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Sample records for adsorption reactive probing

  1. Theory of quasicrystal surfaces: Probing the chemical reactivity by atomic and molecular adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajčí, M.; Hafner, J.

    The adsorption of oxygen and carbon atoms and of carbon monoxide molecules on a fivefold surface of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals has been investigated using ab initio density-functional calculations. The quasicrystalline surface has been modeled by periodically repeated slabs cut from rational approximants to the quasicrystalline structure. Atomic and molecular adsorption have been studied for a large number of possible adsorption sites by performing three-dimensional static relaxations of the adsorbate/substrate complex. Four different scenarios for the dissociative adsorption of the CO molecule have been investigated via nudged-elastic band calculations of the transition states. Al and Mn-metal atoms present at the surface bind C and O atoms rather strongly, while Pd atoms are unstable adsorption sites: during relaxation, the adsorbate drifts to the nearest strong-binding site. The chemical reactivity with respect to a CO molecule varies very strongly across the surface. The adsorption close to Mn sites is promoted by rather strong covalent effects, but CO is only physisorbed at Al sites via weak polarization forces. On the basis of the observed local variations of the adsorption strength, we develop scenarios for dissociation and determine the potential energy barriers for this processes. We find that CO adsorbed close to a transition-metal atom can dissociate via an activated process, but the dissociation rate is expected to be rather low because of a high dissociation barrier and a "late" transition state. CO adsorbed close to Al atoms will desorb before dissociation. Surface vacancies present as a consequence of the irregular coordination of the Mackay cluster in the quasiperiodic structure will act as strongly attractive traps for diffusing molecules. Mn surface atoms are located in the center of truncated Mackay clusters. In scanning tunneling electron microscopy (STM) these truncated clusters are imaged as "white flowers". Surface vacancies are

  2. [Adsorption kinetics of reactive dyes on activated carbon fiber].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yue, Qin-Yan; Gao, Bao-Yu; Yang, Jing; Zheng, Yan

    2007-11-01

    The adsorption capability of activated carbon fiber (ACF) to four reactive dyes (reactive brilliant red K-2BP, reactive turquoise blue KN-G, reactive golden yellow K-3RP, reactive black KN-B) in aqueous solution was studied, and adsorption mechanism was focused on from kinetics point of view. The results show that the equilibrium adsorbing capacity (q(e)) of each dye increases with the addition of initial concentration or temperature. On the same condition, the order of q(e) is: reactive brilliant red > reactive golden yellow > reactive black > reactive turquoise blue. The adsorption processes follow a pseudo second-order kinetic rate equation, and the steric structure, size and polarity of dyes are important influence factors to initial adsorption rate. The adsorption activation energy of each dye is low (16.42, 3.56, 5.21, 26.38 kJ x mol(-1) respectively), which indicates that it belongs to physics adsorption.

  3. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  4. Thiol Reactive Probes and Chemosensors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanjing; Chen, Weixuan; Cheng, Yunfeng; Hakuna, Lovemore; Strongin, Robert; Wang, Binghe

    2012-01-01

    Thiols are important molecules in the environment and in biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), glutathione (GSH) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) play critical roles in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. The selective detection of thiols using reaction-based probes and sensors is very important in basic research and in disease diagnosis. This review focuses on the design of fluorescent and colorimetric probes and sensors for thiol detection. Thiol detection methods include probes and labeling agents based on nucleophilic addition and substitution, Michael addition, disulfide bond or Se-N bond cleavage, metal-sulfur interactions and more. Probes for H2S are based on nucleophilic cyclization, reduction and metal sulfide formation. Thiol probe and chemosensor design strategies and mechanism of action are discussed in this review. PMID:23202239

  5. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND INFRARED REACTIVATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of removing trace organic contaminants and surrogates from drinking water by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The effect of multiple reactivations of spent GAC was also evaluated. Results indicated that reactivated GAC eff...

  6. PROBING REACTIVITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION USING XAD-8 RESIN ADSORPTION AND ULTRAFILTRATION FRACTIONATION. (R828045)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection by-product (DBP) reactivity (yield and speciation upon reaction with chlorine) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from two surface waters was investigated. The source waters, each having significantly different specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA

  7. Probing adsorption sites for CO on ceria.

    PubMed

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Kim, Hyun You; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Baber, Ashleigh E; Liu, Ping; Stacchiola, Dario

    2013-10-14

    Ceria based catalysts show remarkable activity for CO conversion reactions such as CO oxidation and the water-gas shift reaction. The identification of adsorption sites on the catalyst surfaces is essential to understand the reaction mechanisms of these reactions, but the complexity of heterogeneous powder catalysts and the propensity of ceria to easily change oxidation states in the presence of small concentrations of either oxidizing or reducing agents make the process difficult. In this study, the adsorption of CO on CuOx/Cu(111) and CeOx/Cu(111) systems has been studied using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. IR peaks for the adsorbed CO on O/Cu(111) with only chemisorbed oxygen, well-ordered Cu2O/Cu(111) and disordered copper oxide [CuOx/Cu(111)] were observed at 2070-2072, 2097-2098 and 2101-2111 cm(-1), respectively. On CeOx/Cu(111) systems CO chemisorbs at 90 K only on Cu sites under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, whereas at elevated CO pressures and low temperatures adsorption of CO on Ce(3+) is observed, with a corresponding IR peak at 2162 cm(-1). These experimental results are further supported by DFT calculations, and help to unequivocally distinguish the presence of Ce(3+) cations on catalyst samples by using CO as a probe molecule. PMID:23942870

  8. Probing the pore wall structure of nanoporous carbons using adsorption.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh X; Bhatia, Suresh K

    2004-04-27

    Hitherto, adsorption has been traditionally used to study only the porous structure in disordered materials, while the structure of the solid phase skeleton has been probed by crystallographic methods such as X-ray diffraction. Here we show that for carbons density functional theory, suitably adapted to consider heterogeneity of the pore walls, can be reliably used to probe features of the solid structure hitherto accessibly only approximately even by crystallographic methods. We investigate a range of carbons and determine pore wall thickness distributions using argon adsorption, with results corroborated by X-ray diffraction.

  9. Dielectric covered hairpin probe for its application in reactive plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Karkari, S. K.; Turner, M. M.

    2012-07-01

    The hairpin probe is a well known technique for measuring local electron density in low temperature plasmas. In reactive plasmas, the probe characteristics are affected by surface sputtering, contamination, and secondary electron emission. At higher densities, the plasma absorbs the entire electromagnetic energy of hairpin and hence limits the density measurements. These issues can be resolved by covering the hairpin surface with a thin layer of dielectric. In this letter, the dielectric contribution to the probe characteristics is incorporated in a theory which is experimentally verified. The dielectric covering improves the performance of probe and also allows the hairpin tip to survive in reactive plasma where classical electrical probes are easily damaged.

  10. Isotherm study of reactive Blue 19 adsorption by an alum sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khim, Ong Keat; Nor, Mohd Asri Md; Mohamad, Syuriya; Nasaruddin, Nas Aulia Ahmad; Jamari, Nor Laili-Azua; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 using dewatered alum sludge. The dewatered alum sludge was a sludge produced from drinking water treatment plant. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism of the dye adsorption. The adsorption was rapid at its initial stage but the rate decreased as it approached equilibrium. The adsorption data were evaluated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models but was best described by the Langmuir isotherm model as it gave the highest correlation.

  11. Adsorption of dissolved Reactive red dye from aqueous phase onto activated carbon prepared from agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaar, S; Kalaamani, P; Porkodi, K; Varadarajan, P R; Subburaam, C V

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of Reactive red dye (RR) onto Coconut tree flower carbon (CFC) and Jute fibre carbon (JFC) from aqueous solution was investigated. Adsorption studies were carried out at different initial dye concentrations, initial solution pH and adsorbent doses. The kinetic studies were also conducted; the adsorption of Reactive red onto CFC and JFC followed pseudosecond-order rate equation. The effective diffusion coefficient was evaluated to establish the film diffusion mechanism. Quantitative removal of Reactive red dye was achieved at strongly acidic conditions for both the carbons studied. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted well to Langmuir isotherm and the adsorption capacity were found to be 181.9 and 200 mg/g for CFC and JFC, respectively. The overall rate of dye adsorption appeared to be controlled by chemisorption, in this case in accordance with poor desorption studies.

  12. Catalytic Role Of Palladium And Relative Reactivity Of Substituted Chlorines During Adsorption And Treatment Of PCBs On Reactive Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adsorption-mediated dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a unique feature of reactive activated cabon (RAC). Here, we address the RAC system, containing a tunable amount of Fe as a primary electron donor coupled with Pd as an electrochemical catalyst to pote...

  13. A fiber optic, ultraviolet light-emitting diode-based, two wavelength fluorometer for monitoring reactive adsorption.

    PubMed

    Granz, Christopher D; Schindler, Bryan J; Peterson, Gregory W; Whitten, James E

    2016-03-01

    Construction and use of an ultraviolet light-emitting diode-based fluorometer for measuring photoluminescence (PL) from powder samples with a fiber optic probe is described. Fluorescence at two wavelengths is detected by miniature photomultiplier tubes, each equipped with a different band pass filter, whose outputs are analyzed by a microprocessor. Photoluminescent metal oxides and hydroxides, and other semiconducting nanoparticles, often undergo changes in their emission spectra upon exposure to reactive gases, and the ratio of the PL intensities at two wavelengths is diagnostic of adsorption. Use of this instrument for reactive gas sensing and gas filtration applications is illustrated by measuring changes in the PL ratio for zirconium hydroxide and zinc oxide particles upon exposure to air containing low concentrations of sulfur dioxide. PMID:27036833

  14. A fiber optic, ultraviolet light-emitting diode-based, two wavelength fluorometer for monitoring reactive adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granz, Christopher D.; Schindler, Bryan J.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Whitten, James E.

    2016-03-01

    Construction and use of an ultraviolet light-emitting diode-based fluorometer for measuring photoluminescence (PL) from powder samples with a fiber optic probe is described. Fluorescence at two wavelengths is detected by miniature photomultiplier tubes, each equipped with a different band pass filter, whose outputs are analyzed by a microprocessor. Photoluminescent metal oxides and hydroxides, and other semiconducting nanoparticles, often undergo changes in their emission spectra upon exposure to reactive gases, and the ratio of the PL intensities at two wavelengths is diagnostic of adsorption. Use of this instrument for reactive gas sensing and gas filtration applications is illustrated by measuring changes in the PL ratio for zirconium hydroxide and zinc oxide particles upon exposure to air containing low concentrations of sulfur dioxide.

  15. Adsorption of probe molecules in pillared interlayered clays: Experiment and computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, A. Guil, J. M.; Lomba, E.; Almarza, N. G.; Khatib, S. J.; Cabrillo, C.; Sanz, A.; Pires, J.

    2014-06-14

    In this paper we investigate the adsorption of various probe molecules in order to characterize the porous structure of a series of pillared interlayered clays (PILC). To that aim, volumetric and microcalorimetric adsorption experiments were performed on various Zr PILC samples using nitrogen, toluene, and mesitylene as probe molecules. For one of the samples, neutron scattering experiments were also performed using toluene as adsorbate. Various structural models are proposed and tested by means of a comprehensive computer simulation study, using both geometric and percolation analysis in combination with Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations in order to model the volumetric and microcalorimetric isotherms. On the basis of this analysis, we propose a series of structural models that aim at accounting for the adsorption experimental behavior, and make possible a microscopic interpretation of the role played by the different interactions and steric effects in the adsorption processes in these rather complex disordered microporous systems.

  16. Sub-Grid Reactive Diffusion and Apparent Uranyl Adsorption/Desorption Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Kerisit, S.; Ma, R.; Zheng, C.; Zachara, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adsorption/desorption is an important process affecting contaminant fate and transport in subsurface sediments. This presentation will discuss the importance of sub-grid reactive diffusion in both intragranular and inter-grain domains that affect the apparent rates of uranyl adsorption/desorption at the macroscopic scale. Uranyl[U(VI)]-contaminated site at Hanford 300A where U(VI) resides in intragranular domains as surface-complexed species is used as an example in this presentation. Molecular dynamics calculations revealed that uranyl surface complexation reactions are a fast process with a first-order rate constant of 100 per second. Consequently U(VI) adsorption/desorption is treated as an equilibrium process. An equilibrium, Kd-based model, however, significantly over-predicted the historical migration of the uranyl plume at the site. Sub-grain pore-scale simulations and stirred-flow cell experiments indicated that the coupling of intragranular diffusion with surface complexation reactions decreased the apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption over 4 order of magnitude. The apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption decreased further over 1 order of magnitude due to the sub-grid pore-scale coupling of diffusive mass transfer and grain-scale U(VI) adsorption/desorption as revealed by column experiments and pore-scale simulations. Field-scale reactive transport models that incorporate the complexity of sub-grid reactive diffusion in the apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption were consistent with the slow migration of the U(VI) plume at the site.

  17. Adsorption and reactivity of CO(2) on defective graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Sanfelix, Pepa

    2009-01-15

    Density-functional calculations have been performed to investigate the adsorption of CO(2) on defected graphite (0001) represented by a single graphene sheet. The interaction with a vacancy defect gives a computed molecular binding energy of approximately 136 meV in a strong physisorbed state. Subsequently, chemisorption by lactone group formation will occur after overcoming a barrier of approximately 1 eV relative to the gas phase, with an exothermicity of about 1.4 eV. Further reaction paths from this chemisorbed state lead to dissociation of the CO(2) through the formation of epoxy groups followed by oxygen recombination and desorption of O(2), after overcoming successive energy barriers of approximately 0.9 and approximately 1.0 eV. The global minimum ("O(2) desorbed + graphene sheet") entails an energy release of about 3.4 eV with respect to the initial state.

  18. Designing transition metal surfaces for their adsorption properties and chemical reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montemore, Matthew M.

    Many technological processes, such as catalysis, electrochemistry, corrosion, and some materials synthesis techniques, involve molecules bonding to and/or reacting on surfaces. For many of these applications, transition metals have proven to have excellent chemical reactivity, and this reactivity is strongly tied to the surface's adsorption properties. This thesis focuses on predicting adsorption properties for use in the design of transition metal surfaces for various applications. First, it is shown that adsorption through a particular atom (e.g, C or O) can be treated in a unified way. This allows predictions of all C-bound adsorbates from a single, simple adsorbate, such as CH3. In particular, consideration of the adsorption site can improve the applicability of previous approaches, and gas-phase bond energies correlate with adsorption energies for similarly bound adsorbates. Next, a general framework is presented for understanding and predicting adsorption through any atom. The energy of the adsorbate's highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) determines the strength of the repulsion between the adsorbate and the surface. Because adsorbates with similar HOMO energies behave similarly, their adsorption energies correlate. This can improve the efficiency of predictions, but more importantly it constrains catalyst design and suggests strategies for circumventing these constraints. Further, the behavior of adsorbates with dissimilar HOMO energies varies in a systematic way, allowing predictions of adsorption energy differences between any two adsorbates. These differences are also useful in surface design. In both of these cases, the dependence of adsorption energies on surface electronic properties is explored. This dependence is used to justify the unified treatments mentioned above, and is used to gain further insight into adsorption. The properties of the surface's d band and p band control variations in adsorption energy, as does the strength of the

  19. Properties and reactivity of Fe-organic matter associations formed by coprecipitation versus adsorption: Clues from arsenate batch adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Robert; Lorenz, Dennis; Guggenberger, Georg; Haumaier, Ludwig; Freund, Anja

    2014-11-01

    Ferric oxyhydroxides play an important role in controlling the bioavailability of oxyanions such as arsenate and phosphate in soil. Despite this, little is known about the properties and reactivity of Fe(III)-organic matter phases derived from adsorption (reaction of organic matter (OM) to post-synthesis Fe oxide) versus coprecipitation (formation of Fe oxides in presence of OM). Coprecipitates and adsorption complexes were synthesized at pH 4 using two natural organic matter (NOM) types extracted from forest floor layers (Oi and Oa horizon) of a Haplic Podzol. Iron(III) coprecipitates were formed at initial molar metal-to-carbon (M/C) ratios of 1.0 and 0.1 and an aluminum (Al)-to-Fe(III) ratio of 0.2. Sample properties were studied by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 gas adsorption, dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic mobility measurements. Arsenic [As(V)] adsorption to Fe-OM phases was studied in batch experiments (168 h, pH 4, 100 μM As). The organic carbon (OC) contents of the coprecipitates (82-339 mg g-1) were higher than those of adsorption complexes (31 and 36 mg g-1), leading to pronounced variations in specific surface area (9-300 m2 g-1), average pore radii (1-9 nm), and total pore volumes (11-374 mm3 g-1) but being independent of the NOM type or the presence of Al. The occlusion of Fe solids by OM (XPS surface concentrations: 60-82 atom% C) caused comparable pHPZC (1.5-2) of adsorption complexes and coprecipitates. The synthesis conditions resulted in different Fe-OM association modes: Fe oxide particles in 'M/C 0.1' coprecipitates covered to a larger extent the outermost aggregate surfaces, for some 'M/C 1.0' coprecipitates OM effectively enveloped the Fe oxides, while OM in the adsorption complexes primarily covered the outer aggregate surfaces. Despite of their larger OC contents, adsorption of As(V) was fastest to coprecipitates formed at low Fe availability (M/C 0.1) and facilitated by desorption of weakly

  20. Tuning the Reactivity of Ultrathin Oxides: NO Adsorption on Monolayer FeO(111).

    PubMed

    Merte, Lindsay R; Heard, Christopher J; Zhang, Feng; Choi, Juhee; Shipilin, Mikhail; Gustafson, Johan; Weaver, Jason F; Grönbeck, Henrik; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-08-01

    Ultrathin metal oxides exhibit unique chemical properties and show promise for applications in heterogeneous catalysis. Monolayer FeO films supported on metal surfaces show large differences in reactivity depending on the metal substrate, potentially enabling tuning of the catalytic properties of these materials. Nitric oxide (NO) adsorption is facile on silver-supported FeO, whereas a similar film grown on platinum is inert to NO under similar conditions. Ab initio calculations link this substrate-dependent behavior to steric hindrance caused by substrate-induced rumpling of the FeO surface, which is stronger for the platinum-supported film. Calculations show that the size of the activation barrier to adsorption caused by the rumpling is dictated by the strength of the metal-oxide interaction, offering a straightforward method for tailoring the adsorption properties of ultrathin films. PMID:27346455

  1. Molecular Adsorption on Nano Colloidal Particles Probed by Second Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Shih-Hui; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2006-03-01

    It is shown that second-harmonic generation (SHG), detected at 90 degree angle from the fundamental beam propagation direction, can be used to probe molecular adsorption on spherical nano colloidal particles with diameter as small as 50 nm. Measurements done with the malachite green dye adsorbed on polystyrene particles with diameters ranging from 50 to 250 nm show that the SHG signal from these surface adsorbed molecules tilts toward larger scattering angles when the particle size becomes smaller. This phenomenon can be rigorously described by the nonlinear Rayleigh-Gans-Debye theory and used for measuring the density and adsorption free energy of molecules adsorbed on nanometer size colloidal particles.

  2. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  3. Novel probes for visualizing reactive oxygen species in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumova, Katerina; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2010-04-01

    This work describes the rationale behind the preparation of fluorescent probes for imaging lipid peroxyl radicals within membranes of living cells (fluorescent lipophilic antioxidants). The new probes are based on BODIPY dyes tethered to phenol moieties. We discuss the spectroscopic properties of these novel probes, specifically the BODIPY-α-tocopherol analogue B-TOH, and present a molecular level explanation, based on photoinduced electron transfer, that accounts for the significant emission enhancement that the probe BTOH experiences upon reaction with peroxyl free radicals. In addition to the spectroscopy results in homogeneous media, we also describe studies performed in model lipid membranes which show that the sensitivity of BTOH towards lipid peroxyl radicals is somewhat reduced when the probe is membrane embedded. Solutions to increase the sensitivity of the free radical probes are discussed based on the redox potential of BODIPY dyes.

  4. Hydrogen Reactivity on Highly-hydroxylated TiO2(110) Surfaces Prepared via Carboxylic Acid Adsorption and Photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Wang, Zhitao; Henderson, Michael A.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2012-02-27

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy, temperature-programmed desorption, photo stimulated desorption, and density functional theory studies have probed the formation and reactivity of highly-hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, which were prepared via a novel, photochemical route using trimethyl acetic acid (TMAA) dissociative adsorption and subsequent photolysis at 300 K. Deprotonation of TMAA molecules upon adsorption produces both surface bridging hydroxyls (OHb) and bidentate trimethyl acetate (TMA) species with a saturation coverage of near 0.5 monolayer (ML). Ultra-violet light irradiation selectively removes TMA species, producing a highly-hydroxylated surface with up to ~0.5 ML OHb coverage. At high coverages, the OHb species typically occupy second-nearest neighbor sites along the bridging oxygen row locally forming linear (2×1) structures of different lengths, although the surface is less ordered on a long scale. The annealing of the highly-hydroxylated surface leads to hydroxyl recombination and H2O desorption with ~100% yield, thus ruling out the diffusion of H into the bulk that has been suggested in the literature. In agreement with experimental data, theoretical results show that the recombinative H2O desorption is preferred over both H bulk diffusion and H2 desorption processes.

  5. On the reactive adsorption of ammonia on activated carbons modified by impregnation with inorganic compounds.

    PubMed

    Bandosz, Teresa J; Petit, Camille

    2009-10-15

    Ammonia adsorption was studied under dynamic conditions, at room temperature, on activated carbons of different origins (coal-based, wood-based and coconut-shell-based carbons) before and after their impregnation with various inorganic compounds including metal chlorides, metal oxides and polycations. The role of humidity was evaluated by running tests in both dry and moist conditions. Adsorbents were analyzed before and after exposure to ammonia by thermal analyses, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Results of breakthrough tests show significant differences in terms of adsorption capacity depending on the parent carbon, the impregnates and the experimental conditions. It is found that surface chemistry governs ammonia adsorption on the impregnated carbons. More precisely, it was demonstrated that a proper combination of the surface pH, the strength, type and amount of functional groups present on the adsorbents' surface is a key point in ammonia uptake. Water can have either positive or negative effects on the performance of adsorbents. It can enhance NH(3) adsorption capacity since it favors ammonia dissolution and thus enables reaction between ammonium ions and carboxylic groups from the carbons' surface. On the other hand, water can also reduce the performance from the strength of adsorption standpoint. It promotes dissolution of ammonia and that ammonia is first removed from the system when the adsorbent bed is purged with air. Ammonia, besides adsorption by van der Waals forces and dissolution in water, is also retained on the surface via reactive mechanisms such as acid-base reactions (Brønsted and Lewis) or complexation. Depending on the materials used and the experimental conditions, 6-47% ammonia adsorbed is strongly retained on the surface even when the bed is purged with air. PMID:19615690

  6. Adsorption of textile reactive dyestuffs by treatment sludges of inorganic nature.

    PubMed

    Tünay, Olcay; Metin, Emine; Olmez-Hanci, Tuğba; Kabdaşli, Işik

    2012-01-01

    Colour removal from industrial effluents, particularly from the textile industry, has become an important requirement as the adverse effects ofdyestuffs, such as toxicity, on the environment have been proven. Adsorption is a commonly used treatment method for colour removal. Although activated carbon is very effective for this purpose, a number of natural materials and waste materials, such as waste sludges generated from treatment systems, have been tested to reduce the cost of the process. In this paper, sludges arising from the operation of an electrocoagulation process that used stainless steel or aluminium electrodes were investigated as adsorbents for decolorization of reactive dyestuffs. Electrocoagulation waste sludges produced with the use of stainless steel electrodes provided higher than 90% or complete decolorization of Crimson HEXL, Yellow HE4R and RB5 dyestuffs. The sludge produced with aluminium electrodes yielded colour adsorption between 95% and 100% at a 1 g/L dose and pH 8.5-9.1 for two of the dyestuffs; the removal of RB5 did not exceed 60% up to a 4.76 g/L dose. FeCl3 coagulation and adsorption using freshly precipitated coagulation sludge resulted in poor colour removals of 10% for all three dyestuffs. The superior colour adsorption performance of electrocoagulation waste sludges was attributed to modification of the surface properties of the sludges during the electrocoagulation operation. A batch-wise kinetic study indicated that the adsorption of RB5 on to electrocoagulation waste sludges was well fitted by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, suggesting the intra-particle diffusion process as the rate-limiting step of the adsorption process.

  7. On the reactive adsorption of ammonia on activated carbons modified by impregnation with inorganic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bandosz, T.J.; Petit, C.

    2009-10-15

    Ammonia adsorption was studied under dynamic conditions, at room temperature, on activated carbons of different origins (coal-based, wood-based and coconut-shell-based carbons) before and after their impregnation with various inorganic compounds including metal chlorides, metal oxides and polycations. The role of humidity was evaluated by running tests in both dry and moist conditions. Adsorbents were analyzed before and after exposure to ammonia by thermal analyses, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Results of breakthrough tests show significant differences in terms of adsorption capacity depending on the parent carbon, the impregnates and the experimental conditions. It is found that surface chemistry governs ammonia adsorption on the impregnated carbons. More precisely, it was demonstrated that a proper combination of the surface pH, the strength, type and amount of functional groups present on the adsorbents' surface is a key point in ammonia uptake. Water can have either positive or negative effects on the performance of adsorbents. It can enhance NH{sub 3} adsorption capacity since it favors ammonia dissolution and thus enables reaction between ammonium ions and carboxylic groups from the carbons' surface. On the other hand, water can also reduce the performance from the strength of adsorption standpoint. It promotes dissolution of ammonia and that ammonia is first removed from the system when the adsorbent bed is purged with air. Ammonia, besides adsorption by van der Waals forces and dissolution in water, is also retained on the surface via reactive mechanisms such as acid-base reactions (Bronsted and Lewis) or complexation. Depending on the materials used and the experimental conditions, 6-47% ammonia adsorbed is strongly retained on the surface even when the bed is purged with air.

  8. Chitosan hydrogel beads impregnated with hexadecylamine for improved reactive blue 4 adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Mohammadtaghi; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ibrahim, Mahamad Hakimi; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Salamatinia, Babak; Gholami, Zahra

    2016-02-10

    Adsorption performance of chitosan (CS) hydrogel beads was investigated after impregnation of CS with hexadecylamine (HDA) as a cationic surfactant, for the elimination of reactive blue 4 (RB4) from wastewater. The CS/HDA beads formed with 3.8% HDA were the most effective adsorbent. The adsorption capacity was increased by 1.43 times from 317 mg/g (CS) to 454 mg/g (CS/HDA). The RB4 removal increased with decrease in the pH of dye solution from 4 to 9. The isotherm data obtained from RB4 adsorption on CS and CS/HDA are adequately described by Freundlich model (R(2)=0.946 and 0.934, χ(2)=22.414 and 64.761). The kinetic study revealed that the pseudo-second-order rate model (R(2)=0.996 and 0.997) was in better agreement with the experimental data. The negative values of ΔG° (-2.28 and -6.30 kJ/mol) and ΔH° (-172.18 and -101.62 kJ/mol) for CS beads and HDA modified CS beads, respectively; suggested a spontaneous and exothermic process for RB4 adsorption.

  9. Correlation of adsorption isotherms of hydrogen isotopes on mordenite adsorbents using reactive vacancy solution theory

    SciTech Connect

    Munakata, K.; Nakamura, A.; Kawamura, Y.

    2015-03-15

    The authors have applied the isotherm equations derived from the reactive vacancy solution theory (RVST) to correlation of experimental and highly non-ideal adsorption isotherms of hydrogen and deuterium on a mordenite adsorbent, and have examined the ability of the isotherm equations to match this correlation. Several isotherm equations such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Toth, Vacancy Solution Theory and so forth were also tested, but they did not work. For the Langmuir-Freundlich equation tests have indicated that its 'ability to correlate' of the adsorption isotherms is not satisfactory. For the multi-site Langmuir-Freundlich (MSLF) equation the correlation of the isotherms appears to be somewhat improved but remains unsatisfactory. The results show that the isotherm equations derived from RVST can better correlate the experimental isotherms.

  10. A study of Reactive Red 198 adsorption on iron filings from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Azhdarpoor, Abooalfazl; Nikmanesh, Roya; Khademi, Fahime

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, reactive dyes have been widely used in textile industries with particular efficiency. They dyes are often toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic. Improper treatment and non-scientific disposal of dyed wastewater from these industries into water sources has created many environmental problems and concerns around the world. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the efficiency of iron filings in adsorption of Reactive Red 198 from aqueous solutions. This study was conducted using an experimental method at the laboratory scale. In this study, the effects of operating parameters such as pH (1-11), initial dye concentration (40-400 mg/L), contact time (5-120 min) and iron dose (0.1-1 g) with a mesh of<100 were studied. Dye concentration was determined using a spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 520 nm. The results indicated that maximum adsorption capacity of the dye in question was obtained at pH 3, contact time of 60 min and adsorbent dose of 1 g. At initial dye concentration of 100 and 200 mg/L, by increasing the dose of waste iron from 0.1 to 1 g, the removal percentage increased from approximately 76.89% to 97.28% and from 22.64% to 68.03%, respectively. At pH 3, contact time of 5 min and constant waste iron dose of 0.8 g, the dye removal efficiency was 85.34%. By increasing the contact time to 120 min, the removal efficiency increased to 99.2%. Welding iron waste as an inexpensive and available adsorbent has an optimum ability for adsorption of Reactive Red 198 from aqueous solutions.

  11. Goethite surface reactivity: III. Unifying arsenate adsorption behavior through a variable crystal face - Site density model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Camacho, Carlos; Villalobos, Mario

    2010-04-01

    goethite, may be performed for each preparation either by experimental determination of site saturation by an index ion (e.g., chromate), or by achieving congruency of proton adsorption data with those of ideal goethites when plotted as percentage of proton-reactive ( lbond2 FeOH + lbond2 Fe 3OH) sites occupied. The surface arsenate complexes proposed additionally explained: (1) the higher affinity of goethite for As(V) than for Cr(VI) at high pH, and thus the gentle slope of the arsenate pH adsorption edges; and (2) the lower adsorption capacity for As(V) than for Cr(VI) at low pH on low-surface area goethites, through incomplete lbond2 FeOH site occupancy of As(V). The model is very promising as a practical means of predicting the adsorption behavior of arsenate on any goethite preparation, and may extend to predictive capabilities for adsorption behavior of many other relevant oxyanions, as well as for explaining differences in ligand-promoted surface transformation processes on goethite as a function of particle size.

  12. Probing Adsorption / Desorption Processes at the Liquid / Solid Interface: Thiols and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles; Jung, Linda S.; Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer; Nelsen, K. E.; Stayton, P. S.; Gelb, M. H.; Aebersold, R.

    2001-03-01

    The adsorption of molecules from liquid solutions onto solid surfaces can be monitored with high sensitivity and fast time response by following changes in the angle or wavelength at which the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a thin metal film is optically excited. Simple methods convert these measured changes into adsorbate concentrations. We report here the adsorption and desorption kinetics and equilibrium coverages of a variety of species on well-characterized surfaces as determined by SPR techniques. When the diffusion constant of the adsorbing species is known in the liquid phase, the intrinsic rate constants can be determined from the kinetic results. The sticking probability, defined as the rate of adsorption per molecular collision with the surface, directly expresses the difficulty encountered by a molecule in scaling the barrier to adsorption. Its prior use has been restricted to adsorption of gases. A method extending this concept to adsorption from liquid solutions is applied to transient measurements of alkylthiol adsorption onto gold from ethanol solutions. The initial sticking probability increases from 10-8 to 10-6 with alkyl chain length, implying a stabilization of the transition state by 0.65 kJ/mol per CH_2. Since their sticking probabilities in gas phase are 1.0, the solvent increases the activation free energy by 40 kJ/mol. Applications of gold-thin-film SPR sensors in quantifying biological interactions will be described also. A gold surface containing a few biotin headgroups in a self assembled alkylthiolate monolayer of mainly oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) headgroups selectively adsorbs the protein streptavidin with a structure that depends on the biotin / OEG ratio. The free biotin sites in the resulting streptavidin monolayer have been used as strong linker sites for further attachment of intact, biotinylated lipid vesicles and biotinylated, double-stranded oligonucleotides to the surface. These complex biological films then provide a

  13. Opto-Curling Probe for Simultaneous Monitoring of Optical Emission and Electron Density in Reactive Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anil; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo

    2013-05-01

    An advanced robust probe called opto-curling probe (OCP) is presented, which enables the simultaneous monitoring of electron density and optical emission of reactive plasma. The electron density is obtained from the microwave resonance frequency of a small antenna set on the probe surface while the optical emission spectra are observed through an optical fiber tip located at the probe surface. The ratio of the measured optical emission intensity to the electron density readily provides the radical density without relying on actinometry. The usefulness of OCP was experimentally demonstrated in the oxygen plasma cleaning of a carbonized wall with endpoint detection.

  14. Protein adsorption properties of OEG monolayers and dense PNIPAM brushes probed by neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouette, N.; Xue, C.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Fragneto, G.; Leckband, D. E.; Halperin, A.; Sferrazza, M.

    2012-11-01

    The structure of dense poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) brushes and oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) monolayers has been probed using neutron reflectometry and ellipsometry. The PNIPAM brush is swollen below the Lower Critical Solution Temperature (LCST) of 32 ∘C and is collapsed at 37 ∘C. Neutron reflectivity shows that below the LCST, the brush is described by a two-layer model: an inner dense layer and a hydrated outer layer. Above the LCST the collapsed brush forms a homogenous layer. With a fully deuterated myoglobin protein to increase the neutron scattering length density contrast, the reflectivity data show no detectable primary adsorption on the grafted OEG surface. A bound on the ternary adsorption onto PNIPAM chains forming dense brushes below and above the LCST is obtained.

  15. Phosphorous adsorption and precipitation in a permeable reactive wall: Applications for wastewater disposal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.J.; Blowes, D.W. |; Placek, C.J. |

    1997-12-31

    A permeable reactive mixture has been developed using low cost, readily available materials that is capable of providing effective, long-term phosphorous treatment in areas impacted by on-land wastewater disposal. The reactive mixture creates a geochemical environment suitable for P-attenuation by both adsorption and precipitation reactions. Potential benefits include significant reductions in phosphorous loading to receiving groundwater and surface water systems, and the accumulation of P-mass in a finite and accessible volume of material. The mixture may be applied as a component within surface treatment systems or in subsurface applications such as horizontal or vertical permeable reactive walls. The mixture averaged > 90% treatment efficiency over 3.6 years of continuous-flow laboratory column experiments. The mixture was further evaluated at the pilot-scale to treat municipal wastewater, and the field-scale to treat a well-characterized septic system plume using an in situ funnel and gate system. Average PO{sub 4}-P concentrations in effluent exiting the reactive mixture range between 0 - 0.3 mg/L. Mineralogical analyses have isolated the phases responsible for phosphorous uptake, and discrete phosphate precipitates have been identified.

  16. Adsorption behavior of a textile dye of Reactive Blue 19 from aqueous solutions onto modified bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gök, Özer; Özcan, A. Safa; Özcan, Adnan

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic parameters of Reactive Blue 19 (RB19) onto modified bentonite from aqueous solutions. The effects of pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and temperature were investigated in the experimentally. Natural bentonite was modified by using 1,6-diamino hexane (DAH) as a modifying agent. The characterization of modified bentonite (DAH-bentonite) was accomplished by using FTIR, TGA, BET and elemental analysis techniques. The optimum pH value for the adsorption experiments was found to be 1.5 and all the experiments were carried out at this pH value. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model agrees very well with the experimental results. Equilibrium data were also fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model in the studied concentration range of RB19 at 20 °C. The results indicate that DAH-modified bentonite is a suitable adsorbent for the adsorption of textile dyes.

  17. Reactive adsorption of NO2 at dry conditions on sewage sludge-derived materials.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Robert; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2007-11-01

    Composite inorganic-carbonaceous adsorbents were obtained by pyrolysis of sewage sludge at 500, 650, and 950 degrees C for various periods of time. They were used as media for reactive adsorption of NO2. The surface structure and chemistry of the initial and exhausted materials were analyzed using adsorption of nitrogen, XRD, FTIR, and thermal analysis. The results indicate the high level of conversion of NO2 to NO with the retention of both species on the surface depending on its chemistry. At 650 degrees C as the pyrolysis temperature, the most efficient adsorbents were obtained owing to a high reactivity of their oxides toward the formation of nitrites and nitrates. When the pyrolysis temperature is low, NO2 is reduced to NO on surface sulfides and reacts with surface oxides, forming nitrites and nitrates. When adsorbents are obtained at 950 degrees C, the chemically stable surface prevents the formation of nitrites and nitrates, and the majority of NO2 is reduced to NO in the highly carbonized carbonaceous phase.

  18. Characterization of humic acid reactivity modifications due to adsorption onto α-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Janot, Noémie; Reiller, Pascal E; Zheng, Xing; Croué, Jean-Philippe; Benedetti, Marc F

    2012-03-01

    Adsorption of purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) onto α-Al(2)O(3) is studied by batch experiments at different pH, ionic strength and coverage ratios R (mg of PAHA by m(2) of mineral surface). After equilibration, samples are centrifuged and the concentration of PAHA in the supernatants is measured. The amount of adsorbed PAHA per m(2) of mineral surface is decreasing with increasing pH. At constant pH value, the amount of adsorbed PAHA increases with initial PAHA concentration until a pH-dependent constant value is reached. UV/Visible specific parameters such as specific absorbance SUVA(254), ratio of absorbance values E(2)/E(3) and width of the electron-transfer absorbance band Δ(ET) are calculated for supernatant PAHA fractions of adsorption experiments at pH 6.8, to have an insight on the evolution of PAHA characteristics with varying coverage ratio. No modification is observed compared to original compound for R ≥ 20 mg(PAHA)/g(α)(-)(A)1₂(O)₃. Below this ratio, aromaticity decreases with initial PAHA concentration. Size-exclusion chromatography - organic carbon detection measurements on these supernatants also show a preferential adsorption of more aromatic and higher-sized fractions. Spectrophotometric titrations were done to estimate changes of reactivity of supernatants from adsorption experiments made at pH ≈6.8 and different PAHA concentrations. Evolutions of UV/Visible spectra with varying pH were treated to obtain titration curves that are interpreted within the NICA-Donnan framework. Protonation parameters of non-sorbed PAHA fractions are compared to those obtained for the PAHA before contact with the oxide. The amount of low proton-affinity type of sites and the value of their median affinity constant decrease after adsorption. From PAHA concentration in the supernatant and mass balance calculations, "titration curves" are experimentally proposed for the adsorbed fractions for the first time. These changes in reactivity to our opinion could

  19. Design of a sorbent to enhance reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long-Jiang; Fan, Hui-Ling; Shangguan, Ju; Croiset, Eric; Chen, Zhongwei; Wang, Hui; Mi, Jie

    2014-12-10

    A series of novel zinc oxide-silica composites with three-dimensionally ordered macropores (3DOM) structure were synthesized via colloidal crystal template method and used as sorbents for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) removal at room temperature for the first time. The performances of the prepared sorbents were evaluated by dynamic breakthrough testing. The materials were characterized before and after adsorption using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that the composite with 3DOM structure exhibited remarkable desulfurization performance at room temperature and the enhancement of reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide was attributed to the unique structure features of 3DOM composites; high surface areas, nanocrystalline ZnO and the well-ordered interconnected macroporous with abundant mesopores. The introduction of silica could be conducive to support the 3DOM structure and the high dispersion of zinc oxide. Moisture in the H2S stream plays a crucial role in the removal process. The effects of Zn/Si ratio and the calcination temperature of 3DOM composites on H2S removal were studied. It demonstrated that the highest content of ZnO could reach up to 73 wt % and the optimum calcination temperature was 500 °C. The multiple adsorption/regeneration cycles showed that the 3DOM ZnO-SiO2 sorbent is stable and the sulfur capacity can still reach 67.4% of that of the fresh sorbent at the fifth cycle. These results indicate that 3DOM ZnO-SiO2 composites will be a promising sorbent for H2S removal at room temperature.

