temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS), isotope exchange, chemical displacement reactions and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). On the clean Ag(110) surface, CH 3CN was reversibly adsorbed, desorbing with an activation energy of 10 kcal mol -1 at 166 K from a monolayer state and at 158 K from a multilayer state. Vibrational spectra of multilayer, monolayer and sub-monolayer CH 3CN were in excellent agreement with that of gas phase CH 3CN indicating that CH 3CN is only weakly bonded to the clean Ag(110) surface. On the partially oxidized surface CH 3CN reacts with atomic oxygen to form adsorbed CH 2CN, OH and H 2O in addition to forming another molecular adsorption state with a desorption peak at 240 K. This molecular state shows a CN stretching frequency of 1840 cm -1, which is indicative of substantial rehybridization of the CN bond and is associated with side-on coordination via the π system. The CH 2CN species is stable up to 430 K, where C-H bond breaking and reformation begins, leading to the formation of CH 3CN at 480 K and HCN at 510 K and leaving only carbon on the surface. In the presence of excess oxygen atoms C-H bond breaking and reformation is more facile leading to additional desorption peaks for CH 3CN and H 2O at 420 K. This destabilizing effect of O (a) on Ch 2CN (a) is explained in terms of an anionic (CH 2CN -1) species. Comparison of the vibrational spectra from CH 2CN (a) and CD 2CN (a) supports the following assignment for the modes of adsorbed CH 2CN: ν(Ag-C) 215: δ(CCN) 545; ϱ t(CH 2) 695; ϱ w(CH 2) 850; ν(C-C) 960; ϱ r(CH 2) 1060; δ(CH 2) 1375; ν(CN) 2075; and ν(CH 2) 2940 cm -1. These results serve to further indicate the wide applicability of the acid-base reaction concept for reactions between gas phase Brönsted acids and adsorbed oxygen atoms on solver surfaces.

  20. Adsorption, Ordering, and Local Environments of Surfactant-Encapsulated Polyoxometalate Ions Probed at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Benjamin; Yin, Panchao; Ma, Ying-Zhong

    2016-08-16

    The continued development and application of surfactant-encapsulated polyoxometalates (SEPs) relies on understanding the ordering and organization of species at their interface and how these are impacted by the various local environments to which they are exposed. Here, we report on the equilibrium properties of two common SEPs adsorbed to the air-water interface and probed with surface-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. These results reveal clear shifts in vibrational band positions, the magnitude of which scales with the charge of the SEP core, which is indicative of a static field effect on the surfactant coating and the associated local chemical environment. This static field also induces ordering in surrounding water molecules that is mediated by charge screening via the surface-bound surfactants. From these SFG measurements, we are able to show that Mo132-based SEPs are more polar than Mo72V30 SEPs. Disorder in the surfactant chain packing at the highly curved SEP surfaces is attributed to large conic volumes that can be sampled without interactions with neighboring chains. Measurements of adsorption isotherms yield free energies of adsorption to the air-water interface of -46.8 ± 0.4 and -44.8 ± 1.2 kJ/mol for the Mo132 and Mo72V30 SEPs, respectively, indicating a strong propensity for the fluid surface. The influence of intermolecular interactions on the surface adsorption energies is discussed. PMID:27452922

  1. Growth of polyaniline nanofibers for supercapacitor applications using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, P. R.; Pusawale, S. N.; Shinde, N. M.; Lokhande, C. D.

    2014-07-01

    We report the synthesis of polyaniline nanofibers using the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The structural study shows the amorphous nature of polyaniline. The formation of polyaniline nanofibers has been revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) whereas the confirmation of polyaniline material is obtained from Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. A plausible explanation illustrating the growth mechanism is presented. A maximum specific capacitance of 1078 F.g-1 at a scan rate of 5 mV.s-1 is obtained. The charge-discharge behavior shows a maximum specific power of 1.2 kW.kg-1 and specific energy of 64 Wh.kg-1. The ease of the synthesis and the interesting electrochemical properties indicate that polyaniline nanofibers are promising materials for supercapacitor applications.

  2. Passivation effects on quantum dots prepared by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qilin; Maloney, Scott; Chen, Weimin; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-06-01

    ZnS is typically used to passivate semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) prepared by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method for solar cell applications, while for colloidal QDs, organic ligands are usually used for this passivation purpose. In this study we utilized oleylamine and oleic acid ligands, besides ZnS, to passivate QDs prepared by the SILAR approach, and investigated their effects on the incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) performance of the solar cells. It was observed that oleylamine passivation decreased device performance, while oleic acid passivation improved the IPCE of the cells. Redshift of the IPCE onset wavelength was also observed after oleic acid coating, which was attributed to the delocalization of excitons in the CdS QDs.

  3. Adsorption and Reaction of Methanol on Thin-film Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins,D.; Robbins, M.; Zhou, J.

    2006-01-01

    Formaldehyde adsorption and reaction have been studied on cerium oxide thin films that were vapor deposited on Ru(0 0 0 1). The formaldehyde behavior was examined as a function of temperature, exposure and Ce oxidation state. Formaldehyde chemisorbs on fully oxidized CeO{sub 2} as dioxymethylene, CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The dioxymethylene decomposes and desorbs as formaldehyde between 200 K and 400 K. No other products are formed. On reduced ceria, formaldehyde also adsorbs as dioxymethylene. In addition to the formaldehyde desorption between 200 K and 400 K, a more strongly bound form of dioxymethylene is formed that produces formaldehyde at 440 K. Above 400 K, some of the dioxymethylene reacts to form formate and methoxy on the surface. These species decompose to produce H{sub 2}, CO and CH{sub 2}O above 500 K.

  4. Adsorption and Reaction of Formaldehyde on Thin-film Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,J.; Mullins, D.

    2006-01-01

    Formaldehyde adsorption and reaction have been studied on cerium oxide thin films that were vapor deposited on Ru(0 0 0 1). The formaldehyde behavior was examined as a function of temperature, exposure and Ce oxidation state. Formaldehyde chemisorbs on fully oxidized CeO{sub 2} as dioxymethylene, CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The dioxymethylene decomposes and desorbs as formaldehyde between 200 K and 400 K. No other products are formed. On reduced ceria, formaldehyde also adsorbs as dioxymethylene. In addition to the formaldehyde desorption between 200 K and 400 K, a more strongly bound form of dioxymethylene is formed that produces formaldehyde at 440 K. Above 400 K, some of the dioxymethylene reacts to form formate and methoxy on the surface. These species decompose to produce H{sub 2}, CO and CH{sub 2}O above 500 K.

  5. Passivation effects on quantum dots prepared by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qilin; Maloney, Scott; Chen, Weimin; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-06-01

    ZnS is typically used to passivate semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) prepared by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method for solar cell applications, while for colloidal QDs, organic ligands are usually used for this passivation purpose. In this study we utilized oleylamine and oleic acid ligands, besides ZnS, to passivate QDs prepared by the SILAR approach, and investigated their effects on the incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) performance of the solar cells. It was observed that oleylamine passivation decreased device performance, while oleic acid passivation improved the IPCE of the cells. Redshift of the IPCE onset wavelength was also observed after oleic acid coating, which was attributed to the delocalization of excitons in the CdS QDs. PMID:27103144

  6. ZnS Thin Films Deposited by a Spin Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungyeol; Lee, D. H.; Ryu, S. O.; Chang, Chih-hung

    2010-05-20

    In this article, we reported a spin successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method for the first time. ZnS thin films were deposited by spin SILAR using ZnCl2 and Na2S aqueous precursor solutions at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. The optical, structural, and morphological characterizations of the films were studied by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV/visible spectroscopy. Smooth (average roughness <3 nm), uniform, and highly transparent ZnS (transmittance of over 90% in the visible band) thin films could be successfully deposited using this technique with shorter cycle time and much less solvent usage.

  7. Surface reactions, solvation and adsorption phenomena of electrolytic adlayers on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seng Woon

    Fundamental understandings of electrolytic adlayers are important to areas like: batteries, ultra-capacitors, fuel cells, corrosion and atmospheric chemistry. In this dissertation, interactions of electrolytic adlayers are systematically examined using ultra-high vacuum surface analytical techniques. In particular, interactions of water with constituents of electrolytic adlayers are closely followed. On clean Ag(110), water desorbs at 165 K and adsorbs as crystalline ice at 145 K. During continuous adsorption, water initially adsorbs with its molecular plane parallel to the surface, and then gradually tilts towards the surface normal as more water adsorbs. A layer-by-layer adsorption model is proposed for crystalline ice growth on Ag(110). When water is separately coadsorbed with hydroxyl and carbonate, water is stabilized to temperatures as high as 220 and 300 K, respectively. Both anions exhibit great surface solvation. An extended bilayer model is proposed for OH interactions with water, and isotopic exchange experiments have illustrated that (1) the extent of proton mobility in the adlayers, and (2) the migration of hydroxide ion into the water-ice multilayer. On Pt(111), mutual displacement of water and methanol occurs in electrolytic adlayers. Adsorbed methanol monolayer is destabilized when it is co-adsorbed with hydrogen. However, methanol monolayer can be restabilized when water is introduced to the adlayer system. With addition of excess water, destabilization induced by hydrogen can be completely removed and methanol behaves as if it interacts only with water. Interactions of Ru-modified Pt(111) with electrolytic adlayer has been studied. Ru adlayers were deposited with a low power electron beam heated evaporation source, and Ru can be probed with molecular nitrogen. Optimum activity of Ru/Pt(111) surfaces occurs when they are thermally activated to 573 K. Water can be stabilized to temperatures as high as 250 K on these surfaces, and partial

  8. Homogeneous duplex polymerase chain reaction assay using switchable lanthanide fluorescence probes.

    PubMed

    Lehmusvuori, Ari; Tapio, Antti-Heikki; Mäki-Teeri, Petra; Rantakokko-Jalava, Kaisu; Wang, Qi; Takalo, Harri; Soukka, Tero

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on switchable lanthanide chelate complementation probes. In the complementation probe technology, two nonfluorescent oligonucleotide probes, one labeled with a lanthanide ion carrier chelate and another with a light absorbing antenna ligand, form a fluorescent complex by self-assembly of the reporter molecules when the two probes are hybridized in adjacent positions to the target DNA. Here we report the synthesis of a new terbium(III) (Tb(III)) ion carrier chelate and a new light-absorbing antenna ligand for Tb(III) and the development of a duplex Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) PCR assay. For the detection of Ct in urine samples, a specific sequence in Ct cryptic plasmid was amplified and detected using europium(III) (Eu(III)) complementation probes. An internal amplification control was amplified in each reaction and detected using Tb(III) complementation probes to verify the Ct negative results. Ct bacteria were concentrated from urine samples with a rapid and simple centrifugation-based sample preparation method. Good diagnostic accuracy (99-100%) was achieved, and also Ct positive reactions yielded a very high Eu(III) signal-to-background ratio (maximum of 244). High performance of the complementation probes is advantageous when sample may contain impurities after a simple sample preparation. PMID:23353013

  9. Probing the nuclear structure with heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Broglia, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclei display distortions in both ordinary space and in gauge space. It is suggested that it is possible to learn about the spatial distribution of the Nilsson orbitals and about the change of the pairing gap with the rotational frequency through the analysis of one- and two-nucleon transfer reactions induced in heavy-ion collisions.

  10. Kinetic Adsorption Profile and Conformation Evolution at the DNA-Gold Nanoparticle Interface Probed by Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic adsorption profile at the DNA–gold nanoparticle (AuNP) interface is probed by following the binding and organization of thiolated linear DNA and aptamers of varying chain lengths (15, 30, 44, and 51 mer) to the surface of AuNPs (13.0 ± 1.0 nm diameter). A systematic investigation utilizing dynamic light scattering has been performed to directly measure the changes in particle size during the course of a typical aging-salting thiolated DNA/AuNP preparation procedure. We discuss the effect of DNA chain length, composition, salt concentration, and secondary structure on the kinetics and conformation at the DNA–AuNP interface. The adsorption kinetics are chain-length dependent, composition independent, and not diffusion rate limited for the conditions we report here. The kinetic data support a mechanism of stepwise adsorption of thiols to the surface of AuNPs and reorganization of the thiols at the interface. Very interestingly, the kinetic increases of the particle sizes are modeled accurately by the pseudo-second-order rate model, suggesting that DNA could possess the statistically well-defined conformational evolution. Together with other experimental evidence, we propose a dynamic inner-layer and outer-tail (DILOT) model to describe the evolution of the DNA conformation after the initial adsorption of a single oligonucleotide layer. According to this model, the length of the tails that extend from the surface of AuNPs, capable for hybridization or molecular recognition, can be conveniently calculated. Considering the wide applications of DNA/AuNPs, the results should have important implications in sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly. PMID:25222203

  11. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. PMID:26823380

  12. METAL INTERACTIONS AT SULFIDE MINERAL SURFACES: PART 3, METAL AFFINITIES IN SINGLE AND MULTIPLE ION ADSORPTION REACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption reactions of both single ions and multiple ion mixtures with sulfide minerals (chalcocite, galena, pyrite, and sphalerite) were investigated in the metal concentration range of 0.0001 to 0.00001 M. Chromium (III), iron (III), barium (II), cadmium (II), copper (II), nic...

  13. Thermostatted micro-reactor NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brächer, A.; Hoch, S.; Albert, K.; Kost, H. J.; Werner, B.; von Harbou, E.; Hasse, H.

    2014-05-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe head for monitoring fast chemical reactions is described. It combines micro-reaction technology with capillary flow NMR spectroscopy. Two reactants are fed separately into the probe head where they are effectively mixed in a micro-mixer. The mixed reactants then pass through a capillary NMR flow cell that is equipped with a solenoidal radiofrequency coil where the NMR signal is acquired. The whole flow path of the reactants is thermostatted using the liquid FC-43 (perfluorotributylamine) so that exothermic and endothermic reactions can be studied under almost isothermal conditions. The set-up enables kinetic investigation of reactions with time constants of only a few seconds. Non-reactive mixing experiments carried out with the new probe head demonstrate that it facilitates the acquisition of constant highly resolved NMR signals suitable for quantification of different species in technical mixtures. Reaction kinetic measurements on a test system are presented that prove the applicability of the novel NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions.

  14. Thermostatted micro-reactor NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions.

    PubMed

    Brächer, A; Hoch, S; Albert, K; Kost, H J; Werner, B; von Harbou, E; Hasse, H

    2014-05-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe head for monitoring fast chemical reactions is described. It combines micro-reaction technology with capillary flow NMR spectroscopy. Two reactants are fed separately into the probe head where they are effectively mixed in a micro-mixer. The mixed reactants then pass through a capillary NMR flow cell that is equipped with a solenoidal radiofrequency coil where the NMR signal is acquired. The whole flow path of the reactants is thermostatted using the liquid FC-43 (perfluorotributylamine) so that exothermic and endothermic reactions can be studied under almost isothermal conditions. The set-up enables kinetic investigation of reactions with time constants of only a few seconds. Non-reactive mixing experiments carried out with the new probe head demonstrate that it facilitates the acquisition of constant highly resolved NMR signals suitable for quantification of different species in technical mixtures. Reaction kinetic measurements on a test system are presented that prove the applicability of the novel NMR probe head for monitoring fast reactions. PMID:24650728

  15. Low Energy Electrons as Probing Tool for Astrochemical Reaction Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Swiderek, Petra; Hamann, Thorben

    The complexity of molecules found in space varies widely. On one end of the scale of molecular complexity is the hydrogen molecule H2 . Its formation from H atoms is if not understood than at least thoroughly investigated[1]. On the other side of said spectrum the precursors to biopolymers can be found, such as amino acids[2,3], sugars[4], lipids, cofactors[5], etc, and the kerogen-like organic polymer material in carbonaceous meteorites called "black stuff" [6]. These have also received broad attention in the last decades. Sitting in the middle between these two extremes are simple molecules that are observed by radio astronomy throughout the Universe. These are molecules like methane (CH4 ), methanol (CH3 OH), formaldehyde (CH2 O), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and many many others. So far more than 40 such species have been identified.[7] They are often used in laboratory experiments to create larger complex molecules on the surface of simulated interstellar dust grains.[2,8] The mechanisms of formation of these observed starting materials for prebiotic chemistry is however not always clear. Also the exact mechanisms of formation of larger molecules in photochemical experiments are largely unclear. This is mostly due to the very complex chemistry going on which involves many different radicals and ions. The creation of radicals and ions can be studied in detail in laboratory simulations. They can be created in a setup mimicking interstellar grain chemistry using slow electrons. There is no free electron radiation in space. What can be found though is a lot of radiation of different sorts. There is electromagnetic radiation (UV light, X-Rays, rays, etc.) and there is particulate radiation as well in the form of high energy ions. This radiation can provide energy that drives chemical reactions in the ice mantles of interstellar dust grains. And while the multitude of different kinds of radiation might be a little confusing, they all have one thing in common: Upon

  16. Probing Intramolecular versus Intermolecular CO2 Adsorption on Amine-Grafted SBA-15.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chun-Jae; Lee, Li-Chen; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-12-15

    A mesoporous silica SBA-15 is modified with an array of amine-containing organosilanes including (i) propylamine, SiCH2CH2CH2NH2 (MONO), (ii) propylethylenediamine, SiCH2CH2CH2NHCH2CH2NH2 (DI), (iii) propyldiethylenetriamine, SiCH2CH2CH2NHCH2CH2NHCH2CH2NH2 (TRI), and (iv) propyltriethylenetetramine, SiCH2CH2CH2NHCH2CH2N(CH2CH2NH2)2 (TREN) and the low loading silane adsorbents (∼0.45 mmol silane/g) are evaluated for their CO2 adsorption properties, with a focus on gaining insight into the propensity for intramolecular vs intermolecular CO2 adsorption. Adsorption isotherms at low CO2 coverages are measured while simultaneously recording the heat evolved via a Tian-Calvet calorimeter. The results are compared on a silane molecule efficiency basis (mol CO2 adsorbed/mol silane) to assess the potential for intramolecular CO2 adsorption, employing two amine groups in a single silane molecule. As the number of amines in the silane molecule increases (MONO < DI < TREN ∼ TRI), the silane molecule efficiency is enhanced owing to the ability to intramolecularly capture CO2. Analysis of the CO2 uptake for samples with the surface silanols removed by capping demonstrates that cooperative uptake due to amine-CO2-silanol interactions is also possible over these adsorbents and is the primary mode of sorption for the MONO material at the studied low silane loading. As the propensity for intramolecular CO2 capture increases due to the presence of multiple amines in a single silane molecule (MONO < DI < TREN ∼ TRI), the measured heat of adsorption also increases. This study of various amine-containing silanes at low coverage is the first to provide significant, direct evidence for intramolecular CO2 capture in a single silane molecule. Furthermore, it provides evidence for the relative heats of adsorption for physisorption on a silanol laden surface (ca. 37 kJ/mol), a silanol-capped surface (ca. 25 kJ/mol), via amine-CO2-silanol interactions (ca. 46 kJ/mol), and via amine-CO2

  17. Elementary Steps of Syngas Reactions on Mo2C(001): Adsorption Thermochemistry and Bond Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Medford, Andrew

    2012-02-16

    Density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio thermodynamics are applied in order to investigate the most stable surface and subsurface terminations of Mo{sub 2}C(001) as a function of chemical potential and in the presence of syngas. The Mo-terminated (001) surface is then used as a model surface to evaluate the thermochemistry and energetic barriers for key elementary steps in syngas reactions. Adsorption energy scaling relations and Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relationships are established and used to place Mo{sub 2}C into the context of transition metal surfaces. The results indicate that the surface termination is a complex function of reaction conditions and kinetics. It is predicted that the surface will be covered by either C{sub 2}H{sub 2} or O depending on conditions. Comparisons to transition metals indicate that the Mo-terminated Mo{sub 2}C(001) surface exhibits carbon reactivity similar to transition metals such as Ru and Ir, but is significantly more reactive towards oxygen.

  18. Back reaction effects on the dynamics of heavy probes in heavy quark cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabortty, Shankhadeep; Dey, Tanay K.

    2016-05-01

    We holographically study the effect of back reaction on the hydrodynamical properties of {N}=4 strongly coupled super Yang-Mills (SYM) thermal plasma. The back reaction we consider arises from the presence of static heavy quarks uniformly distributed over {N}=4 SYM plasma. In order to study the hydrodynamical properties, we use heavy quark as well as heavy quark-antiquark bound state as probes and compute the jet quenching parameter, screening length and binding energy. We also consider the rotational dynamics of heavy probe quark in the back-reacted plasma and analyse associated energy loss. We observe that the presence of back reaction enhances the energy-loss in the thermal plasma. Finally, we show that there is no effect of angular drag on the rotational motion of quark-antiquark bound state probing the back reacted thermal plasma.

  19. Polymerase Chain Reaction-based Suppression of Repetitive Sequences in Whole Chromosome Painting Probes for FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, L C; Pattee, M; Williams, J; Eklund, M; Bedford, J S; Christian, A T

    2004-04-21

    We have developed a method to suppress the PCR amplification of repetitive sequences in whole chromosome painting probes by adding Cot-1 DNA to the amplification mixture. The repetitive sequences in the Cot-1 DNA bind to their homologous sequences in the probe library, prevent the binding of primers, and interfere with extension of the probe sequences, greatly decreasing PCR efficiency selectively across these blocked regions. A second labeling reaction is then done and this product is resuspended in FISH hybridization mixture without further addition of blocking DNA. The hybridization produces little if any non-specific binding on any other chromosomes. We have been able to successfully use this procedure with both human and rat chromosome probes. This technique should be applicable in producing probes for CGH, M-FISH and SKY, as well as reducing the presence of repetitive DNA in genomic libraries.

  20. Adsorption, Coadsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde and NO₂ on Na-Y,FAU: an in situ FTIR Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun; Moline, Ryan A.; Peden, Charles HF

    2004-11-04

    The adsorption of acetaldehyde and its co-adsorption and reaction with NO₂ were investigated on a Na-Y, FAU zeolite using in situ FTIR spectroscopy. Acetaldehyde adsorbs strongly over Na-Y and desorbs molecularly at around 400K with very limited extent of condensation or polymerization. Reaction between CH₃CHO and NO₂ takes place in co-adsorption experiments even at 300K. In the initial step, acetaldehyde is oxidized to acetic acid accompanied by the formation of NO, which can be observed as N2O₃ formed via a further reaction between NO and NO₂. The key intermediates in the overall NOx reduction in this process are nitro- and nitrosomethane, which form in the next step. Their decomposition and further reaction with adsorbed NOx species lead to the formation of HCN, HNCO, N₂O, CO₂ and organic nitrile species identified by their characteristic IR vibrational signatures. At 473K, the reaction between adsorbed CH₃CHO and NO₂ is very fast. The results seem to suggest a mechanism in which N-N bond formation takes place among ionic nitrogen containing species (NO⁺ and CN⁻ or NCO⁻). No evidence has been found to suggest the participation of NHx⁺NOy⁻ type species in the N⁻N bond formation under the experimental conditions of this study.

  1. The adsorption and reaction of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) on metal oxides. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, J.; Goodman, D.W.; Haw, J.F.

    1998-06-01

    'The goal of the research is to elucidate the properties of the materials responsible for the activation of halocarbons and the nature of the intermediates formed in the dissociative adsorption of this class of compounds. This information is essential for interpreting and predicting stoichiometric and catalytic pathways for the safe destruction of halocarbon pollutants. The specific objectives are: (1) to study the adsorption and reactivity of chloromethanes and chloroethanes on metal oxides; (2) to identify the reaction intermediates using spectroscopic methods; and (3) to develop kinetic models for the reaction of these halocarbons with oxide surfaces. This report summarizes work after 20 months of a 36-month project. Emphasis has been placed understanding the surfaces phases, as well as the bulk phases that are present during the reactions of chlorinated hydrocarbons with strongly basic metal oxides. Most of the research has been carried out with carbon tetrachloride.'

  2. A new probe reaction for studying the hydrogen spillover phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Aihua; Nakamura, Ikusei; Fujimoto, Kaoru

    1997-06-01

    It was found by FTIR measurement that pyridine strongly adsorbed on acid sites of ZSM-5 was hydrogenated over Pt/H-ZSM-5 (0.5 wt%) and a Pt-hybrid catalyst (a physically mixed catalyst with a weight ratio of Pt/SiO{sub 2} (2.5 wt%)/H-ZSM-5 = 1:4) to adsorbed piperidine in the presence of gaseous hydrogen at around 473 K, whereas no such phenomena were observed on either H-ZSM-5 or Pt/SiO{sub 2}. The phenomenon revealed the occurrence of hydrogen spillover from Pt sites to zeolite acid sites (Bronsted and Lewis). A quantitative description of this reaction was attained by calculating and measuring the amount of zeolite acid on the basis of pyridine chemisorption and hydrogen consumption. In connection with this finding, the dehydrogenation of adsorbed piperidine in correlation with reverse hydrogen spillover was also observed on Pt/H-ZSM-5 catalyst in the temperature range from 623 to 723 K. 29 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Water adsorption on TiO2 surfaces probed by soft X-ray spectroscopies: bulk materials vs. isolated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkoula, Safia; Sublemontier, Olivier; Patanen, Minna; Nicolas, Christophe; Sirotti, Fausto; Naitabdi, Ahmed; Gaie-Levrel, François; Antonsson, Egill; Aureau, Damien; Ouf, François-Xavier; Wada, Shin-Ichi; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Miron, Catalin

    2015-10-01

    We describe an experimental method to probe the adsorption of water at the surface of isolated, substrate-free TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) based on soft X-ray spectroscopy in the gas phase using synchrotron radiation. To understand the interfacial properties between water and TiO2 surface, a water shell was adsorbed at the surface of TiO2 NPs. We used two different ways to control the hydration level of the NPs: in the first scheme, initially solvated NPs were dried and in the second one, dry NPs generated thanks to a commercial aerosol generator were exposed to water vapor. XPS was used to identify the signature of the water layer shell on the surface of the free TiO2 NPs and made it possible to follow the evolution of their hydration state. The results obtained allow the establishment of a qualitative determination of isolated NPs’ surface states, as well as to unravel water adsorption mechanisms. This method appears to be a unique approach to investigate the interface between an isolated nano-object and a solvent over-layer, paving the way towards new investigation methods in heterogeneous catalysis on nanomaterials.

  4. Water adsorption on TiO2 surfaces probed by soft X-ray spectroscopies: bulk materials vs. isolated nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Benkoula, Safia; Sublemontier, Olivier; Patanen, Minna; Nicolas, Christophe; Sirotti, Fausto; Naitabdi, Ahmed; Gaie-Levrel, François; Antonsson, Egill; Aureau, Damien; Ouf, François-Xavier; Wada, Shin-Ichi; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Miron, Catalin

    2015-01-01

    We describe an experimental method to probe the adsorption of water at the surface of isolated, substrate-free TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) based on soft X-ray spectroscopy in the gas phase using synchrotron radiation. To understand the interfacial properties between water and TiO2 surface, a water shell was adsorbed at the surface of TiO2 NPs. We used two different ways to control the hydration level of the NPs: in the first scheme, initially solvated NPs were dried and in the second one, dry NPs generated thanks to a commercial aerosol generator were exposed to water vapor. XPS was used to identify the signature of the water layer shell on the surface of the free TiO2 NPs and made it possible to follow the evolution of their hydration state. The results obtained allow the establishment of a qualitative determination of isolated NPs’ surface states, as well as to unravel water adsorption mechanisms. This method appears to be a unique approach to investigate the interface between an isolated nano-object and a solvent over-layer, paving the way towards new investigation methods in heterogeneous catalysis on nanomaterials. PMID:26462615

  5. Probing thyroglobulin in undiluted human serum based on pattern recognition and competitive adsorption of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ran; Huang, Shuai; Li, Jing; Chae, Junseok

    2014-10-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a sensitive indicator of persistent or recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer of follicular cell origin. Detection of Tg in human serum is challenging as bio-receptors, such as anti-Tg, used in immunoassay have relatively weak binding affinity. We engineer sensing surfaces using the competitive adsorption of proteins, termed the Vroman Effect. Coupled with Surface Plasmon Resonance, the "cross-responsive" interactions of Tg on the engineered surfaces produce uniquely distinguishable multiple signature patterns, which are discriminated using Linear Discriminant Analysis. Tg-spiked samples, down to 2 ng/ml Tg in undiluted human serum, are sensitively and selectively discriminated from the control (undiluted human serum).

  6. Surface adsorption and hopping cause probe-size-dependent microrheology of actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Tang, Jay X.

    2011-04-01

    A network of filaments formed primarily by the abundant cytoskeletal protein actin gives animal cells their shape and elasticity. The rheological properties of reconstituted actin networks have been studied by tracking micron-sized probe beads embedded within the networks. We investigate how microrheology depends on surface properties of probe particles by varying the stickiness of their surface. For this purpose, we chose carboxylate polystyrene (PS) beads, silica beads, bovine serum albumin (BSA) -coated PS beads, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) -grafted PS beads, which show descending stickiness to actin filaments, characterized by confocal imaging and microrheology. Probe size dependence of microrheology is observed for all four types of beads. For the slippery PEG beads, particle-tracking microrheology detects weaker networks using smaller beads, which tend to diffuse through the network by hopping from one confinement “cage” to another. This trend is reversed for the other three types of beads, for which microrheology measures stiffer networks for smaller beads due to physisorption of nearby filaments to the bead surface. We explain the probe size dependence with two simple models. We also evaluate depletion effect near nonadsorption bead surface using quantitative image analysis and discuss the possible impact of depletion on microrheology. Analysis of these effects is necessary in order to accurately define the actin network rheology both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Facile Synthesis of Prussian Blue Derivate-Modified Mesoporous Material via Photoinitiated Thiol-Ene Click Reaction for Cesium Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Ma, Jiaqi; He, Weiwei; Hua, Daoben

    2015-08-01

    A novel strategy to synthesize a functional mesoporous material for efficient removal of cesium is reported. Specifically, Prussian blue derivate-modified SBA-15 (SBA-15@FC) was prepared by photoinitiated thiol-ene reaction between thiol-modified SBA-15 and pentacyano(4-vinyl pyridine)ferrate complex. The effects of weight percentage of the Prussian blue derivate, pH, adsorbent dose, co-existing ions, and initial concentration were evaluated on the adsorption of cesium ions. The adsorption kinetically follows a pseudo-second-order model and reaches equilibrium within 2 h with a high adsorption capacity of about 13.90 mg Cs g(-1) , which indicates that SBA-15@FC is a promising adsorbent to effectively remove cesium from aqueous solutions. PMID:25965318

  8. Glycine adsorption and photo-reaction over ZnO(000ī) single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y. K.; Traeger, F.; Wöll, C.; Idriss, H.

    2014-06-01

    The adsorption and reaction of the amino acid glycine (NH2CH2COOH) are studied experimentally on the polar single crystal surface of zinc oxide, ZnO(000ī), by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) under UV light in presence and absence of molecular O2. Deposition at 350 K mainly resulted in a largely deprotonated monolayer (NH2CH2COO-(a) + OH(s); where O is surface oxygen, (a) is for adsorbed and (s) is for surface species) identified by its XPS C1s binding energy at 289.3 eV (COO), 286.7 eV (CH2) and XPS O1s at 531.8 eV (COO). A decrease in the signals of all functional groups of the adsorbed glycine (monitored by their C1s, O1s, and N1s lines) is seen upon UV excitation in the absence and presence of O2 pressures up to 5 × 10- 6 mbar. The photoreaction cross sections extracted from the decrease in the C1s peaks were found to be = 2.6 × 10- 18 (COO(a)) and 1.4 × 10- 18(CH2) cm2. The photoactivity of the ZnO(000ī) surface under UHV-conditions is found to be comparable to that seen in direct photolysis of amino acids in solution.

  9. ZnS nanostructured thin-films deposited by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, S. G.; Jariwala, Akshay; Agarwal, Anubha; Patel, Chetna; Panchal, A. K.; Kheraj, Vipul

    2016-04-01

    ZnS thin films were grown on glass substrate using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique at room temperature. Aqueous solutions of ZnCl2 and Na2S were used as precursors. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Raman spectroscopy and optical absorption measurements were applied to study the structural, surface morphology and optical properties of as-deposited ZnS thin films. The X-ray diffraction profiles revealed that ZnS thin films consist of crystalline grains with cubic phase. Spherical nano grains of random size and well covered on the glass substrate were observed from FESEM. The average grain size were found to be 77 nm, 100 nm and 124 nm for 20 cycles, 40 cycles and 60 cycles samples respectively. For 60 cycle sample, Raman spectra show two prominent peaks at 554 cm-1 and 1094 cm-1. The optical band gap values were found to be 3.76 eV, 3.72 eV and 3.67 eV for 20 cycle, 40 cycle and 60 cycle samples respectively.

  10. Volatile emission in dry seeds as a way to probe chemical reactions during initial asymptomatic deterioration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nature and kinetics of reactions in dry seeds determines how long they survive. We used gas chromatography to assay volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted from seeds of three unrelated species as a means to non-invasively probe chemical changes during very dry, dry and humid (15, 33 and 75% RH...

  11. Surface reactions of iron - enriched smectites: adsorption and transformation of hydroxy fatty acids and phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polubesova, Tamara; Olshansky, Yaniv; Eldad, Shay; Chefetz, Benny

    2014-05-01

    Iron-enriched smectites play an important role in adsorption and transformation of soil organic components. Soil organo-clay complexes, and in particular humin contain hydroxy fatty acids, which are derived from plant biopolymer cutin. Phenolic acids belong to another major group of organic acids detected in soil. They participate in various soil processes, and are of concern due to their allelopathic activity. We studied the reactivity of iron-enriched smectites (Fe(III)-montmorillonite and nontronite) toward both groups of acids. We used fatty acids- 9(10),16-dihydroxypalmitic acid (diHPA), isolated from curtin, and 9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic acid (triHPA); the following phenolic acids were used: ferulic, p-coumaric, syringic, and vanillic. Adsorption of both groups of acids was measured. The FTIR spectra of fatty acid-mineral complexes indicated inner-sphere complexation of fatty acids with iron-enriched smectites (versus outer-sphere complexation with Ca(II)-montmorillonite). The LC-MS results demonstrated enhanced esterification of fatty acids on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces (as compared to Ca(II)-montmorillonite). This study suggests that fatty acids can be esterified on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces, which results in the formation of stable organo-mineral complexes. These complexes may serve as a model for the study of natural soil organo-clay complexes and humin. The reaction of phenolic acids with Fe(III)-montmorillonite demonstrated their oxidative transformation by the mineral surfaces, which was affected by molecular structure of acids. The following order of their transformation was obtained: ferulic >syringic >p-coumaric >vanillic. The LC-MS analysis demonstrated the presence of dimers, trimers, and tetramers of ferulic acid on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite. Oxidation and transformation of ferulic acid were more intense on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite as compared to Fe(III) in solution due to stronger complexation on

  12. A highly sensitive aptasensor for OTA detection based on hybridization chain reaction and fluorescent perylene probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wu, Yuanya; Chen, Yanfen; Weng, Bo; Xu, Liqun; Li, Changming

    2016-07-15

    An optical aptasensor was developed for ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification strategy and fluorescent perylene probe (PAPDI)/DNA composites. Dendritic DNA concatamers were synthesized by HCR strategy and modified on magnetic nanoparticles through aptamer as medium. A large amount of PAPDI probe aggregated under the induction of DNA concatamers and caused fluorescence quenching. In the presence of OTA, the PAPDI/DNA composites were released from magnetic nanoparticles due to the strong affinity between aptamer and OTA. In ethanol, PAPDI monomers disaggregated and produced strong fluorescence. The present method displays excellent sensitivity and selectivity towards OTA. PMID:26938491

  13. Oligonucleotides as probes for studying polymerization reactions in dilute aqueous solution: II. Polycondensations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, V.; Orgel, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    We have prepared a [32P]-labeled oligonucleotide probe carrying a ureido (-NH-CO-NH2) function at its 3'-terminus. This labeled oligomer was used to study polycondensations of urea and formaldehyde and of various phenols and formaldehyde in aqueous solution. The formation of formaldehyde copolymers attached to the amido-function of the probe was monitored by gel electrophoresis. Our results are generally in agreement with those obtained using conventional techniques. Our method is suitable for monitoring potentially prebiotic polycondensation reactions involving formaldehyde.

  14. Oligonucleotides as probes for studying polymerization reactions in dilute aqueous solution. 2: Polycondensations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Vera; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1995-01-01

    We have prepared a (P-32)-labeled oligonucleotide probe carrying a ureido (-NH-CO-NH2) function at its 3'-terminus. This labeled oligomer was used to study polycondensations of urea and formaldehyde and of various phenols and formaldehyde in aqueous solution. The formation of formaldehyde copolymers attached to the amido-function of the probe was monitored by gel electrophoresis. Our results are generally in agreement with those obtained using conventional techniques. Our method is suitable for monitoring potentially prebiotic polycondensation reactions involving formaldehyde.

  15. Adsorption and reaction of acetylene and ethylene on the Si(001)2×1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Yeom, Han Woong; Matsuda, Iwao; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2000-08-01

    The electronic structures and the thermal reaction of chemisorbed C2H2 and C2H4 on the Si(001)2×1 surface have been investigated by carbon K-edge near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) using synchrotron radiation. The bonding and antibonding states due to the interaction of the molecules and the Si surface atoms are identified by detailed polarization-dependent UPS and NEXAFS measurements, respectively. These bonding and antibonding states are shown to originate from the hybridization between the occupied Si dangling bonds and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (π*C-C) of C2H2 and C2H4 double-σ-bonded on the top of the Si dimer. The thermal evolution of mainly C2H2 is investigated in detail for a wide temperature range of 60-1500 K from the condensation to the surface alloy formation. The coexistence of the physisorbatelike and the chemisorbed molecular species is observed at 70-90 K for C2H2 and C2H4, for the coverages greater than ~0.25 monolayer (ML). The π*C-C resonance of those physisorbatelike C2H4 species in NEXAFS exhibits an unusual polarization dependence indicating adsorption with their molecular planes aligned perpendicular to the surface. The dissociation of C2H2 chemisorbates is shown to occur at 600-700 K as observed by UPS. After the dissociation of molecules, the atomic hydrogen adsorbates are identified by the monohydridelike surface resonance states in the UP spectra at 800-950 K. Most of the Si dangling bonds are passivated by, at least partly, the hydrogen adsorbates at this stage. At ~1000 K, the desorption of hydrogen occurs, which accompanies the appearance of a broad SiC-like feature in the UP spectra at ~3 eV below Fermi level.

  16. Probing Aluminum Reactions in Combustion and Explosion Via the Kinetic Isotope Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappan, Bryce

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism that controls the reaction speed of aluminum in explosion and combustion is poorly understood, and experimentally difficult to measure. Recently, work in our laboratory has demonstrated that during the combustion of nanoparticulate aluminum with H2O or D2O, different reaction rates due to the kinetic isotope effect are observed. This result is the first-ever observed kinetic isotope effect in a metal combustion reaction and verifies that chemical reaction kinetics play a major role in determining the global burning rate. During or shortly after a detonation, however, the reaction rates are dramatically faster and the physical mechanism controlling Al reaction is likely different than during combustion events. To utilize the kinetic isotope effect to probe Al reactions in detonation, formulations were produced that contain powdered Al in deuterated high explosives and high-fidelity detonation velocity were determined along with PDV measurements to observe early wall velocity expansion measurements. The JWL equation of state was solved to determine temperature, pressure and energies at specific time periods, in addition of Gurney energies, which enables the elucidation of Al reaction extent. By comparison of the Al oxidation with LiF, data indicate that Al oxidation occurs on an extremely fast time scale and isotope effects in both the HE detonation and post-detonation Al reactions are discussed.

  17. Nonlinear optical property of hemicyanine self-assembled monolayers on gold and its adsorption kinetics probed by optical second-harmonic generation and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraoka, Ryo; Kaise, Go; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Okawa, Haruki; Ikezawa, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Kazuhiko

    2002-08-01

    We have prepared the organosulfur self-assembled monolayer (SAM) containing hemicyanine on gold. It shows a large second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χzzz=58 pm/V. The adsorption kinetics of the SAM on gold was also probed by the in situ real time measurements of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. While the SHG kinetics was saturated immediately after the immersion of the gold substrate in the solution, the SPR kinetics showed additional slow adsorption for more than 20 000 s. This means that rapid formation of the well-ordered hemicyanine SAM is followed by gradual physisorption where the molecules are disordered.

  18. Oligonucleotides as probes for studying polymerization reactions in dilute aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, V.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    We have prepared a [32P]-labled oligonucleotide probe carrying a free primary amine at its 3'-terminus. This probe is used to initiate polymerization of aziridine (ethyleneimine) in aqueous solution. The nature of the oligomeric products and the kinetics of their formation are then monitored by gel electrophoresis. Our results are generally consistent with those obtained using conventional techniques. We have also investigated the effect of polyanionic templates on the rate of oligomerization of aziridine. We find that water-soluble polyanions generally accelerate the polymerization. The sodium salt of polymethacrylic acid is the most effective of the templates that we studied. The methods introduced in this paper should be applicable to a variety of polymerization reactions in aqueous solution. They should greatly simplify the screening of potentially prebiotic polymerization reactions.

  19. Modulation of flat-band voltage on H-terminated silicon-on-insulator pseudo-metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors by adsorption and reaction events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Girjesh; Rosei, Federico; Lopinski, Gregory P.

    2011-05-01

    Accumulation mode pseudo-MOSFETs formed on hydrogen terminated silicon-on-insulator (SOI-H) were used to probe molecular adsorption and reaction events. Current-voltage characteristics of such n-channel devices are found to be sensitive to the environment, with the accumulation threshold voltage, or flat-band voltage, exhibiting large reversible changes upon cycling between ambient atmosphere, high vacuum (<10-5 Torr), and exposure to water and pyridine vapor at pressures in the Torr range. The field-effect mobility is found to be comparatively less affected through these transitions. Oxidation of the H-terminated surface in ambient conditions leads to irreversible shifts in both the flat-band voltage and the field-effect mobility. A photochemical gas phase reaction with decene is used to form a decyl monolayer on the SOI(100)-H surface. Formation of this monolayer is found to result in a relatively small shift of the threshold voltage and only a slight degradation of the field effect mobility, suggesting that alkyl monolayer dielectrics formed in this way could function as good passivating dielectrics in field effect sensing applications.

  20. Monochrome Multiplexing in Polymerase Chain Reaction by Photobleaching of Fluorogenic Hydrolysis Probes.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Friedrich; Trotter, Martin; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2016-03-01

    Multiplexing in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a technique widely used to save cost and sample material and to increase sensitivity compared to distributing a sample to several singleplex reactions. One of the most common methods to detect the different amplification products is the use of fluorogenic probes that emit at different wavelengths (colors). To reduce the number of detection channels, several methods for monochrome multiplexing have been suggested. However, they pose restrictions to the amplifiable target length, the sequence, or the melting temperature. To circumvent these limitations, we suggest a novel approach that uses different fluorophores with the same emission maximum. Discrimination is achieved by their different fluorescence stability during photobleaching. Atto488 (emitting at the same wavelength as 6-carboxyfluorescein, FAM) and Atto467N (emitting at the same wavelength as cyanine 5, Cy5) were found to bleach significantly less than FAM and Cy5; i.e., the final fluorescence of Atto dyes was more than tripled compared to FAM and Cy5. We successfully applied this method by performing a 4-plex PCR targeting antibiotic resistance genes in S. aureus using only 2 color channels. Confidence of discrimination between the targets was >99.9% at high copy initial copy numbers of 100 000 copies. Cases where both targets were present could be discriminated with equal confidence for Cy5 channel and reduced levels of confidence (>68%) for FAM channel. Moreover, a 2-plex digital PCR reaction in 1 color channel was shown. In the future, the degree of multiplexing may be increased by adding fluorogenic probe pairs with other emission wavelengths. The method may also be applied to other probe and assay formats, such as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes and immunoassays. PMID:26840905

  1. Low energy electron induced reactions in fluorinated acetamide - probing negative ions and neutral stable counterparts*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopyra, Janina; König-Lehmann, Constanze; Illenberger, Eugen; Warneke, Jonas; Swiderek, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Electron impact to trifluoroacetamide (CF3CONH2, TFAA) in the energy range 0-12 eV leads to a variety of negative fragment ions which are formed via dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The underlying reactions range from single bond cleavages to remarkably complex reactions that lead to loss of the neutral units HF, H2O and HNCO as deduced from their directly observed ionic counterparts (M - H2O)-, (M - HF)- and (M - HNCO)-. Also formed are the pseudo-halogen ions CN- and OCN-. All these reactions proceed dominantly via a resonance located near 1 eV, i.e., electrons at subexcitation energies trigger reactions involving multiple bond cleavages. The electron induced generation of the neutral molecules HF, H2O and HNCO in condensed TFAA films is probed by temperature controlled thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) which can be viewed as a complementary techniques to gas-phase experiments in DEA to directly probe the neutral counterparts. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  2. Proposed experimental probes of chemical reaction molecular dynamics in solution: ICN photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, I.; Wilson, Kent R.

    1989-04-01

    Knowledge of how translational and rotational motions are influenced by the solvent during the course of a photodissociation ``half-collision'' reaction in solution is of interest in itself and can also help our understanding of how thermally activated reactions take place in solution by means of fluctuations in translational and rotational motion. With this goal, the molecular dynamics of the photodissociation of the triatomic molecule ICN are compared in the gas phase and in Xe solution. The time evolution of the trajectories (particularly with respect to interfragment distance and CN orientation) and of the energy partitioning (particularly into fragment translational recoil and into rotation of the CN) are displayed. Two types of solution experiments are proposed and simulated, both closely related to recent gas phase studies by Dantus, Rosker, and Zewail. These experiments are designed to probe the detailed dynamics of chemical reactions in solution during the time period the reaction is in progress, in particular to reveal the dramatic effects of the solvent on translational motions and energies. Both are pump-probe experiments in which the first photon dissociates the ICN and the second induces fluorescence in the CN fragment. In the first type of experiment, which is particularly sensitive to fragment translational motion, the fluorescence intensity is measured as a function of photon energy and of time delay. In the second type of experiment, which is particularly sensitive to fragment rotation, in addition the angle between the polarizations of the pump and probe photons is varied. In the calculations presented here, the effect of the absorption of the photodissociation photon is treated using the classical Frank-Condon principle. The coupling between the assumed two upper electronic surfaces is taken into account semiclassically using a generalization to the condensed phase of the classical electron model of Miller and Meyer, which was applied to ICN

  3. Adsorption and reaction of trace gas-phase organic compounds on atmospheric water film surfaces: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, D J; Valsaraj, Kalliat T

    2010-02-01

    The air-water interface in atmospheric water films of aerosols and hydrometeors (fog, mist, ice, rain, and snow) presents an important surface for the adsorption and reaction of many organic trace gases and gaseous reactive oxidants (hydroxyl radical (OH(.)), ozone (O(3)), singlet oxygen (O(2)((1)Delta(g))), nitrate radicals (NO(3)(.)), and peroxy radicals (RO(2)(.)). Knowledge of the air-water interface partition constant of hydrophobic organic species is necessary for elucidating the significance of the interface in atmospheric fate and transport. Various methods of assessing both experimental and theoretical values of the thermodynamic partition constant and adsorption isotherm are described in this review. Further, the reactivity of trace gases with gas-phase oxidants (ozone and singlet oxygen) at the interface is summarized. Oxidation products are likely to be more water-soluble and precursors for secondary organic aerosols in hydrometeors. Estimation of characteristic times shows that heterogeneous photooxidation in water films can compete effectively with homogeneous gas-phase reactions for molecules in the atmosphere. This provides further support to the existing thesis that reactions of organic compounds at the air-water interface should be considered in gas-phase tropospheric chemistry. PMID:20058916

  4. Picosecond infrared spectroscopy as probe for photochemical or thermal reactions in solid matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.; Funk, D.J.; Strauss, C.E.M.; Stoutland, P.O.

    1998-08-01

    Spectroscopy in the mid-IR on timescales from pico to milliseconds has been developed for the study of laser-material interactions over broad timescales. To reach these timescales the authors have employed two configurations: (1) for the ps to ns timescale a one and a two stage difference frequency mixing setup is employed, (2) for the longer timescale, CW mid-IR laser diodes have been used. In general, they excite the sample with one pulse at 1064/266/355 nm and probe some time later in the mid IR (2900--800 cm{sup {minus}1}). In the case of photochemical reaction, they excite the sample directly in the UV. Alternatively, they initiate thermal reactions by pumping a heater dye at 1.064 {micro}m, which quickly converts the photon energy into heat. The potential of this technique to study reactions in the solid state was demonstrated for a photochemically induced (266 nm) reaction (Wolff rearrangement of a {alpha}-diazo-ketone to {alpha}-keto-ketene) in a polymer matrix. Thermal initiation resulted in a similar reaction. The position, amplitude and width of the product bands changed, they believe due to additional side reactions and temperature effects.

  5. Adsorption and reaction of sulfur dioxide on alumina and sodium-impregnated alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.B.; Sheinker, V.N.; White, M.G.

    1996-05-02

    The adsorption and oxidation of SO{sub 2} on alumina and sodium-impregnated alumina has been examined using thermogravimetric analysis and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. Sulfur dioxide chemisorbs initially at basic sites to form an adsorbed sulfite, which is quantitatively converted to sulfate on oxidation. It has been observed that at low coverages, nearly 2.6 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}, sodium acts as a promoter for the formation of an adsorbed sulfite and sulfate which have structures similar to those of aluminum sulfite and sulfate, respectively. At higher sodium loadings, a second type of adsorbed SO{sub 2} is formed, similar to sodium sulfite and sulfate. The species with the aluminum sulfate structure appears to be more easily decomposed than does the sodium sulfate species and accounts for the regenerable adsorption capacity. Formation of the sodium sulfate species appears to account for the loss of adsorption capacity as the number of adsorption/regeneration cycles increases. Oxidation of the sulfite form to the sulfate form can occur in the absence of added oxygen, but it is an activated process and begins to occur in measurable amounts at temperatures between 150 and 300{degree}C. Partitioning of adsorbed SO{sub 2} between aluminum and sodium forms is not a function of temperature and depends on only sodium loading. 32 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Adsorption and solid catalysed reaction between activated carbon impregnated with SnO 2 and CO at ordinary temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyuke, Sunny E.; Ahmadun, Fakhru'l.-Razi

    2002-02-01

    We have used pressure swing adsorption (PSA) measurements to study the reaction of CO adsorbed from H 2/CO (75/25 vol.%) onto an activated carbon-tin(IV) oxide (AC-SnO 2) catalyst to form gaseous CO 2. Unimpregnated pure activated carbon was used for comparison. Our data fit well to Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with a rate constant of 0.022 s -1 and an equilibrium constant of 1.04, indicating first-order kinetics. We conclude that chemisorption takes place preferentially on the adsorbed O - sites produced during the thermal pre-treatment of the catalyst.

  7. High-resolution photoemission study of acetylene adsorption and reaction with the Si(100)-2x1 surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.H.; Yang, Y.; Keeffe, M.; Lapeyre, G.J.; Rotenberg, E.

    1999-02-09

    The adsorption and reaction of acetylene with the Si{approximately}100-231 surface has been studied using high-resolution photoemission by monitoring the Si 2p,C 1s, and valence-band (VB) spectra as a function of both acetylene coverage and post-adsorption annealing temperature. After the clean Si(100) surface is exposed to 0.5 monolayer (ML) acetylene, the surface state in the VB is absent. Meanwhile, the curve-fitting results show that there is only one interface component in the Si 2p core level. These results indicate that the asymmetric Si dimers may become symmetric dimers after acetylene adsorption, which can be explained well by the tetra-sigma model determined from our previous photoelectron holographic results. Significant changes in the electronic structure (Si 2p,C 1s, and VB) are found after subsequent annealing of the saturation overlayer. Annealing at lower temperature can induce some acetylene molecule desorption while most of the molecules decompose into C2Hx (x=1,0) and H species. After annealing above 660C, both of the reacted components of the Si 2p and C 1s lines show that the SiC species form clusterlike features. At the same time, the VB and Si 2p spectra indicate a restoration of a Si(100)-2x1 structure, and the asymmetric Si dimers reappear on the surface.

  8. Primary processes in isolated Photosystem II reaction centres probed by magic angle transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, David R.; Rech, Thomas; Melissa Joseph, D.; Barber, James; Durrant, James R.; Porter, George

    1995-05-01

    There is currently some disagreement regarding the dominant time constant for formation of the radical pair state P680 +Ph - in isolated photosystem two reaction centres. It has recently been suggested that this disagreement may originate, at least in part, from different polarisations of the pump and probe beams used in optical experiments. In this paper, we present data collected using a magic angle configuration of the pump and probe polarisations. We find that these data support our previous interpretation of data collected using a parallel polarisation configuration. Moreover, we present further evidence to support our conclusion that formation of the P680 +Ph - state primarily occurs with a 21 ps time constant when P680 is directly excited. A 3 ps component is also observed; this component is not associated with a large proportion of the radical pair formation. We discuss our data and interpretation in comparison with those of other groups.

  9. Changes in Practice Schedule and Functional Task Difficulty: a Study Using the Probe Reaction Time Technique

    PubMed Central

    Akizuki, Kazunori; Ohashi, Yukari

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] Motor learning is accelerated most by optimized task difficulty. When task difficulty is optimized, the amount of information required to complete the task matches the learner's information processing abilities. The practice schedule is one of the factors which changes the amount of task information. We investigated the influence of changes in practice schedule on the amount of task information using the probe reaction time technique. [Methods] Fourteen young male subjects were randomly assigned to a blocked or random practice group. They were required to perform two tasks simultaneously. The primary task consisted of treadmill walking with specific step lengths, and the secondary task consisted of a probe reaction time task. [Results] The blocked practice group was superior to the random practice group in performance during the acquisition phase. In contrast, the random practice group was superior to the blocked practice group in performance during the retention phase. Furthermore, the random practice group had a longer reaction time than the blocked practice group. [Conclusion] From the standpoint of the challenge point framework, motor learning may be accelerated by random practice because random practice probably elicits greater attentional demand than blocked practice. PMID:24259863

  10. Effect of Fluorescently Labeling Protein Probes on Kinetics of Protein-Ligand Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y.S.; Landry, J.P.; Fei, Y.Y.; Luo, J.T.; Wang, X.B.; Lam, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Un-labeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured kon and koff for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as KD = koff/kon, for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3 ~ 4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye; and (2) KD for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  11. Effect of fluorescently labeling protein probes on kinetics of protein-ligand reactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y S; Landry, J P; Fei, Y Y; Zhu, X D; Luo, J T; Wang, X B; Lam, K S

    2008-12-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Unlabeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured k(on) and k(off) for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as K(D) = k(off)/k(on), for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3-4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye and (2) K(D) for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  12. Electron and energy transfer as probes of interparticle ion-exchange reactions in zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, E.S.; Snowden, P.T.; Kim, Y.I.; Mallouk, T.E. )

    1993-08-19

    Photoinduced electron transfer and energy transfer reactions of tris(2,2[prime]-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+]) with methylviologen (MV[sup 2+]) and tris(2,2[prime]-bipyridyl)osmium(II) (Os(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+]) ion-exchanged onto/into separate zeolite Y particles were studied by emission spectroscopy. The kinetics of interparticle exchange were probed by observing the quenching of the MLCT excited state of-Ru(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] by mobile MV[sup 2+] or OS(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] ions. The exchange reactions occur on time scales of seconds to hours, depending on the ionic strength of the surrounding medium. The time-dependent luminescence data were fitted to a dispersed kinetics model, from which average rate constants for the exchange reactions could be extracted. Time constants for interparticle exchange of MV[sup 2+] and Os(bpy)[sub 3][sup 2+] ions, in the range 10[sup 3]-10[sup 5] s at electrolyte concentrations of 0.1-3 mM, are significantly longer than the time scales (10[sup [minus]7]-10[sup 1] s) of most electrochemical and photochemical intrazeolitic reactions involving these and similar electroactive ions. These results argue for reaction mechanisms that invoke intrazeolite electron transfer, rather than exchange of electroactive ions followed by solution-phase electron transfer, in these systems. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Adsorptive capacity and evolution of the pore structure of alumina on reaction with gaseous hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Grant J; Agbenyegah, Gordon E K; Hyland, Margaret M; Metson, James B

    2015-05-19

    Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) specific surface areas are generally used to gauge the propensity of uptake on adsorbents, with less attention paid to kinetic considerations. We explore the importance of such parameters by modeling the pore size distributions of smelter grade aluminas following HF adsorption, an industrially important process in gas cleaning at aluminum smelters. The pore size distributions of industrially fluorinated aluminas, and those contacted with HF in controlled laboratory trials, are reconstructed from the pore structure of the untreated materials when filtered through different models of adsorption. These studies demonstrate the presence of three distinct families of pores: those with uninhibited HF uptake, kinetically limited porosity, and pores that are surface blocked after negligible scrubbing. The surface areas of the inaccessible and blocked pores will overinflate estimates of the adsorption capacity of the adsorbate. We also demonstrate, contrary to conventional understanding, that porosity changes are attributed not to monolayer uptake but more reasonably to pore length attenuation. The model assumes nothing specific regarding the Al2O3-HF system and is therefore likely general to adsorbate/adsorbent phenomena. PMID:25913681

  14. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde on Stoichiometric and Defective SrTiO{sub 3}(100) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li Q.; Ferris, Kim F.; Azad, Samina; Engelhard, Mark H.; Peden, Charles HF.

    2004-02-05

    The adsorption and reaction of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), on stoichiometric (TiO{sub 2}-terminated) and reduced SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surfaces, have been investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Acetaldehyde adsorbs molecularly on the stoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface that contains predominantly Ti{sup 4+} cations. The Ti{sup 4+} sites on the stoichiometric SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface are not sufficiently active for surface reactions such as aldol condensation, as opposed to the Ti{sup 4+} ions on the TiO{sub 2}(001) surface. However, decomposition and redox reactions of acetaldehyde occur in the presence of surface defects created by Ar{sup +} sputtering. The decomposition products following reactions of acetaldehyde on the defective surface include H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, CO, C{sub 4}H{sub 6} and C{sub 4}H{sub 8}. Reductive coupling, to produce C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 4}H{sub 8}, is the main reaction pathway for decomposition of acetaldehyde on the sputter reduced SrTiO{sub 3}(100) surface.

  15. Three model space experiments on chemical reactions. [Gibbs adsorption, equilibrium shift and electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P.; Facemire, B.

    1977-01-01

    Three investigations conducted aboard Skylab IV and Apollo-Soyuz involved phenomena that are of interest to the biochemistry community. The formaldehyde clock reaction and the equilibrium shift reaction experiments conducted aboard Apollo Soyuz demonstrate the effect of low-g foams or air/liquid dispersions on reaction rate and chemical equilibrium. The electrodeposition reaction experiment conducted aboard Skylab IV demonstrate the effect of a low-g environment on an electrochemical displacement reaction. The implications of the three space experiments for various applications are considered.

  16. In situ temperature measurements of reaction spaces under microwave irradiation using photoluminescent probes.

    PubMed

    Ano, Taishi; Kishimoto, Fuminao; Sasaki, Ryo; Tsubaki, Shuntaro; Maitani, Masato M; Suzuki, Eiichi; Wada, Yuji

    2016-05-11

    We demonstrate two novel methods for the measurement of the temperatures of reaction spaces locally heated by microwaves, which have been applied here to two example systems, i.e., BaTiO3 particles covered with a SiO2 shell (BaTiO3-SiO2) and layered tungstate particles. Photoluminescent (PL) probes showing the temperature-sensitivity in their PL lifetimes are located in the nanospaces of the above systems. In the case of BaTiO3-SiO2 core-shell particles, rhodamine B is loaded into the mesopores of the SiO2 shell covering the BaTiO3 core, which generates the heat through the dielectric loss of microwaves. The inner nanospace temperature of the SiO2 shell is determined to be 28 °C higher than the bulk temperature under microwave irradiation at 24 W. On the other hand, Eu(3+) is immobilized in the interlayer space of layered tungstate as the PL probe, showing that the nanospace temperature of the interlayer is only 4 °C higher than the bulk temperature. This method for temperature-measurement is powerful for controlling microwave heating and elucidates the ambiguous mechanisms of microwave special effects often observed in chemical reactions, contributing greatly to the practical application of microwaves in chemistry and materials sciences. PMID:27136754

  17. Probing the critical residues for intramolecular fructosyl transfer reaction of a levan fructotransferase.

    PubMed

    Moon, Keum-Ok; Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Kang, Ho-Young; Oh, Jeong-Il; Jang, Se Bok; Park, Cheon-Seok; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Cha, Jaeho

    2008-06-01

    Levan fructotransferase (LFTase) preferentially catalyzes the transfructosylation reaction in addition to levan hydrolysis, whereas other levan-degrading enzymes hydrolyze levan into a levan-oligosaccharide and fructose. Based on sequence comparisons and enzymatic properties, the fructosyl transfer activity of LFTase is proposed to have evolved from levanase. In order to probe the residues that are critical to the intramolecular fructosyl transfer reaction of the Microbacterium sp. AL-210 LFTase, an error-prone PCR mutagenesis process was carried out, and the mutants that led to a shift in activity from transfructosylation towards hydrolysis of levan were screened by the DNS method. After two rounds of mutagenesis, TLC and HPLC analyses of the reaction products by the selected mutants revealed two major products; one is a di-D-fructose- 2,6':6,2'-dianhydride (DFAIV) and the other is a levanbiose. The newly detected levanbiose corresponds to the reaction product from LFTase lacking transferring activity. Two mutants (2-F8 and 2-G9) showed a high yield of levanbiose (38-40%) compared with the wild-type enzyme, and thus behaved as levanases. Sequence analysis of the individual mutants responsible for the enhanced hydrolytic activity indicated that Asn-85 was highly involved in the transfructosylation activity of LFTase. PMID:18600048

  18. Probing the bioactivity-relevant chemical space of robust reactions and common molecular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Hartenfeller, Markus; Eberle, Martin; Meier, Peter; Nieto-Oberhuber, Cristina; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Schneider, Gisbert; Jacoby, Edgar; Renner, Steffen

    2012-05-25

    In the search for new bioactive compounds, there is a trend toward increasingly complex compound libraries aiming to target the demanding targets of the future. In contrast, medicinal chemistry and traditional library design rely mainly on a small set of highly established and robust reactions. Here, we probe a set of 58 such reactions for their ability to sample the chemical space of known bioactive molecules, and the potential to create new scaffolds. Combined with ~26,000 common available building blocks, the reactions retrieve around 9% of a scaffold-diverse set of compounds active on human target proteins covering all major pharmaceutical target classes. Almost 80% of generated scaffolds from virtual one-step synthesis products are not present in a large set of known bioactive molecules for human targets, indicating potential for new discoveries. The results suggest that established synthesis resources are well suited to cover the known bioactivity-relevant chemical space and that there are plenty of unexplored regions accessible by these reactions, possibly providing valuable "low-hanging fruit" for hit discovery. PMID:22512717

  19. Irreversible adsorption-driven assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces revealed by a dynamic surface tension probe.

    PubMed

    Bizmark, Navid; Ioannidis, Marios A; Henneke, Dale E

    2014-01-28

    Adsorption-driven self-assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces is a promising bottom-up approach for the preparation of advanced functional materials and devices. Full realization of its potential requires quantitative understanding of the parameters controlling the self-assembly, the structure of nanoparticles at the interface, the barrier properties of the assembly, and the rate of particle attachment. We argue that models of dynamic surface or interfacial tension (DST) appropriate for molecular species break down when the adsorption energy greatly exceeds the mean energy of thermal fluctuations and validate alternative models extending the application of generalized random sequential adsorption theory to nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces. Using a model colloidal system of hydrophobic, charge-stabilized ethyl cellulose nanoparticles at neutral pH, we demonstrate the potential of DST measurements to reveal information on the energy of adsorption, the adsorption rate constant, and the energy of particle-interface interaction at different degrees of nanoparticle coverage of the interface. These findings have significant implications for the quantitative description of nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces. PMID:24397479

  20. Probing the adsorption of weak acids on graphite using amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed M A; Huang, Jun; McPhedran, Kerry N; Zeng, Hongbo; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2015-03-17

    Recent thermodynamics calculations and adsorption isotherms showed that the adsorption of a self-assembled layer (SAL) of ionized weak acids to carbon was attributed to the negatively charged hydrogen bonding (-CAHB), yet the direct visualization and characterization of this adsorption behavior have not been reported. Here, an amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-FM AFM) technique was applied to discriminate the adsorption of decanoic acids (DA) on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Thermodynamics calculations revealed that the adsorption of SAL was driven by the formation of -CAHB with negatively charged functional groups of HOPG. Multilayer adsorption could occur over the adsorbed ionized SAL, leading to the development of aggregates. AM-FM AFM imaging showed that the adsorption of the DA molecules forming aggregates occurred only for the HOPG-functionalized steps, while DA molecules were found to adsorb over the entire functionalized HOPG surface after water-plasma treatment, as evident from the frequency shifts identified in AFM images. PMID:25710305

  1. Tetraoxygen on Reduced Ti02(110): Oxygen Adsorption and Reactions with Oxygen Vacancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Greg A.; Petrik, Nikolay G.

    2008-05-16

    Oxygen adsorption on reduced TiO2(110) is investigated using temperature programmed desorption and electron-stimulated desorption. At low temperatures, two O2 molecules can be chemisorbed in each oxygen vacancy, Ov. These molecules do not desorb upon annealing to 700 K. Instead for 200 K < T < 400 K, the two O2 convert to another species which has four oxygen atoms, i.e. tetraoxygen, that decomposes at higher temperatures. In contrast when only 1 O2 is adsorbed in an oxygen vacancy, the molecule dissociates upon annealing above ~150 K to heal the vacancy in agreement with previous results.

  2. High-resolution photoemission study of acetylene adsorption and reaction with the Si(100)-2{times}1 surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.H.; Yang, Y.; Keeffe, M.; Lapeyre, G.J.; Rotenberg, E.

    1999-10-01

    The adsorption and reaction of acetylene with the Si(100)-2{times}1 surface has been studied using high-resolution photoemission by monitoring the Si&hthinsp;2p, C&hthinsp;1s, and valence-band (VB) spectra as a function of both acetylene coverage and post-adsorption annealing temperature. After the clean Si(100) surface is exposed to 0.5 monolayer (ML) acetylene, the surface state in the VB is absent. Meanwhile, the curve-fitting results show that there is only one interface component in the Si&hthinsp;2p core level. These results indicate that the asymmetric Si dimers may become symmetric dimers after acetylene adsorption, which can be explained well by the tetra-{sigma} model determined from our previous photoelectron holographic results. Significant changes in the electronic structure (Si&hthinsp;2p, C&hthinsp;1s, and VB) are found after subsequent annealing of the saturation overlayer. Annealing at lower temperature can induce some acetylene molecule desorption while most of the molecules decompose into C{sub 2}H{sub x} (x=1,0) and H species. After annealing above 660&hthinsp;{degree}C, both of the reacted components of the Si&hthinsp;2p and C&hthinsp;1s lines show that the SiC species form clusterlike features. At the same time, the VB and Si&hthinsp;2p spectra indicate a restoration of a Si(100)-2{times}1 structure, and the asymmetric Si dimers reappear on the surface. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Adsorption and reaction of maleic anhydride on Mo(110), monolayer Pd(111)/Mo(110), and multilayer Pd(111)/Mo(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Goodman, D.W.

    1996-04-03

    The adsorption and reaction of maleic anhydride and deuterated maleic anhydride on Mo(110), monolayer Pd/Mo(110), and multilayer Pd(111)/Mo(110) surfaces have been studied using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Maleic anhydride adsorbs irreversibly on the Mo(110) surface at 100 K. Heating to 1200 K yields adsorbed carbon (C{sub ads}) and gas-phase CO and H{sub 2}. In contrast, the adsorption of maleic anhydride on monolayer Pd(111)/Mo(110) and multilayer Pd(111)/Mo(110) surfaces is largely reversible with the chemisorbed maleic anhydride desorbing at 365 and 375 K, respectively. Approximately 15% of the chemisorbed maleic anhydride decomposes upon heating to 400K, forming CO, CO{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}; C{sub 2}H{sub 2} further dehydrogenates upon heating to C{sub ads} and gas-phase H{sub 2}. The HREELS measurements indicate that maleic anhydride is bonded to multilayer Pd(111)/Mo(110) through the olefin bond in a di-{sigma} configuration, while on monolayer Pd(111)/Mo(110), the maleic anhydride is bonded to the surface through the olefin via a {pi}-bond. On the Mo(110) surface, maleic anhydride is bonded to the surface through the ring oxygen with the molecular plane perpendicular to the surface. As a result of this modified adsorption geometry, the carbonyl stretching mode is red-shifted nearly 150 cm{sup -1} on the monolayer Pd(111)/Mo(110) surface, unshifted on the multilayer Pd(111)/Mo(110) surface, and blue-shifted by nearly 100 cm{sup -1} on the Mo(110) surface. 31 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Probing Surface Sites of TiO2: Reactions with [HRe(CO)5] and [CH3Re(CO)5

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo-Lapidus, R.; Gates, B

    2010-01-01

    Two carbonyl complexes of rhenium, [HRe(CO){sub 5}] and [CH{sub 3}Re(CO){sub 5}], were used to probe surface sites of TiO{sub 2} (anatase). These complexes were adsorbed from the gas phase onto anatase powder that had been treated in flowing O{sub 2} or under vacuum to vary the density of surface OH sites. Infrared (IR) spectra demonstrate the variation in the number of sites, including Ti{sup +3} {double_bond} OH and Ti{sup +4} {double_bond} OH. IR and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra show that chemisorption of the rhenium complexes led to their decarbonylation, with formation of surface-bound rhenium tricarbonyls, when [HRe(CO){sub 5}] was adsorbed, or rhenium tetracarbonyls, when [CH{sub 3}Re(CO){sub 5}] was adsorbed. These reactions were accompanied by the formation of water and surface carbonates and removal of terminal hydroxyl groups associated with Ti{sup +3} and Ti{sup +4} ions on the anatase. Data characterizing the samples after adsorption of [HRe(CO){sub 5}] or [CH{sub 3}Re(CO){sub 5}] determined a ranking of the reactivity of the surface OH sites, with the Ti{sup +3}OH groups being the more reactive towards the rhenium complexes but the less likely to be dehydroxylated. The two rhenium pentacarbonyl probes provided complementary information, suggesting that the carbonate species originate from carbonyl ligands initially bonded to the rhenium and from hydroxyl groups of the titania surface, with the reaction leading to the formation of water and bridging hydroxyl groups on the titania. The results illustrate the value of using a family of organometallic complexes as probes of oxide surface sites.

  5. 6- and 14-Fluoro farnesyl diphosphate: mechanistic probes for the reaction catalysed by aristolochene synthase.

    PubMed

    Miller, David J; Yu, Fanglei; Knight, David W; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2009-03-01

    The catalytic mechanism of the enzyme aristolochene synthase from Penicillium roqueforti (PR-AS) has been probed with the farnesyl diphosphate analogues 6- and 14-fluoro farnesyl diphosphate (1a and 1c). Incubation of these analogues with PR-AS followed by analysis of the reaction products by GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy indicated that these synthetic FPP analogues were converted to the fluorinated germacrene A analogues 3b and 3c, respectively. In both cases the position of the fluorine atom prevented the formation of the eudesmane cation analogues 4b and 4c. These results highlight that germacrene A is an on-path reaction intermediate during PR-AS catalysis and shed light on the mechanism by which germacrene A is converted to eudesmane cation. They support the proposal that the role of PR-AS in the cyclisation is essentially passive in that it harnesses the inherent chemical reactivity present in the substrate by promoting the initial ionisation of farnesyl diphosphate and by acting as a productive template to steer the reaction through an effective series of cyclisations and rearrangements to (+)-aristolochene (7a). PMID:19225680

  6. Room temperature deposition of ZnSe thin films by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, R.B.; Lokhande, C.D. . E-mail: rb_kale@yahoo.co.in

    2004-10-04

    The zinc selenide (ZnSe) thin films are deposited onto glass substrate using relatively simple and inexpensive successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The films are deposited using zinc acetate sodium selenosulphate precursors. The concentration, pH, immersion and rinsing times and number of immersion cycles have been optimized to obtain good quality ZnSe thin films. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) study and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveals nanocrystalline nature alongwith some amorphous phase present in ZnSe thin films. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analysis shows that the films are Se deficient. From optical absorption data, the optical band gap 'E{sub g}' for as-deposited thin film was found to be 2.8 eV and electrical resistivity in the order of 10{sup 7} {omega} cm.

  7. A physical adsorption model of the dependence of ClONO2 heterogeneous reactions on relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, Bryan F.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Robinson, Jeanne M.

    We present a model of heterogeneous reactivity based on physical adsorption that describes the observed relative humidity dependence of the ClONO2 reaction probability with H2O and HCl on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate ice surfaces (SAT) and with H2O on nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). The laboratory data are modeled using only two parameters for a given system, the measured reaction probability on a neat H2O ice surface, and a constant from the BET theory which describes the fraction of an acid hydrate surface covered by H2O as a function of relative humidity. The model indicates that ClONO2 reactivity with both HCl and H2O on SAT and with H2 O on NAT is controlled by the surface coverage of H2O. In contrast, the reaction of ClONO2 +HCl on NAT is better described by an alternative model based on reactivity in solutions formed within a porous ice by capillary liquid absorption.

  8. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  9. Anion adsorption, CO oxidation, and oxygen reduction reaction on a Au(100) surface: The pH effect

    SciTech Connect

    Blizanac, Berislav B.; Lucas, Chris A.; Gallagher, Mark E.; Arenz, Matthias; Ross, Philip N.; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2004-07-29

    The effects of pH on the surface reconstruction of Au(100), on CO oxidation, and on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been studied by a combination of surface X-ray scattering (SXS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) measurements. In harmony with previous SXS and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) results, the potential-induced hexagonal (''hex'') to (1 x 1) transition occurs faster in an alkaline electrolyte than in acidic media. In alkaline solution, CO adsorption facilitates the formation of a ''hex'' phase; in acid solution, however, CO has negligible effect on the potential range of thermodynamic stability of the ''hex'' <--> (1 x 1) transition. We propose that in KOH the continuous removal of OHad in the Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction (CO + OH) CO2 + H+ + e- may stabilize the ''hex'' phase over a much wider potential range than in CO-free solution. In acid solution, where specifically adsorbing anions cannot be displaced by CO from the Au(100) surface, CO has negligible effect on the equilibrium potential for the ''hex'' <--> (1 x 1) transition. Such a mechanism is in agreement with the pH-dependent oxidation of CO. The ORR is also affected by the pH of solution. It is proposed that the pH-dependent kinetics of the ORR on Au(100) can be unraveled by finding the relationship between kinetic rates and two terms: (i) the energetic term of the Au(100)-O2- interaction determines the potential regions where the rate-determining step O2 + e = O2- occurs, and (ii) the preexponential term determines the availability of active sites for the adsorption of O2-.

  10. Polymerase chain reaction as a tool for developing stress protein probes

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, B.J.; Mattley, Y.D. . Dept. of Biology); Snell, T.W. . Div. of Biology)

    1994-08-01

    Because of the high degree of evolutionary conservation of stress proteins, potential exists for the development of nucleic acid probes from particular species that could be used to monitor stress-related changes in mRNA abundance. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful tool that can be applied to the generation of these probes, provided that primer sequences can be identified that specifically amplify sequences of interest from a wide variety of organisms. The authors identified such sequences from multiple alignments of published chaperonin and stress-70 sequences, and tested their ability to amplify appropriately sized fragments from genomic DNA from a variety of vertebrates and invertebrates. Although no primer pair could be used successfully with all species, the authors were able to derive specific products from most species by testing different pairs. One primer pair for chaperonin proved particularly useful. Products were obtained from all tested species, and with a single exception (human), these primers appeared to amplify a single copy sequence. The authors determined the nucleotide sequence of the product obtained from the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis and determined by phylogenetic analysis of the inferred protein product that the product obtained is most likely derived from a rotifer DNA template. Finally, the authors show that this product can be used to detect changes in abundance of homologous mRNA in heat-stressed rotifers.

  11. Detection of coliform bacteria in water by polymerase chain reaction and gene probes.

    PubMed Central

    Bej, A K; Steffan, R J; DiCesare, J; Haff, L; Atlas, R M

    1990-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and gene probe detection of regions of two genes, lacZ and lamB, were tested for their abilities to detect coliform bacteria. Amplification of a segment of the coding region of Escherichia coli lacZ by using a PCR primer annealing temperature of 50 degrees C detected E. coli and other coliform bacteria (including Shigella spp.) but not Salmonella spp. and noncoliform bacteria. Amplification of a region of E. coli lamB by using a primer annealing temperature of 50 degrees C selectively detected E. coli and Salmonella and Shigella spp. PCR amplification and radiolabeled gene probes detected as little as 1 to 10 fg of genomic E. coli DNA and as a few as 1 to 5 viable E. coli cells in 100 ml of water. PCR amplification of lacZ and lamB provides a basis for a method to detect indicators of fecal contamination of water, and amplification of lamB in particular permits detection of E. coli and enteric pathogens (Salmonella and Shigella spp.) with the necessary specificity and sensitivity for monitoring the bacteriological quality of water so as to ensure the safety of water supplies. Images PMID:2306085

  12. Adsorption and reactions of methanethiol on clean and modified Ni(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, D.R. )

    1989-08-10

    The reactions of methanethiol on clean and modified Ni(110) have been studied under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions by temperature-programmed reactions (TPR), including deuterium incorporation studies. Surface bound molecular fragments were identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The TPR data indicate that the major products of the reactions of methanethiol with clean Ni(110) surfaces are methane and hydrogen. Methane desorbs in a reaction-limited peak at 276 K, which does not shift with methanethiol exposure. Hydrogen desorption occurs in several peaks depending on the exposure. The coverage dependence of the methane yield indicates a competition between decomposition and reaction to form methane. At low coverages, decomposition is the major pathway while at higher coverages methane formation dominates. Vibrational spectroscopy (HREELS) indicates the presence of the methyl thiolate intermediate at temperatures less than 200 K. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and deuterium incorporation experiments confirm this assignment. A mechanism has been proposed based on hydrogenolysis of the methyl thiolate species and is consistent with all of the data. The appropriate rate equations associated with this mechanism have been solved numerically to predict the TPR data, and qualitative agreement was achieved. Methanethiol reacts with sulfur- and oxygen-modified Ni(110) surfaces to produce methane, hydrogen, and, in the case of the oxidized surfaces, water. The major effect of the modifier was to enhance the formation of methane relative to decomposition. These observations can be explained by either electronic or structural effects.

  13. Probing surface distributions of α clusters in 20Ne via α -transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Tokuro; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Suhara, Tadahiro; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Background: Direct evidence of the α -cluster manifestation in bound states has not been obtained yet, although a number of experimental studies were carried out to extract the information of the clustering. In particular in conventional analyses of α -transfer reactions, there exist a few significant problems on reaction models, which are insufficient to qualitatively discuss the cluster structure. Purpose: We aim to verify the manifestation of the α -cluster structure from observables. As the first application, we plan to extract the spatial information of the cluster structure of the 20Ne nucleus in its ground state through the cross section of the α -transfer reaction 16O(6Li,d )20Ne. Methods: For the analysis of the transfer reaction, we work with the coupled-channel Born approximation (CCBA) approach, in which the breakup effect of 6Li is explicitly taken into account by means of the continuum-discretized coupled-channel method based on the three-body α +d +16O model. The two methods are adopted to calculate the overlap function between 20Ne and α +16O ; one is the microscopic cluster model (MCM) with the generator coordinate method, and the other is the phenomenological two-body potential model (PM). Results: We show that the CCBA calculation with the MCM wave function gives a significant improvement of the theoretical result on the angular distribution of the transfer cross section, which is consistent with the experimental data. Employing the PM, it is discussed which region of the cluster wave function is probed on the transfer cross section. Conclusions: It is found that the surface region of the cluster wave function is sensitive to the cross section. The present work is situated as the first step in obtaining important information to systematically investigate the cluster structure.

  14. Probing adsorption of polyacrylamide-based polymers on anisotropic Basal planes of kaolinite using quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Alagha, Lana; Wang, Shengqun; Yan, Lujie; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob

    2013-03-26

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was applied to investigate the adsorption characteristics of polyacrylamide-based polymers (PAMs) on anisotropic basal planes of kaolinite. Kaolinite basal planes were differentiated by depositing kaolinite nanoparticles (KNPs) on silica and alumina sensors in solutions of controlled pH values. Adsorption of an in-house synthesized organic-inorganic Al(OH)3-PAM (Al-PAM) as an example of cationic hybrid PAM and a commercially available partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (MF1011) as an example of anionic PAM was studied. Cationic Al-PAM was found to adsorb irreversibly and preferentially on tetrahedral silica basal planes of kaolinite. In contrast, anionic MF1011 adsorbed strongly on aluminum-hydroxy basal planes, while its adsorption on tetrahedral silica basal planes was weak and reversible. Adsorption study revealed that both electrostatic attraction and hydrogen-bonding mechanisms contribute to adsorption of PAMs on kaolinite. The adsorbed Al-PAM layer was able to release trapped water overtime and became more compact, while MF1011 film became more dissipative as backbones stretched out from kaolinite surface with minimal overlapping. Experimental results obtained from this study provide clear insights into the phenomenon that governs flocculation-based solid-liquid separation processes using multicomponent flocculants of anionic and cationic nature. PMID:23398356

  15. Enhancement of selective decomposition. Adsorption and reaction of methanethiol on carbon-covered W(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, D.R.; Lyman, P.F.

    1995-04-13

    Selective decomposition of methanethiol (CH{sub 3}SH) on carbon-covered W(001) to produce methane is enhanced by 75% compared to the clean surface. The maximum enhancement requires only 0.25 monolayers (ML) of preadsorbed C. On a surface percovered with 0.8 ML of C, the methane desorbs in peaks at 460 and 550 K compared to 360 K on the clean surface, suggesting a greater stability in the C-S and C-H bonds. Increased intramolecular bond stability is confirmed by the temperature dependence of the S 2p and C 1s soft X-ray photoemission. Methyl thiolate, CH{sub 3}S, forms upon adsorption at 100 K. Chemisorbed methanethiol, which is not stable on the clean surface, is also observed between 100 and 300 K. The chemisorbed thiol decomposes to form additional thiolate. The thiolate reacts along three competing pathways. It undergoes rehydrogenation and desorbs as methanethiol, it selectively decomposes to form desorbed methane and adsorbed S, or it totally decomposes to form S, C, and desorbed H{sub 2}. 23 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Oxygen-18 tracer studies of enzyme reactions with radical/cation diagnostic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, Luke A.; Fox, Brian G. . E-mail: bgfox@biochem.wisc.edu

    2005-12-09

    This review considers reactions of enzymes with the cyclopropanoid radical/cation diagnostic probes norcarane, 1,1-dimethylcyclopropane, and 1,1-diethylcyclopropane as elaborated by the use of {sup 18}O{sub 2} and {sup 18}OH{sub 2} to trace the origin of O-atoms incorporated during catalysis. The reactions of soluble and integral membrane diiron enzymes are summarized and compared to results obtained from cytochrome P450 studies. Norcarane proved to be an excellent substrate for the diiron enzyme toluene 4-monooxygenase and its engineered isoforms, with k {sub cat} and coupling between NADH utilization and total hydroxylated products comparable to that determined for toluene, the natural substrate. Results obtained with toluene 4-monooxygenase show that the un-rearranged and radical-rearranged alcohol products have a high percentage of O-atom incorporation (>80-95%) from O{sub 2}, while the cation-derived ring-expansion products have O-atom incorporation primarily derived from solvent water. Mechanistic possibilities accounting for this difference are discussed.

  17. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; et al

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shownmore » to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.« less

  18. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.

  19. In Situ Probing of the Active Site Geometry of Ultrathin Nanowires for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiqing; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M; Crooks, Richard M; Adzic, Radoslav R; Liu, Ping; Wong, Stanislaus S

    2015-10-01

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (∼2 nm) core-shell Pt∼Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu∼Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Hence, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general. PMID:26402364

  20. An Adsorptive Transfer Technique Coupled with Brdicka Reaction to Reveal the Importance of Metallothionein in Chemotherapy with Platinum Based Cytostatics

    PubMed Central

    Krizkova, Sona; Fabrik, Ivo; Huska, Dalibor; Adam, Vojtech; Babula, Petr; Hrabeta, Jan; Eckschlager, Tomas; Pochop, Pavel; Darsova, Denisa; Kukacka, Jiri; Prusa, Richard; Trnkova, Libuse; Kizek, Rene

    2010-01-01

    The drugs based on platinum metals represent one of the oldest, but also one of the most effective groups of chemotherapeutic agents. Thanks to many clinical studies it is known that resistance of tumor cells to drugs is a frequent cause of chemotherapy failure. With regard to platinum based drugs, multidrug resistance can also be connected with increased expression of low-molecular weight protein metallothionein (MT). This study aimed at investigating the interactions of MT with cisplatin or carboplatin, using the adsorptive transfer technique coupled with differential pulse voltammetry Brdicka reaction (AdTS DPV Brdicka reaction), and a comparison of in vitro results with results obtained in vivo. The results obtained from the in vitro study show a strong affinity between platinum based drugs and MT. Further, we analyzed extracts of neuroblastoma cell lines treated with cisplatin or carboplatin. It is clear that neuroblastoma UKF-NB-4 cisplatin-resistant and cisplatin-sensitive cell lines unlikely respond to the presence of the platinum-based cytostatics cisplatin and carboplatin. Finally, we determined the level of MT in samples from rabbits treated with carboplatin and patients with retinoblastoma treated with the same drug. PMID:21614176

  1. Weak interaction processes in supernovae: New probes using charge exchange reaction at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, Dieter

    2005-04-01

    Spin-isospin-flip excitations in nuclei at vanishing momentum transfer are generally referred to as Gamov-Teller (GT) transitions. They are being studied because the simplicity of the excitation makes them an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. GT transitions in the β- direction (also referred to as isospin lowering T< transitions) have extensively been studied through (p,n) and (3He,t) charge-exchange reactions [B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 36 (1987) 2195, B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 43 (1991) 50, J. Rapaport et al., Phys. Rev. C 24 (1981) 335, H. Akimune et al., Nucl. Phys. A 569 (1994) 245c, Y. Fujita et al., Phys. Lett. B 365 (1996) 29]. The generally good resolution allows easy extraction of the GT distribution and the total B(GT-) strength in the final nucleus. On the other hand, determination of B(GT+) strength through a charge-exchange reaction in the T> direction were mostly done with secondary neutron beams, and as such, they come with significant experimental difficulties. TRIUMF has pioneered this field in the late 80's and early 90's with a rich and highly successful (n,p) program using a several hundred MeV neutron beam from a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction [R. Helmer, Can. J. Phys. 65 (1987) 588]. In this paper we present the (d,2He) reaction at intermediate energies as another and potentially even more powerful tool for charge-exchange reactions in the T>, resp. β+ direction. The key issue here will be the high resolution of order 100 keV, which provides new and sometimes unexpected insight into nuclear structure phenomena. This program has been launched at the AGOR Superconducting Cyclotron Facility at the KVI Groningen. By now, it covers a wide field of physics questions ranging from few-body physics, the structure of halo-nuclei, to questions pertaining

  2. Ethylene Glycol Adsorption and Reaction over CeOX(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Chen, Tsung-Liang

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the interaction of ethylene glycol with well-ordered CeO{sub x}(111) thin film surfaces. Ethylene glycol initially adsorbs on fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111) and reduced CeO{sub 2-x}(111) through the formation of one C-O-Ce bond and then forms a second alkoxy bond after annealing. On fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111) both recombination of ethylene glycol and water desorption occur at low temperature leaving stable -OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O- (ethylenedioxy) intermediates and oxygen vacancies on the surface. This ethylenedioxy intermediate goes through C-C bond scission to produce formate species which then react to produce CO and CO{sub 2}. The formation of water results in the reduction of the ceria. On a reduced CeO{sub 2-x}(111) surface the reaction selectivity shifts toward a dehydration process. The ethylenedioxy intermediate decomposes by breaking a C-O bond and converts into an enolate species. Similar to the reaction of acetaldehyde on reduced CeO{sub 2-x}(111), the enolate reacts to produce acetaldehyde, acetylene, and ethylene. The loss of O from ethylene glycol leads to a small amount of oxidation of the reduced ceria.

  3. Ethylene Glycol Adsorption and Reaction over CeOX(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    T Chen; D Mullins

    2011-12-31

    This study reports the interaction of ethylene glycol with well-ordered CeO{sub x}(111) thin film surfaces. Ethylene glycol initially adsorbs on fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111) and reduced CeO{sub 2-x}(111) through the formation of one C-O-Ce bond and then forms a second alkoxy bond after annealing. On fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111) both recombination of ethylene glycol and water desorption occur at low temperature leaving stable -OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O- (ethylenedioxy) intermediates and oxygen vacancies on the surface. This ethylenedioxy intermediate goes through C-C bond scission to produce formate species which then react to produce CO and CO{sub 2}. The formation of water results in the reduction of the ceria. On a reduced CeO{sub 2-x}(111) surface the reaction selectivity shifts toward a dehydration process. The ethylenedioxy intermediate decomposes by breaking a C-O bond and converts into an enolate species. Similar to the reaction of acetaldehyde on reduced CeO{sub 2-x}(111), the enolate reacts to produce acetaldehyde, acetylene, and ethylene. The loss of O from ethylene glycol leads to a small amount of oxidation of the reduced ceria.

  4. Optimization of reaction conditions towards multiple types of framework isomers and periodic-increased porosity: luminescence properties and selective CO2 adsorption over N2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Liu; Luo, Feng; Sun, Gong-Ming; Zheng, An-Min; Zhang, Jian; Luo, Ming-Biao; Xu, Wen-Yuan; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Min; Huang, Shu-Yun

    2013-10-21

    Three new metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) were prepared by solvo(hydro)thermolysis and further characterized as framework isomers. The structural transformation from non-porous to porous MOFs and the purity of these products can be modulated by controlling the reaction temperature. The periodic-increased porosity observed was further confirmed by CO2 adsorption isotherms. Owing to the presence of acylamide groups in the pore walls and the flexible nature of the skeleton of these MOFs, highly selective CO2 adsorption over N2 was observed, as well as structure-dependent periodic varieties in luminescence properties. PMID:24038959

  5. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  6. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  7. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2012-07-10

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  8. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  9. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; Berkum, J. G. M. van

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ∼0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  10. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; van Berkum, J. G. M.

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ˜0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  11. Initial dynamics of the Norrish Type I reaction in acetone: probing wave packet motion.

    PubMed

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y; Sølling, Theis I; Møller, Klaus B

    2011-02-10

    The Norrish Type I reaction in the S(1) (nπ*) state of acetone is a prototype case of ketone photochemistry. On the basis of results from time-resolved mass spectrometry (TRMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) experiments, it was recently suggested that after excitation the wave packet travels toward the S(1) minimum in less than 30 fs and stays there for more than 100 picoseconds [Chem. Phys. Lett.2008, 461, 193]. In this work we present simulated TRMS and TRPES signals based on ab initio multiple spawning simulations of the dynamics during the first 200 fs after excitation, getting quite good agreement with the experimental signals. We can explain the ultrafast decay of the experimental signals in the following manner: the wave packet simply travels, mainly along the deplanarization coordinate, out of the detection window of the ionizing probe. This window is so narrow that subsequent revival of the signal due to the coherent deplanarization vibration is not observed, meaning that from the point of view of the experiment the wave packets travels directly to the S(1) minimum. This result stresses the importance of pursuing a closer link to the experimental signal when using molecular dynamics simulations in interpreting experimental results. PMID:21229990

  12. Probing systematic model dependence of complete fusion for reactions with the weakly bound projectiles Li,76

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, A.; Santra, S.; Pal, A.; Chattopadhyay, D.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Kailas, S.

    2016-07-01

    Background: Complete fusion cross section measurements involving weakly bound projectiles show suppression at above-barrier energies compared to coupled-channels (CC) calculations, but no definite conclusion could be drawn for sub-barrier energies. Different CC models often lead to contrasting results. Purpose: We aim to investigate the differences in the fusion cross sections predicted by commonly used CC calculations, using codes such as fresco and ccfull, when compared to experimental data. Methods: The fusion cross sections are normalized to a dimensionless form by isolating the effect of only dynamic channel couplings calculated by both fresco and ccfull, by the method of fusion functions, and compared to a universal fusion function. This acts as a probe for obtaining the model dependence of fusion. Results: A difference is observed between the predictions of fresco and ccfull for all the reactions involving Li,76 as projectiles, and it is noticeably more for systems involving 7Li. Conclusions: With the theoretical foundations of the two CC models being different, their calculation of fusion is different even for the same system. The conclusion about the enhancement or suppression of fusion cross sections is model dependent.

  13. Adsorption and Reaction of C1-C3 Alcohols over CeOx(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    D Mullins; S Senanayake; T Chen

    2011-12-31

    This study reports the interaction of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol with well-ordered CeO{sub 2}(111) thin film surfaces. All of the alcohols adsorb at low temperature by forming alkoxy and hydroxyl species on the surface. On fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111), recombination occurs between some of the alkoxys and hydroxyls, resulting in alcohol desorption near 220 K. At the same temperature, some of the surface hydroxyls disproportionate to produce water and the loss of lattice O. The remaining alkoxys react above 550 K. The primary alcohols favor dehydrogenation products (aldehydes). There is a net loss of O from the system, resulting in a reduction of the ceria. The secondary alcohol, 2-propanol, undergoes primarily dehydration, producing propene with no net change in the cerium oxidation state. Reduced CeO{sub x}(111) competes with the gaseous products for available O. Little or no water is produced. The reaction selectivity for the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} alcohols shifts toward favoring dehydration products. The loss of O from the alcohols leads to oxidation of the reduced ceria. Compared with the oxidized surface, the alkene desorption shifts to lower temperature, whereas the aldehyde desorption shifts to higher temperature. This indicates that, on the reduced surface, it is easier to break the C-O bond but more difficult to break the O-substrate bond.

  14. Enhanced performance of PbS-sensitized solar cells via controlled successive ionic-layer adsorption and reaction.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Muhammad A; Basit, Muhammad A; Park, Tae Joo; Bang, Jin Ho

    2015-04-21

    Despite the potential of PbS quantum dots (QDs) as sensitizers for quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs), achieving a high photocurrent density over 30 mA cm(-2) remains a challenging task in PbS-sensitized solar cells. In contrast to previous attempts, where Hg(2+)-doping or multi-step post-treatment is necessary, we are capable of achieving a high photocurrent exceeding 30 mA cm(-2) simply by manipulating the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. We show that controlling temperature at which SILAR is performed is critical to obtain a higher and more uniform coverage of PbS QDs over a mesoporous TiO2 film. The deposition of a CdS inter-layer between TiO2 and PbS is found to be an effective means of ensuring high photocurrent and stability. Not only does this modification improve the light absorption capability of the photoanode, but it also has a significant effect on charge recombination and electron injection efficiency at the PbS/TiO2 interface according to our in-depth study using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The implication of subtle changes in the interfacial events via modified SILAR conditions for PbS-sensitized solar cells is discussed. PMID:25773573

  15. Probing the adsorption and orientation of 2,3-dichloro-5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone on gold nano-rods: A SERS and XPS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukaegbu, Maraizu; Enwerem, Nkechi; Bakare, Oladapo; Sam, Vichetra; Southerland, William; Vivoni, Alberto; Hosten, Charles

    2016-06-01

    2, 3-Dichloro-5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DDNQ) is a synthetic naphthaquinone which has shown reduced chemotoxicity and enhanced chemotherapeutic activity in in vitro studies. The ability of DDNQ to serve as a chemical dopant of graphene resulting improved performance of graphene by tuning its band gap is also being explored. In this report surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy was utilized to probe the adsorption/orientation of DDNQ on gold nano-rods. Interpretation of the SERS data required a complete assignment of the vibrational modes of DDNQ and this was performed with DFT calculations using BP86/6-31G (d, p), B3LYP/6-31G (d) basis sets, and potential energy distribution (PED) calculations. Surface selection rules and relative band enhancement factors were utilized to propose an orientation and mode of interaction for DDNQ adsorbed on Au nanosurfaces. XPS data supported the conclusions obtained from the SERS data.

  16. A mechanistic study of H2S adsorption and dissociation on Cu2O(1 1 1) surfaces: Thermochemistry, reaction barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Riguang; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Jingrui; Ling, Lixia; Wang, Baojun

    2012-10-01

    The interaction mechanism of H2S with different Cu2O(1 1 1) surfaces, including perfect, oxygen-vacancy and sulfur-containing surfaces, have been systematically studied using periodic density functional calculations. Different kinds of possible modes of H2S, as well as the resultant SH and S species adsorbed on these surfaces are identified. Two types of pathways via molecular and dissociative adsorption processes are mapped out. Our results show that sulfur species (H2S, SH and S) interact with surface Cu centers; H2S exists in the form of molecular adsorption on perfect and sulfur-containing surfaces; the dissociative adsorption of H2S occurs predominantly on oxygen-vacancy surface, suggesting that oxygen-vacancy exhibits a strong catalytic activity toward the dissociation of H2S. On the other hand, the dissociation processes of the molecular and dissociative adsorption H2S, leading to final product S species on these Cu2O(1 1 1) surfaces, show that the overall dissociation process is exothermic. Meanwhile, with respect to molecular adsorption H2S, the activation barrier and reaction energy of the overall dissociation process on perfect and oxygen-vacancy surfaces indicate that H2S can easily dissociate into S species. Importantly, in the case of dissociative adsorption of H2S, the dissociation of H2S into S species is a spontaneous process with respect to molecular adsorption H2S. However, on sulfur-containing surface, the presence of surface S atom goes against the Hsbnd S bond-breaking process both thermodynamically and kinetically. Finally, the vibrational frequencies for the adsorbed H2S, SH and S species on these surfaces have been obtained, which can be applied to guide surface vibrational spectroscopy in experiment.

  17. The Effect of Simulated Microgravity Environment of RWV Bioreactors on Surface Reactions and Adsorption of Serum Proteins on Bone-bioactive Microcarriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radin, Shula; Ducheyne, P.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.

    2003-01-01

    Biomimetically modified bioactive materials with bone-like surface properties are attractive candidates for use as microcarriers for 3-D bone-like tissue engineering under simulated microgravity conditions of NASA designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors. The simulated microgravity environment is attainable under suitable parametric conditions of the RWV bioreactors. Ca-P containing bioactive glass (BG), whose stimulatory effect on bone cell function had been previously demonstrated, was used in the present study. BG surface modification via reactions in solution, resulting formation of bone-like minerals at the surface and adsorption of serum proteins is critical for obtaining the stimulatory effect. In this paper, we report on the major effects of simulated microgravity conditions of the RWV on the BG reactions surface reactions and protein adsorption in physiological solutions. Control tests at normal gravity were conducted at static and dynamic conditions. The study revealed that simulated microgravity remarkably enhanced reactions involved in the BG surface modification, including BG dissolution, formation of bone-like minerals at the surface and adsorption of serum proteins. Simultaneously, numerical models were developed to simulate the mass transport of chemical species to and from the BG surface under normal gravity and simulated microgravity conditions. The numerical results showed an excellent agreement with the experimental data at both testing conditions.

  18. Probing the adsorption mechanism in thiamazole bound to the silver surface with Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering and DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Nandita; Thomas, Susy; Sarkar, Anjana; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2009-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of thiamazole have been investigated in aqueous solution. Thiamazole is an important anti-thyroid drug that is used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism (over activity of the thyroid gland). Due to its medicinal importance, the surface adsorption properties of thiamazole have been studied. The experimental Raman and SERS data are supported with DFT calculations using B3LYP functional with LANL2DZ basis set. From the SERS spectra as well as theoretical calculations, it has been inferred that thiamazole is chemisorbed to the silver surface directly through the sulphur atom and the ring N atom, with a tilted orientation.

  19. Adsorption and Reaction of Acetaldehyde on Shape-Controlled CeO2 Nanocrystals: Elucidation of Structure-function Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Amanda K; Wu, Zili; Calaza, Florencia; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2014-01-01

    CeO2 cubes with {100} facets, octahedra with {111} facets, and wires with highly defective structures were utilized to probe the structure-dependent reactivity of acetaldehyde. Using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), temperature-programmed surface reactions (TPSR), and in situ infrared spectroscopy it was found that acetaldehyde desorbs unreacted or undergoes reduction, coupling, or C-C bond scission reactions depending on the surface structure of CeO2. Room temperature FTIR indicates that acetaldehyde binds primarily as 1-acetaldehyde on the octahedra, in a variety of conformations on the cubes, including coupling products and acetate and enolate species, and primarily as coupling products on the wires. The percent consumption of acetaldehyde follows the order of wires > cubes > octahedra. All the nanoshapes produce the coupling product crotonaldehyde; however, the selectivity to produce ethanol follows the order wires cubes >> octahedra. The selectivity and other differences can be attributed to the variation in the basicity of the surfaces, defects densities, coordination numbers of surface atoms, and the reducibility of the nanoshapes.

  20. Fluorescent labelling of in situ hybridisation probes through the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Susann; Manetto, Antonio; Cassinelli, Valentina; Fuchs, Jörg; Ma, Lu; Raddaoui, Nada; Houben, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    In situ hybridisation is a powerful tool to investigate the genome and chromosome architecture. Nick translation (NT) is widely used to label DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). However, NT is limited to the use of long double-stranded DNA and does not allow the labelling of single-stranded and short DNA, e.g. oligonucleotides. An alternative technique is the copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), at which azide and alkyne functional groups react in a multistep process catalysed by copper(I) ions to give 1,4-distributed 1,2,3-triazoles at a high yield (also called 'click reaction'). We successfully applied this technique to label short single-stranded DNA probes as well as long PCR-derived double-stranded probes and tested them by FISH on plant chromosomes and nuclei. The hybridisation efficiency of differently labelled probes was compared to those obtained by conventional labelling techniques. We show that copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition-labelled probes are reliable tools to detect different types of repetitive sequences on chromosomes opening new promising routes for the detection of single copy gene. Moreover, a combination of FISH using such probes with other techniques, e.g. immunohistochemistry (IHC) and cell proliferation assays using 5-ethynyl-deoxyuridine, is herein shown to be easily feasible. PMID:27095480

  1. PbS Quantum Dots Sensitized TiO2 Solar Cells Prepared by Successive Ionic Layer Absorption and Reaction with Different Adsorption Layers.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jie; Duan, Yanfang; Liu, Chunxia; Gao, Shaohong; Han, Xueting; An, Limin

    2016-04-01

    Lead sulfide (PbS) quantum dots (QDs) have been synthesized via successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) on a titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoporous film for the fabrication of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). The reaction is environmental friendly and energy saving. The green synthesized PbS QDs match the maximum remittance region of the solar spectrum and are suitable as sensitizers for TiO2 electrodes for cell devices application. PbS QDs were adsorbed in different adsorption layers in order to improve the solar cell performance. The optical properties of PbS sensitized TiO2 films were studied by scanning electron microscopy and UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy. The photovoltaic characteristics of the PbS QDSCs were analyzed by I-V characteristics and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. As a result, the light harvesting was enhanced with increasing SILAR adsorption layers. The maximum photovoltaic conversion efficiency of the PbS QDSCs (3.14%) was obtained at the 12 adsorption layers with the highest short circuit current density and lowest charge transfer resistance. PMID:27451735

  2. Probing adsorption of DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG5000 to the surface of felodipine and griseofulvin nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Rydberg, Hanna A; Yanez Arteta, Marianna; Berg, Staffan; Lindfors, Lennart; Sigfridsson, Kalle

    2016-08-20

    Nanosized formulations of poorly water-soluble drugs show great potential due to improved bioavailability. In order to retain colloidal stability, the nanocrystals need to be stabilized. Here we explore the use of the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugated phospholipids DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG5000 as stabilizers of felodipine and griseofulvin nanocrystals. Nanocrystal stability and physicochemical properties were examined and the interaction between the PEGylated lipids and the nanocrystal surface as well as a macroscopic model surface was investigated. Using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring both mass adsorption and the thickness of the adsorbed layer were estimated. The results indicate that the PEGylated lipids are adsorbed as flat layers of around 1-3nm, and that DSPE-PEG5000 forms a thicker layer compared with DSPE-PEG2000. In addition, the mass adsorption to the drug crystals and the model surface are seemingly comparable. Furthermore, both DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG5000 rendered stable drug nanocrystals, with a somewhat higher surface binding and stability seen for DSPE-PEG2000. These results suggest DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG5000 as efficient nanocrystal stabilizers, with DSPE-PEG2000 giving a somewhat higher surface coverage and superior colloidal stability, whereas DSPE-PEG5000 shows a more extended structure that may have advantages for prolongation of circulation time in vivo and facilitation for targeting modifications. PMID:27329674

  3. Intermediates in the cation reactions in solution probed by an in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering method

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Chen, Hung-Ying; Chen, Hsueh-Szu; Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2015-01-01

    For chemical reactions in liquid state, such as catalysis, understanding of dynamical changes is conducive to practical applications. Solvation of copper salts in aqueous solution has implications for life, the environment, and industry. In an ongoing research, the question arises that why the color of aqueous CuCl2 solution changes with solution concentration? In this work, we have developed a convenient and efficient in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering technique to probe the presence of many intermediates, some of them are responsible for color change, in crystallization of aqueous copper chloride solution. The versatility of the novel technique was confirmed in the identification of five intermediates states in the transition from CdS to MoS2 nanowires in solution. The facile in situ method is expected to be widely applicable in probing intermediate states in a variety of chemical reactions in solution. PMID:26333518

  4. Intermediates in the cation reactions in solution probed by an in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chih-Shan; Chen, Hung-Ying; Chen, Hsueh-Szu; Gwo, Shangjr; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2015-09-01

    For chemical reactions in liquid state, such as catalysis, understanding of dynamical changes is conducive to practical applications. Solvation of copper salts in aqueous solution has implications for life, the environment, and industry. In an ongoing research, the question arises that why the color of aqueous CuCl2 solution changes with solution concentration? In this work, we have developed a convenient and efficient in situ surface enhanced Raman scattering technique to probe the presence of many intermediates, some of them are responsible for color change, in crystallization of aqueous copper chloride solution. The versatility of the novel technique was confirmed in the identification of five intermediates states in the transition from CdS to MoS2 nanowires in solution. The facile in situ method is expected to be widely applicable in probing intermediate states in a variety of chemical reactions in solution.

  5. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay. PMID:26879193

  6. Wet chemical synthesis of quantum confined nanostructured tin oxide thin films by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Murali, K.V.; Ragina, A.J.; Preetha, K.C.; Deepa, K.; Remadevi, T.L.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quantum confined SnO{sub 2} thin films were synthesized at 80 °C by SILAR technique. • Film formation mechanism is discussed. • Films with snow like crystallite morphology offer high specific surface area. • The blue-shifted value of band gap confirmed the quantum confinement effect. • Present synthesis has advantages – low cost, low temperature and green friendly. - Abstract: Quantum confined nanostructured SnO{sub 2} thin films were synthesized at 353 K using ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) and other chemicals by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction technique. Film formation mechanism is discussed. Structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties were investigated and compared with the as-grown and annealed films fabricated without NH{sub 4}Cl solution. SnO{sub 2} films were polycrystalline with crystallites of tetragonal structure with grain sizes lie in the 5–8 nm range. Films with snow like crystallite morphology offer high specific surface area. The blue-shifted value of band gap of as-grown films confirmed the quantum confinement effect of grains. Refractive index of the films lies in the 2.1–2.3 range. Films prepared with NH{sub 4}Cl exhibit relatively lower resistivity of the order of 10{sup 0}–10{sup −1} Ω cm. The present synthesis has advantages such as low cost, low temperature and green friendly, which yields small particle size, large surface–volume ratio, and high crystallinity SnO{sub 2} films.

  7. Reaction-based turn-on fluorescent probes with magnetic responses for Fe(2+) detection in live cells.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Siddhartha; Aydin, Ziya; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Maolin

    2015-05-21

    Iron is the most abundant nutritionally essential transition metal found in the human body. It plays important roles in various biological processes such as oxygen delivery, electron transport, enzymatic reactions and DNA synthesis and repair. However, iron can also catalyze the production of free radicals, which are linked to quite a few diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Both iron deficiency and iron overload are related to various health problems. Thus, precisely monitoring iron ions (Fe(2+) and Fe(3+)) in biological systems is important in understanding the detailed biological functions of iron and its trafficking pathways. However, effective tools for monitoring labile Fe(2+) in biological systems have not yet been established. Reported herein are turn on, reaction-based coumarin and rhodamine-linked nitroxide probes (Cou-T and Rh-T) for selective detection of Fe(2+) in solution and in living cells. Rh-T displayed a unique change in the EPR signal as well as enhancement of the fluorescence signal resulting from a specific redox reaction between the probe and Fe(2+). The turn-on fluorescence response towards Fe(2+) allows the subcellular imaging of endogenous Fe(2+) as well as imaging under conditions of external iron supplementation or depletion, with a labile Fe(2+) pool located in the mitochondria of human fibroblast primary cells. The detection and mechanism were verified by the magnetic properties of the probe via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in solution and in cells. PMID:25875289

  8. Probing Defect Sites on CeO2 Nanocrystals with Well-Defined Surface Planes by Raman Spectroscopy and O2 Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Li, Meijun; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer III, Harry M; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2010-01-01

    Defect sites play an essential role in ceria catalysis. In this study, ceria nanocrystals with well defined surface planes have been synthesized and utilized for studying defect sites with both Raman spectroscopy and O2 adsorption. Ceria nanorods ({110} + {100}), nanocubes ({100}), and nano-octahedrons ({111}) are employed to analyze the quantity and quality of defect sites on different ceria surfaces. On oxidized surface, nanorods have the most abundant intrinsic defect sites, followed by nanocubes and nano-octahedrons. When reduced, the induced defect sites are more clustered on nanorods than on nanocubes although similar amount (based on surface area) of such defect sites are produced on the two surfaces. Very few defect sites can be generated on the nano-octahedrons due to the least reducibility. These differences can be rationalized by the crystallographic surface terminations of the ceria nanocrystals. The different defect sites on these nanocrystals lead to the adsorption of different surface dioxygen species. Superoxide on one-electron defect sites and peroxide on two-electron defect sites with different clustering degree are identified on the ceria nanocrystals depending on their morphology. Furthermore, the stability and reactivity of these oxygen species are also found to be surface-dependent, which is of significance for ceria-catalyzed oxidation reactions.

  9. Reaction-based small-molecule fluorescent probes for chemoselective bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jefferson; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamic chemical diversity of elements, ions and molecules that form the basis of life offers both a challenge and an opportunity for study. Small-molecule fluorescent probes can make use of selective, bioorthogonal chemistries to report on specific analytes in cells and in more complex biological specimens. These probes offer powerful reagents to interrogate the physiology and pathology of reactive chemical species in their native environments with minimal perturbation to living systems. This Review presents a survey of tools and tactics for using such probes to detect biologically important chemical analytes. We highlight design criteria for effective chemical tools for use in biological applications as well as gaps for future exploration.

  10. Stigmatellin Probes the Electrostatic Potential in the QB Site of the Photosynthetic Reaction Center

    PubMed Central

    Gerencsér, László; Boros, Bogáta; Derrien, Valerie; Hanson, Deborah K.; Wraight, Colin A.; Sebban, Pierre; Maróti, Péter

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatic potential in the secondary quinone (QB) binding site of the reaction center (RC) of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides determines the rate and free energy change (driving force) of electron transfer to QB. It is controlled by the ionization states of residues in a strongly interacting cluster around the QB site. Reduction of the QB induces change of the ionization states of residues and binding of protons from the bulk. Stigmatellin, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial and photosynthetic respiratory chain, has been proven to be a unique voltage probe of the QB binding pocket. It binds to the QB site with high affinity, and the pK value of its phenolic group monitors the local electrostatic potential with high sensitivity. Investigations with different types of detergent as a model system of isolated RC revealed that the pK of stigmatellin was controlled overwhelmingly by electrostatic and slightly by hydrophobic interactions. Measurements showed a high pK value (>11) of stigmatellin in the QB pocket of the dark-state wild-type RC, indicating substantial negative potential. When the local electrostatics of the QB site was modulated by a single mutation, L213Asp→Ala, or double mutations, L213Asp-L212Glu→Ala-Ala (AA), the pK of stigmatellin dropped to 7.5 and 7.4, respectively, which corresponds to a >210 mV increase in the electrostatic potential relative to the wild-type RC. This significant pK drop (ΔpK > 3.5) decreased dramatically to (ΔpK > 0.75) in the RC of the compensatory mutant (AA+M44Asn→AA+M44Asp). Our results indicate that the L213Asp is the most important actor in the control of the electrostatic potential in the QB site of the dark-state wild-type RC, in good accordance with conclusions of former studies using theoretical calculations or light-induced charge recombination assay. PMID:25606686

  11. Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe with controller to adjust sampling position

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; ElNaggar, Mariam S.