  20. Probing Li-ion Dynamics and Reactivity on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Kumar, Amit; Arruda, Thomas M; Guo, Senli; Proksch, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Progress in development and optimization of energy storage and conversion materials necessitates understanding their ionic and electrochemical functionality on the nanometer scale level of single grain cluster, grain, or extended defect. Classical electrochemical strategies based on Faradaic current detection are fundamentally limited on the nanoscale. Here, we review principles and recent applications of Electrochemical Strain Microscopy (ESM), a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) technique utilizing intrinsic coupling between ionic pehnomena and molar volumes. ESM imaging, as well as time and voltage spectroscopies, are illustrated for several Li-ion cathode and anode materials. Perspectives for future ESM development and applications to other ionic systems are discussed.

  1. The Adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 Dye onto Cucurbit[8]uril and Cucurbit[6]uril: An Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaolei; Luo, Hanhan; Lu, Huijuan; Chen, Feifei; Li, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption behavior and mechanism of Reactive Blue 19 (RB19) on cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) and cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) were investigated. The adsorption isotherm data obtained at different temperatures were fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm, and according to this model, CB[8] and CB[6] exhibited maximum monolayer adsorption capacities of 714.29 and 100.5 mg/g, respectively, at 298.15 K. The adsorption thermodynamic functions ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS were evaluated and revealed that RB19 adsorption onto CB[8] and CB[6] is a spontaneous and enthalpy-driven process. The adsorption process was determined to follow pseudo-second-order kinetics, indicating that chemisorption dominates the adsorption process. Fourier tranform IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed that the formation of an inclusion complex is the main driving force of adsorption. The phenyl and sulfone moieties of RB19 reside inside the cavity of CB[8], but because of the small cavity, only the sulfone of RB19 resides inside the cavity of CB[6]. Time-dependent DFT calculations revealed that all of the absorption bands of RB19 derive from π → π* transitions, while for the adsorption product of CB[8], the bands located at 590 and 287 nm derive from π → π* transitions and the bands located at 254 and 202 nm mainly derive from intermolecular charge transfer (ICT). PMID:27064317

  2. Atmospheric measurements of total OH reactivity: Intercomparison of the pump-probe technique and the comparative reactivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusanter, Sebastien; Hansen, Robert; Leonardis, Thierry; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Blocquet, Marion; Fittschen, Christa; Hanoune, Benjamin; Sinha, Vinayak; Stevens, Philip; Locoge, Nadine

    2013-04-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) drives the oxidation of organic trace gases that can lead to the production of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere. A complete understanding of the sources and sinks of OH is therefore important to address issues related to both air quality and climate change. However, recent measurements of total OH reactivity [1-2], which is the inverse of the OH lifetime, have pointed out that our understanding of OH sinks is still incomplete and important reactive trace gases have not yet been identified. These measurements of total OH reactivity are of particular interest since they provide a critical test of our understanding of the OH budget. Three techniques are available to measure the total OH reactivity, including the total OH loss rate method [3], the pump-probe method [4], and the comparative reactivity method (CRM) [5]. While the first two methods are based on direct measurements of OH decays using laser-induced fluorescence instruments, the CRM is based on a different approach in which a tracer molecule is detected instead of OH to determine the ambient OH loss rate. As these instruments were deployed in different field campaigns, intercomparison exercises would be useful to ensure the accuracy of the measurements. However, such intercomparisons have not yet been published. An informal intercomparison involving a CRM instrument from the Ecole des Mines de Douai (EMD) and a pump-probe instrument from the laboratory Physicochimie des Processus de Combustion et de l'Atmosphere (PC2A) took place in an urban environment at the university of Lille (France). The two OH reactivity instruments measured continuously side by side for a duration of two weeks. Collocated measurements of trace gases were also performed using O3, NOx and SO2 monitors, as well as two automated chromatographic instruments capable of measuring more than 50 volatile organic compounds (VOC). We will present cross calibrations of the two OH reactivity

  3. Amine-Reactive Fluorene Probes: Synthesis, Optical Characterization, Bioconjugation, and Two-Photon Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing demand for confocal and two-photon fluorescence imaging, the availability of reactive probes that possess high two-photon absorptivity, high fluorescence quantum yield, and high photostability is of paramount importance. To address the demand for better-performing probes, we prepared two-photon absorbing amine-reactive fluorenyl-based probes 2-(9,9-bis(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl)-2-isothiocyanato-9H-fluoren-7-yl)benzothiazole (1) and 2-(4-(2-(9,9-bis(2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethyl)-2-isothiocyanato-9H-fluoren-7-yl)vinyl)phenyl)benzothiazole (2), incorporating the isothiocyanate as a reactive linker. Probe design was augmented by integrating high optical nonlinearities, increased hydrophilicity, and coupling with reactive functional groups for specific targeting of biomolecules, assuring a better impact on two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) imaging. The isothiocyanate (NCS) derivatives were conjugated with cyclic peptide RGDfK and Reelin protein. The study of the chemical and photophysical properties of the new labeling reagents, as well as the conjugates, is described. The conjugates displayed high chemical stability and photostability. The NCS derivatives had low fluorescence quantum yields, while their bioconjugates exhibited high fluorescence quantum yields, essentially “lighting up” after conjugation. Conventional and 2PFM imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of HeLa, NT2, and H1299 cells, incubated with two-photon absorbing amine-reactive probe (1), RGDfK-dye conjugate (7), and Reelin-dye conjugate (6), was demonstrated. PMID:19090700

  4. Ab Initio Study of Water Adsorption and Reactivity on the (211) Surface of Anatase TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Xu, Li-Fang; Li, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Jian-Tao; Lin, Zhe-Shuai; Liu, Kai; Cao, Yong-Ge; Selloni, Annabella

    2016-06-01

    The reactivity of the anatase TiO2 (211) surface is systematically studied by ab initio calculations of the surface energy and water-adsorption energy. We find that anatase (211) has a high surface energy of 0.97 J /m2 , close to that of the (001) surface, and the unsaturated fourfold-coordinated Ti4 atom is more reactive than the unsaturated fivefold-coordinated Ti5 atom. Accordingly, for water adsorption on the (211) surface, a dissociative form is favored on Ti4 sites, with a large adsorption energy Δ HH ,OH˜1.28 eV , while a nondissociative molecular form is favored on Ti5 sites, with a smaller adsorption energy Δ HH2O˜0.78 eV . Such distinct surface properties lead to a mixed dissociative and molecular adsorption configuration when the coverage is increased from 1 /3 to 1 monolayer. These results suggest that, similar to the (001) surface, the anatase (211) surface exhibits high reactivity and may be useful in catalytic and photocatalytic applications as well.

  5. Unique Reactivity of Transition Metal Atoms Embedded in Graphene to CO, NO, O₂ and O Adsorption: A First-Principles Investigation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Minmin; Liu, Xin; Sui, Yanhui; Luo, Jie; Meng, Changgong

    2015-10-27

    Taking the adsorption of CO, NO, O₂ and O as probes, we investigated the electronic structure of transition metal atoms (TM, TM = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) embedded in graphene by first-principles-based calculations. We showed that these TM atoms can be effectively stabilized on monovacancy defects on graphene by forming plausible interactions with the C atoms associated with dangling bonds. These interactions not only give rise to high energy barriers for the diffusion and aggregation of the embedded TM atoms to withstand the interference of reaction environments, but also shift the energy levels of TM-d states and regulate the reactivity of the embedded TM atoms. The adsorption of CO, NO, O₂ and O correlates well with the weight averaged energy level of TM-d states, showing the crucial role of interfacial TM-C interactions on manipulating the reactivity of embedded TM atoms. These findings pave the way for the developments of effective monodispersed atomic TM composites with high stability and desired performance for gas sensing and catalytic applications.

  6. Probing protein adsorption on a nanoparticle surface using second harmonic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Das, A; Chakrabarti, A; Das, P K

    2016-09-21

    A new application of second harmonic light scattering to probe protein physisorption on a gold nanoparticle surface in aqueous buffer is reported. The free energies of adsorption, the number of protein molecules adsorbed on the surface and the binding affinity of a moderate size protein, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and a small protein, insulin, have been determined using the change in the second harmonic scattered light signal as a function of binding. Four different size gold nanoparticles from 15 to 60 nm were used to determine the effect of size on the free energy change, the affinity constant and the number of protein molecules adsorbed on the surface. All were shown to increase with an increase in size. The binding can be reversed by centrifugation, and the protein molecules can be desorbed quantitatively. The application of this method for studying thermodynamic parameters of weakly interacting biomolecules with nanoparticles for nanoparticle based diagnostic and therapeutic formulations is important. PMID:27530608

  7. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partialmore » pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.« less

  8. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.

  9. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Newberg, John T; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-09-28

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10(-5) to 2 × 10(-3) Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 10(3) Torr(-1). The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors. PMID:26299301

  10. Adsorption of Reactive Red M-2BE dye from water solutions by multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernando M; Bergmann, Carlos P; Fernandes, Thais H M; Lima, Eder C; Royer, Betina; Calvete, Tatiana; Fagan, Solange B

    2011-09-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and powdered activated carbon were used as adsorbents for the successful removal of Reactive Red M-2BE textile dye from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of pH, shaking time and temperature on adsorption capacity were studied. In the acidic pH region (pH 2.0), the adsorption of the dye was favourable using both adsorbents. The contact time to obtain equilibrium at 298K was fixed at 1h for both adsorbents. The activation energy of the adsorption process was evaluated from 298 to 323K for both adsorbents. The Avrami fractional-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental data compared with pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order kinetic adsorption models. For Reactive Red M-2BE dye, the equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. Simulated dyehouse effluents were used to check the applicability of the proposed adsorbents for effluent treatment. PMID:21724329

  11. Recognition- and reactivity-based fluorescent probes for studying transition metal signaling in living systems.

    PubMed

    Aron, Allegra T; Ramos-Torres, Karla M; Cotruvo, Joseph A; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-08-18

    Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzyme cofactors, in part because of their potential to trigger oxidative stress and damage via Fenton chemistry. Metals in biology can be broadly categorized into two pools: static and labile. In the former, proteins and other macromolecules tightly bind metals; in the latter, metals are bound relatively weakly to cellular ligands, including proteins and low molecular weight ligands. Fluorescent probes can be useful tools for studying the roles of transition metals in their labile forms. Probes for imaging transition metal dynamics in living systems must meet several stringent criteria. In addition to exhibiting desirable photophysical properties and biocompatibility, they must be selective and show a fluorescence turn-on response to the metal of interest. To meet this challenge, we have pursued two general strategies for metal detection, termed "recognition" and "reactivity". Our design of transition metal probes makes use of a recognition-based approach for copper and nickel and a reactivity-based approach for cobalt and iron. This Account summarizes progress in our laboratory on both the development and application of fluorescent probes to identify and study the signaling roles of transition metals in biology. In conjunction with complementary methods for direct metal detection and genetic and/or pharmacological manipulations, fluorescent probes for transition metals have helped reveal a number of principles underlying transition metal dynamics. In this Account, we give three recent

  12. Development of a Sensitive Bioluminogenic Probe for Imaging Highly Reactive Oxygen Species in Living Rats.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryosuke; Takakura, Hideo; Kamiya, Mako; Kobayashi, Eiji; Komatsu, Toru; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2015-12-01

    A sensitive bioluminogenic probe for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS), SO3 H-APL, was developed based on the concept of dual control of bioluminescence emission by means of bioluminescent enzyme-induced electron transfer (BioLeT) and modulation of cell-membrane permeability. This probe enables non-invasive visualization of physiologically relevant amounts of hROS generated deep inside the body of living rats for the first time. It is expected to serve as a practical analytical tool for investigating a wide range of biological functions of hROS in vivo. The design concept should be applicable to other in vivo bioluminogenic probes. PMID:26474404

  13. An Aza-Cope Reactivity-Based Fluorescent Probe for Imaging Formaldehyde in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Thomas F; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-09-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a reactive carbonyl species (RCS) produced in living systems that has been implicated in epigenetics as well as in the pathologies of various cancers, diabetes, and heart, liver, and neurodegenerative diseases. Traditional methods for biological FA detection rely on sample destruction and/or extensive processing, resulting in a loss of spatiotemporal information. To help address this technological gap, we present the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a fluorescent probe for live-cell FA imaging that relies on a FA-induced aza-Cope rearrangement. Formaldehyde probe-1 (FAP-1) is capable of detecting physiologically relevant concentrations of FA in aqueous buffer and in live cells with high selectivity over potentially competing biological analytes. Moreover, FAP-1 can visualize endogenous FA produced by lysine-specific demethylase 1 in a breast cancer cell model, presaging the potential utility of this chemical approach to probe RCS biology.

  14. COD and color removal of reactive orange 16 dye solution by electrochemical oxidation and adsorption method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Zuhailie; Ahmad, Wan Yaacob Wan; Yusop, Muhammad Rahimi; Othman, Mohamed Rozali

    2015-09-01

    Degradation of Reactive Orange 16 (RO16) dye was investigated using electrochemical oxidation and adsorption (batch method) using mixture of coconut trunk charcoal-graphite-tin-polyvinyl chloride(PVC). In batch studies for adsorbents pellet and powder form of the charcoal mixture were used. RO16 was chosen as the model dye because of its high resistance towards conventional treatment methods. NaCl and RO16 concentration, treatment duration, weight of electrode and adsorbent and volume of solution were kept constant for both methods. The effectiveness of the treatments were compared and evaluated by percentage of RO16 decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and results indicated that electrochemical oxidation method ables to decolorized RO16 dye up to 98.5% after 20 minutes electrolysis time while pellet and powder in batch method only removed 17.1 and 33.6% of RO16 color respectively. However, only 45.6% of COD can be removed using electrochemical oxidation method while pellet and powder in batch method removed 47.8 and 49.6% of COD respectively. The decolorization and COD removal of RO16 was determined using UV-Vis spectrophotometer (by the changes of absorption spectrum intensity of azo chromophore (-N=N-) at λ=388 and 492.50 nm and Hach spectrophotometer respectively. FTIR was used to determine functional groups present in the coconut trunk charcoal.

  15. Trends in the adsorption and reactivity of hydrogen on magnesium silicate nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, Ichraf; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Bromley, Stefan T

    2015-04-14

    We study nanoclusters of Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene (having (MgO)6(SiO2)3 and (MgO)4(SiO2)4 compositions) with respect to their reactivity towards hydrogen atoms, using density functional calculations. Ultrasmall silicate particles are fundamental intermediates in cosmic dust grain formation and processing, and are thought to make up a significant mass fraction of the grain population. Due to their nanoscale dimensions and high surface area to bulk ratios, they are likely to also have a disproportionately large influence on surface chemistry in the interstellar medium. This work investigates the potential role of silicate nanoclusters in vital interstellar hydrogen-based chemistry by studying atomic H adsorption and H2 formation. Our extensive set of calculations confirm the generality of a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relation between the H2 reaction barrier and the 2Hchem binding energy, suggesting it to be independent of silicate dust grain shape, size, crystallinity and composition. Our results also suggest that amorphous/porous grains with forsteritic composition would tend to dissociate H2, but relatively Mg-poor silicate grains (e.g. enstatite composition) and/or more crystalline/compact silicate grains would tend to catalyse H2 formation. The high structural thermostability of silicate nanoclusters with respect to the heat released during exothermic H2 formation reactions is also verified.

  16. A transmission infrared cell design for temperature-controlled adsorption and reactivity studies on heterogeneous catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Harris, James W.; Zvinevich, Yury; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-10-01

    A design is presented for a versatile transmission infrared cell that can interface with an external vacuum manifold to undergo in situ gas treatments and receive controlled doses of various adsorbates and probe molecules, allowing characterization of heterogeneous catalyst surfaces in order to identify and quantify active sites and adsorbed surface species. Critical design characteristics include customized temperature control for operation between cryogenic and elevated temperatures (100-1000 K) and modified Cajon fittings for operation over a wide pressure range (10-2-103 Torr) that eliminates the complications introduced when using sealants or flanges to secure cell windows. The customized, hand-tightened Cajon fittings simplify operation of the cell compared to previously reported designs, because they allow for rapid cell assembly and disassembly and, in turn, replacement of catalyst samples. In order to validate the performance of the cell, transmission infrared spectroscopic experiments are reported to characterize the Brønsted and Lewis acid sites present in H-beta and H-mordenite zeolites using cryogenic adsorption of CO (<150 K).

  17. Immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the probe surface for molecular adsorption type endotoxin detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Katsutoshi; Tsuji, Akihito; Nishishita, Naoki; Hirano, Yoshiaki

    2007-04-01

    adsorption reaction between ɛ-polylysine and endotoxin. ɛ-polylysine has the structure of straight chain molecule composed by 25-30 residues made by lysine, and it is used as an antimicrobial agent, moreover, cellulose beads with immobilized ɛ-polylysine is used as the barrier filter for endotoxin removal. Therefore, it is expected that the endotoxin be adsorbed to the immobilized ɛ-polylysine onto the probe. As the result of this reaction, the mass of the probe is increased, and endotoxin can be detected by using of Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM). In our previous research, we have already acquired the proteins immobilization technique onto Au and Si surface. In this report, the proposal of molecular adsorption type endotoxin detection system, and the immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the probe are described. We use X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the ɛ-polylysine immobilization, and the adsorptive activity of immobilized ɛ-polylysine is measured by XPS and AFM. The purpose of this study is to bring about the realization of "Real-time endotoxin detection system".

  18. Low frequency sonochemical synthesis of nanoporous amorphous manganese dioxide (MnO{sub 2}) and adsorption of remazol reactive dye

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Siti Zubaidah; Yusop, Muhammad Rahimi; Othman, Mohamed Rozali

    2015-09-25

    Nanoporous amorphous-MnO{sub 2} was synthesized by sonochemical process (sonication) on the solid manganese (II) acetate tetrahydrate (Mn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O) in 0.1 M KMnO{sub 4}. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), morphology of the material was scanned by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and absorptions of MnO{sub 2} bonding was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectrometer (FT-IR). Remazol reactive dye or Red 3BS, was used in the adsorption study using nanoporous amorphous-MnO{sub 2}. In batch experiment, 10 ppm of Remazol reactive dye was used and experiment was carried out at room temperature. Adsorption of Remazol dye on 0.2g synthesized nanoporous amorphous-MnO{sub 2} showed 99 – 100% decolorization.

  19. THE INTEGRATED USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY, AND VIRTUAL REALITY TO PREDICT THE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last decade three new techniques scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (YR) and computational chemistry ave emerged with the combined capability of a priori predicting the chemically reactivity of environmental surfaces. Computational chemistry provides the cap...

  20. Surface enhanced Raman scattering based sensitive detection of histone demethylase activity using a formaldehyde-selective reactive probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Deng, Xianghua; Liu, Jinwen; Tang, Hao; Jiang, Jianhui

    2013-10-01

    A novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) based assay using a formaldehyde-selective reactive probe for sensitive detection of activity of histone demethylases (HDMs) by direct observation of by-product formaldehyde was reported.

  1. Understanding pH Effects on Trichloroethylene and Perchloroethylene Adsorption to Iron in Permeable Reactive Barriers for Groundwater Remediation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Farrell, James

    2013-01-01

    Metallic iron filings are becoming increasing used in permeable reactive barriers for remediating groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Understanding solution pH effects on rates of reductive dechlorination in permeable reactive barriers is essential for designing remediation systems that can meet treatment objectives under conditions of varying groundwater properties. The objective of this research was to investigate how the solution pH value affects adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) on metallic iron surfaces. Because adsorption is first required before reductive dechlorination can occur, pH effects on halocarbon adsorption energies may explain pH effects on dechlorination rates. Adsorption energies for TCE and PCE were calculated via molecular mechanics simulations using the Universal force field and a self-consistent reaction field charge equilibration scheme. A range in solution pH values was simulated by varying the amount of atomic hydrogen adsorbed on the iron. The potential energies associated TCE and PCE complexes were dominated by electrostatic interactions, and complex formation with the surface was found to result in significant electron transfer from the iron to the adsorbed halocarbons. Adsorbed atomic hydrogen was found to lower the energies of TCE complexes more than those for PCE. Attractions between atomic hydrogen and iron atoms were more favorable when TCE versus PCE was adsorbed to the iron surface. These two findings are consistent with the experimental observation that changes in solution pH affect TCE reaction rates more than those for PCE.

  2. Using the Multipole Resonance Probe to Stabilize the Electron Density During a Reactive Sputter Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberberg, Moritz; Styrnoll, Tim; Ries, Stefan; Bienholz, Stefan; Awakowicz, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Reactive sputter processes are used for the deposition of hard, wear-resistant and non-corrosive ceramic layers such as aluminum oxide (Al2O3) . A well known problem is target poisoning at high reactive gas flows, which results from the reaction of the reactive gas with the metal target. Consequently, the sputter rate decreases and secondary electron emission increases. Both parameters show a non-linear hysteresis behavior as a function of the reactive gas flow and this leads to process instabilities. This work presents a new control method of Al2O3 deposition in a multiple frequency CCP (MFCCP) based on plasma parameters. Until today, process controls use parameters such as spectral line intensities of sputtered metal as an indicator for the sputter rate. A coupling between plasma and substrate is not considered. The control system in this work uses a new plasma diagnostic method: The multipole resonance probe (MRP) measures plasma parameters such as electron density by analyzing a typical resonance frequency of the system response. This concept combines target processes and plasma effects and directly controls the sputter source instead of the resulting target parameters.

  3. New detection targets for amyloid-reactive probes: spectroscopic recognition of bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Guilford, II; Landsman, Pavel

    2005-05-01

    We report characteristic changes in fluorescence of amyloid-binding dyes Thioflavin T (TfT), pinacyanol (PIN) and related dyes, caused by their interaction with suspended Bacillus spore cultures (B. subtilis, B thuringiensis). The gain in TfT emission in the presence of spores allowed their immediate detection in aqueous suspensions, with a sensitivity limit of < 105 spores per ml. The spectroscopic signatures are consistent with a large number of binding sites for the two dyes on spore coats. The possible structural relationship of these dye binding loci with characteristic motifs (β-stacks) of amyloid deposits and other misfolded protein formations suggests new designs for probing biocontamination and also for clinical studies of non-microbial human pathogens (e.g., amyloid-related protein aggregates in prion-related transmissible encephalopathies or in Alzheimer's disease). Also reported is a special screening technique that was designed and used herein for calibration of new detection probes and assays for spore detection. It employed spectroscopic interactions between the candidate amyloid stains and poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-coated colloid silica (Percoll) nanoparticles that also display remarkable parallelism with the corresponding dye-amyloid and dye-spore reactivities. Percoll may thus find new applications as a convenient non-biological structural model mimicking the putative probe-targeted motifs in both classes of bioanalytes. These findings are important in the design of new probes and assays for important human pathogens (i.e. bacterial spores and amyloidogenic protein aggregates).

  4. Probing effects of polymer adsorption in colloidal particle suspensions by light scattering as relevant for the aquatic environment: An overview.

    PubMed

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Borkovec, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Modification of particle surfaces by adsorption of polymers is a process that governs particle behavior in aqueous environmental systems. The present article briefly reviews the current understanding of the adsorption mechanisms and the properties of the resulting layers, and it discusses two environmentally relevant cases of particle modification by polymers. In particular, the discussion focuses on the usefulness of methods based on light scattering to probe such adsorbed layers together with the resulting properties of the particle suspensions, and it highlights advantages and disadvantages of these techniques. Measurement of the electrophoretic mobility allows to follow the development of the adsorption layer and to characterize the charge of the modified particles. At saturation, the surface charge is governed by the charge of the adsorbed film. Dynamic light scattering provides information on the film thickness and on the behavior of the modified suspensions. The charge and the structure of the adsorbed layer influence the stability of the particles, as well as the applicability of the classical theory of Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO). This fundamental knowledge is presented in the light of environmental systems and its significance for applied systems is underlined. In particular, the article discusses two examples of environmental processes involving adsorption of polymers, namely, the modification of particles by natural adsorption of humic substances and the tailoring of surface properties of iron-based particles used to remediate contaminated aquifers.

  5. Monte Carlo Simulations Probing the Adsorptive Separation of Hydrogen Sulfide/Methane Mixtures Using All-Silica Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mansi S; Tsapatsis, Michael; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2015-11-10

    Selective removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from sour natural gas mixtures is one of the key challenges facing the natural gas industry. Adsorption and pervaporation processes utilizing nanoporous materials, such as zeolites, can be alternatives to highly energy-intensive amine-based absorption processes. In this work, the adsorption behavior of binary mixtures containing H2S and methane (CH4) in seven different all-silica zeolite frameworks (CHA, DDR, FER, IFR, MFI, MOR, and MWW) is investigated using Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations at two temperatures (298 and 343 K) and pressures ranging from 1 to 50 bar. The simulations demonstrate high selectivities that, with the exception of MOR, increase with increasing H2S concentration due to favorable sorbate-sorbate interactions. The simulations indicate significant inaccuracies of predictions using unary adsorption data and ideal adsorbed solution theory. In addition, the adsorption of binary H2S/H2O mixtures in MFI is considered to probe whether the presence of H2S induces coadsorption and reduces the hydrophobic character of all-silica zeolites. The simulations show preferential adsorption of H2S from moist gases with a selectivity of about 18 over H2O.

  6. Protein Adsorption and Reorganization on Nanoparticles Probed by the Coffee-Ring Effect: Application to Single Point Mutation Detection.

    PubMed

    Devineau, Stéphanie; Anyfantakis, Manos; Marichal, Laurent; Kiger, Laurent; Morel, Mathieu; Rudiuk, Sergii; Baigl, Damien

    2016-09-14

    The coffee-ring effect denotes the accumulation of particles at the edge of an evaporating sessile drop pinned on a substrate. Because it can be detected by simple visual inspection, this ubiquitous phenomenon can be envisioned as a robust and cost-effective diagnostic tool. Toward this direction, here we systematically analyze the deposit morphology of drying drops containing polystyrene particles of different surface properties with various proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA) and different forms of hemoglobin). We show that deposit patterns reveal information on both the adsorption of proteins onto particles and their reorganization following adsorption. By combining pattern analysis with adsorption isotherm and zeta potential measurements, we show that the suppression of the coffee-ring effect and the formation of a disk-shaped pattern is primarily associated with particle neutralization by protein adsorption. However, our findings also suggest that protein reorganization following adsorption can dramatically invert this tendency. Exposure of hydrophobic (respectively charged) residues can lead to disk (respectively ring) deposit morphologies independently of the global particle charge. Surface tension measurements and microscopic observations of the evaporating drops show that the determinant factor of the deposit morphology is the accumulation of particles at the liquid/gas interface during evaporation. This general behavior opens the possibility to probe protein adsorption and reorganization on particles by the analysis of the deposit patterns, the formation of a disk being the robust signature of particles rendered hydrophobic by protein adsorption. We show that this method is sensitive enough to detect a single point mutation in a protein, as demonstrated here by the distinct patterns formed by human native hemoglobin h-HbA and its mutant form h-HbS, which is responsible for sickle cell anemia. PMID:27562632

  7. Reactive adsorption of SO2 on activated carbons with deposited iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Arcibar-Orozco, Javier A; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2013-02-15

    The effect of iron particle size anchored on the surface of commercial activated carbon on the removal of SO(2) from a gas phase was studied. Nanosize iron particles were deposited using forced hydrolysis of FeCl(3) with or without H(3)PO(4) as a capping agent. Dynamic adsorption experiments were carried out on either dry or pre-humidified materials and the adsorption capacities were calculated. The surface of the initial and exhausted materials was extensively characterized by microscopic, porosity, thermogravimetric and surface chemistry. The results indicate that the SO(2) adsorption capacity increased two and half times after the prehumidification process owing to the formation of H(2)SO(4) in the porous system. Iron species enhance the SO(2) adsorption capacity only when very small nanoparticles are deposited on the pore walls as a thin layer. Large iron nanoparticles block the ultramicropores decreasing the accessibility of the active sites and consuming oxygen that rest adsorption centers for SO(2) molecules. Iron nanoparticles of about 3-4 nm provide highly dispersed adsorption sites for SO(2) molecules and thus increase the adsorption capacity of about 80%. Fe(2)(SO(4))(3) was detected on the surface of exhausted samples. PMID:23333487

  8. Imaging mitochondrial reactive oxygen species with fluorescent probes: current applications and challenges.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Gao, F

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key element in the regulation of several physiological functions and in the development or progression of multiple pathological events. A key task in the study of mitochondrial ROS is to establish reliable methods for measuring the ROS level in mitochondria with high selectivity, sensitivity, and spatiotemporal resolution. Over the last decade, imaging tools with fluorescent indicators from either small-molecule dyes or genetically encoded probes that can be targeted to mitochondria have been developed, which provide a powerful method to visualize and even quantify mitochondrial ROS level not only in live cells, but also in live animals. These innovative tools that have bestowed exciting new insights in mitochondrial ROS biology have been further promoted with the invention of new techniques in indicator design and fluorescent detection. However, these probes present some limitations in terms of specificity, sensitivity, and kinetics; failure to recognize these limitations often results in inappropriate interpretations of data. This review evaluates the recent advances in mitochondrial ROS imaging approaches with emphasis on their proper application and limitations, and highlights the future perspectives in the development of novel fluorescent probes for visualizing all species of ROS.

  9. Detection of reactive oxygen species in mainstream cigarette smoke by a fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Xu, Shi-jie; Li, Song-zhan

    2009-07-01

    A mass of reactive oxygen species(ROS) are produced in the process of smoking. Superfluous ROS can induce the oxidative stress in organism, which will cause irreversible damage to cells. Fluorescent probe is taken as a marker of oxidative stress in biology and has been applied to ROS detection in the field of biology and chemistry for high sensitivity, high simplicity of data collection and high resolution. As one type of fluorescent probe, dihydrorhodamine 6G (dR6G) will be oxidized to the fluorescent rhodamine 6G, which could be used to detect ROS in mainstream cigarette smoke. We investigated the action mechanism of ROS on dR6G, built up the standard curve of R6G fluorescence intensity with its content, achieved the variation pattern of R6G fluorescence intensity with ROS content in mainstream cigarette smoke and detected the contents of ROS from the 4 types of cigarettes purchased in market. The result shows that the amount of ROS has close relationship with the types of tobacco and cigarette production technology. Compared with other detecting methods such as electronic spin resonance(ESR), chromatography and mass spectrometry, this detection method by the fluorescent probe has higher efficiency and sensitivity and will have wide applications in the ROS detection field.

  10. Probing of Competitive Displacement Adsorption of Casein at Oil-in-Water Interface Using Equilibrium Force Distance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, V; Sangeetha, J; Philip, John

    2015-06-01

    The equilibrium force distance measurement is employed for the first time to probe the competitive and displacement adsorption of casein at an oil-water (O/W) emulsion interface that was initially adsorbed with either a diblock polymer or an anionic surfactant. A significant change in the force-distance profile was observed under the competitive displacement adsorption of casein, which is further confirmed from the hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential measurements. A decrease in the onset of repulsion and decay length are observed on competitive adsorption of smaller size casein molecules at O/W interface. With addition of casein in PVA-vac diblock polymer stabilized emulsion, the onset of repulsion decreases from 88 to 48 nm whereas the magnitude of force increases from 1 to 19 nN. The force decay length is reduced from 10.5 to 4.5 nm upon addition of casein. Our results suggest the complete replacement of adsorbed diblock polymers by casein molecules. The hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential measurements corroborate the casein mediated polymer displacement and the competitive adsorption of casein at the O/W interface. In the case of anionic surfactant covered O/W interfaces, casein molecules weakly associate at the interface without displacing the smaller size surfactant molecules where no significant changes in the onset repulsion and force profiles are observed. These results suggest that the casein molecules are effective displacers for replacement of adsorbed macromolecules from formulations, which has several important practical applications.

  11. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-06-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  12. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-10-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  13. Cell wall reactivity of acidophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria determined by potentiometric titrations and Cd adsorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Janice P L; Fein, Jeremy B

    2011-05-15

    In this study, we used potentiometric titrations and Cd adsorption experiments to determine the binding capacities of two acidophilic (A. cryptum and A. acidophilum) and two alkaliphilic (B. pseudofirmus and B. circulans) bacterial species in order to determine if any consistent trends could be observed relating bacterial growth environment to proton and Cd binding properties and to compare those binding behaviors to those of neutrophilic bacteria. All of the bacterial species studied exhibited significant proton buffering over the pH range in this study, with the alkaliphiles exhibiting significantly higher acidity constants than the acidophiles as well as the neutrophilic bacterial consortia. The calculated average site concentrations for each of the bacteria in this study are within 2σ experimental error of each other, with the exception of A. cryptum, which has a significantly higher Site 2 concentration than the other species. Despite differing acidity constants between the acidophiles and alkaliphiles, all bacteria except A. cryptum exhibited remarkably similar Cd adsorption behavior to each other, and the observed extent of adsorption was also similar to that predicted from a generalized model derived using neutrophilic bacterial consortia. This study demonstrates that bacteria that grow under extreme conditions exhibit similar proton and metal adsorption behavior to that of previously studied neutrophilic species and that a single set of proton and metal binding constants can be used to model the behavior of bacterial adsorption under a wide range of environmental conditions.

  14. Enhanced reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on the composites of graphene/graphite oxide with copper (hydr)oxychlorides.

    PubMed

    Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-06-27

    Composites of copper (hydr)oxychlorides with graphite oxide or graphene were synthesized and used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide at dynamic conditions at ambient temperatures. The materials were extensively characterized before and after adsorption in order to link their performance to the surface features. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, thermal analysis, TEM, SEM/EDX, and adsorption of nitrogen were used. It was found that the composite with graphene has the most favorable surface features enhancing reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide. The presence of moisture in the H2S stream has a positive effect on the removal process owing to the dissociation process. H2S is retained on the surface via a direct replacement of OH groups and via acid-base reactions with the copper (hydr)oxide. Highly dispersed reduced copper species on the surface of the composite with graphene enhance activation of oxygen and cause formation of sulfites and sulfates. Higher conductivity of the graphene phase than that of graphite oxide helps in electron transfer in redox reactions.

  15. The distinct effects of Mn substitution on the reactivity of magnetite in heterogeneous Fenton reaction and Pb(II) adsorption.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoliang; He, Zisen; Wei, Gaoling; Liu, Peng; Zhong, Yuanhong; Tan, Wei; Du, Peixin; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping; Zhang, Jing

    2014-07-15

    In this study, a series of Mn substituted magnetites were synthesized and used in catalyzing the heterogeneous Fenton degradation of acid orange II and Pb(II) adsorption, in order to investigate the effect of Mn substitution on the reactivity of magnetite. The valence and local environment of both Fe and Mn in the spinel structure of magnetite were investigated by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. The incorporation of Mn did not change the valence and local structure of Fe in the synthetic magnetite, while Mn was in the valences of +2 and +3. The Mn distribution on the octahedral sites of magnetite surface increased with the increase in Mn content. The Mn introduction led to an improvement of catalytic activity of magnetite. The sample with the minimum Mn content displayed the best efficiency in OH production and the degradation of acid orange II, while the other substituted samples did not show obvious difference in their catalytic performance. The adsorption capacity of magnetite samples toward Pb(II) gradually increased with the increase in Mn content. The above influences of Mn substitution on the reactivity of magnetite were discussed in views of the variations in microstructural environment and physicochemical properties.

  16. Probing the magic numbers of aluminum-magnesium cluster anions and their reactivity toward oxygen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhixun; Grover, Cameron J; Reber, Arthur C; Khanna, Shiv N; Castleman, A W

    2013-03-20

    We report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation into the geometry, stability, and reactivity with oxygen of alloy metal clusters Al(n)Mg(m)(-) (4 ≤ n+m ≤ 15; 0 ≤ m ≤ 3). Considering that Al and Mg possess three and two valence electrons, respectively, clusters with all possible valence electron counts from 11 to 46 are studied to probe the magic numbers predicted by the spherical jellium model, and to determine whether enhanced stability and reduced reactivity may be found for some Al(n)Mg(m)(-) at non-magic numbers. Al5Mg2(-) and Al11Mg3(-) exhibit enhanced stability corresponding to the expected magic numbers of 20 and 40 electrons, respectively; while Al7Mg3(-), Al11Mg(-), and Al11Mg2(-) turn out to be unexpectedly stable at electron counts of 28, 36, and 38, respectively. The enhanced stability at non-magic numbers is explained through a crystal-field-like splitting of degenerate shells by the geometrical distortions of the clusters. Al(n)Mg(m)(-) clusters appear to display higher oxidation than pure Al(n)(-) clusters, suggesting that the addition of Mg atoms enhances the combustion of pure aluminum clusters.

  17. Glycine on silica: a model system for the study of adsorption and reactivity of aminoacids on extraterrestrial particulate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J. F.; Stievano, L.; Costa, D.; Meng, M.; Lomenech, C.

    It is well known that a wide variety of organic compounds have been detected in extraterrestrial environments. Among them, simple aminoacids were often found in meteorites, comets and extraterrestrial particulates. Such materials, which are supposed to be formed and evolved in interstellar space, have therefore become of interest as possible sources for the development of Earth's first biosphere. In order to understand how organic matter can develop in such systems, and, in particular, how oligopeptides can be formed on the surface of such solids starting from simpler molecules, we decided to undertake a study of the adsorption and reactivity of simple aminoacids on finely divided oxide surfaces. Here we report, both from the theoretical and experimental point of view, on the mechanisms of formation of polypeptides starting from glycine, the simplest aminoacid, on the surface of silicon oxide. Glycine was adsorbed on the surface of well-characterised silica both from aqueous solutions under controlled pH and concentration, and from the gas phase. The adsorbed molecules were characterised using middle IR and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopies. The different preparation conditions resulted in different adsorption mechanisms at specific adsorption sites and different states of the adsorbed glycine in agreement with the DFT simulation data. The thermal reactivity of adsorbed/deposited glycine was then investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, in-situ diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy, and thermoprogrammed desorption coupled with mass spectrometry. Adsorbed glycine molecules react to form peptide bonds at a temperature considerably lower than bulk crystalline α -glycine, mainly producing the cyclic dimer diketopiperazine. These findings are of relevance for the evaluation of prebiotic peptide synthesis scenarii.

  18. Adsorption, Ordering, and Local Environments of Surfactant-Encapsulated Polyoxometalate Ions Probed at the Air–Water Interface

    DOE PAGES

    Doughty, Benjamin; Yin, Panchao; Ma, Ying-Zhong

    2016-07-23

    The continued development and application of surfactant-encapsulated polyoxometalates (SEPs) relies on understanding the ordering and organization of species at their interface and how these are impacted by the various local environments to which they are exposed. In this paper, we report on the equilibrium properties of two common SEPs adsorbed to the air–water interface and probed with surface-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. These results reveal clear shifts in vibrational band positions, the magnitude of which scales with the charge of the SEP core, which is indicative of a static field effect on the surfactant coating and the associated localmore » chemical environment. This static field also induces ordering in surrounding water molecules that is mediated by charge screening via the surface-bound surfactants. From these SFG measurements, we are able to show that Mo132-based SEPs are more polar than Mo72V30 SEPs. Disorder in the surfactant chain packing at the highly curved SEP surfaces is attributed to large conic volumes that can be sampled without interactions with neighboring chains. Measurements of adsorption isotherms yield free energies of adsorption to the air–water interface of -46.8 ± 0.4 and -44.8 ± 1.2 kJ/mol for the Mo132 and Mo72V30 SEPs, respectively, indicating a strong propensity for the fluid surface. Finally, the influence of intermolecular interactions on the surface adsorption energies is discussed.« less

  19. Adsorption, Ordering, and Local Environments of Surfactant-Encapsulated Polyoxometalate Ions Probed at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Benjamin; Yin, Panchao; Ma, Ying-Zhong

    2016-08-16

    The continued development and application of surfactant-encapsulated polyoxometalates (SEPs) relies on understanding the ordering and organization of species at their interface and how these are impacted by the various local environments to which they are exposed. Here, we report on the equilibrium properties of two common SEPs adsorbed to the air-water interface and probed with surface-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. These results reveal clear shifts in vibrational band positions, the magnitude of which scales with the charge of the SEP core, which is indicative of a static field effect on the surfactant coating and the associated local chemical environment. This static field also induces ordering in surrounding water molecules that is mediated by charge screening via the surface-bound surfactants. From these SFG measurements, we are able to show that Mo132-based SEPs are more polar than Mo72V30 SEPs. Disorder in the surfactant chain packing at the highly curved SEP surfaces is attributed to large conic volumes that can be sampled without interactions with neighboring chains. Measurements of adsorption isotherms yield free energies of adsorption to the air-water interface of -46.8 ± 0.4 and -44.8 ± 1.2 kJ/mol for the Mo132 and Mo72V30 SEPs, respectively, indicating a strong propensity for the fluid surface. The influence of intermolecular interactions on the surface adsorption energies is discussed. PMID:27452922

  20. Factors affecting the removal of ammonia from air on carbonaceous materials: Investigation of reactive adsorption mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Camille

    Air pollution related to the release of industrial toxic gases, represents one of the main concerns of our modern world owing to its detrimental effect on the environment. To tackle this growing issue, efficient ways to reduce/control the release of pollutants are required. Adsorption of gases on porous materials appears as a potential solution. However, the physisorption of small molecules of gases such as ammonia is limited at ambient conditions. For their removal, adsorbents providing strong adsorption forces must be used/developed. In this study, new carbon-based materials are prepared and tested for ammonia adsorption at ambient conditions. Characterization of the adsorbents' texture and surface chemistry is performed before and after exposure to ammonia to identify the features responsible for high adsorption capacity and for controlling the mechanisms of retention. The characterization techniques include: nitrogen adsorption, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Electron Microscopy. The results obtained indicate that ammonia removal is governed by the adsorbent's surface chemistry. On the contrary, porosity (and thus physisorption) plays a secondary role in this process, unless strong dispersive forces are provided by the adsorbent. The surface chemistry features responsible for the enhanced ammonia adsorption include the presence of oxygen-(carboxyl, hydroxyl, epoxy) and sulfur- (sulfonic) containing groups. Metallic species improve the breakthrough capacity as well as they lead to the formation of Lewis acid-base interactions, hydrogen-bonding or complexation. In addition to the latter three mechanisms, ammonia is retained on the adsorbent surface via Bronsted acid-base interactions or via specific reactions with the adsorbent's functionalities leading to the incorporation of ammonia into the adsorbent's matrix. Another mechanism

  1. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator: Using Differential Reactivity toward Channel-Permeant and Channel-Impermeant Thiol-Reactive Probes To Test a Molecular Model for the Pore†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The sixth transmembrane segment (TM6) of the CFTR chloride channel has been intensively investigated. The effects of amino acid substitutions and chemical modification of engineered cysteines (cysteine scanning) on channel properties strongly suggest that TM6 is a key component of the anion-conducting pore, but previous cysteine-scanning studies of TM6 have produced conflicting results. Our aim was to resolve these conflicts by combining a screening strategy based on multiple, thiol-directed probes with molecular modeling of the pore. CFTR constructs were screened for reactivity toward both channel-permeant and channel-impermeant thiol-directed reagents, and patterns of reactivity in TM6 were mapped onto two new, molecular models of the CFTR pore: one based on homology modeling using Sav1866 as the template and a second derived from the first by molecular dynamics simulation. Comparison of the pattern of cysteine reactivity with model predictions suggests that nonreactive sites are those where the TM6 side chains are occluded by other TMs. Reactive sites, in contrast, are generally situated such that the respective amino acid side chains either project into the predicted pore or lie within a predicted extracellular loop. Sites where engineered cysteines react with both channel-permeant and channel-impermeant probes occupy the outermost extent of TM6 or the predicted TM5−6 loop. Sites where cysteine reactivity is limited to channel-permeant probes occupy more cytoplasmic locations. The results provide an initial validation of two, new molecular models for CFTR and suggest that molecular dynamics simulation will be a useful tool for unraveling the structural basis of anion conduction by CFTR. PMID:19754156

  2. Kinetic adsorption profile and conformation evolution at the DNA-gold nanoparticle interface probed by dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Ding, XiaoFan; He, Miao; Wang, Jing; Lou, Xinhui

    2014-10-21

    The kinetic adsorption profile at the DNA-gold nanoparticle (AuNP) interface is probed by following the binding and organization of thiolated linear DNA and aptamers of varying chain lengths (15, 30, 44, and 51 mer) to the surface of AuNPs (13.0 ± 1.0 nm diameter). A systematic investigation utilizing dynamic light scattering has been performed to directly measure the changes in particle size during the course of a typical aging-salting thiolated DNA/AuNP preparation procedure. We discuss the effect of DNA chain length, composition, salt concentration, and secondary structure on the kinetics and conformation at the DNA-AuNP interface. The adsorption kinetics are chain-length dependent, composition independent, and not diffusion rate limited for the conditions we report here. The kinetic data support a mechanism of stepwise adsorption of thiols to the surface of AuNPs and reorganization of the thiols at the interface. Very interestingly, the kinetic increases of the particle sizes are modeled accurately by the pseudo-second-order rate model, suggesting that DNA could possess the statistically well-defined conformational evolution. Together with other experimental evidence, we propose a dynamic inner-layer and outer-tail (DILOT) model to describe the evolution of the DNA conformation after the initial adsorption of a single oligonucleotide layer. According to this model, the length of the tails that extend from the surface of AuNPs, capable for hybridization or molecular recognition, can be conveniently calculated. Considering the wide applications of DNA/AuNPs, the results should have important implications in sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly.

  3. Kinetic Adsorption Profile and Conformation Evolution at the DNA-Gold Nanoparticle Interface Probed by Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic adsorption profile at the DNA–gold nanoparticle (AuNP) interface is probed by following the binding and organization of thiolated linear DNA and aptamers of varying chain lengths (15, 30, 44, and 51 mer) to the surface of AuNPs (13.0 ± 1.0 nm diameter). A systematic investigation utilizing dynamic light scattering has been performed to directly measure the changes in particle size during the course of a typical aging-salting thiolated DNA/AuNP preparation procedure. We discuss the effect of DNA chain length, composition, salt concentration, and secondary structure on the kinetics and conformation at the DNA–AuNP interface. The adsorption kinetics are chain-length dependent, composition independent, and not diffusion rate limited for the conditions we report here. The kinetic data support a mechanism of stepwise adsorption of thiols to the surface of AuNPs and reorganization of the thiols at the interface. Very interestingly, the kinetic increases of the particle sizes are modeled accurately by the pseudo-second-order rate model, suggesting that DNA could possess the statistically well-defined conformational evolution. Together with other experimental evidence, we propose a dynamic inner-layer and outer-tail (DILOT) model to describe the evolution of the DNA conformation after the initial adsorption of a single oligonucleotide layer. According to this model, the length of the tails that extend from the surface of AuNPs, capable for hybridization or molecular recognition, can be conveniently calculated. Considering the wide applications of DNA/AuNPs, the results should have important implications in sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly. PMID:25222203

  4. Probing Intramolecular versus Intermolecular CO2 Adsorption on Amine-Grafted SBA-15.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chun-Jae; Lee, Li-Chen; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-12-15

    A mesoporous silica SBA-15 is modified with an array of amine-containing organosilanes including (i) propylamine, SiCH2CH2CH2NH2 (MONO), (ii) propylethylenediamine, SiCH2CH2CH2NHCH2CH2NH2 (DI), (iii) propyldiethylenetriamine, SiCH2CH2CH2NHCH2CH2NHCH2CH2NH2 (TRI), and (iv) propyltriethylenetetramine, SiCH2CH2CH2NHCH2CH2N(CH2CH2NH2)2 (TREN) and the low loading silane adsorbents (∼0.45 mmol silane/g) are evaluated for their CO2 adsorption properties, with a focus on gaining insight into the propensity for intramolecular vs intermolecular CO2 adsorption. Adsorption isotherms at low CO2 coverages are measured while simultaneously recording the heat evolved via a Tian-Calvet calorimeter. The results are compared on a silane molecule efficiency basis (mol CO2 adsorbed/mol silane) to assess the potential for intramolecular CO2 adsorption, employing two amine groups in a single silane molecule. As the number of amines in the silane molecule increases (MONO < DI < TREN ∼ TRI), the silane molecule efficiency is enhanced owing to the ability to intramolecularly capture CO2. Analysis of the CO2 uptake for samples with the surface silanols removed by capping demonstrates that cooperative uptake due to amine-CO2-silanol interactions is also possible over these adsorbents and is the primary mode of sorption for the MONO material at the studied low silane loading. As the propensity for intramolecular CO2 capture increases due to the presence of multiple amines in a single silane molecule (MONO < DI < TREN ∼ TRI), the measured heat of adsorption also increases. This study of various amine-containing silanes at low coverage is the first to provide significant, direct evidence for intramolecular CO2 capture in a single silane molecule. Furthermore, it provides evidence for the relative heats of adsorption for physisorption on a silanol laden surface (ca. 37 kJ/mol), a silanol-capped surface (ca. 25 kJ/mol), via amine-CO2-silanol interactions (ca. 46 kJ/mol), and via amine-CO2

  5. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Oxidative Stress Using a Reactive Oxygen Species–Activated Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    Prunty, Megan C.; Aung, Moe H.; Hanif, Adam M.; Allen, Rachael S.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Thule, Peter M.; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In vivo methods for detecting oxidative stress in the eye would improve screening and monitoring of the leading causes of blindness: diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Methods To develop an in vivo biomarker for oxidative stress in the eye, we tested the efficacy of a reactive oxygen species (ROS)–activated, near-infrared hydrocyanine-800CW (H-800CW) fluorescent probe in light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) mouse models. After intravitreal delivery in LIRD rats, fluorescent microscopy was used to confirm that the oxidized H-800CW appeared in the same retinal layers as an established ROS marker (dichlorofluorescein). Results Dose–response curves of increasing concentrations of intravenously injected H-800CW demonstrated linear increases in both intensity and total area of fundus hyperfluorescence in LIRD mice, as detected by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Fundus hyperfluorescence also correlated with the duration of light damage and functional deficits in vision after LIRD. In LIRD rats with intravitreal injections of H-800CW, fluorescent labeling was localized to photoreceptor inner segments, similar to dichlorofluorescein. Conclusions Hydrocyanine-800CW detects retinal ROS in vivo and shows potential as a novel biomarker for ROS levels in ophthalmic diseases. PMID:26348635

  6. Chemical Reactivity Probes for Assessing Abiotic Natural Attenuation by Reducing Iron Minerals.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dimin; Bradley, Miranda J; Hinkle, Adrian W; Johnson, Richard L; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2016-02-16

    Increasing recognition that abiotic natural attenuation (NA) of chlorinated solvents can be important has created demand for improved methods to characterize the redox properties of the aquifer materials that are responsible for abiotic NA. This study explores one promising approach: using chemical reactivity probes (CRPs) to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of contaminant reduction by reducing iron minerals. Assays of thermodynamic CRPs were developed to determine the reduction potentials (ECRP) of suspended minerals by spectrophotometric determination of equilibrium CRP speciation and calculations using the Nernst equation. ECRP varied as expected with mineral type, mineral loading, and Fe(II) concentration. Comparison of ECRP with reduction potentials measured potentiometrically using a Pt electrode (EPt) showed that ECRP was 100-150 mV more negative than EPt. When EPt was measured with small additions of CRPs, the systematic difference between EPt and ECRP was eliminated, suggesting that these CRPs are effective mediators of electron transfer between mineral and electrode surfaces. Model contaminants (4-chloronitrobenzene, 2-chloroacetophenone, and carbon tetrachloride) were used as kinetic CRPs. The reduction rate constants of kinetic CRPs correlated well with the ECRP for mineral suspensions. Using the rate constants compiled from literature for contaminants and relative mineral reduction potentials based on ECRP measurements, qualitatively consistent trends were obtained, suggesting that CRP-based assays may be useful for estimating abiotic NA rates of contaminants in groundwater.

  7. Water adsorption on TiO2 surfaces probed by soft X-ray spectroscopies: bulk materials vs. isolated nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Benkoula, Safia; Sublemontier, Olivier; Patanen, Minna; Nicolas, Christophe; Sirotti, Fausto; Naitabdi, Ahmed; Gaie-Levrel, François; Antonsson, Egill; Aureau, Damien; Ouf, François-Xavier; Wada, Shin-Ichi; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Miron, Catalin

    2015-01-01

    We describe an experimental method to probe the adsorption of water at the surface of isolated, substrate-free TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) based on soft X-ray spectroscopy in the gas phase using synchrotron radiation. To understand the interfacial properties between water and TiO2 surface, a water shell was adsorbed at the surface of TiO2 NPs. We used two different ways to control the hydration level of the NPs: in the first scheme, initially solvated NPs were dried and in the second one, dry NPs generated thanks to a commercial aerosol generator were exposed to water vapor. XPS was used to identify the signature of the water layer shell on the surface of the free TiO2 NPs and made it possible to follow the evolution of their hydration state. The results obtained allow the establishment of a qualitative determination of isolated NPs’ surface states, as well as to unravel water adsorption mechanisms. This method appears to be a unique approach to investigate the interface between an isolated nano-object and a solvent over-layer, paving the way towards new investigation methods in heterogeneous catalysis on nanomaterials. PMID:26462615

  8. Surface adsorption and hopping cause probe-size-dependent microrheology of actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Tang, Jay X.

    2011-04-01

    A network of filaments formed primarily by the abundant cytoskeletal protein actin gives animal cells their shape and elasticity. The rheological properties of reconstituted actin networks have been studied by tracking micron-sized probe beads embedded within the networks. We investigate how microrheology depends on surface properties of probe particles by varying the stickiness of their surface. For this purpose, we chose carboxylate polystyrene (PS) beads, silica beads, bovine serum albumin (BSA) -coated PS beads, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) -grafted PS beads, which show descending stickiness to actin filaments, characterized by confocal imaging and microrheology. Probe size dependence of microrheology is observed for all four types of beads. For the slippery PEG beads, particle-tracking microrheology detects weaker networks using smaller beads, which tend to diffuse through the network by hopping from one confinement “cage” to another. This trend is reversed for the other three types of beads, for which microrheology measures stiffer networks for smaller beads due to physisorption of nearby filaments to the bead surface. We explain the probe size dependence with two simple models. We also evaluate depletion effect near nonadsorption bead surface using quantitative image analysis and discuss the possible impact of depletion on microrheology. Analysis of these effects is necessary in order to accurately define the actin network rheology both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Adsorption of acridine on silver electrode: SERS spectra potential dependence as a probe of adsorbate state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyeva, Elena V.; Myund, Liubov A.; Dem'yanchuk, Evgeniya M.; Makarov, Artiom A.; Denisova, Anna S.

    2013-02-01

    This work investigates acridine adsorption on the silver electrode surface. The dependence of the acridine SERS spectra on the electrode potential proved to be quite different for azaheterocycle molecules, while the pH effect as expected. The changes in the acridine SERS spectrum caused by the double electric layer (DEL) rearrangement can be explained by sorption/desorption rather than the adsorbate molecule reorientation. The presence of chloride anions close to the silver surface is important not only for the SERS-active properties but for the formation of the stabilised surface complexes of the protonated acridine as well.

  10. Probing thyroglobulin in undiluted human serum based on pattern recognition and competitive adsorption of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ran; Huang, Shuai; Li, Jing; Chae, Junseok

    2014-10-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a sensitive indicator of persistent or recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer of follicular cell origin. Detection of Tg in human serum is challenging as bio-receptors, such as anti-Tg, used in immunoassay have relatively weak binding affinity. We engineer sensing surfaces using the competitive adsorption of proteins, termed the Vroman Effect. Coupled with Surface Plasmon Resonance, the "cross-responsive" interactions of Tg on the engineered surfaces produce uniquely distinguishable multiple signature patterns, which are discriminated using Linear Discriminant Analysis. Tg-spiked samples, down to 2 ng/ml Tg in undiluted human serum, are sensitively and selectively discriminated from the control (undiluted human serum).

  11. Probing the contribution of different intermolecular forces to the adsorption of spheroproteins onto hydrophilic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Borges, João; Campiña, José M; Silva, A Fernando

    2013-12-27

    Protein adsorption is a delicate process, which results from the balance between the properties of proteins and their solid supports. Although the relevance of some of these parameters has been already unveiled, the precise involvement of electrostatics and other weaker intermolecular forces requires further comprehension. Aiming to contribute to this task, this work explores the attachment, rearrangement, and surface aggregation of a model spheroprotein, such as bovine β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), onto hydrophilic substrates prefunctionalized with different alkylthiol films. Thereby, a variety of electrostatic scenarios for the adsorption of β-LG could be recreated through the variation of the pH and the functional chemistry of the surfaces. The changes in surface mass density (plus associated water) and film flexibility were followed in situ with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Film packing and aggregation were assessed by faradaic electrochemical measurements and ex situ atomic force microscopy and field effect scanning electron microscopy. In contrast to previous hypotheses arguing that electrostatic interactions between charged substrates and proteins would be the only driving force, a complex interplay between Coulombic and non-Coulombic intermolecular forces (which would depend upon the experimental conditions) has been suggested to explain the results.

  12. Controls on the surface chemical reactivity of volcanic ash investigated with probe gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maters, Elena C.; Delmelle, Pierre; Rossi, Michel J.; Ayris, Paul M.; Bernard, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Increasing recognition that volcanic ash emissions can have significant impacts on the natural and human environment calls for a better understanding of ash chemical reactivity as mediated by its surface characteristics. However, previous studies of ash surface properties have relied on techniques that lack the sensitivity required to adequately investigate them. Here we characterise at the molecular monolayer scale the surfaces of ash erupted from Eyjafjallajökull, Tungurahua, Pinatubo and Chaitén volcanoes. Interrogation of the ash with four probe gases, trimethylamine (TMA; N(CH3)3), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA; CF3COOH), hydroxylamine (HA; NH2OH) and ozone (O3), reveals the abundances of acid-base and redox sites on ash surfaces. Measurements on aluminosilicate glass powders, as compositional proxies for the primary constituent of volcanic ash, are also conducted. We attribute the greater proportion of acidic and oxidised sites on ash relative to glass surfaces, evidenced by comparison of TMA/TFA and HA/O3 uptake ratios, in part to ash interaction with volcanic gases and condensates (e.g., H2O, SO2, H2SO4, HCl, HF) during the eruption. The strong influence of ash surface processing in the eruption plume and/or cloud is further supported by particular abundances of oxidised and reduced sites on the ash samples resulting from specific characteristics of their eruptions of origin. Intense interaction with water vapour may result in a higher fraction of oxidised sites on ash produced by phreatomagmatic than by magmatic activity. This study constitutes the first quantification of ash chemical properties at the molecular monolayer scale, and is an important step towards better understanding the factors that govern the role of ash as a chemical agent within atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic or biotic systems.

  13. Monitoring Cr Intermediates and Reactive Oxygen Species with Fluorescent Probes during Chromate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cr(VI) genotoxicity is caused by products of its reductive metabolism inside the cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Cr(V,IV) intermediates are potential sources of oxidative damage by Cr(VI). Here, we investigated seven fluorescent probes for the detection of ROS and non-ROS oxidants in Cr(VI) reactions with its main reducers. We found that Cr(V)-skipping metabolism of Cr(VI) by ascorbate in vitro gave no responses with all tested dyes, indicating nonreactivity of Cr(IV) and absence of ROS. Cr(VI) reduction with glutathione (GSH) or Cys strongly enhanced the fluorescence of dichlorofluorescein (DCF) and dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR123) but produced minimal fluorescence with dihydroethidium and no increases with aminophenylfluorescein and CellRox Green, Orange, and Red. Several tests showed that Cr(VI)-thiol reactions lacked ROS and that Cr(V) caused oxidation of DCF and DHR123. DCF reacted only with free Cr(V), whereas DHR123 detected both the free Cr(V) and Cr(V)-GSH complex. We estimated that Cr(VI)-GSH reactions generated approximately 75% Cr(V)-GSH and 25% free Cr(V), whereas Cys reactions appeared to produce only free Cr(V). DHR123 measurements in H460 cells showed that reduction of Cr(VI) was complete within 20 min postexposure, but it lasted at least 1 h without GSH. Cells with restored ascorbate levels exhibited no DCF or DHR123 oxidation by Cr(VI). Overall, our results demonstrated that Cr(VI) metabolism with its biological reducers lacked ROS and that DHR123 and DCF responses were indicators of total and free Cr(V), respectively. CellRox dyes, dihydroethidium and aminophenylfluorescein, are insensitive to Cr(V,IV) and can be used for monitoring ROS during coexposure to Cr(VI) and oxidants. PMID:24646070

  14. Probing the sorption reactivity of the edge surfaces in birnessite nanoparticles using nickel(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanova, Anna A.; Kwon, Kideok D.; Bone, Sharon E.; Bargar, John R.; Refson, Keith; Sposito, Garrison; Peña, Jasquelin

    2015-09-01

    Birnessite minerals are layer-type manganese oxides characterized by large surface areas, the presence of cation vacancy sites and varying amounts of structural and adsorbed Mn(III). In this study, we identify the conditions that favor trace metal adsorption on the edge surfaces of birnessite nanoparticles by using Ni as a probe ion for Ni K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and geometry optimizations based on density function theory (DFT). In δ-MnO2 nanoparticles free of Mn(II,III) at pH 6.6, Ni was adsorbed primarily at vacancy sites, with a minor fraction of Ni present as a double-edge sharing (DES) or a double-corner sharing (DCS) complex at surface loadings exceeding the vacancy content. In Mn(III)-rich δ-MnO2 nanoparticles, about 80% of the adsorbed Ni formed a mixture of DES and DCS complexes at particle edges in samples with loadings ranging from 0.01 to 0.08 mol Ni mol-1 Mn, with only a small fraction of vacancy sites available to adsorb Ni. The presence of Mn(III) at the nanoparticle edges also changed the architecture of the DES complex, causing the Ni octahedra to adsorb onto the cavity formed between two Mn(III) octahedra at the particle edges. The EXAFS-derived Ni-Mn interatomic distances of 3.01-3.05 Å for this "flipped" Ni-DES complex were in excellent agreement with those obtained by DFT geometry optimization. Edge surfaces on birnessite nanoparticles have a lower affinity for trace metals than vacancy sites, but have a moderate sorption capacity (ca. 0.14 mol Ni mol-1 Mn at vacancies vs. 0.06 mol Ni mol-1 Mn at edge surfaces). Finally, although Mn(III) increases the relative proportion of Ni adsorbed at particle edges by blocking sorption sites on the basal surface, the overall sorption capacity of the mineral diminishes significantly.

  15. Adsorption and photocatalysis of nanocrystalline TiO2 particles for Reactive Red 195 removal: effect of humic acids, anions and scavengers.

    PubMed

    Chládková, B; Evgenidou, E; Kvítek, L; Panáček, A; Zbořil, R; Kovář, P; Lambropoulou, D

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the coupling of adsorption capacity and photocatalytic efficiency of two different industrially produced titania catalysts was investigated and compared. The azo dye Reactive Red 195 was selected as a model compound. The tested catalysts, PK-10 and PK-180, exhibited different adsorption capacities due to their significant difference in their specific surface, but both have proven to be effective photocatalysts for photodegradation of the studied dye. PK-10 exhibited strong adsorption of the studied dye due to its high specific surface area, while the second studied catalyst, PK-180, demonstrated negligible adsorption of Reactive Red 195. The effect of the pH, the concentration of the catalyst and the initial concentration of the dye appear to affect the photocatalytic rate. The effect of the presence of humic acids and inorganic ions was also examined, while the contribution of various reactive species was indirectly evaluated through the addition of various scavengers. To evaluate the extent of mineralisation of the studied dye, total organic carbon (TOC) measurements during the experiment were also conducted. Besides total colour removal, evident reduction of TOC was also achieved using both catalysts. PMID:26054457

  16. Adsorption and photocatalysis of nanocrystalline TiO2 particles for Reactive Red 195 removal: effect of humic acids, anions and scavengers.

    PubMed

    Chládková, B; Evgenidou, E; Kvítek, L; Panáček, A; Zbořil, R; Kovář, P; Lambropoulou, D

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the coupling of adsorption capacity and photocatalytic efficiency of two different industrially produced titania catalysts was investigated and compared. The azo dye Reactive Red 195 was selected as a model compound. The tested catalysts, PK-10 and PK-180, exhibited different adsorption capacities due to their significant difference in their specific surface, but both have proven to be effective photocatalysts for photodegradation of the studied dye. PK-10 exhibited strong adsorption of the studied dye due to its high specific surface area, while the second studied catalyst, PK-180, demonstrated negligible adsorption of Reactive Red 195. The effect of the pH, the concentration of the catalyst and the initial concentration of the dye appear to affect the photocatalytic rate. The effect of the presence of humic acids and inorganic ions was also examined, while the contribution of various reactive species was indirectly evaluated through the addition of various scavengers. To evaluate the extent of mineralisation of the studied dye, total organic carbon (TOC) measurements during the experiment were also conducted. Besides total colour removal, evident reduction of TOC was also achieved using both catalysts.

  17. Adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 and Congo Red dye from aqueous solution by amino-functionalized Fe3O4 particles: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ting-guo; Wang, Li-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic adsorbent was synthesized by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modification of Fe(3)O(4) particles using a two-step process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and vibration sample magnetometry were used to characterize the obtained magnetic adsorbent. EDS and XPS showed that APTES polymer was successfully introduced onto the as-prepared Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particle surfaces. The saturation magnetization of the magnetic adsorbent was around 65 emu g(-1), which indicated that the dye can be removed fast and efficiently from aqueous solution with an external magnetic field. The maximum adsorption capacities of Fe(3)O(4)/APTES for C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) were 51.4 and 118.8 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) on Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particles corresponded well to the Langmuir model and the Freundlich model, respectively. The adsorption processes for RR 228 and CR followed the pseudo-second-order model. The Boyd's film-diffusion model showed that film diffusion also played a major role in the studied adsorption processes for both dyes. Thermodynamic study indicated that both of the adsorption processes of the two dyes are spontaneous exothermic. PMID:24552735

  18. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas. PMID:26972953

  19. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas.

  20. Efficient and rapid adsorption characteristics of templating modified guar gum and silica nanocomposite toward removal of toxic reactive blue and Congo red dyes.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sagar; Patra, Abhay Shankar; Ghorai, Soumitra; Sarkar, Amit Kumar; Mahato, Vivekananda; Sarkar, Supriyo; Singh, R P

    2015-09-01

    The present study highlights the potentiality of sol-gel synthesized guar gum-graft-poly (acrylamide)/silica (g-GG/SiO2) hybrid nanocomposite toward the rapid removal of toxic reactive blue 4 (RB) and Congo red (CR) dyes from aqueous solution. Various physicochemical characterizations support the feasibility of the functionalized guar gum matrix as efficient template for the formation of homogeneous nanoscale silica particles. The composite demonstrates rapid and superior adsorption efficiency of RB (Qmax: 579.01 mg g(-1) within 40 min) and CR (Qmax: 233.24 mg g(-1) within 30 min) dyes from aqueous environment. Here, the pH driven adsorption process depends strongly on the ionic strength of the salt solution. The adsorption kinetics data predicts that pseudo second-order (surface adsorption) and intraparticle diffusion take place simultaneously. The adsorption equilibrium is in good agreement with the Langmuir isotherm, while the thermodynamics study confirms spontaneous nature of the adsorption process. Desorption study predicts the excellent regenerative efficacy of nanocomposite.

  1. Efficient and rapid adsorption characteristics of templating modified guar gum and silica nanocomposite toward removal of toxic reactive blue and Congo red dyes.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sagar; Patra, Abhay Shankar; Ghorai, Soumitra; Sarkar, Amit Kumar; Mahato, Vivekananda; Sarkar, Supriyo; Singh, R P

    2015-09-01

    The present study highlights the potentiality of sol-gel synthesized guar gum-graft-poly (acrylamide)/silica (g-GG/SiO2) hybrid nanocomposite toward the rapid removal of toxic reactive blue 4 (RB) and Congo red (CR) dyes from aqueous solution. Various physicochemical characterizations support the feasibility of the functionalized guar gum matrix as efficient template for the formation of homogeneous nanoscale silica particles. The composite demonstrates rapid and superior adsorption efficiency of RB (Qmax: 579.01 mg g(-1) within 40 min) and CR (Qmax: 233.24 mg g(-1) within 30 min) dyes from aqueous environment. Here, the pH driven adsorption process depends strongly on the ionic strength of the salt solution. The adsorption kinetics data predicts that pseudo second-order (surface adsorption) and intraparticle diffusion take place simultaneously. The adsorption equilibrium is in good agreement with the Langmuir isotherm, while the thermodynamics study confirms spontaneous nature of the adsorption process. Desorption study predicts the excellent regenerative efficacy of nanocomposite. PMID:26002148

  2. Adsorption of 4-picoline and piperidine to the hydrated SiO2 surface: probing the surface acidity with vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dingfang; Ma, Gang; Allen, Heather C

    2005-04-01

    Vapor adsorption is an important process influencing the migration and the fate of many organic pollutants in the environment. In this study, vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy was used to study the adsorption of two surface acidity probe molecules, 4-picoline (pKa = 5.94) and piperidine (pKa = 11.24), onto the amorphous SiO2 surface. The adsorption of 4-picoline onto the silica surface occurs by forming weak hydrogen bonds between the nitrogen atoms of 4-picoline molecules and the hydrogen atoms of surface silanol OH groups. Piperidine molecules are strongly chemisorbed onto the SiO2 surface through the protonation of piperidine molecules by surface silanol OH groups. The SFG results indicate that the surface acidity constant of silanol OH groups (pKa-(HOSi triple bond)) is in the range of 5.94-11.24 at the air/solid interface. Although this range of surface acidity constants is quite wide, it is possible to narrow it by choosing probe molecules with a smaller pKa range. Together with theoretical prediction methods, adsorption studies using vibrational SFG spectroscopy are capable of quantifying the surface acidity of mineral oxides by carefully choosing the acidity probe molecules.

  3. Assessing Site-Isolation of Amine Groups on Aminopropyl-Functionalized SBA-15 Materials via Spectroscopic and Reactivity Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, Jason C; Dabestani, Reza T; Buchanan III, A C; Jones, Christopher W

    2008-01-01

    The average degree of separation and the accessibility of aminopropyl groups on SBA-15 silica materials prepared using different silane grafting approaches are compared. Three specific synthetic approaches are used: (1) the traditional grafting of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane in toluene, (2) a protection/deprotection method using benzyl- or trityl-spacer groups, and (3) a cooperative dilution method where 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane and methyltrimethoxysilane are co-condensed on the silica surface as a silane mixture. The site-isolation and accessibility of the amine groups are probed via three methods: (a) evaluation of pyrene groups adsorbed onto the solids using fluorescence spectroscopy, (b) the reactions of chlorodimethyl(2,3,4,5-tetramethyl-2,4-cyclopentadien-1-yl)silane (Cp'Si(Me){sub 2}Cl) and chloro(cyclopenta-2,4-dienyl)dimethylsilane (CpSi(Me){sub 2}Cl) with the tethered amine sites, and (c) comparison of the reactivity of zirconium constrained-geometry-inspired catalysts (CGCs) prepared using the Cp'Si(Me){sub 2}-modified aminosilicas in the catalytic polymerization of ethylene to produce poly(ethylene). The spectroscopic probe of site-isolation suggests that both the protection/deprotection method and the cooperative dilution method yield similarly isolated amine sites that are markedly more isolated than sites on traditional aminosilica. In contrast, both reactivity probes show that the protection/deprotection strategy leads to more uniformly accessible amine groups. It is proposed that the reactivity probes are more sensitive tests for accessibility and site-isolation in this case.

  4. Nonlinear optical property of hemicyanine self-assembled monolayers on gold and its adsorption kinetics probed by optical second-harmonic generation and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraoka, Ryo; Kaise, Go; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Okawa, Haruki; Ikezawa, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Kazuhiko

    2002-08-01

    We have prepared the organosulfur self-assembled monolayer (SAM) containing hemicyanine on gold. It shows a large second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χzzz=58 pm/V. The adsorption kinetics of the SAM on gold was also probed by the in situ real time measurements of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. While the SHG kinetics was saturated immediately after the immersion of the gold substrate in the solution, the SPR kinetics showed additional slow adsorption for more than 20 000 s. This means that rapid formation of the well-ordered hemicyanine SAM is followed by gradual physisorption where the molecules are disordered.

  5. A DFT study of the acid-base properties of anatase TiO2 and tetragonal ZrO2 by adsorption of CO and CO2 probe molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi Tiffany; Tosoni, Sergio; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-10-01

    We have performed a comparative study of the acid-base characteristics of the surfaces of anatase TiO2 and tetragonal ZrO2. To this end we performed DFT + U calculations on CO and CO2 probe molecules adsorbed both on terraces and steps of the two oxides. For titania, CO adsorption results in a moderate adsorption energy (about - 0.3 eV) and in a positive shift of the Csbnd O stretching frequency (about + 40 cm- 1), typical of Lewis acid sites, with no clear difference in the acidity between terraces or steps. For zirconia we found a similar CO binding energy as for titania, and a CO vibrational shift that depends on the location of the Zr cation: negligible on terraces, similar to TiO2 on steps. We conclude that the acidic properties are similar in the two oxide surfaces. Things are different for CO2 adsorption. On titania the interaction is weak and surface carbonates compete with physisorbed CO2, indicating a weak basic character. On the contrary, on zirconia three types of stable carbonates have been identified. Their vibrational frequencies are consistent with IR measurements reported in the literature. The most stable species forms on steps of the t-ZrO2 surface and consists of a CO32 - unit which lies flat on the surface with the O atoms pointing towards three Zr ions. The species forms spontaneously by extraction of a lattice oxygen by an incoming CO2 molecule. The different reactivity points towards a much more pronounced basic character of zirconia compared to titania, at least if measured by CO2 adsorption.

  6. Mesoporous magnetic activated carbon: Effect of preparation route on texture and surface properties and on effect for Reactive Black 5 adsorption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakoudakis, Dimitrios; Saroyan, Hayarpi; Lazaridis, Nikolaos; Deliyanni, Eleni

    2016-04-01

    Mesoporous magnetic activated carbon: Effect of preparation route on texture and surface properties and on effect for Reactive Black 5 adsorption. Dimitrios Giannakoudakis1, Hayarpi Saroyan2, Nikolaos Lazaridis2, Eleni Deliyanni2 1 City College of New York, Chemistry Department, 160 Convent Avenue, New York, United States 2 Laboratory of General and oInorganic Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece In this study, the effect of preparation route of a mesoporous magnetic activated carbon on Reactive Black 5 (RB5) adsorption was investigated. The synthesis of the magnetic activated carbon was achieved both with (i) impregnation method (Bmi), and (ii) co-precipitation with two precipitation agents: NaOH (Bm) and NH4OH (Bma). After synthesis, the full characterization with various techniques (SEM, FTIR, XRD, DTA, DTG, VSM) was achieved in order to testify the effect of the preparation route on its textural and surface properties. It was shown that after the precipitation method the prepared carbon presented a collapsed texture and small magnetic properties. Effects of initial solution pH, effect of temperature, adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated in order to conclude about the aforementioned effect of the preparation method on dye adsorption performance of the magnetic carbons. The adsorption evaluation of the magnetic activated carbon presented higher adsorption capacity of Bmi carbon (350 mg/g) and lower of Bm (150 mg/g). Equilibrium experiments are also performed studying the effect of contact time (pseudo-first and -second order equations) and temperature (isotherms at 25, 45 and 65 °C fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich model). A full thermodynamic evaluation was carried out, calculating the parameters of enthalpy, free energy and entropy (ΔHο, ΔGο and ΔSο). The characterization with various techniques revealed the possible interactions/forces of dye-composite system.

  7. Role of surface chemistry and morphology in the reactive adsorption of H₂S on iron (hydr)oxide/graphite oxide composites.