    2016-07-19

    A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

  12. A Partially Fluorinated, Water-Stable Cu(II)-MOF Derived via Transmetalation: Significant Gas Adsorption with High CO2 Selectivity and Catalysis of Biginelli Reactions.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tapan K; De, Dinesh; Senthilkumar, S; Neogi, Subhadip; Bharadwaj, Parimal K

    2016-08-15

    A partially fluorinated, angular tetracarboxylic acid linker (H4L) incorporating a pendant amine moiety forms a three-dimensional Zn(II) framework, 1. The structure consists of paddle-wheel Zn2(CO2)4 secondary building units (SBUs) and Zn12(CO2)24 supramolecular building blocks (SBBs). Thermal stability of 1 is found to be low. However, it undergoes transmetalation reaction with Cu(II) at room temperature without losing crystallinity affording an isostructural framework, 1Cu. Framework 1Cu is thermally robust and allows generation of the solvent-free porous framework 1Cu' upon activation with coordinatively unsaturated metal centers. Framework 1Cu' exhibits water stability and at 77 K, adsorbs 2.56 wt % of H2 up to 1 bar that significantly increases to 4.01 wt % at 13 bar. Also, this framework gives a high adsorption of 164.70 cc/g of CH4 (11.7 wt %) at 303 K and 60 bar. The channel surfaces decorated with -NH2 group and unsaturated metal centers in 1Cu' allow a promising 36.4 wt % of CO2 adsorption at 1 bar and 273 K. Moreover, it exhibits pronounced selectivity of CO2 adsorption over N2 and H2 at 273 K. Finally, the versatility of 1Cu' is shown by its excellent heterogeneous catalytic activity in the Biginelli coupling reactions involving an aldehyde, urea, and ethylacetoacetate to afford dihydroprimidinones. PMID:27459252

  13. Adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode: An in situ IR spectroscopy search for adsorbed reaction intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Behm, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Summary As part of a mechanistic study of the electrooxidation of C1 molecules we have systematically investigated the dissociative adsorption/oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode under experimental conditions optimizing the chance for detecting weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates. Employing in situ IR spectroscopy in an attenuated total reflection configuration (ATR-FTIRS) with p-polarized IR radiation to further improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and using low reaction temperatures (3 °C) and deuterium substitution to slow down the reaction kinetics and to stabilize weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates, we could detect an IR absorption band at 1660 cm−1 characteristic for adsorbed formyl intermediates. This assignment is supported by an isotope shift in wave number. Effects of temperature, potential and deuterium substitution on the formation and disappearance of different adsorbed species (COad, adsorbed formate, adsorbed formyl), are monitored and quantified. Consequences on the mechanism for dissociative adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde are discussed. PMID:24991512

  14. Impact of organic solvents on cytochrome P450 probe reactions: filling the gap with (S)-Warfarin and midazolam hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Vanessa; Connolly, Elizabeth A; Bridges, Arlene S; Wienkers, Larry C; Paine, Mary F

    2012-11-01

    (S)-Warfarin 7-hydroxylation and midazolam 1'-hydroxylation are among the preferred probe substrate reactions for CYP2C9 and CYP3A4/5, respectively. The impact of solvents on enzyme activity, kinetic parameters, and predicted in vivo hepatic clearance (Cl(H)) associated with each reaction has not been evaluated. The effects of increasing concentrations [0.1-2% (v/v)] of six organic solvents (acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, acetone, isopropanol) were first tested on each reaction using human liver microsomes (HLMs), human intestinal microsomes (midazolam 1'-hydroxylation only), and recombinant enzymes. Across enzyme sources, relative to water, acetonitrile and methanol had the least inhibitory effect on (S)-warfarin 7-hydroxylation (0-58 and 9-96%, respectively); acetonitrile, methanol, and ethanol had the least inhibitory effect on midazolam 1'-hydroxylation (0-29, 0-22, and 0-20%, respectively). Using HLMs, both acetonitrile and methanol (0.1-2%) decreased the V(max) (32-60 and 24-65%, respectively) whereas methanol (2%) increased the K(m) (100%) of (S)-warfarin-hydroxylation. (S)-Warfarin Cl(H) was underpredicted by 21-65% (acetonitrile) and 13-84% (methanol). Acetonitrile, methanol, and ethanol had minimal to modest impact on both the kinetics of midazolam 1'-hydroxylation (10-24%) and predicted midazolam Cl(H) (2-20%). In conclusion, either acetonitrile or methanol at ≤0.1% is recommended as the primary organic solvent for the (S)-warfarin 7-hydroxylation reaction; acetonitrile is preferred if higher solvent concentrations are required. Acetonitrile, methanol, and ethanol at ≤2% are recommended as primary organic solvents for the midazolam 1'-hydroxylation reaction. This information should facilitate optimization of experimental conditions and improve the interpretation and accuracy of in vitro-in vivo predictions involving these two preferred cytochrome P450 probe substrate reactions. PMID:22896727

  15. Mesoporous BaTiO₃@SBA-15 derived via solid state reaction and its excellent adsorption efficiency for the removal of hexavalent chromium from water.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Vandana; Sasidharan, Manickam; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-01-28

    We report the synthesis of a barium-titanate/mesoporous silica nanocomposite material BaTiO3@SBA-15 via aerosol assisted solid state reaction using SBA-15 as a hard template. Hexavalent chromium is one of the most harmful contaminants of industrial waste-water. We have used BaTiO3@SBA-15 nanocomposite as an adsorbent for the removal of chromium(vi)-contaminated water and it showed an adsorption capacity of 98.2 wt% within only 40 min contact time in a batch reactor. This mesoporous composite has retained this excellent adsorption efficiency of hexavalent chromium for several repetitive cycles, suggesting its future potential for the remediation of water contaminated with Cr(vi). PMID:25490743

  16. Adsorption and reactions of O2 and D2 on small free palladium clusters in a cluster-molecule scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Mats; Rosén, Arne

    2010-08-01

    The adsorption of oxygen and hydrogen (deuterium) on small neutral palladium clusters was investigated in a cluster beam experiment. The beam passes through two low-pressure reaction cells, and the clusters, with and without adsorbed molecules, are detected using laser ionization and mass spectrometry. Both H2 and O2 adsorb efficiently on the palladium clusters with only moderate variations with cluster size in the investigated range, i.e. between 8 and 28 atoms. The co-adsorption of H2 and O2 results in the formation of H2O, detected as a decrease in the number of adsorbed oxygen atoms with an increasing number of collisions with H2 molecules. A comparison is done with an earlier similar study of clusters of Pt. Furthermore a comparison is done with what is known for sticking and reactivity of surfaces.

  17. Reaction-based small-molecule fluorescent probes for chemoselective bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jefferson; Dodani, Sheel C; Chang, Christopher J

    2012-12-01

    The dynamic chemical diversity of elements, ions and molecules that form the basis of life offers both a challenge and an opportunity for study. Small-molecule fluorescent probes can make use of selective, bioorthogonal chemistries to report on specific analytes in cells and in more complex biological specimens. These probes offer powerful reagents to interrogate the physiology and pathology of reactive chemical species in their native environments with minimal perturbation to living systems. This Review presents a survey of tools and tactics for using such probes to detect biologically important chemical analytes. We highlight design criteria for effective chemical tools for use in biological applications as well as gaps for future exploration. PMID:23174976

  18. Reaction-based small-molecule fluorescent probes for chemoselective bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jefferson; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic chemical diversity of elements, ions and molecules that form the basis of life offers both a challenge and an opportunity for study. Small-molecule fluorescent probes can make use of selective, bioorthogonal chemistries to report on specific analytes in cells and in more complex biological specimens. These probes offer powerful reagents to interrogate the physiology and pathology of reactive chemical species in their native environments with minimal perturbation to living systems. This Review presents a survey of tools and tactics for using such probes to detect biologically important chemical analytes. We highlight design criteria for effective chemical tools for use in biological applications as well as gaps for future exploration. PMID:23174976

  19. Carbon-13 Labeling Used to Probe Cure and Degradation Reactions of High- Temperature Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature, crosslinked polyimides are typically insoluble, intractible materials. Consequently, in these systems it has been difficult to follow high-temperature curing or long-term degradation reactions on a molecular level. Selective labeling of the polymers with carbon-13, coupled with solid nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), enables these reactions to be followed. We successfully employed this technique to provide insight into both curing and degradation reactions of PMR-15, a polymer matrix resin used extensively in aircraft engine applications.

  20. Fluorescent probes for tracking the transfer of iron-sulfur cluster and other metal cofactors in biosynthetic reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Vranish, James N; Russell, William K; Yu, Lusa E; Cox, Rachael M; Russell, David H; Barondeau, David P

    2015-01-14

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are protein cofactors that are constructed and delivered to target proteins by elaborate biosynthetic machinery. Mechanistic insights into these processes have been limited by the lack of sensitive probes for tracking Fe-S cluster synthesis and transfer reactions. Here we present fusion protein- and intein-based fluorescent labeling strategies that can probe Fe-S cluster binding. The fluorescence is sensitive to different cluster types ([2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters), ligand environments ([2Fe-2S] clusters on Rieske, ferredoxin (Fdx), and glutaredoxin), and cluster oxidation states. The power of this approach is highlighted with an extreme example in which the kinetics of Fe-S cluster transfer reactions are monitored between two Fdx molecules that have identical Fe-S spectroscopic properties. This exchange reaction between labeled and unlabeled Fdx is catalyzed by dithiothreitol (DTT), a result that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. DTT likely functions in a ligand substitution reaction that generates a [2Fe-2S]-DTT species, which can transfer the cluster to either labeled or unlabeled Fdx. The ability to monitor this challenging cluster exchange reaction indicates that real-time Fe-S cluster incorporation can be tracked for a specific labeled protein in multicomponent assays that include several unlabeled Fe-S binding proteins or other chromophores. Such advanced kinetic experiments are required to untangle the intricate networks of transfer pathways and the factors affecting flux through branch points. High sensitivity and suitability with high-throughput methodology are additional benefits of this approach. We anticipate that this cluster detection methodology will transform the study of Fe-S cluster pathways and potentially other metal cofactor biosynthetic pathways. PMID:25478817

  1. Characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex direct repeat sequence for use in cycling probe reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, M L; Cave, M D; Marlowe, C; Cloney, L; Duck, P; Eisenach, K D

    1996-01-01

    Cycling probe technology (CPT) is a unique and simple method for the detection of specific target sequences. CPT utilizes a chimeric DNA-RNA-DNA probe providing an RNase H-sensitive scissile linkage when bound to a complementary target sequence. For this study a diagnostic assay based on CPT was developed for the detection of the 36-bp direct repeat (DR) region in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To determine the feasibility of using the DR for detecting M. tuberculosis by CPT, a wide variety of mycobacteria were tested by Southern blot hybridization with three DR probes to verify their specificity. The entire DR region of Mycobacterium bovis 401 was sequenced, and the data were used to design a PCR assay that would allow us to estimate the number of DRs present in a variety of strains. A CPT assay which uses a probe complementary to the DR region was developed and evaluated with synthetic targets and genomic DNA from mycobacteria. In summary, the 36-bp DR provides an attractive target for detecting M. tuberculosis because the sequence is present in high copy numbers in the genome, is specific for the M. tuberculosis complex, and is found in strains that lack IS6110. PMID:8940435

  2. A study of the OMVPE growth mechanisms using internal reflectance spectroscopy to examine adsorption of TMGa and NH3 and surface reactions between them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, A.; Mazzarese, D.; Conner, W. C.; Jones, K. A.

    1989-01-01

    Internal reflection spectroscopy spectra show that NH3 and ND3 chemisorb onto (100) and (111)A GaAs surfaces. Adsorption occurs by the formation of Ga—N bonds via Lewis acid-base reactions which are identified by an absorption band between 1325 and 1100 cm-1 with peaks near 1285, 1220 and 1150 cm-1. No NH3 absorption bands are detected when the (111)B surface is exposed. TMGa also chemisorbs onto the (100) GaAs surface. The adsorption spectra of NH3 + TMGa is a function of the order in which the reactants are introduced. When NH3 is introduced first, the reactivity is much greater as is evidenced by the almost total elimination of absorption peaks associated with N—H and CH3 peaks which suggests that the reactions are surface catalyzed methane elimination reactions. Implications of the requirement that the hydride be adsorbed and the methyls react with the hydrogen atoms from the hydride to ALE and MOMBE growth are discussed. Also, consistent explanations are presented for why growth on the (111)B surface is difficult, the growth rate is independent of the hydride partial pressure under normal growth conditions, the incorporation of C into GaAs has an orientational dependence, and As is more preferentially incorporated into GaAsP at the lower growth temperatures.

  3. The influence of CO adsorption on the surface composition of cobalt/palladium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, A.; Trant, A. G.; Gustafson, J.; Jones, T. E.; Noakes, T. C. Q.; Bailey, P.; Baddeley, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    Segregation induced by the adsorption of gas phase species can strongly influence the composition of bimetallic surfaces and can therefore play an important role in influencing heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The addition of palladium to cobalt catalysts has been shown to promote Fischer Tropsch catalysis. We investigate the adsorption of CO onto bimetallic CoPd surfaces on Pd{111} using a combination of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and medium energy ion scattering. The vibrational frequency of adsorbed CO provides crucial information on the adsorption sites adopted by CO and medium energy ion scattering probes the surface composition before and after CO exposure. We show that cobalt segregation is induced by CO adsorption and rationalise these observations in terms of the strength of adsorption of CO in various surface adsorption sites.

  4. Probing the reaction coordinate for ligand binding in hemoglobin using ultrafast transient Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huiping; Lingle, Robert, Jr.; Xu, Xiaobing; Hopkins, John B.

    1993-05-01

    Transient picosecond Raman spectroscopy is capable of differentiating vibrational relaxation from conformational changes by comparing the Stokes and anti-Stokes dynamics. We report pump-probe picosecond Raman experiments on oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin (oxyHb and deoxyHb, respectively) using 8 ps 532 nm pump pulses and 8 ps 355 nm probe pulses. Heme- to-protein vibrational cooling has been directly observed in deoxyHb for the first time, and the deconvolved cooling time constant is measured to be 2 - 5 ps. By applying our mode-specific Stokes and anti-Stokes technique to oxyHb, we find that any geminate recombination of photodeligated O2 must occur in either less than two picoseconds or longer than a nanosecond.

  5. Reaction-Based Probes for Imaging Mobile Zinc in Live Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chelatable, or mobile, forms of zinc play critical signaling roles in numerous biological processes. Elucidating the action of mobile Zn(II) in complex biological environments requires sensitive tools for visualizing, tracking, and manipulating Zn(II) ions. A large toolbox of synthetic photoinduced electron transfer (PET)-based fluorescent Zn(II) sensors are available, but the applicability of many of these probes is limited by poor zinc sensitivity and low dynamic ranges owing to proton interference. We present here a general approach for acetylating PET-based probes containing a variety of fluorophores and zinc-binding units. The new sensors provide substantially improved zinc sensitivity and allow for incubation of live cells and tissue slices with nM probe concentrations, a significant improvement compared to the μM concentrations that are typically required for a measurable fluorescence signal. Acetylation effectively reduces or completely quenches background fluorescence in the metal-free sensor. Binding of Zn(II) selectively and quickly mediates hydrolytic cleavage of the acetyl groups, providing a large fluorescence response. An acetylated blue coumarin-based sensor was used to carry out detailed analyses of metal binding and metal-promoted acetyl hydrolysis. Acetylated benzoresorufin-based red-emitting probes with different zinc-binding sites are effective for sensing Zn(II) ions in live cells when applied at low concentrations (∼50–100 nM). We used green diacetylated Zinpyr1 (DA-ZP1) to image endogenous mobile Zn(II) in the molecular layer of mouse dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), confirming that acetylation is a suitable approach for preparing sensors that are highly specific and sensitive to mobile zinc in biological systems. PMID:26878065

  6. Probing elastic and inelastic breakup contributions to intermediate-energy two-proton removal reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, K.; Bazin, D.; Gade, A.; Tostevin, J. A.; Baugher, T.; Chajecki, Z.; Coupland, D.; Famiano, M. A.; Ghosh, T. K.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hodges, R.; Howard, M. E.; Kilburn, M.; Lynch, W. G.; Manning, B.; Meierbachtol, K.; Quarterman, P.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Sanetullaev, A.; Stroberg, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Weisshaar, D.; Winkelbauer, J.; Winkler, R.; Youngs, M.

    2012-05-01

    The two-proton removal reaction from 28Mg projectiles has been studied at 93 MeV/u. First coincidence measurements of the heavy 26Ne projectile residues, the removed protons, and other light charged particles enabled the relative cross sections from each of the three possible elastic and inelastic proton removal mechanisms to be determined. These more final-state-exclusive measurements are key for further interrogation of these reaction mechanisms and use of the reaction channel for quantitative spectroscopy of very neutron-rich nuclei. The relative and absolute yields of the three contributing mechanisms are compared to reaction model expectations based on the use of eikonal dynamics and sd-shell-model structure amplitudes.

  7. bar{K}-Nucleus Interaction Probed by the In-Flight (K^-,N) Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Ajimura, S.; Khanam, F.; Itabashi, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Minami, S.; Mitoma, Y.; Sakaguchi, A.; Shimizu, Y.; Terai, K.; Chrien, R. E.; Pile, P.; Noumi, H.; Sekimoto, M.; Takahashi, H.; Fukuda, T.; Imoto, W.; Mizoi, Y.

    We would like to point out that the (K^-,N) reactions are particularly useful for the study of the bar{K}-nucleus interaction. We have measured the missing mass spectra derived from the momenta of both neutrons and protons from the ^{12}{C}(K^-,N) reactions. It was found that an appreciable amount of strength were below the bar{K}-nucleus threshold which indicates that the bar{K}-nuclear potential is strongly attractive. The missing mass spectra are compared with theoretical calculations. It is found that a potential depth of around -190 MeV reproduces well the spectrum of the ^{12}C(K^-,n) reaction and a less deep potential of around -160 MeV reproduces well that of the ^{12}C(K^-,p) reaction. Our data show that the bar{K}-nucleus potential is very deep to realize kaon condensation in the core of neutron stars.

  8. Reaction-based epoxide fluorescent probe for in vivo visualization of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Sathyadevi, Palanisamy; Chen, Yu-Jen; Wu, Shou-Cheng; Chen, Yen-Hao; Wang, Yun-Ming

    2015-06-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as the most important biosynthetic gasotransmitters along with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). In this study, we report the design and the synthesis of a new epoxide fluorescent probe 7-glycidyloxy-9-(2-glycidyloxycarbonylphenyl)-2-xanthone (FEPO) for use in in vivo visualization of hydrogen sulfide. The probe employs a fluorescein as a fluorophore, and is equipped with an operating epoxide unit. FEPO functions via epoxide ring opening upon nucleophilic attack of H2S. This ring opening strategy may open a new avenue for the development of various H2S fluorescent sensors. FEPO showed high selectivity and high sensitivity for H2S. FEPO's cytotoxicity was tested using MTT (2-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-3,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. Furthermore, the use of confocal imaging of H2S and in vivo imaging in live zebra fish demonstrated FEPO's potential biological applications. We anticipate that, owing to their ideal properties, probes of this type will find great uses in exploring the role of H2S in biology. PMID:25660659

  9. Metal-Catalyzed Chemical Reaction of Single Molecules Directly Probed by Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Han-Kyu; Park, Won-Hwa; Park, Chan-Gyu; Shin, Hyun-Hang; Lee, Kang Sup; Kim, Zee Hwan

    2016-04-01

    The study of heterogeneous catalytic reactions remains a major challenge because it involves a complex network of reaction steps with various intermediates. If the vibrational spectra of individual molecules could be monitored in real time, one could characterize the structures of the intermediates and the time scales of reaction steps without ensemble averaging. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy does provide vibrational spectra with single-molecule sensitivity, but typical single-molecule SERS signals exhibit spatial heterogeneities and temporal fluctuations, making them difficult to be used in single-molecule kinetics studies. Here we show that SERS can monitor the single-molecule catalytic reactions in real time. The surface-immobilized reactants placed at the junctions of well-defined nanoparticle-thin film structures produce time-resolved SERS spectra with discrete, step-transitions of photoproducts. We interpret that such SERS-steps correspond to the reaction events of individual molecules occurring at the SERS hotspot. The analyses of the yield, dynamics, and the magnitude of such SERS steps, along with the associated spectral characteristics, fully support our claim. In addition, a model that is based on plasmonic field enhancement and surface photochemistry reproduces the key features of experimental observation. Overall, the result demonstrates that it is possible, under well-controlled conditions, to differentiate the chemical and physical processes contributing to the single-molecule SERS signals, and thus shows the use of single-molecule SERS as a tool for studying the metal-catalyzed organic reactions. PMID:26964567

  10. Short-range plasmonic nanofocusing within submicron regimes facilitates in situ probing and promoting of interfacial reactions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chen-Chieh; Lin, Keng-Te; Su, Pao-Yun; Wang, En-Yun; Yen, Yu-Ting; Chen, Hsuen-Li

    2016-02-14

    In this study, a simple configuration, based on high-index dielectric nanoparticles (NPs) and plasmonic nanostructures, is employed for the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The excited SPPs are locally bound and focused at the interface between the dielectric NPs and the underlying metallic nanostructures, thereby greatly enhancing the local electromagnetic field. Taking advantage of the surface properties of the dielectric NPs, this system performs various functions. For example, the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range SPPs is used to enhance the Raman signals of gas molecules adsorbed on the dielectric NPs. In addition, the presence of the local strong electromagnetic field accelerates the rates of interfacial reactions on the surfaces of the dielectric NPs. Therefore, the proposed nanofocusing configuration can both promote and probe interfacial reactions simultaneously. Herein, the promotion and probing of the desorption of EtOH vapor are described, as well as the photodegradation of methylene blue. Moreover, the nanofocusing of SPPs is demonstrated on an aluminum surface in both the visible and UV regimes, a process that has not been achieved using conventional tapered waveguide nanofocusing structures. Therefore, the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range SPPs by dielectric NPs on plasmonic nanostructures is not limited to low-loss noble metals. Accordingly, this system has potential for use in light management and on-chip green devices and sensors. PMID:26809318

  11. Glass Matrix Facilitated Thermal Reduction: A Tool for Probing Reactions of Met Hemoglobin with Nitrite and Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.

    2010-01-01

    Isolating elemental steps that comprise a protein reaction in solution is a difficult process. In this study, the use of sugar-derived glass matrices is evaluated as a biophysical tool to help dissect out elemental steps and isolate intermediates. Two features of the glass are utilized in this endeavor: i) the capacity of trehalose glass matrices to support thermal reduction over macroscopic distances; and ii) the ability of glass matrices to significantly damp large amplitude protein dynamics. The focus of the study is on the reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with a nitrite ion coordinated to the heme iron of hemoglobin (Hb). The thermal reduction property of the glass is used to generate NO from nitrite within the glass and the damping of protein dynamics is used to control entry of NO into the distal heme pocket of Hb where it can either interact with bound nitrite or bind to the heme iron. The results not only relate to earlier controversial studies addressing the reactions of Hb with NO and nitrite but also raise the prospect that these properties of sugar-derived glassy matrices can be exploited as a new biophysical tool to modulate and probe reactions of NO with hemeproteins as well as a wide range of other metalloproteins. PMID:20146537

  12. Probing harpooning and dissociation in gas-surface reactions by exoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greber, T.

    The reaction of electronegative molecules with low work function surfaces may proceed nonadiabatically. As a consequence ``exoemission'' of negative ions or electrons can be observed. The reactions of O2 and N2O with Cs are discussed. If the molecules interact with a metal surface the nonadiabaticity is triggered by harpooning, i.e. resonant ionization and acceleration in the image field, and subsequent dissociation. From recent experiments with state-selected N2O molecules on Cs [1] the range of harpooning reactions is extended. From exoemission of N2O in the first excited bending mode and its suppression in the ground state, it is concluded that a molecular affinity level may be lowered by more than 3.5 eV in front of a metallic Cs surface. This is a hint that harpooning is more common than expected.

  13. Flow probe of symmetry energy in relativistic heavy-ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Cozma, M. D.; Le Fèvre, A.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R.; Li, Q.; Łukasik, J.; Trautmann, W.

    2014-02-01

    Flow observables in heavy-ion reactions at incident energies up to about 1GeV per nucleon have been shown to be very useful for investigating the reaction dynamics and for determining the parameters of reaction models based on transport theory. In particular, the elliptic flow in collisions of neutron-rich heavy-ion systems emerges as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities. The comparison of ratios or differences of neutron and proton flows or neutron and hydrogen flows with predictions of transport models favors an approximately linear density dependence, consistent with ab initio nuclear-matter theories. Extensive parameter searches have shown that the model dependence is comparable to the uncertainties of existing experimental data. Comprehensive new flow data of high accuracy, partly also through providing stronger constraints on model parameters, can thus be expected to improve our knowledge of the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter.

  14. Probing dynamics of fusion reactions through cross-section and spin distribution measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Behera, B. R.; Singh, Gulzar; Singh, Varinderjit; Madhavan, N.; Muralithar, S.; Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Mohanto, G.; Mukul, Ish; Siwal, D.; Thakur, M.; Kapoor, K.; Sharma, P.; Banerjee, T.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Bala, Indu; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Stevenson, P. D.

    2016-05-01

    Present work aims to explicate the effect of entrance channel mass asymmetry on fusion dynamics for the Compound Nucleus 80Sr populated through two different channels, 16O+64Zn and 32S+48Ti, using cross-section and spin distribution measurements as probes. The evaporation spectra studies for these systems, reported earlier indicate the presence of dynamical effects for mass symmetric 32S+48Ti system.The CCDEF and TDHF calculations have been performed for both the systems and an attempt has been made to explain the reported deviations in the α-particle spectrum for the mass symmetric system.

  15. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  16. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  17. Probing the Rate-Determining Step of the Claisen-Schmidt Condensation by Competition Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.; Chan, Wing-Fat; Lung, Ka-Ying; Lam, Wai-Yee; Ng, Weng-Cheong; Lee, Siu-Fung

    2007-01-01

    Competition experiments are a useful tool for preliminary study of the linear free energy relationship of organic reactions. This article describes a physical organic experiment for upper-level undergraduates to identify the rate-determining step of the Claisen-Schmidt condensation of benzaldehyde and acetophenone by studying the linear free…

  18. Reaction ({gamma},2e) and (e,3e) as probe of electron correlation in atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.

    1995-08-01

    Cross sections of the ({gamma},2e) and (e,3e) reactions contain information about the two vacancy-energy spectrum and electron-pair correlations in initial and final states of the target atom. Physical pictures of these processes are presented for two- and many-electron atoms. The simplest mechanisms are discussed, demonstrating some features which await experimental confirmation. Attention is given to high photon energy and the relativistic energy region of these reactions. The energy distribution of outgoing relativistic electrons is qualitatively different from the nonrelativistic case. The origin and types of corrections to the simplest mechanisms, and possible means of their detection, are discussed. In addition, the role of different resonances: shape, giant, autoionizational, and Feshbach-type are considered. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data, mainly on double photoionization cross sections. Different possible objects as targets for the reactions are considered, including negative ions, excited atoms, molecules, and clusters. The modification of these reactions due to photon emission is discussed. The future of the domain is outlined.

  19. Solvent as a probe of active site motion and chemistry during the hydrogen tunnelling reaction in morphinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Hay, Sam; Pudney, Christopher R; Sutcliffe, Michael J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2008-09-15

    The reductive half-reaction of morphinone reductase involves a hydride transfer from enzyme-bound beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to a flavin mononucleotide (FMN). We have previously demonstrated that this step proceeds via a quantum mechanical tunnelling mechanism. Herein, we probe the effect of the solvent on the active site chemistry. The pK(a) of the reduced FMN N1 is 7.4+/-0.7, based on the pH-dependence of the FMN midpoint potential. We rule out that protonation of the reduced FMN N1 is coupled to the preceding H-transfer as both the rate and temperature-dependence of the reaction are insensitive to changes in solution pH above and below this pK(a). Further, the solvent kinetic isotope effect is approximately 1.0 and both the 1 degrees and 2 degrees KIEs are insensitive to solution pH. The effect of the solvent's dielectric constant is investigated and the rate of H-transfer is found to be unaffected by changes in the dielectric constant between approximately 60 and 80. We suggest that, while there is crystallographic evidence for some water in the active site, the putative promoting motion involved in the H-tunnelling reaction is insensitive to such changes. PMID:18668493

  20. Probing nucleon-nucleon correlations in heavy-ion transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilner, S.

    2016-05-01

    The γ-particle coincident measurements, performed by coupling of the PRISMA spectrometer to the large γ arrays (CLARA and AGATA), demonstrate a strong interplay between single-particle and collective degrees of freedom that is pertinent to the reaction dynamics. By using the unique PRISMA performance in terms of both resolution and efficiency, measurements at very low bombarding energies have been performed. Via transfer of nucleon pairs, valuable information on the component responsible for particle correlations has been derived.

  1. Probing the Reaction Mechanism of Aluminum/Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Composites.

    PubMed

    DeLisio, Jeffery B; Hu, Xiuli; Wu, Tao; Egan, Garth C; Young, Gregory; Zachariah, Michael R

    2016-06-23

    Energetic thin films with high mass loadings of nanosized components have been recently fabricated using electrospray deposition. These films are composed of aluminum nanoparticles (nAl) homogeneously dispersed in an energetic fluoropolymer binder, poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF). The nascent oxide shell of the nAl has been previously shown to undergo a preignition reaction (PIR) with fluoropolymers such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). This work examines the PIR between alumina and PVDF to further explain the reaction mechanism of the Al/PVDF system. Temperature jump (T-jump) ignition experiments in air, argon, and vacuum environments showed that the nAl is fluorinated by gas phase species due to a decrease in reactivity in a vacuum. Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC) was used to confirm the occurrence of a PIR, and gas phase products during the PIR and fluorination of nAl were investigated with temperature jump time-of-flight mass spectrometry (T-jump TOFMS). Results show a direct correlation between the amount of alumina in the PVDF film and the relative signal intensity of hydrogen fluoride release (HF). Although the PIR between alumina and PVDF plays an important role in the Al/PVDF reaction mechanism, burn speeds of Al/PVDF films containing additional pure alumina particles showed no burn speed enhancement. PMID:27228361

  2. Probing the Diastereoselectivity of Staudinger Reactions Catalyzed by N-Heterocyclic Carbenes.

    PubMed

    Hans, Morgan; Wouters, Johan; Demonceau, Albert; Delaude, Lionel

    2015-07-20

    The reaction of ethylphenylketene with 1,3-dimesitylimidazol-2-ylidene (IMes) or 1,3-dimesitylimidazolin-2-ylidene (SIMes) afforded the corresponding azolium enolates in high yields. The two zwitterions were fully characterized by various analytical techniques. Their thermal stabilities were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis and the molecular structure of SIMes⋅EtPhCCO was determined by means of X-ray crystallography. A mechanism was proposed to account for the trans-diastereoselectivity observed in the [2+2] cycloaddition of ketenes and N-protected imines catalyzed by N-heterocyclic carbenes and an extensive catalytic screening was performed to test its validity. The steric bulk of the NHC catalyst markedly affected the cis/trans ratio of the model β-lactam product. The nature of the solvent used to carry out the Staudinger reaction also significantly influenced its diastereoselectivity. Conversely, the nature of the substituent on the N-sulfonated imine reagent and the reaction temperature were less critical parameters. PMID:26073307

  3. Hydrogen Surface Reactions and Adsorption Studied on Y2O3, YSZ, and ZrO2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The surface reactivity of Y2O3, YSZ, and ZrO2 polycrystalline powder samples toward H2 has been comparatively studied by a pool of complementary experimental techniques, comprising volumetric methods (temperature-programmed volumetric adsorption/oxidation and thermal desorption spectrometry), spectroscopic techniques (in situ electric impedance and in situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy), and eventually structural characterization methods (X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy). Reduction has been observed on all three oxides to most likely follow a surface or near-surface-limited mechanism involving removal of surface OH-groups and associated formation of water without formation of a significant number of anionic oxygen vacancies. Partly reversible adsorption of H2 was proven on the basis of molecular H2 desorption. Dictated by the specific hydrophilicity of the oxide, readsorption of water eventually takes place. The inference of this surface-restricted mechanism is further corroborated by the fact that no bulk structural and/or morphological changes were observed upon reduction even at the highest reduction temperatures (1173 K). We anticipate relevant implications for the use of especially YSZ in fuel cell research, since in particular the chemical state and structure of the surface under typical reducing high-temperature conditions affects the operation of the entire cell. PMID:24791182

  4. Hydrogen Surface Reactions and Adsorption Studied on Y2O3, YSZ, and ZrO2.

    PubMed

    Kogler, Michaela; Köck, Eva-Maria; Bielz, Thomas; Pfaller, Kristian; Klötzer, Bernhard; Schmidmair, Daniela; Perfler, Lukas; Penner, Simon

    2014-04-24

    The surface reactivity of Y2O3, YSZ, and ZrO2 polycrystalline powder samples toward H2 has been comparatively studied by a pool of complementary experimental techniques, comprising volumetric methods (temperature-programmed volumetric adsorption/oxidation and thermal desorption spectrometry), spectroscopic techniques (in situ electric impedance and in situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy), and eventually structural characterization methods (X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy). Reduction has been observed on all three oxides to most likely follow a surface or near-surface-limited mechanism involving removal of surface OH-groups and associated formation of water without formation of a significant number of anionic oxygen vacancies. Partly reversible adsorption of H2 was proven on the basis of molecular H2 desorption. Dictated by the specific hydrophilicity of the oxide, readsorption of water eventually takes place. The inference of this surface-restricted mechanism is further corroborated by the fact that no bulk structural and/or morphological changes were observed upon reduction even at the highest reduction temperatures (1173 K). We anticipate relevant implications for the use of especially YSZ in fuel cell research, since in particular the chemical state and structure of the surface under typical reducing high-temperature conditions affects the operation of the entire cell. PMID:24791182

  5. Short-range plasmonic nanofocusing within submicron regimes facilitates in situ probing and promoting of interfacial reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chen-Chieh; Lin, Keng-Te; Su, Pao-Yun; Wang, En-Yun; Yen, Yu-Ting; Chen, Hsuen-Li

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a simple configuration, based on high-index dielectric nanoparticles (NPs) and plasmonic nanostructures, is employed for the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The excited SPPs are locally bound and focused at the interface between the dielectric NPs and the underlying metallic nanostructures, thereby greatly enhancing the local electromagnetic field. Taking advantage of the surface properties of the dielectric NPs, this system performs various functions. For example, the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range SPPs is used to enhance the Raman signals of gas molecules adsorbed on the dielectric NPs. In addition, the presence of the local strong electromagnetic field accelerates the rates of interfacial reactions on the surfaces of the dielectric NPs. Therefore, the proposed nanofocusing configuration can both promote and probe interfacial reactions simultaneously. Herein, the promotion and probing of the desorption of EtOH vapor are described, as well as the photodegradation of methylene blue. Moreover, the nanofocusing of SPPs is demonstrated on an aluminum surface in both the visible and UV regimes, a process that has not been achieved using conventional tapered waveguide nanofocusing structures. Therefore, the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range SPPs by dielectric NPs on plasmonic nanostructures is not limited to low-loss noble metals. Accordingly, this system has potential for use in light management and on-chip green devices and sensors.In this study, a simple configuration, based on high-index dielectric nanoparticles (NPs) and plasmonic nanostructures, is employed for the nanofocusing of submicron-short-range surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The excited SPPs are locally bound and focused at the interface between the dielectric NPs and the underlying metallic nanostructures, thereby greatly enhancing the local electromagnetic field. Taking advantage of the surface properties of the dielectric NPs, this

  6. Coke Formation in a Zeolite Crystal During the Methanol-to-Hydrocarbons Reaction as Studied with Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Joel E; Poplawsky, Jonathan D; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using (13) C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30-60 (13) C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. This nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation. PMID:27485276

  7. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D. A. Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid sitemore » density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.« less

  8. TaqMan probe real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the quantification of canine DNA in chicken nugget.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mahfujur; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Basirun, Wan Jefrey; Bhassu, Subha; Rashid, Nur Raifana Abdul; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Mohd Desa, Mohd Nasir; Ali, Md Eaqub

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a short-amplicon-based TaqMan probe quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the quantitative detection of canine meat in chicken nuggets, which are very popular across the world, including Malaysia. The assay targeted a 100-bp fragment of canine cytb gene using a canine-specific primer and TaqMan probe. Specificity against 10 different animals and plants species demonstrated threshold cycles (Ct) of 16.13 ± 0.12 to 16.25 ± 0.23 for canine DNA and negative results for the others in a 40-cycle reaction. The assay was tested for the quantification of up to 0.01% canine meat in deliberately spiked chicken nuggets with 99.7% PCR efficiency and 0.995 correlation coefficient. The analysis of the actual and qPCR predicted values showed a high recovery rate (from 87% ± 28% to 112% ± 19%) with a linear regression close to unity (R(2) = 0.999). Finally, samples of three halal-branded commercial chicken nuggets collected from different Malaysian outlets were screened for canine meat, but no contamination was demonstrated. PMID:26458055

  9. Simultaneous evaluation of one-electron reducing systems and radical reactions in cells by nitroxyl biradical as probe.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoko; Koshiishi, Ichiro

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, a novel probe for the simultaneous evaluation of one-electron reducing systems (electron transport chain) and one-electron oxidizing systems (free radical reactions) in cells by electron chemical detection was developed. Six-membered cyclic nitroxyl radicals (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl; TEMPO series) are sensitive to one-electron redox systems, generating the hydroxylamine form [TEMPO(H)] via one-electron reduction, and the secondary amine form [TEMPO(N)] via one-electron oxidation in the presence of thiols. In contrast, the sensitivities of five-membered cyclic nitroxyl radicals (2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl; PROXYL series) to the one-electron redox systems are comparatively low. The electron chemical detector can detect 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO), TEMPO(H) and PROXYL but not TEMPO(N). Therefore, nitroxyl biradical, TEMPO-PROXYL, as a probe for the evaluation of one-electron redox systems was employed. TEMPO-PROXYL was synthesized by the conjunction of 4-amino-TEMPO with 3-carboxyl-PROXYL via the conventional dicyclohexyl carbodiimide reaction. TEMPO-PROXYL, TEMPO(H)-PROXYL and TEMPO(N)-PROXYL were simultaneously quantified by HPLC with Coularray detection. Calibration curves for the quantification of TEMPO-PROXYL, TEMPO(H)-PROXYL and TEMPO(N)-PROXYL were linear in the range from 80 nm to 80 μm, and the lowest quantification limit of each molecule was estimated to be <80 nm. The relative standard deviations at 0.8 and 80 μm were within 10% (n = 5). Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26613564

  10. Electron transfer in reactions of ketones with organolithium reagents. A carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect probe

    SciTech Connect

    Yamataka, H.; Fujimura, N.; Kawafuji, Y.; Hanafusa, T.

    1987-07-08

    Kinetic isotope effects have been determined for reactions of ketones labeled with carbon-14 at the carbonyl carbon with MeLi and Me/sub 2/CuLi in diethyl ether at 0/sup 0/C. Observed isotope effects were as follows: (C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/C double bonds O + MeLi, /sup 12/k//sup 14/k = 1.000 +/- 0.002; (C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/C double bonds O + Me/sub 2/CuLi, 1.029 +/- 0.005; 2,4,6-Me/sub 3/C/sub 6/H/sub 2/COC/sub 6/H/sub 5/ + MeLi, 1.023 +/- 0.004. The relative reactivities of ortho-, meta-, and para-substituted benzophenones with these reagents were also determined by the competition experiments. These results are consistent with an electron-transfer step which is followed by a carbon-carbon bond-forming step that is or is not rate determining depending on the structure of ketones and reagents. The reaction of benzophenone with MeLi proceeds via rate-determining electron transfer; the change in nucleophile from MeLi to Me/sub 2/CuLi shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination; the change in ketone from benzophenone to 2,4,6-trimethylbenzophenone also shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination because the latter step becomes slower for the more hindered ketone. The extent of the geometrical change of the substrate at the electron-transfer transition state of the reaction of benzophenone with MeLi was estimated to be small on the basis of the magnitude of the KIE and the rho value of the Hammett correlation.

  11. Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons as a Probe of Hydrodynamical Mixing at NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna; Grim, Gary; Jungman, Jerry

    2009-10-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons above the main 14 MeV peak make up about 0.5% of the neutrons production. In this talk we present calculations that show the sensitivity of the RIF neutron production to hydrodynamical mixing of the outer shell of the NIF capsule into the main dt fuel. This mixing generally quenches the dt burn and could be a serious mode of ignition failure. These calculations suggest that a time-of-flight measurement or radiochemical measurement of the RIF neutrons could be used as a robust indicator of the degree o mix taking place in an imploded NIF capsule.

  12. Alkyl bromides as mechanistic probes of reductive dehalogenation: reactions of vicinal dibromide stereoisomers with zerovalent metals.

    PubMed

    Totten, L A; Jans, U; Roberts, A L

    2001-06-01

    Whether reductive dehalogenation proceeds via a one- or a two-electron mechanism has been suggested to affect product distributions, hence potentially influencing the success of engineered treatment systems. In this work, we explore vicinal dibromide stereoisomers as "probes" of the concertedness of electron transfer in reduction by aqueous suspensions of iron and zinc metal. Dibromides consisted of 2,3-dibromopentane (diBP) stereoisomers and (+/-)-1,2-dibromo-1,2-diphenylethane. All dibromides reacted with metals to give the same E:Z ratio of olefins observed during dehalogenation by iodide (a two-electron reductant). Reduction by Cr(II) (a one-electron reductant) yielded distinctly different proportions of E and Z olefins. Although this might be construed as evidence that metals function as two-electron reductants, high stereo-specificity was also obtained for reduction of diBPs by Fe(II) adsorbed to goethite, a presumed one-electron reductant; this can be explained by two single-electron transfers in rapid succession, facilitated by the locally elevated concentration of reducing equivalents at the oxide-water interface. The results suggest that reduction of alkyl halides by metals is not likely to produce free radicals that persist long enough to undergo radical-radical coupling or hydrogen-atom abstraction from minor dissolved constituents. Apparent free-radical coupling products are more likely to result from (possibly surface-bound) organometallic intermediates. PMID:11414030

  13. Nanosecond Time-Resolved Polarization Spectroscopies: Tools for Probing Protein Reaction Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eefei; Goldbeck, Robert A.; Kliger, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Polarization methods, introduced in the 1800’s, offered one of the earliest ways to examine protein structure. Since then, many other structure-sensitive probes have been developed, but circular dichroism (CD) remains a powerful technique because of its versatility and the specificity of protein structural information that can be explored. With improvements in time-resolution, from millisecond to picosecond CD measurements, it has proven to be an important tool for studying the mechanism of folding and function in many biomolecules. For example, nanosecond time-resolved CD (TRCD) studies of the sub-microsecond events of reduced cytochrome c folding have provided direct experimental evidence of kinetic heterogeneity, which is an inherent property of the diffusional nature of early folding dynamics on the energy landscape. In addition, TRCD has been applied to the study of many biochemical processes, such as ligand rebinding in hemoglobin and myoglobin and signaling state formation in photoactive yellow protein and prototropin 1 LOV2. The basic approach to TRCD has also been extended to include a repertoire of nanosecond polarization spectroscopies: optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), magnetic CD and ORD, and linear dichroism. This article will discuss the details of the polarization methods used in this laboratory, as well as the coupling of timeresolved ORD with the temperature-jump trigger so that protein folding can be studied in a larger number of proteins. PMID:20438842

  14. The adsorption and reaction of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) on metal oxides. Annual progress report, September 1996--October 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, J.H.; Haw, J.F.; Goodman, D.W.

    1997-10-01

    'The interactions of carbon tetrachloride with strongly basic oxides and hydroxides have been studied by several techniques in order to understand the surface reactions and the subsequent bulk reactions that result in the destruction of the chlorinated hydrocarbon. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the surface phases, as well as the bulk phases, that are present during these transformations. As a result of the study with barium oxide, a reaction cycle has been demonstrated that may have practical significance in the removal of chlorinated hydrocarbons.'

  15. F-18 Labeled RGD Probes Based on Bioorthogonal Strain-Promoted Click Reaction for PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of fluorine-substituted monomeric and dimeric cRGD peptide derivatives, such as cRGD-ADIBOT-F (ADIBOT = azadibenzocyclooctatriazole), di-cRGD-ADIBOT-F, cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-F, and di-cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-F, were prepared by strain-promoted alkyne azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction of the corresponding aza-dibenzocyclooctyne (ADIBO) substituted peptides with a fluorinated azide 3. Among these cRGD derivatives, di-cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-F had the highest binding affinity in a competitive binding assay compared to other derivatives and even the original cRGDyk. On the basis of the in vitro study results, di-cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-18F was prepared from a SPAAC reaction with 18F-labeled azide and subsequent chemo-orthogonal scavenger-assisted separation without high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification in 92% decay-corrected radiochemical yield (dcRCY) with high specific activity for further in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging study. In vivo PET imaging study and biodistribution data showed that this radiotracer allowed successful visualization of tumors with good tumor-to-background contrast and significantly higher tumor uptake compared to other major organs. PMID:25893040

  16. Probing Nonadiabaticity in the Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reaction Catalyzed by Soybean Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. PCET rate constant expressions are available for various well-defined regimes, and determining which expression is appropriate for a given system is essential for reliable modeling. Quantitative diagnostics have been devised to characterize the vibronic nonadiabaticity between the electron–proton quantum subsystem and the classical nuclei, as well as the electron–proton nonadiabaticity between the electrons and proton(s) within the quantum subsystem. Herein these diagnostics are applied to a model of the active site of the enzyme soybean lipoxygenase, which catalyzes a PCET reaction that exhibits unusually high deuterium kinetic isotope effects at room temperature. Both semiclassical and electronic charge density diagnostics illustrate vibronic and electron–proton nonadiabaticity for this PCET reaction, supporting the use of the Golden rule nonadiabatic rate constant expression with a specific form of the vibronic coupling. This type of characterization will be useful for theoretical modeling of a broad range of PCET processes. PMID:25258676

  17. Characterization of full-length and polymerase chain reaction-derived partial-length Gottfried and OSU gene 4 probes for serotypic differentiation of porcine rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Rosen, B I; Parwani, A V; Gorziglia, M; Larralde, G; Saif, L J

    1992-10-01

    To determine the VP4 (P type) specificity of porcine rotaviruses, full- and partial-length gene 4 probes were produced from cloned Gottfried and OSU porcine rotavirus genomic segment 4 cDNAs. The gene 4 segments from the prototype Gottfried (VP7 serotype 4) and OSU (VP7 serotype 5) porcine rotavirus strains were selected for study because of their distinct P types and the occurrence of rotaviruses with similar serotypes among swine. Partial-length gene 4 cDNAs were produced and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and encompassed portions of the variable region (nucleotides 211 to 612) of VP8 encoded by genomic segment 4. The hybridization stringency conditions necessary for optimal probe specificity and sensitivity were determined by dot or Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations against a diverse group of human and animal rotaviruses of heterologous group A serotypes and against representative group B and C porcine rotaviruses. The PCR-derived gene 4 probes were more specific than the full-length gene 4 probes but demonstrated equivalent sensitivity. The Gottfried PCR-derived probe hybridized with Gottfried, SB2, SB3, and SB5 G serotype 4 porcine rotaviruses. The OSU PCR-derived probe hybridized with OSU, EE, A580, and SB-1A porcine rotaviruses and equine H1 rotavirus. Results of the hybridization reactions of the PCR-derived gene 4 probes with selected porcine rotavirus strains agreed with previous serological or genetic analyses, indicating their suitability as diagnostic reagents. PMID:1328281

  18. Multi-Isotope Analysis as a Natural Reaction Probe of Biodegradation Mechanisms of 1,2- Dichloroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschorn, S. K.; Dinglasan-Panlilio, M.; Edwards, E. A.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2006-12-01

    1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), a chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon, is an EPA priority pollutant and a widespread groundwater contaminant. Stable isotope fractionation during biodegradation of 1,2-DCA occurs due to differences in the reaction rates of heavy versus light atoms present at a reacting bond in the 1,2-DCA molecule. In general, light isotopic bonds react more quickly, producing a relative enrichment in the heavy isotope in the remaining contaminant pool. Compound specific isotope analysis has the potential to demonstrate the occurrence and extent of biodegradation at chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater sites. In this study, stable carbon isotope fractionation was used as a novel reaction probe to provide information about the mechanism of 1,2-DCA biodegradation. Isotopic fractionation was measured during 1,2-DCA degradation by a microbial culture capable of degrading 1,2-DCA under O2-reducing and NO3-reducing conditions. The microbial culture produced isotopic enrichment values that are not only large and reproducible, but are the same whether O2 or NO3 was used as an electron acceptor. The mean isotopic enrichment value of -25.8 permil measured for the microbial culture during 1,2-DCA degradation under both O2 and NO3- reducing conditions can be converted into a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value to relate the observed isotopic fractionation to the mechanism of degradation. This KIE value (1.05) is consistent with degradation via a hydrolysis (SN2) reaction under both electron-accepting conditions. Isotope analysis was able to provide a first line of evidence for the reaction mechanism of 1,2-DCA biodegradation by the microbial culture. Using a multi-isotope approach incorporating both carbon and hydrogen isotopic data, compound specific isotope analysis also has the potential to determine degradation mechanisms for 1,2-DCA under aerobic conditions where 1,2-DCA is known to be degraded by two distinct enzymatic pathways. Biodegradation of 1

  19. Different Adsorption Behavior of Rare Earth and Metallic Ion Complexes on Langmuir Mono layers Probed by Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Woongmo; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2013-02-25

    Adsorption behavior of counterions under a Langmuir monolayer was investigated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. By comparing SFG spectra of arachidic acid (AA) Langmuir monolayer/water interface with and without added salt, it was found that the simple trivalent cation La3+ adsorbed on AA monolayer only when the carboxylic headgroups are charged (deprotonated), implying that counterion adsorption is induced by Coulomb interaction. On the other hand, metal hydroxide complex Fe(OH)3 adsorbed even on a charge-neutral AA monolayer, indicating that the adsorption of iron hydroxide is due to chemical interaction such as covalent or hydrogen bonding to the headgroup of the molecules at the monolayer.

  20. Desulfurization of thiophenic compounds by Ni(111): Adsorption and reactions of thiophene, 3-methylthiophene, and 2,5-dimethylthiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, D.R.; Mullins, D.R.; Wingeier, M.P.

    1996-12-12

    The adsorption and reactivity of thiophene, 2,5-dimethylthiophene, and 3-methylthiophene on Ni(111) have been examined. The saturation coverages of the three molecules are similar, about 0.13 monolayer (ML), and in all cases alkenes are the major hydrocarbon products. On initially clean surfaces, decomposition to sulfur, carbon and hydrogen is the major pathway, but the selectivity to hydrocarbon production can be enhanced by a factor of about 3 by predosing the surface with hydrogen. Sulfur is easily removed from the ring, and C-S bond scission is complete by 150 K. The rate-limiting step in alkene formation is hydrogenation of a highly unsaturated hydrocarbon intermediate. The hydrocarbon intermediates formed are difficult to unambiguously identify but are most likely cyclic structures, retaining the C{sub 4} framework. 44 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Microfluidic Technology Platforms for Synthesizing, Labeling and Measuring the Kinetics of Transport and Biochemical Reactions for Developing Molecular Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, Michael E.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotracer techniques are used in environmental sciences, geology, biology and medicine. Radiotracers with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provided biological examinations of ~3 million patients 2008. Despite the success of positron labeled tracers in many sciences, there is limited access in an affordable and convenient manner to develop and use new tracers. Integrated microfluidic chips are a new technology well matched to the concentrations of tracers. Our goal is to develop microfluidic chips and new synthesis approaches to enable wide dissemination of diverse types of tracers at low cost, and to produce new generations of radiochemists for which there are many unfilled jobs. The program objectives are to: 1. Develop an integrated microfluidic platform technology for synthesizing and 18F-labeling diverse arrays of different classes of molecules. 2. Incorporate microfluidic chips into small PC controlled devices (“Synthesizer”) with a platform interfaced to PC for electronic and fluid input/out control. 3. Establish a de-centralized model with Synthesizers for discovering and producing molecular imaging probes, only requiring delivery of inexpensive [18F]fluoride ion from commercial PET radiopharmacies vs the centralized approach of cyclotron facilities synthesizing and shipping a few different types of 18F-probes. 4. Develop a position sensitive avalanche photo diode (PSAPD) camera for beta particles embedded in a microfluidic chip for imaging and measuring transport and biochemical reaction rates to valid new 18F-labeled probes in an array of cell cultures. These objectives are met within a research and educational program integrating radio-chemistry, synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, engineering and biology in the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging. The Radiochemistry Training Program exposes PhD and post doctoral students to molecular imaging in vitro in cells and microorganisms in microfluidic chips and in vivo with PET, from new technologies

  2. Probing Quark-Gluon Structure of Matter with e-p and e-A Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the strong interaction (QCD) in the truly strong ('non-perturbative') region remains a major challenge in modern physics. Nucleon and nuclei provide natural laboratories to study the strong interaction. The quark-gluon structure of the nucleon and nuclei are important by themselves since they are the main (>99%) part of the visible world. With electroweak interaction well-understood, e-p and e-A are clean means to probe the nucleon and nuclear structure and to study the strong interaction (QCD). Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiments have provided us with the most extensive information on the unpolarized and longitudinally-polarized parton (quark and gluon) distributions (PDFs). It has becoming clear that transverse spin and transverse structure (both transverse spatial structure via generalized parton distributions (GPDs) and transverse momentum structure via transverse- momentum-dependent distributions (TMDs)) study are crucial for a more complete understanding of the nucleon structure and the dynamics of the strong interaction(QCD). The transverse spin, GPDs and TMDs have been the subjects of increasingly intense theoretical and experimental study recently. With 12 GeV energy upgrade, Jefferson Lab (JLab) will provide the most precise multi-dimensional map of the TMDs and GPDs in the valence quark region through Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS) and Deep-Exclusive experiments, providing a 3-d partonic picture of the nucleon in momentum and spatial spaces. The precision information on TMDs and GPDs will provide access to the quark orbital angular momentum and its correlation with the quark and the nucleon spins. The planned future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) will enable a precision study of the TMDs and GPDs of the sea quarks and gluons, in addition to completing the study in the valence region. The EIC will also open a new window to study the role of gluons in nuclei.

  3. Probing the reaction mechanism of IspH protein by x-ray structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gräwert, Tobias; Span, Ingrid; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Rohdich, Felix; Eppinger, Jörg; Bacher, Adelbert; Groll, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) represent the two central intermediates in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids. The recently discovered deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate pathway generates a mixture of IPP and DMAPP in its final step by reductive dehydroxylation of 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-butenyl 4-diphosphate. This conversion is catalyzed by IspH protein comprising a central iron-sulfur cluster as electron transfer cofactor in the active site. The five crystal structures of IspH in complex with substrate, converted substrate, products and PPi reported in this article provide unique insights into the mechanism of this enzyme. While IspH protein crystallizes with substrate bound to a [4Fe-4S] cluster, crystals of IspH in complex with IPP, DMAPP or inorganic pyrophosphate feature [3Fe-4S] clusters. The IspH:substrate complex reveals a hairpin conformation of the ligand with the C(1) hydroxyl group coordinated to the unique site in a [4Fe-4S] cluster of aconitase type. The resulting alkoxide complex is coupled to a hydrogen-bonding network, which serves as proton reservoir via a Thr167 proton relay. Prolonged x-ray irradiation leads to cleavage of the C(1)-O bond (initiated by reducing photo electrons). The data suggest a reaction mechanism involving a combination of Lewis-acid activation and proton coupled electron transfer. The resulting allyl radical intermediate can acquire a second electron via the iron-sulfur cluster. The reaction may be terminated by the transfer of a proton from the β-phosphate of the substrate to C(1) (affording DMAPP) or C(3) (affording IPP). PMID:20080550

  4. Probing a chemical compass: novel variants of low-frequency reaction yield detected magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kiminori; Storey, Jonathan G; Liddell, Paul A; Gust, Devens; Hore, P J; Wedge, C J; Timmel, Christiane R

    2015-02-01

    We present a study of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad previously shown to function as a chemical compass: the photogenerated carotenoid-fullerene radical pair recombines at a rate sensitive to the orientation of an applied magnetic field. To characterize the system we develop a time-resolved Low-Frequency Reaction Yield Detected Magnetic Resonance (tr-LF-RYDMR) technique; the effect of varying the relative orientation of applied static and 36 MHz oscillating magnetic fields is shown to be strongly dependent on the strength of the oscillating magnetic field. RYDMR is a diagnostic test for involvement of the radical pair mechanism in the magnetic field sensitivity of reaction rates or yields, and has previously been applied in animal behavioural experiments to verify the involvement of radical-pair-based intermediates in the magnetic compass sense of migratory birds. The spectroscopic selection rules governing RYDMR are well understood at microwave frequencies for which the so-called 'high-field approximation' is valid, but at lower frequencies different models are required. For example, the breakdown of the rotating frame approximation has recently been investigated, but less attention has so far been given to orientation effects. Here we gain physical insights into the interplay of the different magnetic interactions affecting low-frequency RYDMR experiments performed in the challenging regime in which static and oscillating applied magnetic fields as well as internal electron-nuclear hyperfine interactions are of comparable magnitude. Our observations aid the interpretation of existing RYDMR-based animal behavioural studies and will inform future applications of the technique to verify and characterize further the biological receptors involved in avian magnetoreception. PMID:25537133

  5. Probing the Additional Capacity and Reaction Mechanism of the RuO2 Anode in Lithium Rechargeable Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunok; Muhammad, Shoaib; Kim, Hyunchul; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kim, Hansu; Kim, Ji Man; Yoon, Won-Sub

    2015-07-20

    The structural changes and electrochemical behavior of RuO2 are investigated by using in situ XRD, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and electrochemical techniques to understand the electrochemical reaction mechanism of this metal oxide anode material. Intermediate phase-assisted transformation of RuO2 to LiRuO2 takes place at the start of discharge. Upon further lithiation, LiRuO2 formed by intercalation decomposes to nanosized Ru metal and Li2 O by a conversion reaction. A reversible capacity in addition to its theoretical capacity is observed on discharging below 0.5 V during which no redox activity involving Ru is observed. TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the galvanostatic intermittent titration technique are used to probe this additional capacity. The results show that the additional capacity is a result of Li storage in the grain boundary between nanosized Ru metal and Li2 O. Findings of this study provide a better understanding of the quantitative share of capacity by a unique combination of intercalation, conversion, and interfacial Li storage in a RuO2 anode. PMID:26130378

  6. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical specimens by polymerase chain reaction and Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, C; Hirano, K; Wada, M; Kazumi, Y; Takahashi, M; Fukasawa, Y; Yoshimura, T; Miyagi, C; Goto, S

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using oligonucleotides based on the repetitive sequence (IS986) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a primer and the Gen-Probe Amplified Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct Test (MTD), which combines an M. tuberculosis rRNA amplification method with the hybridization protection assay format, were evaluated for detection of M. tuberculosis in clinical samples. The detection limits of these two assay systems based on nucleic acid amplification for cultured M. tuberculosis were less than 10 cells per reaction. A total of 135 sputum specimens were examined by the two assay systems. The PCR and the MTD systems for detection of M. tuberculosis gave overall positivity rates of 84.2% (32 of 38) and 91.9% (34 of 37), respectively, as compared with 71.9% (23 of 32) by smear and 96.9% (31 of 32) by culture in the liquid medium MB-Check. Procedures for sample preparation used in the two methods were different. Although the sensitivities of the PCR and MTD appeared to be similar to that of culture with the MB-Check system, the two methods based on nucleic acid amplification should be very useful for rapid detection of M. tuberculosis infections without the long time required for culture of M. tuberculosis. Images PMID:8308121

  7. Adsorption, Coadsorption, and Reaction of Acetaldehyde and NO2 on Na-Y,FAU: An In Situ FTIR Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    János, Szanyi; Ja Hun, Kwak; Ryan A.,Moline; Charles H. F.,Peden

    2004-11-01

    The adsorption of acetaldehyde and its coadsorption and reaction with NO2 were investigated on a Na-Y,FAU zeolite using in situ FTIR spectroscopy. Acetaldehyde adsorbs strongly over Na-Y and desorbs molecularly at around 400 K with very limited extent of condensation or polymerization. Reaction between CH3CHO and NO2 takes place in coadsorption experiments even at 300 K. In the initial step, acetaldehyde is oxidized to acetic acid accompanied by the formation of NO, which can be observed as N2O3 formed via a further reaction between NO and NO2. The key intermediates in the overall NOx reduction in this process are nitromethane and, possibly, nitrosomethane, which form in the next step. Their decomposition and further reaction with adsorbed NOx species lead to the formation of HCN, HNCO, N2O, CO2, and organic nitrile species identified by their characteristic IR vibrational signatures. At 473 K, the reaction between adsorbed CH3CHO and NO2 is very fast. The results seem to suggest a mechanism in which N-N bond formation takes place among ionic nitrogen containing species (NO+ and CN- or NCO-). Finally, no evidence has been found to suggest the participation of NHx+NOy- type species in the N-N bond formation under the experimental conditions of this study, although their role in the overall N2 formation process cannot be ruled out under realistic catalytic conditions.