    PubMed

    Arcibar-Orozco, Javier A; Wallace, Rajiv; Mitchell, Joshua K; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2015-03-10

    Composites of magnetite and two-line ferrihydrite with graphite oxide (GO) were synthesized and tested as hydrogen sulfide adsorbents. Exhausted and initial composites were characterized by the adsorption of nitrogen, X-ray diffraction, potentiometric titration, thermal analysis, and FTIR. The addition of GO increased the surface area of the composites due to the formation of new micropores. The extent of the increase depended on the nature of the iron (hydr)oxide and the content of GO. The addition of GO did not considerably change the crystal structure but increased the number of acidic functional groups. While for the magnetite composites an increase in the H2S adsorption capacity after GO addition was found, the opposite effect was recorded for the ferrihydrite composites. That increase in the adsorption capacity was linked to the affinity of the composites to adsorb water in mesopores of specific sizes in which the reaction with basic surface groups takes place. Elemental sulfur and ferric and ferrous sulfates were detected on the surface of the exhausted samples. A redox reactive adsorption mechanism is proposed to govern the retention of hydrogen sulfide on the surface of the composites. The incorporation of GO enhances the chemical retention of H2S due to the incorporation of OH reactive groups and an increase in surface heterogeneity.

  8. A BODIPY-based fluorescent probe for ratiometric detection of gold ions: utilization of Z-enynol as the reactive unit.

    PubMed

    Üçüncü, Muhammed; Karakuş, Erman; Emrullahoğlu, Mustafa

    2016-07-01

    Using an irreversible intramolecular cyclisation pathway triggered by gold ions, a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) based fluorescent probe integrated with a reactive Z-enynol motif responds selectively to gold ions. With the addition of gold(iii), the probe displays ratiometric fluorescence behaviour clearly observable to the naked eye under both visible and UV light. PMID:27284598

  9. In vivo imaging of Ca2+, pH, and reactive oxygen species using fluorescent probes in plants.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Sarah J; Choi, Won-Gyu; Chanoca, Alexandra; Gilroy, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the levels of Ca(2+), pH, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as key cellular regulators involved in diverse physiological and developmental processes in plants. Critical to understanding how they exert such widespread control is an appreciation of their spatial and temporal dynamics at levels from organ to organelle and from seconds to many hours. With appropriate controls, fluorescent sensors can provide a robust approach with which to quantify such changes in Ca(2+), pH, and ROS in real time, in vivo. The fluorescent cellular probes available for visualization split into two broad classes: (a) dyes and (b) an increasingly diverse set of genetically encoded sensors based around green fluorescent proteins (GFPs). The GFP probes in particular can be targeted to well-defined subcellular locales, offering the possibility of high-resolution mapping of these signals within the cell.

  10. Practical use of chemical probes for reactive oxygen species produced in biological systems by γ-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min Hee; Moon, Yu Ran; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Kang-Soo; Cho, Jae-Young; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2009-05-01

    Application of chemical probes, for detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS), was tested during γ-irradiation. The ethanol/α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)- N- tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN) and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) were structurally stable enough to detect rad OH and H 2O 2, increasingly generated by γ-irradiation up to 1000 Gy. Interestingly, the production rate of H 2O 2, but not rad OH, during γ-irradiation, was significantly different between in vitro systems of lettuce and spinach. These results suggest that 4-POBN and DAB could be utilized as a semi-quantitative probe to quantify rad OH and H 2O 2, produced by γ-irradiation up to 1000 Gy.

  11. Chemical probes for molecular imaging and detection of hydrogen sulfide and reactive sulfur species in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Vivian S; Chen, Wei; Xian, Ming; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-07-21

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous species produced by both bacteria and higher eukaryotic organisms, including mammalian vertebrates, has attracted attention in recent years for its contributions to human health and disease. H2S has been proposed as a cytoprotectant and gasotransmitter in many tissue types, including mediating vascular tone in blood vessels as well as neuromodulation in the brain. The molecular mechanisms dictating how H2S affects cellular signaling and other physiological events remain insufficiently understood. Furthermore, the involvement of H2S in metal-binding interactions and formation of related RSS such as sulfane sulfur may contribute to other distinct signaling pathways. Owing to its widespread biological roles and unique chemical properties, H2S is an appealing target for chemical biology approaches to elucidate its production, trafficking, and downstream function. In this context, reaction-based fluorescent probes offer a versatile set of screening tools to visualize H2S pools in living systems. Three main strategies used in molecular probe development for H2S detection include azide and nitro group reduction, nucleophilic attack, and CuS precipitation. Each of these approaches exploits the strong nucleophilicity and reducing potency of H2S to achieve selectivity over other biothiols. In addition, a variety of methods have been developed for the detection of other reactive sulfur species (RSS), including sulfite and bisulfite, as well as sulfane sulfur species and related modifications such as S-nitrosothiols. Access to this growing chemical toolbox of new molecular probes for H2S and related RSS sets the stage for applying these developing technologies to probe reactive sulfur biology in living systems.

  12. Chemical Probes for Molecular Imaging and Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide and Reactive Sulfur Species in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous species produced by both bacteria and higher eukaryotic organisms, including mammalian vertebrates, has attracted attention in recent years for its contributions to human health and disease. H2S has been proposed as a cytoprotectant and gasotransmitter in many tissue types, including mediating vascular tone in blood vessels as well as neuromodulation in the brain. The molecular mechanisms dictating how H2S affects cellular signaling and other physiological events remain insufficiently understood. Furthermore, the involvement of H2S in metal-binding interactions and formation of related RSS such as sulfane sulfur may contribute to other distinct signaling pathways. Owing to its widespread biological roles and unique chemical properties, H2S is an appealing target for chemical biology approaches to elucidate its production, trafficking, and downstream function. In this context, reaction-based fluorescent probes offer a versatile set of screening tools to visualize H2S pools in living systems. Three main strategies used in molecular probe development for H2S detection include azide and nitro group reduction, nucleophilic attack, and CuS precipitation. Each of these approaches exploit the strong nucleophilicity and reducing potency of H2S to achieve selectivity over other biothiols. In addition, a variety of methods have been developed for the detection of other reactive sulfur species (RSS), including sulfite and bisulfite, as well as sulfane sulfur species and related modifications such as S-nitrosothiols. Access to this growing chemical toolbox of new molecular probes for H2S and related RSS sets the stage for applying these developing technologies to probe reactive sulfur biology in living systems. PMID:25474627

  13. Non-hydrolyzable Diubiquitin Probes Reveal Linkage-Specific Reactivity of Deubiquitylating Enzymes Mediated by S2 Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Flierman, Dennis; van der Heden van Noort, Gerbrand J.; Ekkebus, Reggy; Geurink, Paul P.; Mevissen, Tycho E.T.; Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Komander, David; Ovaa, Huib

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitin chains are important post-translational modifications that control a large number of cellular processes. Chains can be formed via different linkages, which determines the type of signal they convey. Deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) regulate ubiquitylation status by trimming or removing chains from attached proteins. DUBs can contain several ubiquitin-binding pockets, which confer specificity toward differently linked chains. Most tools for monitoring DUB specificity target binding pockets on opposing sides of the active site; however, some DUBs contain additional pockets. Therefore, reagents targeting additional pockets are essential to fully understand linkage specificity. We report the development of active site-directed probes and fluorogenic substrates, based on non-hydrolyzable diubiquitin, that are equipped with a C-terminal warhead or a fluorogenic activity reporter moiety. We demonstrate that various DUBs in lysates display differential reactivity toward differently linked diubiquitin probes, as exemplified by the proteasome-associated DUB USP14. In addition, OTUD2 and OTUD3 show remarkable linkage-specific reactivity with our diubiquitin-based reagents. PMID:27066941

  14. 15N solid-state NMR provides a sensitive probe of oxidized flavin reactive sites.

    PubMed

    Koder, Ronald L; Walsh, Joseph D; Pometun, Maxim S; Dutton, P Leslie; Wittebort, Richard J; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2006-11-29

    Flavins are central to the reactivity of a wide variety of enzymes and electron transport proteins. There is great interest in understanding the basis for the different reactivities displayed by flavins in different protein contexts. We propose solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) as a tool for directly observing reactive positions of the flavin ring and thereby obtaining information on their frontier orbitals. We now report the SS-NMR signals of the redox-active nitrogens N1 and N5, as well as that of N3. The chemical shift tensor of N5 is over 720 ppm wide, in accordance with the predictions of theory and our calculations. The signal of N3 can be distinguished on the basis of coupling to 1H absent for N1 and N5, as well as the shift tensor span of only 170 ppm, consistent with N3's lower aromaticity and lack of a nonbonding lone pair. The isotropic shifts and spans of N5 and N1 reflect two opposite extremes of the chemical shift range for "pyridine-type" N's, consistent with their electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical reactivities, respectively. Upon flavin reduction, N5's chemical shift tensor contracts dramatically to a span of less than 110 ppm, and the isotropic chemical shift changes by approximately 300 ppm. Both are consistent with loss of N5's nonbonding lone pair and decreased aromaticity, and illustrate the responsiveness of the 15N chemical shift principal values to electronic structure. Thus. 15N chemical shift principal values promise to be valuable tools for understanding electronic differences that underlie variations in flavin reactivity, as well as the reactivities of other heterocyclic cofactors. PMID:17117871

  15. Detailed characterization and preliminary adsorption model for materials for an intermediate-scale reactive-transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R.; Siegel, M.D.

    1994-12-31

    An experiment involving migration of fluid and tracers (Li, Br, Ni) through a 6-m-high x 3-m-dia caisson Wedron 510 sand, is being carried out for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Sand`s surface chemistry of the sand was studied and a preliminary surface-complexation model of Ni adsorption formulated for transport calculations. XPS and leaching suggest that surface of the quartz sand is partially covered by thin layers of Fe-oxyhydroxide and Ca-Mg carbonate and by flakes of kaolinite. Ni adsorption by the sand is strongly pH-dependent, showing no adsorption at pH 5 and near-total adsorption at pH 7. Location of adsorption edge is independent of ionic strength and dissolved Ni concentration; it is shifted to slightly lower pH with higher pCO2 and to slightly higher pH by competition with Li. Diminished adsorption at alkiline pH with higher pCO2 implies formation of dissolved Ni-carbonato complexes. Ni adsorption edges for goethite and quartz, two components of the sand were also measured. Ni adsorption on pure quartz is only moderately pH-dependent and differs in shape and location from that of the sand, whereas Ni adsorption by goethite is strongly pH-dependent. A triple-layer surface-complexation model developed for goethite provides a good fit to the Ni-adsorption curve of the sand. Based on this model, the apparent surface area of the Fe-oxyhydroxide coating is estimated to be 560 m{sup 2}/g, compatible with its occurrence as amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxide. Potentiometric titrations on sand also differ from pure quartz and suggest that effective surface area of sand may be much greater than that measured by N{sub 2}-BET gas adsorption. Attempts to model the adsorption of bulk sand in terms of properties of pure end member components suggest that much of the sand surface is inert. Although the exact Ni adsorption mechanisms remain ambiguous, this preliminary adsorption model provides an initial set of parameters that can be used in transport calculations.

  16. Quantitative atomic resolution force imaging on epitaxial graphene with reactive and nonreactive AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Boneschanscher, Mark P; van der Lit, Joost; Sun, Zhixiang; Swart, Ingmar; Liljeroth, Peter; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël

    2012-11-27

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of graphene and graphite show contrast with atomic periodicity. However, the contrast patterns vary depending on the atomic termination of the AFM tip apex and the tip-sample distance, hampering the identification of the atomic positions. Here, we report quantitative AFM imaging of epitaxial graphene using inert (carbon-monoxide-terminated) and reactive (iridium-terminated) tips. The atomic image contrast is markedly different with these tip terminations. With a reactive tip, we observe an inversion from attractive to repulsive atomic contrast with decreasing tip-sample distance, while a nonreactive tip only yields repulsive atomic contrast. We are able to identify the atoms with both tips at any tip-sample distance. This is a prerequisite for future structural and chemical analysis of adatoms, defects, and the edges of graphene nanostructures, crucial for understanding nanoscale graphene devices.

  17. Emerging scanning probe approaches to the measurement of ionic reactivity at energy storage materials.

    PubMed

    Barton, Zachary J; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-04-01

    Many modern energy storage technologies operate via the nominally reversible shuttling of alkali ions between an anode and a cathode capable of hosting them. The degradation process that occurs with normal usage is not yet fully understood, but emerging progress in analytical tools may help address this knowledge gap. By interrogating ionic fluxes over electrified surfaces, scanning probe methods may identify features that impact the local cyclability of a material and subsequently help inform rational electrode design for future generations of batteries. Methods developed for identifying ion fluxes for batteries show great promise for broader applications, including biological interfaces, corrosion, and catalysis.

  18. Probing the adsorption of weak acids on graphite using amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed M A; Huang, Jun; McPhedran, Kerry N; Zeng, Hongbo; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2015-03-17

    Recent thermodynamics calculations and adsorption isotherms showed that the adsorption of a self-assembled layer (SAL) of ionized weak acids to carbon was attributed to the negatively charged hydrogen bonding (-CAHB), yet the direct visualization and characterization of this adsorption behavior have not been reported. Here, an amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-FM AFM) technique was applied to discriminate the adsorption of decanoic acids (DA) on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Thermodynamics calculations revealed that the adsorption of SAL was driven by the formation of -CAHB with negatively charged functional groups of HOPG. Multilayer adsorption could occur over the adsorbed ionized SAL, leading to the development of aggregates. AM-FM AFM imaging showed that the adsorption of the DA molecules forming aggregates occurred only for the HOPG-functionalized steps, while DA molecules were found to adsorb over the entire functionalized HOPG surface after water-plasma treatment, as evident from the frequency shifts identified in AFM images. PMID:25710305

  19. Probing the adsorption of weak acids on graphite using amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed M A; Huang, Jun; McPhedran, Kerry N; Zeng, Hongbo; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2015-03-17

    Recent thermodynamics calculations and adsorption isotherms showed that the adsorption of a self-assembled layer (SAL) of ionized weak acids to carbon was attributed to the negatively charged hydrogen bonding (-CAHB), yet the direct visualization and characterization of this adsorption behavior have not been reported. Here, an amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-FM AFM) technique was applied to discriminate the adsorption of decanoic acids (DA) on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Thermodynamics calculations revealed that the adsorption of SAL was driven by the formation of -CAHB with negatively charged functional groups of HOPG. Multilayer adsorption could occur over the adsorbed ionized SAL, leading to the development of aggregates. AM-FM AFM imaging showed that the adsorption of the DA molecules forming aggregates occurred only for the HOPG-functionalized steps, while DA molecules were found to adsorb over the entire functionalized HOPG surface after water-plasma treatment, as evident from the frequency shifts identified in AFM images.

  20. Irreversible adsorption-driven assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces revealed by a dynamic surface tension probe.

    PubMed

    Bizmark, Navid; Ioannidis, Marios A; Henneke, Dale E

    2014-01-28

    Adsorption-driven self-assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces is a promising bottom-up approach for the preparation of advanced functional materials and devices. Full realization of its potential requires quantitative understanding of the parameters controlling the self-assembly, the structure of nanoparticles at the interface, the barrier properties of the assembly, and the rate of particle attachment. We argue that models of dynamic surface or interfacial tension (DST) appropriate for molecular species break down when the adsorption energy greatly exceeds the mean energy of thermal fluctuations and validate alternative models extending the application of generalized random sequential adsorption theory to nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces. Using a model colloidal system of hydrophobic, charge-stabilized ethyl cellulose nanoparticles at neutral pH, we demonstrate the potential of DST measurements to reveal information on the energy of adsorption, the adsorption rate constant, and the energy of particle-interface interaction at different degrees of nanoparticle coverage of the interface. These findings have significant implications for the quantitative description of nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces.

  1. Earle K. Plyler Prize Talk: Using High Resolution Electronic Spectroscopy to Probe Reactive Chemical Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Terry

    2009-03-01

    Gas phase chemical reactions, such as occur in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, plasma processing, etc. are of great importance to our economy and society. These reactions are typically very complex involving up to 1000's of elementary steps with a corresponding number of reactive chemical intermediates. Spectrospic diagnostics, based upon well analyzed and well understood spectra of the intermediates, are crucial for monitoring such reactions and unraveling their mechanisms. These spectral analyses often benefit from the guidance provided by quantum chemical calculations and conversely the molecular parameters, experimentally determined from the spectra, serve as ``gold standards'' for benchmarking such calculations. Such standards are especially valuable for reactive intermediates whose electronic or geometric structure is particularly complex because of electron-spin interactions, Jahn-Teller effects or other vibronic interactions, hindered internal motions, large molecular size and weight, etc. The organic alkoxy, RO., and peroxy, RO2., (R=alkyl group) free radicals are excellent examples of such species. The talk will focus on our recent characterization of these radicals via their ``high-resolution,'' mostly rotationally resolved, electronic spectra utilizing the techniques of laser induced fluorescence, stimulated emission pumping, and cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Selected spectra, their analysis, and the molecular information resulting therefrom will be discussed.

  2. Physiological and pathophysiological reactive oxygen species as probed by EPR spectroscopy: the underutilized research window on muscle ageing.

    PubMed

    A Abdel-Rahman, Engy; Mahmoud, Ali M; Khalifa, Abdulrahman M; Ali, Sameh S

    2016-08-15

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) play crucial roles in triggering, mediating and regulating physiological and pathophysiological signal transduction pathways within the cell. Within the cell, ROS efflux is firmly controlled both spatially and temporally, making the study of ROS dynamics a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed for ROS assessment; however, many of these assays are not capable of direct identification or determination of subcellular localization of different ROS. Here we highlight electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy as a powerful technique that is uniquely capable of addressing questions on ROS dynamics in different biological specimens and cellular compartments. Due to their critical importance in muscle functions and dysfunction, we discuss in some detail spin trapping of various ROS and focus on EPR detection of nitric oxide before highlighting how EPR can be utilized to probe biophysical characteristics of the environment surrounding a given stable radical. Despite the demonstrated ability of EPR spectroscopy to provide unique information on the identity, quantity, dynamics and environment of radical species, its applications in the field of muscle physiology, fatiguing and ageing are disproportionately infrequent. While reviewing the limited examples of successful EPR applications in muscle biology we conclude that the field would greatly benefit from more studies exploring ROS sources and kinetics by spin trapping, protein dynamics by site-directed spin labelling, and membrane dynamics and global redox changes by spin probing EPR approaches. PMID:26801204

  3. Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) as a probe of macromolecule adsorption kinetics at functionalized interfaces.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Michael A; de Cuendias, Anne; Gayet, Florence; Shirley, Ian M; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Haddleton, David M; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-05-01

    Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) has been employed to study the interfacial adsorption kinetics of coumarin-tagged macromolecules onto a range of functionalized planar surfaces. Such studies are valuable in designing polymers for complex systems where the degree of interaction between the polymer and surface needs to be tailored. Three tagged synthetic polymers with different functionalities are examined: poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) (PSPMA), and a mannose-modified glycopolymer. Adsorption transients at the silica/water interface are found to be characteristic for each polymer, and kinetics are deduced from the initial rates. The chemistry of the adsorption interfaces has been varied by, first, manipulation of silica surface chemistry via the bulk pH, followed by surfaces modified by poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA) and cellulose, giving five chemically different surfaces. Complementary atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging has been used for additional surface characterization of adsorbed layers and functionalized interfaces to allow adsorption rates to be interpreted more fully. Adsorption rates for PSPMA and the glycopolymer are seen to be highly surface sensitive, with significantly higher rates on cellulose-modified surfaces, whereas PAA shows a much smaller rate dependence on the nature of the adsorption surface. PMID:22489550

  4. Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) as a probe of macromolecule adsorption kinetics at functionalized interfaces.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Michael A; de Cuendias, Anne; Gayet, Florence; Shirley, Ian M; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Haddleton, David M; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-05-01

    Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) has been employed to study the interfacial adsorption kinetics of coumarin-tagged macromolecules onto a range of functionalized planar surfaces. Such studies are valuable in designing polymers for complex systems where the degree of interaction between the polymer and surface needs to be tailored. Three tagged synthetic polymers with different functionalities are examined: poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) (PSPMA), and a mannose-modified glycopolymer. Adsorption transients at the silica/water interface are found to be characteristic for each polymer, and kinetics are deduced from the initial rates. The chemistry of the adsorption interfaces has been varied by, first, manipulation of silica surface chemistry via the bulk pH, followed by surfaces modified by poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA) and cellulose, giving five chemically different surfaces. Complementary atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging has been used for additional surface characterization of adsorbed layers and functionalized interfaces to allow adsorption rates to be interpreted more fully. Adsorption rates for PSPMA and the glycopolymer are seen to be highly surface sensitive, with significantly higher rates on cellulose-modified surfaces, whereas PAA shows a much smaller rate dependence on the nature of the adsorption surface.

  5. Probing the Interplay between Electronic and Geometric Degrees-of-Freedom in Molecules and Reactive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajski, Roman F.

    The Density-Functional Theory (DFT) description of molecular equilibria in both the externally closed (N-controlled) and open ([mu]-controlled) systems, where N denotes the system overall number of electrons and [mu] stands for its chemical potential, equal to that of the external reservoir of electrons, is explored within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The complementary Electron-Following (EF) and Electron-Preceding (EP) perspectives on molecular processes are examined, in which the external potential due to nuclei and the system electron density, respectively, provide the local state-variable of the molecular ground-state. In the chemical-softness representation of the EF perspective, which directly refers to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation of the wave-function theory, the external potential due to the system nuclei constitutes the independent state-parameter, with the electron distribution "following" the movements of the nuclei. In the chemical-hardness representation of the EP approach, in the spirit of DFT, the ground-state electron density determines the equilibrium state of the molecule. Its displacements create conditions for ("precede") the movements of the nuclei in the spirit of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. The equivalence of these two formulations is stressed and their complementarity in the complete theory of the electronic/geometrical structure and chemical reactivity is stressed. The associated quadratic Taylor expansions of the corresponding "thermodynamic" potentials for each representation are discussed. A distinction is made between the equilibrium ("horizontal") and non-equilibrium ("variational") expansions of the corresponding density functionals. In each Legendre-transformed representation the generalized "potentials" (first partials) and charge "sensitivities" (second partials) are summarized and interpreted as prospective descriptors of reactivity phenomena and external conditions of molecular processes. These basic concepts of

  6. Development of enzymatic probes of oxidative and nitrosative DNA damage caused by reactive nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Dong, Min; Vongchampa, Viengsai; Gingipalli, Lakshmaiah; Cloutier, Jean-Francois; Kow, Yoke W; O'Connor, Timothy; Dedon, Peter C

    2006-02-22

    Chronic inflammation is associated with a variety of human diseases, including cancer, with one possible mechanistic link involving over-production of nitric oxide (NO*) by activated macrophages. Subsequent reaction of NO* with superoxide in the presence of carbon dioxide yields nitrosoperoxycarbonate (ONOOCO2-), a strong oxidant that reacts with guanine in DNA to form a variety of oxidation and nitration products, such 2'-deoxy-8-oxoguanosine. Alternatively, the reaction of NO and O2 leads to the formation of N2O3, a nitrosating agent that causes nucleobase deamination to form 2'-deoxyxanthosine (dX) and 2'-deoxyoxanosine (dO) from dG; 2'-deoxyinosine (dI) from dA; and 2'-deoxyuridine (dU) from dC, in addition to abasic sites and dG-dG cross-links. The presence of both ONOOCO2- and N2O3 at sites of inflammation necessitates definition of the relative roles of oxidative and nitrosative DNA damage in the genetic toxicology of inflammation. To this end, we sought to develop enzymatic probes for oxidative and nitrosative DNA lesions as a means to quantify the two types of DNA damage in in vitro DNA damage assays, such as the comet assay and as a means to differentially map the lesions in genomic DNA by the technique of ligation-mediated PCR. On the basis of fragmentary reports in the literature, we first systematically assessed the recognition of dX and dI by a battery of DNA repair enzymes. Members of the alkylpurine DNA glycosylase family (E. coli AlkA, murine Aag, and human MPG) all showed repair activity with dX (k(cat)/Km 29 x 10(-6), 21 x 10(-6), and 7.8 x 10(-6) nM(-1) min(-1), respectively), though the activity was considerably lower than that of EndoV (8 x 10(-3) nM(-1) min(-1)). Based on these results and other published studies, we focused the development of enzymatic probes on two groups of enzymes, one with activity against oxidative damage (formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg); endonuclease III (EndoIII)) and the other with activity against

  7. Using iron-loaded sepiolite obtained by adsorption as a catalyst in the electro-Fenton oxidation of Reactive Black 5.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, O; Fernández de Dios, M A; Pazos, M; Sanromán, M A

    2013-09-01

    This study explores the possibility of using iron-loaded sepiolite, obtained by recovering iron from polluted water, as a catalyst in the electro-Fenton oxidation of organic pollutants in textile effluents. The removal of iron ions from aqueous solution by adsorption on sepiolite was studied in batch tests at iron concentrations between 100 and 1,000 ppm. Electro-Fenton experiments were carried out in an electrochemical cell with a working volume of 0.15 L, an air flow of 1 L/min, and 3 g of iron-loaded sepiolite. An electric field was applied using a boron-doped diamond anode and a graphite sheet cathode connected to a direct current power supply with a constant potential drop. Reactive Black 5 (100 mg/L) was selected as the model dye. The adsorption isotherms proved the ability of the used adsorbent. The removal of the iron ion by adsorption on sepiolite was in the range of 80-100 % for the studied concentration range. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were found to be applicable in terms of the relatively high regression values. Iron-loaded sepiolite could be used as an effective heterogeneous catalyst for the degradation of organic dyes in the electro-Fenton process. Successive batch processes were performed at optimal working conditions (5 V and pH 2). The results indicate the suitability of the proposed combined process, adsorption to iron remediation followed by the application of the obtained iron-loaded sepiolite to the electro-Fenton technique, to oxidize polluted effluents. PMID:23516035

  8. Using iron-loaded sepiolite obtained by adsorption as a catalyst in the electro-Fenton oxidation of Reactive Black 5.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, O; Fernández de Dios, M A; Pazos, M; Sanromán, M A

    2013-09-01

    This study explores the possibility of using iron-loaded sepiolite, obtained by recovering iron from polluted water, as a catalyst in the electro-Fenton oxidation of organic pollutants in textile effluents. The removal of iron ions from aqueous solution by adsorption on sepiolite was studied in batch tests at iron concentrations between 100 and 1,000 ppm. Electro-Fenton experiments were carried out in an electrochemical cell with a working volume of 0.15 L, an air flow of 1 L/min, and 3 g of iron-loaded sepiolite. An electric field was applied using a boron-doped diamond anode and a graphite sheet cathode connected to a direct current power supply with a constant potential drop. Reactive Black 5 (100 mg/L) was selected as the model dye. The adsorption isotherms proved the ability of the used adsorbent. The removal of the iron ion by adsorption on sepiolite was in the range of 80-100 % for the studied concentration range. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were found to be applicable in terms of the relatively high regression values. Iron-loaded sepiolite could be used as an effective heterogeneous catalyst for the degradation of organic dyes in the electro-Fenton process. Successive batch processes were performed at optimal working conditions (5 V and pH 2). The results indicate the suitability of the proposed combined process, adsorption to iron remediation followed by the application of the obtained iron-loaded sepiolite to the electro-Fenton technique, to oxidize polluted effluents.

  9. High pressure reactivity of solid furan probed by infrared and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppatelli, Matteo; Santoro, Mario; Bini, Robert; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of crystalline furan has been investigated, at room temperature, along the 0-47-0 GPa pressure cycle by using IR and Raman spectroscopy. These data, joint to high pressure low temperature IR data, allow the identification of two solid phases in the 1.2-12 GPa pressure range: the low-pressure orientationally disordered phase IV and the high-pressure ordered phase III. Above 10-12 GPa solid furan starts to chemically transform. The threshold pressure for the transformation is much lower than in benzene, as expected according to the minor stability of the heteroaromatic ring. The reaction proceeds continuously along the compression path, but it becomes complete only with releasing pressure, and a yellow-brownish sample is recovered. This compound was identified as an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) containing alkylpolyether type segments, alcoholic functions, and C=O bonds. The presence of these new chemical species attests to the opening of the original furan rings and to the transfer of hydrogen atoms. The reaction seems to be very similar to that induced in crystalline benzene. This comparison indicates a general behavior for the reactivity under ultrahigh pressures of the whole class of aromatic compounds.

  10. Zinc (hydr)oxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites: role of surface features in H₂S reactive adsorption.

    PubMed

    Giannakoudakis, Dimitrios A; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2014-12-15

    Zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites with various levels of complexity were synthesized using an in situ precipitation method. Then they were used as H2S adsorbents in visible light. The materials' surfaces were characterized before and after H2S adsorption by various physical and chemical methods (XRD, FTIR, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration, adsorption of nitrogen and SEM/EDX). Significant differences in surface features and synergistic effects were found depending on the materials' composition. Addition of graphite oxide and the deposition of gold nanoparticles resulted in a marked increase in the adsorption capacity in comparison with that on the zinc hydroxide and zinc hydroxide/AuNP. Addition of AuNPs to zinc hydroxide led to a crystalline ZnO/AuNP composite while the zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNP composite was amorphous. The ZnOH/GO/AuNPs composite exhibited the greatest H2S adsorption capacity due to the increased number of OH terminal groups and the conductive properties of GO that facilitated the electron transfer and consequently the formation of superoxide ions promoting oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. AuNPs present in the composite increased the conductivity, helped with electron transfer to oxygen, and prevented the fast recombination of the electrons and holes.

  11. Probing adsorption of polyacrylamide-based polymers on anisotropic Basal planes of kaolinite using quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Alagha, Lana; Wang, Shengqun; Yan, Lujie; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob

    2013-03-26

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was applied to investigate the adsorption characteristics of polyacrylamide-based polymers (PAMs) on anisotropic basal planes of kaolinite. Kaolinite basal planes were differentiated by depositing kaolinite nanoparticles (KNPs) on silica and alumina sensors in solutions of controlled pH values. Adsorption of an in-house synthesized organic-inorganic Al(OH)3-PAM (Al-PAM) as an example of cationic hybrid PAM and a commercially available partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (MF1011) as an example of anionic PAM was studied. Cationic Al-PAM was found to adsorb irreversibly and preferentially on tetrahedral silica basal planes of kaolinite. In contrast, anionic MF1011 adsorbed strongly on aluminum-hydroxy basal planes, while its adsorption on tetrahedral silica basal planes was weak and reversible. Adsorption study revealed that both electrostatic attraction and hydrogen-bonding mechanisms contribute to adsorption of PAMs on kaolinite. The adsorbed Al-PAM layer was able to release trapped water overtime and became more compact, while MF1011 film became more dissipative as backbones stretched out from kaolinite surface with minimal overlapping. Experimental results obtained from this study provide clear insights into the phenomenon that governs flocculation-based solid-liquid separation processes using multicomponent flocculants of anionic and cationic nature.

  12. Probing adsorption of polyacrylamide-based polymers on anisotropic Basal planes of kaolinite using quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Alagha, Lana; Wang, Shengqun; Yan, Lujie; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob

    2013-03-26

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was applied to investigate the adsorption characteristics of polyacrylamide-based polymers (PAMs) on anisotropic basal planes of kaolinite. Kaolinite basal planes were differentiated by depositing kaolinite nanoparticles (KNPs) on silica and alumina sensors in solutions of controlled pH values. Adsorption of an in-house synthesized organic-inorganic Al(OH)3-PAM (Al-PAM) as an example of cationic hybrid PAM and a commercially available partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (MF1011) as an example of anionic PAM was studied. Cationic Al-PAM was found to adsorb irreversibly and preferentially on tetrahedral silica basal planes of kaolinite. In contrast, anionic MF1011 adsorbed strongly on aluminum-hydroxy basal planes, while its adsorption on tetrahedral silica basal planes was weak and reversible. Adsorption study revealed that both electrostatic attraction and hydrogen-bonding mechanisms contribute to adsorption of PAMs on kaolinite. The adsorbed Al-PAM layer was able to release trapped water overtime and became more compact, while MF1011 film became more dissipative as backbones stretched out from kaolinite surface with minimal overlapping. Experimental results obtained from this study provide clear insights into the phenomenon that governs flocculation-based solid-liquid separation processes using multicomponent flocculants of anionic and cationic nature. PMID:23398356

  13. Adsorption And Simultaneous Dechlorination Of PCBs On GAC/Fe/Pd: Mechanistic Aspects And Reactive Capping Barrier Concept

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are many concerns and challenges in current remediation strategies for sediments contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Our efforts have been geared toward the development of granular activated carbon (GAC) impregnated with reactive iron/palladium (Fe/Pd) bime...

  14. Solid-phase supported profluorescent nitroxide probe for the determination of aerosol-borne reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Destaillats, Hugo; Gundel, Lara A

    2013-11-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals play important roles in the chemical transformation and adverse health effects of environmental aerosols. This work presents a simple and sensitive method for sampling and analysis of ROS using a packed column coated with a profluorescent nitroxide scavenger, proxyl fluorescamine (PF). Quantification was performed by extraction and analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection. For comparison, the conventional method of collecting aerosols into dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) aqueous solution was used as a reference. The method was successfully applied to the determination of ROS in a model secondary organic aerosol (SOA) system generated by ozonolysis of nicotine, as well as in secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS). ROS concentrations between 50-565 nmol m(-3) were detected in fresh SOA and SHS samples. After SHS aging for 22 h, 13-18% of the initial ROS mass remained, suggesting the presence of persistent ROS. The new method offers better stability and reproducibility along with sensitivity comparable to that of DCFH (method detection limit of 3.2 and 1.4 nmol m(-3) of equivalent H2O2 for PF and DCFH respectively). The PF probe was stable during storage at room temperature and not reactive with ozone or NOx, whereas DCFH in the particle-collecting liquid system was strongly influenced by ozone and NOx interferences. This case study provides a good basis for employing solid-phase supported PF for field measurement of specific ROS in other combustion systems (i.e. biomass burning, candles, and diesel exhaust) and environmental aerosols. PMID:24148512

  15. Cobalt (hydr)oxide/graphite oxide composites: importance of surface chemical heterogeneity for reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-07-15

    Composites of cobalt (hydr)oxide and graphite oxide (GO) were obtained and evaluated as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide at ambient conditions. The surface properties of the initial and exhausted samples were studied by FTIR, TEM, SEM/EDX, XRD, adsorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, and thermal analysis. The results obtained show a significant improvement in their adsorption capacities compared to parent compounds. The importance of the OH groups of cobalt (hydr)oxide/GO composites and new interface chemistry for the adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on these materials is revealed. The oxygen activation by the carbonaceous component resulted in formation of sulfites. Water enhanced the removal process. This is the result of the basic environment promoting dissociation of H(2)S and acid-base reactions. Finally, the differences in the performance of the materials with different mass ratios of GO were linked to the availability of active sites on the surface of the adsorbents, dispersion of these sites, their chemical heterogeneity, and location in the pore system.

  16. Surface Reactivity of Iron Oxide Pigmentary Powders toward Atmospheric Components: XPS and Gravimetry of Oxygen and Water Vapor Adsorption

    PubMed

    Ismail; Cadenhead; Zaki

    1996-11-10

    The adsorption of oxygen and water vapor on a number of specially prepared alpha-Fe2O3 samples was measured gravimetrically at 25°C. The samples themselves were prepared from a steel-pickling chemical waste (97 wt% FeSO4·7H2O) by roasting the original material at 700°C for 5 h in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. Estimated surface coverages by the adsorbed oxygen and water vapor were made on the basis of nitrogen-adsorption-based surface areas, while the nature of the sample surfaces was investigated by both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field emission SEM (FESEM) techniques. In addition a depth profiling study utilizing a sputtering argon beam and XPS was undertaken. Morphological studies using FESEM showed that, while the surface areas were essentially the same (27-29 m2/g) for all three samples, the sample prepared in nitrogen had a significantly larger particle size than the other two. These studies also indicated that neither oxygen nor water vapor adsorption caused any significant structural changes. The differing sample preparations resulted in differing oxygenated surfaces for the alpha-Fe2O3 samples, with the degree of oxygenation decreasing in the order of preparatory gases: oxygen, (wet) air, nitrogen. The amounts of both oxygen and water vapor adsorbed were in inverse proportion to the original degree of surface oxygenation, though the amounts of both represented fractional coverage at best. While the water vapor adsorption was always greater than that of oxygen, the former was more weakly adsorbed, as was indicated by the ease of desorption. Depth profiling failed to indicate any bulk diffusion of oxygen but could not be considered reliable since even the attenuated argon beam used here still brought about reduction of surface iron. Both oxygen and dissociative water adsorption are thought to involve surface sites of high coordination unsaturation. Oxygen is postulated to adsorb on such poorly oxygenated sites primarily as O-2; however, O2

  17. Oxidation of tertiary amines by cytochrome p450-kinetic isotope effect as a spin-state reactivity probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsen; Wu, Wei; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Shaik, Sason

    2009-08-24

    Two types of tertiary amine oxidation processes, namely, N-dealkylation and N-oxygenation, by compound I (Cpd I) of cytochrome P450 are studied theoretically using hybrid DFT calculations. All the calculations show that both N-dealkylation and N-oxygenation of trimethylamine (TMA) proceed preferentially from the low-spin (LS) state of Cpd I. Indeed, the computed kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the rate-controlling hydrogen abstraction step of dealkylation show that only the KIE(LS) fits the experimental datum, whereas the corresponding value for the high-spin (HS) process is much higher. These results second those published before for N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA), and as such, they further confirm the conclusion drawn then that KIEs can be a sensitive probe of spin state reactivity. The ferric-carbinolamine of TMA decomposes most likely in a non-enzymatic reaction since the Fe-O bond dissociation energy (BDE) is negative. The computational results reveal that in the reverse reaction of N-oxygenation, the N-oxide of aromatic amine can serve as a better oxygen donor than that of aliphatic amine to generate Cpd I. This capability of the N-oxo derivatives of aromatic amines to transfer oxygen to the heme, and thereby generate Cpd I, is in good accord with experimental data previously reported. PMID:19322770

  18. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  19. Critical influence of adsorption geometry in the heterogeneous epoxidation of "allylic" alkenes: structure and reactivity of three phenylpropene isomers on Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Williams, Federico J; Cropley, Rachael L; Vaughan, Owain P H; Urquhart, Andrew J; Tikhov, Mintcho S; Kolczewski, Christine; Hermann, Klaus; Lambert, Richard M

    2005-12-01

    It has long been conjectured that the difficulty of heterogeneously epoxidizing higher alkenes such as propene is due to the presence in the molecule of "allylic" H atoms that are readily stripped off by the oxygenated surface of the metal catalyst resulting in combustion. Here, taking advantage of the intrinsically higher epoxidation selectivity of Cu over Ag under vacuum conditions, we have used three phenylpropene structural isomers to examine the correlation between adsorption geometry and oxidation chemistry. It is found that under comparable conditions alpha-methylstyrene, trans-methylstyrene, and allylbenzene behave very differently on the oxygenated Cu(111) surface: the first undergoes extensive epoxidation accompanied by relatively little decomposition of the alkene; the second leads to some epoxide formation and extensive alkene decomposition; and the third is almost inert with respect to both reaction pathways. This reactive behavior is understandable in terms of the corresponding molecular conformations determined by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The proximity to the surface of the C=C function and of the allylic H atoms is critically important in determining reaction selectivity. This demonstrates the importance of adsorption geometry and confirms that allylic H stripping is indeed a key process that limits epoxidation selectivity in such cases.