  8. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen oxidation reaction in solid oxide fuel cell anode based on species territory adsorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Tsuyoshi; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2015-09-01

    A modified reaction model of hydrogen oxidation around a triple phase boundary (TPB) is proposed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a Ni/oxide ion conductor cermet anode containing proton conductor particles in order to describe the mechanism of anode overpotential reduction. In this model, three kinds of TPBs consisting of nickel metal, oxide ion conductors, proton conductors, and gas phases were considered. It was assumed that the chemical species could be adsorbed within a finite narrow area on each material around the TPB. The reaction rate in the anode was controlled by the surface reaction between the adsorbed hydrogen and adsorbed oxygen; all other reactions took place under chemical equilibrium. Based on the reaction model, analytical expressions of current density with oxygen activity and anode overpotential with current density could be obtained. The latter could combine the anode overpotential at low- and high-current-density regions, which were conventionally expressed independently. The analytical results were in good agreement with the experimental results for both the conventional anode and the new anode incorporating a proton conductor. Especially, the anode overpotential reduction could be explained by the additional supply of adsorbed hydrogen from the proton conductor to the TPB.

  9. Surface reactions of hydrocarbons as a probe for the characterization of RhCu/SiO sub 2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Coq, B.; Dutartre, R.; Figueras, F. ); Rouco, A. , Bahia Blanca )

    1989-06-15

    RhCu/SiO{sub 2} catalysts of various compositions were prepared from nitrate precursors and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and chemisorption. The catalytic properties were determined in a flow microreactor, at low conversion, for the hydrogenation of benzene, poisoned or not by thiophene, and the conversion of a series of alkanes: n-hexane (n-H), 2-methylpentane (2MP), 2,2-dimethylbutane (22DMB), 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane (2233TMB), methylcyclopentane (MCP). The conversion of alkanes at 493 K gives mainly hydrogenolysis of C-C bonds. The rate of cleavage depends on the degree of substitution of the carbon atoms and on the Cu/Rh ratio. Cu inhibits all reactions; however, the magnitude of this effect depends on the structure of the reactant. The comparison of the alloying effect with the effect of Rh particle size on the same set of reactions (Coq et. al.) shows that on the one hand 2233TMB has a lower sensitivity to alloying than to particle size; the selectivity to i-C{sub 4} remains high and characteristic of large particles of rhodium up to Cu/Rh = 1. On the other hand n-H, 2MP, and MCP are more sensitive to alloying than to change of particle size. These results suggest that Cu occupies preferentially the sites of low coordination, edges, and corners, and Rh the sites of high coordination on dense planes. This set of reactions, therefore, probes the extent of surface segregation on RhCu-supported particles.. By addition of thiophene a monotonic decrease of activity in the hydrogenation of benzene occurs due to sulfurization of the surface. The rate of poisoning is faster when the local density of states at the Fermi level of Rh surface atoms is higher. Dilution of Rh by Cu has little effect on the thioresistance which remains low even at high Cu content. Very likely little electronic interaction occurs between Rh and Cu.

  10. The ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) reaction as a probe for nuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cappuzzello, F.; Bondì, M.; Nicolosi, D.; Tropea, S.; Agodi, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; De Napoli, M.; Linares, R.

    2014-11-11

    The response of nuclei to the ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) two-neutron transfer reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been systematically studied at the Catania INFN-LNS laboratory. The experiments were performed using several solid targets from light ({sup 9}Be, {sup 11}B, {sup 12,13}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 28}Si) to heavy ones ({sup 58,64}Ni, {sup 120}Sn, {sup 208}Pb). The {sup 16}O ejectiles were detected at forward angles by the MAGNEX magnetic spectrometer. Exploiting the large momentum acceptance (−10%, +14%) and solid angle (50 msr) of the spectrometer, energy spectra were obtained with a relevant yield up to about 20 MeV excitation energy. The application of the powerful trajectory reconstruction technique did allow to get energy spectra with energy resolution of about 150 keV and angular distributions with angular resolution better than 0.3°. A common feature observed with light nuclei is the appearance of unknown resonant structures at high excitation energy. The strong population of these latter together with the measured width can reveal the excitation of a collective mode connected with the transfer of a pair.

  11. Multiple isotope effects with alternative dinucleotide substrates as a probe of the malic enzyme reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.M.; Urbauer, J.L.; Cleland, W.W. ); Gavva, S.R.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F. )

    1991-06-11

    Deuterium isotope effects and {sup 13}C isotope effects with deuterium- and protium-labeled malate have been obtained for both NAD- and NADP-malic enzymes by using a variety of alternative dinucleotide substrates. With nicotinamide-containing dinucleotides as the oxidizing substrate, the {sup 13}C effect decreases when deuterated malate is the substrate compared to the value obtained with protium-labeled malate. These data are consistent with a stepwise chemical mechanism in which hydride transfer precedes decarboxylation of the oxalacetate intermediate as previously proposed. When dinucleotide substrates such as thio-NAD, 3-nicotinamide rings are used, the {sup 13}C effect increases when deuterated malate is the substrate compared to the value obtained with protium-labeled malate. These data, at face value, are consistent with a change in mechanism from stepwise to concerted for the oxidative decarboxylation portion of the mechanism. However, the increase in the deuterium isotope effect from 1.5 to 3 with a concomitant decrease in the {sup 13}C isotope effect from 1.034 to 1.003 as the dinucleotide substrate is changed suggests that the reaction may still be stepwise with the non-nicotinamide dinucleotides. A more likely explanation is that a {beta}-secondary {sup 13}C isotope effect accompanies hydride transfer as a result of hyperconjugation of the {beta}-carboxyl of malate as the transition state for the hydride transfer step is approached.

  12. Passivation Layer and Cathodic Redox Reactions in Sodium-Ion Batteries Probed by HAXPES.

    PubMed

    Doubaji, Siham; Philippe, Bertrand; Saadoune, Ismael; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Gustafsson, Torbjorn; Solhy, Abderrahim; Valvo, Mario; Rensmo, Håkan; Edström, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The cathode material P2-Nax Co2/3 Mn2/9 Ni1/9 O2, which could be used in Na-ion batteries, was investigated through synchrotron-based hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). Nondestructive analysis was made through the electrode/electrolyte interface of the first electrochemical cycle to ensure access to information not only on the active material, but also on the passivation layer formed at the electrode surface and referred to as the solid permeable interface (SPI). This investigation clearly shows the role of the SPI and the complexity of the redox reactions. Cobalt, nickel, and manganese are all electrochemically active upon cycling between 4.5 and 2.0 V; all are in the 4+ state at the end of charging. Reduction to Co(3+), Ni(3+), and Mn(3+) occurs upon discharging and, at low potential, there is partial reversible reduction to Co(2+) and Ni(2+). A thin layer of Na2 CO3 and NaF covers the pristine electrode and reversible dissolution/reformation of these compounds is observed during the first cycle. The salt degradation products in the SPI show a dependence on potential. Phosphates mainly form at the end of the charging cycle (4.5 V), whereas fluorophosphates are produced at the end of discharging (2.0 V). PMID:26692568

  13. Impedance spectroscopy and conductometric biosensing for probing catalase reaction with cyanide as ligand and inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bouyahia, Naima; Hamlaoui, Mohamed Larbi; Hnaien, Mouna; Lagarde, Florence; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2011-02-01

    In this work, a new biosensor was prepared through immobilization of bovine liver catalase in a photoreticulated poly (vinyl alcohol) membrane at the surface of a conductometric transducer. This biosensor was used to study the kinetics of catalase-H(2)0(2) reaction and its inhibition by cyanide. Immobilized catalase exhibited a Michaelis-Menten behaviour at low H(2)0(2) concentrations (<100mM) with apparent constant K(M)(app)=84±3mM and maximal initial velocity V(M)(app)=13.4μS min(-1). Inhibition by cyanide was found to be non-competitive and inhibition binding constant K(i) was 13.9±0.3μM. The decrease of the biosensor response by increasing cyanide concentration was linear up to 50μM, with a cyanide detection limit of 6μM. In parallel, electrochemical characteristics of the catalase/PVA biomembrane and its interaction with cyanide were studied by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Addition of the biomembrane onto the gold electrodes induced a significant increase of the interfacial polarization resistance R(P). On the contrary, cyanide binding resulted in a decrease of Rp proportional to KCN concentration in the 4 to 50μM range. Inhibition coefficient I(50) calculated by this powerful label-free and substrate-free technique (24.3μM) was in good agreement with that determined from the substrate-dependent conductometric biosensor (24.9μM). PMID:20813591

  14. Lowest Q2 Measurement of the gamma*p-> Delta Reaction: Probing the Pionic Contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Stave, Sean

    2006-06-30

    The first excited state of the proton, the Delat, can be reached through a magnetic dipole spin flip of one of the quarks (M1) or through electric and Coulomb quadrupole terms (E2 and C2) which indicate a deviation from spherical symmetry. The quark models using the color hyperfine interaction underestimate the size of the quadrupole terms by more than an order of magnitude. Models using the pion cloud do a much better job of describing the data. This is expected due to the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry which leads to a cloud of virtual p wave pions which introduce the non-spherical amplitudes. The data presented in this work fill gaps in the low Q², long distance region where the pion cloud is expected to dominate and to produce significant Q2 variation. The p(e¯, ép)π° reaction was measured in the Δ region at Q² = 0.060 (GeV/c)², the lowest Q² to date for pion electroproduction, utilizing out-of-plane magnetic spectrometers at the Mainz Microtron in Germany. This work reports results for the dominant transition magnetic dipole amplitude and the quadrupole to dipole ratios obtained from fitting the new data with models using a three parameter, resonant multipole fit: M³/²1+ = (40.33 +- 0.63stat+syst +-model)(10-³/mπ+), E2/M1=Re(E³/²1+M³/²1+) = (-2.28+- 0.29stat+syst +- 0.20model)%, and C2/M1 =Re(S³/²1+/M³/²1+) poles disagree with predictions of the quark models but are in reasonable agreement with a chiral extrapolation of lattice QCD, chiral effective field theory and dynamical model results confirming the dominance and general Q² variation of the long range pionic contribution. While there is qualitative agreement with the models, there is no quantitative agreement thus indicating the need for further improvement of the models.

  15. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  16. Graphene-based porous materials with tunable surface area and CO2 adsorption properties synthesized by fluorine displacement reaction with various diamines.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoyin; Fan, Kun; Ma, Xin; Liu, Yang; Chen, Teng; Cheng, Zheng; Wang, Xu; Jiang, Jiaxing; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-09-15

    A mild, operationally simple and controllable protocol for preparing graphene-based porous materials is essential to achieve a good pore-design development. In this paper, graphene-based porous materials with tunable surface area were constructed by the intercalation of fluorinated graphene (FG) based on the reaction of reactive CF bonds attached to graphene sheets with various amine-terminated molecules. In the porous materials, graphene sheets are like building blocks, and the diamines covalently grafted onto graphene framework act as pillars. Various diamines are successfully grafted onto graphene sheets, but the grafting ratio of diamines and reduction degree of FG differ greatly and depend on the chemical reactivity of diamines. Pillared diamine molecules chemically anchor at one end and are capable of undergoing a different reaction on the other end, resulting in three different conformations of graphene derivatives. Nitrogen sorption isotherms revealed that the surface area and pore distribution of the obtained porous materials depend heavily on the size and structure of diamine pillars. CO2 uptake capacity characterization showed that ethylenediamine intercalated FG achieved a high CO2 uptake density of 18.0 CO2 molecules per nm(2) at 0°C and 1.1bars, and high adsorption heat, up to 46.1kJmol(-1) at zero coverage. PMID:27280538

  17. Soybean epoxide hydrolase: identification of the catalytic residues and probing of the reaction mechanism with secondary kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Blée, Elizabeth; Summerer, Stephan; Flenet, Martine; Rogniaux, Hélène; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Schuber, Francis

    2005-02-25

    Soybean epoxide hydrolase catalyzes the oxirane ring opening of 9,10-epoxystearate via a two-step mechanism involving the formation of an alkylenzyme intermediate, which, in contrast to most epoxide hydrolases studied so far, was found to be the rate-limiting step. We have probed residues potentially involved in catalysis by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of His(320), a residue predicted from sequence analysis to belong to the catalytic triad of the enzyme, considerably slowed down the second half-reaction. This kinetic manipulation provoked an accumulation of the reaction intermediate, which could be trapped and characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. As expected, mutation of Asp(126) totally abolished the activity of the enzyme from its crucial function as nucleophile involved in the formation of the alkylenzyme. In line with its role as the partner of His(320) in the "charge relay system," mutation of Asp(285) dramatically reduced the rate of catalysis. However, the mutant D285L still exhibited a very low residual activity, which, by structural analysis and mutagenesis, has been tentatively attributed to Glu(195), another acidic residue of the active site. Our studies have also confirmed the fundamental role of the conserved Tyr(175) and Tyr(255) residues, which are believed to activate the oxirane ring. Finally, we have determined the secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects on the epoxide opening step of 9,10-epoxystearate. The large observed values, i.e. (T)(V/K(m)) approximately 1.30, can be interpreted by the occurrence of a very late transition state in which the epoxide bond is broken before the nucleophilic attack by Asp(126) takes place. PMID:15596432

  18. Adsorption and thermal reactions of disilane and the growth of Si films on Ge(100)-(2[times]1)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Miller, T.; Chiang, T. Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 )

    1993-03-15

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), core-level photoemission spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation, and electron diffraction were employed to study the vapor-phase epitaxial growth of Si on Ge(100)-(2[times]1) using disilane (Si[sub 2]H[sub 6]). The dissociative chemisorption of a Si[sub 2]H[sub 6] molecule on Ge(100)-(2[times]1) at room temperature results in two Si-trihydride (SiH[sub 3]) radicals bonded onto two adjacent Ge dangling bonds. Some SiH[sub 2] and GeH species are also formed as a result of decomposition of SiH[sub 3]. An initial sticking coefficient of [similar to]0.5 is deduced from STM images. An exposure of more than 2 langmuirs (1 langmuir=10[sup [minus]6] Torr s) of disilane at room temperature saturates the surface with SiH[sub 3], SiH[sub 2], and GeH species, and the resulting surface is disordered. The total amount of Si on the saturated surface is about 1/2 monolayer (ML). Successive annealing of the saturated surface to higher temperatures causes the conversion of SiH[sub 3] to SiH[sub 2], the conversion of SiH[sub 2] to SiH, and the desorption of H from GeH. These processes become complete at about 600 K, and the resulting surface is a clean Ge(100)-(2[times]1) interspersed with about 1/2 ML of Si-monohydride (SiH)-(2[times]1) islands. Desorption of hydrogen from these SiH islands occurs at even higher annealing temperatures, and is accompanied by indiffusion of Si into the Ge substrate. This process becomes complete at about 690 K, and the final system configuration is a clean Ge(100)-(2[times]1) with about 1/2 ML of Si buried in the subsurface region. Multilayer Si deposition was performed by atomic layer epitaxy, i.e., cyclic disilane adsorption at [similar to]340 K followed by thermal conversion at 820 K. For up to 18 cycles, the resulting surface consists of Ge only. The change in surface morphology is studied by STM.

  19. A DFT study of the acid-base properties of anatase TiO2 and tetragonal ZrO2 by adsorption of CO and CO2 probe molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi Tiffany; Tosoni, Sergio; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-10-01

    We have performed a comparative study of the acid-base characteristics of the surfaces of anatase TiO2 and tetragonal ZrO2. To this end we performed DFT + U calculations on CO and CO2 probe molecules adsorbed both on terraces and steps of the two oxides. For titania, CO adsorption results in a moderate adsorption energy (about - 0.3 eV) and in a positive shift of the Csbnd O stretching frequency (about + 40 cm- 1), typical of Lewis acid sites, with no clear difference in the acidity between terraces or steps. For zirconia we found a similar CO binding energy as for titania, and a CO vibrational shift that depends on the location of the Zr cation: negligible on terraces, similar to TiO2 on steps. We conclude that the acidic properties are similar in the two oxide surfaces. Things are different for CO2 adsorption. On titania the interaction is weak and surface carbonates compete with physisorbed CO2, indicating a weak basic character. On the contrary, on zirconia three types of stable carbonates have been identified. Their vibrational frequencies are consistent with IR measurements reported in the literature. The most stable species forms on steps of the t-ZrO2 surface and consists of a CO32 - unit which lies flat on the surface with the O atoms pointing towards three Zr ions. The species forms spontaneously by extraction of a lattice oxygen by an incoming CO2 molecule. The different reactivity points towards a much more pronounced basic character of zirconia compared to titania, at least if measured by CO2 adsorption.

  20. A novel near-infrared fluorescent platform with good photostability and the application for a reaction-based Cu(2+) probe in living cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Keyin; Shang, Huiming; Meng, Fangfang; Liu, Yong; Lin, Weiying

    2016-01-15

    Most of the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent copper ion probes are coordination-based, and the fluorescence enhancement is between 10 and 20 folds. Herein, a novel NIR fluorescent dye named CSCN with excellent photostability and a reaction-based Cu(2+) NIR probe named CSCN-Cu were reported. CSCN exhibited good photostability toward photo irradiation. CSCN-Cu showed lower background fluorescent interference and over 40-fold fluorescence enhancement in NIR region, it also exhibited good selectivity toward Cu(2+) in Hepes solution. Biotic experiments demonstrated that CSCN-Cu possessed low toxicity and successfully imaged Cu(2+) in living cells under the conditions performed. PMID:26592595

  1. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z. )

    1990-08-01

    We have synthesized {sup 32}P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies.

  2. Adsorption sites in zeolites A and X probed by competitive adsorption of H{sub 2} with N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}: Implications for N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} separation

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, J.; Trouw, F.; Bug, A.L.R.

    1998-08-01

    The authors determine details of the adsorption of O{sub 2} or N{sub 2} in Li{sup +} exchanged zeolites by way of their effect on coadsorbed H{sub 2} molecules using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) techniques. The results clearly show, for example, the absence of type III cations in Li-A and the expected stronger binding of N{sub 2} (compared with O{sub 2}) and thereby provide insight into the relative efficacy of Li-X for O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation.

  3. Adsorption and Reaction of C(1)-C(3) Alcohols over CeO(x)(111) Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Chen, Tsung-Liang

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the interaction of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol with well-ordered CeO{sub 2}(111) thin film surfaces. All of the alcohols adsorb at low temperature by forming alkoxy and hydroxyl species on the surface. On fully oxidized CeO{sub 2}(111), recombination occurs between some of the alkoxys and hydroxyls, resulting in alcohol desorption near 220 K. At the same temperature, some of the surface hydroxyls disproportionate to produce water and the loss of lattice O. The remaining alkoxys react above 550 K. The primary alcohols favor dehydrogenation products (aldehydes). There is a net loss of O from the system, resulting in a reduction of the ceria. The secondary alcohol, 2-propanol, undergoes primarily dehydration, producing propene with no net change in the cerium oxidation state. Reduced CeO{sub X}(111) competes with the gaseous products for available O. Little or no water is produced. The reaction selectivity for the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} alcohols shifts toward favoring dehydration products. The loss of O from the alcohols leads to oxidation of the reduced ceria. Compared with the oxidized surface, the alkene desorption shifts to lower temperature, whereas the aldehyde desorption shifts to higher temperature. This indicates that, on the reduced surface, it is easier to break the C-O bond but more difficult to break the O-substrate bond.

  4. Reactivity of a thick BaO film supported on Pt(111): adsorption and reaction of NO2, H2O, and CO2.

    PubMed

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Yi, Cheol-Woo; Szanyi, János

    2009-09-15

    Reactions of NO2, H2O, and CO2 with a thick (>20 monolayer equivalent (MLE)) BaO film supported on Pt(111) were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). NO2 reacts with a thick BaO layer to form surface nitrite-nitrate ion pairs at 300 K, while only nitrates form at 600 K. In the thermal decomposition process of nitrite-nitrate ion pairs, first nitrites decompose and desorb as NO. Then nitrates decompose in two steps: at lower temperature with the release of NO2 and at higher temperature, nitrates dissociate to NO+O2. The thick BaO layer converts completely to Ba(OH)2 following the adsorption of H2O at 300 K. Dehydration/dehydroxylation of this hydroxide layer can be fully achieved by annealing to 550 K. CO2 also reacts with BaO to form BaCO3 that completely decomposes to regenerate BaO upon annealing to 825 K. However, the thick BaO film cannot be converted completely to Ba(NOx)2 or BaCO3 under the experimental conditions employed in this study. PMID:19588918

  5. Reactivity of a Thick BaO Film Supported on Pt(111): Adsorption and Reaction of NO2, H2O and CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Yi, Cheol-Woo W.; Szanyi, Janos

    2009-09-15

    Reactions of NO2, H2O, and CO2 with a thick (> 20 MLE) BaO film supported on Pt(111) were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). NO2 reacts with a thick BaO to form surface nitrite-nitrate ion pairs at 300 K, while only nitrates form at 600 K. In the thermal decomposition process of nitrite–nitrate ion pairs, first nitrites decompose and desorb as NO. Then nitrates decompose in two steps : at lower temperature with the release of NO2 and at higher temperature, nitrates dissociate to NO + O2. The thick BaO layer converts completely to Ba(OH)2 following the adsorption of H2O at 300 K. Dehydration/dehydroxylation of this hydroxide layer can be fully achieved by annealing to 550 K. CO2 also reacts with BaO to form BaCO3 that completely decomposes to regenerate BaO upon annealing to 825 K. However, the thick BaO film cannot be converted completely to Ba(NOx)2 or BaCO3 under the experimental conditions employed in this study.

  6. Adsorption and reactions on a surface alloy: CO, NO, O 2 and CO 2 on Pd(100)-Mn-c(2×2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandell, A.; Jaworowski, A. J.; Beutler, A.; Wiklund, M.

    1999-02-01

    The adsorption properties of the Pd(100)-Mn-c(2×2) surface alloy have been investigated using photoemission of both core and valence levels. CO adsorbs in a molecular form without affecting the alloy structure. Two CO species were found, one bonded to Pd, which desorbs upon heating to 270 K , and one bonded to Mn, which desorbs when heating to 400 K. O 2 destroys the alloy, leading to a disordered surface with MnO x complexes. The MnO x aggregates stabilize adsorbed CO 2 and act as active sites for the following oxidation reactions at 110 K: CO+O→CO 2, CO+2O→CO 3δ- and CO 2+O→CO 3δ-. The CO 2 species desorbs upon heating to 170 K , whereas the CO 3δ- species is stable up to temperatures between 300 and 500 K. When exposed to low amounts of NO at 110 K, the major part of the molecules dissociates in order to form MnO x, thereby destroying the alloy. Larger NO doses yield an increasing amount of molecular NO, which dissociate upon heating to 300 K. CO can react with the dissociated NO to form CO 2 and another species with a C 1s binding energy and thermal stability similar to that of CO 3δ-. This species was tentatively identified as -NCO or -NCO 2.

  7. Effect of sodium acetate additive in successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction on the performance of CdS quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Ping; Chen, Liang-Yih; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2016-09-01

    Sodium acetate (NaAc) is utilized as an additive in cationic precursors of the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process to fabricate CdS quantum-dot (QD)-sensitized photoelectrodes. The effects of the NaAc concentration on the deposition rate and distribution of QDs in mesoporous TiO2 films, as well as on the performance of CdS-sensitized solar cells are studied. The experimental results show that the presence of NaAc can significantly accelerate the deposition of CdS, improve the QD distribution across photoelectrodes, and thereby, increase the performance of solar cells. These results are mainly attributed to the pH-elevation effect of NaAc to the cationic precursors which increases the electrostatic interaction of the TiO2 film to cadmium ions. The light-to-energy conversion efficiency of the CdS-sensitized solar cell increases with increasing concentration of the NaAc and approaches a maximum value (3.11%) at 0.05 M NaAc. Additionally, an ionic exchange is carried out on the photoelectrode to transform the deposited CdS into CdS1-xSex ternary QDs. The light-absorption range of the photoelectrode is extended and an exceptional power conversion efficiency of 4.51% is achieved due to this treatment.

  8. Process optimization of deposition conditions of PbS thin films grown by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Ersin; Yücel, Yasin; Beleli, Buse

    2015-07-01

    In this study, lead sulfide (PbS) thin films were synthesized by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method with different pH, dipping time and dipping cycles. Response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were successfully used to optimize the PbS films deposition parameters and understand the significance and interaction of the factors affecting the film quality. 5-level-3-factor central composite design was employed to evaluate the effects of the deposition parameters (pH, dipping time and dipping cycles) on the response (the optical band gap of the films). Data obtained from RSM were subjected to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analyzed using a second order polynomial equation. The optimal conditions for the PbS films deposition have been found to be: pH of 9.1, dipping time of 10 s and dipping cycles of 10 cycles. The predicted band gap of PbS film was 2.13 eV under the optimal conditions. Verification experiment (2.24 eV) confirmed the validity of the predicted model. The film structures were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Morphological properties of the films were studied with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The optical properties of the films were investigated using a UV-visible spectrophotometer.

  9. Enhanced super-hydrophobic and switching behavior of ZnO nanostructured surfaces prepared by simple solution--immersion successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction process.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, P; Sundaramurthy, J; Mangalaraj, D; Nataraj, D; Rajarathnam, D; Srinivasan, M P

    2011-11-01

    A simple and cost-effective successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method was adopted to fabricate hydrophobic ZnO nanostructured surfaces on transparent indium-tin oxide (ITO), glass and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. ZnO films deposited on different substrates show hierarchical structures like spindle, flower and spherical shape with diameters ranging from 30 to 300 nm. The photo-induced switching behaviors of ZnO film surfaces between hydrophobic and hydrophilic states were examined by water contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. ZnO nanostructured films had contact angles of ~140° and 160°±2 on glass and PET substrates, respectively, exhibiting hydrophobic behavior without any surface modification or treatment. Upon exposure to ultraviolet (UV) illumination, the films showed hydrophilic behavior (contact angle: 15°±2), which upon low thermal stimuli revert back to its original hydrophobic nature. Such reversible and repeatable switching behaviors were observed upon cyclical exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These biomimetic ZnO surfaces exhibit good anti-reflective properties with lower reflectance of 9% for PET substrates. Thus, the present work is significant in terms of its potential application in switching devices, solar coatings and self-cleaning smart windows. PMID:21831394

  10. Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction deposited kesterite Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} nanoflakes counter electrodes for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mali, Sawanta S.; Shim, Chang Su; Hong, Chang Kook

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} nanoflakes by SILAR technique. • Hydrothermal synthesis of TiO{sub 2}. • Counter electrode for DSSC application. • 4.48% conversion efficiency. - Abstract: In this investigation, we have successfully synthesized Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) nanoflakes by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and used as a counter electrode in the hydrothermally grown TiO{sub 2} based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The prepared CZTS nanoflakes were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), micro Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive analysis. Our DSSCs results revealed that, compared with conventional Pt/FTO counter electrode DSSCs, nanoflakes of p-type CZTS as the photocathode and n-type TiO{sub 2} thin films as the photoanode shows an increased short circuit current (13.35 mA/cm{sup 2}) with 4.84% power conversion efficiency. The detailed interface properties of were analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements.

  11. Surface characterization, protein adsorption, and initial cell-surface reactions on glutathione and 3-mercapto-1,2,-propanediol immobilized to gold.

    PubMed

    Kanagaraja, S; Alaeddine, S; Eriksson, C; Lausmaa, J; Tengvall, P; Wennerberg, A; Nygren, H

    1999-09-15

    Monolayers of glutathione (GSH) and 3-mercapto-1,2-propanediol (MG) on gold were tested for their bioreactivity by assessing the degree of inflammatory reaction as manifested by the adherence and activation of platelets and white blood cells (wbc) after exposure to blood ex vivo. Surface composition was characterized by XPS, and noncontact optical profilometry was used to determine surface roughness. The thickness and composition of the adsorbed protein layers were measured by ellipsometry/antibody techniques in vitro. Cell adhesion and activation were quantified by acridine orange staining, fluorescein-diacetate staining, and by specific antibodies against cell membrane antigens. Distinct differences among the surfaces were observed relative to the amounts and composition of adsorbed plasma proteins and the adhesion and activation of platelets (CD62P-exposure) and wbc (CD11b/CD18-exposure). GSH surfaces, which adsorbed the least amount of plasma protein, caused the least adherence and activation of platelets (CD62P), followed by the highest activation of wbc (CD11b/18). The MG surfaces caused a rapid recruitment and activation of platelets (CD62P), followed by a lower activation of wbc (CD11b/18). Thus it appears that measurements of the initial adsorption of plasma protein from anticoagulated plasma and of the adhesion and activation of platelets after 8 min of exposure to whole blood cannot be used to predict accurately the adhesion and activation behavior of inflammatory cells after longer periods (2 h) of exposure on different surfaces. PMID:10398020

  12. Free radicals: how do we stand them? Anaerobic and aerobic free radical (chain) reactions involved in the use of fluorogenic probes and in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Liochev, Stefan I

    2014-01-01

    Biologically significant conclusions have been based on the use of fluorogenic and luminogenic probes for the detection of reactive species. The basic mechanisms of the processes involved have not been satisfactorily elucidated. In the present work, the mechanism of the enzyme and photosensitized oxidation of NAD(P)H by resorufin is analyzed and appears to involve both aerobic and anaerobic free radical chain reactions. There are two major fallouts of this analysis. Many of the conclusions about the participation of radicals based on the use of probes such as resorufin and Amplex red need reevaluation. It is also concluded that anaerobic free radical reactions may be biologically significant, and the possible existence of enzymatic systems to eliminate certain free radicals is discussed. PMID:24356000

  13. First-principles calculations of the adsorption and hydrogenation reactions of CHx(x=0,4) species on a Fe(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sorescu, D.C.

    2006-04-01

    A previous set of investigations related to adsorption, diffusion, and dissociation properties of CO [D. C. Sorescu, D. L. Thompson, M. M. Hurley, and C. F. Chabalowski, Phys. Rev. B 66, 035416 (2002)] and H2 [D. C. Sorescu, Catal. Today 105, 44 (2005)] on Fe(100) surface have been extended to the case of chemisorption properties of CHx (x=0,4) species on the same surface. Similar to our previous studies, the current work is based on first-principles plane-wave calculations using spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculations employ slab geometry and periodic boundary conditions. It was determined that CHx (x=0,2) species preferentially adsorb at the four-folded sites while the CH3 species prefer the binding at the bridge site. In contradistinction, the CH4 molecule is only weakly physisorbed on the surface, independent of surface site or molecular orientation. In the case of the C atom, the adsorption investigations have been extended to include both the coverage effects as well as the possibility for absorption at subsurface sites. The presence of the C atom at either hollow or subsurface sites was found to increase the stability of the other atomic (C, H, O) and molecular or radical species [CO, CHx (x=1,4)] adsorbed on the surface. Beside chemisorption properties, the activation energies for surface diffusion have been determined for all individual CHx (x=0,3)species while in the case of C atom diffusion to subsurface sites have also been considered. Finally, we have determined the minimum energy path for the elementary hydrogenation reactions of CHx (x=0,3) species. We found that for the ensemble of surface processes involving dissociation of CO and H2 on Fe(100) surface followed by hydrogenation of CHx (x=0,3) species with formation of CH4, the CO dissociation is the rate determining step with an activation energy of 24.5 kcal/mol.

  14. Benzofuroxan as a thiol-specific reactivity probe. Kinetics of its reactions with papain, ficin, bromelain and low-molecular-weight thiols.

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, M; Brocklehurst, K

    1977-01-01

    1. The characteristics of benzofuroxan (benzofurazan 1-oxide, benzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole N-oxide) that relate to its application as a reactivity probe for the study of environments of thiol groups are discussed. 2. To establish a kinetic and mechanistic basis for its use as a probe, a kinetic study of its reaction with 2-mercaptoethanol was carried out. 3. This reaction appears to proceed by a rate-determining attack of the thiolate ion on one of the electrophilic centres of benzofuroxan (possibly C-6) to provide a low steady-state concentration of an intermediate adduct; rapid reaction of this adduct with a second molecule of thiol gives the disulphide and o-benzoquinone dioxime. 4. The effects of the different types of environment that proteins can provide on the kinetic characteristics of reactions of thiol groups with benzofuroxan are delineated. 5. Benzofuroxan was used as a thiolspecific reactivity probe to investigate the active centres of papain (EC 3.4.22.2), ficin (EC 3.4.22.3) and bromelain (EC 3.4.22.4). The results support the concept that the active centres of all three enzymes either contain a nucleophilic thiolate ion whose formation is characterized by a pKa of 3-4 and whose reaction with an electrophile can be assisted by interaction of a site of high electron density in the electrophile with active-centre imidazolium ion of pKa 8-9, or can provide such ions by protonic redistribution in enzyme-reagent or enzyme-substrate complexes. PMID:23765

  15. A potential fluorescent probe: Maillard reaction product from glutathione and ascorbic acid for rapid and label-free dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiang Xue; Song, Xiao Fang; Shi, Yan; Gao, Zhong Feng; Li, Bang Lin; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-07-15

    Maillard reactions and their fluorescent products have drawn much attention in the fields of food and life science, however, the application of fluorescent products separated from the reaction as an indicator for detection of certain substances in sensor field has not been mentioned. In this article, we report on an easy-to-synthesize and water-soluble fluorescent probe separated from the typical Maillard reaction products of glutathione and ascorbic acid, with excellent stability and high quantum yield (18.2%). The further application of the probe has been explored for dual detection of Hg(2+) and biothiols including cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione, which is based on Hg(2+)-induced fluorescence quenching of the Maillard reaction fluorescent products (MRFPs) and the fluorescence recovery as the introduction of biothiols. This sensing system exhibits a good selectivity and sensitivity, and the linear ranges for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 0.05-12, 0.5-10, 0.3-20, and 0.3-20μM, respectively. The detection limits for Hg(2+), cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione are 22, 47, 96, and 30nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, respectively. Furthermore, the practical applications of this sensor for Hg(2+) and biothiols determination in water samples and human plasma sample have been demonstrated with satisfactory results. PMID:27015151

  16. Fluctuational opening-closing reactions in DNA and mononucleosome cores of chromatin probed by H-exchange and ligand binding reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, C.; Englander, S.W.; Young, P.R.; Kallenbach, N.R.

    1980-10-01

    The DNA double helix represents a dynamic structure in solution that undergoes a spectrum of conformational opening and closing reactions under conditions remote from onset of denaturation. Two kinds of opening reactions of the double helix are manifested by: (a) the ability of base and solvent protons to exchange; and (b) the access of the duplex interior to intercalating agents such as ethidium bromide.

  17. A simple naphthalene-based fluorescent probe for high selective detection of formaldehyde in toffees and HeLa cells via aza-Cope reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junchao; Zhang, Yue; Zeng, Lintao; Liu, Jinbiao; Kinsella, Joseph M; Sheng, Ruilong

    2016-11-01

    A simple naphthalene-based fluorescent probe (AENO) for formaldehyde (FA) was successfully synthesized, which exhibited a significant fluorescence turn-on response towards FA in aqueous solution. The probe could quantitatively determine the concentration of FA (0-1.0mM) with excellent selectivity, high sensitivity and low limit of detection (0.57µM). The sensing mechanism was proposed as 2-aza-Cope rearrangement for AENO after reaction with FA, which was confirmed by (1)H NMR, HR-MS, FT-IR, UV-vis and fluorescence spectra. The probe has been employed to determine the FA contents in several commercially available toffee samples with satisfactory performance. Thus, AENO might be used as a promising tool for quantitative detection of FA in food. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging of HeLa cells indicated that the probe was cell membrane permeable and could be used for visualizing/imaging the FA trace/transportation in cancer cells. PMID:27591661

  18. Comparative study on the effect of H2 pre-adsorption on CO oxidation in O2-poor atmosphere over Au/TiO2 and TiO2: Temperature programmed surface reaction by a multiplexed mass spectrometer testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Ruiru; Liu, Junfeng; Zhang, Yujuan; Chen, Xun; Dai, Wenxin; Fu, Xianzhi

    2016-11-01

    The behaviors of H2 pre-adsorption on CO oxidation in an O2-poor stream containing a trace H2O over Au/TiO2 and TiO2 have been investigated by a temperature programmed surface reaction testing, respectively. It was found that the H2 pre-adsorption could keep CO oxidation without H2O consumption over Au/TiO2, but suppress CO oxidation over TiO2. The chemisorption testing showed that the H2 adsorption at Au/TiO2 could benefit to the formation of Ti-bonded hydroxyl species (Ti4+-OH), while the H2 adsorption at TiO2 would consume the Ti-bonded hydroxyl species and form the bridge hydroxyl species (Ti4+-OH-Ti4+). These results show that only the Ti-bonded hydroxyl species (not all kinds of hydroxyl species) could act as the active species of oxidizing CO. Furthermore, it is suggested that the dissociative hydrogen adsorbed at Au sites could activate the lattice oxygen of TiO2 to form the active Ti-bonded hydroxyl species (hydrogen spillover from Au to TiO2), which exhibit a strong reducibility than the H directly adsorbed at TiO2.

  19. Fluorescence turn-on detection of mercury ions based on the controlled adsorption of a perylene probe onto the gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Juanmin; Chen, Jian; Chen, Yang; Li, Yongxin; Shahzad, Sohail Anjum; Wang, Yan; Yang, Meiding; Yu, Cong

    2016-01-01

    A novel fluorescence turn-on strategy based on Au nanoparticles and a perylene probe for the sensing of Hg(2+) ions has been developed. It was observed that a perylene probe could be adsorbed onto the surface of Au NPs through strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Its fluorescence was efficiently quenched by the Au nanoparticles. However, in the presence of Hg(2+) and NaBH4, Hg(2+) was reduced and an Au/Hg amalgam was formed on the surface of the Au nanoparticles. The perylene probe could hardly be adsorbed and quenched by the Au/Hg amalgam. A turn on fluorescence signal was therefore detected. The assay is quite sensitive, and 5 nM Hg(2+) could be easily detected. It is also very selective, a number of metal ions were tested and no noticeable interference was observed. The assay was also successfully applied for the determination of Hg(2+) in lake water samples. A simple, fast, inexpensive, highly sensitive and selective Hg(2+) sensing strategy is therefore established. PMID:26618370

  20. Probing the Properties of the Molecular Adlayers on Metal Substrates: Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study of Amine Adsorption on Gold(111) and Graphene Nanoislands on Cobalt(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hui

    In this thesis, we present our findings on two major topics, both of which are studies of molecules on metal surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The first topic is on adsorption of a model amine compound, 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), on the reconstructed Au(111) surface, chosen for its potential application as a molecular electronic device. The molecules were deposited in the gas phase onto the substrate in the vacuum chamber. Five different patterns of BDA molecules on the surface at different coverages, and the preferred adsorption sites of BDA molecules on reconstructed Au(111) surface, were observed. In addition, BDA molecules were susceptible to tip-induced movement, suggesting that BDA molecules on metal surfaces can be a potential candidate in STM molecular manipulations. We also studied graphene nanoislands on Co(0001) in the hope of understanding interaction of expitaxially grown graphene and metal substrates. This topic can shed a light on the potential application of graphene as an electronic device, especially in spintronics. The graphene nanoislands were formed by annealing contorted hexabenzocoronene (HBC) on the Co(0001) surface. In our experiments, we have determined atop registry of graphene atoms with respect to the underlying Co surface. We also investigated the low-energy electronic structures of graphene nanoislands by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The result was compared with a first-principle calculation using density functional theory (DFT) which suggested strong coupling between graphene pi-bands and cobalt d-electrons. We also observed that the islands exhibit zigzag edges, which exhibits unique electronic structures compared with the center areas of the islands.

  1. Self-healable and reversible liposome leakage by citrate-capped gold nanoparticles: probing the initial adsorption/desorption induced lipid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Juewen

    2015-09-01

    We herein report that the adsorption/desorption of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) transiently causes leakage in fluid phase DOPC liposomes, while the liposomes do not leak with AuNPs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Leakage also fails to occur for gel phase DPPC liposomes. Citrate-capped (but not MPA-capped) AuNPs raise the phase transition temperature of DPPC. We conclude that citrate-capped AuNPs interact with the PC liposomes very strongly, inducing a local fluid-to-gel lipid phase transition for DOPC. Leakage takes place during this transition, and the membrane integrity is resumed after the transition. Citrate-capped AuNPs allow stronger van der Waals forces than MPA-capped AuNPs with PC liposomes, since the latter are separated from the liposome surface by the ~0.3 nm MPA layer.We herein report that the adsorption/desorption of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) transiently causes leakage in fluid phase DOPC liposomes, while the liposomes do not leak with AuNPs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Leakage also fails to occur for gel phase DPPC liposomes. Citrate-capped (but not MPA-capped) AuNPs raise the phase transition temperature of DPPC. We conclude that citrate-capped AuNPs interact with the PC liposomes very strongly, inducing a local fluid-to-gel lipid phase transition for DOPC. Leakage takes place during this transition, and the membrane integrity is resumed after the transition. Citrate-capped AuNPs allow stronger van der Waals forces than MPA-capped AuNPs with PC liposomes, since the latter are separated from the liposome surface by the ~0.3 nm MPA layer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methods, TEM, UV-vis and DLS data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04805b

  2. RADMAP: Simple probes for rapid assessment of complex reactivity: A method and case studies on the reaction of hydrogen atoms with unsaturated organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew K; Fawcett, Jason A; Clyburne, Jason A C; Pye, Cory C

    2016-03-01

    RADMAP, an open source program, allows for rapid analysis and visualization of the earliest stages of reactions between any molecule and a monoatomic probe (i.e., H*, H(+), H(-), Br*, or any other monoatomic species) using ab initio methods. This program creates non-planar potential energy surfaces of the initial interaction between a molecule of interest and the monoatomic probe. These surfaces can be used to both predict the site of addition as well as provide a qualitative estimate for the relative proportion of the formation of adducts; therefore, it gives insight into both the reactivity and the kinetic stability of a molecule. The program presents a way to quickly predict the number of signals anticipated in transverse field muon spin resonance spectra as well as their relative intensities. PMID:26851865

  3. Probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection and typing of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Eschbaumer, Michael; Li, Wansi (May); Wernike, Kerstin; Marshall, Frank; Czub, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has tremendous impact on the pork industry in North America. The molecular diagnosis of infection with PRRS virus (PRRSV) is hampered by its considerable strain diversity. In this study, 43 previously published or newly developed primers for probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were evaluated on their sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and repeatability, using a diverse panel of 36 PRRSV strains as well as other arteriviruses and unrelated porcine viruses. Three primer pairs had excellent diagnostic and analytical sensitivity on par with a probe-based reference assay, absolute specificity to virus genotype and species, as well as over 95% reproducibility and repeatability across a wide dynamic range. PMID:26130848

  4. Probing Reaction Dynamics of Transition-Metal Complexes in Solution via Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huse, Nils; Kim, Tae Kyu; Khalil, Munira; Jamula, Lindsey; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2010-05-02

    We report the first time-resolved soft x-ray measurements of solvated transition-metal complexes. L-edge spectroscopy directly probes dynamic changes in ligand-field splitting of 3d orbitals associated with the spin transition, and mediated by changes in ligand-bonding.

  5. Detection of DNA hybridization and extension reactions by an extended-gate field-effect transistor: characterizations of immobilized DNA-probes and role of applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage onto a reference electrode.

    PubMed

    Kamahori, Masao; Ishige, Yu; Shimoda, Maki

    2008-02-28

    As we have already shown in a previous publication [Kamahori, M., Ihige, Y., Shimoda, M., 2007. Anal. Sci. 23, 75-79], an extended-gate field-effect transistor (FET) sensor with a gold electrode, on which both DNA probes and 6-hydroxyl-1-hexanethiol (6-HHT) molecules are immobilized, can detect DNA hybridization and extension reactions by applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage to a reference electrode. However, kinetic parameters such as the dissociation constant (K(d)(s)) and the apparent DNA-probe concentration (C(probe)(s)) on a surface were not clarified. In addition, the role of applying the superimposed high-frequency voltage was not considered in detail. In this study, the values of K(d)(s) and C(probe)(s) were estimated using a method involving single-base extension reaction combined with bioluminescence detection. The value of K(d)(s) on the surface was 0.38 microM, which was about six times that in a liquid phase. The value of C(probe)(s), which expressed the upper detection limit for the solid phase reaction, was 0.079 microM at a DNA-probe density of 2.6 x 10(12)molecules/cm(2). We found that applying the superimposed high-frequency voltage accelerated the DNA molecules to reach the gold surface. Also, the distance between the DNA-probes immobilized on the gold surface was controlled to be over 6 nm by applying a method of competitive reaction with DNA probes and 6-HHT molecules. This space was sufficient to enable the immobilized DNA-probes to lie down on the 6-HHT monolayer in the space between them. Thus, the FET sensor could detect DNA hybridization and extension reactions by applying a superimposed high-frequency voltage to the DNA-probes density-controlling gold surface. PMID:18054478

  6. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, George R.; Peter, Frank J.; Butler, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  7. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-02-16

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir. 7 figs.

  8. PROBING REACTIVITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION USING XAD-8 RESIN ADSORPTION AND ULTRAFILTRATION FRACTIONATION. (R828045)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection by-product (DBP) reactivity (yield and speciation upon reaction with chlorine) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from two surface waters was investigated. The source waters, each having significantly different specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA

  9. Volume contraction on photoexcitation of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26: internal probe of dielectrics.

    PubMed Central

    Mauzerall, D C; Gunner, M R; Zhang, J W

    1995-01-01

    Reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides undergo a approximately 20 A3/mole volume contraction in < 50 ns after excitation. The rapid volume change is tentatively assigned to electrostriction. From its magnitude, we infer that the effective dielectric coefficient is 10-15 if the compressibility of the reaction center is similar to that of globular proteins. The volume contraction is not sensitive to replacement of the natural ubiquinone at the QA site by other quinones or to the occupancy of the QB site. The quenching caused by pressure on the reaction centers most likely occurs on a faster time scale than that of electron transfer. PMID:7711251

  10. Adsorption and reaction of acetylene on clean and oxygen-precovered Pd(100) studied with high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfert, O.; Lorenz, M. P. A.; Streber, R.; Zhao, W.; Bayer, A.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Papp, C.

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the adsorption and thermal evolution of acetylene on clean Pd(100) and Pd(100) precovered with 0.25 ML oxygen. The measurements were performed in situ by fast XPS at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II. On Pd(100) acetylene molecularly adsorbs at 130 K. Upon heating transformation to a CCH species occurs around 390 K along with the formation of a completely dehydrogenated carbon species. On the oxygen-precovered surface partial CCH formation already occurs upon adsorption at 130 K, and the dehydrogenation temperature and the stability range of CCH are shifted to lower temperatures by ˜200 K.

  11. Adsorption and reaction of acetylene on clean and oxygen-precovered Pd(100) studied with high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Höfert, O; Lorenz, M P A; Streber, R; Zhao, W; Bayer, A; Steinrück, H-P; Papp, C

    2013-10-28

    We investigated the adsorption and thermal evolution of acetylene on clean Pd(100) and Pd(100) precovered with 0.25 ML oxygen. The measurements were performed in situ by fast XPS at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II. On Pd(100) acetylene molecularly adsorbs at 130 K. Upon heating transformation to a CCH species occurs around 390 K along with the formation of a completely dehydrogenated carbon species. On the oxygen-precovered surface partial CCH formation already occurs upon adsorption at 130 K, and the dehydrogenation temperature and the stability range of CCH are shifted to lower temperatures by ∼200 K. PMID:24182063

  12. Hybridization probes for conventional DNA fingerprinting used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction to distinguish strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, W; Mitchell, T G; Freedman, E Z; Vilgalys, R

    1993-01-01

    In conventional DNA fingerprinting, hypervariable and repetitive sequences (minisatellite or microsatellite DNA) are detected with hybridization probes. As demonstrated here, these probes can be used as single primers in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to generate individual fingerprints. Several conventional DNA fingerprinting probes were used to prime the PCR, yielding distinctive, hypervariable multifragment profiles for different strains of Cryptococcus neoformans. PCR fingerprinting with the oligonucleotide primers (GTG)5, (GACA)4, and the phage M13 core sequence (GAGGGTGGXGGXTCT), but not with (CA)8 or (CT)8, generated DNA polymorphisms with all 42 strains of C. neoformans investigated. PCR fingerprints produced by priming with (GTG)5, (GACA)4, or the M13 core sequence differentiated the two varieties of C. neoformans, C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotypes A and D) and C. neoformans var. gattii (serotypes B and C). Furthermore, strains of serotypes A, D, and B or C could be distinguished from each other by specific PCR fingerprint patterns. These primers, which also successfully amplified hypervariable DNA segments from other species, provide a convenient method of identification at the species or individual level. Amplification of polymorphic DNA patterns by PCR with these primers offers several advantages over classical DNA fingerprinting techniques, appears to be more reliable than other PCR-based methods for detecting polymorphic DNA, such as analysis of random-amplified polymorphic DNA, and should be applicable to many other organisms. Images PMID:8408543

  13. Virtual Barcoding using LATE-PCR and Lights-On/Lights-Off probes: identification of nematode species in a closed-tube reaction.

    PubMed

    Rice, Lisa M; Reis, Arthur H; Wangh, Lawrence J

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes a rapid, universal, easy-to-use, closed-tube, non-sequencing method that should also be able to uniquely identify almost any animal species on earth. The approach, called Virtual Barcoding, is illustrated using five species of nematodes from three genera. Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE) PCR was used to amplify a portion of the CO1 gene for each of five commercially available, beneficial species of soil nematodes. A set of ten low temperature Lights-On/Lights-Off consensus probes were included in the reaction mixture and were used at end-point to coat the accumulated single-stranded amplicon by dropping the temperature. Because each of the probes is mis-match tolerant, the temperature at which it hybridizes to its complementary region within the target is sequence dependent. As anticipated, each species had its own unique fluorescent signature in either three different colors, or a single color depending on which fluorophores were used to label the Lights-On probes. Each fluorescent signature was then mathematically converted to a species-specific Virtual Barcode. PMID:25109627

  14. Resonance Raman spectroscopy as an in situ probe for monitoring catalytic events in a Ru-porphyrin mediated amination reaction.

    PubMed

    Zardi, Paolo; Gallo, Emma; Solan, Gregory A; Hudson, Andrew J

    2016-05-10

    Resonance Raman microspectroscopy has been widely used to study the structure and dynamics of porphyrins and metal complexes containing the porphyrin ligand. Here, we have demonstrated that the same technique can be adapted to examine the mechanism of a homogeneously-catalysed reaction mediated by a transition-metal-porphyrin complex. Previously it has been challenging to study this type of reaction using in situ spectroscopic monitoring due to the low stability of the reaction intermediates and elevated-temperature conditions. We have made a straightforward modification to the sample stage on a microscope for time-lapsed Raman microspectroscopy from reaction mixtures in these media. The allylic amination of unsaturated hydrocarbons by aryl azides, which can be catalysed by a ruthenium-porphyrin complex, has been used as an illustrative example of the methodology. The mechanism of this particular reaction has been studied previously using density-functional theory and kinetic approaches. The Raman measurements support the mechanism proposed in the earlier publications by providing the first experimental verification of a precursor reaction complex between the aryl azide and the ruthenium metal ion, and evidence for the formation of a mono-imido intermediate complex under conditions of high concentration of the reactant olefin. PMID:27070335

  15. Development of an on-site rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction system and the characterization of suitable DNA polymerases for TaqMan probe technology.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Naruishi, Nahoko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Nagai, Hidenori

    2016-08-01

    On-site quantitative analyses of microorganisms (including viruses) by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system are significantly influencing medical and biological research. We have developed a remarkably rapid and portable real-time PCR system that is based on microfluidic approaches. Real-time PCR using TaqMan probes consists of a complex reaction. Therefore, in a rapid real-time PCR, the optimum DNA polymerase must be estimated by using actual real-time PCR conditions. In this study, we compared the performance of three DNA polymerases in actual PCR conditions using our rapid real-time PCR system. Although KAPA2G Fast HS DNA Polymerase has the highest enzymatic activity among them, SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase exhibited better performance to rapidly increase the fluorescence signal in an actual real-time PCR using TaqMan probes. Furthermore, we achieved rapid detection of Escherichia coli in 7 min by using SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase with the same sensitivity as that of a conventional thermal cycler. PMID:27271319

  16. Catalyst Chemical State during CO Oxidation Reaction on Cu(111) Studied with Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Near Edge X-ray Adsorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eren, Baran; Heine, Christian; Bluhm, Hendrik; Somorjai, Gabor A; Salmeron, Miquel

    2015-09-01

    The chemical structure of a Cu(111) model catalyst during the CO oxidation reaction in the CO+O2 pressure range of 10-300 mTorr at 298-413 K was studied in situ using surface sensitive X-ray photoelectron and adsorption spectroscopy techniques [X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS)]. For O2:CO partial pressure ratios below 1:3, the surface is covered by chemisorbed O and by a thin (∼1 nm) Cu2O layer, which covers completely the surface for ratios above 1:3 between 333 and 413 K. The Cu2O film increases in thickness and exceeds the escape depth (∼3-4 nm) of the XPS and NEXAFS photoelectrons used for analysis at 413 K. No CuO formation was detected under the reaction conditions used in this work. The main reaction intermediate was found to be CO2(δ-), with a coverage that correlates with the amount of Cu2O, suggesting that this phase is the most active for CO oxidation. PMID:26275662

  17. Optically probing Al—O and O—H vibrations to characterize water adsorption and surface reconstruction on α-alumina: An experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Yujin Kirsch, Harald; Wolf, Martin; Campen, R. Kramer; Wirth, Jonas; Saalfrank, Peter

    2015-02-07

    Oxide/water interfaces are ubiquitous in a wide variety of applications and the environment. Despite this ubiquity, and attendant decades of study, gaining molecular level insight into water/oxide interaction has proven challenging. In part, this challenge springs from a lack of tools to concurrently characterize changes in surface structure (i.e., water/oxide interaction from the perspective of the solid) and O—H population and local environment (i.e., water/oxide interaction from the water perspective). Here, we demonstrate the application of surface specific vibrational spectroscopy to the characterization of the interaction of the paradigmatic α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) surface and water. By probing both the interfacial Al—O (surface phonon) and O—H spectral response, we characterize this interaction from both perspectives. Through electronic structure calculation, we assign the interfacial Al—O response and rationalize its changes on surface dehydroxylation and reconstruction. Because our technique is all-optical and interface specific, it is equally applicable to oxide surfaces in vacuum, ambient atmospheres and at the solid/liquid interface. Application of this approach to additional alumina surfaces and other oxides thus seems likely to significantly expand our understanding of how water meets oxide surfaces and thus the wide variety of phenomena this interaction controls.