  20. Adsorption of water on reconstructed rutile TiO2(011)-(2 x 1): Ti=O double bonds and surface reactivity.

    PubMed

    Di Valentin, Cristiana; Tilocca, Antonio; Selloni, Annabella; Beck, T J; Klust, Andreas; Batzill, Matthias; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Diebold, Ulrike

    2005-07-13

    Recent combined experimental and theoretical studies (Beck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 2004, 93, 036104) have provided evidence for Ti=O double-bonded titanyl groups on the reconstructed rutile TiO(2)(011)-(2 x 1) surface. The adsorption of water on the same surface is now investigated to further probe the properties of these groups, as well as to confirm their existence. Ultraviolet photoemission experiments show that water is adsorbed in molecular form at a sample temperature of 110 K. At the same time, the presence of a 3sigma state in the photoemission spectra and work function measurements indicate a significant amount of hydroxyls within the first monolayer of water. At room temperature, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) suggests that dissociated water is present, and about 30% of the surface active sites are hydroxylated. These findings are well explained by total energy density functional theory calculations and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations for water adsorption on the titanyl model of TiO(2)(011)-(2 x 1). The theoretical results show that a mixed molecular/dissociative layer is the most stable configuration in the monolayer regime at low temperatures, while complete dissociation takes place at 250 K. The arrangement of the protonated mono-coordinated oxygens in the mixed molecular/dissociated layer is consistent with the observed short-range order of the hydroxyls in the STM images.

  1. Inverse Reactive Transport Simulator (Inverts): An Inverse Model for Contaminant Transport with Nonlinear Adsorption and Source Terms

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter

    2001-10-31

    A numerically based simulator was developed to assist in the interpretation of complex laboratory experiments examining transport processes of chemical and biological contaminants subject to nonlinear adsorption and/or source terms. The inversion is performed with any of three nonlinear regression methods, Marquardt-Levenberg, conjugate gradient, or quasi-Newton. The governing equations for the problem are solved by the method of finite-differences including any combination of three boundary conditions: (1) Dirichlet, (2) Neumann, and (3) Cauchy. The dispersive terms in the transport equations were solved using the second-order accurate in time and space Crank-Nicolson scheme, while the advective terms were handled using a third-order in time and space, total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme that damps spurious oscillations around sharp concentration fronts. The numerical algorithms were implemented in the computer code INVERTS, which runs on any standard personal computer. Apart from a comprehensive set of test problems, INVERTS was also used to model the elution of a nonradioactive tracer, {sup 185}Re, in a pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) experiment with a simulated waste glass for low-activity waste immobilization. Interpretation of the elution profile was best described with a nonlinear kinetic model for adsorption.

  2. Novel Lipophilic Probe for Detecting Near-Membrane Reactive Oxygen Species Responses and Its Application for Studies of Pancreatic Acinar Cells: Effects of Pyocyanin and L-Ornithine

    PubMed Central

    Chvanov, Michael; Huang, Wei; Jin, Tao; Wen, Li; Armstrong, Jane; Elliot, Vicky; Alston, Ben; Burdyga, Alex; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The aim of this study was to develop a fluorescent reactive oxygen species (ROS) probe, which is preferentially localized in cellular membranes and displays a strong change in fluorescence upon oxidation. We also aimed to test the performance of this probe for detecting pathophysiologically relevant ROS responses in isolated cells. Results: We introduced a novel lipophilic ROS probe dihydrorhodamine B octadecyl ester (H2RB-C18). We then applied the new probe to characterize the ROS changes triggered by inducers of acute pancreatitis in pancreatic acinar cells. We resolved ROS changes produced by L-ornithine, L-arginine, cholecystokinin-8, acetylcholine, taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate, palmitoleic acid ethyl ester, and the bacterial toxin pyocyanin. Particularly prominent ROS responses were induced by pyocyanin and L-ornithine. These ROS responses were accompanied by changes in cytosolic Ca2+concentration ([Ca2+]i), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), and NAD(P)H concentration. Innovation: The study describes a novel sensitive lipophilic ROS probe. The probe is particularly suitable for detecting ROS in near-membrane regions and therefore for reporting the ROS environment of plasma membrane channels and pumps. Conclusions: In our experimental conditions, the novel probe was more sensitive than 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (CM-H2DCF) and dihydrorhodamine123 (H2R123) and allowed us to resolve ROS responses to secretagogues, pyocyanin, and L-ornithine. Changes in the fluorescence of the new probe were particularly prominent in the peripheral plasma membrane-associated regions. Our findings suggest that the new probe will be a useful tool in studies of the contribution of ROS to the pathophysiology of exocrine pancreas and other organs/tissues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 451–464. PMID:24635199

  3. Probing Defect Sites on CeO2 Nanocrystals with Well-Defined Surface Planes by Raman Spectroscopy and O2 Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Li, Meijun; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer III, Harry M; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2010-01-01

    Defect sites play an essential role in ceria catalysis. In this study, ceria nanocrystals with well defined surface planes have been synthesized and utilized for studying defect sites with both Raman spectroscopy and O2 adsorption. Ceria nanorods ({110} + {100}), nanocubes ({100}), and nano-octahedrons ({111}) are employed to analyze the quantity and quality of defect sites on different ceria surfaces. On oxidized surface, nanorods have the most abundant intrinsic defect sites, followed by nanocubes and nano-octahedrons. When reduced, the induced defect sites are more clustered on nanorods than on nanocubes although similar amount (based on surface area) of such defect sites are produced on the two surfaces. Very few defect sites can be generated on the nano-octahedrons due to the least reducibility. These differences can be rationalized by the crystallographic surface terminations of the ceria nanocrystals. The different defect sites on these nanocrystals lead to the adsorption of different surface dioxygen species. Superoxide on one-electron defect sites and peroxide on two-electron defect sites with different clustering degree are identified on the ceria nanocrystals depending on their morphology. Furthermore, the stability and reactivity of these oxygen species are also found to be surface-dependent, which is of significance for ceria-catalyzed oxidation reactions.

  4. A water-soluble selenoxide reagent as a useful probe for the reactivity and folding of polythiol peptides☆

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Kenta; Noguchi, Masato; Singh, Beena G.; Priyadarsini, K. Indira; Fujio, Katsuhiko; Kubo, Yurika; Takayama, Kyoko; Ando, Setsuko; Iwaoka, Michio

    2012-01-01

    A water-soluble selenoxide (DHSox) having a five-membered ring structure enables rapid and selective conversion of cysteinyl SH groups in a polypeptide chain into SS bonds in a wide pH and temperature range. It was previously demonstrated that the second-order rate constants for the SS formation with DHSox would be proportional to the number of the free SH groups present in the substrate if there is no steric congestion around the SH groups. In the present study, kinetics of the SS formation with DHSox was extensively studied at pH 4–10 and 25 °C by using reduced ribonuclease A, recombinant hirudin variant (CX-397), insulin A- and B-chains, and relaxin A-chain, which have two to eight cysteine residues, as polythiol substrates. The obtained rate constants showed stochastic SS formation behaviors under most conditions. However, the rate constants for CX-397 at pH 8.0 and 10.0 were not proportional to the number of the free SH groups, suggesting that the SS intermediate ensembles possess densely packed structures under weakly basic conditions. The high two-electron redox potential of DHSox (375 mV at 25 °C) compared to l-cystine supported the high ability of DHSox for SS formation in a polypeptide chain. Interestingly, the rate constants of the SS formation jumped up at a pH around the pKa value of the cysteinyl SH groups. The SS formation velocity was slightly decreased by addition of a denaturant due probably to the interaction between the denaturant and the peptide. The stochastic behaviors as well as the absolute values of the second-order rate constants in comparison to dithiothreitol (DTTred) are useful to probe the chemical reactivity and conformation, hence the folding, of polypeptide chains. PMID:23772375

  5. Cation location in microporous zeolite, SSZ-13, probed with xenon adsorption measurement and 129Xe NMR spectrum.

    PubMed

    Shin, Na Ra; Kim, Su Hyun; Shin, Hye Sun; Jang, Ik Jun; Cho, Sung June

    2013-06-01

    The location of metal ion, Ag2+, Ca2+, Cu2+ and Y3+ in the SSZ-13 has been investigated with xenon adsorption measurement and 129Xe NMR spectrum. It was referred that the location of the metal ion varies depending on the corresponding charge. The ion-exchanged Ag ion was located in the alpha-cage to interact directly with xenon. Others multivalent cation contributed little with xenon because these were present near the six membered rings where xenon cannot access. PMID:23862500

  6. Probing the adsorption mechanism in thiamazole bound to the silver surface with Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering and DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Nandita; Thomas, Susy; Sarkar, Anjana; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2009-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of thiamazole have been investigated in aqueous solution. Thiamazole is an important anti-thyroid drug that is used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism (over activity of the thyroid gland). Due to its medicinal importance, the surface adsorption properties of thiamazole have been studied. The experimental Raman and SERS data are supported with DFT calculations using B3LYP functional with LANL2DZ basis set. From the SERS spectra as well as theoretical calculations, it has been inferred that thiamazole is chemisorbed to the silver surface directly through the sulphur atom and the ring N atom, with a tilted orientation.

  7. Concerns in the application of fluorescent probes DCDHF-DA, DHR 123 and DHE to measure reactive oxygen species in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Mazyar

    2015-12-25

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed in biological systems by partial reduction of molecular oxygen. The essential role of ROS in maintaining physiological health may be corrupted into oxidative stress by their overproduction or the exhaustion of antioxidant mechanisms. Many studies covering a broad range of methodologies have investigated ROS production and their toxic mechanisms of action. Of these methodologies, fluorometry has been among the preferred techniques. Three frequently used fluorescent probes for in vitro studies are 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCDHF-DA), Dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR 123) and Dihydroethidium (DHE). Apart from the unavoidable limitations of auto-oxidation, photo-oxidation and photo-conversion, there are also concerns relating to protocol modification for the improved monitoring of ROS. This paper aims to highlight such contributing factors, including cell culture conditions and the characteristics of individual fluorescent probes in the utilization of these selected probes in in vitro systems.

  8. Reactive adsorption of ammonia and ammonia/water on CuBTC metal-organic framework: A ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liangliang; Bandosz, Teresa; Joshi, Kaushik L.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Gubbins, Keith E.

    2013-01-01

    We report ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulations for reactive adsorption of NH3 on dehydrated CuBTC metal-organic framework. If the temperature is moderate (up to 125 °C), the dehydrated CuBTC demonstrates a good hydrostatic stability for water concentrations up to 4.0 molecules per copper site. However, if the temperature increases to 550 K, the dehydrated CuBTC will collapse even at a small water concentration, 1.0 H2O molecule per copper site. When NH3 molecules are adsorbed in the channel and micropores of CuBTC, they prefer to chemisorb to the copper sites rather than forming a dimer with another NH3 molecule. The formation of equimolar Cu2(NH2)4 and (NH4)3BTC structures is observed at 348 K, which is in good agreement with previous experimental findings. The dehydrated CuBTC framework is partially collapsed upon NH3 adsorption, while the Cu-Cu dimer structure remains stable under the investigated conditions. Further calculations reveal that the stability of CuBTC is related to the ammonia concentration. The critical NH3 concentration after which the dehydrated CuBTC starts to collapse is determined to be 1.0 NH3 molecule per copper site. Depending on whether NH3 concentration is below or above the critical value, the dehydrated CuBTC can be stable to a higher temperature, 378 K, or can collapse at a lower temperature, 250 K. H2O/NH3 mixtures have also been studied, and we find that although water molecules do not demonstrate a strong interaction with the copper sites of CuBTC, the existence of water molecules can substantially prevent ammonia from interacting with CuBTC, and thus reduce the amount of chemisorbed NH3 molecules on CuBTC and stabilize the CuBTC framework to some extent.

  9. Comparative Study on Synergetic Degradation of a Reactive Dye Using Different Types of Fly Ash in Combined Adsorption and Photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri Babu, P. V. S.; Swaminathan, G.

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out on four different fly ashes used as a catalyst for the degradation of Acid Red 1 using ultraviolet rays. These fly ashes are collected from different thermal power stations located at various places in India and having different chemical compositions. Three fly ashes are from lignite-based thermal power plants, and one is from the coal-based power plant. One fly ash is classified as Class F, two fly ashes are classified as Class C and remaining one is not conforming to ASTM C618 classification. X-Ray Fluorescence analysis was used to identify the chemical composition of fly ashes and SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, Fe2O3 and TiO2 were found to be the major elements present in different proportions. Various analysis were carried out on all the fly ashes like Scanning Electron Microscopy to identify the microphysical properties, Energy Dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy to quantify the elements present in the catalyst and X-Ray Diffraction to identify the catalyst phase analysis. The radical generated during the reaction was identified by Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The parameters such as initial pH of the dye solution, catalyst dosage and initial dye concentration which influence the dye degradation efficiency were studied and optimised. In 60 min duration, the dye degradation efficiency at optimum parametric values of pH 2.5, initial dye concentration of 10 mg/L and catalyst dosage of 1.0 g/L using various fly ashes, i.e., Salam Power Plant, Barmer Lignite Power Plant, Kutch Lignite Power Plant and Neyveli Lignite Thermal Power plant (NLTP) were found to be 40, 60, 67 and 95 % respectively. The contribution of adsorption alone was 18 % at the above mentioned optimum parametric values. Among the above four fly ash NLTP fly ashes proved to be most efficient.

  10. Comparative Study on Synergetic Degradation of a Reactive Dye Using Different Types of Fly Ash in Combined Adsorption and Photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri Babu, P. V. S.; Swaminathan, G.

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out on four different fly ashes used as a catalyst for the degradation of Acid Red 1 using ultraviolet rays. These fly ashes are collected from different thermal power stations located at various places in India and having different chemical compositions. Three fly ashes are from lignite-based thermal power plants, and one is from the coal-based power plant. One fly ash is classified as Class F, two fly ashes are classified as Class C and remaining one is not conforming to ASTM C618 classification. X-Ray Fluorescence analysis was used to identify the chemical composition of fly ashes and SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, Fe2O3 and TiO2 were found to be the major elements present in different proportions. Various analysis were carried out on all the fly ashes like Scanning Electron Microscopy to identify the microphysical properties, Energy Dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy to quantify the elements present in the catalyst and X-Ray Diffraction to identify the catalyst phase analysis. The radical generated during the reaction was identified by Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The parameters such as initial pH of the dye solution, catalyst dosage and initial dye concentration which influence the dye degradation efficiency were studied and optimised. In 60 min duration, the dye degradation efficiency at optimum parametric values of pH 2.5, initial dye concentration of 10 mg/L and catalyst dosage of 1.0 g/L using various fly ashes, i.e., Salam Power Plant, Barmer Lignite Power Plant, Kutch Lignite Power Plant and Neyveli Lignite Thermal Power plant (NLTP) were found to be 40, 60, 67 and 95 % respectively. The contribution of adsorption alone was 18 % at the above mentioned optimum parametric values. Among the above four fly ash NLTP fly ashes proved to be most efficient.

  11. Tailoring the chain packing in ultrathin polyelectrolyte films formed by sequential adsorption: nanoscale probing by positron annihilation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Quinn, John F; Pas, Steven J; Quinn, Anthony; Yap, Heng Pho; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Tuomisto, Filip; Shekibi, Bijan S; Mardel, James I; Hill, Anita J; Caruso, Frank

    2012-12-01

    Depth profiling experiments by positron annihilation spectroscopy have been used to investigate the free volume element size and concentration in films assembled using the layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption method. Films prepared from strong polyelectrolytes, weak polyelectrolytes, hydrogen-bonding polymers, and blended polyelectrolyte multilayers have different chain packing that is reflected in the free volume characteristics. The influence of various parameters on free volume, such as number of bilayers, salt concentration, solution pH, and molecular weight, has been systematically studied. The free volume cavity diameters vary from 4 to 6 Å, and the free volume concentrations vary from (1.1-4.3) × 10(20) cm(-3), depending on the choice of assembly polymers and conditions. Films assembled from strong polyelectrolytes have fewer free volume cavities with a larger average size than films prepared from weak polyelectrolytes. Blending the weak polyanion poly(acrylic acid), PAA, with the strong polyanion poly(styrene sulfonate), PSS, to layer alternately with the polycation poly(allyamine hydrochloride), PAH, is shown to be a viable method to achieve intermediate free volume characteristics in these LbL films. An increase in salt concentration of the adsorption solutions for films prepared from strong polyelectrolytes makes these films tend toward weaker polyelectrolyte free volume characteristics. Hydrogen-bonded layered films show larger free volume element size and concentration than do their electrostatically bonded counterparts, while reducing the molecular weight of these hydrogen-bonded polymers results in slightly reduced free volume size and concentration. A study of the effect of solution pH on films prepared from weak polyelectrolytes shows that when both polyelectrolytes are substantially charged in solution (assembly pH = 7.5), the chains pack similarly to strong polyelectrolytes (i.e., lower free volume concentration), but with smaller average cavity

  12. RADMAP: Simple probes for rapid assessment of complex reactivity: A method and case studies on the reaction of hydrogen atoms with unsaturated organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew K; Fawcett, Jason A; Clyburne, Jason A C; Pye, Cory C

    2016-03-01

    RADMAP, an open source program, allows for rapid analysis and visualization of the earliest stages of reactions between any molecule and a monoatomic probe (i.e., H*, H(+), H(-), Br*, or any other monoatomic species) using ab initio methods. This program creates non-planar potential energy surfaces of the initial interaction between a molecule of interest and the monoatomic probe. These surfaces can be used to both predict the site of addition as well as provide a qualitative estimate for the relative proportion of the formation of adducts; therefore, it gives insight into both the reactivity and the kinetic stability of a molecule. The program presents a way to quickly predict the number of signals anticipated in transverse field muon spin resonance spectra as well as their relative intensities. PMID:26851865

  13. Characterization of reactive impurities in methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol by monitoring the activities of added ionic probes with ion selective electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Deshmukh, B.K.; Coetzee, J.F.

    1984-11-01

    The presence of reactive impurities compromises many important applications of solvents. It is shown that a wide variety of impurities can be detected and determined by adding such highly reactive probes as hydrogen, methoxide, copper(II), mercury(II), and fluoride ions and monitoring their activities over an appropriately wide range with the corresponding ion selective electrodes. The results for the alcohols show that typical reagent grades of these solvents contain amines at the 10/sup -5/ - 10/sup -4/ M (1-10 ppm) level as well as other reactive impurities. This approach is applicable to most polar solvents. It has the overriding merits that it detects impurities on the basis on their reactivities (rather than only their concentrations) and that its lower detection limit is self-adjusting in that it is lowest (most favorable) in the very solvents in which impurities are most harmful, i.e., relatively inert solvent. In such solvents, its lower detection limit can be much lower than that attainable with gas chromatography.

  14. PREDICTING CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES FOR MINERALS AND XENOBIOTICS: USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY AND VIRTUAL REALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter we review the literature on scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (VR), and computational chemistry and our earlier work dealing with modeling lignin, lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC), humic substances (HSs) and non-bonded organo-mineral interactions...

  15. Surface sites on Pt-CeO2 mixed oxide catalysts probed by CO adsorption: a synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Neitzel, Armin; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Skála, Tomáš; Tsud, Nataliya; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Mazur, Daniel; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír; Libuda, Jörg

    2014-12-01

    By means of synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy, we have investigated Pt-CeO2 mixed oxide films prepared on CeO2(111)/Cu(111). Using CO molecules as a probe, we associate the corresponding surface species with specific surface sites. This allows us to identify the changes in the composition and morphology of Pt-CeO2 mixed oxide films caused by annealing in an ultrahigh vacuum. Specifically, two peaks in C 1s spectra at 289.4 and 291.2 eV, associated with tridentate and bidentate carbonate species, are formed on the nanostructured stoichiometric CeO2 film. The peak at 290.5-291.0 eV in the C 1s spectra indicates the onset of restructuring, i.e. coarsening, of the Pt-CeO2 film. This peak is associated with a carbonate species formed near an oxygen vacancy. The onset of cerium oxide reduction is indicated by the peak at 287.8-288.0 eV associated with carbonite species formed near Ce(3+) cations. The development of surface species on the Pt-CeO2 mixed oxides suggests that restructuring of the films occurs above 300 K irrespective of Pt loadings. We do not find any adsorbed CO species associated with Pt(4+) or Pt(2+). The onset of Pt(2+) reduction is indicated by the peak at 286.9 eV in the C 1s spectra due to CO adsorption on metallic Pt particles. The thermal stability of Pt(2+) in Pt-CeO2 mixed oxide depends on Pt loading. We find excellent stability of Pt(2+) for 12% Pt content in the CeO2 film, whereas at a Pt concentration of 25% in the CeO2 film, a large fraction of the Pt(2+) is converted into metallic Pt particles above 300 K.

  16. Effect of natural organic substances on the surface and adsorptive properties of environmental black carbon (char): pseudo pore blockage by model lipid components and its implications for N2-probed surface properties of natural sorbents.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seokjoon; Pignatello, Joseph J

    2005-10-15

    Black carbon (BC; char and soot) particles emitted to the environment typically are formed with high microporosity and surface area, properties that are responsible for their presumed important role in adsorption of anthropogenic organic compounds in soils and sediments. An issue that has received little direct attention is the possibility that naturally occurring organic matter attenuates the surface activity of BC. We found that simulated "aging" of prepared wood char particles in a soil-water suspension leads to a strong decline in char total surface area (TSA) by N2 adsorption at 77 K with BET analysis and a more modest decline in affinity for dissolved benzene. To help determine the underlying cause, we measured the effects of adsorbed natural lipids or lipid fractions of humic substances, modeled by triglycerides of a commercial vegetable oil. With increasing lipid loading (up to 40% by char weight) from aqueous mixtures, N2 TSA was strongly suppressed (up to 100-fold), while CO2 cumulative surface area (CSA, 0-1.4 nm) at 273 K and benzene adsorption at 293 K were hardly affected. In addition, the rate of CO2 adsorption was retarded. We propose that externally adsorbed lipid molecules occupy pore throats with access to interior pore networks. At 77 K, as opposed to the higher temperatures, lipid chains are too inflexible to allow passage of adsorbate. It is concluded that benzene adsorption to char predominates at interior pore sites and does not correlate with N2-probed micropore properties when the char accrues pore-blocking substances from the surroundings. The findings question the suitability of N2 for probing hydrophobic microporosity of BC in soils and sediments.

  17. Azobenzene-caged sulforhodamine dyes: a novel class of ‘turn-on’ reactive probes for hypoxic tumor cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Piao, Wen; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    New sulforhodamine-based fluorescent ‘turn-on’ probes have been developed for the direct imaging of cellular hypoxia. Rapid access to this novel class of water-soluble ‘azobenzene-caged’ fluorophores was made possible through an easily-implementable azo-coupling reaction between a fluorescent primary arylamine derived from a sulforhodamine 101 scaffold (named SR101-NaphtNH 2 ) and a tertiary aniline whose N-substituents are neutral, cationic, or zwitterionic. The detection mechanism is based on the bioreductive cleavage of the azo bond that restores strong far-red fluorescence (emission maximum at 625 nm) by regenerating the original sulforhodamine SR101-NaphtNH 2 . This valuable fluorogenic response was obtained for the three ‘smart’ probes studied in this work, as shown by an in vitro assay using rat liver microsomes placed under aerobic and then under hypoxic conditions. Most importantly, the probe namely SR101-NaphtNH 2 -Hyp-diMe was successfully applied for imaging the hypoxic status of tumor cells (A549 cells).

  18. Adsorption with biodegradation for decolorization of reactive black 5 by Funalia trogii 200800 on a fly ash-chitosan medium in a fluidized bed bioreactor-kinetic model and reactor performance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Hui; Lin, Wen-Fan; Jhang, Kai-Ning; Lin, Pei-Yu; Lee, Mong-Chuan

    2013-02-01

    A non-steady-state mathematical model system for the kinetics of adsorption and biodegradation of reactive black 5 (RB5) by Funalia trogii (F. trogii) ATCC 200800 biofilm on fly ash-chitosan bead in the fluidized bed process was derived. The mechanisms in the model system included adsorption by fly ash-chitosan beads, biodegradation by F. trogii cells and mass transport diffusion. Batch kinetic tests were independently performed to determine surface diffusivity of RB5, adsorption parameters for RB5 and biokinetic parameters of F. trogii ATCC 200800. A column test was conducted using a continuous-flow fluidized bed reactor with a recycling pump to approximate a completely-mixed flow reactor for model verification. The experimental results indicated that F. trogii biofilm bioregenerated the fly ash-chitosan beads after attached F. trogii has grown significantly. The removal efficiency of RB5 was about 95 % when RB5 concentration in the effluent was approximately 0.34 mg/L at a steady-state condition. The concentration of suspended F. trogii cells reached up to about 1.74 mg/L while the thickness of attached F. trogii cells was estimated to be 80 μm at a steady-state condition by model prediction. The comparisons of experimental data and model prediction show that the model system for adsorption and biodegradation of RB5 can predict the experimental results well. The approaches of experiments and mathematical modeling in this study can be applied to design a full-scale fluidized bed process to treat reactive dye in textile wastewater.

  19. Phosphate-based glass fiber vs. bulk glass: Change in fiber optical response to probe in vitro glass reactivity.

    PubMed

    Massera, J; Ahmed, I; Petit, L; Aallos, V; Hupa, L

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the effect of fiber drawing on the thermal and structural properties as well as on the glass reactivity of a phosphate glass in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-buffered (TRIS) solution and simulated body fluid (SBF). The changes induced in the thermal properties suggest that the fiber drawing process leads to a weakening and probable re-orientation of the POP bonds. Whereas the fiber drawing did not significantly impact the release of P and Ca, an increase in the release of Na into the solution was noticed. This was probably due to small structural reorientations occurring during the fiber drawing process and to a slight diffusion of Na to the fiber surface. Both the powders from the bulk and the glass fibers formed a Ca-P surface layer when immersed in SBF and TRIS. The layer thickness was higher in the calcium and phosphate supersaturated SBF than in TRIS. This paper for the first time presents the in vitro reactivity and optical response of a phosphate-based bioactive glass (PBG) fiber when immersed in SBF. The light intensity remained constant for the first 48h after which a decrease with three distinct slopes was observed: the first decrease between 48 and 200h of immersion could be correlated to the formation of the Ca-P layer at the fiber surface. After this a faster decrease in light transmission was observed from 200 to ~425h in SBF. SEM analysis suggested that after 200h, the surface of the fiber was fully covered by a thin Ca-P layer which is likely to scatter light. For immersion times longer than ~425h, the thickness of the Ca-P layer increased and thus acted as a barrier to the dissolution process limiting further reduction in light transmission. The tracking of light transmission through the PBG fiber allowed monitoring of the fiber dissolution in vitro. These results are essential in developing new bioactive fiber sensors that can be used to monitor bioresponse in situ.

  20. Di- and triarylmethylium ions as probes for the ambident reactivities of carbanions derived from 5-benzylated Meldrum's acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Tan, Yue; Berionni, Guillaume; Ofial, Armin R; Mayr, Herbert

    2014-08-25

    The kinetics of the reactions of carbocations with carbanions 1 derived from 5-benzyl-substituted Meldrum's acids 1-H (Meldrum's acid = 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-dione) were investigated by UV/Vis spectroscopic methods. Benzhydryl cations Ar2CH(+) added exclusively to C-5 of the Meldrum's acid moiety. As the second-order rate constants (kC) of these reactions in DMSO followed the linear free-energy relationship lg k = sN (N+E), the nucleophile-specific reactivity parameters N and sN for the carbanions 1 could be determined. In contrast, trityl cations Ar3C(+) reacted differently. While tritylium ions of low electrophilicity (E<-2) reacted with 1 through rate-determining β-hydride abstraction, more Lewis acidic tritylium ions initially reacted at the carbonyl oxygen of 1 to form trityl enolates, which subsequently reionized and eventually yielded triarylmethanes and 5-benzylidene Meldrum's acids by hydride transfer. PMID:25099696

  1. Mixed silane monolayers for controlling the surface areal density of click-reactive alkyne groups: a method to assess preferential surface adsorption on flat substrates and a method to verify compositional homogeneity on nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maidenberg, Yanir; Zhang, Shuo; Luo, Kai; Akhavein, Nima; Koberstein, Jeffrey T

    2013-09-24

    SAMs formed from mixtures of alkyne-silanes and alkane-silanes are used to control the areal density of click-reactive alkyne groups on the surface of flat germanium substrates, silicon wafers, and silica nanoparticles. Two new analytical tools are described for characterization of the mixed SAMs: a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) technique for quantifying the compositional homogeneity of the mixed monolayers formed on nanoparticles, and an infrared spectroscopy (IR) technique to detect preferential surface adsorption. The TGA technique involves measurement of the change in weight when azide-terminated polymers react with surface alkyne groups on silica nanoparticles via a click reaction, while the IR technique is based on the use of attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) to monitor click reactions between azide compounds with infrared "labels" and alkyne-functional mixed SAMs deposited on germanium ATR plates. Upon application of the new characterization techniques, we are able to prove that the mixed silane monolayers show neither phase separation nor preferential surface adsorption on any of the three substrates studied. When reacted with azide terminal polymers, the areal density at saturation, σ(sat) is found to scale with molecular weight according to σ(sat) ≈ N(-0.57). We conclude that mixed monolayers of alkyne-silanes and alkane-silanes are an effective means of controlling the surface areal density of click-reactive alkyne groups on both flat and nanoparticle substrates. PMID:23985021

  2. Earle K. Plyler Prize: Probing the Structural Evolution and Size-Dependent Reactivity of Gold Clusters by Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    Gold has attracted much interest in nanoscience because of its emerging catalytical and optical properties at the nanometer scale. A prerequisite to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the catalytic effects of nanogold is a detailed understanding of the structural and electronic properties of gold clusters as a function of size. Negatively charged gold clusters (Aun-) up to n = 12 were known to be planar. Using photoelectron spectroscopy and computational chemistry, we found that Au16- to Au18- possess hollow cage structures, while Au20- was found to have a high symmetry tetrahedral structure. Beyond Au20-, we have found that low symmetry core-shell type structures started to emerge at Au25-. The size-dependent reactivity of O2 with gold clusters was further studied using photoelectron spectroscopy. Previous works showed that only even-sized Aun- clusters react with O2, whereas odd-sized Aun- clusters are nonreactive. Superoxo-type Aun(O2-) complexes were proposed for even-sized clusters. We observed van der Waals complexes of odd-sized Aun- clusters with O2, confirming the inertness of the odd-sized Aun- toward O2. This observation led to new insight into how neutral even-sized Aun clusters interact with O2. Further studies revealed that there is a superoxo to peroxo chemisorption transition for the O2 interaction with even-sized Aun- clusters. The O2 in the peroxo O2Aun- complexes is much more activated (with a longer O-O bond length), suggesting that this mode of chemisorption may play a more important role in the O2 activation by gold nanoparticles.

  3. Reactive characterization as a probe of the nature of catalytic sites. Final report, April 15, 1988--February 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, A.

    1998-05-01

    The primary goal of the last year of the research program was to create a new type of selective heterogeneous catalyst. The new catalysts were synthesized, their unusual selectivity assessed by a model reaction, and some of the parameters which are important in creating unusual selectivity in these catalysts determined. Near the end of this proposal, considerable excitement was generated by the discovery of high temperature superconductors. It was decided to briefly investigate the activity of some superconductors and related cuprates. This research was done in concert with a project funded by Ford Motor Company. Catalysts were investigated for two reactions useful in pollution control: CO oxidation and NO reduction. In addition, some stoichiometric measurements of the oxygen content of superconductors and related cuprates were made using a TPR apparatus in the lab. In addition, some experiments were done with the objective of preparing novel MO-Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in which the Mo and Pd were in close contact. These catalysts have the potential of replacing much more expensive rhodium containing catalysts which are currently used for emissions control. Progress on the following is described: H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange on transition metals; New method of determining the number of active sites; New method of determining the hydroxyl content of catalysts; H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange on metal oxides; Reactive characterization and atomic isolation of active sites; Site isolated catalysts synthesized by selective poisoning; Catalysts prepared from high temperature superconductors; Mixed metal Pd-Mo catalysts; and Selective reduction of nitric oxide.

  4. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  5. Synthesis Of Reactive Nano-Fe/Pd Bimetallic System-Impregnated Activated Carbon For The Simultaneous Adsorption And Dechlorination Of PCBs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synthesis and use of reactive metal particles have shown significant environmental implications for the remediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated compounds. Herein, we have developed an effective strategy, employing a series of innovative granular act...

  6. Correlation of plasma characteristics to etch rate and via sidewall angle in a deep reactive ion etch system using Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Koirala, S. P.; Awaah, I.; Burkett, S. L.; Gordon, M. H.

    2011-01-15

    A Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy were used in a deep reactive ion etch system to correlate plasma parameters (atomic fluorine and argon emission, electron density, ion density, and electron average energy) with the etch rate and via sidewall angle. All data were obtained for coil powers ranging from 200 to 800 W, platen powers ranging from 7 to 16 W, and pressure ranging from 3.8 to 62 mTorr with constant SF{sub 6} and Ar flow rates of 112 and 18 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP), respectively. Results indicate that there is a correlation with etch rate for all plasma parameters except for argon emission. For argon emission, the etch rate exhibits a double-valued relation where the etch rate can either increase or decrease with increasing argon emission intensity due to changes in pressure which affect the energy coupling efficiency. As expected, the etch rate increases for measured increases in fluorine emission, electron density, and ion density. The etch rate, however, decreases with increasing average electron energy due to collision processes. In contrast, no correlation is observed between any of the measured plasma parameters with sidewall angle. The last result is consistent with the idea that sidewall angle is primarily controlled by the passivation cycle as opposed to the etching cycle, where all the authors' data were obtained.

  7. Synthesis of 1-(β-D-Galactopyranosyl)Thymine-6'-O-Triphosphate - A Potential Probe to Generate Reactive Dialdehyde for DNA-Enzyme Cross-Linking.

    PubMed

    Kore, Anilkumar R; Yang, Bo; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian

    2015-01-01

    Concise, facile, and efficient synthesis of 1-(β-D-galactopyranosyl)thymine-6'-O-triphosphate, a potential probe that can generate reactive dialdehyde for DNA-enzyme cross-linking applications, was described starting from O,O'-bis(trimethylsilyl)thymine. Stannic chloride promoted glycosylation of 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-acetyl-α-D-galactopyranose with O,O'-bis(trimethylsilyl)thymine, resulting in the formation of 1-(2,3,4,6-O-tetraacetyl-β-D-galactopyranosyl)thymine in 91% yield. Acetyl deprotection using methanolic ammonia afforded 1-(β-D-galactopyranosyl)thymine in 98% yield. The modified one-pot methodology was used to convert 1-(β-D-galactopyranosyl)thymine into 1-(β-D-galactopyranosyl)thymine-6'-O-triphosphate in 72% yield, which involves the formation of 1-(β-D-galactopyranosyl)thymine dichlorophosphoridate using POCl3 as the reagent at the monophosphorylation step followed by reaction with tributylammonium pyrophosphate and hydrolysis of resulting cyclic intermediate.

  8. CdS quantum dots as fluorescence probes for the sensitive and selective detection of highly reactive HSe- ions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuan-Liu; Zhao, Yi-Bing

    2007-06-01

    Water-soluble cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs) capped by mercaptoacetic acid were synthesized by aqueous-phase arrested precipitation, and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, spectrofluorometry, and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The prepared luminescent water-soluble CdS QDs were evaluated as fluorescence probes for the detection of highly reactive hydrogen selenide ions (HSe(-) ions). The quenching of the fluorescence emission of CdS QDs with the addition of HSe(-) ions is due to the elimination of the S(2-) vacancies which are luminescence centers. Quantitative analysis based on chemical interaction between HSe(-) ions and the surface of CdS QDs is very simple, easy to develop, and has demonstrated very high sensitivity and selectivity features. The effect of foreign ions (common anions and biologically relevant cations) on the fluorescence of the CdS QDs was examined to evaluate the selectivity. Only Cu(2+) and S(2-) ions exhibit significant effects on the fluorescence of CdS QDs. With the developed method, we are able to determine the concentration of HSe(-) ions in the range from 0.10 to 4.80 micromol L(-1), and the limit of detection is 0.087 micromol L(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied to monitor the obtained HSe(-) ions from the reaction of glutathione with selenite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on fluorescence analysis of HSe(-) ions in aqueous solution.

  9. Adsorption and separation of reactive aromatic isomers and generation and stabilization of their radicals within cadmium(II)-triazole metal-organic confined space in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal fashion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi-Kui; Ma, Jian-Ping; Dong, Yu-Bin

    2010-05-26

    A series of reactive group functionalized aromatics, namely 2-furaldehyde, 3-furaldehyde, 2-thenaldehyde, 3-thenaldehyde, o-toluidine, m-toluidine, p-toluidine, and aniline, can be absorbed by a CdL(2) (1; L = 4-amino-3,5-bis(4-pyridyl-3-phenyl)-1,2,4-triazole) porous framework in both vapor and liquid phases to generate new G(n) [symbol: see text] CdL(2) (n = 1, 2) host-guest complexes. In addition, the CdL(2) framework can be a shield to protect the active functional group (-CHO and -NH(2)) substituted guests from reaction with the outside medium containing their reaction partners. That is, aldehyde-substituted guests within the CdL(2) host become "stable" in the aniline phase and vice versa. Moreover, 1 displays a very strict selectivity for these reactive group substituted aromatic isomers and can completely separate these guest isomers under mild conditions (i.e., 2-furaldehyde vs 3-furaldehyde, 2-thenaldehyde vs 3-thenaldehyde, and o-toluidine vs m-toluidine vs p-toluidine). All adsorptions and separations are directly performed on the single crystals of 1. More interestingly, these reactive group substituted aromatics readily transform to the corresponding radicals within the CdL(2) host upon ambient light or UV light (355 nm) irradiation. Furthermore, the generated organic radicals are alive for 1 month within the interior cavity in air under ambient conditions. Simple organic radicals are highly reactive short-lived species, and they cannot be generally isolated and conserved under ambient conditions. Thus, the CdL(2) host herein could be considered as a radical generator and storage vessel.