  18. Probing the redox chemistry of titanium silicalite-1: formation of tetrahedral Ti3+ centers by reaction with triethylaluminum.

    PubMed

    Morra, Elena; Giamello, Elio; Chiesa, Mario

    2014-06-10

    Transition-metal ions with open-shell configurations hold promise in the development of novel coordination chemistry and potentially unprecedented redox catalysis. Framework-substituted Ti(3+) ions with tetrahedral coordination are generated by reductive activation of titanium silicalite-1 with triethylaluminum, an indispensable co-catalyst for heterogeneous Ziegler-Natta polymerization catalysts. Continuous-wave and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance methods are applied to unravel details on the local environment of the reduced transition metal-ions, which are shown to be part of the silica framework by detection of (29)Si hyperfine interactions. The chemical accessibility of the reduced sites is probed using ammonia as probe molecule. Evidence is found for the coordination of a single ammonia molecule. Comparison to similar systems, such as TiAlPO-5, reveals clear differences in the coordination chemistry of the reduced Ti sites in the two solids, which may be understood considering the different electronic properties of the solid frameworks. PMID:24824439

  19. Probing reaction dynamics of transition-metal complexes in solution via time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huse, N.; Kim, T.-K.; Khalil, M.; Jamula, L.; McCusker, J.K.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2008-08-01

    We report the first time-resolved soft x-ray measurements of solvated transition-metal complexes. L-edge spectroscopy directly probes dynamic changes in ligand-field splitting of 3d orbitals associated with the spin transition, and mediated by changes in ligand-bonding. We report the first time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy of solution-phase molecular dynamics. Changes in ligand-field splitting and spin-state populations in 3d orbitals of the Fe{sup II} complex are directly probed via transient absorption changes of the Fe L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} edges following photo-induced metal-to-ligand charge transfer. With the emergence of high-flux ultrafast soft x-ray sources, details on interplay between atomic structure, electronic states, and spin contributions will be revealed. Our experimental approach opens the door to femtosecond soft x-ray investigations of liquid phase chemistry that have previously been inaccessible.

  20. Probing the Energy Transfer Dynamics of Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complexes Through Hole-Burning and Single-Complex Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kerry Riley

    2008-05-01

    Photosynthesis is the process by which light energy is used to drive reactions that generate sugars to supply energy for cellular processes. It is one of the most important fundamental biological reactions and occurs in both prokaryotic (e.g. bacteria) and eukaryotic (e.g. plants and algae) organisms. Photosynthesis is also remarkably intricate, requiring the coordination of many different steps and reactions in order to successfully transform absorbed solar energy into a biochemical usable form of energy. However, the net reaction for all photosynthetic organisms can be reduced to the following, deceptively general, equation developed by Van Niel[1] H{sub 2} - D + A {sub {implies}}{sup hv} A - H{sub 2} + D where H{sub 2}-D is the electron donor, e.g. H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}S. A is the electron acceptor, e.g. CO{sub 2}, and A-H{sub 2} is the synthesized sugar. Amazingly, this simple net equation is responsible for creating the oxidizing atmosphere of Earth and the recycling of CO{sub 2}, both of which are necessary for the sustainment of the global ecosystem.

  1. IMPACT OF OXYGEN MEDIATED OXIDATIVE COUPLING ON ADSORPTION KINETICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of molecular oxygen in the test environment promotes oxidative coupling (polymer formation) of phenolic compounds on the surface of granular activated carbon (GAC). Both adsorption equilibria and adsorption kinetics are affected by these chemical reactions. Lack of...

  2. Desaturase reactions complicate the use of norcarane as a mechanistic probe. Unraveling the mixture of twenty-plus products formed in enzyme-catalyzed oxidations of norcarane.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Martin; Chandrasena, R Esala P; Lansakara-P, Dharmika S P; Kim, Hye-Yeong; Lippard, Stephen J; Beauvais, Laurance G; Murray, Leslie J; Izzo, Viviana; Hollenberg, Paul F; Coon, Minor J

    2007-02-16

    Norcarane, bicyclo[4.1.0]heptane, has been widely used as a mechanistic probe in studies of oxidations catalyzed by several iron-containing enzymes. We report here that, in addition to oxygenated products, norcarane is also oxidized by iron-containing enzymes in desaturase reactions that give 2-norcarene and 3-norcarene. Furthermore, secondary products from further oxidation reactions of the norcarenes are produced in yields that are comparable to those of the minor products from oxidation of the norcarane. We studied oxidations catalyzed by a representative spectrum of iron-containing enzymes including four cytochrome P450 enzymes, CYP2B1, CYPDelta2B4, CYPDelta2E1, and CYPDelta2E1 T303A, and three diiron enzymes, soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), toluene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1, and phenol hydroxylase (PH) from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1. 2-Norcarene and 3-norcarene and their oxidation products were found in all reaction mixtures, accounting for up to half of the oxidation products in some cases. In total, more than 20 oxidation products were identified from the enzyme-catalyzed reactions of norcarane. The putative radical-derived product from the oxidation of norcarane, 3-hydroxymethylcyclohexene (21), and the putative cation-derived product from the oxidation of norcarane, cyclohept-3-enol (22), coelute with other oxidation products on low-polarity GC columns. The yields of product 21 found in this study are smaller than those previously reported for the same or similar enzymes in studies where the products from norcarene oxidations were ignored, and therefore, the limiting values for lifetimes of radical intermediates produced in the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation reactions are shorter than those previously reported. PMID:17288366

  3. Optimised padlock probe ligation and microarray detection of multiple (non-authorised) GMOs in a single reaction

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Theo W; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Beenen, Henriek G; Van Hoef, AM Angeline; Voorhuijzen, Marleen M; Schoen, Cor D; Aarts, Henk JM; Kok, Esther J

    2008-01-01

    Background To maintain EU GMO regulations, producers of new GM crop varieties need to supply an event-specific method for the new variety. As a result methods are nowadays available for EU-authorised genetically modified organisms (GMOs), but only to a limited extent for EU-non-authorised GMOs (NAGs). In the last decade the diversity of genetically modified (GM) ingredients in food and feed has increased significantly. As a result of this increase GMO laboratories currently need to apply many different methods to establish to potential presence of NAGs in raw materials and complex derived products. Results In this paper we present an innovative method for detecting (approved) GMOs as well as the potential presence of NAGs in complex DNA samples containing different crop species. An optimised protocol has been developed for padlock probe ligation in combination with microarray detection (PPLMD) that can easily be scaled up. Linear padlock probes targeted against GMO-events, -elements and -species have been developed that can hybridise to their genomic target DNA and are visualised using microarray hybridisation. In a tenplex PPLMD experiment, different genomic targets in Roundup-Ready soya, MON1445 cotton and Bt176 maize were detected down to at least 1%. In single experiments, the targets were detected down to 0.1%, i.e. comparable to standard qPCR. Conclusion Compared to currently available methods this is a significant step forward towards multiplex detection in complex raw materials and derived products. It is shown that the PPLMD approach is suitable for large-scale detection of GMOs in real-life samples and provides the possibility to detect and/or identify NAGs that would otherwise remain undetected. PMID:19055784

  4. The cellular uptake and localization of non-emissive iridium(III) complexes as cellular reaction-based luminescence probes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Liu, Yi; Wu, Yongquan; Sun, Yun; Li, Fuyou

    2013-01-01

    Improvement of cellular uptake and subcellular resolution remains a major obstacle in the successful and broad application of cellular optical probes. In this context, we design and synthesize seven non-emissive cyclometalated iridium(III) solvent complexes [Ir(CˆN)(2)(solv)(2)](+)L(-) (LIr2-LIr8, in which CˆN = 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) or its derivative; solv = DMSO, H(2)O or CH(3)CN; L(-) = PF(6)(-) or OTf(-)) applicable in live cell imaging to facilitate selective visualization of cellular structures. Based on the above variations (including different counter ions, solvent ligands, and CˆN ligands), structure-activity relationship analyses reveal a number of clear correlations: (1) variations in counter anions and solvent ligands of iridium(III) complexes do not affect cellular imaging behavior, and (2) length of the side carbon chain in CˆN ligands has significant effects on cellular uptake and localization/accumulation of iridium complexes in living cells. Moreover, investigation of the uptake mechanism via low-temperature and metabolism inhibitor assays reveal that [Ir(4-Meppy)(2)(CH(3)CN)(2)](+)OTf(-) (LIr5) with 2-phenylpyridine derivative with side-chain of methyl group at the 4-position as CˆN ligand permeates the outer and nuclear membranes of living cells through an energy-dependent, non-endocytic entry pathway, and translocation of the complex from the cell periphery towards the perinuclear region possibly occurs through a microtubule-dependent transport pathway. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) appear to selectively control the transport of iridium(III) complexes between the cytoplasm and nucleus. A generalization of trends in behavior and structure-activity relationships is presented, which should provide further insights into the design and optimization of future probes. PMID:23131533

  5. Probing the chemical structure of monolayer covalent-organic frameworks grown via Schiff-base condensation reactions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ya; Goodeal, Niall; Chen, Ying; Ganose, Alex M; Palgrave, Robert G; Bronstein, Hugo; Blunt, Matthew O

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional covalent-organic frameworks (2D-COFs) on surfaces offer a facile route to new 2D materials. Schiff-base condensation reactions have proven to be an effective fabrication route for such materials. We present scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of porphyrin 2D-COFs grown at a solid-vapour interface. XPS shows that covalent links between porphyrins consist of a mixture of imines and hemiaminals, a non-conjugated intermediate in the Schiff-base condensation reaction. These results demonstrate that environmental conditions during growth can have an important impact on the chemical composition of Schiff-base 2D-COFs. PMID:27436064

  6. Spectrometric study of AOT-hydrolysis reaction in water/AOT/isooctane microemulsions using phenolphthalein as a chemical probe.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shiyan; Chen, Zhiyun; Fan, Dashuang; An, Xueqin; Shen, Weiguo

    2012-01-12

    The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) in water/AOT/isooctane microemulsions has been studied by monitoring the absorbance change of the phenolphthalein in the system with time. The apparent first-order rate constant k(obs) has been obtained and found to be dependent on both the molar ratio of water to AOT ω and the temperature. The dependences of k(obs) on ω have been analyzed by a pseudophase model which gives the true rate constants k(i) of the AOT-hydrolysis reaction on the interface and the partition coefficients K(wi) for the distribution of OH(-) between aqueous and interface pseudophases at various temperatures; the latter is almost independent of the temperature and ω. The temperature dependences of the reaction rate constants k(obs) and k(i) have been analyzed to obtain enthalpy ΔH(≠), entropy ΔS(≠), and energy E(a) of activation, which indicate that the distribution of OH(-) between aqueous and interface pseudophases increases ΔS(≠) but makes no contribution to E(a) and ΔH(≠). The influence of the overall concentration of AOT in the system on the rate constant has been examined and found to be negligible. It contradicts with what was reported by García-Río et al. (1) but confirms that the first-order reaction of the AOT-hydrolysis takes place on the surfactant interface. The study of the influence of AOT-hydrolysis on the kinetics of the alkaline fading of crystal violet or phenolphthalein in the water/AOT/isooctane microemulsions suggests that corrections for the AOT-hydrolysis in these reactions are required. PMID:22168828

  7. Probing Ligand Binding to Duplex DNA using KMnO4 Reactions and Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mazzitelli, Carolyn L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    An ESI-MS/MS strategy employing the thymine-selective KMnO4 oxidation reaction to detect conformational changes and ligand binding sites in non-covalent DNA/drug complexes is reported. ESI-MS/MS is used to detect specific mass shifts of the DNA ions that are associated with the oxidation of thymines. This KMnO4 oxidation/ESI-MS/MS approach is an alternative to conventional gel-based oxidation methods and affords excellent sensitivity while eliminating the reliance on radiolabelled DNA. Comparison of single strand versus duplex DNA indicates that the duplexes exhibit a significant resistance to the reaction, thus confirming that the oxidation process is favored for unwound or single strand regions of DNA. DNA complexes containing different drugs including echinomycin, actinomycin-D, ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342 and cis-C1 were subjected to the oxidation reaction. Echinomycin, a ligand with a bisintercalative binding mode, was found to induce the greatest KMnO4 reactivity, while Hoechst 33342, a minor groove binder, caused no increase in the oxidation of DNA. The oxidation of echinomycin/DNA containing duplexes with different sequences and lengths was also assessed. Duplexes with thymines closer to the terminal ends of the duplex demonstrated a greater increase in the degree of oxidation than those with thymines in the middle of the sequence. CAD and IRMPD experiments were used to determine the site of oxidation based on oligonucleotide fragmentation patterns. PMID:17508717

  8. Genetic probes of structure/function relationships in the Q{sub B} binding site of the photosynthetic reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.K.; Tiede, D.M.; Nance, S.L.; Chang, Chong-Hwan; Schiffer, M.

    1991-06-25

    In photosynthetic reaction centers, a quinone molecule, Q{sub B}, is the terminal acceptor in light-induced electron transfer. The crystal structure of the reaction center implicates the protonatable amiho acid residues L212Glu and L213Asp in the binding of Q{sub B} to the reaction center and in proton transfer to the anionic forms of Q{sub B} generated by electron transfer from Q{sub A}. Here we report the construction of the double mutant L212Ala-L213Ala by site-specific mutagenesis, and the isolation and preliminary biophysical characterization of revertant and suppressor strains that have regained the ability to grow under photosynthetic conditions. Our results show that neither L212Glu nor L213Asp is essential for efficient light-induced electron or proton transfer in Rhodobacter capsulatus and that second-site mutations, located within the QB binding pocket or at a more distant site, can compensate for mutations at L212 and L213. Acquisition of a single negatively charged residue (at position L213, or on the other side of the binding pocket at position L225) or loss of a positively charged residue (at position M231) is sufficient to restore activity to the complex.

  9. Facile Synthesis of Silica-Encapsulated Gold Nanoflowers as Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Probes Using Silane-Mediated Sol-Gel Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihye; Park, Sang-Joon; Lee, Sang-Wha

    2016-06-01

    Flower-like gold nanoparticles, so called gold nanoflowers (AuNFs), were synthesized through the reduction of HAuC4 with ascorbic acid in the presence of chitosan polymers. Chitosan-mediated AuNFs exhibited the distinct SERS signals of 2-chlorothiophenol (CTP) due to the presence of many interstitial gaps (so called hot spots) on the surface. For the facile silica coating, the AuNFs were conjugated with terminal carboxylate groups of (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPTMS), consequently forming alkoxy-terminated AuNFs which could facilely participate in the sol-gel reaction for silica coating. The resulting core-shell particles, i.e., CTP-adsorbed AuNFs with silica coating, exhibited the distinct SERS signals of CTP embedded within silica layer, warranting the effectiveness of this chemical strategy for spectroscopic labeling of Raman probes. PMID:27427704

  10. Genotyping of Trypanosoma cruzi Sublineage in Human Samples from a North-East Argentina Area by Hybridization with DNA Probes and Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Cristina; Lorenz, Virginia; Ortiz, Silvia; Gonzalez, Verónica; Racca, Andrea; Bontempi, Iván; Manattini, Silvia; Solari, Aldo; Marcipar, Iván

    2010-01-01

    We have evaluated blood samples of chronic and congenital Trypanosoma cruzi-infected patients from the city of Reconquista located in the northeast of Argentina where no information was previously obtained about the genotype of infecting parasites. Fourteen samples of congenital and 19 chronical patients were analyzed by hybridization with DNA probes of minicircle hypervariable regions (mHVR). In congenital patients, 50% had single infections with TcIId, 7% single infections with TcIIe, 29% mixed infections with TcIId/e, and 7% had mixed infections with TcIId/b and 7% TcIId/b, respectively. In Chronical patients, 52% had single infections with TcIId, 11% single infections with TcIIe, 26% had mixed infections with TcIId/e, and 11% had non-identified genotypes. With these samples, we evaluated the minicircle lineage-specific polymerase chain reaction assay (MLS-PCR), which involves a nested PCR to HVR minicircle sequences and we found a correlation with hybridization probes of 96.4% for TcIId and 54.8% for TcIIe. PMID:20064998

  11. Development of an event-specific hydrolysis probe quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for Embrapa 5.1 genetically modified common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Treml, Diana; Venturelli, Gustavo L; Brod, Fábio C A; Faria, Josias C; Arisi, Ana C M

    2014-12-10

    A genetically modified (GM) common bean event, namely Embrapa 5.1, resistant to the bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV), was approved for commercialization in Brazil. Brazilian regulation for genetically modified organism (GMO) labeling requires that any food containing more than 1% GMO be labeled. The event-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method has been the primary trend for GMO identification and quantitation because of its high specificity based on the flanking sequence. This work reports the development of an event-specific assay, named FGM, for Embrapa 5.1 detection and quantitation by use of SYBR Green or hydrolysis probe. The FGM assay specificity was tested for Embrapa 2.3 event (a noncommercial GM common bean also resistant to BGMV), 46 non-GM common bean varieties, and other crop species including maize, GM maize, soybean, and GM soybean. The FGM assay showed high specificity to detect the Embrapa 5.1 event. Standard curves for the FGM assay presented a mean efficiency of 95% and a limit of detection (LOD) of 100 genome copies in the presence of background DNA. The primers and probe developed are suitable for the detection and quantitation of Embrapa 5.1. PMID:25437743

  12. Development and validation of a novel hydrolysis probe real-time polymerase chain reaction for agamid adenovirus 1 in the central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Fredholm, Daniel V; Coleman, James K; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-03-01

    Agamid adenovirus 1 (AgAdv-1) is a significant cause of disease in bearded dragons (Pogona sp.). Clinical manifestations of AgAdv-1 infection are variable and often nonspecific; the manifestations range from lethargy, weight loss, and inappetence, to severe enteritis, hepatitis, and sudden death. Currently, diagnosis of AgAdv-1 infection is achieved through a single published method: standard nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) and sequencing. Standard nPCR with sequencing provides reliable sensitivity, specificity, and validation of PCR products. However, this process is comparatively expensive, laborious, and slow. Probe hybridization, as used in a TaqMan assay, represents the best option for validating PCR products aside from the time-consuming process of sequencing. This study developed a real-time PCR (qPCR) assay using a TaqMan probe-based assay, targeting a highly conserved region of the AgAdv-1 genome. Standard curves were generated, detection results were compared with the gold standard conventional PCR and sequencing assay, and limits of detection were determined. Additionally, the qPCR assay was run on samples known to be positive for AgAdv-1 and samples known to be positive for other adenoviruses. Based on the results of these evaluations, this assay allows for a less expensive, rapid, quantitative detection of AgAdv-1 in bearded dragons. PMID:25776549

  13. Reactions between vanadium ions and biogenic reductants of tunicates: Spectroscopic probing for complexation and redox products in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, D.E.; Grant, K.B.; Nakanishi, K.

    1996-07-02

    Several species of marine tunicates store oxygen-sensitive V{sup III} in blood cells. A sensitive colorimetric V{sup III} assay was used t survey the leading candidates for the native reducing agent of vanadate in tunicates (i.e., An-type tunichromes, glutathione, NADPH, and H{sub 2}S) in reactions with V{sup V} or V{sup IV} ions under anaerobic, aqueous conditions at acidic or neutral pH. Except for the case of An-1 and V{sup V} ions in pH 7 buffer, the assay results for the biogenic reducing agents clearly showed that appreciable quantities of V{sup III} products were not generated under the conditions tested. Therefore, the assay results place new limits on hypothetical mechanisms of V{sup III} formation in vivo. For reactions between An-1 and V{sup V} ions in pH 7 buffer, low levels of V{sup III} products could not be ruled out because of an interfering peak in the colorimetric assays. For similar reactions between V{sup V} ions and An-1, or an An-1,2 mixture, in mildly to moderately basic media, the product mixtures precipitated as greenish black solids. Analyses of the precipitated V/An mixtures using vanadium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) showed that the major products were tris(catecholate)-type V{sup IV} complexes (65 {plus_minus} 6%) and bis(catecholate)-type V{sup IV}O complexes (20 {plus_minus} 4%). XAS analysis of the V/An-1 product mixture also provided evidence of a minor V{sup III} component (9 {plus_minus} 5% of total V), notable for possible relevance to tunicate biochemistry. The combined results of XAS studies, spectrophotometric studies, and EPR studies consistently establish that reactions between tunichromes (Mm-1 or An-1) and V{sup V} ions generate predominantly V{sup IV}-tunichrome complexes in neutral to moderately basic aqueous media. 53 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Trityl Isocyanide as a Mechanistic Probe in Multicomponent Chemistry: Walking the Line between Ugi- and Strecker-type Reactions.

    PubMed

    Cioc, Răzvan C; Preschel, Hans D; van der Heijden, Gydo; Ruijter, Eelco; Orru, Romano V A

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we describe the versatile application of triphenylmethyl (trityl) isocyanide in multicomponent chemistry. This reagent can be employed as a cyanide source in the Strecker reaction and as convertible isocyanide in the preparation of N-acyl amino acids by Ugi 4CR/detritylation and free imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-amines by a Groebke-Blackburn-Bienaymé 3CR condensation/deprotection protocol. The mechanisms of these three classical MCRs intersect at the common N-trityl nitrilium ion intermediate, whose predictable reactivity can be exploited towards chemoselective transformations. PMID:27112103

  15. Estimation of free energy barriers in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase reactions probed by hydrogen-exchange kinetics of C alpha-labeled amino acids with solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, D.A.; Wiesinger, H.; Toney, M.D.; Kirsch, J.F. )

    1989-05-02

    The existence of the postulated quinonoid intermediate in the cytoplasmic aspartate amino-transferase catalyzed transamination of aspartate to oxaloacetate was probed by determining the extent of transfer of tritium from the C alpha position of tritiated L-aspartate to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate in single turnover experiments in which washout from the back-reaction was obviated by product trapping. The maximum amount of transferred tritium observed was 0.7%, consistent either with a mechanism in which a fraction of the net transamination reaction proceeds through a quinonoid intermediate or with a mechanism in which this intermediate is formed off the main reaction pathway. It is shown that transfer of labeled hydrogen from the amino acid to cofactor cannot be used to differentiate a stepwise from a concerted transamination mechanism. The amount of tritium transferred is a function of the rate constant for torsional equilibration about the epsilon-amino group of Lys-258, the presumptive abstractor of the C alpha proton; the relative rate constants for hydrogen exchange with solvent versus cofactor protonation; and the tritium isotope effect on this ratio. The free energy barriers facing the covalent intermediate between aldimine and keto acid product (i.e., ketimine and possibly quinonoid) were evaluated relatively by comparing the rates of C alpha-hydrogen exchange in starting amino acid with the rates of keto acid formation. The value of theta (= kexge/kprod) was found to be 2.6 for the reaction of cytoplasmic isozyme with aspartate and ca. 0.5 for that of the mitochondrial form with glutamate.

  16. Lipid Peroxides Promote Large Rafts: Effects of Excitation of Probes in Fluorescence Microscopy and Electrochemical Reactions during Vesicle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ayuyan, Artem G.; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2006-01-01

    Raft formation and enlargement was investigated in liposomes and supported bilayers prepared from sphingomyelin (SM), cholesterol, and unsaturated phospholipids; NBD-DPPE and rhodamine-(DOPE) were employed as fluorescent probes. Rafts were created by lowering temperature. Maintaining 20 mol % SM, fluorescence microscopy showed that, in the absence of photooxidation, large rafts did not form in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing 20 or more mol % cholesterol. But if photooxidation was allowed to proceed, large rafts were readily observed. In population, cuvette experiments, small rafts formed without photooxidation at high cholesterol concentrations. Thus, photooxidation was the cause of raft enlargement during microscopy experiments. Because photooxidation results in peroxidation at lipid double bonds, photosensitization experiments were performed to explicitly produce peroxides of SM and an unsaturated phospholipid. GUVs of high cholesterol content containing the breakdown products of SM-peroxide, but not phospholipid-peroxide, resulted in large rafts after lowering temperature. In addition, GUV production by electroswelling can result in peroxides that cause large raft formation. The use of titanium electrodes eliminates this problem. In conclusion, lipid peroxides and their breakdown products are the cause of large raft formation in GUVs containing biological levels of cholesterol. It is critical that experiments investigating rafts in bilayer membranes avoid the production of peroxides. PMID:16815906

  17. Molecular beam studies of unimolecular and bimolecular chemical reaction dynamics using VUV synchrotron radiation as a product probe

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation describes the use of a new molecular beam apparatus designed to use tunable VUV synchrotron radiation for photoionization of the products from scattering experiments. The apparatus was built at the recently constructed Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a third generation 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source. The new apparatus is applied to investigations of the dynamics of unimolecular reactions, photodissociation experiments, and bimolecular reactions, crossed molecular beam experiments. The first chapter describes the new apparatus and the VUV radiation used for photoionization. This is followed by a number of examples of the many advantages provided by using VUV photoionization in comparison with the traditional technique of electron bombardment ionization. At the end of the chapter there is a discussion of the data analysis employed in these scattering experiments. The remaining four chapters are complete investigations of the dynamics of four chemical systems using the new apparatus and provide numerous additional examples of the advantages provided by VUV photoionizaiton of the products. Chapters 2-4 are photofragment translational spectroscopy studies of the photodissociation dynamics of dimethyl sulfoxide, acrylonitrile, and vinyl chloride following absorption at 193 mn. All of these systems have multiple dissociation channels and provide good examples of the ability of the new apparatus to unravel the complex UV photodissociation dynamics that can arise in small polyatomic molecules.

  18. Charge recombination reactions in photoexcited C[sub 60]-amine complexes studied by picosecond pump probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, H.N.; Pal, H.; Sapre, A.V.; Mittal, J.P. )

    1993-12-15

    Photoexcitation of complexes between fullerence C[sub 60] and organic amines in benzene solutions is known to result in charge separation (CS) and subsequent charge recombination (CR) reactions, which lead to varying yields of fullerence triplet formation. Picosecond flash photolysis studies are carried out on C[sub 60]-diphenylamine (DPA), C[sub 60]-triethylamine (TEA), C[sub 60]-diazabicyclooctane (DABCO), and C[sub 60]-triphenylamine (TPA) systems to find out mechanistic details of the triplet formation on CR by inducing heavy atom and polarity effects by using suitable solvents. It is found that in the case of C[sub 60]-DPA, C[sub 60]-TEA, and C[sub 60]-DABCO systems proton transfer from the amine cation to the C[sub 60] anion in the ion pair state dominates, leading to poor triplet yields, which improve in heavy atom containing solvents. In TPA, proton transfer is not possible and hence fullerene triplet yields are high. Increase of solvent polarity for this system results in decreased C[sub 60] triplet yields with a consequent increase in the ion dissociation yield. A suitable reaction scheme is proposed to explain the results obtained. 34 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Probing the Time Scale of FPOP (Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins): Radical Reactions Extend Over Tens of Milliseconds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidi, Siavash; Konermann, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxyl radical (ṡOH) labeling with mass spectrometry detection reports on protein conformations and interactions. Fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) involves ṡOH production via H2O2 photolysis by UV laser pulses inside a flow tube. The experiments are conducted in the presence of a scavenger (usually glutamine) that shortens the ṡOH lifetime. The literature claims that FPOP takes place within 1 μs. This ultrafast time scale implies that FPOP should be immune to labeling-induced artifacts that may be encountered with other techniques. Surprisingly, the FPOP time scale has never been validated in direct kinetic measurements. Here we employ flash photolysis for probing oxidation processes under typical FPOP conditions. Bleaching of the reporter dye cyanine-5 (Cy5) served as readout of the time-dependent radical milieu. Surprisingly, Cy5 oxidation extends over tens of milliseconds. This time range is four orders of magnitude longer than expected from the FPOP literature. We demonstrate that the glutamine scavenger generates metastable secondary radicals in the FPOP solution, and that these radicals lengthen the time frame of Cy5 oxidation. Cy5 and similar dyes are widely used for monitoring the radical dose experienced by proteins in solution. The measured Cy5 kinetics thus strongly suggest that protein oxidation in FPOP extends over a much longer time window than previously thought (i.e., many milliseconds instead of one microsecond). The optical approach developed here should be suitable for assessing the performance of future FPOP-like techniques with improved temporal labeling characteristics.

  20. Probing the Time Scale of FPOP (Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins): Radical Reactions Extend Over Tens of Milliseconds.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, Siavash; Konermann, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxyl radical (⋅OH) labeling with mass spectrometry detection reports on protein conformations and interactions. Fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) involves ⋅OH production via H2O2 photolysis by UV laser pulses inside a flow tube. The experiments are conducted in the presence of a scavenger (usually glutamine) that shortens the ⋅OH lifetime. The literature claims that FPOP takes place within 1 μs. This ultrafast time scale implies that FPOP should be immune to labeling-induced artifacts that may be encountered with other techniques. Surprisingly, the FPOP time scale has never been validated in direct kinetic measurements. Here we employ flash photolysis for probing oxidation processes under typical FPOP conditions. Bleaching of the reporter dye cyanine-5 (Cy5) served as readout of the time-dependent radical milieu. Surprisingly, Cy5 oxidation extends over tens of milliseconds. This time range is four orders of magnitude longer than expected from the FPOP literature. We demonstrate that the glutamine scavenger generates metastable secondary radicals in the FPOP solution, and that these radicals lengthen the time frame of Cy5 oxidation. Cy5 and similar dyes are widely used for monitoring the radical dose experienced by proteins in solution. The measured Cy5 kinetics thus strongly suggest that protein oxidation in FPOP extends over a much longer time window than previously thought (i.e., many milliseconds instead of one microsecond). The optical approach developed here should be suitable for assessing the performance of future FPOP-like techniques with improved temporal labeling characteristics. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27067899

  1. Probing the Time Scale of FPOP (Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins): Radical Reactions Extend Over Tens of Milliseconds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidi, Siavash; Konermann, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical (ṡOH) labeling with mass spectrometry detection reports on protein conformations and interactions. Fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) involves ṡOH production via H2O2 photolysis by UV laser pulses inside a flow tube. The experiments are conducted in the presence of a scavenger (usually glutamine) that shortens the ṡOH lifetime. The literature claims that FPOP takes place within 1 μs. This ultrafast time scale implies that FPOP should be immune to labeling-induced artifacts that may be encountered with other techniques. Surprisingly, the FPOP time scale has never been validated in direct kinetic measurements. Here we employ flash photolysis for probing oxidation processes under typical FPOP conditions. Bleaching of the reporter dye cyanine-5 (Cy5) served as readout of the time-dependent radical milieu. Surprisingly, Cy5 oxidation extends over tens of milliseconds. This time range is four orders of magnitude longer than expected from the FPOP literature. We demonstrate that the glutamine scavenger generates metastable secondary radicals in the FPOP solution, and that these radicals lengthen the time frame of Cy5 oxidation. Cy5 and similar dyes are widely used for monitoring the radical dose experienced by proteins in solution. The measured Cy5 kinetics thus strongly suggest that protein oxidation in FPOP extends over a much longer time window than previously thought (i.e., many milliseconds instead of one microsecond). The optical approach developed here should be suitable for assessing the performance of future FPOP-like techniques with improved temporal labeling characteristics.

  2. Dimethylselenide as a probe for reactions of halogenated alkoxyl radicals in aqueous solution. Degradation of dichloro- and dibromomethane.

    PubMed

    Makogon, Oksana; Flyunt, Roman; Tobien, Thomas; Naumov, Sergej; Bonifacić, Marija

    2008-07-01

    Using pulse radiolysis and steady-state gamma-radiolysis techniques, it has been established that, in air-saturated aqueous solutions, peroxyl radicals CH 2HalOO (*) (Hal = halogen) derived from CH 2Cl 2 and CH 2Br 2 react with dimethyl selenide (Me 2Se), with k on the order of 7 x 10 (7) M (-1) s (-1), to form HCO 2H, CH 2O, CO 2, and CO as final products. An overall two-electron oxidation process leads directly to dimethyl selenoxide (Me 2SeO), along with oxyl radical CH 2HalO (*). The latter subsequently oxidizes another Me 2Se molecule by a much faster one-electron transfer mechanism, leading to the formation of equal yields of CH 2O and the dimer radical cation (Me 2Se) 2 (*+). In absolute terms, these yields amount to 18% and 28% of the CH 2ClO (*) and CH 2BrO (*) yields, respectively, at 1 mM Me 2Se. In competition, CH 2HalO (*) rearranges into (*)CH(OH)Hal. These C-centered radicals react further via two pathways: (a) Addition of an oxygen molecule leads to the corresponding peroxyl radicals, that is, species prone to decomposition into H (+)/O 2 (*-) and formylhalide, HC(O)Hal, which further degrades mostly to H (+)/Hal (-) and CO. (b) Elimination of HHal yields the formyl radical H-C(*)=O with a rate constant of about 6 x 10 (5) s (-1) for Hal = Cl. In an air-saturated solution, the predominant reaction pathway of the H-C(*)=O radical is addition of oxygen. The formylperoxyl radical HC(O)OO (*) thus formed reacts with Me 2Se via an overall two-electron transfer mechanism, giving additional Me 2SeO and formyloxyl radicals HC(O)O(*). The latter rearrange via a 1,2 H-atom shift into (*)C(O)OH, which reacts with O2 to give CO2 and O2(*)(-). The minor fraction of H-C(*)=O undergoes hydration, with an estimated rate constant of k approximately 2 x 10(5) s(-1). The resulting HC(*)(OH)2 radical, upon reaction with O2, yields HCO 2H and H (+)/O2(*-). Some of the conclusions about the reactions of halogenated alkoxyl radicals are supported by quantum chemical

  3. Imidazole C-2 Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Reaction at Histidine for Probing Protein Structure and Function with MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Naoka; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nakajima, Chihiro; Kawahara, Kazuki; Miyagi, Masaru; Nishimura, Osamu; Matsuo, Hisayuki; Nakazawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We present a mass spectrometric method for analyzing protein structure and function, based on the imidazole C-2 or histidine Cε1 hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange reaction, which is intrinsically second order with respect to the concentrations of the imidazolium cation and OD− in D2O. The second-order rate constant (k2) of this reaction was calculated from the pH-dependency of the pseudo-first-order rate constant (kφ) obtained from the change of average mass ΔMr (0 ≤ ΔMr < 1) of a peptide fragment containing a defined histidine residue at incubation time (t) such that kφ = − [ln(1−ΔMr)]/t. We preferred using k2 rather than kφ because k2max (maximal value of k2) was empirically related to pKa as illustrated with a Brønsted plot: logk2max=-0.7pKa+α (α is an arbitrary constant), so that we could analyze the effect of structure on the H/D-exchange rate in terms of log(k2max/k2) representing the deviation of k2 from k2max. In the catalytic site of bovine ribonuclease A, His12 showed much larger change in log(k2max/k2) compared with His119 upon binding with cytidine 3′-monophosphate, as anticipated from the X-ray structures and the possible change in solvent accessibility. However, there is a need of considering the hydrogen bonds of the imidazole group with non-dissociable groups to interpret an extremely slow H/D exchange rate of His48 in partially solvent-exposed situation. PMID:24606199

  4. Probing the reaction mechanism of spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) via diastereoselectively labeled dinucleotide SP TpT substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Lin, Gengjie; Liu, Degang; Dria, Karl J.; Telser, Joshua; Li, Lei

    2011-01-01

    5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine (commonly called spore photoproduct or SP) is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores. It is generated in the bacterial sporulation phase and repaired by a radical SAM enzyme, spore photoproduct lyase (SPL), at the early germination phase. SPL utilizes a special [4Fe-4S] cluster to reductively cleave S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to generate a reactive 5′-dA radical. The 5′-dA radical is proposed to abstract one of the two H atoms at the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process. Via organic synthesis and DNA photochemistry, we selectively labeled the 6-HproS or 6-HproR position with a deuterium in a dinucleotide SP TpT substrate. Monitoring the deuterium migration in enzyme catalysis (employing Bacillus subtilis SPL) revealed that it is the 6-HproR atom of SP that is abstracted by the 5′-dA radical. Surprisingly, the abstracted deuterium was not returned to the resulting TpT after enzymatic catalysis, an H atom from the aqueous buffer was incorporated into TpT instead. This result questions the currently hypothesized SPL mechanism which excludes the involvement of protein residue(s) in SPL reaction, suggesting that some protein residue(s), which is capable of exchanging a proton with the aqueous buffer, is involved in the enzyme catalysis. Moreover, evidence has been obtained for a possible SAM regeneration after each catalytic cycle; however, such a regeneration process is more complex than currently thought, with one or even more protein residues involved as well. These observations have enabled us to propose a modified reaction mechanism for this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. PMID:21671623

  5. Glycolaldehyde as a Probe Molecule for Biomass Derivatives: Reaction of C-OH and C=O Functional Groups on Monolayer Ni Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Weiting; Barteau, Mark A.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2011-12-21

    Controlling the activity and selectivity of converting biomass derivatives to syngas (H₂ and CO) is critical for the utilization of biomass feedstocks as renewable sources for chemicals and fuels. One key chemistry in the conversion is the selective bond scission of the C—OH and C=O functionalities, which are present in many biomass derivatives. Because of the high molecular weight and low vapor pressure, it is relatively difficult to perform fundamental surface science studies of C6 sugars, such as glucose and fructose, using ultrahigh vacuum techniques. Glycolaldehyde (HOCH₂CH=O) is the smallest molecule that contains both the C—OH and C=O functional groups, as well as the same C/O ratio as C6 sugars, and thus is selected as a probe molecule in the current study to determine how the presence of the C=O bond affects the reaction mechanism. Using a combination of density functional theory calculations and experimental measurements, our results indicate that the reaction pathway of glycolaldehyde to produce syngas can be enhanced by supporting monolayer Ni on a Pt substrate, which shows higher activity than either of the parent metals. Furthermore, the Pt substrate can be replaced by tungsten monocarbide to achieve similar activity and selectivity, indicating the possibility of using Ni/WC to replace Ni/Pt as active and selective catalysts with higher stability and lower cost.

  6. Manipulating the charge state of Au clusters on rutile TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces through molecular reactions probed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunjun; Hu, Shujun; Yu, Min; Wang, Tingting; Huang, Shiming; Yan, Shishen; Xu, Mingchun

    2016-07-14

    The charge state of Au clusters deposited on rutile TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces was studied by UHV-FTIRS using CO as a probe. The as-deposited Au clusters on oxidized TiO2(110) surfaces are electrically neutral and are identified by the 2105-2112 cm(-1) vibrational frequency of adsorbed CO depending on Au coverage. Annealing Au/TiO2(110) in a moderate O2 atmosphere at 400 K blue shifts the CO vibrational frequency by only 2-3 cm(-1) both on bare TiO2(110) surfaces and on Au clusters. However, NO exposure blue shifts the CO vibrational frequency by 16-26 cm(-1) for CO adsorbed on Au atoms near the interface and by 3-4 cm(-1) for CO adsorbed on top of Au clusters. As the acceptors of the intense charge transfer from Au, the Oa atoms generated through (NO)2→ N2O + Oa reactions on the small fraction of the bare TiO2(110) surface reside around the Au/TiO2(110) interface perimeter, causing the neutral Au(0) to be cationic Au(δ+) states. This is a new approach to manipulate the charge state of Au clusters on oxide surfaces, which may be helpful in regulating the catalytic redox reactions on oxide supported metal systems. PMID:27306113

  7. Temperature-dependences of the kinetics of reactions of papain and actinidin with a series of reactivity probes differing in key molecular recognition features

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Sheraz; Mellor, Geoffrey W.; Thomas, Emrys W.; Brocklehurst, Keith

    2006-01-01

    The temperature-dependences of the second-order rate constants (k) of the reactions of the catalytic site thiol groups of two cysteine peptidases papain (EC 3.4.22.2) and actinidin (EC 3.4.22.14) with a series of seven 2-pyridyl disulphide reactivity probes (R-S-S-2-Py, in which R provides variation in recognition features) were determined at pH 6.7 at temperatures in the range 4–30 °C by stopped-flow methodology and were used to calculate values of ΔS‡, ΔH‡ and ΔG‡. The marked changes in ΔS‡ from negative to positive in the papain reactions consequent on provision of increase in the opportunities for key non-covalent recognition interactions may implicate microsite desolvation in binding site–catalytic site signalling to provide a catalytically relevant transition state. The substantially different behaviour of actinidin including apparent masking of changes in ΔH‡ by an endothermic conformational change suggests a difference in mechanism involving kinetically significant conformational change. PMID:16445383

  8. Glycolaldehyde as a probe molecule for biomass derivatives: reaction of C-OH and C═O functional groups on monolayer Ni surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weiting; Barteau, Mark A; Chen, Jingguang G

    2011-12-21

    Controlling the activity and selectivity of converting biomass derivatives to syngas (H(2) and CO) is critical for the utilization of biomass feedstocks as renewable sources for chemicals and fuels. One key chemistry in the conversion is the selective bond scission of the C-OH and C═O functionalities, which are present in many biomass derivatives. Because of the high molecular weight and low vapor pressure, it is relatively difficult to perform fundamental surface science studies of C6 sugars, such as glucose and fructose, using ultrahigh vacuum techniques. Glycolaldehyde (HOCH(2)CH═O) is the smallest molecule that contains both the C-OH and C═O functional groups, as well as the same C/O ratio as C6 sugars, and thus is selected as a probe molecule in the current study to determine how the presence of the C═O bond affects the reaction mechanism. Using a combination of density functional theory calculations and experimental measurements, our results indicate that the reaction pathway of glycolaldehyde to produce syngas can be enhanced by supporting monolayer Ni on a Pt substrate, which shows higher activity than either of the parent metals. Furthermore, the Pt substrate can be replaced by tungsten monocarbide to achieve similar activity and selectivity, indicating the possibility of using Ni/WC to replace Ni/Pt as active and selective catalysts with higher stability and lower cost. PMID:22066750

  9. Adsorption of lipase on polypropylene powder.

    PubMed

    Gitlesen, T; Bauer, M; Adlercreutz, P

    1997-04-01

    Adsorption of different lipases by EP-100 polypropylene powder from crude and pure lipase preparations was studied. Langmuir isotherms described the adsorption equilibria well both for protein and lipase activity adsorption. Adsorption isotherms for five different proteins all gave a similar saturation level of 220 mg protein per g carrier. Twelve commercial lipase preparations were tested for selectivity in the adsorption of lipase. For all preparations the selectivity factor was larger than one. In a crude lipase preparation from Pseudomonas fluorescence, the specific activity in solution decreased by two orders of magnitude after adsorption. The adsorption was not significantly influenced by pH changes in the adsorption buffer, indicating that hydrophobic and not electrostatic interactions are the dominating adsorption forces. Adsorption of a crude lipase from Candida rugosa (Sigma) was fast and equilibrium was reached in 30 and 100 min for protein and lipase activity adsorption respectively. Desorption in aqueous solution was negligible. Investigations with seven different lipases showed no correlation between the specific lipolytic activity of dissolved enzyme in aqueous solution and the specific activity of adsorbed enzyme in an esterification reaction in organic solvent. PMID:9106498

  10. A DIAMANT Wedding For AFRODITE: Probing Structure and Characterizing Reaction Properties Via Charged-Particle-{gamma} Correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T.; Bark, R. A.; Gueorguieva, E.; Lawrie, J. J.; Lieder, E. O.; Lieder, R. M.; Papka, P.; Nyako, B. M.; Timar, J.; Berek, G.; Gal, J.; Kalinka, G.; Molnar, J.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Zolnai, L.; Juhasz, K.; Lipoglavsek, M.; Ntshangase, S. S.; Scheurer, J. N.

    2008-05-12

    The DIAMANT-AFRODITE combination has been used to investigate incomplete fusions reactions via the {sup 13}C+{sup 170}Er entrance channel. The intensity of {sup 176}Hf (populated via the {alpha} 3n exit channel) is {approx}8% of {sup 178}W (populated via 5n evaporation) which is {approx}8 times stronger than that expected from complete fusion. Moreover, 2{alpha}xn exit channels leading to Yb nuclei are observed with intensities that are {approx}30-to-40% of {sup 176}Hf, for which no yield is expected from complete fusion. A comparison of the intensities from the two-{alpha}- and one-{alpha}-gated data is consistent with fragmentation of the {sup 13}C beam into ({alpha}-{alpha}-{alpha}-n) which suggests that the population of Yb nuclei results from fusion (or ''massive transfer'') of one the break-up {alpha}-particles. A campaign of measurements is scheduled for late 2007 with further investigations planned for 2008, including the continuation of the study of superdeformation in {sup 32}S.

  11. Initial CaF2 reactions on Si(1 1 4)-2 × 1: Isolated silicides, faceting and partial CaF adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hidong; Duvjir, Ganbat; Dugerjav, Otgonbayar; Li, Huiting; Seo, Jae M.

    2015-12-01

    When CaF2 molecules are deposited on Si(1 1 4)-2 × 1 held at 500 °C, two kinds of isolated and symmetric Ca-silicide units are initially formed. With increasing CaF2 deposition to 0.4 ML, instead of the terrace being filled with them, a trench composed of (1 1 3) and (1 1 7) facets appears on the surface as a result of substrate etching induced by dissociated F atoms. Selectively on this (1 1 3) facet, a 2 × 2 CaF overlayer is formed uniformly. In the present studies, using scanning tunneling microscopy and synchrotron photoemission spectroscopy, the origins of such isolation of Ca-silicide units on the (1 1 4) terrace as well as selective adsorption of CaF on the (1 1 3) facet have been disclosed.

  12. Growth of Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanocrystallites on TiO2 Nanorod Arrays as Novel Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cell Structure via the Successive-Ion-Layer-Adsorption-Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoran; Demopoulos, George P

    2015-10-21

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is an environmentally benign semiconductor with excellent optoelectronic properties that attracts a lot of interest in thin film photovoltaics. In departure from that conventional configuration, we fabricate and test a novel absorber-conductor structure featuring in situ successive-ion-layer-adsorption-reaction (SILAR)-deposited CZTS nanocrystallites as a light absorber on one-dimensional TiO2 (rutile) nanorods as an electron conductor. The effectiveness of the nanoscale heterostructure in visible light harvesting and photoelectron generation is demonstrated with an initial short circuit current density of 3.22 mA/cm(2) and an internal quantum efficiency of ∼60% at the blue light region, revealing great potential in developing CZTS extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells. PMID:26422062

  13. Probing the Orientation of Electrostatically Immobilized Protein G B1 by Time of Flight Secondary Ion Spectrometry, Sum Frequency Generation and Near-edge X-Ray Adsorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Joe E.; Weidner, Tobias; Baugh, Loren; Gamble, Lara J.; Stayton, Patrick S.; Castner, David G.

    2011-01-01

    To fully develop techniques that provide an accurate description of protein structure at a surface, we must start with a relatively simple model system before moving on to increasingly complex systems. In this study, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG), near-edge x-ray adsorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used to probe the orientation of Protein G B1 (6 kDa) immobilized onto both amine (NH3+) and carboxyl (COO−) functionalized gold. Previously, we have shown that we could successful control orientation of a similar Protein G fragment via a cysteine-maleimide bond. In this investigation, to induce opposite end-on orientations, a charge distribution was created within the Protein G B1 fragment by first substituting specific negatively charged amino acids with neutral amino acids and then immobilizing the protein onto two oppositely charged self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces (NH3+ and COO−). Protein coverage, on both surfaces, was monitored by the change in the atomic % N, as determined by XPS. Spectral features within the SFG spectra, acquired for the protein adsorbed onto a NH3+-SAM surface, indicates that this electrostatic interaction does induce the protein to form an oriented monolayer on the SAM substrate. This corresponded to the polarization dependence of the spectral feature related to the NEXAFS N1s to π* transition of the β-sheet peptide bonds within the protein layer. ToF-SIMS data demonstrated a clear separation between the two samples based on the intensity differences of secondary ions stemming from amino acids located asymmetrically within Protein G B1 (Methionine: 62 and 105 m/z; Tyrosine: 107 and 137 m/z; Leucine: 86 m/z). For a more quantitative examination of orientation, we developed a ratio comparing the sum of the intensities of secondary-ions stemming from the amino acid residues at either end of the protein

  14. Isolation of a Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific DNA probe by subtraction hybridization and construction of species-specific oligonucleotide primers for sensitive detection by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Seal, S E; Jackson, L A; Daniels, M J

    1992-01-01

    A subtraction hybridization technique was employed to make a library enriched for Pseudomonas solanacearum-specific sequences. One cloned fragment, PS2096, hybridized under stringent conditions to DNA of 82 P. solanacearum strains representing all subgroups of the species. Other plant-associated bacteria, including closely related species such as Pseudomonas capacia, Pseudomonas picketti, or Pseudomonas syzygii, did not hybridize to PS2096. A minimum number of between 4 x 10(5) and 4 x 10(6) P. solanacearum cells could routinely be detected with PS2096 labelled either with [32P]dCTP or with digoxigenin-11-dUTP. To improve the sensitivity of detection, PS2096 was sequenced to allow the construction of specific oligonucleotide primers to be used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. After 50 cycles of amplification, 5 to 116 cells, depending on the strain, could reproducibly be detected by visualization of a 148-bp PCR product on an agarose gel. A preliminary field trial in Burundi with the probe and PCR primers has confirmed that they are sensitive tools for specifically detecting low-level infections of P. solanacearum in potato tubers. Images PMID:1482193

  15. The surface metal site in Blc. viridis photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers: Cu{sup 2+} as a probe of structure, location, and flexibility.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Dalosto, S. D.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Poluektov, O. G.

    2010-01-01

    Metal ion binding to a surface site on photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) modulates light-induced electron and proton transfer events in the RC. Whereas many studies have elucidated aspects of metal ion modulation events in Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs, much less is understood about the surface site in Blastochloris viridis (Blc. viridis) RCs. Interestingly, electron paramagnetic resonance studies revealed two spectroscopically distinct Cu{sup 2+} surface site environments in Blc. viridis RCs. Herein, Cu{sup 2+} has been used to spectroscopically probe the structure of these Cu{sup 2+} site(s) in response to freezing conditions, temperature, and charge separation. One Cu{sup 2+} environment in Blc. viridis RCs, termed CuA, exhibits temperature-dependent conformational flexibility. Different conformation states of the CuA{sup 2+} site are trapped when the RC is frozen in the dark either by fast-freeze or slow-freeze procedure. The second Cu{sup 2+} environment, termed CuB, is structurally invariant to different freezing conditions and shows resolved hyperfine coupling to three nitrogen atoms. Cu{sup 2+} is most likely binding at the same location on the RC, but in different coordination environments which may reflect two distinct conformational states of the isolated Blc. viridis RC protein.

  16. Facile synthesis of N-rich carbon quantum dots by spontaneous polymerization and incision of solvents as efficient bioimaging probes and advanced electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhouyue; Xu, Shengjie; Wan, Jiaxun; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-01-28

    In this study, uniform nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CDs) were synthesized through a one-step solvothermal process of cyclic and nitrogen-rich solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethyl-imidazolidinone (DMEU), under mild conditions. The products exhibited strong light blue fluorescence, good cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, after a facile post-thermal treatment, it developed a lotus seedpod surface-like structure of seed-like N-CDs decorating on the surface of carbon layers with a high proportion of quaternary nitrogen moieties that exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity and long-term durability towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The peak potential was -160 mV, which was comparable to or even lower than commercial Pt/C catalysts. Therefore, this study provides an alternative facile approach to the synthesis of versatile carbon quantum dots (CDs) with widespread commercial application prospects, not only as bioimaging probes but also as promising electrocatalysts for the metal-free ORR. PMID:26739885

  17. Development of a TaqMan Probe-Based Insulated Isothermal Polymerase Chain Reaction (iiPCR) Assay for Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Race 4.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Hong; Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Tsai-De; Hong, Li-Ling; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Chang, Pi-Fang Linda

    2016-01-01

    This study developed a novel and inexpensive detection method based on a TaqMan probe-based insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) method for the rapid detection of Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) race 4, which is currently among the most serious fungal vascular diseases worldwide. By using the portable POCKIT™ device with the novel primer set iiFoc-1/iiFoc-2, the Foc race 4 iiPCR assay (including DNA amplification and signal monitoring) could be completed within one hour. The developed Foc race 4 iiPCR assay is thus a user-friendly and efficient platform designed specifically for the detection of Foc race 4. The detection limit of this optimized Foc iiPCR system was estimated to be 1 copy of the target standard DNA as well as 1 fg of the Foc genomic DNA. This approach can serve as a rapid detection method for in planta detection of Foc race 4 in field-infected banana. It was concluded that this molecular detection procedure based on iiPCR has good potential for use as an efficient detection method. PMID:27448242

  18. Development of a TaqMan Probe-Based Insulated Isothermal Polymerase Chain Reaction (iiPCR) Assay for Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Race 4

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Tsai-De; Hong, Li-Ling; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Chang, Pi-Fang Linda

    2016-01-01

    This study developed a novel and inexpensive detection method based on a TaqMan probe-based insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) method for the rapid detection of Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) race 4, which is currently among the most serious fungal vascular diseases worldwide. By using the portable POCKIT™ device with the novel primer set iiFoc-1/iiFoc-2, the Foc race 4 iiPCR assay (including DNA amplification and signal monitoring) could be completed within one hour. The developed Foc race 4 iiPCR assay is thus a user-friendly and efficient platform designed specifically for the detection of Foc race 4. The detection limit of this optimized Foc iiPCR system was estimated to be 1 copy of the target standard DNA as well as 1 fg of the Foc genomic DNA. This approach can serve as a rapid detection method for in planta detection of Foc race 4 in field-infected banana. It was concluded that this molecular detection procedure based on iiPCR has good potential for use as an efficient detection method. PMID:27448242

  19. Probing the Repulsive Core of the Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction via the He4(e ,e'pN) Triple-Coincidence Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korover, I.; Muangma, N.; Hen, O.; Shneor, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Kelleher, A.; Gilad, S.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Piasetzky, E.; Watson, J. W.; Wood, S. A.; Aguilera, P.; Ahmed, Z.; Albataineh, H.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Anez, D.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J.; Armstrong, W.; Arrington, J.; Averett, T.; Badman, T.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Bai, X.; Beck, A.; Beck, S.; Bellini, V.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bittner, J.; Boeglin, W.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Cisbani, E.; Dalton, M. M.; Daniel, A.; Day, D.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Defurne, M.; Flay, D.; Fomin, N.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Fuchey, E.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Gu, C.; Gueye, P.; Hamilton, D.; Hanretty, C.; Hansen, J.-O.; Hashemi Shabestari, M.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Iqbal, S.; Jin, G.; Kalantarians, N.; Kang, H.; Khandaker, M.; LeRose, J.; Leckey, J.; Lindgren, R.; Long, E.; Mammei, J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marti Jimenez-Arguello, A.; Meekins, D.; Meziani, Z.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Monaghan, P.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Norum, B.; Nuruzzaman, Pan, K.; Phillips, S.; Pomerantz, I.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qiu, X.; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Riordan, S.; Ron, G.; Rondon-Aramayo, O.; Saha, A.; Schulte, E.; Selvy, L.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Sjoegren, J.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Sparveris, N.; Subedi, R.; Tireman, W.; Wang, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, W.; Yaron, I.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, P.; Zielinski, R.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    We studied simultaneously the He4(e ,e'p), He4(e ,e'pp), and He4(e ,e'pn) reactions at Q2=2(GeV/c)2 and xB>1, for an (e ,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A =2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum, in a region where the nucleon-nucleon (NN) force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. The abundance of neutron-proton pairs is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ˜500 MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum. Our data are compared with calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in He4 and discussed in the context of probing the elusive repulsive component of the NN force.