  10. Uptake and bio-reactivity of polystyrene nanoparticles is affected by surface modifications, ageing and LPS adsorption: in vitro studies on neural tissue cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Kumarasamy; Kenesei, Kata; Li, Yang; Demeter, Kornél; Környei, Zsuzsanna; Madarász, Emilia

    2015-02-01

    Because of their capacity of crossing an intact blood-brain barrier and reaching the brain through an injured barrier or via the nasal epithelium, nanoparticles have been considered as vehicles to deliver drugs and as contrast materials for brain imaging. The potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles, however, is not fully explored. Using particles with a biologically inert polystyrene core material, we investigated the role of the chemical composition of particle surfaces in the in vitro interaction with different neural cell types. PS NPs within a size-range of 45-70 nm influenced the metabolic activity of cells depending on the cell-type, but caused toxicity only at extremely high particle concentrations. Neurons did not internalize particles, while microglial cells ingested a large amount of carboxylated but almost no PEGylated NPs. PEGylation reduced the protein adsorption, toxicity and cellular uptake of NPs. After storage (shelf-life >6 months), the toxicity and cellular uptake of NPs increased. The altered biological activity of ``aged'' NPs was due to particle aggregation and due to the adsorption of bioactive compounds on NP surfaces. Aggregation by increasing the size and sedimentation velocity of NPs results in increased cell-targeted NP doses. The ready endotoxin adsorption which cannot be prevented by PEG coating, can render the particles toxic. The age-dependent changes in otherwise harmless NPs could be the important sources for variability in the effects of NPs, and could explain the contradictory data obtained with ``identical'' NPs.Because of their capacity of crossing an intact blood-brain barrier and reaching the brain through an injured barrier or via the nasal epithelium, nanoparticles have been considered as vehicles to deliver drugs and as contrast materials for brain imaging. The potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles, however, is not fully explored. Using particles with a biologically inert polystyrene core material, we investigated the

  11. Detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the oxidant-sensing probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, Rajesh P.; Singh, Shailendra P.; Haeder, Donat-P.; Sinha, Rajeshwar P.

    2010-07-02

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under simulated solar radiation (UV-B: 0.30 Wm{sup -2}, UV-A: 25.70 Wm{sup -2} and PAR: 118.06 Wm{sup -2}) was studied in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937 using the oxidant-sensing fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). DCFH-DA is a nonpolar dye, converted into the polar derivative DCFH by cellular esterases that are nonfluorescent but switched to highly fluorescent DCF when oxidized by intracellular ROS and other peroxides. The images obtained from the fluorescence microscope after 12 h of irradiation showed green fluorescence from cells covered with 295, 320 or 395 nm cut-off filters, indicating the generation of ROS in all treatments. However, the green/red fluorescence ratio obtained from fluorescence microscopic analysis showed the highest generation of ROS after UV-B radiation in comparison to PAR or UV-A radiation. Production of ROS was also measured by a spectrofluorophotometer and results obtained supported the results of fluorescence microscopy. Low levels of ROS were detected at the start (0 h) of the experiment showing that they are generated even during normal metabolism. This study also showed that UV-B radiation causes the fragmentation of the cyanobacterial filaments which could be due to the observed oxidative stress. This is the first report for the detection of intracellular ROS in a cyanobacterium by fluorescence microscopy using DCFH-DA and thereby suggesting the applicability of this method in the study of in vivo generation of ROS.

  12. Probing the Structure, Stability and Hydrogen Adsorption of Lithium Functionalized Isoreticular MOF-5 (Fe, Cu, Co, Ni and Zn) by Density Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    Venkataramanan, Natarajan Sathiyamoorthy; Sahara, Ryoji; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Li adsorption on isoreticular MOFs with metal Fe, Cu, Co, Ni and Zn was studied using density function theory. Li functionalization shows a considerable structural change associated with a volume change in isoreticular MOF-5 except for the Zn metal center. Hydrogen binding energies on Li functionalized MOFs are seen to be in the range of 0.2 eV, which is the desired value for an ideal reversible storage system. This study has clearly shown that Li doping is possible only in Zn-based MOF-5, which would be better candidate to reversibly store hydrogen. PMID:19468328

  13. Probing the low temperature initiation sites in Fe-, Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia via CO and H{sub 2} adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sayari, A.; Yang, Y.

    1999-10-01

    Exposure of freshly activated Fe-, Mn-promoted sulfated zirconia (SFMZ) to carbon monoxide at temperatures up to 50 C induced permanent loss of activity, while the addition of CO after the beginning of the reaction had a reversible effect, regardless of whether the butane flow has been interrupted or not. Similar experiments using dissociated hydrogen instead of CO led to irreversible poisoning in all cases. These findings were interpreted based on (1) the occurrence of initiation sites that are consumed stoichiometrically and very rapidly upon exposure to butane, (2) such initiation sites which are also consumed by CO or dissociated hydrogen, (3) CO which competes effectively for adsorption sites without affecting accumulated reaction intermediates, and (4) such intermediates that are removed in the presence of dissociated hydrogen.

  14. Reactivity of a Thick BaO Film Supported on Pt(111): Adsorption and Reaction of NO2, H2O and CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Yi, Cheol-Woo W.; Szanyi, Janos

    2009-09-15

    Reactions of NO2, H2O, and CO2 with a thick (> 20 MLE) BaO film supported on Pt(111) were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). NO2 reacts with a thick BaO to form surface nitrite-nitrate ion pairs at 300 K, while only nitrates form at 600 K. In the thermal decomposition process of nitrite–nitrate ion pairs, first nitrites decompose and desorb as NO. Then nitrates decompose in two steps : at lower temperature with the release of NO2 and at higher temperature, nitrates dissociate to NO + O2. The thick BaO layer converts completely to Ba(OH)2 following the adsorption of H2O at 300 K. Dehydration/dehydroxylation of this hydroxide layer can be fully achieved by annealing to 550 K. CO2 also reacts with BaO to form BaCO3 that completely decomposes to regenerate BaO upon annealing to 825 K. However, the thick BaO film cannot be converted completely to Ba(NOx)2 or BaCO3 under the experimental conditions employed in this study.

  15. Optically probing Al—O and O—H vibrations to characterize water adsorption and surface reconstruction on α-alumina: An experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Yujin Kirsch, Harald; Wolf, Martin; Campen, R. Kramer; Wirth, Jonas; Saalfrank, Peter

    2015-02-07

    Oxide/water interfaces are ubiquitous in a wide variety of applications and the environment. Despite this ubiquity, and attendant decades of study, gaining molecular level insight into water/oxide interaction has proven challenging. In part, this challenge springs from a lack of tools to concurrently characterize changes in surface structure (i.e., water/oxide interaction from the perspective of the solid) and O—H population and local environment (i.e., water/oxide interaction from the water perspective). Here, we demonstrate the application of surface specific vibrational spectroscopy to the characterization of the interaction of the paradigmatic α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) surface and water. By probing both the interfacial Al—O (surface phonon) and O—H spectral response, we characterize this interaction from both perspectives. Through electronic structure calculation, we assign the interfacial Al—O response and rationalize its changes on surface dehydroxylation and reconstruction. Because our technique is all-optical and interface specific, it is equally applicable to oxide surfaces in vacuum, ambient atmospheres and at the solid/liquid interface. Application of this approach to additional alumina surfaces and other oxides thus seems likely to significantly expand our understanding of how water meets oxide surfaces and thus the wide variety of phenomena this interaction controls.

  16. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  17. Phosphorus, and nitrogen co-doped carbon dots as a fluorescent probe for real-time measurement of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species inside macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yunqian; Yu, Bin; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2016-05-15

    Phosphorus and nitrogen doped carbon dots (PN-CDs) were conveniently prepared by carbonization of adenosine-5'-triphosphate using a hydrothermal treatment. The PN-CDs with P/C atomic ratio of ca. 9.2/100 emit blue luminescence with high quantum yields of up to 23.5%. The PN-CDs were used as a novel sensing platform for live cell imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including ClO(-), ONOO(-), and NO in macrophages. The nanosensor design is based on our new finding that the strong fluorescence of the PN-CDs can be sensitively and selectively quenched by ROS and RNS both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal that the PN-CDs can serve as a sensitive sensor for rapid imaging of ROS and RNS signaling with high selectivity and contrast.

  18. Developing an Acidic Residue Reactive and Sulfoxide-Containing MS-Cleavable Homobifunctional Cross-Linker for Probing Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) has become a powerful strategy for defining protein–protein interactions and elucidating architectures of large protein complexes. However, one of the inherent challenges in MS analysis of cross-linked peptides is their unambiguous identification. To facilitate this process, we have previously developed a series of amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linkers. These MS-cleavable reagents have allowed us to establish a common robust XL-MS workflow that enables fast and accurate identification of cross-linked peptides using multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn). Although amine-reactive reagents targeting lysine residues have been successful, it remains difficult to characterize protein interaction interfaces with little or no lysine residues. To expand the coverage of protein interaction regions, we present here the development of a new acidic residue-targeting sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable homobifunctional cross-linker, dihydrazide sulfoxide (DHSO). We demonstrate that DHSO cross-linked peptides display the same predictable and characteristic fragmentation pattern during collision induced dissociation as amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linked peptides, thus permitting their simplified analysis and unambiguous identification by MSn. Additionally, we show that DHSO can provide complementary data to amine-reactive reagents. Collectively, this work not only enlarges the range of the application of XL-MS approaches but also further demonstrates the robustness and applicability of sulfoxide-based MS-cleavability in conjunction with various cross-linking chemistries. PMID:27417384

  19. Binding hotspots on K-ras: consensus ligand binding sites and other reactive regions from probe-based molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Priyanka; Hancock, John F; Gorfe, Alemayehu A

    2015-05-01

    We have used probe-based molecular dynamics (pMD) simulations to search for interaction hotspots on the surface of the therapeutically highly relevant oncogenic K-Ras G12D. Combining the probe-based query with an ensemble-based pocket identification scheme and an analysis of existing Ras-ligand complexes, we show that (i) pMD is a robust and cost-effective strategy for binding site identification, (ii) all four of the previously reported ligand binding sites are suitable for structure-based ligand design, and (iii) in some cases probe binding and expanded sampling of configurational space enable pocket expansion and increase the likelihood of site identification. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution of hotspots in nonpocket-like regions with known protein- and membrane-interacting interfaces, we propose that pMD has the potential to predict surface patches responsible for protein-biomolecule interactions. These observations have important implications for future drug design efforts and will facilitate the search for potential interfaces responsible for the proposed transient oligomerization or interaction of Ras with other biomolecules in the cellular milieu.

  20. Adsorption of polyelectrolyte multilayers on plasma-modified porous polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, George; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2004-06-01

    Hydrophilic and chemically reactive porous media was prepared by adsorbing functional polymers at the surface of sintered polyethylene membranes. Modification of the membrane was accomplished by first exposing the membrane to an oxygen glow discharge gas plasma to render electrostatic charge at the membrane surfaces. Cationic polyelectrolyte polyethylenimine (PEI) was adsorbed from solution to the anionically charged surface to form an adsorbed monolayer. The adsorption of a second anionic polyelectrolyte allowed further modification of the membrane surface with a polyelectrolyte bilayer complex. In this paper we probe the effect of polymer structure on the conformation and stability of the adsorbed polyelectrolyte monolayers and bilayers on the modified polyethylene surface. Using the wicking rate of deionized, distilled water through the porous membrane to gauge the interfacial energy of the modified surface, we show that the wicking rate of the multilayer membrane can be controlled by varying the chemistry of the adsorbing polyelectrolytes and their molecular weights.

  1. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) as a Tool for Probing the Reactivity of Polyynes Relevant to Hexadehydro-Diels–Alder (HDDA) Cascades

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) behavior of a number of alkyne-rich compounds is described. The DSC trace for each compound exhibits an exothermic event at a characteristic onset temperature. For the tri- and tetraynes whose [4 + 2] HDDA reactivity in solution has been determined, these onset temperatures show a strong correlation with the cyclization activation energy. The studies reported here exemplify how the data available through this operationally simple analytical technique can give valuable insights into the thermal behavior of small molecules. PMID:25470072

  2. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as a tool for probing the reactivity of polyynes relevant to hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) cascades.

    PubMed

    Woods, Brian P; Hoye, Thomas R

    2014-12-19

    The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) behavior of a number of alkyne-rich compounds is described. The DSC trace for each compound exhibits an exothermic event at a characteristic onset temperature. For the tri- and tetraynes whose [4 + 2] HDDA reactivity in solution has been determined, these onset temperatures show a strong correlation with the cyclization activation energy. The studies reported here exemplify how the data available through this operationally simple analytical technique can give valuable insights into the thermal behavior of small molecules.

  3. A water soluble glucopyranosyl conjugate as a selective and reactive probe for cysteine in a buffer and its application to living cells.

    PubMed

    Areti, Sivaiah; Teotia, Rohit; Rao, Chebrolu Pulla

    2015-11-01

    A water soluble and biocompatible glucopyranosyl conjugate (L) has been synthesized and characterized by various techniques. The L has been employed to recognize Cys selectively among the naturally occurring amino acids in HEPES buffer at physiological pH. A minimum detection limit of 2.5 × 10(-7) M was shown by L for Cys in the buffer at pH = 7.4. The reactivity of L towards biological thiols as demonstrated by emission and absorption is supported by the observed increase in the fluorescence intensity; however, Cys shows a maximum increase owing to its better nucleophilicity. The reactivity of Cys on L is demonstrated by (1)H NMR, ESI MS, emission and absorption spectroscopy, and the formation of the binary complex was supported by ESI MS. The control molecular study revealed the necessity of the glyco-moiety to bring water solubility and biological adaptability. The cellular studies support that the conjugate L is biologically adaptable and shows effective intracellular fluorescence emission upon reacting with intracellular thiols.

  4. Tactics for Probing Aryne Reactivity: Mechanistic Studies of Silicon-oxygen Bond Cleavage During the Trapping of (HDDA-generated) Benzynes by Silyl Ethers

    PubMed Central

    Hoye, Thomas R.; Baire, Beeraiah; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    We report mechanistic aspects of the trapping of thermally (HDDA) generated benzyne derivatives by pendant silyl ether groups, which results in net insertion of the pair of benzyne Csp-hydribized carbon atoms into the silicon–oxygen sigma bond. Cross-over experiments using symmetrical, doubly labeled bis-silyl ether substrates established that the reaction is unimolecular in nature. Competition experiments involving either intramolecular or intermolecular dihydrogen transfer clock reactions (from within a TIPS isopropyl group or cyclooctane, respectively) vs. the silyl ether cyclization were used to gain additional insights. We evaluated effects of the steric bulk of the silyl ether trapping group and of the ring-size of the cyclic ether being formed (furan vs. pyran). These types of competition experiments allow the relative rates of various product-determining steps to be determined. This previously has only rarely been possible because aryne formation is typically rate-limiting, making it challenging to probe the kinetics of subsequent trapping reactions. Solvent effects (polarity of the medium) and computational studies were used to probe the question of stepwise vs. concerted pathways for the Si–O insertion. PMID:25419449

  5. Probing the orientation of electrostatically immobilized Protein G B1 by time-of-flight secondary ion spectrometry, sum frequency generation, and near-edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baio, Joe E; Weidner, Tobias; Baugh, Loren; Gamble, Lara J; Stayton, Patrick S; Castner, David G

    2012-01-31

    To fully develop techniques that provide an accurate description of protein structure at a surface, we must start with a relatively simple model system before moving to increasingly complex systems. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG), near-edge X-ray adsorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used to probe the orientation of Protein G B1 (6 kDa) immobilized onto both amine (NH(3)(+)) and carboxyl (COO(-)) functionalized gold. Previously, we have shown that we could successfully control orientation of a similar Protein G fragment via a cysteine-maleimide bond. In this investigation, to induce opposite end-on orientations, a charge distribution was created within the Protein G B1 fragment by first substituting specific negatively charged amino acids with neutral amino acids and then immobilizing the protein onto two oppositely charged self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces (NH(3)(+) and COO(-)). Protein coverage, on both surfaces, was monitored by the change in the atomic % N, as determined by XPS. Spectral features within the SFG spectra, acquired for the protein adsorbed onto a NH(3)(+)-SAM surface, indicates that this electrostatic interaction does induce the protein to form an oriented monolayer on the SAM substrate. This corresponded to the polarization dependence of the spectral feature related to the NEXAFS N(1s)-to-π* transition of the β-sheet peptide bonds within the protein layer. ToF-SIMS data demonstrated a clear separation between the two samples based on the intensity differences of secondary ions stemming from amino acids located asymmetrically within Protein G B1 (methionine: 62 and 105 m/z; tyrosine: 107 and 137 m/z; leucine: 86 m/z). For a more quantitative examination of orientation, we developed a ratio comparing the sum of the intensities of secondary-ions stemming from the amino acid residues at either end

  6. Self-assembled monolayers of Aβ peptides on Au electrodes: an artificial platform for probing the reactivity of redox active metals and cofactors relevant to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Debajyoti; Sengupta, Kushal; Mukherjee, Soumya; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh; Dey, Abhishek

    2012-07-25

    The water-soluble hydrophilic part of human Aβ peptide has been extended to include a C-terminal cysteine residue. Utilizing the thiol functionality of this cysteine residue, self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of these peptides are formed on Au electrodes. Atomic force microscopy imaging confirms formation of small Aβ aggregates on the surface of the electrode. These aggregates bind redox active metals like Cu and cofactors like heme, both of which are proposed to generate toxic partially reduced oxygen species (PROS) and play a vital role in Alzheimer's disease. The spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of these Cu and heme bound Aβ SAM are similar to those reported for the soluble Cu and heme bound Aβ peptide. Experiments performed on these Aβ-SAM electrodes clearly demonstrate that (1) heme bound Aβ is kinetically more competent in reducing O(2) than Cu bound Aβ, (2) under physiological conditions the reduced Cu site produces twice as much PROS (measured in situ) than the reduced heme site, and (3) chelators like clioquinol remove Cu from these aggregates, while drugs like methylene blue inhibit O(2) reactivity of the heme cofactor. This artificial construct provides a very easy platform for investigating potential drugs affecting aggregation of human Aβ peptides and PROS generation by its complexes with redox active metals and cofactors.

  7. Use of cysteine-reactive crosslinkers to probe conformational flexibility of human DJ-1 demonstrates that Glu18 mutations are dimers

    PubMed Central

    Prahlad, Janani; Hauser, David N.; Milkovic, Nicole M.; Cookson, Mark R.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of a key cysteine residue (Cys106) in the parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1 regulates its ability to protect against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Cys106 interacts with a neighboring protonated Glu18 residue, stabilizing the Cys106-SO2− (sulfinic acid) form of DJ-1. To study this important post-translational modification, we previously designed several Glu18 mutations (E18N, E18D, E18Q) that alter the oxidative propensity of Cys106. However, recent results suggest these Glu18 mutations cause loss of DJ-1 dimerization, which would severely compromise the protein’s function. The purpose of this study was to conclusively determine the oligomerization state of these mutants using X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, thermal stability analysis, CD spectroscopy, sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation, and crosslinking. We found that all of the Glu18 DJ-1 mutants were dimeric. Thiol crosslinking indicates that these mutant dimers are more flexible than the wild-type protein and can form multiple crosslinked dimeric species due to the transient exposure of cysteine residues that are inaccessible in the wild-type protein. The enhanced flexibility of Glu18 DJ-1 mutants provides a parsimonious explanation for their lower observed crosslinking efficiency in cells. In addition, thiol crosslinkers may have an underappreciated value as qualitative probes of protein conformational flexibility. PMID:24832775

  8. High-resolution probing of local conformational changes in proteins by the use of multiple labeling: unfolding and self-assembly of human carbonic anhydrase II monitored by spin, fluorescent, and chemical reactivity probes.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, P; Owenius, R; Mårtensson, L G; Carlsson, U; Lindgren, M

    2001-06-01

    Two different spin labels, N-(1-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrrolidinyl)iodoacetamide (IPSL) and (1-oxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrroline-3-methyl) methanethiosulfonate (MTSSL), and two different fluorescent labels 5-((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)-ethyl)amino)naphtalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS) and 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimetylaminonaphtalene (BADAN), were attached to the introduced C79 in human carbonic anhydrase (HCA II) to probe local structural changes upon unfolding and aggregation. HCA II unfolds in a multi-step manner with an intermediate state populated between the native and unfolded states. The spin label IPSL and the fluorescent label IAEDANS reported on a substantial change in mobility and polarity at both unfolding transitions at a distance of 7.4-11.2 A from the backbone of position 79. The shorter and less flexible labels BADAN and MTSSL revealed less pronounced spectroscopic changes in the native-to-intermediate transition, 6.6-9.0 A from the backbone. At intermediate guanidine (Gu)-HCl concentrations the occurrence of soluble but irreversibly aggregated oligomeric protein was identified from refolding experiments. At approximately 1 M Gu-HCl the aggregation was found to be essentially complete. The size and structure of the aggregates could be varied by changing the protein concentration. EPR measurements and line-shape simulations together with fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy measurements provided a picture of the self-assembled protein as a disordered protein structure with a representation of both compact as well as dynamic and polar environments at the site of the molecular labels. This suggests that a partially folded intermediate of HCA II self-assembles by both local unfolding and intermolecular docking of the intermediates vicinal to position 79. The aggregates were determined to be 40-90 A in diameter depending on the experimental conditions and spectroscopic technique used.

  9. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  10. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  11. Characterization of micro- and mesoporous materials using accelerated dynamics adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qajar, Ali; Peer, Maryam; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Foley, Henry C

    2013-10-01

    Porosimetry is a fundamental characterization technique used in development of new porous materials for catalysis, membrane separation, and adsorptive gas storage. Conventional methods like nitrogen and argon adsorption at cryogenic temperatures suffer from slow adsorption dynamics especially for microporous materials. In addition, CO2, the other common probe, is only useful for micropore characterization unless being compressed to exceedingly high pressures to cover all required adsorption pressures. Here, we investigated the effect of adsorption temperature, pressure, and type of probe molecule on the adsorption dynamics. Methyl chloride (MeCl) was used as the probe molecule, and measurements were conducted near room temperature under nonisothermal condition and subatmospheric pressure. A pressure control algorithm was proposed to accelerate adsorption dynamics by manipulating the chemical potential of the gas. Collected adsorption data are transformed into pore size distribution profiles using the Horvath-Kavazoe (HK), Saito-Foley (SF), and modified Kelvin methods revised for MeCl. Our study shows that the proposed algorithm significantly speeds up the rate of data collection without compromising the accuracy of the measurements. On average, the adsorption rates on carbonaceous and aluminosilicate samples were accelerated by at least a factor of 4-5. PMID:23919893

  12. XPS, EXAFS, and FTIR as tools to probe the unexpected adsorption-coupled reduction of U(VI) to U(V) and U(IV) on Borassus flabellifer-based adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, S; Sreedhar, B; Padmaja, P

    2012-11-20

    Palm shell-based adsorbents prepared under five different thermochemical conditions and palm shell powder have been shown to be quite effective for removal of uranium from aqueous solutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) have been used to determine information about the speciation and binding of uranium on the adsorbents under study. Studies indicate that the uranium which is present as uranyl ion in aqueous solution is present in mixed valence states (U(IV), U(V), and U(VI)) when it is bound to the adsorbents. The mechanism of adsorption is likely to be adsorption-coupled reduction as well as complexation. Adsorption of uranium, cesium, and iron was found to be quantitative in binary as well as ternary mixtures.

  13. Study of Gas Adsorption on Biphasic Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nader, Rami; Hamieh, Tayssir; Villieras, Frédéric; Angelina. Razafitianamaharav; Toufaily, Joumana; Mcheik, Ali S.; Thomas, Fabien

    This work has carried out on grafted nanoparticles oxide silica to determine the possible existence of "nanoeffect". The textural properties and heterogeneity of surface of the samples were studied at the interface solid-gas. The Geometric properties were discussed in terms of the surface area while the energy properties were discussed in terms of the reactive sites of the surface.In the framework of this study, firstly, the sample was used in the non-grafted state and then in the grafted state using a hydrophilic molecule and a hydrophobic molecule. Several techniques have been used: Infrared spectroscopy, X ray diffraction, the point by point volumetric technique, which enable us to study the interactions between the adsorbate and the solid surface. Finally we have determined the size and electro thermal mobility using zestasizer (Nano ZS). The results obtained show that there are two types of groups silanols and siloxanes on the silica OX5 giving a composite hydrophilic-hydrophobic. This character causes a singular behavior in adsorptive material, the presence of hydrophilic groups, strongly polarized, and is detected by infrared spectroscopy. These groups cause significant differences depending on the polarizability of the probe molecules, and the adsorption of argon shows no heterogeneity of the surface, while nitrogen is adsorbed on the polar sites at low relative pressure, While the volumetric continues to adsorption of argon and nitrogen on combustion silica to obtain and to highlight sites of high energy and polar surface sites. The combustion silica which has been used as adsorbent in this study has an amorphous surface, virtually free of impurities indicates that the sample is not micro porous and grafting of the molecules makes a decrease in high energy sites or to a relative increase in surface low energy.

  14. Reactive arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hind, C. R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of certain infections. The similar features and HLA associations with the seronegative arthropathies have raised the possibility that the latter may be forms of reactive arthritis. This review describes the clinical and epidemiological features, and the recent advances in our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of reactive arthritis. PMID:7100033

  15. A photoemission study of the coadsorption of CO 2 and Na on TiO 2(110)-(1 × 1) and -(1 × 2) surfaces: adsorption geometry and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerlov, Jesper; Christensen, Søren V.; Weichel, Steen; Pedersen, Eddie H.; Møller, Preben J.

    1997-02-01

    The coadsorption of CO 2 and Na on TiO 2(110)-(1 × 1) and -(1 × 2) surfaces have been investigated by synchrotron-radiation based core-level and valence band photoemission. We find that the initially adsorbed Na exhibits a core-level shift of 1.15 eV when the two surfaces are compared. From a simple adsorption model this binding energy shift is understood in terms of a difference in initial Na adsorption site on these surfaces. While the (1 × 1) surface seems to favor Na adsorption in a hollow site "between" bridging surface oxygen atoms, it is found that the (1 × 2) surface facilitates a chemically more advantageous Na adsorption "adjacent to" the bridging oxygen atoms. Valence band measurements support this model since Na adsorption on the (1 × 2) surface leads to emission characteristic of alkali-oxygen-like compounds while this is not the case for the {Na}/{TiO2(110) }-(1 × 1) system. Finally, the relatively high resolution of the core-level emission allows in a direct way the various features contributing to the Na 2p core-level emission to be determined. With respect to adsorption of CO 2 we find for the (1 × 2) surface that CO 2 uptake saturates around 0.5 ML Na coverage compared to 1 ML for the (1 × 1) surface, indicating that the Na coverage required for saturation of CO 2 uptake is proportional to the density of protruded oxygen rows present at the surface. The CO 2 uptake, however, increases as the density of the oxygen rows decreases. Valence band photoemission data obtained from both interfaces show that a surface carbonate species is formed. At lower coverages/exposures there are, however, indications of the presence of a CO -2 species rather than carbonate, thereby suggesting that the carbonate species is formed through the surface reaction: 2CO -2→CO 2-3 + CO.

  16. Probing the Adsorption Behavior of 4,5-Diazafluoren-9-one and Its Schiff Base Derivatives on SIlver and Gold Nanosurfaces Using Raman Spectroscopy, Density Functional Theory and Potential Energy Distribution Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Rhonda Patrice

    from the center ring was shortened because of metal-ligand coordination. These observations are correlated to the shifts in Raman frequencies; a decrease in bond length resulted in a shift to a higher vibrational energy. The surface-enhanced Raman spectrum of DAFO was obtained on silver colloids and gold nanorods. The resulting SER spectra were compared to their corresponding normal Raman spectra, there were changes in relative band intensities and there were bands shifted because of adsorption; these observations were used to probe orientation. Orientation is determined by applying surface selections rules developed by both Creighton and Moskovits. The rules indicate, when the vibrational modes assigned to out-of-plane modes are observed as enhanced in the SER spectrum, the ligand is considered parallel relative to the metal surface, and when the vibrational modes assigned to in-plane modes are observed as enhanced, the ligand is not parallel relative to the metal surface. The relative surface enhancement factors were calculated by normalizing the spectra and then by taking the ratio of ISERS/INR. Based on the enhancement factors, the bands assigned to in-plane modes exhibited the highest enhancement factors on the Au and Ag SER spectra. This observation suggests that DAFO is not parallel to the metal nano-surfaces. In the Ag SERS spectrum the bands with the highest enhancement factors were assigned to quadrant ring stretching and cyclopentone bending. Analysis of the carbonyl stretching frequency on the Ag spectrum revealed the frequency shifted to a lower vibrational energy. This shift has been ascribed to the carbonyl bond losing double bond character, which permits the interaction between the metal and the carbonyl oxygen. It was proposed the DAFO ligand is sandwiched between the silver hydrosol. The TER spectrum of DAFO was obtained; analysis of the spectrum revealed similarities to the Ag SERS spectrum. The carbonyl stretching frequency was lowered, the bands

  17. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  18. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  19. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  20. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2012-07-10

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  1. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  2. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  3. Interactions of Water with Mineral Dust Aerosol: Water Adsorption, Hygroscopicity, Cloud Condensation, and Ice Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Cziczo, Daniel J; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-13

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the major types of aerosol present in the troposphere. The molecular level interactions of water vapor with mineral dust are of global significance. Hygroscopicity, light scattering and absorption, heterogneous reactivity and the ability to form clouds are all related to water-dust interactions. In this review article, experimental techniques to probe water interactions with dust and theoretical frameworks to understand these interactions are discussed. A comprehensive overview of laboratory studies of water adsorption, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation of fresh and atmspherically aged mineral dust particles is provided. Finally, we relate laboratory studies and theoretical simulations that provide fundemental insights into these processes on the molecular level with field measurements that illustrate the atmospheric significance of these processes. Overall, the details of water interactions with mineral dust are covered from multiple perspectives in this review article. PMID:27015126

  4. Interactions of Water with Mineral Dust Aerosol: Water Adsorption, Hygroscopicity, Cloud Condensation, and Ice Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Cziczo, Daniel J; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-13

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the major types of aerosol present in the troposphere. The molecular level interactions of water vapor with mineral dust are of global significance. Hygroscopicity, light scattering and absorption, heterogneous reactivity and the ability to form clouds are all related to water-dust interactions. In this review article, experimental techniques to probe water interactions with dust and theoretical frameworks to understand these interactions are discussed. A comprehensive overview of laboratory studies of water adsorption, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation of fresh and atmspherically aged mineral dust particles is provided. Finally, we relate laboratory studies and theoretical simulations that provide fundemental insights into these processes on the molecular level with field measurements that illustrate the atmospheric significance of these processes. Overall, the details of water interactions with mineral dust are covered from multiple perspectives in this review article.

  5. A molecular investigation of adsorption onto mineral pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninness, Brian J.

    Pigment suspensions are important in several processes such as ceramics, paints, inks, and coatings. In the wet state, pigments are combined with a variety of chemical species such as polymers, surfactants, and polyelectrolytes which produce a complex colloidal system. The adsorption, desorption, and redistribution of these species at the pigment-aqueous solution interface can have an impact on the behavior in both the wet state or its final dried state. The goal of this work is to establish a molecular picture of the adsorption properties of these pigmented systems. A novel in situ infrared technique has been developed which allows the detection of adsorbed surface species on pigment particles in an aqueous environment. The technique involves the use of a polymeric binder to anchor the colloidal pigment particles to the surface of an internal reflection element (IRE). The binder only weakly perturbs about 25% of the reactive surface sites (hydroxyl groups) on silica. The reaction of succinic anhydride with an aminosilanized silica surface has been quantified using this technique. The adsorption dynamics of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) at the TiO2-aqueous solution interface has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and electrokinetic analysis. At low bulk concentrations, C16TAB is shown to adsorb as isolated islands with a "defective" bilayer structure. Anionic probe molecules are shown to effectively "tune" the adsorbed surfactant microstructure. The results indicate that the structure of the adsorbed surfactant layer, and not the amount of adsorbed surfactant, dictates the subsequent adsorption behavior of the system. Atomic Layer Deposition is used to deposit a TiO2 layer onto the surfaces of silica and kaolin pigments. The process involves the cyclic reaction sequence of the vapors of TiCl4 and H2O. Three complete deposition cycles are needed before the surfaces

  6. Characterization and reactivity of sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fiber surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz Rivera, Lymaris; Bakaev, Victor A.; Banerjee, Joy; Mueller, Karl T.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2016-05-01

    Multicomponent complex oxides, such as sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fibers, are important materials used for thermal insulation in buildings and homes. Although the surface properties of single oxides, such as silica, have been extensively studied, less is known about the distribution of reactive sites at the surface of multicomponent oxides. Here, we investigated the reactivity of sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fiber surfaces for better understanding of their interface chemistry and bonding with acrylic polymers. Acetic acid (with and without a 13C enrichment) was used as a probe representative of the carboxylic functional groups in many acrylic polymers and adhesives. Inverse gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (IGC-MS), and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), were used to characterize the fiber surface reactions and surface chemical structure. In this way, we discovered that both sodium ions in the glass surface, as well as sodium carbonate salts that formed on the surface due to the intrinsic reactivity of this glass in humid air, are primary sites of interaction with the carboxylic acid. Surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of sodium carbonates on these surfaces. Computer simulations of the interactions between the reactive sites on the glass fiber surface with acetic acid were performed to evaluate energetically favorable reactions. The adsorption reactions with sodium in the glass structure provide adhesive bonding sites, whereas the reaction with the sodium carbonate consumes the acid to form sodium-carboxylate, H2O and CO2 without any contribution to chemical bonding at the interface.

  7. Kelvin probe force microscopy in nonpolar liquids.

    PubMed

    Domanski, Anna L; Sengupta, Esha; Bley, Karina; Untch, Maria B; Weber, Stefan A L; Landfester, Katharina; Weiss, Clemens K; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Berger, Rüdiger

    2012-10-01

    Work function changes of Au were measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in the nonpolar liquid decane. As a proof of principle for the measurement in liquids, we investigated the work function change of an Au substrate upon hexadecanethiol chemisorption. To relate the measured contact potential difference (CPD) during the chemisorption of alkanethiols to a change of the work function, the influence of physisorbed decane must be taken into account. It is crucial that either the work function of the scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip or the sample surface remains constant throughout the reaction, since both contribute to the CPD. We describe two routes for determining the work function shift of Au coated with a monolayer of alkanethiols: In the first route, the SPM tips were taken as reference surfaces (constant tip work function). For this approach, we used Au(111) surfaces and kept the SPM tip ex situ during the adsorption process. In the second route, structured surfaces with reactive and inert parts were studied by KPFM (constant reference work function). For this route, we prepared nanometer sized Au structures by nanosphere lithography on SiO(x) substrates. Now, the SiO(x) served as the inert reference surface. The shifts in the work function after exposure to the hexadecanethiol (HDT) solution were determined to be ΔΦ(Au+HDT,decane-Au,air) = -1.33 eV ± 0.07 eV (route I) and ΔΦ(Au+HDT,decane-Au,air) = -1.46 eV ± 0.04 eV (route II). Both values are in excellent agreement with the work function shifts determined by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) reported in literature. The presented procedures of measuring work function changes in decane open new ways to study local reactions at solid-liquid interfaces.

  8. Using chromate to investigate the impact of natural organics on the surface reactivity of nanoparticulate magnetite.

    PubMed

    Swindle, Andrew L; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M; Elwood Madden, Andrew S

    2015-02-17

    Chromate was used as a chemical probe to investigate the size-dependent influence of organics on nanoparticle surface reactivity. Magnetite-chromate sorption experiments were conducted with ∼ 90 and ∼ 6 nm magnetite nanoparticles in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA), natural organic matter (NOM), and isolated landfill leachate (LL). Results indicated that low concentrations (1 mg/L) of organics had no noticeable impact on chromate sorption, whereas concentrations of 50 mg/L or more resulted in decreased amounts of chromate sorption. The adsorption of organics onto the magnetite surfaces interfered equally with the ability of the 6 and 90 nm particles to sorb chromate from solution, despite the greater surface area of the smaller particles. Results indicate the presence of organics did not impact the redox chemistry of the magnetite-chromate system over the duration of the experiments (8 h), nor did the organics interact with the chromate in solution. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results indicate that the organics blocked the surface reactivity by occupying surface sites on the particles. The similarity of results with FA and NOM suggests that coverage of the reactive mineral surface is the main factor behind the inhibition of surface reactivity in the presence of organics.

  9. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  10. Ionization characteristics of the Cys-25/His-159 interactive system and of the modulatory group of papain: resolution of ambiguity by electronic perturbation of the quasi-2-mercaptopyridine leaving group in a new pyrimidyl disulphide reactivity probe.