  20. Probing the repulsive core of the nucleon-nucleon interaction via the (4)He(e,e'pN) triple-coincidence reaction.

    PubMed

    Korover, I; Muangma, N; Hen, O; Shneor, R; Sulkosky, V; Kelleher, A; Gilad, S; Higinbotham, D W; Piasetzky, E; Watson, J W; Wood, S A; Aguilera, P; Ahmed, Z; Albataineh, H; Allada, K; Anderson, B; Anez, D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Armstrong, W; Arrington, J; Averett, T; Badman, T; Baghdasaryan, H; Bai, X; Beck, A; Beck, S; Bellini, V; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bittner, J; Boeglin, W; Camsonne, A; Chen, C; Chen, J-P; Chirapatpimol, K; Cisbani, E; Dalton, M M; Daniel, A; Day, D; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deconinck, W; Defurne, M; Flay, D; Fomin, N; Friend, M; Frullani, S; Fuchey, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Gu, C; Gueye, P; Hamilton, D; Hanretty, C; Hansen, J-O; Hashemi Shabestari, M; Holmstrom, T; Huang, M; Iqbal, S; Jin, G; Kalantarians, N; Kang, H; Khandaker, M; LeRose, J; Leckey, J; Lindgren, R; Long, E; Mammei, J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marti Jimenez-Arguello, A; Meekins, D; Meziani, Z; Michaels, R; Mihovilovic, M; Monaghan, P; Munoz Camacho, C; Norum, B; Nuruzzaman; Pan, K; Phillips, S; Pomerantz, I; Posik, M; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Qiu, X; Rakhman, A; Reimer, P E; Riordan, S; Ron, G; Rondon-Aramayo, O; Saha, A; Schulte, E; Selvy, L; Shahinyan, A; Sirca, S; Sjoegren, J; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sparveris, N; Subedi, R; Tireman, W; Wang, D; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, W; Yaron, I; Ye, Z; Zhan, X; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z; Zheng, X; Zhu, P; Zielinski, R

    2014-07-11

    We studied simultaneously the (4)He(e,e'p), (4)He(e,e'pp), and (4)He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q(2)=2(GeV/c)(2) and x(B)>1, for an (e,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830  MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A=2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum, in a region where the nucleon-nucleon (NN) force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. The abundance of neutron-proton pairs is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ∼500  MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum. Our data are compared with calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in (4)He and discussed in the context of probing the elusive repulsive component of the NN force. PMID:25062168

  1. Differentiating inflamed and normal lungs by the apparent reaction rate constants of lactate dehydrogenase probed by hyperpolarized 13C labeled pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, He N.; Kadlececk, Stephen; Shaghaghi, Hoora; Zhao, Huaqing; Profka, Harilla; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Rizi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinically translatable hyperpolarized (HP) 13C-NMR can probe in vivo enzymatic reactions, e.g., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-catalyzed reaction by injecting HP 13C-pyruvate into the subject, which is converted to 13C labeled lactate by the enzyme. Parameters such as 13C-lactate signals and lactate-to-pyruvate signal ratio are commonly used for analyzing the HP 13C-NMR data. However, the biochemical/biological meaning of these parameters remains either unclear or dependent on experimental settings. It is preferable to quantify the reaction rate constants with a clearer physical meaning. Here we report the extraction of the kinetic parameters of the LDH reaction from HP 13C-NMR data and investigate if they can be potential predictors of lung inflammation. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats (12 controls, 14 treated) were used. One dose of bleomycin (2.5 U/kg) was administered intratracheally to the treatment group. The lungs were removed, perfused, and observed by the HP-NMR technique, where a HyperSense dynamic nuclear polarization system was used to generate the HP 13C-pyruvate for injecting into the lungs. A 20 mm 1H/13C dual-tuned coil in a 9.4-T Varian vertical bore NMR spectrometer was employed to acquire the 13C spectral data every 1 s over a time period of 300 s using a non-selective, 15-degree radiofrequency pulse. The apparent rate constants of the LDH reaction and their ratio were quantified by applying ratiometric fitting analysis to the time series data of 13C labeled pyruvate and lactate. Results The apparent forward rate constant kp=(3.67±3.31)×10−4 s−1, reverse rate constant kl=(4.95±2.90)×10−2 s−1, rate constant ratio kp/kl=(7.53±5.75)×10−3 for the control lungs; kp=(11.71±4.35)×10−4 s−1, kl=(9.89±3.89)×10−2 s−1, and kp/kl=(12.39±4.18)×10−3 for the inflamed lungs at the 7th day post treatment. Wilcoxon rank-sum test showed that the medians of these kinetic parameters of the 7-day cohort were significantly

  2. Deuterated carbohydrate probes as ‘label-free’ substrates for probing nutrient uptake in mycobacteria by nuclear reaction analysis† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4cc09588j Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, R.; Gibson, M. I.; Thompson, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and probing small molecule uptake in cells is challenging, requiring sterically large chemical labels, or radioactive isotopes. Here, the uptake of deuterated sugars by Mycobacterium smegmatis, a non-pathogenic model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has been investigated using ion-beam (nuclear reaction) analysis demonstrating a new technique for label-free nutrient acquisition measurement. PMID:25695462

  3. Surface spectroscopic studies of a model silica-supported copper catalyst: Adsorption and reactions of CO, H[sub 2]O, and NO

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Vesecky, S.M.; He, J.; Goodman, D.W. )

    1993-07-01

    A model silica-supported copper catalyst has been studied with temperature programmed desorption, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infrared reflection--absorption spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. The reactions of water and nitric oxide on the Cu/SiO[sub 2] catalyst were also investigated. The model catalyst was prepared by evaporating copper onto a silica thin film ([similar to]100 A) which was, in turn, supported on a Mo(110) surface. Copper forms small metallic clusters on the silica surface with a small fraction being partially oxidized. Water dissociates on the Cu/SiO[sub 2] catalyst to yield dihydrogen at 400 K and surface oxygen during temperature programmed reaction. Nitric oxide reacts with the model silica-supported copper catalyst to produce nitrous oxide and surface oxygen, which does not desorb until copper evaporates at high temperatures.

  4. Characterization of micro- and mesoporous materials using accelerated dynamics adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qajar, Ali; Peer, Maryam; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Foley, Henry C

    2013-10-01

    Porosimetry is a fundamental characterization technique used in development of new porous materials for catalysis, membrane separation, and adsorptive gas storage. Conventional methods like nitrogen and argon adsorption at cryogenic temperatures suffer from slow adsorption dynamics especially for microporous materials. In addition, CO2, the other common probe, is only useful for micropore characterization unless being compressed to exceedingly high pressures to cover all required adsorption pressures. Here, we investigated the effect of adsorption temperature, pressure, and type of probe molecule on the adsorption dynamics. Methyl chloride (MeCl) was used as the probe molecule, and measurements were conducted near room temperature under nonisothermal condition and subatmospheric pressure. A pressure control algorithm was proposed to accelerate adsorption dynamics by manipulating the chemical potential of the gas. Collected adsorption data are transformed into pore size distribution profiles using the Horvath-Kavazoe (HK), Saito-Foley (SF), and modified Kelvin methods revised for MeCl. Our study shows that the proposed algorithm significantly speeds up the rate of data collection without compromising the accuracy of the measurements. On average, the adsorption rates on carbonaceous and aluminosilicate samples were accelerated by at least a factor of 4-5. PMID:23919893

  5. Facile synthesis of N-rich carbon quantum dots by spontaneous polymerization and incision of solvents as efficient bioimaging probes and advanced electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhouyue; Xu, Shengjie; Wan, Jiaxun; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, uniform nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CDs) were synthesized through a one-step solvothermal process of cyclic and nitrogen-rich solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethyl-imidazolidinone (DMEU), under mild conditions. The products exhibited strong light blue fluorescence, good cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, after a facile post-thermal treatment, it developed a lotus seedpod surface-like structure of seed-like N-CDs decorating on the surface of carbon layers with a high proportion of quaternary nitrogen moieties that exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity and long-term durability towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The peak potential was -160 mV, which was comparable to or even lower than commercial Pt/C catalysts. Therefore, this study provides an alternative facile approach to the synthesis of versatile carbon quantum dots (CDs) with widespread commercial application prospects, not only as bioimaging probes but also as promising electrocatalysts for the metal-free ORR.In this study, uniform nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CDs) were synthesized through a one-step solvothermal process of cyclic and nitrogen-rich solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethyl-imidazolidinone (DMEU), under mild conditions. The products exhibited strong light blue fluorescence, good cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, after a facile post-thermal treatment, it developed a lotus seedpod surface-like structure of seed-like N-CDs decorating on the surface of carbon layers with a high proportion of quaternary nitrogen moieties that exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity and long-term durability towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The peak potential was -160 mV, which was comparable to or even lower than commercial Pt/C catalysts. Therefore, this study provides an alternative facile approach to the synthesis of versatile carbon quantum dots (CDs) with widespread

  6. Mixed Quantum-Classical Simulations of Transient Absorption Pump-Probe Signals for a Photo-Induced Electron Transfer Reaction Coupled to an Inner-Sphere Vibrational Mode.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Franz; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-05-19

    In a previous study (Martinez, F.; Hanna, G. Chem. Phys. Lett. 2013, 573, 77-83), we demonstrated the ability of two approximate solutions of the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) for qualitatively capturing the electronic dynamics in the pump-probe transient absorption (TA) signal of a model of a condensed phase photoinduced electron transfer reaction whose ground and excited donor states have the same equilibrium geometry. However, the question remained as to the ability of these solutions to treat the more complex situation in which the electronic states are coupled to a low-frequency inner-sphere harmonic vibrational mode (representing an intramolecular mode of the donor-acceptor complex) that shifts their equilibrium geometries with respect to each other and thereby gives rise to signatures of vibrational dynamics in the TA signal. Thus, in this study, we investigated this situation by treating the vibrational mode both quantum mechanically and classically within the context of the approximate Poisson bracket mapping equation (PBME) and forward-backward trajectory solutions (FBTS) of the QCLE. Depending on the definition of the quantum subsystem, both PBME and FBTS are capable of qualitatively capturing several of the main features in the exact TA signal and quantitatively capturing the characteristic time scale of the vibrational dynamics, despite the moderately strong subsystem-bath coupling in this model. Particularly, we found that treating the vibrational mode quantum mechanically using either PBME or FBTS better captures the signatures of the vibrational dynamics, while treating it classically using FBTS better captures the decay in the signal. These findings underscore the utility of the PBME and FBTS approaches for efficiently modeling and interpreting TA signals. PMID:26766568

  7. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  8. The adsorption of NO and reaction of NO with O{sub 2} on H-, NaH-, CuH-, and Cu-ZSM-5: An in situ FTIR investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi, J.; Paffett, M.T.

    1996-11-01

    The adsorption of NO and the reaction of NO with O{sub 2} on H-, NaH-, CuH-, and Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites were studied at 300 K using in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). At this temperature, NO readily adsorbs on the Cu{sup +} sites of CuH- and Cu-ZSM-5 catalysts and decomposition of NO is observed for all catalysts, although the rate of decomposition is vastly different on these materials. In comparison, this reaction is negligible over the H- and NaH-ZSM-5 samples. The time evolution of several nitrogen-containing molecules after controlled O{sub 2} exposure to the NO/ZSM-5 systems has allowed the spectral correlation of these species. These nitrogen-containing species can interact with either the protonic sites of bridging hydroxyls forming hydrogen bonding complexes or the metal cations producing primarily surface nitrates and nitrites. The hydrogen bonded N{sub x}O{sub y} complexes were characterized with their IR absorption features: (1) NO{sub 2}, 2133 cm{sup {minus}1}; (b) N{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 1875 and 1587 cm{sup {minus}1}; and (c) N{sub 2}O{sub 4}, 2185 and 1745 cm{sup {minus}1}. The stretching vibrational frequency of the acidic OH groups of ZSM-5 red-shifts due to the interaction with nitrogen-containing molecules and forms {open_quotes}ABC{close_quotes} band structures characteristic of medium and strong hydrogen bonding complexes. Although the adsorbed N{sub x}O{sub y} species (N{sub 2}O{sub 3}, N{sub 2}O{sub 4}) interacting with the Bronsted protons exhibit characteristics of a strong Lewis base, adsorption enthalpies are sufficiently weak that their existence is not observed even after brief evacuation. Nitric oxide, oxygen coadsorption produces metal cation (Na{sup +} and Cu{sup n+}) bonded surface species possessing IR absorption bands between 1400 and 1650 cm{sup {minus}1} characteristic of nitrite and nitrate species. 46 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. III. Stoichiometric and reduced surfaces of titania and the adsorption of water

    SciTech Connect

    Lozovoi, A. Y.; Sheppard, T. J.; Kohanoff, J. J.; Pashov, D. L.; Paxton, A. T.

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate a model for stoichiometric and reduced titanium dioxide intended for use in molecular dynamics and other atomistic simulations and based in the polarizable ion tight binding theory. This extends the model introduced in two previous papers from molecular and liquid applications into the solid state, thus completing the task of providing a comprehensive and unified scheme for studying chemical reactions, particularly aimed at problems in catalysis and electrochemistry. As before, experimental results are given priority over theoretical ones in selecting targets for model fitting, for which we used crystal parameters and band gaps of titania bulk polymorphs, rutile and anatase. The model is applied to six low index titania surfaces, with and without oxygen vacancies and adsorbed water molecules, both in dissociated and non-dissociated states. Finally, we present the results of molecular dynamics simulation of an anatase cluster with a number of adsorbed water molecules and discuss the role of edge and corner atoms of the cluster.

  10. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  11. Chelating σ-Aryl Post-Metallocenes: Probing Intramolecular [C-H···F-C] Interactions and Unusual Reaction Pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cham-Chuen; Chan, Michael C W

    2015-06-16

    Our interest in chelating σ-aryl ancillary ligands was motivated by their potential to impart unusual reactivity, since we envisioned that σ-donors with minimal π-donation would create a catalytic center with enhanced electrophilicity. We developed a family of Group 4 post-metallocene catalysts supported by pyridine-2-phenolate-6-(σ-aryl) [O,N,C] ligands bearing a fluorinated moiety in the vicinity of the metal. Notable features of these meta-substituted tris(hetero)aryl frameworks include their coordination geometry and inherent rigidity. For the first time, the elusive C-H···F-C interaction was manifested as NMR-discernible (1)H-(19)F coupling in solution and characterized by a neutron diffraction study. Their existence carries implications for catalyst design and in the context of weak attractive ligand-polymer interactions (WALPI), since they substantiate the practical viability of the ortho-F···H(β) ligand-polymer interactions proposed for living Group 4 fluorinated bis(phenoxyimine) catalysts. In metal-catalyzed olefin polymerization reactions, the notion of noncovalent interactions between an active ancillary ligand and the growing polymer chain is new. These interactions must be fragile and transient in nature, otherwise the intrinsic chain propagation process would be disrupted, and inherently tunable attractive forces such as hydrogen bonds are ideally suited to this role. The nature, relevance, and usability of extremely weak hydrogen bonds such as C-H···F-C has been a topical yet controversial area of research. We subsequently prepared a series of Group 4 complexes supported by fluorinated (σ-aryl)-2-phenolate-6-pyridyl [O,C,N] ligands. [(1)H,(19)F]-HMBC NMR experiments were conducted to probe the observed (1)H-(19)F coupling, and specifically separate contributions from scalar (J) coupling and cross-correlation (CR) interference. For the first time, a significant scalar component was confirmed for the (1)H-(19)F coupling in Ti

  12. Carbon monoxide adsorption on beryllium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, A.

    2013-02-01

    Density functional calculations are here carried out to study the carbon monoxide molecule adsorption on pristine, hydrogenated and hydroxylated beryllium Be (0001) surfaces. The adsorption energies and structures, the activation barriers to molecular adsorption and dissociation are calculated. These reactions are described in terms of potential energy surfaces and electronic density of states. The quantum results are discussed along two directions: the beryllium surface reactivity in the domain of nuclear fusion devices and the possible usage of beryllium as a catalyst of Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis.

  13. Electrochemical and surface characterization of 4-aminothiophenol adsorption at polycrystalline platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I; Fachini, Estevao R; Hernández, Jessica; Pérez-Davis, Marla E; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2006-07-01

    The formation of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on polycrystalline platinum electrodes has been characterized by surface analysis and electrochemistry techniques. The 4-ATP monolayer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry, Raman spectroscopy, reflection-absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). CV was used to study the dependence of the adsorption time and 4-ATP solution concentration on the relative degree of coverage of 4-ATP monolayers on polycrystalline Pt electrodes. The adsorption time range probed was 24-72 h. The optimal concentration of 4-ATP needed to obtain the highest surface at the lowest adsorption time was 10 mM. RAIR and Raman spectroscopy for 4-ATP-modified platinum electrodes showed the characteristic adsorption bands for 4-ATP, such as nuNH, nuCH(arom), and nuCS(arom), indicating the adsorption on the platinum surface. The XPS spectra for the modified Pt surface presented the binding energy peaks of sulfur and nitrogen. High energy resolution XPS studies, RAIR, and Raman spectrum for platinum electrodes modified with 4-ATP indicate that the molecules are sulfur-bonded to the platinum surface. The formation of a S-Pt bond suggests that ATP adsorption leads to an amino-terminated electrode surface. The thickness of the monolayer was evaluated via angle-resolved XPS (AR-XPS) analyses, giving a value of 8 A. As evidence of the terminal amino group on the electrode surface, the chemical derivatization of the 4-ATP SAM was done with 16-Br hexadecanoic acid. This surface reaction was followed by RAIR spectroscopy. PMID:16800665

  14. Al atom on MoO3(010) surface: adsorption and penetration using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong-Zhang; Bandaru, Sateesh; Wang, Da; Liu, Jin; Lau, Woon Ming; Wang, Zhenling; Li, Li-Li

    2016-03-14

    Interfacial issues, such as the interfacial structure and the interdiffusion of atoms at the interface, are fundamental to the understanding of the ignition and reaction mechanisms of nanothermites. This study employs first-principle density functional theory to model Al/MoO3 by placing an Al adatom onto a unit cell of a MoO3(010) slab, and to probe the initiation of interfacial interactions of Al/MoO3 nanothermite by tracking the adsorption and subsurface-penetration of the Al adatom. The calculations show that the Al adatom can spontaneously go through the topmost atomic plane (TAP) of MoO3(010) and reach the 4-fold hollow adsorption-site located below the TAP, with this subsurface adsorption configuration being the most preferred one among all plausible adsorption configurations. Two other plausible configurations place the Al adatom at two bridge sites located above the TAP of MoO3(010) but the Al adatom can easily penetrate below this TAP to a relatively more stable adsorption configuration, with a small energy barrier of merely 0.2 eV. The evidence of subsurface penetration of Al implies that Al/MoO3 likely has an interface with intermixing of Al, Mo and O atoms. These results provide new insights on the interfacial interactions of Al/MoO3 and the ignition/combustion mechanisms of Al/MoO3 nanothermites. PMID:26899169

  15. Degradation of methyl bromide and methyl chloride in soil microcosms: Use of stable C isotope fractionation and stable isotope probing to identify reactions and the responsible microorganisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Warner, K.L.; Baesman, S.M.; Oremland, R.S.; McDonald, I.R.; Radajewski, S.; Murrell, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria in soil microcosm experiments oxidized elevated levels of methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl bromide (MeBr), the former compound more rapidly than the latter. MeBr was also removed by chemical reactions while MeCl was not. Chemical degradation dominated the early removal of MeBr and accounted for more than half of its total loss. Fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during chemical degradation of MeBr resulted in a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 59 ?? 7???. Soil bacterial oxidation dominated the later removal of MeBr and MeCl and was characterized by different KIEs for each compound. The KIE for MeBr oxidation was 69 ?? 9??? and the KIE for MeCl oxidation was 49 ?? 3???. Stable isotope probing revealed that different populations of soil bacteria assimilated added 13C-labeled MeBr and MeCl. The identity of the active MeBr and MeCl degrading bacteria in soil was determined by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified from 13C-DNA fractions, which identified a number of sequences from organisms not previously thought to be involved in methyl halide degradation. These included Burkholderia , the major clone type in the 13C-MeBr fraction, and Rhodobacter, Lysobacter and Nocardioides the major clone types in the 13C-MeCl fraction. None of the 16S rRNA gene sequences for methyl halide oxidizing bacteria currently in culture (including Aminobacter strain IMB-1 isolated from fumigated soil) were identified. Functional gene clone types closely related to Aminobacter spp. were identified in libraries containing the sequences for the cmuA gene, which codes for the enzyme known to catalyze the initial step in the oxidation of MeBr and MeCl. The cmuA gene was limited to members of the alpha-Proteobacteria whereas the greater diversity demonstrated by the 16S rRNA gene may indicate that other enzymes catalyze methyl halide oxidation in different groups of bacteria. Copyright ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Degradation of Methyl Bromide and Methyl Chloride in Soil Microcosms: Use of Stable C Isotope Fractionation and Stable Isotope Probing to Identify Reactions and the Responsible Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Warner, K. L.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.; McDonald, I. R.; Radajewski, S.; Murrell, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) and methyl chloride (MeCl) are important atmospheric trace gases that contribute directly to stratospheric ozone depletion. These compounds have natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Soils comprise the largest known sink for MeBr on the Earth's surface and are also a large sink for MeCl. However, the processes that influence the flux of these compounds from air to soil or soil to air are poorly understood at present. Bacteria in soil microcosm experiments oxidized both MeCl and MeBr, the former compound more rapidly than the latter. MeBr was also removed by chemical reactions while MeCl was not. Chemical degradation of MeBr accounted for more than half of its total loss. We applied new techniques to determine if different bacteria were responsible for degrading MeBr and MeCl. Stable isotope probing revealed that different populations of soil bacteria assimilated added 13C-labeled MeBr and MeCl. Soil bacterial oxidation of MeBr and MeCl was characterized by different kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). The KIE for MeBr oxidation by bacteria was 22 +/- 5 \\permil and the KIE for MeCl oxidation was 56 +/- 3 \\permil, suggesting that different bacteria were responsible for degrading each compound. The identity of the active MeBr and MeCl degrading bacteria in soil was determined by analysis of 16S rDNA sequences amplified from 13C-DNA fractions. The diverse population of active bacteria was reflected by the range of sequences found for the cmuA gene, which codes for the enzyme that catalyzes the initial step in the oxidation of MeBr and MeCl. The diversity and number of different bacteria actively degrading MeBr and MeCl in the soil and the number of bacteria identified that contain the enzyme capable of degrading methyl halides were in contrast to the limited number of methyl halide degrading bacteria that have been isolated thus far from soil and aquatic environments; thus suggesting that the

  17. Degradation of methyl bromide and methyl chloride in soil microcosms: Use of stable C isotope fractionation and stable isotope probing to identify reactions and the responsible microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Laurence G.; Warner, Karen L.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Oremland, Ronald S.; McDonald, Ian R.; Radajewski, Stefan; Murrell, J. Colin

    2004-08-01

    Bacteria in soil microcosm experiments oxidized elevated levels of methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl bromide (MeBr), the former compound more rapidly than the latter. MeBr was also removed by chemical reactions while MeCl was not. Chemical degradation dominated the early removal of MeBr and accounted for more than half of its total loss. Fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during chemical degradation of MeBr resulted in a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 59 ± 7‰. Soil bacterial oxidation dominated the later removal of MeBr and MeCl and was characterized by different KIEs for each compound. The KIE for MeBr oxidation was 69 ± 9‰ and the KIE for MeCl oxidation was 49 ± 3‰. Stable isotope probing revealed that different populations of soil bacteria assimilated added 13C-labeled MeBr and MeCl. The identity of the active MeBr and MeCl degrading bacteria in soil was determined by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified from 13C-DNA fractions, which identified a number of sequences from organisms not previously thought to be involved in methyl halide degradation. These included Burkholderia, the major clone type in the 13C-MeBr fraction, and Rhodobacter, Lysobacter and Nocardioides the major clone types in the 13C-MeCl fraction. None of the 16S rRNA gene sequences for methyl halide oxidizing bacteria currently in culture (including Aminobacter strain IMB-1 isolated from fumigated soil) were identified. Functional gene clone types closely related to Aminobacter spp. were identified in libraries containing the sequences for the cmuA gene, which codes for the enzyme known to catalyze the initial step in the oxidation of MeBr and MeCl. The cmuA gene was limited to members of the alpha-Proteobacteria whereas the greater diversity demonstrated by the 16S rRNA gene may indicate that other enzymes catalyze methyl halide oxidation in different groups of bacteria.

  18. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  19. Mechanism of the reaction, CH4+O(1D2)→CH3+OH, studied by ultrafast and state-resolved photolysis/probe spectroscopy of the CH4ṡO3 van der Waals complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. Cameron; van Zee, Roger D.; Stephenson, John C.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of the reaction CH4+O(1D2)→CH3+OH was investigated by ultrafast, time-resolved and state-resolved experiments. In the ultrafast experiments, short ultraviolet pulses photolyzed ozone in the CH4ṡO3 van der Waals complex to produce O(1D2). The ensuing reaction with CH4 was monitored by measuring the appearance rate of OH(v=0,1;J,Ω,Λ) by laser-induced fluorescence, through the OH A←X transition, using short probe pulses. These spectrally broad pulses, centered between 307 and 316 nm, probe many different OH rovibrational states simultaneously. At each probe wavelength, both a fast and a slow rise time were evident in the fluorescence signal, and the ratio of the fast-to-slow signal varied with probe wavelength. The distribution of OH(v,J,Ω,Λ) states, Pobs(v,J,Ω,Λ), was determined by laser-induced fluorescence using a high-resolution, tunable dye laser. The Pobs(v,J,Ω,Λ) data and the time-resolved data were analyzed under the assumption that different formation times represent different reaction mechanisms and that each mechanism produces a characteristic rovibrational distribution. The state-resolved and the time-resolved data can be fit independently using a two-mechanism model: Pobs(v,J,Ω,Λ) can be decomposed into two components, and the appearance of OH can be fit by two exponential rise times. However, these independent analyses are not mutually consistent. The time-resolved and state-resolved data can be consistently fit using a three-mechanism model. The OH appearance signals, at all probe wavelengths, were fit with times τfast≈0.2 ps, τinter≈0.5 ps and τslow≈5.4 ps. The slowest of these three is the rate for dissociation of a vibrationally excited methanol intermediate (CH3OH*) predicted by statistical theory after complete intramolecular energy redistribution following insertion of O(1D2) into CH4. The Pobs(v,J,Ω,Λ) was decomposed into three components, each with a linear surprisal, under the assumption that the

  20. Probing the Adsorption Behavior of 4,5-Diazafluoren-9-one and Its Schiff Base Derivatives on SIlver and Gold Nanosurfaces Using Raman Spectroscopy, Density Functional Theory and Potential Energy Distribution Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Rhonda Patrice

    from the center ring was shortened because of metal-ligand coordination. These observations are correlated to the shifts in Raman frequencies; a decrease in bond length resulted in a shift to a higher vibrational energy. The surface-enhanced Raman spectrum of DAFO was obtained on silver colloids and gold nanorods. The resulting SER spectra were compared to their corresponding normal Raman spectra, there were changes in relative band intensities and there were bands shifted because of adsorption; these observations were used to probe orientation. Orientation is determined by applying surface selections rules developed by both Creighton and Moskovits. The rules indicate, when the vibrational modes assigned to out-of-plane modes are observed as enhanced in the SER spectrum, the ligand is considered parallel relative to the metal surface, and when the vibrational modes assigned to in-plane modes are observed as enhanced, the ligand is not parallel relative to the metal surface. The relative surface enhancement factors were calculated by normalizing the spectra and then by taking the ratio of ISERS/INR. Based on the enhancement factors, the bands assigned to in-plane modes exhibited the highest enhancement factors on the Au and Ag SER spectra. This observation suggests that DAFO is not parallel to the metal nano-surfaces. In the Ag SERS spectrum the bands with the highest enhancement factors were assigned to quadrant ring stretching and cyclopentone bending. Analysis of the carbonyl stretching frequency on the Ag spectrum revealed the frequency shifted to a lower vibrational energy. This shift has been ascribed to the carbonyl bond losing double bond character, which permits the interaction between the metal and the carbonyl oxygen. It was proposed the DAFO ligand is sandwiched between the silver hydrosol. The TER spectrum of DAFO was obtained; analysis of the spectrum revealed similarities to the Ag SERS spectrum. The carbonyl stretching frequency was lowered, the bands

  1. O2 adsorption on MO2 (M=Ru, Ir, Sn) films supported on rutile TiO2(110) by DFT calculations: Probing the nature of metal oxide-support interaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianglan; Sun, Xiongfei; Sun, Baozhen; Peng, Honggen; Liu, Wenming; Wang, Xiang

    2016-07-01

    To explore metal oxide-support interaction and its effect on O2 adsorption, periodic DFT calculations were used to explore the most preferred O2 molecular and dissociative adsorption on stoichiometric (MO2) and defective (MO2-x) (M=Ru, Ir, Sn) films supported on rutile TiO2(110), and compared with that on pure surfaces without TiO2(110) support. For defective RuO2-x films, it is revealed that the TiO2(110) support and the film thickness have an evident impact on the O2 adsorbed species. On the contrary, the two factors show little influence for defective IrO2-x and SnO2-x films. The analyses for Bader charge and density of states indicate that the reducibility change of the unsaturated surface Ru atoms, which are adjacent to the bridge oxygen vacancies, is responsible for this O2 adsorption alteration. These results provide insights into the oxide-oxide interaction, and its effect on the properties of supported oxide catalysts. PMID:27060230

  2. Identification of tuna species in commercial cans by minor groove binder probe real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Terio, Valentina; Di Pinto, Pietro; Decaro, Nicola; Parisi, Antonio; Desario, Costantina; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio; Tantillo, Marilia Giuseppina

    2010-12-01

    Three different minor groove binder (MGB) probe assays have been developed for rapid and accurate identification of the species commonly used for production of canned tuna, i.e. yellowfin (Thunnus albacares), bluefin (Thunnus thynnus) and albacore (Thunnus alalunga) tunas. The assays targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were able to discriminate efficiently between the three species contained in fresh or canned tunas and did not react with other Scombroidei that were tested. A correct species prediction was obtained even from artificial mixtures prepared with different amounts of the reference tuna species and subjected to the sterilisation treatment. Testing of 27 commercial canned tunas by PCR-RFLP, MGB probe assays and sequence analysis showed a concordance of 100% between the last two techniques, whereas by using PCR-RFLP several samples were uncharacterised or mischaracterised. These results make the established MGB probe assays an attractive tool for direct and rapid species identification in canned tuna. PMID:20691254

  3. Influence of wide band gap oxide substrates on the photoelectrochemical properties and structural disorder of CdS nanoparticles grown by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method

    PubMed Central

    Malashchonak, Mikalai V; Korolik, Olga V; Streltsov, Еugene А; Kulak, Anatoly I

    2015-01-01

    Summary The photoelectrochemical properties of nanoheterostructures based on the wide band gap oxide substrates (ZnO, TiO2, In2O3) and CdS nanoparticles deposited by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method have been studied as a function of the CdS deposition cycle number (N). The incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) passes through a maximum with the increase of N, which is ascribed to the competition between the increase in optical absorption and photocarrier recombination. The maximal IPCE values for the In2O3/CdS and ZnO/CdS heterostructures are attained at N ≈ 20, whereas for TiO2/CdS, the appropriate N value is an order of magnitude higher. The photocurrent and Raman spectroscopy studies of CdS nanoparticles revealed the occurrence of the quantum confinement effect, demonstrating the most rapid weakening with the increase of N in ZnO/CdS heterostructures. The structural disorder of CdS nanoparticles was characterized by the Urbach energy (E U), spectral width of the CdS longitudinal optical (LO) phonon band and the relative intensity of the surface optical (SO) phonon band in the Raman spectra. Maximal values of E U (100–120 meV) correspond to СdS nanoparticles on a In2O3 surface, correlating with the fact that the CdS LO band spectral width and intensity ratio for the CdS SO and LO bands are maximal for In2O3/CdS films. A notable variation in the degree of disorder of CdS nanoparticles is observed only in the initial stages of CdS growth (several tens of deposition cycles), indicating the preservation of the nanocrystalline state of CdS over a wide range of SILAR cycles. PMID:26734517

  4. Angle-integrated measurements of the 26Al (d, n)27Si reaction cross section: a probe of spectroscopic factors and astrophysical resonance strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankainen, A.; Woods, P. J.; Nunes, F.; Langer, C.; Schatz, H.; Bader, V.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Browne, J.; Doherty, D. T.; Estrade, A.; Gade, A.; Kontos, A.; Lotay, G.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Noji, S.; Perdikakis, G.; Pereira, J.; Recchia, F.; Redpath, T.; Stroberg, R.; Scott, M.; Seweryniak, D.; Stevens, J.; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.; Zegers, R.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of angle-integrated cross sections to discrete states in 27Si have been performed studying the 26Al ( d, n) reaction in inverse kinematics by tagging states by their characteristic γ -decays using the GRETINA array. Transfer reaction theory has been applied to derive spectroscopic factors for strong single-particle states below the proton threshold, and astrophysical resonances in the 26Al ( p, γ) 27Si reaction. Comparisons are made between predictions of the shell model and known characteristics of the resonances. Overall very good agreement is obtained, indicating this method can be used to make estimates of resonance strengths for key reactions currently largely unconstrained by experiment.

  5. A molecular investigation of adsorption onto mineral pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninness, Brian J.

    Pigment suspensions are important in several processes such as ceramics, paints, inks, and coatings. In the wet state, pigments are combined with a variety of chemical species such as polymers, surfactants, and polyelectrolytes which produce a complex colloidal system. The adsorption, desorption, and redistribution of these species at the pigment-aqueous solution interface can have an impact on the behavior in both the wet state or its final dried state. The goal of this work is to establish a molecular picture of the adsorption properties of these pigmented systems. A novel in situ infrared technique has been developed which allows the detection of adsorbed surface species on pigment particles in an aqueous environment. The technique involves the use of a polymeric binder to anchor the colloidal pigment particles to the surface of an internal reflection element (IRE). The binder only weakly perturbs about 25% of the reactive surface sites (hydroxyl groups) on silica. The reaction of succinic anhydride with an aminosilanized silica surface has been quantified using this technique. The adsorption dynamics of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) at the TiO2-aqueous solution interface has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and electrokinetic analysis. At low bulk concentrations, C16TAB is shown to adsorb as isolated islands with a "defective" bilayer structure. Anionic probe molecules are shown to effectively "tune" the adsorbed surfactant microstructure. The results indicate that the structure of the adsorbed surfactant layer, and not the amount of adsorbed surfactant, dictates the subsequent adsorption behavior of the system. Atomic Layer Deposition is used to deposit a TiO2 layer onto the surfaces of silica and kaolin pigments. The process involves the cyclic reaction sequence of the vapors of TiCl4 and H2O. Three complete deposition cycles are needed before the surfaces

  6. Probing the role of P dbnd O stretching mode enhancement in nerve-agent sensors: Simulation of the adsorption of diisopropylfluorophosphate on the model MgO and CaO surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziejczyk, Wojciech; Majumdar, D.; Roszak, Szczepan; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2007-12-01

    The interactions of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) with model MgO and CaO surfaces have been investigated using density functional (DFT) and Møller-Plesset second order perturbation techniques. The geometries were fully optimized at the DFT level. The calculated interaction energies and the corresponding thermodynamic properties show that DFP is physisorbed on these two model oxide surfaces and adsorption on the MgO surface is stronger. Analyses of the calculated IR and Raman spectra point to the enhancement of the P dbnd O stretching mode with respect to the isolated DFP and this property could be used to detect nerve-agents using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Derivation of the Freundlich Adsorption Isotherm from Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skopp, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The Freundlich adsorption isotherm is a useful description of adsorption phenomena. It is frequently presented as an empirical equation with little theoretical basis. In fact, a variety of derivations exist. Here a new derivation is presented using the concepts of fractal reaction kinetics. This derivation provides an alternative basis for…

  8. Functional Probes for Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Kotone; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Hasegawa, Yukio; Sakurai, Toshio

    2007-03-01

    For superior performance of scanning probe microscopy, we are working to fabricate functional probes. For Kelvin probe force microscopy, we fabricated a metal-tip cantilever by attaching a thin metal wire to a regular Si cantilever and milling it by focused ion beam (FIB)^1. By using the W tip with a curvature radius of 3.5 nm, we obtained the potential profile of Ge/Si(105) surface in atomic resolution with the energy resolution better than 3 meV^2. For synchrotron-radiation-light-irradiated scanning tunneling microscopy which aims at atomically resolved elemental analysis, we fabricated a glass-coated W tip using FIB^3. It is found that the glass coating blocks the unwanted secondary electrons, which come from large area of the sample, by a factor of 40 with respect to the case no coating. Using the tip to detect the electrons emitted just below the tip, we obtained element specific images with a spatial resolution better than 20 nm under the photo irradiation whose energy is just above the adsorption edge of the element^4. 1 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 033705 (2005) 2 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., PRL 93, 266102 (2004) 3 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 083711 (2005) 4 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., APL, in press

  9. Development of oligonucleotide primers and probes against structural and regulatory genes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and their use for amplification of HIV-1 provirus by using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, M R; Allan, R; Fowke, K; Embree, J; Hammond, G W

    1992-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction is a powerful technique for amplifying a few copies of double-stranded genetic material to millions of copies in a few hours. The sensitivity and specificity of the polymerase chain reaction technique depend to some extent on the nucleotide sequences of the oligonucleotide primer pair used in the amplification. We report new oligonucleotide primers and probes which can be used for the amplification and detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 provirus sequences of not only structural but also regulatory genes. These primers are very sensitive and specific and can be used for the detection of African and North American strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Images PMID:1400991

  10. Modeling tailed bacteriophage adsorption: Insight into mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Storms, Zachary J; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2015-11-01

    The process of a bacteriophage attaching to its host cell is a combination of physical diffusion, biochemical surface interactions, and reaction-induced conformational changes in receptor proteins. Local variations in the physico-chemical properties of the medium, the phage׳s mode of action, and the physiology of the host cell also all influence adsorption kinetics. These characteristics can affect a specific phage׳s binding capabilities and the susceptibility of the host cell to phage attack. Despite the complexity of this process, describing adsorption kinetics of a population of bacteriophages binding to a culture of cells has been accomplished with relatively simple equations governed by the laws of mass-action. Many permutations and modifications to the basic set of reactions have been suggested through the years. While no single solution emerges as a universal answer, this review provides the fundamentals of current phage adsorption modeling and will guide researchers in the selection of valid, appropriate models. PMID:26331682

  11. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  12. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  13. Placing Single-Molecule T4 Lysozyme Enzymes on a Bacterial Cell Surface: Toward Probing Single-Molecule Enzymatic Reaction in Living Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dehong; Lu, H PETER.

    2004-07-01

    TheT4 lysozyme enzymatic hydrolyzation reaction of bacterial cell walls is an important biological process, and single-molecule enzymatic reaction dynamics had been studied under physiological condition using purified E. Coli cell walls as substrates. Here, we report progress toward characterizing the T4 lysozyme enzymatic reaction on a living bacterial cell wall using a combined single-molecule placement and spectroscopy. Placing a dye-labeled single T4 lysozyme molecule on a targeted cell wall by using a hydrodynamic micro-injection approach, we monitored single-molecule rotational motions during binding, attachment to, and dissociation from the cell wall by tracing single-molecule fluorescence intensity time trajectories and polarization. The single-molecule attachment duration of the T4 lysozyme to the cell wall during enzymatic reactions was typically shorter than photobleaching time under physiological conditions.

  14. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  15. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  16. Ammonia Production Using Pressure Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose overall objective is to develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system that integrates reaction to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production.

  17. Probing Metal Carbonation Reactions of CO2 in a Model System Containing Forsterite and H2O Using Si-29, C-13 Magic Angle Sample Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Kwak, J.; Hoyt, D. W.; Sears, J. A.; Rosso, K. M.; Felmy, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    Ex situ solid state NMR have been used for the first time to study fundamental mineral carbonation processes and reaction extent relevant to geologic carbon sequestration using a model silicate mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4)+scCO2 with and without H2O. Run conditions were 80C and 96 bar. Si-29 NMR clearly shows that in the absence of CO2, the role of H2O is to hydrolyze surface Mg-O-Si bonds to produce Mg2+, and mono- and oligomeric hydroxylated silica species. The surface hydrolysis products contain only Q0 (Si(OH)4) and Q1 (Si(OH)3OSi) species. An equilibrium between Q0, Q1 and Mg2+ with a saturated concentration equivalent to less than 3.2% of the Mg2SiO4 conversion is obtained at a reaction time of up to 7 days. Using scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is observed within 7 days. Using both scCO2 and H2O, the surface reaction products for silica are mainly Q3 (SiOH(OSi)3) species accompanied by a lesser amount of Q2 (Si(OH)2(OSi)2) and Q4 (Si(OSi)4). However, no Q0 and Q1 were detected, indicating the carbonic acid formation/deprotonation and magnesite (MgCO3) precipitation reactions are faster than the forsterite hydrolysis process. Thus it can be concluded that the Mg2SiO4 hydrolysis process is the rate limiting step of the overall mineral carbonation process. Si-29 NMR combined with XRD, TEM, SAED and EDX further reveal that the reaction is a surface reaction with the Mg2SiO4 crystallite in the core and with condensed Q2-Q4 species forming amorphous surface layers. C-13 MAS NMR identified a possible reaction intermediates as (MgCO3)4*Mg(OH)2*5H2O. However, at long reaction times only crystallite magnesite MgCO3 products are observed. This research is part of a broader effort at PNNL to develop experimental tools and fundamental insights into chemical transformations affecting subsurface CO2 reactive transport. Si-29 (left) and C-13 (right) MAS NMR spectra of Mg2SiO4 under various reaction conditions. Si-29 NMR reveals that in scCO2 without H2O, no reaction is

  18. Probing the dynamics of polyatomic multichannel elementary reactions by crossed molecular beam experiments with soft electron-ionization mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Casavecchia, Piergiorgio; Leonori, Francesca; Balucani, Nadia; Petrucci, Raffaele; Capozza, Giovanni; Segoloni, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    In this Perspective we highlight developments in the field of chemical reaction dynamics. Focus is on the advances recently made in the investigation of the dynamics of elementary multichannel radical-molecule and radical-radical reactions, as they have become possible using an improved crossed molecular beam scattering apparatus with universal electron-ionization mass spectrometric detection and time-of-flight analysis. These improvements consist in the implementation of (a) soft ionization detection by tunable low-energy electrons which has permitted us to reduce interfering signals originating from dissociative ionization processes, usually representing a major complication, (b) different beam crossing-angle set-ups which have permitted us to extend the range of collision energies over which a reaction can be studied, from very low (a few kJ mol(-1), as of interest in astrochemistry or planetary atmospheric chemistry) to quite high energies (several tens of kJ mol(-1), as of interest in high temperature combustion systems), and (c) continuous supersonic sources for producing a wide variety of atomic and molecular radical reactant beams. Exploiting these new features it has become possible to tackle the dynamics of a variety of polyatomic multichannel reactions, such as those occurring in many environments ranging from combustion and plasmas to terrestrial/planetary atmospheres and interstellar clouds. By measuring product angular and velocity distributions, after having suppressed or mitigated, when needed, the problem of dissociative ionization of interfering species (reactants, products, background gases) by soft ionization detection, essentially all primary reaction products can be identified, the dynamics of each reaction channel characterized, and the branching ratios determined as a function of collision energy. In general this information, besides being of fundamental relevance, is required for a predictive description of the chemistry of these

  19. Effect of grain size on uranium(VI) surface complexation kinetics and adsorption additivity.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M

    2011-07-15

    The contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption was studied using a sediment from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.053-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (<0.053 mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch and flow-cell experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms and kinetic uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. One important implication of this study is that grain-size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location. PMID:21648458

  20. Probing the correlations between the defects in metal-organic frameworks and their catalytic activity by an epoxide ring-opening reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Klet, Rachel C; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar

    2016-06-14

    Seven Zr/Hf-based MOFs with different degrees of defects were obtained by modulating the synthetic conditions. The number of missing linkers in these MOFs was calculated based on potentiometric acid-base titration. The number of defects was found to correlate quantitatively with the catalytic activity of UiO-type MOFs for an acid-catalyzed epoxide ring-opening reaction. More importantly, we were able to identify a MOF with inherent defective Zr6 nodes, which showed great activity and regio-selectivity for the epoxide ring-opening reaction. PMID:27229848

  1. A Perspective on the Maillard Reaction and the Analysis of Protein Glycation by Mass Spectrometry: Probing the Pathogenesis of Chronic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Ames, Jennifer M.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-12-18

    The Maillard reaction, starting from the glycation of protein and progressing to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), is implicated in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular, renal, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this perspective review, we provide on overview on the relevance of the Maillard reaction in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and discuss traditional approaches and recent developments in the analysis of glycated proteins by mass spectrometry. We propose that proteomics approaches, particularly bottom-up proteomics, will play a significant role in analyses of clinical samples leading to the identification of new markers of disease development and progression.

  2. A comparison of two real-time polymerase chain reaction assays using hybridization probes targeting either 16S ribosomal RNA or a subsurface lipoprotein gene for detecting leptospires in canine urine.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Fabio; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Zambon, Elisa; Turba, Maria Elena

    2015-11-01

    Leptospires are excreted in the urine of infected animals, and the prompt detection of leptospiral DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is increasingly being used. However, contradictory data has emerged concerning the diagnostic accuracy of the most popular PCR assays that target either the 16S ribosomal RNA (rrs) or the subsurface lipoprotein (LipL32) genes. In order to clarify the effect of the gene target, a novel hydrolysis probe-based, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the LipL32 gene was developed, validated, and then compared directly to the previously described rrs hydrolysis probe-based qPCR using a convenience collection of canine urine samples. The novel LipL32 qPCR assay was linear from 5.9 × 10(6) to 59 genome equivalents per reaction. Both the LipL32 and the rrs qPCR assays showed a limit of detection of 10 target copies per reaction indicating an approximately equivalent analytical sensitivity. Both assays amplified all 20 pathogenic leptospiral strains tested but did not amplify a representative collection of bacteria commonly found in voided canine urine. When the field samples were assayed, 1 and 5 out of 184 samples yielded an amplification signal in the LipL32 and rrs assays, respectively. Nevertheless, when the limit of detection was considered as the cutoff for interpreting findings, the 4 discordant cases were judged as negative. In conclusion, our study confirmed that both LipL32 and rrs are suitable targets for qPCR for the detection of leptospiral DNA in canine urine. However, the rrs target requires the mandatory use of a cutoff value in order to correctly interpret spurious amplifications. PMID:26450835

  3. Beta-decay of 31Cl: an indirect probe of the 30P(p,γ)31S reaction. Present status and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saastamoinen, Antti; Kankainen, Anu; Trache, Livius

    2016-08-01

    β-decay of 31Cl can be used as a selective tool for studying astrophysically relevant states in 31S. In this article we review the present status of the decay data. The implications for the 30P(p,γ)31S reaction rate at novae temperatures, and future experimental ideas are discussed.

  4. Adsorption of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Studies were undertaken of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols from aqueous solution on granular activated carbon (Filtrasorb-400, 30 x 40 mesh). Single-component equilibrium adsorption data on the eight compounds in two concentration ranges at pH 7.0 fit the Langmuir equation better than the Freundlich equation. The adsorptive capacities at pH 7.0 increase from pentachlorophenol to trichlorophenols and are fairly constant from trichlorophenols to monochlorophenols. The adsorption process was found to be exothermic for pentachlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and endothermic for 2,4-dichlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol. Equilibrium measurements were also conducted for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 4-chlorophenol over a wide pH range. A surface complexation model was proposed to describe the effect of pH on adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on activated carbon. The simulations of the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Batch kinetics studies were conducted of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols on granular activated carbon. The results show that the surface reaction model best describes both the short-term and long-term kinetics, while the external film diffusion model describes the short-term kinetics data very well and the linear-driving-force approximation improved its performance for the long-term kinetics. Multicomponent adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon was investigated in the micromolar equilibrium concentration range. The Langmuir competitive and Ideal Adsorbed Solution (IAS) models were tested for their performance on the three binary systems of pentachlorophenol/2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and the tertiary system of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and found to fail to predict the two-component adsorption equilibria of the former two binary systems and the tertiary system.

  5. Kinetics of phosphate adsorption on goethite: comparing batch adsorption and ATR-IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina; Brigante, Maximiliano; Antelo, Juan; Avena, Marcelo

    2006-08-15

    The adsorption kinetics of phosphate on goethite has been studied by batch adsorption experiments and by in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy at different pH, initial phosphate concentrations and stirring rates. Batch adsorption results are very similar to those reported by several authors, and show a rather fast initial adsorption taking place in a few minutes followed by a slower process taking place in days or weeks. The adsorption kinetics could be also monitored by integrating the phosphate signals obtained in ATR-IR experiments, and a very good agreement between both techniques was found. At pH 4.5 two surface complexes, the bidentate nonprotonated (FeO)(2)PO(2) and the bidentate protonated (FeO)(2)(OH)PO complexes, are formed at the surface. There are small changes in the relative concentrations of these species as the reaction proceeds, and they seem to evolve in time rather independently. At pH 7.5 and 9 the dominating surface species is (FeO)(2)PO(2), which is accompanied by an extra unidentified species at low concentration. They also seem to evolve independently as the reaction proceeds. The results are consistent with a mechanism that involve a fast adsorption followed by a slow diffusion into pores, and are not consistent with surface precipitation of iron phosphate. PMID:16643942

  6. ARSENIC TREATMENT BY ADSORPTIVE TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the removal of arsenic from drinking water using the adsorptive media treatment process. Fundamental information is provided on the design and operation of adsorptive media technology including the selection of the adsorptive media. The information cites...

  7. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  8. Communication: Probing the entrance channels of the X + CH{sub 4}{yields} HX + CH{sub 3} (X = F, Cl, Br, I) reactions via photodetachment of X{sup -}-CH{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Min; Feng Yuan; Du Yikui; Zhu Qihe; Zheng Weijun; Czako, Gabor; Bowman, Joel M.

    2011-05-21

    The entrance channel potentials of the prototypical polyatomic reaction family X + CH{sub 4}{yields} HX + CH{sub 3} (X = F, Cl, Br, I) are investigated using anion photoelectron spectroscopy and high-level ab initio electronic structure computations. The pre-reactive van der Waals (vdW) wells of these reactions are probed for X = Cl, Br, I by photodetachment spectra of the corresponding X{sup -}-CH{sub 4} anion complex. For F-CH{sub 4}, a spin-orbit splitting ({approx}1310 cm{sup -1}) much larger than that of the F atom (404 cm{sup -1}) was observed, in good agreement with theory. This showed that in the case of the F-CH{sub 4} system the vertical transition from the anion ground state to the neutral potentials accesses a region between the vdW valley and transition state of the early-barrier F + CH{sub 4} reaction. The doublet splittings observed in the other halogen complexes are close to the isolated atomic spin-orbit splittings, also in agreement with theory.

  9. Use of H2S to Probe the Active Sites in FeNC Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) in Acidic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Deepika; Mamtani, Kuldeep; Bruening, Christopher R.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Ozkan, Umit S.

    2014-10-01

    H2S has been used as a probe molecule both in an “in situ” poisoning experiment and in intermediate-temperature heat-treatment steps during and after the preparation of FeNC catalysts in an attempt to analyze its effect on their ORR activity. The heat treatments were employed either on the ball-milled precursor of FeNC or after the Ar-NH3 high temperature heat treatments. ORR activity of the H2S-treated catalysts was seen to be significantly lower than the sulfur-free catalysts, whether the sulfur exposure was during a half-cell testing, or as an intermediate-temperature exposure to H2S. The incorporation of sulfur species and interaction of Fe with sulfur were confirmed by characterization using XPS, EXAFS, TPO, and TPD. This study provides crucial evidence regarding differences in active sites in FeNC versus nitrogen-containing carbon nanostructured (CNx) catalysts.

  10. A Perspective on the Maillard Reaction and the Analysis of Protein Glycation by Mass Spectrometry: Probing the Pathogenesis of Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qibin; Ames, Jennifer M.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John W.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2009-01-01

    The Maillard reaction, starting from the glycation of protein and progressing to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), is implicated in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular, renal, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this perspective review, we provide an overview on the relevance of the Maillard reaction in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and discuss traditional approaches and recent developments in the analysis of glycated proteins by mass spectrometry. We propose that proteomics approaches, particularly bottom-up proteomics, will play a significant role in analyses of clinical samples leading to the identification of new markers of disease development and progression. PMID:19093874

  11. Adsorption of amino acids and glucose by sediments of Resurrection Bay, Alaska, USA: Functional group effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrichs, Susan M.; Sugai, Susan F.

    1993-02-01

    The adsorption of amino acids and glucose was investigated in sediments from Resurrection Bay, Alaska. Adsorption of the basic amino acid lysine was greater than adsorption of glutamic acid, alanine, leucine, or glucose. Formaldehyde and heat treatments were used to separate adsorption from biological uptake, but can alter adsorption significantly; formaldehyde treatment, followed by a seawater rinse, was the most satisfactory. Much of the rapid amino acid adsorption by these sediments was due to the formation of ionic bonds, since adsorbed amino acids could be extracted using concentrated solutions of amino acid, cesium chloride, sodium citrate, ammonium chloride, or sodium acetate. However, most amino acid adsorption was not reversible by ion exchange solutions, indicating that additional processes or chemical reactions occur which result in irreversible binding to sediment. Consistent with literature reports of the negative surface charge of marine particulate matter, lysine (with a net positive charge) was adsorbed to the greatest extent and had the largest cation-exchangeable adsorption. However, negatively charged amino acid functional groups also influenced adsorption. Chemical modification of sediments with reagents reactive with aldehydes decreased lysine adsorption. This suggests that reactive functional groups of sediment organic matter contribute to adsorption, consistent with a melanoidintype reaction. An estimate of the rate of amino acid adsorption indicates that adsorption could produce a significant amount of the total refractory sediment organic nitrogen.

  12. Evaluation of the adsorption capacity of alkali-treated waste materials for the adsorption of sulphamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Lisha

    2012-01-01

    The present work is to develop potential adsorbents from waste material and employ them for the removal of a hazardous antibacterial, sulphamethoxazole, from the wastewater by the Adsorption technique. The Adsorption technique was used to impound the dangerous antibiotics from wastewater using Deoiled Soya (DOS), an agricultural waste, and Water Hyacinth (WH), a prolific colonizer. The adsorption capacity of these adsorbents was further enhanced by treating them with sodium hydroxide solution and it was seen that the adsorption capacity increases by 10 to 25%. Hence a comparative account of the adsorption studies of all the four adsorbents, i.e. DOS, Alkali-treated DOS, WH and Alkali-treated Water Hyacinth has been discussed in this paper. Different isotherms like Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich were also deduced from the adsorption data. Isotherm studies were in turn used in estimating the thermodynamic parameters. DOS showed sorption capacity of 0.0007 mol g(-1) while Alkali-treated Deoiled Soya exhibited 0.0011 mol g(-1) of sorption capacity, which reveals that the adsorption is higher in case of alkali-treated adsorbent. The mean sorption energy (E) was obtained between 9 and 12 kJ mol, which shows that the reaction proceeds by ion exchange reaction. Kinetic study reveals that the reaction follows pseudo-second-order rate equation. Moreover, mass transfer studies performed for the ongoing processes show that the mass transfer coefficient obtained for alkali-treated moieties was higher than the parent moieties. The breakthrough curves plotted from the column studies show percentage saturation of 90-98%. About 87-97% of sulphamethoxazole was recovered from column by desorption. PMID:22508113

  13. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of arsenic onto ceria nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qinzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Yuhui; He, Xiao; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2012-01-01

    The rapid increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles [ENPs] has resulted in an increasing concern over the potential impacts of ENPs on the environmental and human health. ENPs tend to adsorb a large variety of toxic chemicals when they are emitted into the environment, which may enhance the toxicity of ENPs and/or adsorbed chemicals. The study was aimed to investigate the adsorption and desorption behaviors of arsenic on ceria NPs in aqueous solution using batch technique. Results show that the adsorption behavior of arsenic on ceria NPs was strongly dependent on pH and independent of ionic strength, indicating that the electrostatic effect on the adsorption of these elements was relatively not important compared to surface chemical reactions. The adsorption isotherms fitted very well to both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The thermodynamic parameters (Δ H 0 , Δ S 0 , and Δ G 0 ) for the adsorption of arsenic were determined at three different temperatures of 283, 303, and 323 K. The adsorption reaction was endothermic, and the process of adsorption was favored at high temperature. The desorption data showed that desorption hysteresis occurred at the initial concentration studied. High adsorption capacity of arsenic on ceria NPs suggests that the synergistic effects of ceria NPs and arsenic on the environmental systems may exist when they are released into the environment.

  14. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Erlanger, Bernard F.; Chen, Bi-Xing

    1999-01-01

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example, detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest, detecting a polypeptide such as those expressed by infectious agents, fungi or parasites.

  15. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    DOEpatents

    Erlanger, B.F.; Chen, B.

    1999-07-20

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example, detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest, detecting a polypeptide such as those expressed by infectious agents, fungi or parasites. 25 figs.

  16. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    DOEpatents

    Erlanger, Bernard F.; Chen, Bi-Xing

    1997-01-01

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest.

  17. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    DOEpatents

    Erlanger, B.F.; Chen, B.X.

    1997-07-22

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest. 8 figs.

  18. One-pot synthesis of tetrazole-1,2,5,6-tetrahydronicotinonitriles and cholinesterase inhibition: Probing the plausible reaction mechanism via computational studies.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Abdul; Zehra, Syeda Tazeen; Abbas, Saba; Nisa, Riffat Un; Mahmood, Tariq; Ayub, Khurshid; Al-Rashida, Mariya; Bajorath, Jürgen; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, one-pot synthesis of 1H-tetrazole linked 1,2,5,6-tetrahydronicotinonitriles under solvent-free conditions have been carried out in the presence of tetra-n-butyl ammonium fluoride trihydrated (TBAF) as catalyst and solvent. Computational studies have been conducted to elaborate two plausible mechanistic pathways of this one-pot reaction. Moreover, the synthesized compounds were screened for cholinesterases (acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase) inhibition which are consider to be major malefactors of Alzheimer's disease (AD) to find lead compounds for further research in AD therapy. PMID:26851737

  19. Chiroptical Probing of Lanthanide-Directed Self-Assembly Formation Using btp Ligands Formed in One-Pot Diazo-Transfer/Deprotection Click Reaction from Chiral Amines.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Joseph P; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Peacock, Robert D; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2016-01-11

    A series of enantiomeric 2,6-bis(1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)pyridines (btp)-containing ligands was synthesized by a one-pot two-step copper-catalyzed amine/alkyne click reaction. The Eu(III) - and Tb(III) -directed self-assembly formation of these ligands was studied in CH3 CN by monitoring their various photophysical properties, including their emerging circular dichroism and circularly polarized luminescence. The global analysis of the former enabled the determination of both the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the various chiral supramolecular species in solution. PMID:26555573

  20. A novel real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay with partially double-stranded linear DNA probe for sensitive detection of hepatitis C viral RNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianfu; Wan, Zhenzhou; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Lingyi; Zhou, Yanheng; Lan, Ke; Hu, Yihong; Zhang, Chiyu

    2016-10-01

    The detection and quantification of HCV RNA is very helpful for the management and treatment of HCV related diseases. Detection of low HCV viral load is a great challenge in HCV RNA detection. Here, we developed a novel real-time RT-PCR assay with partially double-stranded linear DNA probe which can detect all HCV genotypes and improve the detection performance. The novel assay has a wide linear dynamic range of HCV RNA quantification (1×10(2)-1×10(11)IU/ml) and a limit of detection of 78IU/ml. The assay exhibits an excellent reproducibility with 2.52% and 1.33% coefficients of variations, for inter- and intra-assays, respectively. To evaluate the viability of the assay, a comparison with a commercial HCV RNA detection kit was performed using 106 serum samples. The lineared correlation coefficient between the novel assay and the commercial HCV RNA detection kit was 0.940. Meanwhile, the deviation between the two methods was tolerable. Therefore, the novel real-time RT-PCR assay was applicable for laboratory diagnosis and monitoring of HCV infection. PMID:27451264

  1. Adsorption behavior of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) on boehmite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Chengshuai; Shih, Kaimin

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the interaction of perfluorochemicals, persistent pollutants with known human health effects, with mineral compounds in surface water and groundwater environments is essential to determining their fate and transport. Kinetic experiments showed that adsorption equilibrium can be achieved within 48 h and the boehmite (AlOOH) surface is receptive to perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorption. The adsorption isotherms estimated the maximum adsorption capacities of PFOS and PFOA on boehmite as 0.877 μg m(-2) and 0.633 μg m(-2), respectively. Compared to the adsorption capacity on γ-alumina, the abundant hydroxyl groups on boehmite surfaces resulted in the 2-3 times higher adsorption of PFOS and PFOA. Increasing solution pH led to a moderate decrease in PFOS and PFOA adsorption, owing to an increase in ligand exchange reactions and the decrease of electrostatic interactions. The presence of NaCl and CaCl(2) in solution demonstrated negative effects for PFOS and PFOA adsorption on boehmite surfaces, with potential mechanisms being electrical double layer compression, competitive adsorption of chloride, and the Ca(2+) bridging effect between perfluorochemicals. PMID:22897837

  2. Immobilised Histidine Tagged β2-Adrenoceptor Oriented by a Diazonium Salt Reaction and Its Application in Exploring Drug-Protein Interaction Using Ephedrine and Pseudoephedrine as Probes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Bian, Liujiao; Zhao, Xinfeng; Gao, Xiaokang; Zheng, Jianbin; Li, Zijian; Zhang, Youyi; Jiang, Ru; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2014-01-01

    A new oriented method using a diazonium salt reaction was developed for linking β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) on the surface of macroporous silica gel. Stationary phase containing the immobilised receptor was used to investigate the interaction between β2-AR and ephedrine plus pseudoephedrine by zonal elution. The isotherms of the two drugs best fit the Langmuir model. Only one type of binding site was found for ephedrine and pseudoephedrine targeting β2-AR. At 37 °C, the association constants during the binding were (5.94±0.05)×103/M for ephedrine and (3.80±0.02) ×103/M for pseudoephedrine, with the binding sites of (8.92±0.06) ×10−4 M. Thermodynamic studies showed that the binding of the two compounds to β2-AR was a spontaneous reaction with exothermal processes. The ΔGθ, ΔHθ and ΔSθ for the interaction between ephedrine and β2-AR were −(22.33±0.04) kJ/mol, −(6.51±0.69) kJ/mol and 50.94±0.31 J/mol·K, respectively. For the binding of pseudoephedrine to the receptor, these values were −(21.17±0.02) kJ/mol, −(7.48±0.56) kJ/mol and 44.13±0.01 J/mol·K. Electrostatic interaction proved to be the driving force during the binding of the two drugs to β2-AR. The proposed immobilised method will have great potential for attaching protein to solid substrates and realizing the interactions between proteins and drugs. PMID:24747442

  3. Kinetic studies of the sucrose adsorption onto an alumina interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kaman; Mohan, Sudhanshu

    2004-01-01

    An account is given of an experimental kinetic study of adsorption of analar reagent sucrose (ARS) onto an alumina interface spectrometrically ( λmax=570 nm) at pH 8.0 and at room temperature. The adsorption isotherm is a typical Langmuirian isotherm (S-type) and adsorption parameters have been deduced according to the Langmuir's model. The adsorption coefficient evaluated from the Langmuir's equation was found to be 2.52×10 2 l mol -1. Adsorption mechanism has been interpreted on the basis of metal-saccharide interaction as found in organometallic compounds and interaction due to negatively charged ends on the disaccharide molecules and positively charge groups on the surface on alumina which depends on the pH value. The effects of variation in experimental conditions of the adsorption system have also been investigated. The adsorption exhibited a typical response to the pH effect and on going towards the PZC the net charge decreases and any reaction making dependence on charge and maximum adsorption (amount) was found near the isoelectric point of alumina (pH 9.0). The presence of ions like Cl -, SO 42- and PO 43- affect the adsorbed amount quantitatively and it seems that these anions compete with sucrose for the positively charged surface sites. The addition of similar concentration of cations was found to reduce the adsorbed amount. The temperature was found to have an inverse effect on adsorption. The additions of catonic and anionic detergents influence both the adsorbed amount and the adsorption rate. The thermodynamics of the titled adsorption model indicates the spontaneous and exothermic nature. The negative value of entropy is an indication of probability of favorable and complex nature of the adsorption.

  4. Design Strategies for Bioorthogonal Smart Probes

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Peyton; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry has enabled the selective labeling and detection of biomolecules in living systems. Bioorthogonal smart probes, which become fluorescent or deliver imaging or therapeutic agents upon reaction, allow for the visualization of biomolecules or targeted delivery even in the presence of excess unreacted probe. This review discusses the strategies used in the development of bioorthogonal smart probes and highlights the potential of these probes to further our understanding of biology. PMID:25315039

  5. Kinetic models for the adsorption of lead ions by steel slag.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng-Yu; Gao, Jin; Qu, Bin; Yang, Yi-Jin; Xin, Xin

    2010-08-01

    Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the kinetics of adsorption of lead ions by steel slag on the basis of the external diffusion, intraparticle diffusion and adsorption reaction model (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order). The results showed that the controlling step for the adsorption kinetics changed with experimental parameters varied. When the particle size of steel slag was larger than 120 mesh, intraparticle diffusion of Pb(2+) was the controlling step; when the initial concentration of Pb(2+) was less than 150 mg L(-1) or the shaking rate was lower than 150 rpm, external diffusion of Pb(2+) was promoted. Contrary to the former experimental conditions, the adsorption reaction was the controlling step, and the adsorption followed second-order kinetics, with an adsorption rate constant of 13.26 g mg(-1) min(- 1). The adsorption isotherm of Pb(2+) with steel slag followed the Langmuir model, with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. PMID:19808736

  6. Mechanism of the bisphosphatase reaction of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase probed by (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Okar, D A; Live, D H; Devany, M H; Lange, A J

    2000-08-15

    The histidines in the bisphosphatase domain of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase were labeled with (15)N, both specifically at N1' and globally, for use in heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR spectroscopic analyses. The histidine-associated (15)N resonances were assigned by correlation to the C2' protons which had been assigned previously [Okar et al., Biochemistry 38, 1999, 4471-79]. Acquisition of the (1)H-(15)N HSQC from a phosphate-free sample demonstrated that the existence of His-258 in the rare N1' tautomeric state is dependent upon occupation of the phosphate binding site filled by the O2 phosphate of the substrate, fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, and subsequently, the phosphohistidine intermediate. The phosphohistidine intermediate is characterized by two hydrogen bonds involving the catalytic histidines, His-258 and His-392, which are directly observed at the N1' positions of the imidazole rings. The N1' of phospho-His-258 is protonated ((1)H chemical shift, 14.0 ppm) and hydrogen bonded to the backbone carbonyl of Gly-259. The N1' of cationic His-392 is hydrogen bonded ((1)H chemical shift, 13.5 ppm) to the phosphoryl moiety of the phosphohistidine. The existence of a protonated phospho-His-258 intermediate and the observation of a fairly strong hydrogen bond to the same phosphohistidine implies that hydrolysis of the covalent intermediate proceeds without any requirement for an "activated" water. Using the labeled histidines as probes of the catalytic site mutation of Glu-327 to alanine revealed that, in addition to its function as the proton donor to fructose-6-phosphate during formation of the transient phosphohistidine intermediate at the N3' of His-258, this residue has a significant role in maintaining the structural integrity of the catalytic site. The (1)H-(15)N HSQC data also provide clear evidence that despite being a surface residue, His-446 has a very acidic pK(a), much less than 6.0. On the basis of

  7. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  8. Adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene on carboxylated porous polystyrene microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhengfang; Meng, Qingqiang; Lu, Shengtao

    2012-02-01

    Large-pore-size (150 nm) polystyrene (PSt) microspheres were carboxylated with phthalic anhydride (PA) through Friedel-Crafts acetylation to study the adsorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on this material from aqueous solution. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and mercury porosimetry measurements (MPM) of the microspheres showed that the pore structure was unchanged during the reaction. High adsorption capacity (11.2 mg g-1 of suction-dried adsorbent) and adsorption rate (33.9 mg g-1 h-1) for TNT were observed during the study. As shown by the adsorption isotherm, the adsorption of TNT on PA-PSt can be described by the Freundlich adsorption equation, indicating heterogeneous adsorption process. On-column adsorption of TNT on PA-PSt and elution indicated that TNT can be completely removed from aqueous solution and condensed into acetone.

  9. Probing the Repulsive Core of the Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction via the 4He(e,e`pN) Triple-Coincidence Reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Korover, Igor; Muangma, Navaphon; Hen, Or; Shneor, Ran; Sulkosky, Vincent; Kelleher, Aidan; Gilad, Shalev; Higinbotham, Douglas; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Wood, Stephen; et al

    2014-07-01

    We studied simultaneously the 4He(e,e'p), 4He(e,e'pp), and 4He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q2=2 [GeV/c]2 and xB >1, for a (e,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A=2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum in a region where the nucleon-nucleon force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. Neutron-proton pairs dominate the high-momentum tail ofmore » the nucleon momentum distributions, but their abundance is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ~500 MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum in the range we studied. Our data are compared with ab-initio calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in 4He.« less

  10. Probing the Repulsive Core of the Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction via the 4He(e,e`pN) Triple-Coincidence Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Korover, Igor; Muangma, Navaphon; Hen, Or; Shneor, Ran; Sulkosky, Vincent; Kelleher, Aidan; Gilad, Shalev; Higinbotham, Douglas; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Wood, Stephen; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Aguilera, Paula; Ahmed, Zafar; Albataineh, Hisham; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Bryon; Anez, David; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Armstrong, Whitney; Arrington, John; Averett, Todd; Badman, Toby; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Bai, Xinzhan; Beck, Arie; Beck, Sharon; Bellini, Vincenzo; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bittner, James; Boeglin, Werner; Camsonne, Alexandre; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian -Ping; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Cisbani, Evaristo; Dalton, Mark; Daniel, Aji; Day, Donal; De, Cornelis; de Jager, C. W.; De, Raffaele; Leo, R. De; Deconinck, Wouter; Defurne, Maxime; Flay, David; Fomin, Nadia; Friend, Megan; Frullani, Salvatore; Fuchey, Eric; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Gu, Chao; Gueye, Paul; Hamilton, David; Hanretty, Charles; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Shabestari, Mitra Hashemi; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Min; Iqbal, Sophia; Jin, Ge; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kang, Hoyoung; Khandaker, Mahbubul; LeRose, John; Leckey, John; Lindgren, Richard; Long, Elena; Mammei, Juliette; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Meekins, David; Meziani, Zein -Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Mihovilovic, Miha; Monaghan, Peter; Munoz, Carlos; Camacho, C. Munoz; Norum, Blaine; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Pan, Kai; Phillips, Sarah; Pomerantz, Ishay; Posik, Matthew; Punjabi, Vina; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Qiu, Xiyu; Reimer, Paul; Riordan, Seamus; Ron, Guy; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Saha, Arunava; Schulte, Elaine; Selvy, Lawrence; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Sjoegren, Johan; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Sparveris, Nikolaos; Subedi, Ramesh; Tireman, William; Wang, Diancheng; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, Wenbiao; Yaron, Israel; Ye, Zhihong; Zhan, X.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Pengjia; Zielinski, Ryan; Watson, John

    2014-07-01

    We studied simultaneously the 4He(e,e'p), 4He(e,e'pp), and 4He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q2=2 [GeV/c]2 and xB >1, for a (e,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A=2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum in a region where the nucleon-nucleon force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. Neutron-proton pairs dominate the high-momentum tail of the nucleon momentum distributions, but their abundance is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ~500 MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum in the range we studied. Our data are compared with ab-initio calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in 4He.

  11. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric investigations of [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds--Probing intermediates formed in the course of the nonenzymatic browning reaction of l-ascorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Anke; Trage, Claudia; Schwarz, Helmut; Kroh, Lothar W.

    2007-05-01

    A new method is presented which allows the simultaneous detection of various [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds generated in the course of the nonenzymatic browning reaction initiated by thermal treatment of l-ascorbic acid, namely: glyoxal, methylglyoxal, diacetyl, 3-deoxy-l-pentosone, and l-threosoneE 3-Deoxy-l-threosone was successfully identified as a new C4-[alpha]-dicarbonyl structure for the first time in the degradation of Vitamin C by application of this non-chromatographic mass spectrometric approach. Moreover, a more detailed elucidation of the mechanistic scenario with respect to the oxidative and nonoxidative pathways is presented by using dehydro-l-ascorbic acid and 2,3-diketo-l-gulonic acid instead of l-ascorbic acid as a starting material. Furthermore, the postulated pathways are corroborated with the aid of 13C-isotopic labeling studies. The investigations were extended to baby food, and the successful detection of [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds characteristic for Vitamin C degradation proved the matrix tolerance of the introduced method.

  12. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  13. Adsorption and regenerative oxidation of trichlorophenol with synthetic zeolite: Ozone dosage and its influence on adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Prigent, Bastien; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2016-07-01

    Regeneration of loaded adsorbents is a key step for the sustainability of an adsorption process. In this study, ozone was applied to regenerate a synthetic zeolite for the adsorption of trichlorophenol (TCP) as an organic model pollutant. Three initial concentrations of TCP in water phase were used in adsorption tests. After the equilibrium, zeolite loaded different amounts of TCP was dried and then regenerated with ozone gas. It was found that the adsorption capacity of zeolite was increased through three regeneration cycles. However, the adsorption kinetics was compromised after the regeneration with slightly declined 2nd order reaction constants. The ozone demand for the regeneration was highly dependent on the TCP mass loaded onto the zeolite. It was estimated that the mass ratio of ozone to TCP was 1.2 ± 0.3 g O3/g TCP. PMID:27043379

  14. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2011-07-27

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  15. Neptunium(V) adsorption to calcite.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Frank; Brendebach, Boris; Bosbach, Dirk

    2008-12-12

    The migration behavior of the actinyl ions U(VI)O2(2+), Np(V)O2+ and Pu(V,VI)O2(+,2+) in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption reactions (inner- or outer-sphere adsorption, ion-exchange, coprecipitation/structural incorporation) with minerals. Here NpO2+ adsorption onto calcite is studied in batch type experiments over a wide range of pH (6.0-9.4) and concentration (0.4 microM-40 microM) conditions. pH is adjusted by variation of CO2 partial pressure. Adsorption is found to be pH dependent with maximal adsorption at pH 8.3 decreasing with increasing and decreasing pH. pH dependence of adsorption decreases with increasing Np(V) concentration. EXAFS data of neptunyl adsorbed to calcite and neptunyl in the supernatant shows differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance, 1.85+/-0.01 angstroms for the adsorbed and 1.82+/-0.01 angstroms for the solution species. The equatorial environment of the neptunyl in solution shows about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.45+/-0.02 angstroms. For adsorbed neptunyl there are also about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.46+/-0.01 angstroms. An additional feature in the adsorbed species' R-space spectrum can be related to carbonate neighbours, 3 to 6 carbon backscatterers (C-eq) at 3.05+/-0.03 angstroms and 3 to 6 oxygen backscatterers (O-eq2) at 3.31+/-0.02 angstroms. The differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance and the C-eq and O-eq2 backscatterers which are only present for the adsorbed species indicate inner-sphere bonding of the adsorbed neptunyl species to the calcite surface. Experiments on adsorption kinetics indicate that after a fast surface adsorption process a continuous slow uptake occurs which may be explained by incorporation via surface dissolution and reprecipitation processes. This is also indicated by the part irreversibility of the adsorption as shown by increased KD values after desorption compared to adsorption. PMID:18973965

  16. Adsorption of aniline and toluidines on montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Essington, M.E. )

    1994-09-01

    Bentonite clay liners are commonly employed to mitigate the movement of contaminants from waste disposal sites. In order to assess the ability of clay liner material to restrict the mobility of amine compounds under a variety of chemical conditions and to further elucidate amine adsorption characteristics, the adsorption of aniline and o-, m-, and p-toluidine on Ca[sup 2+]- and K[sup +]-saturated Wyoming bentonite (SWy-1) was investigated. Adsorption experiments were performed under conditions of varied pH and ionic environment. Amine adsorption on montmorillonite is pH dependent. Maximum amine adsorption occurs when solution pH is approximately equal to the pK[sub a] of the anilinium ion deprotonation reaction (pH 4.45-5.08). An amine adsorption envelope results from the combined influence of increasing anilinium ion and anilinium-aniline complex formation (as pH decreases to the pK[sub a]) and amine competition with H[sup +] for surface sites, decreasing anilinium-aniline complex concentration, and decreasing aniline available for water bridging with exchangeable Ca[sup 2+] and K[sup +] (as solution pH decreases below the pK[sub a]). For any given amine, maximum adsorption increases with decreasing ionic strength. Maximum amine adsorption is greater in the Ca[sup 2+] systems than in the K[sup +] systems at equivalent cation charge and reflects the formation of an amine water bridge with the exchangeable Ca[sup 2+]. Amine adsorption is also greater in chloride systems compared with sulfate systems at comparable cation concentrations, possibly due to the formation of aqueous anilinium-sulfate complexes. The amine compounds are retained mainly by bentonite through a cation exchange process, the capacity of the clay to adsorb the amine compounds being a significant percentage of the exchange capacity at the pK[sub a]. However, amine retention decreases with increasing pH and is minimal at solution pH values greater than 7. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1995-03-21

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devices, in probe array devices. 10 figures.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1995-01-01

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devises, in probe array devices.

  19. Adsorption of mercury on laterite from Guizhou Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Lijun; Guo, Baiwei; He, Shouyang

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of Hg(II) on laterite from Guizhou Province, China, were studied and the adsorption mechanism was discussed. The results showed that different mineral compositons in the laterite will cause differences in the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). Illite and non-crystalloids are the main contributors to enhancing the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). The pH of the solution is an important factor affecting the adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite. The alkalescent environment (pH 7-9) is favorable to the adsorption of Hg(II). The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) increases with increasing pH. When the pH reaches a certain value, the amount of the adsorbed Hg(II) will reach the maximum level. The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) decreases with increasing pH. The optimal pHs of laterite and kaolinite are 9 and 8, respectively. The optimal initial concentrations of Hg(II) on laterite and kaolinite are 250 and 200 microg/ml, respectively. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Langmuir model. The adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite is a quick process while that of Hg(II) on kaolinite is a slow reaction. Laterite from Guizhou Province is a promising environmental material which can be used in the removal of Hg(II) from wastewater. PMID:19202872

  20. Molecular Imaging Probe Development using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Phung, Duy Linh; Girgis, Mark D.; Wu, Anna M.; Tomlinson, James S.; Shen, Clifton K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the latest advancement of microfluidics in molecular imaging probe development. Due to increasing needs for medical imaging, high demand for many types of molecular imaging probes will have to be met by exploiting novel chemistry/radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of suitable probes. The microfluidic-based probe synthesis is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional systems. Numerous chemical reactions have been successfully performed in micro-reactors and the results convincingly demonstrate with great benefits to aid synthetic procedures, such as purer products, higher yields, shorter reaction times compared to the corresponding batch/macroscale reactions, and more benign reaction conditions. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples of molecular imaging probe syntheses using microfluidics, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and their potential limitations are discussed here. PMID:22977436

  1. Thiol Reactive Probes and Chemosensors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanjing; Chen, Weixuan; Cheng, Yunfeng; Hakuna, Lovemore; Strongin, Robert; Wang, Binghe

    2012-01-01

    Thiols are important molecules in the environment and in biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), glutathione (GSH) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) play critical roles in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. The selective detection of thiols using reaction-based probes and sensors is very important in basic research and in disease diagnosis. This review focuses on the design of fluorescent and colorimetric probes and sensors for thiol detection. Thiol detection methods include probes and labeling agents based on nucleophilic addition and substitution, Michael addition, disulfide bond or Se-N bond cleavage, metal-sulfur interactions and more. Probes for H2S are based on nucleophilic cyclization, reduction and metal sulfide formation. Thiol probe and chemosensor design strategies and mechanism of action are discussed in this review. PMID:23202239

  2. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Recent Progress in Fluorescent Imaging Probes.

    PubMed

    Pak, Yen Leng; Swamy, K M K; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and low detection limit, especially the bioimaging ability for cells, fluorescence probes serve as unique detection methods. With the aid of molecular recognition and specific organic reactions, research on fluorescent imaging probes has blossomed during the last decade. Especially, reaction based fluorescent probes have been proven to be highly selective for specific analytes. This review highlights our recent progress on fluorescent imaging probes for biologically important species, such as biothiols, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, metal ions including Zn(2+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+) and Au(3+), and anions including cyanide and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:26402684

  4. Recent Progress in Fluorescent Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Yen Leng; Swamy, K. M. K.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and low detection limit, especially the bioimaging ability for cells, fluorescence probes serve as unique detection methods. With the aid of molecular recognition and specific organic reactions, research on fluorescent imaging probes has blossomed during the last decade. Especially, reaction based fluorescent probes have been proven to be highly selective for specific analytes. This review highlights our recent progress on fluorescent imaging probes for biologically important species, such as biothiols, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, metal ions including Zn2+, Hg2+, Cu2+ and Au3+, and anions including cyanide and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:26402684

  5. [Adsorption-desorption Characteristics of Fermented Rice Husk for Ferrous and Sulfur Ions].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-mei; Liao, Min; Hua, Jia-yuan; Chen, Na; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Pei-zhi; Xie Kai-zhi; XU, Chang-xu; Liu, Guang-rong

    2015-10-01

    To understand the potential of rice husk to fix Fe2+ and S2- ions, the sorption of Fe2+ and S2- by fermented rice husk was studied by using batch incubation experiments in the present study. The effects of adsorption time, Fe2+ and S2- concentration, pH, the temperature and ionic strength in adsorption reaction solution on the sorption were investigated. Therefore, the stability of Fe2+ and S2- adsorbed by fermented rice husk was further validated by desorption experiments performed under similar conditions as adsorption. The results showed that, the adsorption kinetics of Fe2+ (r = 0.912 1) and S2- (r = 0.901 1) by fermented rice husk fits the Elovich kinetics equation, and Freundlich isotherm model could simulate the isotherm adsorption processes of Fe2+ (R2 = 0.965 1) and S2- (R2 = 0.936 6) on fermented rice husk was better than other models. The adsorption processes on fermented rice husk were non- preferential adsorption for Fe2+ and S2, while the adsorption process of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was spontaneous reaction and the adsorption process of S2- was non-spontaneous reaction. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk were endothermic process since high temperature could benefit to the adsorption. The adsorption mechanism of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by coordination adsorption, the adsorption mechanism of S2- on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by ligand exchange adsorption. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk showed greater pH adaptability which ranged from 1.50 to 11.50. With the increasing of ionic strength, the amount of adsorbed Fe2+ on fermented rice husk wasincreased in some extent, the amount of adsorbed S2- on fermented rice husk was slightly decreased, which further proved the adsorption of Fe2+ was major in inner sphere complexation and the adsorption of S2- was major in outer complexation. The desorption rates of Fe2+ and S2- which was adsorbed by fermented

  6. Tailoring oxide properties: An impact on adsorption characteristics of molecules and metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkala, Karoliina

    2014-12-01

    Both density functional theory calculations and numerous experimental studies demonstrate a variety of unique features in metal supported oxide films and transition metal doped simple oxides, which are markedly different from their unmodified counterparts. This review highlights, from the computational perspective, recent literature on the properties of the above mentioned surfaces and how they adsorb and activate different species, support metal aggregates, and even catalyse reactions. The adsorption of Au atoms and clusters on metal-supported MgO films are reviewed together with the cluster's theoretically predicted ability to activate and dissociate O2 at the Au-MgO(100)/Ag(100) interface, as well as the impact of an interface vacancy to the binding of an Au atom. In contrast to a bulk MgO surface, an Au atom binds strongly on a metal-supported ultra-thin MgO film and becomes negatively charged. Similarly, Au clusters bind strongly on a supported MgO(100) film and are negatively charged favouring 2D planar structures. The adsorption of other metal atoms is briefly considered and compared to that of Au. Existing computational literature of adsorption and reactivity of simple molecules including O2, CO, NO2, and H2O on mainly metal-supported MgO(100) films is discussed. Chemical reactions such as CO oxidation and O2 dissociation are discussed on the bare thin MgO film and on selected Au clusters supported on MgO(100)/metal surfaces. The Au atoms at the perimeter of the cluster are responsible for catalytic activity and calculations predict that they facilitate dissociative adsorption of oxygen even at ambient conditions. The interaction of H2O with a flat and stepped Ag-supported MgO film is summarized and compared to bulk MgO. The computational results highlight spontaneous dissociation on MgO steps. Furthermore, the impact of water coverage on adsorption and dissociation is addressed. The modifications, such as oxygen vacancies and dopants, at the oxide

  7. Modeling the Adsorption of Oxalate onto Montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M Elena; Emiroglu, Caglayan; García, David; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Huertas, F Javier

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a multiscale modeling of the interaction of oxalate with clay mineral surfaces from macroscale thermodynamic equilibria simulations to atomistic calculations is presented. Previous results from macroscopic adsorption data of oxalate on montmorillonite in 0.01 M KNO3 media at 25 °C within the pH range from 2.5 to 9 have been used to develop a surface complexation model. The experimental adsorption edge data were fitted using the triple-layer model (TLM) with the aid of the FITEQL 4.0 computer program. Surface complexation of oxalate is described by two reactions: >AlOH + Ox(2-) + 2H(+) = >AlOxH + H2O (log K = 14.39) and >AlOH + Ox(2-) + H(+) = >AlOx(-) + H2O (log K = 10.39). The monodentate complex >AlOxH dominated adsorption below pH 4, and the bidentate complex >AlOx(-) was predominant at higher pH values. Both of the proposed inner-sphere oxalate species are qualitatively consistent with previously published diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopic results for oxalate on montmorillonite edge surface (Chem. Geol. 2014, 363, 283-292). Atomistic computational studies have been performed to understand the interactions at the molecular level between adsorbates and mineral surface, showing the atomic structures and IR frequency shifts of the adsorption complexes of oxalate with the edge surface of a periodic montmorillonite model. PMID:26444928

  8. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  9. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  10. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of phenol onto graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Liu, Tonghao; Sun, Jiankun; Jiao, Yuqin; Xia, Yanzhi; Xia, Linhua; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of temperature on phenol adsorbed by graphene shows that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of phenol increases with the increase in temperature from 285 to 333 K. Increasing adsorption capacities with temperature indicates that the adsorption of phenol is controlled by an endothermic reaction. Highlights: ► The graphene has high phenol adsorption capacity. ► The graphene has a high specific surface area of 305 m{sup 2}/g. ► The adsorption capacity is high at acidic pH range. ► The graphene has rapid phenol adsorption rate. ► Phenol adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. -- Abstract: Graphene, a new member of carbon family, has been prepared, characterized and used as adsorbent to remove phenol from aqueous solution. The effect parameters including pH, dosage, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption properties of phenol onto graphene were investigated. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity can reach 28.26 mg/g at the conditions of initial phenol concentration of 50 mg/L, pH 6.3 and 285 K. Adsorption data were well described by both Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene fit the pseudo second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene was endothermic and spontaneous.

  11. Enhanced adsorptive removal of toxic dyes using SiO2 nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batool, S. S.; Imran, Z.; Hassan, Safia; Rasool, Kamran; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Rafiq, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    Electrospinning method was used to synthesize porous SiO2 nanofibers. The adsorption of Methyl Orange and Safranin O by porous SiO2 nanofibers was carried out by varying the parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, dye concentration, and temperature. Equilibrium adsorption data followed Langmuir isotherms. Kinetic adsorption followed second-order rate kinetics model. The maximum adsorption capacity for Methyl Orange and Safranin O was found to be 730.9 mg/g and 960.4 mg/g, respectively. Acidic pH was favorable for the adsorption of Methyl Orange while basic pH was favorable for the adsorptions of Safranin O. Modeling study suggested the major mode of adsorption, while thermodynamic study showed the endothermic reactions. This effort has pronounced impact on environmental applications of SiO2 nanofibers as auspicious adsorbent nanofibers for organic material from aqueous solution.

  12. Adsorption and Separation Modeling of Porous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanoski, Anthony; van Swol, Frank

    2001-03-01

    With the advent of self-assembly techniques has come the potential to tailor materials for adsorption and separation applications. For example, using surfactants as templating agents it is now feasible to finely control both the three-dimensional (3D) porosity as well as the surface chemistry. With an eye on assisting the emerging materials design we have embarked on a program that focuses on modeling adsorption/desorption, reactions and permeation phenomena in such structures. What makes the modeling particularly challenging is the coupling of length scales. The role of the atomic length scale features such as surface reactions and surface structure must be captured as well as the role of the network connectivity and other larger length scales. The latter include the pore shape and length, and the presence of external surfaces. This paper reports on how we employ refineable lattice models to tackle the modeling problems. We use both equilibrium and non-equilibrium Monte Carlo (MC) and 3D density functional theory (DFT) techniques to study the equilibrium and transport behavior in nanostructured porous materials. We will present 1) results of both adsorption/desorption hysteresis in large regular and random networks and 2) the results of using reactive sites in separation membranes, and compare these with experiments.

  13. NO adsorption and dissociation on palladium clusters: The importance of charged state and metal doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Zhang, Li Mei; Kong, Chun Cai; Yang, Zhi Mao; Chen, Yong Mei

    2016-08-01

    The NO adsorption and dissociation on neutral, charged and Ni-doped Pd13 clusters were studied by using density functional calculations. Our results revealed that NO always prefers to adsorb on the hollow site rather than the top or bridge sites. However, the charge state and Ni doping remarkably influence NO adsorption energy, dissociation barrier and reaction energy. The reaction on Pd13- has the lowest energy barrier and largest reaction energy. The Hirshfeld charge analysis discloses that the origin of the catalytic activity difference is the charge transfer from clusters to NO in the metastable NO adsorption state.

  14. Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

    2012-03-29

    Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

  15. [Water binding of adsorptive immobilized lipases].

    PubMed

    Loose, S; Meusel, D; Muschter, A; Ruthe, B

    1990-01-01

    It is supposed that not only the total water content of lipase preparations but more their state of water binding is of technological importance in enzymatic interesterification reactions in systems nearly free from water. The isotherms at 65 degrees C of two microbial lipases immobilized on various adsorbents as well as different adsorbents themselves are shown. The water binding capacity in the range of water content of technological interest decreases from the anion exchange resin Amberlyst A 21 via nonpolar adsorbent Amberlite XAD-2 to kieselguhr Celite 545. It is demonstrated that water binding by lipases is depending on temperature but is also affected by adsorptive immobilization. Adsorptive immobilized lipases show hysteresis, which is very important for preparing a definite water content of the enzyme preparations. PMID:2325750

  16. Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L.

    2009-12-15

    High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

  17. Adsorption of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by an Andosol.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Furubayashi, Akihiro; Uchida, Natsuyo; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2007-01-01

    To identify the important soil components involved in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) adsorption on Andosols, 2,4-D adsorption on a surface horizon of an Andosol was compared with that on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-treated (soil organic matter [SOM] was removed), acid-oxalate (OX)-treated (active metal hydroxides and SOM were removed), and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)-treated (free and active metal [hydr]oxides and SOM were removed) soil samples at equilibrium pHs ranging from 4 to 8. Although the untreated soil contained a large amount of organic C (71.9 g kg-1), removal of SOM had little effect on 2,4-D adsorption. Active surface hydroxyls, which were attached to the active and free metal (hydr)oxides and metal SOM complexes, were identified as the most important soil functional group for 2,4-D adsorption. The dominant mechanism of the 2,4-D adsorption was a ligand exchange reaction in which the carboxylic group of 2,4-D displaced the active surface hydroxyl associated with metals and formed a strong coordination bond between the 2,4-D molecule and soil solid phase. The ligand exchange reaction reasonably accounted for the selective adsorption of 2,4-D over Cl-, competitive adsorption of phosphate over 2,4-D, reduction in plant-growth-inhibitory activity of soil-adsorbed 2,4-D, and the high 2,4-D adsorption ability of Andosols. Although a humic acid purified from the soil did not adsorb 2,4-D, the presence of the humic acid increased 2,4-D adsorption on Al and Fe, probably by inhibiting the hydrolysis and polymerization of Al and Fe resulting in the preservation of available adsorption sites on these metals. The adsorption behavior of 2,4-D on soils could be a good index for predicting the adsorption behavior of other organic acids in soils. PMID:17215217

  18. Adsorption of Cadmium, Nickel and Zinc in a Brazilian Oxisoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, José Carlos; Martins, Susian Christian; Soares, Marcio Roberto

    2010-05-01

    The adsorption reactions mechanisms provide the understanding of the pollutant fate metals and often control the bioavailability and transport of heavy metals ions in soil, indicating the preventive environmental control. The cadmium, nickel and zinc behavior in the soils are explained by the reactions of adsorption, influenced by pH and ionic strength. The objective of this work was to study the influence of those factors on cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption in an oxisol. It was studied the Cd, Ni and Zn adsorption in soil samples of the State of São Paulo (Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox), collected in surface and in depth and submitted to solutions of Ca(NO3)2 1,0; 0,1 and 0,01 mol L-1. The pH of the samples from 3,0 to 10,0 was varied adding NaOH or HCl 4 mol L-1 not surpassing 2% of the electrolyte volume. The soil samples received 5,0 mg dm-3 of cadmium, nickel and zinc, ratio 1:10 (2,0 g of soil: 20 solution ml) and were shacked for 24 hours. The cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption increased with pH, reaching it picks at pH 7,0 for cadmium and approximately at pH 6,0 for nickel and zinc. This indicates that zinc and nickel have higher affinity than cadmium with the soil colloids, because it reached the maximum adsorption in a small pH value. In other words, the amount of negative charges necessary to promote the maximum adsorption was small for zinc. The influence of ionic strengths was small for cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption, being similar from pH 3,0 to 10,0, in surface soil layer and in depth, demonstrating that competition with Ca2+ for the retention colloid sites of the soils didn't interfere in the adsorption. In that way, it is supposed that cadmium, nickel and zinc binding energy is high in a soil rich in Fe and Al oxides. Adsorption of cadmium, nickel and zinc was similar for the ionic strengths, not depending on PZSE. The cadmium, nickel and zinc adsorption increased with pH elevation, with small ionic strength influence. Nickel and zinc have

  19. Protein adsorption onto medical alloys: Voltage effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettens, Robert T. T.

    This work examined the adsorption of an important-plasma protein, fibrinogen (Fb), onto a clinically-relevant-biomedical alloy, 316L stainless steel (SS) and electrically polarized 316L SS. Then, several key-interfacial properties important to protein adsorption were examined. The overriding role of electrochemical (EC) charge-transfer processes in the behavior of both the adsorption of Fb and interfacial properties was apparent. Adsorption of Fb onto polarized 316L SS was observed and quantified using both in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Significant differences in Fb adsorption were observed across potential. Ex situ studies showed significantly lower area coverage and height of adsorbed Fb at cathodic potentials. In situ studies showed significantly slower kinetics below -100 mV. Current density data showed large charge-transfer processes (˜1x10 -5 to 1x10-4 A/cm2) taking place at voltages below -100 mV. A parallel-plate electrocapillary method was used to measure changes in metal-electrolyte surface energy (Deltagammasl) with potential. The results showed increasingly negative Deltagamma sl values on 316L SS at more cathodic voltages (i.e., more hydrophilic) and little to no change above -100 mV. These data correlate linearly with current density. Force measurements using a colloidal-AFM probe measured interfacial forces. Increasingly repulsive forces scaled with increasingly cathodic potentials; little interaction was detected at anodic potentials. These data correlated linearly with current density. The EC impedance was also studied. Electrochemical AFM (ECAFM) simultaneously gave impedance and structural changes with potential. Several regions of oxide topography/impedance characteristic were apparent which matched closely with the impedance behavior of the system. Through Mott-Schottky analysis the presence of the flatband potential was determined to be around -150 mV. Property observations of polarized 316L SS, specifically

  20. Soft X-ray spectroscopy studies of adsorption and reaction of CO in the presence of H2 over 6 nm MnO nanoparticles supported on mesoporous Co3O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Walter T.; Musselwhite, Nathan; Kennedy, Griffin; An, Kwangjin; Horowitz, Yonatan; Cordones, Amy A.; Rude, Bruce; Ahmed, Musahid; Melaet, Gerome; Alayoglu, Selim

    2016-06-01

    MnO nanoparticles (6 nm) were supported on mesoporous spinel Co3O4 and studied using ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) during hydrogenation of CO. The nature and evolution of surface adsorbed species as well as the oxidation states of the metal oxide surfaces were evaluated under oxidizing, reducing, and H2 + CO (2:1) reaction atmospheres. From APXPS, MnO nanoparticle surfaces were found to be progressively reduced in H2 atmospheres with increasing temperature. Surface adsorbed CO was found to be formed at the expense of lattice O under H2 + CO reaction conditions. In situ XAS indicated that the dominant oxide species were Co(OH)2, Co (II) oxides, MnO, and Mn3O4 under reaction conditions. In situ XAS also indicated the formation of gas phase CO2, the disappearance of lattice O, and the further reduction of Mn3O4 to MnO upon prolonged reaction in H2 + CO. Mass spectroscopy measurements showed the formation of CO2 and hydrocarbons. The spent catalyst was investigated using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and (scanning) transmission electron microscopy; the catalyst grains were found to be homogeneous.

  1. Extracorporeal adsorption of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Staubach, K H; Rosenfeldt, J A; Veit, O; Bruch, H P

    1997-02-01

    In a porcine endotoxin shock model using a continuous intravenous endotoxin infusion of 250 ng/kg body weight per hour, the cardiorespiratory and hematologic parameters were studied while applying a new on-line polymyxin B immobilized adsorption system. This preliminary report shows that the new adsorbent can remove endotoxin selectively from the circulation and confers a good amount of protection from endotoxin-induced cardiopulmonary decompensation as well as hematologic alterations. Survival time could be extended from 216 min to 313 min. Whereas cardiac output and mean arterial pressure declined critically after 3 h in the controls, the treated group remained stable for another 3 h. These data show that endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B coupled covalently to acrylic spheres as an adjunctive on-line measure in the septic syndrome seems feasible. PMID:10225785

  2. Adsorption edge study about cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc adsorption by variable charge soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, J. C.; Mouta, E. R.; Soares, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    The improper discharge of industrial and urban residues and the inadvertent use of fertilizers and pesticides can result in soil and water pollution and improve the potential of trace metals to enter in the human food chain. Adsorption reactions occur at the solid/liquid interface and are the most important mechanisms for controlling the activity of metal ions in soil solution. In a complex system with amphoteric behavior, the comprehension of the mobility, availability and fate of pollutants in the soil system is crucial for the prediction of the environmental consequences and for development of prevention/remediation strategies. A comparative study of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) adsorption by highly weathered soils was carried out. Surface (0-0.2m) and subsoil (B horizon) samples were taken from a Rhodic Kandiudalf (RH), an Anionic "Xanthic" Acrudox (XA) and an Anionic "Rhodic" Acrudox (RA), located in brazilian humid tropical area. As the pH and the ionic strength are important environmental factors influencing the solution chemistry of heavy metals in variable charge systems, adsorption envelopes, in a batch adsorption experiment, were elaborated by reacting, for 24 h, soil samples with individual 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mol L-1 Ca(NO3)2 aqueous solutions containing nitrate salts of the adsorptive heavy metal (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) at the initial concentration of 5 mg L-1, with an increasing pH value from 3.0 to 8.0. pH50-100%, the difference between the pH of 100 and 50 percent metal adsorption was determined. A sharp increase of adsorption density (adsorption edge) was observed within a very narrow pH range, usually less than two pH units. Commonly, the relative affinity of a soil for a metal cation increases with the tendency of the cation to form inner-sphere surface complexes. This may be caused by differences in extent of hydrolysis of Cu ions and in affinity of adsorption sites for Cu. In general, subsurface samples showed low pH50

  3. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  4. Accuracy of marker analysis, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification to determine SMN2 copy number in patients with spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Alías, Laura; Bernal, Sara; Barceló, Maria J; Also-Rallo, Eva; Martínez-Hernández, Rebeca; Rodríguez-Alvarez, Francisco J; Hernández-Chico, Concepción; Baiget, Montserrat; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2011-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by absence of or mutations in the survival motor neuron1 gene (SMN1). All SMA patients have a highly homologous copy of SMN1, the SMN2 gene. Severe (type I) SMA patients present one or two SMN2 copies, whereas milder chronic forms (type II-III) usually have three or four SMN2 copies. SMN2 dosage is important to stratify patients for motor function tests and clinical trials. Our aim was to compare three methods, marker analysis, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction using the LightCycler instrument, and multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), to characterize their accuracy in quantifying SMN2 genes. We studied a group of 62 genetically confirmed SMA patients, 54 with homozygous absence of exons 7 and 8 of SMN1 and 8 with SMN2-SMN1 hybrid genes. A complete correlation using the three methods was observed in 32 patients (51.6%). In the remaining 30 patients, discordances between the three methods were found, including under or overestimation of SMN2 copies by marker analysis with respect to the quantitative methods (LightCycler and MLPA) because of lack of informativeness of markers, 3' deletions of SMN genes, and breakpoints in SMN2-SMN1 hybrid genes. The technical limitations and advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. We conclude that the three methods complement each other in estimating the SMN2 copy number in most cases. However, MLPA offers additional information to characterize SMA cases with particular rearrangements such as partial deletions and hybrid genes. PMID:21548796

  5. Application of surface complexation models to anion adsorption by natural materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various chemical models of ion adsorption will be presented and discussed. Chemical models, such as surface complexation models, provide a molecular description of anion adsorption reactions using an equilibrium approach. Two such models, the constant capacitance model and the triple layer model w...

  6. Role of organic matter on boron adsorption-desorption hysteresis of soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we evaluated the boron (B) adsorption/desorption reaction in six soils and examined the extent to which organic matter content, as well as incubation time affected B release. Six soils varying in initial pH, clay content, and were selected for the study. Adsorption experiments were c...

  7. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying; Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment.

  8. [Application of classical isothermal adsorption models in heavy metal ions/ diatomite system and related problems].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Wu, Qing-Ding; Wang, Ping; Li, Ke-Lin; Lei, Ming-Jing; Zhang, Wei-Li

    2013-11-01

    In order to fully understand adsorption nature of Cu2+, Zn2+, Pb2+, Cd2+, Mn2+, Fe3+ onto natural diatomite, and to find problems of classical isothermal adsorption models' application in liquid/solid system, a series of isothermal adsorption tests were conducted. As results indicate, the most suitable isotherm models for describing adsorption of Pb2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Fe3+ onto natural diatomite are Tenkin, Tenkin, Langmuir, Tenkin, Freundlich and Freundlich, respectively, the adsorption of each ion onto natural diatomite is mainly a physical process, and the adsorption reaction is favorable. It also can be found that, when using classical isothermal adsorption models to fit the experimental data in liquid/solid system, the equilibrium adsorption amount q(e) is not a single function of ion equilibrium concentration c(e), while is a function of two variables, namely c(e) and the adsorbent concentration W0, q(e) only depends on c(e)/W(0). Results also show that the classical isothermal adsorption models have a significant adsorbent effect, and their parameter values are unstable, the simulation values of parameter differ greatly from the measured values, which is unhelpful for practical use. The tests prove that four-adsorption-components model can be used for describing adsorption behavior of single ion in nature diatomite-liquid system, its parameters k and q(m) have constant values, which is favorable for practical quantitative calculation in a given system. PMID:24455943

  9. [Adsorption Characteristics of Norfloxacin by Biochars Derived from Reed Straw and Municipal Sludge].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han-yu; Wang, Zhao-wei; Gao, Jun-hong; Zhu, Jun-min; Xie, Chao-ran; Xie, Xiao-yun

    2016-02-15

    Two types of biochars were prepared by pyrolyzing reed straw and municipal sludge at the temperature of 500 degrees C. The structure and properties of biochars were characterized by BET, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy ( FTIR ). The effects of pH value, adsorption time, temperature and initial concentration of norfloxacin (NOR) on the adsorption behaviors were determined by single factor experiments, which were used to preliminarily discuss adsorption mechanism. The results showed that the adsorption of NOR onto biochars derived from reed straw and municipal sludge could reach 70% and 60% of the total adsorption within 12 h, respectively; the maximum adsorption capacities of the two biochars were 2.13 mg x g(-1) (biochar derived from reed straw) and 2.09 mg x g(-1) (biochar derived from municipal sludge). The quantities of both absorptions increased with the decreasing solution pH. The two adsorption kinetics of NOR onto biochars followed the pseudo second order kinetic equations, and adsorption isotherms fitted well with the Langmuir equations. Adsorption thermodynamics parameters such as Gibbs free energy (AG), enthalpy (AH) and entropy (AS) indicated that the two adsorptions were endothermic reactions. Infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that oxygen-containing functional groups on biochars provided NOR molecules with adsorptive sites, which facilitated the formation of hydrogen bonds between NOR and the biochars. PMID:27363161

  10. Preparation of titanium peroxide and its selective adsorption property on cationic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-guang; Huang, Ji-guo; Wang, Bo; Bi, Qiang; Dong, Li-li; Liu, Xing-juan

    2014-02-01

    Titanium peroxide powder was prepared with the reaction of titanium sulfate and H2O2 and showed good selective adsorption property on cationic dyes. The obtained material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The selective adsorption property was confirmed and evaluated by adsorption experiments of methyl orange (MO), phenol and three kinds of cationic dyes including methylene blue (MB), malachite green (MG) and neutral red (NR). The adsorption was very fast and adsorption equilibrium was reached in a very short time for all three cationic dyes. The adsorption kinetics of MB, MG and NR were studied then. It was found that the adsorption data fitted perfectly with the pseudo-second-order kinetics and the saturated adsorption capacities for MB, MG and NR were 224.37, 251.38 and 327.61 mg/g at 25 °C, respectively. The characterization and adsorption results indicated the controlling mechanism of adsorption processes could be electrostatic adsorption.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of gas-solid adsorption processes at pore scale level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Chen, L.; Tao, W. Q.

    2015-11-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) approach was established to implement kinetic concentration boundary conditions in interfacial mass-transfer processes and to simulate the adsorption process in porous media at pore scale and mesoscopic levels. A general treatment was applied to conduct three types of concentration boundary conditions effectively and accurately. Applicability for adsorption was verified by two benchmark examples, which were representative of the interparticle mass transport and intraparticle mass transport in the adsorption system, respectively. The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed porous media at the pore scale level was numerically investigated. Mass-transfer processes of the adsorption reaction were simulated by executing Langmuir adsorption kinetics on surfaces of adsorbent particles. Meanwhile, the homogeneous solid diffusion model (HSDM) was used for mass transport in interior particles. The transient adsorbed amount was obtained in detail, and the impact of flow condition, porosity, and adsorbent particle size on the entire dynamic adsorption performance was investigated. The time needed to approach steady state decreased with increased fluid velocity. Transient adsorption capability and time consumption to equilibrium were nearly independent of porosity, whereas increasing pore size led to a moderating adsorption rate and more time was consumed to approach the saturation adsorption. Benefiting from the advantages of the LB method, both bulk and intraparticle mass transfer performances during adsorption can be obtained using the present pore scale approach. Thus, interparticle mass transfer and intraparticle mass transfer are the two primary segments, and intraparticle diffusion has the dominant role.

  12. Organic and inorganic molecules as probes of mineral surfaces (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverjensky, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Although the multi-site nature of mineral surfaces is to be expected based on the underlying crystal structure, definitive evidence of the need to use more than one site in modelling proton surface charge or adsorption of a single adsorbate at the mineral-water interface is lacking. Instead, a single-site approach affords a practical way of averaging over all possible crystal planes and sites in a powdered mineral sample. Extensive analysis of published proton surface charge and adsorption of metals on oxide mineral surfaces can be undertaken with a single site density for each mineral based on tritium exchange or estimation from averages of the site densities of likely exposed surfaces. Even in systems with competing metals (e.g. Cu and Pb on hematite), the same site density as used for proton surface charge can be employed depending on the reaction stoichiometry. All of this indicates that protons and metals can bind to a great variety of sites with the same overall site density. However, simple oxyanions such as carbonate, sulfate, selenate, arsenate and arsenite require a much lower site density for a given mineral. For example, on goethite these oxyanions utilize a site density that correlates with the BET surface area of the goethite. In this way, the oxyanions can be thought of as selectively probing the available sites on the mineral. The correlation probably arises because goethites with different BET surface areas have different proportions of singly and multiply-bonded oxygens, and only the singly-bonded oxygens are useful for inner-sphere surface complexation by the ligand exchange mechanism. Small organic molecules behave in a remarkably similar way. For example, adsorption of oxalate on goethite, and aspartate, glutamate, dihydroxyphenylalanine, lysine and arginine on rutile are all consistent with a much smaller site density than those required for metals such as calcium or neodymium. Overall, these results suggest that both inorganic oxyanions and

  13. Probing framework-guest interactions in phenylene-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica using spin-probe EPR.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Meng, Xiangyan; Mertens, Myrjam; Cool, Pegie; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    The pore walls of phenylene-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilicas (B-PMOs) can be crystal-like or amorphous depending on the synthesis conditions. Here, spin-probe electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used to monitor the adsorption of nitroxide radicals on three types of B-PMO with varying pore size and wall characteristics. Nitroxide radicals with varying polarity are chosen as probes to mimic guest molecules with different properties. The study shows that the B-PMO materials with amorphous walls allow an overall better adsorption of the spin probes than the one with crystalline walls, independent of the nature of the spin probe. The effect of hydration of the guest-host system on the mobility of the spin probe molecule depends more on the nature of the spin probe than on the B-PMO material. Comparison of the spin-probe adsorption on B-PMOs and ethylene-bridged PMO materials shows the sensitivity of the mobility of the guest molecule to the nature of the organic group. PMID:25231242

  14. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  15. Adsorption-Desorption Kinetics of Soft Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberg, Brendan; Nuebler, Johannes; Gerland, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Adsorption-desorption processes are ubiquitous in physics, chemistry, and biology. Models usually assume hard particles, but within the realm of soft matter physics the adsorbing particles are compressible. A minimal 1D model reveals that softness fundamentally changes the kinetics: Below the desorption time scale, a logarithmic increase of the particle density replaces the usual Rényi jamming plateau, and the subsequent relaxation to equilibrium can be nonmonotonic and much faster than for hard particles. These effects will impact the kinetics of self-assembly and reaction-diffusion processes.

  16. Random sequential adsorption of tetramers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał

    2013-07-01

    Adsorption of a tetramer built of four identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Tetramers were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Two different models of the adsorbate were investigated: a rhomboid and a square one; monomer centres were put on vertices of rhomboids and squares, respectively. Numerical simulations allow us to establish the maximal random coverage ratio as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining kinetics of the adsorption process. These results were compared with data obtained experimentally for KfrA plasmid adsorption. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured.

  17. Xe adsorption site distributions on Pt(111), Pt(221) and Pt(531)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellman, Andrew J.; Baker, L.; Holsclaw, B. S.

    2016-04-01

    The ideal structures of the Pt(111), Pt(221) and Pt(531) surfaces expose adsorption sites that can be qualitatively described as terrace sites on Pt(111), both step and terrace sites on Pt(221), and kink sites on Pt(531). The real surface structures of these surfaces can be complicated by imperfections such as misorientation, reconstruction and thermal roughening, all of which will influence their distributions of adsorption sites. Xe adsorption sites on the Pt(111), Pt(221) and Pt(531) surfaces have been probed using both photoemission of adsorbed Xe (PAX) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of Xe. Both PAX and Xe TPD are sensitive to the adsorption sites of the Xe and serve as complementary means of assessing the distributions of adsorption sites on these three Pt surfaces. The adsorption of Xe is sufficiently sensitive to detect the presence of residual steps on the Pt(111) surface at a density of ~ 1.5% step atoms per Pt atom. On the Pt(221) surface, PAX and Xe TPD reveal adsorption at both terrace and step sites simultaneously. Although the ideal structure of the Pt(531) surface has no well-defined steps or terraces, Xe adsorption indicates that its adsorption sites are best described as a distribution of both step and kink sites with roughly twice as many steps sites as kinks.

  18. Adsorption of copper at aqueous illite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.; Sun, Z.; Forsling, W.; Tang, H.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, the authors conducted potentiometric titrations, batch adsorption experiments and FT-IR analysis to study the uptake of copper in illite/water suspensions and then applied the constant capacitance surface complexation model to interpret the reaction mechanism at the aqueous illite surfaces. This research shows that the copper adsorption at these surfaces is strongly dependent on pH and that the adsorption causes a deprotonation of surface groups. The authors propose that the uptake of copper in the carbonate-free illite suspensions can be explained by the formation of mononuclear surface complexes, {triple_bond}SOCu{sup +} and {triple_bond}SOCuOH, and a multinuclear surface complex, {triple_bond}SOCu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}{sup +}, followed by the formation of a bulk precipitate, Cu(OH){sub 2}(s), or a surface precipitate, {triple_bond}SOCu{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}(sp). For the illite suspensions containing carbonates, the authors propose that the copper-illite interaction can be depicted by the formation of mononuclear surface complexes, {triple_bond}SOCu{sup +} and {triple_bond}SOCuOH, followed by the formation of a copper hydroxylcarbonate precipitate, Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s), rather than a copper hydroxide precipitate. The existence of Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s) in the carbonate-containing illite suspensions was identified by FT-IR analysis.

  19. On the physical adsorption of vapors by microporous carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, R.H. . Inst. of Surface Science and Technology); Rand, B. . Division of Ceramics)

    1995-01-01

    The physical adsorption of nonpolar and polar vapors by active carbons is discussed in relation to pore structure and pore wall chemistry. For nonpolar vapors the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation is used to derive micropore volumes (W[sub 0]), average adsorption energies (E[sub 0]), and micropore widths (L) for a number of systems. These parameters are used to interpret the adsorption behavior of nitrogen which, because it is a relatively small molecule, is frequently used at 77 K to probe porosity and surface area. Results are presented for three carbons from differing precursors, namely, coal, coconut shells, and polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) to illustrate the applicability of the technique. For the latter carbon increases in micropore size, induced by activation in carbon dioxide, and reductions in accessible pore volume caused by heat treatment in argon are also characterized and related to structural changes. The approach is then extended to the adsorption of larger hydrogen vapors, where the resulting W[sub 0] values may require correction for molecular packing effects which occur in the lower relative pressure regions of the isotherms, i.e., during the filling of ultramicropores. These packing effects are shown to limit the use of the Polanyi characteristic curve for correlating isotherm data for several vapors, of differing molecular size, by one adsorbent. Data for the adsorption of water, which is a strongly polar liquid, have been interpreted using the Dubinin-Serpinsky equation.