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, G W; Thomas, E W; Topham, C M; Brocklehurst, K

    1993-01-01

    1. A new thiol-specific reactivity probe 4,4'-dipyrimidyl disulphide [compound (VII), m.p. 110 degrees C, pKa of its monohydronated form 0.91] was synthesized and used to resolve the ambiguity of interpretation of the behaviour of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) in alkaline media known to depend to varying extents on two ionizations with pKa values approx. 8.0-8.5 and > or = 9.5 respectively. 2. A new extensive pH-second-order rate constant (k) data set for the reaction of papain with 2-(acetamido)-ethyl 2'-pyridyl disulphide (IV) demonstrated the existence of a striking rate maximum at pH approx. 4, the independence of k around pH 8 and the increase in k with increase in pH across a pKa value of 10.0, behaviour similar to that of other 2-pyridyl disulphides (R-S-S-2-Py) that lack key substrate-like binding sites in R. 3. Although the simplest interpretation of the pKa value of 10.0 assigns it to the formation of (Cys-25)-S-/(His-159)-Im from the ion-pair state of the papain catalytic site, another interpretation may be conceived in which this pKa value is assigned to another group remote from the catalytic site, the state of ionization of which modulates catalytic-site behaviour. This alternative assignment is shown to require compensating effects in the pH region around 8 such that the formation of (Cys-25)-S-/(His-159)-Im across pKa 8.0-8.5 is without net kinetic effect in the reactions of simple 2-pyridyl disulphides such as compound (IV) and 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide (II). 4. The lower basicity of compound (VII) relative to that of compound (II) (pKa 2.45) was predicted to diminish or abolish the compensation postulated as a possibility in reactions of 2-pyridyl disulphides because of the decreased effectiveness of reaction via a (His-159)-Im+H-assisted transition state. The characteristics of the pH-dependence of the reaction of papain with compound (VII) which are quite different from those for its reaction with compound (II) support both this prediction and the

  11. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  12. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    The number and chemical identity of reactive sites on surfaces of glass affects the processing, reliability, and lifetime of a number of important commercial products. Surface site densities, distributions, and structural identities are closely tied to the formation and processing of the glass surface, and exert a direct influence on strength and coating performance. The surface of a glass sample may vary markedly from the composition and chemistry of the bulk glass. We are taking a physicochemical approach to understanding adsorption sites on pristine multicomponent glass fibers surfaces, directly addressing the effect of processing on surface reactivity. This project aimed to understand the energy distributions of surface adsorption sites, the chemical/structural identity of those sites, and the relationship of these glasses to glass composition, thermal history, and in future work, surface coatings. We have studied the bulk and surface structure as well as the surface reactivity of the glass fibers with solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, inverse gas chromatography (IGC), and computational chemistry methods. These methods, solid-state NMR and IGC, typically require high surface area materials; however, by using probe molecules for NMR experiments or packing a column at high density for IGC measurements, lower surface area materials, such as glass fibers, can be investigated. The glasses used within this study were chosen as representative specimens of fibers with potentially different reactive sites on their surfaces. The two glass compositions were centered around a nominal E-glass, which contains very little alkali cations and mainly alkaline earth cations, and wool glass, which contains an abundance of alkali cations. The concentration of boron was varied from 0 to 8 mole % in both fiber compositions. Fibers were drawn from each composition at a variety of temperatures and draw speeds to provide a range of glass samples with varying

  13. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  14. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  15. Problems affecting the fidelity of pressure measuring instruments for planetary probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Determination is made of the nature and magnitude of surface-related effects that cause errors in pressure measuring instruments, with special reference being made to instruments intended for use in planetary probes. The interaction of gases with clean surfaces of metals likely to be used as gage construction materials was studied. Special emphasis was placed on the adsorption, chemical reaction, and electron-induced desorption processes. The results indicated that all metals tested were subject to surface processes which would degrade gage fidelity. It was also found, however, that the formation of inert adsorbed layers on these metal surfaces, such as carbon on platinum, greatly reduced or eliminated these effects. This process, combined with a system design which avoids contact between reactive gases and hot filaments, appears to offer the most promising solution to the gage fidelity problem.

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1995-01-01

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devises, in probe array devices.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1995-03-21

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devices, in probe array devices. 10 figures.

  18. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling a gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extend in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  20. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extends in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  1. Impact of interactions between metal oxides to oxidative reactivity of manganese dioxide.

    PubMed

    Taujale, Saru; Zhang, Huichun

    2012-03-01

    Manganese oxides typically exist as mixtures with other metal oxides in soil-water environments; however, information is only available on their redox activity as single oxides. To bridge this gap, we examined three binary oxide mixtures containing MnO(2) and a secondary metal oxide (Al(2)O(3), SiO(2) or TiO(2)). The goal was to understand how these secondary oxides affect the oxidative reactivity of MnO(2). SEM images suggest significant heteroaggregation between Al(2)O(3) and MnO(2) and to a lesser extent between SiO(2)/TiO(2) and MnO(2). Using triclosan and chlorophene as probe compounds, pseudofirst-order kinetic results showed that Al(2)O(3) had the strongest inhibitory effect on MnO(2) reactivity, followed by SiO(2) and then TiO(2). Al(3+) ion or soluble SiO(2) had comparable inhibitory effects as Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2), indicating the dominant inhibitory mechanism was surface complexation/precipitation of Al/Si species on MnO(2) surfaces. TiO(2) inhibited MnO(2) reactivity only when a limited amount of triclosan was present. Due to strong adsorption and slow desorption of triclosan by TiO(2), precursor-complex formation between triclosan and MnO(2) was much slower and likely became the new rate-limiting step (as opposed to electron transfer in all other cases). These mechanisms can also explain the observed adsorption behavior of triclosan by the binary oxide mixtures and single oxides. PMID:22309023

  2. Impact of interactions between metal oxides to oxidative reactivity of manganese dioxide.

    PubMed

    Taujale, Saru; Zhang, Huichun

    2012-03-01

    Manganese oxides typically exist as mixtures with other metal oxides in soil-water environments; however, information is only available on their redox activity as single oxides. To bridge this gap, we examined three binary oxide mixtures containing MnO(2) and a secondary metal oxide (Al(2)O(3), SiO(2) or TiO(2)). The goal was to understand how these secondary oxides affect the oxidative reactivity of MnO(2). SEM images suggest significant heteroaggregation between Al(2)O(3) and MnO(2) and to a lesser extent between SiO(2)/TiO(2) and MnO(2). Using triclosan and chlorophene as probe compounds, pseudofirst-order kinetic results showed that Al(2)O(3) had the strongest inhibitory effect on MnO(2) reactivity, followed by SiO(2) and then TiO(2). Al(3+) ion or soluble SiO(2) had comparable inhibitory effects as Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2), indicating the dominant inhibitory mechanism was surface complexation/precipitation of Al/Si species on MnO(2) surfaces. TiO(2) inhibited MnO(2) reactivity only when a limited amount of triclosan was present. Due to strong adsorption and slow desorption of triclosan by TiO(2), precursor-complex formation between triclosan and MnO(2) was much slower and likely became the new rate-limiting step (as opposed to electron transfer in all other cases). These mechanisms can also explain the observed adsorption behavior of triclosan by the binary oxide mixtures and single oxides.

  3. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  4. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  5. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  6. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  7. Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

    2012-03-29

    Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

  8. LOCATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBSURFACE ANOMALIES USING A SOIL CONDUCTIVITY PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electrical conductivity probe, designed for use with "direct push" technology, has been successfully used to locate buried drums, contaminant plumes, and to precisely locate and characterize a previously installed permeable reactive iron wall. The conductivity probe was desig...

  9. Probing zeolites by vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Bordiga, Silvia; Lamberti, Carlo; Bonino, Francesca; Travert, Arnaud; Thibault-Starzyk, Frédéric

    2015-10-21

    This review addresses the most relevant aspects of vibrational spectroscopies (IR, Raman and INS) applied to zeolites and zeotype materials. Surface Brønsted and Lewis acidity and surface basicity are treated in detail. The role of probe molecules and the relevance of tuning both the proton affinity and the steric hindrance of the probe to fully understand and map the complex site population present inside microporous materials are critically discussed. A detailed description of the methods needed to precisely determine the IR absorption coefficients is given, making IR a quantitative technique. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process that can be extracted from a variable-temperature IR study are described. Finally, cutting-edge space- and time-resolved experiments are reviewed. All aspects are discussed by reporting relevant examples. When available, the theoretical literature related to the reviewed experimental results is reported to support the interpretation of the vibrational spectra on an atomic level.

  10. The 'reactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Piccardo, Giovanni; Guarnieri, Luisa

    2010-05-01

    The Ligurian ophiolitic peridotites [South Lanzo, Erro-Tobbio, Internal Ligurides and Corsica] are characterized by the abundance of spinel(Sp) peridotites showing depleted compositions and ranging from Cpx-poor Sp lherzolites to Sp harzburgites. They were recognized in the last decades as refractory residua by MORB-forming partial melting of the asthenosphere, and were similar to abyssal peridotites. Recent structural and compositional studies promoted a better understanding of their structural and compositional features and their genetic processes. In the field these depleted peridotites replace with primary contacts pyroxenite-bearing fertile Sp lherzolites that have been recognized as sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Field relationships evidence that decametric-hectometric bodies of pristine pyroxenite-veined lithospheric Sp lherzolites are preserved as structural remnants within the km-scale masses of depleted peridotites. The depleted peridotites show coarse-grained recrystallized textures and reaction micro-structures indicating pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation that have been considered as records of melt/peridotite interaction during reactive diffuse porous flow of undersaturated melts. They show, moreover, contrasting bulk and mineral chemistries that cannot be produced by simple partial melting and melt extraction. In particular, their bulk compositions are depleted in SiO2 and enriched in FeO with respect to refractory residua after any kind of partial melting, as calculated by Niu (1997), indicating that they cannot be formed by simple partial melting and melt extraction processes. Moreover, TiO2 content in Sp is usually significantly higher (up to 0.8-1.0 wt%) than typical TiO2 contents of spinels (usually < 0.1-0.2 wt %) in fertile mantle peridotites and melting refractory residua, indicating that spinel attained element equilibration with a Ti-bearing basaltic melt. The depleted peridotites usually show strongly variable Cpx modal

  11. ICES ON TITAN: LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS THAT COMPLEMENT THE HUYGENS PROBE

    SciTech Connect

    J. ROBINSON; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The composition of the cold bodies in the outer solar system may hold some of the key molecular clues concerning the composition of the prestellax molecular cloud that gave rise to the solar system. We studied the physical chemistry and heterogeneous (gas/surface) reactivity of extraterrestrial ice analogs of the surfaces of Saturn's moon Titan. This program coupled our surface spectroscopic techniques with physical adsorption measurements. We addressed several of the pressing questions regarding Titan such as: Is storage of hydrocarbons in Titan's water ice crust feasible? Do heterogeneous processes influence the atmospheric chemical composition of Titan? Are phase transitions to be expected? These data can be incorporated into photochemical models with the goal of improved modeling of the chemical composition and meteorology of Titan's atmosphere. Titan will be probed by the Cassini-Huygens Mission. Our results on Titan ice analogs can be used to help interpret the mission data.

  12. Removal of carbonyl sulfide using activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Melanie L; Rosenberk, Ranjith Samuel

    2006-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plant odors are caused by compounds such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptans, and carbonyl sulfide (COS). One of the most efficient odor control processes is activated carbon adsorption; however, very few studies have been conducted on COS adsorption. COS is not only an odor causing compound but is also listed in the Clean Air Act as a hazardous air pollutant. Objectives of this study were to determine the following: (1) the adsorption capacity of 3 different carbons for COS removal; (2) the impact of relative humidity (RH) on COS adsorption; (3) the extent of competitive adsorption of COS in the presence of H2S; and (4) whether ammonia injection would increase COS adsorption capacity. Vapor phase react (VPR; reactivated), BPL (bituminous coal-based), and Centaur (physically modified to enhance H2S adsorption) carbons manufactured by Calgon Carbon Corp. were tested in three laboratory-scale columns, 6 in. in depth and 1 in. in diameter. Inlet COS concentrations varied from 35 to 49 ppmv (86-120 mg/m3). RHs of 17%, 30%, 50%, and 90% were tested. For competitive adsorption studies, H2S was tested at 60 ppmv, with COS at 30 ppmv. COS, RH, H2S, and ammonia concentrations were measured using an International Sensor Technology Model IQ-350 solid state sensor, Cole-Parmer humidity stick, Interscan Corp. 1000 series portable analyzer, and Drager Accuro ammonia sensor, respectively. It was found that the adsorption capacity of Centaur carbon for COS was higher than the other two carbons, regardless of RH. As humidity increased, the percentage of decrease in adsorption capacity of Centaur carbon, however, was greater than the other two carbons. The carbon adsorption capacity for COS decreased in proportion to the percentage of H2S in the gas stream. More adsorption sites appear to be available to H2S, a smaller molecule. Ammonia, which has been found to increase H2S adsorption capacity, did not increase the capacity for COS.

  13. Study of char gasification in a reaction/adsorption apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.; Crowley, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    The reaction of an activated carbon (coconut char) with CO/sub 2/ was studied in a reaction/adsorption apparatus which allows successive reactivity and physical adsorption measurements to be made on the same solid sample. Reaction and surface area evolution data were obtained in the temperature range from 800 to 900/sup 0/C. All reaction rate trajectories obtained in this study showed a maximum in the reaction rate, 2-3 times higher than the initial rate, at about 85% conversion. There was no correlation between these results and the evolution of the internal surface area although the reaction appeared to take place initially in the kinetically controlled regime.

  14. Adsorption and Separation Modeling of Porous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanoski, Anthony; van Swol, Frank

    2001-03-01

    With the advent of self-assembly techniques has come the potential to tailor materials for adsorption and separation applications. For example, using surfactants as templating agents it is now feasible to finely control both the three-dimensional (3D) porosity as well as the surface chemistry. With an eye on assisting the emerging materials design we have embarked on a program that focuses on modeling adsorption/desorption, reactions and permeation phenomena in such structures. What makes the modeling particularly challenging is the coupling of length scales. The role of the atomic length scale features such as surface reactions and surface structure must be captured as well as the role of the network connectivity and other larger length scales. The latter include the pore shape and length, and the presence of external surfaces. This paper reports on how we employ refineable lattice models to tackle the modeling problems. We use both equilibrium and non-equilibrium Monte Carlo (MC) and 3D density functional theory (DFT) techniques to study the equilibrium and transport behavior in nanostructured porous materials. We will present 1) results of both adsorption/desorption hysteresis in large regular and random networks and 2) the results of using reactive sites in separation membranes, and compare these with experiments.

  15. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  16. Sulfate adsorption on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-10-15

    Recent spectroscopic work has suggested that only one surface species of sulfate is dominant on hematite. Sulfate is therefore a very suitable anion to test and develop adsorption models for variable charge minerals. The authors have studied sulfate adsorption on goethite covering a large range of sulfate concentrations, surface coverages, pH values, and electrolyte concentrations. Four different techniques were used to cover the entire range of conditions. For characterization at low sulfate concentrations, below the detection limit of sulfate with ICP-AES, the authors used proton-sulfate titrations at constant pH. Adsorption isotherms were studied for the intermediate sulfate concentration range. Acid-base titrations in sodium sulfate and electromobility were used for high sulfate concentrations. All the data can be modeled with one adsorbed species if it is assumed that the charge of adsorbed sulfate is spatially distributed in the interface. The charge distribution of sulfate follows directly from modeling the proton-sulfate adsorption stoichoimemtry sine this stoichiometry is independent of the intrinsic affinity constant of sulfate. The charge distribution can be related to the structure of the surface complex by use of the Pauling bond valence concept and is in accordance with the microscopic structure found by spectroscopy. The intrinsic affinity constant follows from the other measurements. Modeling of the proton-ion stoichoimetry with the commonly used 2-pK models, where adsorbed ions are treated as point charges, is possible only if at least two surface species for sulfate are used.

  17. SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, C.S.

    1959-06-16

    Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

  18. Probing the Influence of a 4,6-O-Acetal on the Reactivity of Galactopyranosyl Donors: Verification of the Disarming Influence of the trans-gauche Conformation of C5–C6 Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Moumé-Pymbock, Myriame; Furukawa, Takayuki; Mondal, Sujit; Crich, David

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a 4,6-O-alkylidene acetal on the rate of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of methyl galactopyranosides and of spontaneous hydrolysis of 2,4-dinitrophenyl galactopyranosides has been studied through the synthesis and hydrolysis of analogs in which O6 is replaced by a methoxymethylene unit in which the methoxy group adopts either an equatorial or an axial position according to the configuration. Consistent with earlier studies under both acid-catalyzed and spontaneous hydrolysis conditions the alkylidene acetal, or its 7-carba analog, retards hydrolysis with respect to comparable systems lacking the cyclic protecting group. The configuration at C7 in the 7-carba analogs does not influence the rate of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis but has a minor influence on the rate of spontaneous hydrolysis of the 2,4-dinitrophenyl galactosides, confirming earlier studies on the role played by the hydroxymethyl group conformation on glycoside reactivity. The benzylidene acetal is found to stabilize the α-anomer of galactopyranose derivatives relative to monocyclic analogs. Reasons for the α-selectivity of 4,6-O-benzylidene-protected galactopyranosyl donors bearing neighboring group-active protecting groups at O2 are discussed. PMID:23984633

  19. Quaternized magnetic microspheres for the efficient removal of reactive dyes.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Chendong; Li, Penghui; Li, Aimin; Zhou, Qing; Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Yang

    2012-09-15

    In this paper, a novel quaternized magnetic resin, NDMP, was prepared and characterized. Two reactive dyes (RDs), Orange G (OG) and red RWO, were used as a small-molecular RD and large-molecular RD, respectively, to investigate their adsorption on NDMP. A common quaternized magnetic resin, MIEX, was selected for comparison. The adsorption kinetics of OG onto both resins and the adsorption kinetics of RWO onto NDMP followed pseudo-second-order kinetics, whereas the adsorption of RWO onto MIEX was better fitted by pseudo-first-order kinetics. The experimental data illustrated that the equilibrium adsorption amount of both RDs onto NDMP (1.9 mmol OG/g, 0.70 mmol RWO/g) was twice as large as that on MIEX (1.0 mmol OG/g, 0.35 mmol RWO/g). The Langmuir equation and the Freundlich model fit the isotherm data for OG and RWO adsorption, respectively. The adsorption of OG on the NDMP and MIEX resins declined in the presence of NaCl or Na₂SO₄. The effects of the salts on the adsorption of RWO were different. The recyclability of NDMP and MIEX were also evaluated. This work provides a reusable efficient adsorbent for the removal of RDs. PMID:22726352

  20. Carbonaceous materials for adsorptive refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, B.; Wolak, E.

    2012-06-01

    Carbon monoliths prepared from hard coal precursors were obtained. The porous structure of the monoliths was evaluated on the basis of nitrogen adsorption — desorption equilibrium data. The investigated monoliths have a well-developed microporous structure with significant specific surface area (S BET ). Equilibrium studies of methanol vapour adsorption were used to characterize the methanol adsorptive capacity that was determined using a volumetric method. The heat of wetting by methanol was determined in order to estimate the energetic effects of the adsorption process. The results of the investigations show that all monoliths exhibit high adsorption capacity and high heat of wetting with methanol.

  1. Activation of Methane Promoted by Adsorption of CO on Mo2 C2 (-) Cluster Anions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Yu; Ma, Jia-Bi; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Chongyang; Ning, Chuan-Gang; Chen, Hui; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-05-01

    Atomic clusters are being actively studied for activation of methane, the most stable alkane molecule. While many cluster cations are very reactive with methane, the cluster anions are usually not very reactive, particularly for noble metal free anions. This study reports that the reactivity of molybdenum carbide cluster anions with methane can be much enhanced by adsorption of CO. The Mo2 C2 (-) is inert with CH4 while the CO addition product Mo2 C3 O(-) brings about dehydrogenation of CH4 under thermal collision conditions. The cluster structures and reactions are characterized by mass spectrometry, photoelectron spectroscopy, and quantum chemistry calculations, which demonstrate that the Mo2 C3 O(-) isomer with dissociated CO is reactive but the one with non-dissociated CO is unreactive. The enhancement of cluster reactivity promoted by CO adsorption in this study is compared with those of reported systems of a few carbonyl complexes. PMID:27060286

  2. Arsenate adsorption mechanisms at the allophane - Water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; Sparks, D.L.; Davis, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated arsenate (As(V)) reactivity and surface speciation on amorphous aluminosilicate mineral (synthetic allophane) surfaces using batch adsorption experiments, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The adsorption isotherm experiments indicated that As(V) uptake increased with increasing [As(V)]0 from 50 to 1000 ??M (i.e., Langmuir type adsorption isotherm) and that the total As adsorption slightly decreased with increasing NaCl concentrations from 0.01 to 0.1 M. Arsenate adsorption was initially (0-10 h) rapid followed by a slow continuum uptake, and the adsorption processes reached the steady state after 720 h. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses suggest that As(V) predominantly forms bidentate binuclear surface species on aluminum octahedral structures, and these species are stable up to 11 months. Solubility calculations and powder XRD analyses indicate no evidence of crystalline AI-As(V) precipitates in the experimental systems. Overall, macroscopic and spectroscopic evidence suggest that the As(V) adsorption mechanisms at the allophane-water interface are attributable to ligand exchange reactions between As(V) and surface-coordinated water molecules and hydroxyl and silicate ions. The research findings imply that dissolved tetrahedral oxyanions (e.g., H2PO42- and H2AsO42-) are readily retained on amorphous aluminosilicate minerals in aquifer and soils at near neutral pH. The innersphere adsorption mechanisms might be important in controlling dissolved arsenate and phosphate in amorphous aluminosilicate-rich low-temperature geochemical environments. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  3. Chemical evidence for the pH-dependent control of ion-pair geometry in cathepsin B. Benzofuroxan as a reactivity probe sensitive to differences in the mutual disposition of the thiolate and imidazolium components of cysteine proteinase catalytic sites.

    PubMed

    Willenbrock, F; Brocklehurst, K

    1986-08-15

    Benzofuroxan reacts with the catalytic-site thiol group of cathepsin B (EC 3.4.22.1) to produce stoichiometric amount of the chromophoric reduction product, o-benzoquinone dioxime. In a study of the pH-dependence of the kinetics of this reaction, most data were collected for the bovine spleen enzyme, but the more limited data collected for the rat liver enzyme were closely similar both in the magnitude of the values of the second-order rate constants (k) and in the shape of the pH-k profile. In acidic and weakly alkaline media, the reaction is faster than the reactions of benzofuroxan with some other cysteine proteinases. For example, in the pH region around 5-6, the reaction of cathepsin B is about 10 times faster than that of papain, 15 times faster than that of stem bromelain and 6 times faster than that of ficin. The pH-dependence of k for the reaction of cathepsin B with benzofuroxan was determined in the pH range 2.7-8.3. In marked contrast with the analogous reactions of papain, ficin and stem bromelain [reported by Shipton & Brocklehurst (1977) Biochem. J. 167, 799-810], the pH-k profile for the cathepsin B reaction contains a sigmoidal component with pKa 5.2 in which k increases with decrease in pH. This modulation of the reactivity of the catalytic-site -S-/-ImH+ ion-pair state of cathepsin B (produced by protonic dissociation from -SH/-ImH+ with pKa approx. 3) towards a small, rigid, electrophilic reagent, in a reaction that appears to involve both components of the ion-pair for efficient reaction, suggests that the state of ionization of a group associated with a molecular pKa of approx. 5 may control ion-pair geometry. This might account for the remarkable finding [reported by Willenbrock & Brocklehurst (1984) Biochem. J. 222, 805-814] that, although the ion-pair appears to be generated in cathepsin B as the pH is increased across pKa 3.4, catalytic competence is not generated until the pH is increased across pKa 5-6.

  4. Mark 22 Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.R.

    2001-07-02

    Calculations for reactivity held in control rods have underpredicted the observed Mark 22 reactivity. Reactivity predictions by charge designers have accounted for this by including large biases which change with exposure and reactor region. The purpose of this study was to thoroughly investigate the methods and data used in the reactivity calculations. The goal was to identify errors and improvements and make necessary corrections.

  5. Acidity characterization of heterogeneous catalysts by solid-state NMR spectroscopy using probe molecules.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the surface acidic properties of solid acid catalysts is a key issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Important acid features of solid acids, such as their type (Brønsted vs. Lewis acid), distribution and accessibility (internal vs. external sites), concentration (amount), and strength of acid sites are crucial factors dictating their reactivity and selectivity. This short review provides information on different solid-state NMR techniques used for acidity characterization of solid acid catalysts. In particular, different approaches using probe molecules containing a specific nucleus of interest, such as pyridine-d5, 2-(13)C-acetone, trimethylphosphine, and trimethylphosphine oxide, are compared. Incorporation of valuable information (such as the adsorption structure, deprotonation energy, and NMR parameters) from density functional theory (DFT) calculations can yield explicit correlations between the chemical shift of adsorbed probe molecules and the intrinsic acid strength of solid acids. Methods that combine experimental NMR data with DFT calculations can therefore provide both qualitative and quantitative information on acid sites.

  6. Extracorporeal adsorption of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Staubach, K H; Rosenfeldt, J A; Veit, O; Bruch, H P

    1997-02-01

    In a porcine endotoxin shock model using a continuous intravenous endotoxin infusion of 250 ng/kg body weight per hour, the cardiorespiratory and hematologic parameters were studied while applying a new on-line polymyxin B immobilized adsorption system. This preliminary report shows that the new adsorbent can remove endotoxin selectively from the circulation and confers a good amount of protection from endotoxin-induced cardiopulmonary decompensation as well as hematologic alterations. Survival time could be extended from 216 min to 313 min. Whereas cardiac output and mean arterial pressure declined critically after 3 h in the controls, the treated group remained stable for another 3 h. These data show that endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B coupled covalently to acrylic spheres as an adjunctive on-line measure in the septic syndrome seems feasible. PMID:10225785

  7. Structural characteristics of modified activated carbons and adsorption of explosives.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, W; Gun'ko, V M; Skubiszewska-Zieba, J; Leboda, R

    2003-10-15

    Several series of activated carbons prepared by catalytic and noncatalytic gasification and subsequent deposition of pyrocarbon by pyrolysis of methylene chloride or n-amyl alcohol were studied by FTIR, chromatography, and adsorption methods using nitrogen and probe organics (explosives). The relationships between the textural characteristics of carbon samples and the recovery rates (eta) of explosives on solid-phase extraction (SPE) using different solvents for their elution after adsorption were analyzed using experimental and quantum chemical calculation results. The eta values for nitrate esters, cyclic nitroamines, and nitroaromatics only partially correlate with different adsorbent parameters (characterizing microporosity, mesoporosity, pore size distributions, etc.), polarity of eluting solvents, or characteristics of probe molecules, since there are many factors strongly affecting the recovery rates. Some of the synthesized carbons provide higher eta values than those for such commercial adsorbents as Hypercarb and Envicarb.

  8. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  9. Adsorption of arsenic(III) into modified lamellar Na-magadiite in aqueous medium-Thermodynamic of adsorption process

    SciTech Connect

    Lima Guerra, Denis Azevedo Pinto, Alane; Airoldi, Claudio; Ribeiro Viana, Rubia

    2008-12-15

    Synthetic Na-magadiite sample was used for organofunctionalization process with N-propyldiethylenetrimethoxysilane and bis[3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl]tetrasulfide, after expanding the interlayer distance with polar organic solvents such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The resulted materials were submitted to process of adsorption with arsenic solution at pH 2.0 and 298{+-}1 K. The adsorption isotherms were adjusted using a modified Langmuir equation with regression nonlinear; the net thermal effects obtained from calorimetric titration measurements were adjusted to a modified Langmuir equation. The adsorption process was exothermic ({delta}{sub int}H=-4.15-5.98 kJ mol{sup -1}) accompanied by increase in entropy ({delta}{sub int}S=41.32-62.20 J k{sup -1} mol{sup -1}) and Gibbs energy ({delta}{sub int}G=-22.44-24.56 kJ mol{sup -1}). The favorable values corroborate with the arsenic (III)/basic reactive centers interaction at the solid-liquid interface in the spontaneous process. - Grapical Abstract: The results suggest that the adsorption capacities increased with an increase of reactive basic centers in the pendant organic chains of the intercalated agent.

  10. [Comparison study on adsorption of middle molecular substances with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Li, Guifeng; Wan, Jianxin; Huang, Xiangqian; Zeng, Qiao; Tang, Jing

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs) are very favorable to the adsorption of middle molecular substances in the hemoperfusion because of their multiporous structure, large surface area and high reactivity, which are beneficial to the excellent absorption properties. The purpose of this study was to study the MWCTs on the adsorption capacity of the middle molecular substances. Vitamin B12 (VB12) was selected as a model of the middle molecular substances. The morphologies of MWCTs and activated carbon from commercial "carbon kidney" were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption behavior of VB12 was compared to each other with UV-visible absorption spectra. The MWCTs formed a sophistaicate gap structure, and compared to the activated carbon, MWCTs had a larger surface area. By Langmuir equation and Freundlich equation fitting analysis, VB12 adsorption on MWCTs is fit for multi-molecular layer adsorption, and the adsorption type of activated carbon is more inclined to the model corresponding to Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The adsorption rate of MWCTs is faster than that of the activated carbon and the adsorption capacity is greater, which could be expected to become the new adsorbent in the hemoperfusion. PMID:21936376

  11. Effect Of Reaction Environments On The Reactivity Of PCB (2-Chlorobiphenyl) Over Activated Carbon Impregnated With Palladized Iron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles has been developed to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, we evaluated the effects of various reaction environments on the adsorption-mediated dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-...

  12. Dissociative adsorption of O2 on unreconstructed metal (100) surfaces: Pathways, energetics, and sticking kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2014-05-01

    An accurate description of oxygen dissociation pathways and kinetics for various local adlayer environments is key for an understanding not just of the coverage dependence of oxygen sticking, but also of reactive steady states in oxidation reactions. Density functional theory analysis for M(100) surfaces with M =Pd, Rh, and Ni, where O prefers the fourfold hollow adsorption site, does not support the traditional Brundle-Behm-Barker picture of dissociative adsorption onto second-nearest-neighbor hollow sites with an additional blocking constraint. Rather adsorption via neighboring vicinal bridge sites dominates, although other pathways can be active. The same conclusion also applies for M =Pt and Ir, where oxygen prefers the bridge adsorption site. Statistical mechanical analysis is performed based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of a multisite lattice-gas model consistent with our revised picture of adsorption. This analysis determines the coverage and temperature dependence of sticking for a realistic treatment of the oxygen adlayer structure.

  13. The dynamics of adsorption on clean and adsorbate-modified transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Madix, R.J.

    1991-06-01

    Research is being carried out on both nondissociative and dissociative adsorption of gases on transition metal surfaces, with emphasis on alkanes. Particular attention is be placed on understanding the effects of adsorbed species on adsorption probabilities and on clarifying the role of energy exchange processes at the surface in both dissociative and nondissociative adsorption. Molecular beam methods are coupled with methods of surface science to gain the greatest control of the variables of the problem, including the incident kinetic energy, vibrational energy and angle of incidence of the incoming molecules. The dynamics of both direct and precursor-influenced dissociative adsorption routes are examined. Surface intermediates formed by activated adsorption are identified by vibrational spectroscopy and temperature programmed reaction. Emphasis is on comparative studies of low molecular weight alkanes in order to understand the origin of the differences in their reactivities on different metals.

  14. Dissociative adsorption of O2 on unreconstructed metal (100) surfaces: Pathways, energetics, and sticking kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2014-05-06

    An accurate description of oxygen dissociation pathways and kinetics for various local adlayer environments is key for an understanding not just of the coverage dependence of oxygen sticking, but also of reactive steady states in oxidation reactions. Density functional theory analysis for M(100) surfaces with M=Pd, Rh, and Ni, where O prefers the fourfold hollow adsorption site, does not support the traditional Brundle-Behm-Barker picture of dissociative adsorption onto second-nearest-neighbor hollow sites with an additional blocking constraint. Rather adsorption via neighboring vicinal bridge sites dominates, although other pathways can be active. The same conclusion also applies for M=Pt and Ir, where oxygen prefers the bridge adsorption site. Statistical mechanical analysis is performed based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of a multisite lattice-gas model consistent with our revised picture of adsorption. This analysis determines the coverage and temperature dependence of sticking for a realistic treatment of the oxygen adlayer structure.

  15. On the physical adsorption of vapors by microporous carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, R.H. . Inst. of Surface Science and Technology); Rand, B. . Division of Ceramics)

    1995-01-01

    The physical adsorption of nonpolar and polar vapors by active carbons is discussed in relation to pore structure and pore wall chemistry. For nonpolar vapors the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation is used to derive micropore volumes (W[sub 0]), average adsorption energies (E[sub 0]), and micropore widths (L) for a number of systems. These parameters are used to interpret the adsorption behavior of nitrogen which, because it is a relatively small molecule, is frequently used at 77 K to probe porosity and surface area. Results are presented for three carbons from differing precursors, namely, coal, coconut shells, and polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) to illustrate the applicability of the technique. For the latter carbon increases in micropore size, induced by activation in carbon dioxide, and reductions in accessible pore volume caused by heat treatment in argon are also characterized and related to structural changes. The approach is then extended to the adsorption of larger hydrogen vapors, where the resulting W[sub 0] values may require correction for molecular packing effects which occur in the lower relative pressure regions of the isotherms, i.e., during the filling of ultramicropores. These packing effects are shown to limit the use of the Polanyi characteristic curve for correlating isotherm data for several vapors, of differing molecular size, by one adsorbent. Data for the adsorption of water, which is a strongly polar liquid, have been interpreted using the Dubinin-Serpinsky equation.

  16. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  17. Reactive compatibilizer-tracer: A powerful tool for designing, scaling up and optimizing reactive blending processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei-Yun; Feng, Lian-Fang; Zhang, Cai-Liang; Hu, Guo-Hua

    2015-05-01

    A concept of reactive compatibilizer-tracer is developed to study reactive polymer blending processes in a twin screw extruder. It is summarized as follows. Fluorescent moieties such as anthracene are attached to a reactive compatibilizer so that the latter can be served both as a compatibilizer and a tracer. When evaluating its compatibilizing efficiency for a polymer blending system, unlike the polymer components of the blend which are continuously fed to the extruder, the reactive compatibilizer-tracer is added as a pulse. The concentration of the reactive compatibilizer-tracer in the polymer blend at the die exit is measured, in-line and in real time, using probes capable of detecting the signal of the emission of fluorescent moieties of the reactive compatibilizer-tracer. In the meantime, the corresponding size of the dispersed phase domains of the blend is determined off-line. These two pieces of information allow assessing the compatibilizing efficiency of a reactive compatibilizer in a much easier manner and using a much smaller amount of compatibilizer. Consequently, the concept of reactive compatibilizer-tracer can help select most appropriate compatibilizers under real industrial polymer blending conditions as well as scaling up and/or optimizing them.

  18. Adsorption of fulvic acid on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Filius, J.D.; Lumsdon, D.G.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsduk, W.H. van

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption of fulvic acid by goethite was determined experimentally as a function of concentration, pH, and ionic strength. The data were described with the CD-MUSIC model of Hiemstra and Van Riemsdijk (1996), which allows the distribution of charge of the bound fulvate molecule over a surface region. Simultaneously, the concentration, pH, and salt dependency of the binding of fulvic acid can be described. Using the same parameters, the basic charging behavior of the goethite in the absence of fulvic acid could be described well. The surface species used in the model indicate that inner sphere coordination of carboxylic groups of the fulvate molecule is important at low pH, whereas at high pH the outer sphere coordination with reactive groups of the fulvate molecule with high proton affinity is important.

  19. System for reactivating catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  20. Cd adsorption onto bacterial surfaces: A universal adsorption edge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Nathan; Fein, Jeremy

    2001-07-01

    In this study, we measure the thermodynamic stability constants for proton and Cd binding onto the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus megaturium, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Sporosarcina ureae, and Bacillus cereus. Potentiometric titrations and Cd-bacteria adsorption experiments yield average values for the carboxyl site pK a, site concentration, and log stability constant for the bacterial surface Cd-carboxyl complex of 5.0, 2.0 × 10 -3 mol/g and 4.0 respectively. Our results indicate that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit nearly identical Cd adsorption behavior as a function of pH. We propose that metal-bacteria adsorption is not dependent on the bacterial species involved, and we develop a generalized adsorption model which may greatly simplify the task of quantifying the effects of bacterial adsorption on dissolved mass transport in realistic geologic systems.

  1. Rethinking Critical Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Peach, Sarah; Polak, Robert D.

    1996-03-01

    Recent reflectivity experiments on near-critical mixtures of carbon disulfide and nitromethane contained in glass cells footnote Niraj S. Desai, Sarah Peach, and Carl Franck, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4129 (1995) have shown that preferential adsorption of one liquid component onto the wall can be controlled by chemical modification of the glass. The glass was treated with varying amounts of hexamethyldisilazane to decrease surface polarity and therefore enhance the adsorption of carbon disulfide in a surprisingly continuous way. The effect of the glass wall on the local liquid composition can be described by two different scaling hypotheses: using a short range field on the liquid closest to the wall, or pinning the amplitude of the order parameter at the surface. We have found that only the second approach is consistent with the experimental data, although this is difficult to reconcile with observed wetting critical phenomena. We also have reexamined the issue of substrate inhomogeneity and conclude that the substrates were indeed homogeneous on relevant length scales. Supported by the NSF under DMR-9320910 and the central facilities of the Materials Science Center at Cornell University.

  2. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  3. Hyperpolarized NMR probes for biological assays.

    PubMed

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H

    2014-01-16

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  4. Global versus local adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Marloie, Gael; Markovits, Alexis; Ellinger, Yves

    2015-10-01

    The origin of the enantiomeric excess found in the amino acids present in the organic matter of carbonaceous meteorites is still unclear. Selective adsorption of one of the two enantiomers existing after a racemic formation could be part of the answer. Hereafter we report a comparative study of the adsorption of the R and S enantiomers of α-alanine and lactic acid on the hydroxylated { } chiral surface of α-quartz using numerical simulation techniques. Structurally different adsorption sites were found with opposite R versus S selectivity for the same molecule-surface couple, raising the problem of whether to consider adsorption as a local property or as a global response characteristic of the whole surface. To deal with the second term of this alternative, a statistical approach was designed, based on the occurrence of each adsorption site whose energy was calculated using first principle periodic density functional theory. It was found that R-alanine and S-lactic acid are the enantiomers preferentially adsorbed, even if the adsorption process on the quartz { } surface stays with a disappointingly poor enantio-selectivity. Nevertheless, it highlighted the important point that considering adsorption as a global property changes perspectives in the search for more efficient enantio-selective supports and more generally changes the way to apprehend adsorption processes in astro-chemistry/biology.

  5. Design method for adsorption beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, R. L.; Jackson, J. K.

    1970-01-01

    Regenerable adsorption beds for long-term life support systems include synthetic geolite to remove carbon dioxide and silica gel to dehumidify the atmospheric gas prior to its passage through the geolite beds. Bed performance is evaluated from adsorption characteristics, heat and mass transfer, and pressure drop.

  6. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  7. Sulfur-bonded thiophenes in organometallic rhenium complexes and adsorption of isocyanides on gold

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.J.

    1993-08-01

    This dissertation contains results of research conducted in two different areas: (1) organometallic synthesis and reactivity, and (2) organometallic surface chemistry. In the synthesis and reactivity studies, sulfur coordination of thiophene and benzo[b]thiophene to the metal center in organometallic rhenium complexes is examined. In the surface chemistry studies, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is used to analyze the adsorption of several isocyanides on the surface of gold powder. Results are compared and contrasted to known organometallic chemistry.