  20. Probing the transition state region in catalytic CO oxidation on Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrom, H.; Oberg, H.; Xin, H.; LaRue, J.; Beye, M.; Dell'Angela, M.; Gladh, J.; Ng, M. L.; Sellberg, J. A.; Kaya, S.; Mercurio, G.; Nordlund, D.; Hantschmann, M.; Hieke, F.; Kuhn, D.; Schlotter, W. F.; Dakovski, G. L.; Turner, J. J.; Minitti, M. P.; Mitra, A.; Moeller, S. P.; Fohlisch, A.; Wolf, M.; Wurth, W.; Persson, M.; Norskov, J. K.; Abild-Pedersen, F.; Ogasawara, H.; Pettersson, L. G. M.; Nilsson, A.

    2015-02-12

    Femtosecond x-ray laser pulses are used to probe the CO oxidation reaction on ruthenium (Ru) initiated by an optical laser pulse. On a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds, the optical laser pulse excites motions of CO and O on the surface, allowing the reactants to collide, and, with a transient close to a picosecond (ps), new electronic states appear in the O K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum. Density functional theory calculations indicate that these result from changes in the adsorption site and bond formation between CO and O with a distribution of OC–O bond lengths close to the transition state (TS). After 1 ps, 10% of the CO populate the TS region, which is consistent with predictions based on a quantum oscillator model.

  1. Problems affecting the fidelity of pressure measuring instruments for planetary probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Determination is made of the nature and magnitude of surface-related effects that cause errors in pressure measuring instruments, with special reference being made to instruments intended for use in planetary probes. The interaction of gases with clean surfaces of metals likely to be used as gage construction materials was studied. Special emphasis was placed on the adsorption, chemical reaction, and electron-induced desorption processes. The results indicated that all metals tested were subject to surface processes which would degrade gage fidelity. It was also found, however, that the formation of inert adsorbed layers on these metal surfaces, such as carbon on platinum, greatly reduced or eliminated these effects. This process, combined with a system design which avoids contact between reactive gases and hot filaments, appears to offer the most promising solution to the gage fidelity problem.

  2. STM-based methodologies for molecular identification and studies of chemical reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hamers, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    The use of STM to study chemical reactions has been hampered by the general inability to identify molecules and molecular fragments on surfaces. By combining the ability of the STM to probe local electronic structure with systematic study as a function of temperature and concepts from coordination chemistry, a priori chemical identification can be achieved, and this information can be used to elucidate new information about the mechanisms of chemical reactions. On silicon, this approach has been applied to study the decomposition of disilane, phosphine, and diborane. On metals, the delocalized bonding necessitates different approaches. We have also applied STM and tunneling spectroscopy to study the adsorption and decomposition of thiophene and related molecules on Ag(111) surfaces at 120 Kelvin. Here, voltage-dependent STM imaging is used to identify the rotational orientation of the molecules and to study polymerization at the molecular level. Methodologies for molecular identification will be discussed, with recent applications on semiconductors and metals.

  3. Water-induced adsorption of carbon monoxide and oxygen on the gold dimer cation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomonori; Patwari, G Naresh; Arakawa, Masashi; Terasaki, Akira

    2014-09-18

    It is demonstrated, using tandem mass spectrometry and ion trap, that preadsorption of a H2O molecule on the gold dimer cation, Au2(+), enhances adsorption of CO and O2 molecules, which is otherwise inert toward these molecules. The rate of adsorption of CO on Au2(H2O)(+) was found to be higher by 2 orders of magnitude relative to bare Au2(+). The enhancement of the CO adsorption rate is due to the presence of a reaction channel, which cleaves the Au-Au bond, leading to the formation of Au(H2O)(CO)(+). Such an observation can be attributed to weakening of the Au-Au bond upon adsorption of a water molecule. Further, it was also observed that preadsorption of H2O leads to dramatic enhancement of O2 adsorption on the Au2(+) ion, which can be attributed to the changes in the electron density following water adsorption. PMID:24593818

  4. Rethinking Critical Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Peach, Sarah; Polak, Robert D.

    1996-03-01

    Recent reflectivity experiments on near-critical mixtures of carbon disulfide and nitromethane contained in glass cells footnote Niraj S. Desai, Sarah Peach, and Carl Franck, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4129 (1995) have shown that preferential adsorption of one liquid component onto the wall can be controlled by chemical modification of the glass. The glass was treated with varying amounts of hexamethyldisilazane to decrease surface polarity and therefore enhance the adsorption of carbon disulfide in a surprisingly continuous way. The effect of the glass wall on the local liquid composition can be described by two different scaling hypotheses: using a short range field on the liquid closest to the wall, or pinning the amplitude of the order parameter at the surface. We have found that only the second approach is consistent with the experimental data, although this is difficult to reconcile with observed wetting critical phenomena. We also have reexamined the issue of substrate inhomogeneity and conclude that the substrates were indeed homogeneous on relevant length scales. Supported by the NSF under DMR-9320910 and the central facilities of the Materials Science Center at Cornell University.

  5. Adsorption behaviour of bulgur.

    PubMed

    Erbaş, Mustafa; Aykın, Elif; Arslan, Sultan; Durak, Atike N

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this research was to determine the adsorption behaviour of bulgur. Three different particle sizes (2adsorption, because of %E values lower than 10%. Bulgur must be stored below 70% relative humidity and with less than 10 g water per 100 g of dry mater. PMID:26575716

  6. Scaling Properties of Adsorption Energies for Hydrogen-Containing Molecules on Transition-Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abild-Pedersen, F.; Greeley, J.; Studt, F.; Rossmeisl, J.; Munter, T. R.; Moses, P. G.; Skúlason, E.; Bligaard, T.; Nørskov, J. K.

    2007-07-01

    Density functional theory calculations are presented for CHx, x=0,1,2,3, NHx, x=0,1,2, OHx, x=0,1, and SHx, x=0,1 adsorption on a range of close-packed and stepped transition-metal surfaces. We find that the adsorption energy of any of the molecules considered scales approximately with the adsorption energy of the central, C, N, O, or S atom, the scaling constant depending only on x. A model is proposed to understand this behavior. The scaling model is developed into a general framework for estimating the reaction energies for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

  7. Investigating the thermodynamic stability of Bacillus subtilis spore-uranium(VI) adsorption though surface complexation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Z.; Hertel, M.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolved uranium speciation, mobility, and remediation are increasingly important topics given continued and potential uranium (U) release from mining operations and nuclear waste. Vegetative bacterial cell surfaces are known to adsorb uranium and may influence uranium speciation in the environment. Previous investigations regarding U(VI) adsorption to bacterial spores, a differentiated and dormant cell type with a tough proteinaceous coat, include U adsorption affinity and XAFS data. We investigated the thermodynamic stability of aerobic, pH dependent uranium adsorption to bacterial spore surfaces using purified Bacillus subtilis spores in solution with 5ppm uranium. Adsorption reversibility and kinetic experiments indicate that uranium does not precipitate over the duration of the experiments and equilibrium is reached within 20 minutes. Uranium-spore adsorption edges exhibited adsorption at all pH measured between 2 and 10. Maximum adsorption was achieved around pH 7 and decreased as pH increased above 7. We used surface complexation modeling (SCM) to quantify uranium adsorption based on balanced chemical equations and derive thermodynamic stability constants for discrete uranium-spore adsorption reactions. Site specific thermodynamic stability constants provide insight on interactions occurring between aqueous uranium species and spore surface ligands. The uranium adsorption data and SCM parameters described herein, also provide a basis for predicting the influence of bacterial spores on uranium speciation in natural systems and investigating their potential as biosorption agents in engineered systems.

  8. Characteristics of simultaneous ammonium and phosphate adsorption from hydrolysis urine onto natural loess.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shanqing; Wang, Xiaochang; Yang, Shengjiong; Shi, Honglei

    2016-02-01

    Nutrient recovery from human urine is a promising pretreatment of domestic wastewater and provides a sustainable recyclability of N and P. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to identify the characteristics of natural loess (NL) for the adsorption and recovery of ammonium and phosphate from hydrolysis urine (HU). The adsorption mechanisms, the adsorption kinetics and isotherms, as well as the major influencing factors, such as pH and temperature, were investigated. Results revealed that adsorption of ammonium occurred by means of ion exchange and molecule adsorption with the ≡ Si-OH groups, while phosphate adsorption was based on the calcium phosphate precipitation reaction and formation of inner-sphere complexes with ≡ M-OH groups. The adsorption processes of ammonium and phosphate were well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the Freundlich isotherm model. Adsorption of phosphate was endothermic, while ammonium adsorption was exothermic. Furthermore, the maximum ammonium and phosphate adsorption capacities of NL was 23.24 mg N g(-1) and 4.01 mg P g(-1) at an initial pH of 9 and 10, respectively. Results demonstrated that nutrient-adsorbed NL used as compound fertilizer or conventional fertilizer superaddition was feasible for its high contents of N and P as well as its environmental friendliness. PMID:26432267

  9. Co-adsorption of phosphate and zinc(II) on the surface of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Runliang; Xu, Tianyuan; Xu, Yin; Ge, Fei; Xi, Yunfei; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping

    2016-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is of great importance in affecting the migration and transformation of heavy-metal cations and oxyanions. To advance the understanding of co-adsorption reactions on Fh surface, the co-adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) from aqueous solution to a synthesized Fh was determined. The batch experiments demonstrated a synergistic adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) on Fh. In the pH range of 3.5-6, the adsorption of the two contaminants showed strong pH dependence in the single solute adsorption systems, but the dependence alleviated in the simultaneous adsorption system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the chemical shifts of Zn 2p1/2 and Zn 2p3/2 binding energies were more significant than that of P 2p in the single and simultaneous adsorption systems. On the other side, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) observed increased formation of outer- and inner-sphere complexes of phosphate in the simultaneous system. Thus, the synergistic adsorption of the two contaminants could be attributed to the formation of ternary complexes as well as electrostatic interactions, while surface precipitation could not be completely ruled out. On the basis of the results from both the batch adsorption experiments and structural characterization, these two contaminants were likely to form phosphate-bridged ternary complexes (≡Fe-P-Zn) in the simultaneous adsorption system. PMID:26461439

  10. Atrazine adsorption removal with nylon6/polypyrrole core-shell nanofibers mat: possible mechanism and characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bi-Yi; Cao, Yang; Qi, Fei-Fei; Li, Xiao-Qing; Xu, Qian

    2015-05-01

    A functionalized nylon6/polypyrrole core-shell nanofibers mat (PA6/PPy NFM) was prepared via situ polymerization on nylon6 electrospun nanofibers mat (PA6 NFM) template and used as an adsorbent to remove atrazine from aqueous solutions. The core-shell structure of PA6/PPy NFM can be clearly proved under scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effects of initial solution pH and ionic strength, as well as the comparison of the adsorption capacity of functionalized (PA6/PPy NFM) and non-functionalized (PA6 NFM) adsorbent, were examined to reveal the possible adsorption mechanism. The results indicated that π-π interaction and electrostatic interaction should play a key role in the adsorption process. The kinetics and thermodynamics studies also further elucidated the detailed adsorption characteristics of atrazine removal by PA6/PPy NFM. The adsorption of atrazine could be well described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The adsorption equilibrium data was well fitted with the Freundlich isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity value of 14.8 mg/g. In addition, the increase of adsorption rate caused by a temperature increase could be felicitously explained by the endothermic reaction. The desorption results showed that the adsorption capacity remained almost unchanged after six adsorption/desorption cycles. These results suggest that PA6/PPy NFM could be employed as an efficient adsorbent for removing atrazine from contaminated water sources.

  11. Arsenate adsorption mechanisms at the allophane - Water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; Sparks, D.L.; Davis, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated arsenate (As(V)) reactivity and surface speciation on amorphous aluminosilicate mineral (synthetic allophane) surfaces using batch adsorption experiments, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The adsorption isotherm experiments indicated that As(V) uptake increased with increasing [As(V)]0 from 50 to 1000 ??M (i.e., Langmuir type adsorption isotherm) and that the total As adsorption slightly decreased with increasing NaCl concentrations from 0.01 to 0.1 M. Arsenate adsorption was initially (0-10 h) rapid followed by a slow continuum uptake, and the adsorption processes reached the steady state after 720 h. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses suggest that As(V) predominantly forms bidentate binuclear surface species on aluminum octahedral structures, and these species are stable up to 11 months. Solubility calculations and powder XRD analyses indicate no evidence of crystalline AI-As(V) precipitates in the experimental systems. Overall, macroscopic and spectroscopic evidence suggest that the As(V) adsorption mechanisms at the allophane-water interface are attributable to ligand exchange reactions between As(V) and surface-coordinated water molecules and hydroxyl and silicate ions. The research findings imply that dissolved tetrahedral oxyanions (e.g., H2PO42- and H2AsO42-) are readily retained on amorphous aluminosilicate minerals in aquifer and soils at near neutral pH. The innersphere adsorption mechanisms might be important in controlling dissolved arsenate and phosphate in amorphous aluminosilicate-rich low-temperature geochemical environments. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  12. Insights into tetracycline adsorption onto kaolinite and montmorillonite: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanping; Gu, Xueyuan; Li, Shiyin; Han, Ruiming; Wang, Guoxiang

    2015-11-01

    Adsorption of tetracycline (TC) on kaolinite and montmorillonite was investigated using batch adsorption experiments with different pH, ionic strength, and surface coverage. As a result, pH and ionic strength-dependent adsorption of TC was observed for the two clay minerals. The adsorption of TC decreased with the increase of pH and ionic strength, and high initial TC concentration had high adsorption. In addition, a triple-layer model was used to predict the adsorption and surface speciation of TC on the two minerals. As a result, four complex species on kaolinite (≡X(-)∙H3TC(+), ≡X(-)∙H2TC(±), ≡SOH(0)∙H2TC(±), and ≡SOH(0)∙HTC(-)) and three species on montmorillonite (≡X(-)∙H3TC(+), ≡X(-)∙H2TC(±), and ≡SOH(0)∙HTC(-)) were structurally constrained by spectroscopy, and these species were also successfully fitted to the adsorption edges of TC. Three functional groups of TC were involved in these adsorption reactions, including the positively charged dimethylamino group, the C=O amide I group, and the C=O group at the C ring. Combining adsorption experiments and model in this study, the adsorption of TC on kaolinite and montmorillonite was mainly attributed to cation exchange on the surface sites (≡X(-)) compared to surface complexation on the edge sites (≡SOH) at natural soil pH condition. Moreover, the surface adsorption species, the corresponding adsorption modes, and the binding constants for the surface reactions were also estimated. PMID:26122570

  13. Adsorption Device Based on a Langatate Crystal Microbalance for High Temperature High Pressure Gas Adsorption in Zeolite H-ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wenjin; Baracchini, Giulia; Klumpp, Michael; Schwieger, Wilhelm; Dittmeyer, Roland

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-temperature and high-pressure gas adsorption measurement device based on a high-frequency oscillating microbalance (5 MHz langatate crystal microbalance, LCM) and its use for gas adsorption measurements in zeolite H-ZSM-5. Prior to the adsorption measurements, zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals were synthesized on the gold electrode in the center of the LCM, without covering the connection points of the gold electrodes to the oscillator, by the steam-assisted crystallization (SAC) method, so that the zeolite crystals remain attached to the oscillating microbalance while keeping good electroconductivity of the LCM during the adsorption measurements. Compared to a conventional quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) which is limited to temperatures below 80 °C, the LCM can realize the adsorption measurements in principle at temperatures as high as 200-300 °C (i.e., at or close to the reaction temperature of the target application of one-stage DME synthesis from the synthesis gas), owing to the absence of crystalline-phase transitions up to its melting point (1,470 °C). The system was applied to investigate the adsorption of CO2, H2O, methanol and dimethyl ether (DME), each in the gas phase, on zeolite H-ZSM-5 in the temperature and pressure range of 50-150 °C and 0-18 bar, respectively. The results showed that the adsorption isotherms of these gases in H-ZSM-5 can be well fitted by Langmuir-type adsorption isotherms. Furthermore, the determined adsorption parameters, i.e., adsorption capacities, adsorption enthalpies, and adsorption entropies, compare well to literature data. In this work, the results for CO2 are shown as an example. PMID:27585356

  14. Global versus local adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Marloie, Gael; Markovits, Alexis; Ellinger, Yves

    2015-10-01

    The origin of the enantiomeric excess found in the amino acids present in the organic matter of carbonaceous meteorites is still unclear. Selective adsorption of one of the two enantiomers existing after a racemic formation could be part of the answer. Hereafter we report a comparative study of the adsorption of the R and S enantiomers of α-alanine and lactic acid on the hydroxylated { } chiral surface of α-quartz using numerical simulation techniques. Structurally different adsorption sites were found with opposite R versus S selectivity for the same molecule-surface couple, raising the problem of whether to consider adsorption as a local property or as a global response characteristic of the whole surface. To deal with the second term of this alternative, a statistical approach was designed, based on the occurrence of each adsorption site whose energy was calculated using first principle periodic density functional theory. It was found that R-alanine and S-lactic acid are the enantiomers preferentially adsorbed, even if the adsorption process on the quartz { } surface stays with a disappointingly poor enantio-selectivity. Nevertheless, it highlighted the important point that considering adsorption as a global property changes perspectives in the search for more efficient enantio-selective supports and more generally changes the way to apprehend adsorption processes in astro-chemistry/biology.

  15. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  16. ADSORPTION MEDIA FOR ARSENIC REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the use of adsorptive media for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. Presentation is a fundamental discussion on the use of adsorptive media for arsenic removal and includes information from several EPA field studies on removal of arsenic from dr...

  17. Basicity, Catalytic and Adsorptive Properties of Hydrotalcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, Francois

    Solid bases have numerous potential applications, not only as catalyst for the manufacture of fine chemicals, in refining and petrochemistry, but also for adsorption and anion exchange. The present processes use liquid bases, typically alcoholic potash, and require neutralisation of the reaction medium at the end of the reaction, with production of salts. The substitution of these liquid bases by solids would provide cleaner and safer processes, due to the reduction of salts, and facilitate separation of the products and recycling of the catalyst. This chapter reviews the recent ideas on the modification of the basic properties of hydrotalcites by anion exchange and on the catalytic properties of solid bases as catalysts. Many examples of successful applications are given, with emphasis to industrial processes recently presented such as isomerisation of olefins. The basic properties of hydrotalcites can also be used to carry the exchange of toxic anions, humic acids or dyes, and have driven recent developments proposing HDT as drug carriers.

  18. Polymerase chain reaction coupling with magnetic nanoparticles-based biotin-avidin system for amplification of chemiluminescent detection signals of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyang; He, Lei; He, Nongyue; Deng, Yan; Shi, Zhiyang; Wang, Hua; Li, Song; Liu, Hongna; Wang, Zhifei; Wang, Daxin

    2011-02-01

    A novel method was established through the detection of chemiluminescent signals of nucleic acid hybridization based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and PCR. 5' amino- modified specific probes were immobilized on the surface of silanized MNPs by Schiff reaction between amino and aldehyde group. The probes were used to capture the synthetic biotin-dUTP-labeled DNA fragments which were obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Then these complexes were bonded with streptavidin-modified alkaline phosphatase (SA-AP). Finally the chemiluminescent signals were detected by adding 3-(2'-spiroadamantane)- 4-methoxy -4-(3"-phosphoryloxy) phenyl-1, 2-dioxetane (AMPPD) which was the substrate reagent of AP. The concentration of probes which were immobilized on the surface of MNPs was studied, how to reduce the adsorption of SA-AP on the surface of MNPs was also researched. It was shown that 12.5 pmol of probes were immobilized on 1 mg of MNPs. Aldehyde-MNPs modified with probes could adsorb SA-AP, affecting the sensitivity of chemiluminescene consequently. Reduction of aldehyde group by sodium borohydride and blocking the bare position of MNPs with bovine serum albumin (BSA) could decrease the background of chemiluminescence, and this method has good specificity in detection of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. PMID:21456141

  19. AGGLUTININ-ADSORPTION ANALYSIS OF VIBRIO FETUS1

    PubMed Central

    Reich, C. V.; Heist, C. E.; Dunne, H. W.

    1961-01-01

    Reich, C. V. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park), C. E. Heist, and H. W. Dunne. Agglutinin-adsorption analysis of Vibrio fetus. J. Bacteriol. 82:210–214. 1961.—All pathogenic strains of Vibrio fetus are apparently members of a single serotype. Within this broad grouping, it was possible to define the relationship of certain selected strains by a system of complete reciprocal adsorption and cross agglutination. Formalin treated suspensions of V. fetus, and controlled titer homologous rabbit antisera were used. The results of a set of reactions, involving five strains, were analyzed as a complete reaction pattern. A system of 12 antigens and 4 haptens, each alphabetically characterized, was necessary to reproduce schematically the experimentally obtained reaction pattern. One of the antigens, designated as antigen A, was a somatic antigen present on every strain of V. fetus examined. Evidence indicates that this antigen represented about 5% of the total antigenic area of the cell surface. PMID:13740411

  20. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  1. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  2. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  3. A pulse chromatographic study of the adsorption properties of the amino-MIL-53 (Al) metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Couck, Sarah; Rémy, Tom; Baron, Gino V; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2010-08-28

    Low-coverage adsorption properties of the metal-organic framework amino-MIL-53 (Al) were determined using the pulse chromatographic technique. By using n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, 1-alkenes, cyclohexane and benzene as probe molecules, the nature of the adsorptive interactions in amino-MIL-53 (Al) was studied. Henry adsorption constants and adsorption enthalpies of iso-alkanes are significantly lower than those of the linear alkanes, demonstrating the shape selective properties of amino-MIL-53. The presence of amino-groups in the pores of the material increases the electrostatic contributions with molecules containing double bonds. A simple model relates adsorption enthalpies to the number of hydrogen atoms and double bonds in the molecule. The effective pore size of the material was estimated based on the relationship between adsorption enthalpy and entropy. PMID:20532387

  4. ABIOTIC ORGANIC REACTIONS AT MINERAL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abiotic organic reactions, such as hydrolysis, elimination, substitution, redox, and polymerization reactions, can be influenced by surfaces of clay and primary minerals, and of metal oxides. This influence is due to adsorption of the reactants to surface Lewis and Bronsted sites...

  5. Dissociative versus molecular adsorption of phenol on Si(100)2×1 : A first-principles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Marilena; Meloni, Simone; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the competitive adsorption of a bifunctional molecule, phenol, on Si(100)2×1 by ab initio calculations. We performed geometry optimizations of phenol adsorbed either molecularly or dissociatively, on five possible sites (top, bridge, valley bridge, cave, and pedestal), in the low coverage regime. We found that the dissociative adsorption of phenol on top of a silicon dimer is the most favorable adsorption configuration. In the group of dissociative adsorption the phenol initially placed on the bridge or the valley-bridge sites ends up as a toplike local minima. The pedestal and cave sites remain as low-adsorption energy “open” sites. In the group of molecular adsorption, a higher adsorption energy is associated to the adsorption through an addition reaction and loss of the aromatic character (bridge, valley-bridge, and pedestal sites). Standard butterfly or diagonal butterfly are the corresponding optimized geometries. Retention of aromatic character and lower adsorption energy are associated to the adsorption on the top and cave sites. The ordering of adsorption sites according to the adsorption energy shows a mixture of the dissociative and the molecular sites. In the case of adsorption on the top site, the adsorption energies after a rotation of the phenoxy fragment along the bonding axis and hydrogen migration on the surface are very similar. The bend of the phenoxy fragment on the surface, instead, is not favored (the adsorption energy is 1.004eV lower compared to the vertical position). Different electron density maps were calculated for different adsorption sites and modes. Finally, we investigated the possibility that molecularly adsorbed phenol behaves as a precursor for the dissociative one by nudged elastic band calculations. We found a barrier of the same order of magnitude of the thermodynamic energy at room temperature for the conversion of the valley-bridge molecular into the top dissociative site.

  6. Adsorption of polymeric brushes: Bridging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johner, Albert; Joanny, Jean-François

    1992-04-01

    We study the adsorption of grafted polymer layers on a planar surface parallel to the grafting surface. The layer consists of two types of chains: nonadsorbed chains with a free end and adsorbed chains forming bridges between the two plates. In the limit of strong adsorption a dead zone exists in the vicinity of the adsorbing plate; its size increases with the adsorption strength. Two adsorption mechanisms are possible: adsorption of the last monomer only and adsorption of all the monomers. In both cases the adsorption regimes at equilibrium (when no external force acts on the plates) are discussed within the framework of the self-consistent mean-field theory. We also give scaling laws taking into account excluded volume correlations. Finally, we consider situations where a finite external force, either tangential or normal to the plates, is applied on the adsorbing plate. Pulling and tangential forces both reduce the fraction of bridges and eventually lead to rupture, whereas compressional forces favor bridging. For normal forces, force vs distance profiles between planes and crossed cylinders are given.

  7. Random sequential adsorption on fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-01

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  8. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions. PMID:22852643

  9. Characterization and adsorption modeling of silicon carbide-derived carbons.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T X; Bae, J-S; Bhatia, S K

    2009-02-17

    We present characterization results of silicon carbide-derived carbons (Si-CDCs) prepared from both nano- and micron-sized betaSiC particles by oxidation in pure chlorine atmosphere at various synthesis temperatures (600-1000 degrees C). Subsequently, the adsorption modeling study of simple gases (CH4 and CO2) in these Si-CDC samples for a wide range of pressures and temperatures using our Finite Wall Thickness model [Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K. Langmuir 2004, 20, 3532] was also carried out. In general, characterization results showed that the core of Si-CDC particles contains predominantly amorphous material while minor graphitization was also observed on the surface of these particles for all the investigated synthesis temperatures (600-1000 degrees C). Furthermore, postsynthetic heat treatment at 1000 degrees C for 3 days, as well as particle size of precursor (betaSiC) were shown to have slight impact on the graphitization. In spite of the highly disordered nature of Si-CDC samples, the adsorption modeling results revealed that the Finite Wall Thickness model provides reasonably good prediction of experimental adsorption data of CO2 and CH4 in all the investigated Si-CDC samples at the temperatures of 273 K, 313 K, and 333 K for a wide range of pressure up to 200 bar. Furthermore, the impact of the difference in molecular size and geometry between analysis and probing gases on the prediction of the experimental adsorption isotherm in a disordered carbon using the slit-pore model is also found. Finally, the correlation between compressibility of the Si-CDC samples under high pressure adsorption and their synthesis temperature was deduced from the adsorption modeling. PMID:19123908

  10. Experimental study of neptunyl adsorption onto Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman-Lewis, D.; Fein, J. B.; Soderholm, L.; Jensen, M. P.; Chiang, M.-H.

    2005-10-01

    The subsurface mobility of Np is difficult to predict in part due to uncertainties associated with its sorption behavior in geologic systems. In this study, we measured Np adsorption onto a common gram-positive soil bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. We performed batch adsorption experiments with Np(V) solutions as a function of pH, from 2.5 to 8, as a function of total Np concentration from 1.29 × 10 -5 M to 2.57 × 10 -4 M, and as a function of ionic strength from 0.001 to 0.5 M NaClO 4. Under most pH conditions, Np adsorption is reversible and exhibits an inverse relationship with ionic strength, with adsorption increasing with increasing pH. At low pH in the 0.1 M ionic strength systems, we observed irreversible adsorption, which is consistent with reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV). We model the adsorption reaction using a nonelectrostatic surface complexation approach to yield ionic strength dependent NpO 2+-bacterial surface stability constants. The data require two bacterial surface complexation reactions to account for the observed adsorption behavior: R-L 1- + NpO 2+ ↔ R-L 1-NpO 2° and R-L 2- + NpO 2+ ↔ R-L 2-NpO 2°, where R represents the bacterium to which each functional group is attached, and L 1 and L 2 represent the first and second of four discrete site types on the bacterial surface. Stability constants (log K values) for the L 1 and L 2 reactions in the 0.001 M system are 2.3 ± 0.3 and 2.3 ± 0.2, and in the 0.1 M system the values are 1.7 ± 0.2 and 1.6 ± 0.2, respectively. The calculated neptunyl-bacterial surface stability constants are not consistent with values predicted using the linear free energy correlation approach from Fein et al. (2001), suggesting that possible unfavorable steric interactions and the low charge of NpO 2+ affects Np-bacterial adsorption.

  11. FY-2015 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nicholas Ray; Watson, Tony Leroy

    2015-09-30

    Nuclear fission produces fission and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2015 according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. Updates to the deep-bed test system have also been performed to enable the inclusion of evaporated HNO3 and increased NO2 concentrations in future tests. This report summarizes the result of those activities. Test results showed that iodine adsorption from gaseous methyl iodide using reduced silver zeolite (AgZ) resulted in initial iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) under 1,000 for the conditions of the long-duration test performed this year (45 ppm CH3I, 1,000 ppm each NO and NO2, very low H2O levels [3 ppm] in balance air). The mass transfer zone depth exceeded the cumulative 5-inch depth of 4 bed segments, which is deeper than the 2-4 inch depth estimated for the mass transfer zone for adsorbing I2 using AgZ in prior deep-bed tests. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity for the AgZ under the conditions of this test was 6.2% (6.2 g adsorbed I per 100 g sorbent). The maximum Ag utilization was 51%. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  12. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  13. [Thermodynamics adsorption and its influencing factors of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on the bentonite and humus].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Chi; Zai, De-Xin; Zhao, Rong

    2010-11-01

    The adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite and humus was investigated by using the equilibrium oscillometry. The adsorption capacity of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on humus was great higher than bentonite at the same concentration. Equilibrium data of Langmuir, Freundlich isotherms showed significant relationship to the adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on humus (chlorpyrifos: R2 0.996 4, 0.996 3; triazophos: R2 0.998 9, 0.992 4). Langmuir isotherm was the best for chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite (chlorpyrifos: R2 = 0.995 7, triazophos: R2 = 0.998 9). The pH value, adsorption equilibrium time and temperature were the main factors affecting adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite and humus. The adsorption equilibrium time on mixed adsorbent was 12h for chlorpyrifos and 6h for triazophos respectively. The mass ratio of humus and bentonite was 12% and 14% respectively, the adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos was the stronglest and tended to saturation. At different temperatures by calculating the thermodynamic parameters deltaG, deltaH and deltaS, confirmed that the adsorption reaction was a spontaneous exothermic process theoretically. The adsorption was the best when the pH value was 6.0 and the temperature was 15 degrees C. PMID:21250454

  14. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-Won; Leckie, J.O.; Siegel, M.D.

    1995-09-01

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption.

  15. Adsorption of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen on an ultramicroporous copper metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaofei; Yuan, Bin; Bao, Zongbi; Deng, Shuguang

    2014-09-15

    An ultramicroporous copper metal-organic framework (Cu-MOF), Cu(hfipbb)(H2hfipbb)0.5 [H2hfipbb=4,4'-(hexafluoro-isopropylidene) bis(benzoic acid)] was successfully synthesized by a microwave-assisted method (1) with a shorter reaction time and higher MOFs yield. The obtained Cu-MOF sample was characterized with scanning electron microscopy for crystal structure, powder X-ray diffraction for phase structure, and carbon dioxide adsorption at 273 K for pore textural properties. Single-component adsorption (adsorption equilibrium and kinetics) of CO2, CH4, and N2 on 1 was measured using a Micromeritics ASAP 2020 adsorption porosimeter at 278, 298 and 318 K, and pressures up to 1 bar. Isosteric heats of adsorption, Henry's constants, and diffusion time constants were calculated and carefully analyzed. Adsorption equilibrium selectivity (α), adsorbent selection parameter for pressure swing adsorption processes (S), kinetic selectivity and combined separation selectivity (β) for CO2/CH4, CO2/N2 and CH4/N2 binary mixtures were estimated based on the single-component adsorption data. The relative high values of the adsorption selectivities suggest that Cu-MOF is a promising adsorbent for separating CO2/CH4, CO2/N2 and CH4/N2 gas pairs. PMID:24998057

  16. Simultaneous adsorption of Cd²⁺ and BPA on amphoteric surfactant activated montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongmin; Wu, Pingxiao; Zhu, Yajie; Tran, Lytuong

    2016-02-01

    The study mainly investigated the simultaneous adsorption of bisphenol A (BPA) and Cd(2+) from aqueous solution on octadecane-betaine modified montmorillonite (BS-Mt). The characteristics of the obtained materials were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), Specific surface area (BET) and Scanning electron microscopy/Energy disperse spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), confirming that BS-18 was successfully introduced into Mt. Also, factors including initial solution pH, initial Cd(2+)/BPA concentration, contact time and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption processes were shown to be crucial for Cd(2+) adsorption, whereas had negligible effects on BPA adsorption. In this study, we found that pseudo-second-order model fitted well with the adsorption kinetic studies for both Cd(2+) and BPA with an equilibrium time of 24 h. The Cd(2+) and BPA adsorption isotherm could be well described by Freundlich model and Langmuir model, respectively. On the basis of kinetic models, the maximum adsorption capacity of Cd(2+) in aqueous solution was slightly enhanced after modification, indicating that Cd(2+) adsorption on BS-Mt was mainly attributed to direct electrostatic attraction and the chelate reaction, while the dramatic enhancement of maximum adsorption capacity for BPA was due to the hydrophobic interaction. PMID:26451652

  17. Bromide Adsorption by Reference Minerals and Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bromide, Br-, adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous Al and Fe oxide, montmorillonite, kaolinite, and temperate and tropical soils. Bromide adsorption decreased with increasing solution pH with minimal adsorption occurring above pH 7. Bromide adsorption was higher for amorphous oxides t...

  18. The mechanism of Zn sup 2+ adsorption on calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M. ); Kittrick, J.A.; Harsh, J.B. )

    1988-09-01

    The adsorption of Zn{sup 2+} on calcite (CaCO{sub 3(s)}) was investigated from aqueous solutions in equilibrium with CaCO{sub 3(s)} and undersaturated with respect to Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 6}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2(s)}. Zinc adsorption occurred via exchange with Ca{sub 2+} in a surface-adsorbed layer on calcite. The validity of this exchange reaction was supported by adsorption isotherm and constant concentration experiments, where Ca{sup 2+}{sub aq} was varied by systematically changing the pH and CO{sub 2(g)}. Greater adsorption of Zn{sup 2+} occurred at higher pH and Co{sub 2(g)} levels, where Ca{sup 2+} activities were lowest. Sites available for Zn{sup 2+} sorption were less than 10% of Ca{sup 2+} sites on the calcite surface. Surface exchange of Zn{sup 2+} did not affect the solubility of calcite. Zinc sorption was apparently independent of surface charge, which suggested that the surface complex had covalent character. Desorption and isotopic exchange experiments indicated that the surface complex remained hydrated and labile as Zn{sup 2+} was rapidly exchangeable with Ca{sup 2+}. Careful analysis of the adsorption data showed that Zn{sup 2+} and ZnOH{sup +} were the sorbing species.

  19. Molecular adsorption on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingmei; Enders, Axel; Rahman, Talat S.; Dowben, Peter A.

    2014-11-01

    Current studies addressing the engineering of charge carrier concentration and the electronic band gap in epitaxial graphene using molecular adsorbates are reviewed. The focus here is on interactions between the graphene surface and the adsorbed molecules, including small gas molecules (H2O, H2, O2, CO, NO2, NO, and NH3), aromatic, and non-aromatic molecules (F4-TCNQ, PTCDA, TPA, Na-NH2, An-CH3, An-Br, Poly (ethylene imine) (PEI), and diazonium salts), and various biomolecules such as peptides, DNA fragments, and other derivatives. This is followed by a discussion on graphene-based gas sensor concepts. In reviewing the studies of the effects of molecular adsorption on graphene, it is evident that the strong manipulation of graphene’s electronic structure, including p- and n-doping, is not only possible with molecular adsorbates, but that this approach appears to be superior compared to these exploiting edge effects, local defects, or strain. However, graphene-based gas sensors, albeit feasible because huge adsorbate-induced variations in the relative conductivity are possible, generally suffer from the lack of chemical selectivity.

  20. Molecular adsorption on graphene.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingmei; Enders, Axel; Rahman, Talat S; Dowben, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Current studies addressing the engineering of charge carrier concentration and the electronic band gap in epitaxial graphene using molecular adsorbates are reviewed. The focus here is on interactions between the graphene surface and the adsorbed molecules, including small gas molecules (H(2)O, H(2), O(2), CO, NO(2), NO, and NH(3)), aromatic, and non-aromatic molecules (F4-TCNQ, PTCDA, TPA, Na-NH(2), An-CH(3), An-Br, Poly (ethylene imine) (PEI), and diazonium salts), and various biomolecules such as peptides, DNA fragments, and other derivatives. This is followed by a discussion on graphene-based gas sensor concepts. In reviewing the studies of the effects of molecular adsorption on graphene, it is evident that the strong manipulation of graphene's electronic structure, including p- and n-doping, is not only possible with molecular adsorbates, but that this approach appears to be superior compared to these exploiting edge effects, local defects, or strain. However, graphene-based gas sensors, albeit feasible because huge adsorbate-induced variations in the relative conductivity are possible, generally suffer from the lack of chemical selectivity. PMID:25287516

  1. Effect of tribology processes on adsorption of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yu; Yang, Hongjuan; Wang, Linghe; Su, Yanjing; Qiao, Lijie

    2016-03-01

    As soon as artificial joint replacements are implanted into patients, the adsorption of proteins can occur. Joint implants operate in a protein-rich and relatively corrosive environment under tribological contact. The contacted area acted as an anodic part and the rest of the surface was more cathodic. Therefore, the adsorption of proteins is different in and outside the wear track. Adsorbed proteins would denature during rubbing and a tribofilm could form. The tribofilm can lubricate the surface and act as a barrier to corrosion damage. However, to observe the adsorption of proteins in situ has always been a challenge. Scanning Kelvin probe force microscope (SKPFM) was used to study the adsorption of albumin on the surface of CoCrMo alloy under simulated tribology movement. Fluorescence microscopy (FM) was employed to reveal the protein molecules in the wear scar. It was found that albumin molecules can decrease the surface potential and accelerate the corrosion process. In the wear track, albumin denatured and changed the surface potential as time progressed.

  2. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  3. Kinetic study of aluminum adsorption by aluminosilicate clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, W.J.; Cronan, C.S.; Patterson, H.H.

    1988-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics of Al/sup 3 +/ by montmorillonite, kaolinite, and vermiculite were investigated as a function of the initial Al concentration, the surface area of the clay, and H/sup +/ concentration, at 25/sup 0/, 18/sup 0/, and 10/sup 0/C. In order to minimize complicated side reactions the pH range was kept between 3.0 and 4.1. Results showed that the adsorption rate was first order with respect to both the initial Al concentration and the clay surface area. Changes in pH within this narrow range had virtually no effect on adsorption rate. This zero order reaction dependence suggested that the H/sup +/, compared to Al, has a weak affinity for the surface. The rates of adsorption decreased in the order of montmorillonite > kaolinite > vermiculite when compared on the basis of equal surface areas, but changed to kaolinite > montmorillonite > vermiculite when the clays were compared on an equal exchange capacity basis. The calculated apparent activation energies were < 32 kJ mol/sup -1/, indicating that over the temperature range of the study the adsorption process is only marginally temperature sensitive. The mechanism is governed by a simple electrostatic cation exchange involving outer sphere complexes between adsorbed Al and the clay surface. Vermiculite, may have a second reaction step governed by both electrostatic attraction and internal ion diffusion. Equilibrium constants for the formation of an adsorbed Al clay complex were also estimated and are 10/sup 5.34/, 10/sup 5.18/, and 10/sup 4.94/ for kaolinite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite, respectively, suggesting that these clays could play a significant role in controlling soil solutions Al concentrations.

  4. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  5. A generalized adsorption-phase transition model to describe adsorption rates in flexible metal organic framework RPM3-Zn.

    PubMed

    Lueking, Angela D; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Sircar, Sarmishtha; Malencia, Christopher; Wang, Hao; Li, Jing

    2016-03-14

    Flexible gate-opening metal organic frameworks (GO-MOFs) expand or contract to minimize the overall free energy of the system upon accommodation of an adsorbate. The thermodynamics of the GO process are well described by a number of models, but the kinetics of the process are relatively unexplored. A flexible GO-MOF, RPM3-Zn, exhibits a significant induction period for opening by N2 and Ar at low temperatures, both above and below the GO pressure. A similar induction period is not observed for H2 or O2 at comparable pressures and temperatures, suggesting the rate of opening is strongly influenced by the gas-surface interaction rather than an external stress. The induction period leads to severe mass transfer limitations for adsorption and over-prediction of the gate-opening pressure. After review of a number of existing adsorption rate models, we find that none adequately describe the experimental rate data and similar timescales for diffusion and opening invalidate prior reaction-diffusion models. Statistically, the rate data are best described by a compressed exponential function. The resulting fitted parameters exceed the expectations for adsorption but fall within those expected for phase transition. By treating adsorption as a phase transition, we generalize the Avrami theory of phase transition kinetics to describe adsorption in both rigid and flexible hosts. The generalized theory is consistent with observed experimental trends relating to induction period, temperature, pressure, and gas-substrate interaction. PMID:26563399

  6. Time-resolved multiple probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Greetham, G. M.; Sole, D.; Clark, I. P.; Parker, A. W.; Pollard, M. R.; Towrie, M.

    2012-10-15

    Time-resolved multiple probe spectroscopy combines optical, electronic, and data acquisition capabilities to enable measurement of picosecond to millisecond time-resolved spectra within a single experiment, using a single activation pulse. This technology enables a wide range of dynamic processes to be studied on a single laser and sample system. The technique includes a 1 kHz pump, 10 kHz probe flash photolysis-like mode of acquisition (pump-probe-probe-probe, etc.), increasing the amount of information from each experiment. We demonstrate the capability of the instrument by measuring the photolysis of tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO){sub 6}) monitored by IR absorption spectroscopy, following picosecond vibrational cooling of product formation through to slower bimolecular diffusion reactions on the microsecond time scale.

  7. Dissociative adsorption of O2 on unreconstructed metal (100) surfaces: Pathways, energetics, and sticking kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2014-05-06

    An accurate description of oxygen dissociation pathways and kinetics for various local adlayer environments is key for an understanding not just of the coverage dependence of oxygen sticking, but also of reactive steady states in oxidation reactions. Density functional theory analysis for M(100) surfaces with M=Pd, Rh, and Ni, where O prefers the fourfold hollow adsorption site, does not support the traditional Brundle-Behm-Barker picture of dissociative adsorption onto second-nearest-neighbor hollow sites with an additional blocking constraint. Rather adsorption via neighboring vicinal bridge sites dominates, although other pathways can be active. The same conclusion also applies for M=Pt and Ir, where oxygen prefers the bridge adsorption site. Statistical mechanical analysis is performed based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of a multisite lattice-gas model consistent with our revised picture of adsorption. This analysis determines the coverage and temperature dependence of sticking for a realistic treatment of the oxygen adlayer structure.

  8. TiO2 hollow microspheres with mesoporous surface: Superior adsorption performance for dye removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ran; Cai, Xia; Shen, Fenglei

    2014-06-01

    TiO2 hollow microspheres with mesoporous surface were synthesized by a facile template-assisted solvothermal reaction. The adsorption performance of TiO2 hollow microspheres for removing Methylene Blue from aqueous solution has been investigated. The comparative adsorption study indicated that adsorption capacity of TiO2 hollow microspheres with mesoporous surface is markedly higher than that of solid microsphere. The equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity reached 196.83 mg/g. The kinetics of dye adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order model and the adsorbed dye could be degraded completely by the subsequent photocatalytic process. These TiO2 hollow microspheres can be considered as a low-cost alternative adsorbent for removal of organic pollutants from wastewater.

  9. Studies on the adsorption of sulfo-group-containing aromatics by chitosan-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenjian; Chen, Shuwei; Chang, Fei; Han, Yue; Zhang, Yuanzhang

    2012-01-01

    Chitosan-β-cyclodextrin (CTS-CD) prepared through a crosslinking reaction between chitosan and β-cyclodextrin was employed to adsorb the three following sulfo-group-containing aromatics: disodium 2-naphthol-3,6-disulfonate (R salt), 2-naphthalene sulfonic acid (NSA), and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS). At 318 K, the saturated adsorption capacity of CTS-CD for R salt, NSA, and SDBS was 431, 416, and 376 mg/g, respectively. The experimental data fitted the second-order model well and the rate constant of the adsorption increased with the temperature increment. The values of apparent activation energy for R salt, NSA, and SDBS were calculated as 33.2, 34.2, and 16.8 kJ/mol respectively. The isothermal adsorption was found following the Langmuir adsorption equation. The negative values of ΔG and the positive values of ΔH indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic. PMID:22339013

  10. Adsorption behavior of hydrothermally treated municipal sludge & pulp and paper industry sludge.

    PubMed

    Alatalo, Sara-Maaria; Repo, Eveliina; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Vakkilainen, Esa; Sillanpää, Mika

    2013-11-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate how hydrothermal carbonization changes adsorption efficiency toward metal ions of typical sludges. Hydrothermal carbonization is a novel and green method of treating biomasses. Reactions take place in an aqueous environment at relatively mild temperature and high pressure resulting a different end biomass structure than obtained from traditional pyrolysis. Anaerobically digested sludge (ADS) and pulp and paper industry sludge (INS) were utilized as a feedstock. Adsorption behavior of ADS and INS was examined towards Pb(II), Cr(III), Cr(VI), As(III) and As(V). Both ADS and INS were found to remove Pb(II) effectively and followed Sips adsorption isotherm. Adsorption kinetics was fast and followed pseudo-second order model. Furthermore, intraparticle diffusion was observed to be partly responsible in the adsorption process. Hydrothermal carbonization indicated high potential for the production of novel carbonaceous materials for metal removal from waters. PMID:23994693

  11. Functional nucleic acid probes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2006-10-03

    The present invention provides functional nucleic acid probes, and methods of using functional nucleic acid probes, for binding a target to carry out a desired function. The probes have at least one functional nucleic acid, at least one regulating nucleic acid, and at least one attenuator. The functional nucleic acid is maintained in an inactive state by the attenuator and activated by the regulating nucleic acid only in the presence of a regulating nucleic acid target. In its activated state the functional nucleic acid can bind to its target to carry out a desired function, such as generating a signal, cleaving a nucleic acid, or catalyzing a reaction.

  12. Polymer Adsorption on Graphite and CVD Graphene Surfaces Studied by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Yudan; Han, Hui-Ling; Cai, Qun; Wu, Qiong; Xie, Mingxiu; Chen, Daoyong; Geng, Baisong; Zhang, Yuanbo; Wang, Feng; Shen, Y R; Tian, Chuanshan

    2015-10-14

    Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was employed to probe polymer contaminants on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and to study alkane and polyethylene (PE) adsorption on graphite. In comparing the spectra from the two surfaces, it was found that the contaminants on CVD graphene must be long-chain alkane or PE-like molecules. PE adsorption from solution on the honeycomb surface results in a self-assembled ordered monolayer with the C-C skeleton plane perpendicular to the surface and an adsorption free energy of ∼42 kJ/mol for PE(H(CH2CH2)nH) with n ≈ 60. Such large adsorption energy is responsible for the easy contamination of CVD graphene by impurity in the polymer during standard transfer processes. Contamination can be minimized with the use of purified polymers free of PE-like impurities. PMID:26367247

  13. Modelling metal centres, acid sites and reaction mechanisms in microporous catalysts.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Alexander J; Logsdail, A J; Sokol, A A; Catlow, C R A

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the role of QM/MM (embedded cluster) computational techniques in catalytic science, in particular their application to microporous catalysis. We describe the methodologies employed and illustrate their utility by briefly summarising work on metal centres in zeolites. We then report a detailed investigation into the behaviour of methanol at acidic sites in zeolites H-ZSM-5 and H-Y in the context of the methanol-to-hydrocarbons/olefins process. Studying key initial steps of the reaction (the adsorption and subsequent methoxylation), we probe the effect of framework topology and Brønsted acid site location on the energetics of these initial processes. We find that although methoxylation is endothermic with respect to the adsorbed system (by 17-56 kJ mol(-1) depending on the location), there are intriguing correlations between the adsorption/reaction energies and the geometries of the adsorbed species, of particular significance being the coordination of methyl hydrogens. These observations emphasise the importance of adsorbate coordination with the framework in zeolite catalysed conversions, and how this may vary with framework topology and site location, particularly suited to investigation by QM/MM techniques. PMID:27136967

  14. Mercapto functionalized silica entrapped polyacrylamide hydrogel: Arsenic adsorption behaviour from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jain, S K; Verma, S; Malodia, P

    2015-10-15

    In this article, 3-mercaptopropyl functionalized silica entrapped polyacrylamide hydrogel (MPFS-PAA) was prepared and characterized by FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Synthesized hydrogel was evaluated for removal of arsenic(III) from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were carried out by batch method as function of contact time, initial concentration of arsenic and pH. As(III) adsorption data fitted well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Adsorption capacity of arsenic 92.5 μg/g was obtained at initial concentration of 100 μg/L by Langmuir isotherm. Adsorption kinetics was tested for pseudo-second order reaction at different contact time. The rate constants of pseudo second order reaction were calculated and good correlation coefficient R(2) 99.67 obtained. The results indicates that MPFS-PAA is an effective adsorbent for removal of As(III) from aqueous solution. PMID:26151463

  15. [Effect of SO2 volume fraction in flue gas on the adsorption behaviors adsorbed by ZL50 activated carbon and kinetic analysis].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ji-xian; Wang, Tie-feng; Wang, Jin-fu

    2010-05-01

    The influence of SO2 dynamic adsorption behaviors using ZL50 activated carbon for flue gas desulphurization and denitrification under different SO2 volume fraction was investigated experimentally, and the kinetic analysis was conducted by kinetic models. With the increase of SO2 volume fraction in flue gas, the SO2 removal ratio and the activity ratio of ZL50 activated carbon decreased, respectively, and SO2 adsorption rate and capacity increased correspondingly. The calculated results indicate that Bangham model has the best prediction effect, the chemisorption processes of SO2 was significantly affected by catalytic oxidative reaction. The adsorption rate constant of Lagergren's pseudo first order model increased with the increase of inlet SO, volume fraction, which indicated that catalytic oxidative reaction of SO2 adsorbed by ZL50 activated carbon may be the rate controlling step in earlier adsorption stage. The Lagergren's and Bangham's initial adsorption rate were deduced and defined, respectively. The Ho's and Elovich's initial adsorption rate were also deduced in this paper. The Bangham's initial adsorption rate values were defined in good agreement with those of experiments. The defined Bangham's adsorptive reaction kinetic model can describe the SO2 dynamic adsorption rate well. The studied results indicated that the SO2 partial order of initial reaction rate was one or adjacent to one, while the O2 and water vapor partial order of initial reaction rate were constants ranging from 0.15-0.20 and 0.45-0.50, respectively. PMID:20623845

  16. Adsorption of lanthanum to goethite in the presence of gluconate

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Laurence C.; Sarah Pepper; Sue Clark

    2005-05-01

    Adsorption of Lanthanum to Goethite in the Presence of Gluconic Acid L. C. HULL,1 S. E. PEPPER2 AND S. B. CLARK2 1Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (hulllc@inel.gov) 2Washington State University, Pullman, WA (spepper@wsu.edu), (s_clark@wsu.edu) Lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elements in radioactive waste can pose risks to humans and ecological systems for many years. Organic complexing agents, from natural organic matter or the degradation of waste package components, can alter the mobility of these elements. We studied the effect of gluconic acid, as an analogue for cellulose degradation products, on the adsorption of lanthanum, representing lanthanide and trivalent-actinide elments, to goethite, representing natural iron minearals and degradation products of waste packages. Batch pH adsorption edge experiments were conducted with lanthanum alone, and with lanthanum and gluconate at a 1:1 mole ratio. Lanthanum concentrations studied were 0.1, 1, and 10 mM, covering a range from 10% to 1000% of the calculated available adsorption sites on goethite. In the absence of gluconate, lanthanum was primarily present in solution as free lanthanum ion. With gluconate present, free lanthanum concentration in solution decreased with increasing pH as step-wise deprotonation of the gluconate molecule increased the fraction lanthanum complexed with gluconate. Adsorption to the goethite surface was represented with the diffuse double-layer model. The number of adsorption sites and the intrinsic binding constants for the surface complexes were estimated from the pH adsorption edge data using the computer code FITEQL 4.0. Two surface reactions were used to fit the adsorption data in the absence of gluconate. A strong binding site with no proton release and a much higher concentration of weak binding sites with release of two protons per lanthanum adsorbed. The adsorption of lanthanum was not measurably affected by the presence of gluconate

  17. Adsorption and desorption of chlorpyrifos to soils and sediments.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Seyoum Yami; Beutel, Marc W; Yonge, David R; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2012-01-01

    ,439 and 15,500 L/kg for sediipents. This variation may result from several factors, including various experimental artifacts, variation in quality of soil organic matter, and inconsistencies in experimental methodologies. Based on this review, there appears to be no definitive quantification of chlorpyrifos adsorption or desorption characteristics. Thus, it is difficult to predict its adsorptive behavior with certainty, without resorting to experimental methods specific to the soil or sediment of interest. This limitation should be recognized in the context of current efforts to predict the risk, fate, and transport of chlorpyrifos based upon published partition coefficients. Based on a comprehensive review of the peer-reviewed literature related to adsorption and desorption of chlorpyrifos, we propose the following key areas for future research. From this review, it becomes increasingly evident that pesticide partitioning cannot be fully accounted for by the fraction of soil or solid-matrix organic matter or carbon content. Therefore, research that probes the variation in the nature and quality of soil organic matter on pesticide adsorption is highly desirable. Pesticide persistence and bioavailability depend on insights into desorption capacity. Therefore, understanding the fate and environmental impact of hydrophobic pesticides is incomplete without new research being performed to improve insights into pesticide desorption from soils and sediments. There is also a need for greater attention and consistency in developing experimental methods aimed at estimating partition coefficients. Moreover, in such testing, choosing initial concentrations and liquid-solid ratios that are more representative of environmental conditions could improve usefulness and interpretation of data that are obtained. Future monitoring efforts should include the sampling and analysis of suspended particulates to account for suspended solid-phase CPF, a commonly underestimated fraction in surface

  18. Adsorption and reaction of methanethiol on W(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, D.R.; Lyman, P.F. )

    1993-09-09

    Methanethiol (CH[sub 3]SH) adsorbs dissociatively on W(001) at 100 K, forming two distinct intermediates. These species have been identified by S 2p soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) as methyl thiolate moieties adsorbed in different bonding sites. Both species are stable at all coverages up to 150 K. At low coverages the thiolates totally decompose upon heating into atomic C and S and gaseous H[sub 2]. At high coverages a competing pathway produces atomic S and gaseous CH[sub 4]. The thiolate adsorbed in a fourfold hollow site undergoes C-S bond scission at a lower temperature than the species in a lower coordination site. At high coverage the fourfold bonded intermediate preferentially leads to total decomposition whereas the other species favors methane formation. 41 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Application of surface complexation models to anion adsorption by natural materials.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    Various chemical models of ion adsorption are presented and discussed. Chemical models, such as surface complexation models, provide a molecular description of anion adsorption reactions using an equilibrium approach. Two such models, the constant capacitance model and the triple layer model, are described in the present study. Characteristics common to all the surface complexation models are equilibrium constant expressions, mass and charge balances, and surface activity coefficient electrostatic potential terms. Methods for determining parameter values for surface site density, capacitances, and surface complexation constants also are discussed. Spectroscopic experimental methods of establishing ion adsorption mechanisms include vibrational spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. Experimental determinations of point of zero charge shifts and ionic strength dependence of adsorption results and molecular modeling calculations also can be used to deduce adsorption mechanisms. Applications of the surface complexation models to heterogeneous natural materials, such as soils, using the component additivity and the generalized composite approaches are described. Emphasis is on the generalized composite approach for predicting anion adsorption by soils. Continuing research is needed to develop consistent and realistic protocols for describing ion adsorption reactions on soil minerals and soils. The availability of standardized model parameter databases for use in chemical speciation-transport models is critical. PMID:24619924

  20. Spectroscopic confirmation of uranium(VI)-carbonato adsorption complexes on hematite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, John R.; Reitmeyer, Rebecca; Davis, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluating societal risks posed by uranium contamination from waste management facilities, mining sites, and heavy industry requires knowledge about uranium transport in groundwater, often the most significant pathway of exposure to humans. It has been proposed that uranium mobility in aquifers may be controlled by adsorption of U(VI)−carbonato complexes on oxide minerals. The existence of such complexes has not been demonstrated, and little is known about their compositions and reaction stoichiometries. We have used attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies to probe the existence, structures, and compositions of ≡FeOsurface−U(VI)−carbonato complexes on hematite throughout the pH range of uranyl uptake under conditions relevant to aquifers. U(VI)−carbonato complexes were found to be the predominant adsorbed U(VI) species at all pH values examined, a much wider pH range than previously postulated based on analogy to aqueous U(VI)−carbonato complexes, which are trace constituents at pH < 6. This result indicates the inadequacy of the common modeling assumption that the compositions and predominance of adsorbed species can be inferred from aqueous species. By extension, adsorbed carbonato complexes may be of major importance to the groundwater transport of similar actinide contaminants such as neptunium and plutonium.