  8. Reactive spreading in ceramic/metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Cannon, Rowland M.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2000-11-06

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated mechanistically. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the steps involved in spreading are outlined to permit comparison to the steps in the compound formation that typically accompanies reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. They can all be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. This analysis plus assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than commonly believed, and perhaps is the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the slow spreading rates plus the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  9. First principle study of the surface reactivity of layered lithium oxides LiMO2 (M = Ni, Mn, Co)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallverdu, Germain; Minvielle, Marie; Andreu, Nathalie; Gonbeau, Danielle; Baraille, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    LiNixMnyCo1 - x - yO2 compounds (NMC) are layered oxides widely used in commercial lithium-ion batteries at the positive electrode. Nevertheless surface reactivity of this material is still not well known. As a first step, based on first principle calculations, this study deals with the electronic properties and the surface reactivity of LiMO2 (M = Co, Ni, Mn) compounds, considering the behavior of each transition metal separately in the same R 3 ̅ mα-NaFeO2-type structure, the one of LiCoO2 and NMC. For each compound, after a brief description of the bare slab electronic properties, we explored the acido-basic and redox properties of the (110) and (104) surfaces by considering the adsorption of a gaseous probe. The chemisorption of SO2 produces both sulfite or sulfate species associated respectively to an acido-basic or a reduction process. These processes are localized on the transition metals of the first two layers of the surface. Although sulfate species are globally favored, a different behavior is obtained depending on both the surface and the transition metal considered. We conclude with a simple scheme which describes the reduction processes on the both surfaces in terms of formal oxidation degrees of transition metals.

  10. Adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by graphene and graphene oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Chen, Zaiming; Chen, Baoliang

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene onto graphene (GNS) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets was investigated to probe the potential adsorptive sites and molecular mechanisms. The microstructure and morphology of GNS and GO were characterized by elemental analysis, XPS, FTIR, Raman, SEM, and TEM. Graphene displayed high affinity to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), whereas GO adsorption was significantly reduced after oxygen-containing groups were attached to GNS surfaces. An unexpected peak was found in the curve of adsorption coefficients (Kd) with the PAH equilibrium concentrations. The hydrophobic properties and molecular sizes of the PAHs affected the adsorption of G and GO. The high affinities of the PAHs to GNS are dominated by π-π interactions to the flat surface and the sieving effect of the powerful groove regions formed by wrinkles on GNS surfaces. In contrast, the adsorptive sites of GO changed to the carboxyl groups attaching to the edges of GO because the groove regions disappeared and the polar nanosheet surfaces limited the π-π interactions. The TEM and SEM images initially revealed that after loading with PAH, the conformation and aggregation of GNS and GO nanosheets dramatically changed, which explained the observations that the potential adsorption sites of GNS and GO were unusually altered during the adsorption process.

  11. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  12. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  13. Automatic Processing of Reactive Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1985-01-01

    A series of process modeling computer codes were examined. The codes use finite element techniques to determine the time-dependent process parameters operative during nonisothermal reactive flows such as can occur in reaction injection molding or composites fabrication. The use of these analytical codes to perform experimental control functions is examined; since the models can determine the state of all variables everywhere in the system, they can be used in a manner similar to currently available experimental probes. A small but well instrumented reaction vessel in which fiber-reinforced plaques are cured using computer control and data acquisition was used. The finite element codes were also extended to treat this particular process.

  14. Comparison of two strategies for detection of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weidong; Zhou, Yuanshu; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved treatment that was applied to oncology , dermatology, and ophthalmology. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a important role in the efficacy of PDT. Online monitoring of reactive oxygen species is the key to understand effect of PDT treatment. We used Fluorescence probes DPBF and luminescent probe luminal to measure the ROS in cells. And we revaluate the relationship between the amount of light and cell survival. There is strongly correlated between the amount of light and cell kill.

  15. Reactive nitrogen species reactivities with nitrones: theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Nash, Kevin M; Rockenbauer, Antal; Villamena, Frederick A

    2012-08-20

    Reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitrogen dioxide ((•)NO(2)), peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), and nitrosoperoxycarbonate (ONOOCO(2)(-)) are among the most damaging species present in biological systems due to their ability to cause modification of key biomolecular systems through oxidation, nitrosylation, and nitration. Nitrone spin traps are known to react with free radicals and nonradicals via electrophilic and nucleophilic addition reactions and have been employed as reagents to detect radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and as pharmacological agents against oxidative stress-mediated injury. This study examines the reactivity of cyclic nitrones such as 5,5-dimethylpyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) with (•)NO(2), ONOO(-), ONOOCO(2)(-), SNAP, and SIN-1 using EPR. The thermochemistries of nitrone reactivity with RNS and isotropic hfsc's of the addition products were also calculated at the PCM(water)/B3LYP/6-31+G**//B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory with and without explicit water molecules to rationalize the nature of the observed EPR spectra. Spin trapping of other RNS such as azide ((•)N(3)), nitrogen trioxide ((•)NO(3)), amino ((•)NH(2)) radicals and nitroxyl (HNO) were also theoretically and experimentally investigated by EPR spin trapping and mass spectrometry. This study also shows that other spin traps such as 5-carbamoyl-5-methyl-pyrroline N-oxide, 5-ethoxycarbonyl-5-methyl-pyrroline N-oxide, and 5-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide can react with radical and nonradical RNS, thus making spin traps suitable probes as well as antioxidants against RNS-mediated oxidative damage. PMID:22775566

  16. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  17. Chemical modeling of boron adsorption by humic materials using the constant capacitance model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The constant capacitance surface complexation model was used to describe B adsorption behavior on reference Aldrich humic acid, humic acids from various soil environments, and dissolved organic matter extracted from sewage effluents. The reactive surface functional groups on the humic materials wer...

  18. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  19. Synthesis of BiOBr-PVP hybrids with enhanced adsorption-photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanqing; Wang, Zeyan; Huang, Baibiao; Dai, Ying; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Qin, Xiaoyan

    2015-08-01

    We synthesized BiOBr-PVP hybrids by a simple solvothermal process, and investigated the adsorption and photocatalytic properties. Due to the presence of PVP, the thickness of the BiOBr nanosheets in BiOBr-PVP hybrids can be greatly reduced, which increased the percentage of highly reactive (0 0 1) facets exposed. And PVP was found to be adsorbed on the surface of BiOBr nanosheets by a strong donor-acceptor interactions via Cdbnd O bonds, which lead to an enhanced zeta potential and stronger adsorption capacity of cationic RhB molecules on the surface of BiOBr-PVP hybrids. And due to the synergistic effects of both high percentage of reactive (0 0 1) crystal facets and strong adsorption capacity, BiOBr-PVP hybrids exhibit excellent activities and stabilities on RhB dye degradation, which could be potentially used for practical waste water treatments.

  20. Material Exhibiting Efficient CO2 Adsorption at Room Temperature for Concentrations Lower Than 1000 ppm: Elucidation of the State of Barium Ion Exchanged in an MFI-Type Zeolite.

    PubMed

    Itadani, Atsushi; Oda, Akira; Torigoe, Hiroe; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Sato, Mineo; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is well-known as a greenhouse gas that leads to global warming. Many efforts have been made to capture CO2 from coal-fired power plants, as well as to reduce the amounts of excess CO2 in the atmosphere to around 400 ppm. However, this is not a simple task, particularly in the lower pressure region than 1000 ppm. This is because the CO2 molecule is chemically stable and has a relatively low reactivity. In the present study, the CO2 adsorption at room temperature on MFI-type zeolites exchanged with alkaline-earth-metal ions, with focus on CO2 concentrations <1000 ppm, was investigated both experimentally and by calculation. These materials exhibited a particularly efficient adsorption capability for CO2, compared with other presented samples, such as the sodium-form and transition-metal ion-exchanged MFI-type zeolites. Ethyne (C2H2) was used as a probe molecule. Analyses were carried out with IR spectroscopy and X-ray absorption, and provided significant information regarding the presence of the M(2+)-O(2-)-M(2+) (M(2+): alkaline-earth-metal ion) species formed in the samples. It was subsequently determined that this species acts as a highly efficient site for CO2 adsorption at room temperature under very low pressure, compared to a single M(2+) species. A further advantage is that this material can be easily regenerated by a treatment, e.g., through the application of the temperature swing adsorption process, at relatively low temperatures (300-473 K). PMID:26990497

  1. Effect of tribology processes on adsorption of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yu; Yang, Hongjuan; Wang, Linghe; Su, Yanjing; Qiao, Lijie

    2016-03-01

    As soon as artificial joint replacements are implanted into patients, the adsorption of proteins can occur. Joint implants operate in a protein-rich and relatively corrosive environment under tribological contact. The contacted area acted as an anodic part and the rest of the surface was more cathodic. Therefore, the adsorption of proteins is different in and outside the wear track. Adsorbed proteins would denature during rubbing and a tribofilm could form. The tribofilm can lubricate the surface and act as a barrier to corrosion damage. However, to observe the adsorption of proteins in situ has always been a challenge. Scanning Kelvin probe force microscope (SKPFM) was used to study the adsorption of albumin on the surface of CoCrMo alloy under simulated tribology movement. Fluorescence microscopy (FM) was employed to reveal the protein molecules in the wear scar. It was found that albumin molecules can decrease the surface potential and accelerate the corrosion process. In the wear track, albumin denatured and changed the surface potential as time progressed.

  2. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  3. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  4. Phenylethynyl reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having a specified general structure is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having a specified general structure is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react with to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  5. Capability of defective graphene-supported Pd13 and Ag13 particles for mercury adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeprasert, Jittima; Junkaew, Anchalee; Rungnim, Chompoonut; Kunaseth, Manaschai; Kungwan, Nawee; Promarak, Vinich; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2016-02-01

    Reactivity of single-vacancy defective graphene (DG) and DG-supported Pdn and Agn (n = 1, 13) for mercury (Hg0) adsorption has been studied using density functional theory calculation. The results show that Pdn binds defective site of DG much stronger than the Agn, while metal nanocluster binds DG stronger than single metal atom. Metal clustering affects the adsorption ability of Pd composite while that of Ag is comparatively less. The binding strength of -8.49 eV was found for Pd13 binding on DG surface, indicating its high stability. Analyses of structure, energy, partial density of states, and d-band center (ɛd) revealed that the adsorbed metal atom or cluster enhances the reactivity of DG toward Hg adsorption. In addition, the Hg adsorption ability of Mn-DG composite is found to be related to the ɛd of the deposited Mn, in which the closer ɛd of Mn to the Fermi level correspond to the higher adsorption strength of Hg on Mn-DG composite. The order of Hg adsorption strength on Mn-DG composite are as follows: Pd13 (-1.68 eV) >> Ag13 (-0.67 eV) ∼ Ag1 (-0.69 eV) > Pd1 (-0.62 eV). Pd13-DG composite is therefore more efficient sorbent for Hg0 removal in terms of high stability and high adsorption reactivity compared to the Ag13. Further design of highly efficient carbon based sorbents should be focused on tailoring the ɛd of deposited metals.

  6. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  7. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  8. Tracking thermal fronts with temperature-sensitive, chemically reactive tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts in fractured geothermal reservoirs. If a nonadsorbing tracer flowing from the injection to production well chemically reacts, its reaction rate will be a strong function of temperature. Thus the extent of chemical reaction will be greatest early in the lifetime of the system, and less as the thermal front progresses from the injection to production well. Early laboratory experiments identified tracers with chemical kinetics suitable for reservoirs in the temperature range of 75 to 100/sup 0/C. Recent kinetics studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene. This class of reactions can be used in reservoirs ranging in temperature from 150 to 275/sup 0/C, which is of greater interest to the geothermal industry. Future studies will include laboratory adsorption experiments to identify possibly unwanted adsorption on granite, development of sensitive analytical techniques, and a field demonstration of the reactive tracer concept.

  9. Wet oxidative regeneration of activated carbon loaded with reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Shende, R V; Mahajani, V V

    2002-01-01

    Wet Oxidative Regeneration (WOR) of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with the reactive dyes, namely chemictive brilliant blue R and cibacron turquoise blue G, was studied. Attempts were made to regenerate the loaded carbons designated now as spent carbon. A slurry (10% w/v) of spent carbon in distilled water was oxidized by wet oxidation in the temperature range of 150-250 degrees C using oxygen partial pressures between 0.69-1.38 MPa in an 1 1 SS 316 autoclave. The percent regeneration was determined from a ratio, X(RC)/X(VC), corresponding to an equilibrium adsorption capacity of regenerated carbon/equilibrium adsorption capacity of virgin carbon from an initial adsorption period of 3 h. It was observed that the regeneration mainly occurred due to the oxidation of the adsorbates taking place on the surface of carbon. It was possible to regenerate the spent GAC and PAC to the extent of more than 98% (approximately X(RC)/X(VC) > 0.98) by wet oxidation. After four consecutive cycles of adsorption and regeneration using the same stocks of GAC, carbon weight loss observed at 200 degrees C was about 40%. SEM studies of the regenerated carbon showed widening of the pores and loss of structure between the adjacent pores as compared with the virgin carbon. PAC was found to be more suitable as compared with GAC for the adsorption and wet oxidative regeneration processes to treat the aqueous solution containing lower concentration of unhydrolyzed reactive dye. The suitability of wet oxidative regeneration is demonstrated at a bench scale to treat the synthetic reactive dye solution.

  10. Wet oxidative regeneration of activated carbon loaded with reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Shende, R V; Mahajani, V V

    2002-01-01

    Wet Oxidative Regeneration (WOR) of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with the reactive dyes, namely chemictive brilliant blue R and cibacron turquoise blue G, was studied. Attempts were made to regenerate the loaded carbons designated now as spent carbon. A slurry (10% w/v) of spent carbon in distilled water was oxidized by wet oxidation in the temperature range of 150-250 degrees C using oxygen partial pressures between 0.69-1.38 MPa in an 1 1 SS 316 autoclave. The percent regeneration was determined from a ratio, X(RC)/X(VC), corresponding to an equilibrium adsorption capacity of regenerated carbon/equilibrium adsorption capacity of virgin carbon from an initial adsorption period of 3 h. It was observed that the regeneration mainly occurred due to the oxidation of the adsorbates taking place on the surface of carbon. It was possible to regenerate the spent GAC and PAC to the extent of more than 98% (approximately X(RC)/X(VC) > 0.98) by wet oxidation. After four consecutive cycles of adsorption and regeneration using the same stocks of GAC, carbon weight loss observed at 200 degrees C was about 40%. SEM studies of the regenerated carbon showed widening of the pores and loss of structure between the adjacent pores as compared with the virgin carbon. PAC was found to be more suitable as compared with GAC for the adsorption and wet oxidative regeneration processes to treat the aqueous solution containing lower concentration of unhydrolyzed reactive dye. The suitability of wet oxidative regeneration is demonstrated at a bench scale to treat the synthetic reactive dye solution. PMID:11942707

  11. Adsorption of metal adatoms on single-layer phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kulish, Vadym V; Malyi, Oleksandr I; Persson, Clas; Wu, Ping

    2015-01-14

    Single- or few-layer phosphorene is a novel two-dimensional direct-bandgap nanomaterial. Based on first-principles calculations, we present a systematic study on the binding energy, geometry, magnetic moment and electronic structure of 20 different adatoms adsorbed on phosphorene. The adatoms cover a wide range of valences, including s and p valence metals, 3d transition metals, noble metals, semiconductors, hydrogen and oxygen. We find that adsorbed adatoms produce a rich diversity of structural, electronic and magnetic properties. Our work demonstrates that phosphorene forms strong bonds with all studied adatoms while still preserving its structural integrity. The adsorption energies of adatoms on phosphorene are more than twice higher than on graphene, while the largest distortions of phosphorene are only ∼0.1-0.2 Å. The charge carrier type in phosphorene can be widely tuned by adatom adsorption. The unique combination of high reactivity with good structural stability is very promising for potential applications of phosphorene.

  12. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  13. PDMS compound adsorption in context.

    PubMed

    Li, Nianzhen; Schwartz, Michael; Ionescu-Zanetti, Cristian

    2009-02-01

    Soft lithography of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), an elastomeric polymer, has enabled rapid and inexpensive fabrication of microfluidic devices for various biotechnology applications. However, concerns remain about adsorption of compounds on PDMS surfaces because of its porosity and hydrophobicity. Here, the adsorption of 2 small fluorescent dyes of different hydrophobicity (calcein and 5- (and 6-)carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMR)) on PDMS surface has been systematically characterized, and PDMS adsorption has been compared with 2 traditional substrates: glass and polystyrene. To characterize adsorption in a regimen that is more relevant to microfluidic applications, the adsorption and desorption of the 2 compounds in PDMS microfluidic channels under flow conditions were also studied. Results showed that there was minimal adsorption of the hydrophilic compound calcein on PDMS, whereas the more hydrophobic TMR adsorbed on PDMS up to 4 times of that on glass or polystyrene. Under flow conditions, the desorption profiles and times needed to drop desorbed compound concentrations to negligible levels (desorption time constant, 10-42 s) were characterized. In the worst case scenario, after a 4-min exposure to TMR, 4 min of continuous wash resulted in compound concentrations in the microchannels to drop to values below 2 x 10(- 5) of the initial concentration.

  14. Polymer Adsorption on Graphite and CVD Graphene Surfaces Studied by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Yudan; Han, Hui-Ling; Cai, Qun; Wu, Qiong; Xie, Mingxiu; Chen, Daoyong; Geng, Baisong; Zhang, Yuanbo; Wang, Feng; Shen, Y R; Tian, Chuanshan

    2015-10-14

    Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was employed to probe polymer contaminants on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and to study alkane and polyethylene (PE) adsorption on graphite. In comparing the spectra from the two surfaces, it was found that the contaminants on CVD graphene must be long-chain alkane or PE-like molecules. PE adsorption from solution on the honeycomb surface results in a self-assembled ordered monolayer with the C-C skeleton plane perpendicular to the surface and an adsorption free energy of ∼42 kJ/mol for PE(H(CH2CH2)nH) with n ≈ 60. Such large adsorption energy is responsible for the easy contamination of CVD graphene by impurity in the polymer during standard transfer processes. Contamination can be minimized with the use of purified polymers free of PE-like impurities.

  15. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  16. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  17. Traversing probe system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  18. A biosorption isotherm model for the removal of reactive azo dyes by inactivated mycelia of Cunninghamella elegans UCP542.

    PubMed

    Ambrósio, Sandra T; Vilar, José C; Silva, Carlos A Alves da; Okada, Kaoru; Nascimento, Aline E; Longo, Ricardo L; Campos-Takaki, Galba M

    2012-01-04

    The biosorption of three reactive azo dyes (red, black and orange II) found in textile effluents by inactive mycelium of Cunninghamella elegans has been investigated. It was found that after 120 hours of contact the adsorption led to 70%, 85%, 93% and 88% removal of reactive orange II, reactive black, reactive red and a mixture of them, respectively. The mycelium surface was found to be selective towards the azo dyes in the following order: reactive red > reactive black > orange II. Dye removal from a mixture solution resulted in 48.4 mg/g retention by mycelium and indicated a competition amongst the dyes for the cellular surface. A Freundlich adsorption isotherm model exhibited a better fit, thus suggesting the presence of heterogeneous binding sites. Electrondense deposits observed on the mycelium ultrastructure suggest that the dyes are mainly retained under the cellular surface of the inactive biomass of C. elegans.

  19. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  20. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  1. The effects of pH and surface composition on Pb adsorption to natural freshwater biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A R; Lion, L W; Nelson, Y M; Shuler, M L; Ghiorse, W C

    2001-08-01

    Two dominant variables that control the adsorption of toxic trace metals to suspended particulate materials and aquatic surface coatings are surface composition and solution pH. A model for the pH-dependent adsorption of Pbto heterogeneous particulate surface mixtures was derived from experimental evaluation of Pb adsorption to laboratory-derived surrogates. The surrogate materials were selected to represent natural reactive surface components. Pb adsorption to both the laboratory surrogates and natural biofilms was determined in chemically defined solutions under controlled laboratory conditions. Pb adsorption was measured over a pH range of 5-8, with an initial Pb concentration in solution of 2.0 microM. The surface components considered include amorphous Fe oxide, biogenic Mn oxide produced by a Mn(II) oxidizing bacterium (Leptothrix discophora SS-1), Al oxide, the common green alga Chlorella vulgaris, and Leptothrix discophora SS-1 cells. A linearization of Pb adsorption data for each adsorbent was used to quantify the relationship between Pb adsorption and pH. The parameters for individual adsorbents were incorporated into an additive model to predict the total Pb adsorption in multiple-adsorbent natural surface coatings that were collected from Cayuga Lake, NY. Pb adsorption experiments on the natural surface coatings at variable pH were utilized to verify the additive model predictions based on the pH dependent behavior of the experimental laboratory surrogates. Observed Pb adsorption is consistent with the model predictions (within 1-24%) over the range of solution pH values considered. The experimental results indicate that the combination of Fe and biogenic Mn oxides can contribute as much as 90% of Pb adsorbed on Cayuga Lake biofilms, with the dominant adsorbent switching from Mn to Fe oxide with increasing pH. PMID:11505999

  2. Probing Surface Sites of TiO2: Reactions with [HRe(CO)5] and [CH3Re(CO)5

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo-Lapidus, R.; Gates, B

    2010-01-01

    Two carbonyl complexes of rhenium, [HRe(CO){sub 5}] and [CH{sub 3}Re(CO){sub 5}], were used to probe surface sites of TiO{sub 2} (anatase). These complexes were adsorbed from the gas phase onto anatase powder that had been treated in flowing O{sub 2} or under vacuum to vary the density of surface OH sites. Infrared (IR) spectra demonstrate the variation in the number of sites, including Ti{sup +3} {double_bond} OH and Ti{sup +4} {double_bond} OH. IR and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra show that chemisorption of the rhenium complexes led to their decarbonylation, with formation of surface-bound rhenium tricarbonyls, when [HRe(CO){sub 5}] was adsorbed, or rhenium tetracarbonyls, when [CH{sub 3}Re(CO){sub 5}] was adsorbed. These reactions were accompanied by the formation of water and surface carbonates and removal of terminal hydroxyl groups associated with Ti{sup +3} and Ti{sup +4} ions on the anatase. Data characterizing the samples after adsorption of [HRe(CO){sub 5}] or [CH{sub 3}Re(CO){sub 5}] determined a ranking of the reactivity of the surface OH sites, with the Ti{sup +3}OH groups being the more reactive towards the rhenium complexes but the less likely to be dehydroxylated. The two rhenium pentacarbonyl probes provided complementary information, suggesting that the carbonate species originate from carbonyl ligands initially bonded to the rhenium and from hydroxyl groups of the titania surface, with the reaction leading to the formation of water and bridging hydroxyl groups on the titania. The results illustrate the value of using a family of organometallic complexes as probes of oxide surface sites.

  3. Adsorption of mercury in coal-fired power plants gypsum slurry on TiO2/chitosan composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Gao, B. B.; Gao, J. Q.; Zhang, K.; Chen, Y. J.; Yang, Y. P.; Chen, H. W.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a simple method was used to prepare a chitosan adsorbent to mix with KI and TiO2. Gravimetric analysis (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize the samples before and after adsorption of Hg2+. A mercury adsorption experiment was also conducted in the gypsum slurry. The results show that using hydrobromic acid as a solvent of adsorbent resulted in a better adsorption effect than using acetic acid alone. Also, the sample (CS-KI/TiO2-HBr) had a maximum mercury adsorption capacity when the pH=5 and the t=50°C. The characterization experiments showed that the thermal stability of composite materials declined and the TiO2 uniformly dispersed in the surface of the samples with a lamellar structure, generating a lot of cracks and recesses that increased the reactive sites. Furthermore, when the TiO2 reacted with CS, it resulted in Ti-C, Ti-O and Ti-N bonds. The Br- can prevent the growth of TiO2 crystal grains and strengthen the ability of I- to remove mercury. The adsorption isotherm and kinetic results indicated that the adsorption behaviour of CS-KI/TiO2-HBr as it removes Hg2+ is an inhomogeneous multilayer adsorption process. The surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion effects are both important in the Hg2+ adsorption process.

  4. Adsorption and desorption of chlorpyrifos to soils and sediments.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Seyoum Yami; Beutel, Marc W; Yonge, David R; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2012-01-01

    ,439 and 15,500 L/kg for sediipents. This variation may result from several factors, including various experimental artifacts, variation in quality of soil organic matter, and inconsistencies in experimental methodologies. Based on this review, there appears to be no definitive quantification of chlorpyrifos adsorption or desorption characteristics. Thus, it is difficult to predict its adsorptive behavior with certainty, without resorting to experimental methods specific to the soil or sediment of interest. This limitation should be recognized in the context of current efforts to predict the risk, fate, and transport of chlorpyrifos based upon published partition coefficients. Based on a comprehensive review of the peer-reviewed literature related to adsorption and desorption of chlorpyrifos, we propose the following key areas for future research. From this review, it becomes increasingly evident that pesticide partitioning cannot be fully accounted for by the fraction of soil or solid-matrix organic matter or carbon content. Therefore, research that probes the variation in the nature and quality of soil organic matter on pesticide adsorption is highly desirable. Pesticide persistence and bioavailability depend on insights into desorption capacity. Therefore, understanding the fate and environmental impact of hydrophobic pesticides is incomplete without new research being performed to improve insights into pesticide desorption from soils and sediments. There is also a need for greater attention and consistency in developing experimental methods aimed at estimating partition coefficients. Moreover, in such testing, choosing initial concentrations and liquid-solid ratios that are more representative of environmental conditions could improve usefulness and interpretation of data that are obtained. Future monitoring efforts should include the sampling and analysis of suspended particulates to account for suspended solid-phase CPF, a commonly underestimated fraction in surface

  5. The dynamics of adsorption on clean and adsorbate-modified transition metal surfaces. [Progress report, 1989--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Madix, R.J.

    1991-06-01

    Research is being carried out on both nondissociative and dissociative adsorption of gases on transition metal surfaces, with emphasis on alkanes. Particular attention is be placed on understanding the effects of adsorbed species on adsorption probabilities and on clarifying the role of energy exchange processes at the surface in both dissociative and nondissociative adsorption. Molecular beam methods are coupled with methods of surface science to gain the greatest control of the variables of the problem, including the incident kinetic energy, vibrational energy and angle of incidence of the incoming molecules. The dynamics of both direct and precursor-influenced dissociative adsorption routes are examined. Surface intermediates formed by activated adsorption are identified by vibrational spectroscopy and temperature programmed reaction. Emphasis is on comparative studies of low molecular weight alkanes in order to understand the origin of the differences in their reactivities on different metals.

  6. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  7. Approaches for drug delivery with intracortical probes.

    PubMed

    Spieth, Sven; Schumacher, Axel; Trenkle, Fabian; Brett, Olivia; Seidl, Karsten; Herwik, Stanislav; Kisban, Sebastian; Ruther, Patrick; Paul, Oliver; Aarts, Arno A A; Neves, Hercules P; Rich, P Dylan; Theobald, David E; Holtzman, Tahl; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Janssen, Peter; Zengerle, Roland

    2014-08-01

    Intracortical microprobes allow the precise monitoring of electrical and chemical signaling and are widely used in neuroscience. Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technologies have greatly enhanced the integration of multifunctional probes by facilitating the combination of multiple recording electrodes and drug delivery channels in a single probe. Depending on the neuroscientific application, various assembly strategies are required in addition to the microprobe fabrication itself. This paper summarizes recent advances in the fabrication and assembly of micromachined silicon probes for drug delivery achieved within the EU-funded research project NeuroProbes. The described fabrication process combines a two-wafer silicon bonding process with deep reactive ion etching, wafer grinding, and thin film patterning and offers a maximum in design flexibility. By applying this process, three general comb-like microprobe designs featuring up to four 8-mm-long shafts, cross sections from 150×200 to 250×250 µm², and different electrode and fluidic channel configurations are realized. Furthermore, we discuss the development and application of different probe assemblies for acute, semichronic, and chronic applications, including comb and array assemblies, floating microprobe arrays, as well as the complete drug delivery system NeuroMedicator for small animal research.

  8. Metal adsorption on mosses: Toward a universal adsorption model.

    PubMed

    González, A G; Pokrovsky, O S

    2014-02-01

    This study quantifies the adsorption of heavy metals on 4 typical moss species used for environmental monitoring in the moss bag technique. The adsorption of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto Hypnum sp., Sphagnum sp., Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachytecium rutabulum has been investigated using a batch reactor in a wide range of pH (1.3-11.0) and metal concentrations in solution (1.6μM-3.8mM). A Linear Programming Model (LPM) was applied for the experimental data to derive equilibrium constants and the number of surface binding sites. The surface acid-base titration performed for 4 mosses at a pH range of 3-10 in 0.1M NaNO3 demonstrated that Sphagnum sp. is the most efficient adsorbent as it has the maximal number of proton-binding sites on the surface (0.65mmol g(-1)). The pKa computed for all the moss species suggested the presence of 5 major functional groups: phosphodiester, carboxyl, phosphoryl, amine and polyphenols. The results of pH-edge experiments demonstrated that B. rutabulum exhibits the highest percentage of metal adsorption and has the highest number of available sites for most of the metals studied. However, according to the results of the constant pH "Langmuirian" isotherm, Sphagnum sp. can be considered as the strongest adsorbent, although the relative difference from other mosses is within 20%. The LPM was found to satisfactorily fit the experimental data in the full range of the studied solution parameters. The results of this study demonstrate a rather similar pattern of five metal adsorptions on mosses, both as a function of pH and as a metal concentration, which is further corroborated by similar values of adsorption constants. Therefore, despite the species and geographic differences between the mosses, a universal adsorption edge and constant pH adsorption isotherm can be recommended for 4 studied mosses. The quantitative comparison of metal adsorption with other common natural organic and inorganic materials demonstrates

  9. An ultrafast reciprocating probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenbin; Tan, Yi; Wang, Wenhao; Gao, Zhe

    2016-11-01

    For tokamak plasma diagnostics, an ultrafast reciprocating probe system driven by magnetic field coils, achieving a maximum velocity of 21 m/s, is introduced. The probes are attached with a driving hoop made of carbon steel and accelerated by three acceleration coils in series, then decelerated by two deceleration coils and buffer springs and return slowly. The coils with a current of about 1 kA generate a magnetic field of about 1 T. This probe system has been tested on the SUNIST (Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak) spherical tokamak. Radial profiles of the floating potential and other plasma parameters measured by this probe system are given.

  10. Atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Forbes, R.G.

    2009-06-15

    This introductory tutorial describes the technique of atom probe tomography for materials characterization at the atomic level. The evolution of the technique from the initial atom probe field ion microscope to today's state-of-the-art three dimensional atom probe is outlined. An introduction is presented on the basic physics behind the technique, the operation of the instrument, and the reconstruction of the three-dimensional data. The common methods for analyzing the three-dimensional atom probe data, including atom maps, isoconcentration surfaces, proximity histograms, maximum separation methods, and concentration frequency distributions, are described.

  11. Reactive Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, C.; Bouret, Y.; Celestini, F.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the reactivity of Leidenfrost droplets with their supporting substrates. Several organic liquids are put into contact with a copper substrate heated above their Leidenfrost temperature. As the liquid evaporates, the gaseous flow cleans the superficial copper oxide formed at the substrate surface and the reaction maintains a native copper spot below the evaporating droplet. The copper spot can reach several times the droplet size for the most reactive organic compounds. This study shows an interesting coupling between the physics of the Leidenfrost effect and the mechanics of reactive flows. Different applications are proposed such as drop motion tracking and vapor flow monitoring.

  12. Fractional Statistical Theory of Adsorption of Polyatomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardo, J. L.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Romá, F.

    2004-10-01

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane’s statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory.

  13. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption of polyatomics.

    PubMed

    Riccardo, J L; Ramirez-Pastor, A J; Romá, F

    2004-10-29

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane's statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory. PMID:15525184

  14. In-series columns adsorption performance of Kraft mill wastewater pollutants onto volcanic soil.

    PubMed

    Navia, R; Fuentes, B; Lorber, K E; Mora, M L; Diez, M C

    2005-08-01

    Two in-series columns systems with volcanic soil were tested for wastewater pollutants adsorption capacity. The first system was tested with acidified volcanic soil and the second with a reactivated volcanic soil. The reactivated soil was obtained by washing the previous spent acidified soil system with an acid solution. The systems parameters were obtained using the Bohardt and Adams model for fixed-beds. The acidified soil parameters indicated an adsorption capacity q of 28 and 139 mg/g of phenolic compounds and color, respectively (for each column), compared to 12 and 39 mg/g for the reactivated soil system. The adsorption rate constant k ranged between 1.5x10(-6) and 2.8x10(-6) l/min mg and no significant difference was observed for each analysed column system and pollutant. Furthermore, the molecular weight distribution analysis of input and output samples of one acidified soil column indicated that the fraction >30000 Da is the most adsorbed until the breakpoint. Moreover, the CODs and tannins and lignin removal efficiencies at the breakpoint reached values between 60% and 70% in each column and each system, indicating that lower biodegradable compounds were retained effectively. The results indicate that it is possible to compare the acidified volcanic soil adsorption capacity with natural zeolites, and a preliminary costs evaluation indicates that volcanic soil could be also competitive, even when comparing with activated carbon.

  15. Design strategies of fluorescent probes for selective detection among biothiols.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-Ya; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Zheng, Hai-Rong; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Simple thiol derivatives, such as cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), and glutathione (GSH), play key roles in biological processes, and the fluorescent probes to detect such thiols in vivo selectively with high sensitivity and fast response times are critical for understanding their numerous functions. However, the similar structures and reactivities of these thiols pose considerable challenges to the development of such probes. This review focuses on various strategies for the design of fluorescent probes for the selective detection of biothiols. We classify the fluorescent probes for discrimination among biothiols according to reaction types between the probes and thiols such as cyclization with aldehydes, conjugate addition-cyclization with acrylates, native chemical ligation, and aromatic substitution-rearrangement.

  16. Water adsorption isotherms on porous onionlike carbonaceous particles. Simulations with the grand canonical Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Hantal, György; Picaud, Sylvain; Hoang, Paul N M; Voloshin, Vladimir P; Medvedev, Nikolai N; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2010-10-14

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the adsorption isotherms of water molecules on different types of model soot particles. These soot models are constructed by first removing atoms from onion-fullerene structures in order to create randomly distributed pores inside the soot, and then performing molecular dynamics simulations, based on the reactive adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) description of the interaction between carbon atoms, to optimize the resulting structures. The obtained results clearly show that the main driving force of water adsorption on soot is the possibility of the formation of new water-water hydrogen bonds with the already adsorbed water molecules. The shape of the calculated water adsorption isotherms at 298 K strongly depends on the possible confinement of the water molecules in pores of the carbonaceous structure. We found that there are two important factors influencing the adsorption ability of soot. The first of these factors, dominating at low pressures, is the ability of the soot of accommodating the first adsorbed water molecules at strongly hydrophilic sites. The second factor concerns the size and shape of the pores, which should be such that the hydrogen bonding network of the water molecules filling them should be optimal. This second factor determines the adsorption properties at higher pressures. PMID:20950025

  17. Water adsorption isotherms on porous onionlike carbonaceous particles. Simulations with the grand canonical Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantal, György; Picaud, Sylvain; Hoang, Paul N. M.; Voloshin, Vladimir P.; Medvedev, Nikolai N.; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2010-10-01

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the adsorption isotherms of water molecules on different types of model soot particles. These soot models are constructed by first removing atoms from onion-fullerene structures in order to create randomly distributed pores inside the soot, and then performing molecular dynamics simulations, based on the reactive adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) description of the interaction between carbon atoms, to optimize the resulting structures. The obtained results clearly show that the main driving force of water adsorption on soot is the possibility of the formation of new water-water hydrogen bonds with the already adsorbed water molecules. The shape of the calculated water adsorption isotherms at 298 K strongly depends on the possible confinement of the water molecules in pores of the carbonaceous structure. We found that there are two important factors influencing the adsorption ability of soot. The first of these factors, dominating at low pressures, is the ability of the soot of accommodating the first adsorbed water molecules at strongly hydrophilic sites. The second factor concerns the size and shape of the pores, which should be such that the hydrogen bonding network of the water molecules filling them should be optimal. This second factor determines the adsorption properties at higher pressures.

  18. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  19. Adsorption-induced colloidal aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, B. M.; Petit, J.-M.; Beysens, D.

    1998-03-01

    Reversible colloidal aggregation in binary liquid mixtures has been studied for a number of years. As the phase separation temperature of the liquid mixture is approached the thickness of an adsorption layer around the colloidal particles increases. Beysens and coworkers have demonstrated experimentally that this adsorption layer is intimately connected with the aggregation of the colloidal particles, however, no definitive theory has been available which can explain all of the experimental observations. In this contribution we describe an extension of the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek theory of colloidal aggregation which takes into account the presence of the adsorption layer and which more realistically models the attractive dispersion interactions. This modified theory can quantitatively account for many of the observed experimental features such as the characteristics of the aggregated state, the general shape of the aggregation line, and the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient for a lutidine-water mixture containing a small volume fraction of silica colloidal particles.

  20. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-15

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas.

  1. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-01

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas.

  2. Study of carbon dioxide adsorption on a Cu-nitroprusside polymorph

    SciTech Connect

    Roque-Malherbe, R.; Lozano, C.; Polanco, R.; Marquez, F.; Lugo, F.; Hernandez-Maldonado, A.; Primera-Pedrozo, J.N.

    2011-05-15

    A careful structural characterization was carried out to unequivocally determine the structure of the synthesized material. The TGA, DRIFTS and a Pawley fitting of the XRD powder profiles indicate that the hydrated and in situ dehydrated polymorph crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pnma. Meanwhile, the CO{sub 2} isosteric heat of adsorption appears to be independent of loading with an average value of 30 kJ/mol. This translates to a physisorption type interaction, where the adsorption energy corresponding to wall and lateral interactions are mutually compensated to produce, an apparently, homogeneous adsorption energy. The somewhat high adsorption energy is probably due to the confinement of the CO{sub 2} molecules in the nitroprusside pores. Statistical Physics and the Dubinin theory for pore volume filling allowed model the CO{sub 2} equilibrium adsorption process in Cu-nitroprusside. A DRIFTS test for the adsorbed CO{sub 2} displayed a peak at about 2338 cm{sup -1} that was assigned to a contribution due to physical adsorption of the molecule. Another peak found at 2362 cm{sup -1} evidenced that this molecule interacts with the Cu{sup 2+}, which appears to act as an electron accepting Lewis acid site. The aim of the present paper is to report a Pnma stable Cu-nitroprusside polymorph obtained by the precipitation method that can adsorb carbon dioxide. -- Graphical abstract: The adsorption space of a very well characterized Cu-nitroprusside polymorph, applying carbon dioxide as probe molecule, was studied. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Accurate information about the geometry of the adsorption space was provided. {yields} Truthful data about the interactions within the adsorption space was presented. {yields} The structure of the tested Cu-NP polymorph was established. {yields} Was evidenced adsorbed CO{sub 2} molecules in the form of weakly bonded adducts. {yields} Is proposed that adsorbed molecules could change the Cu-NP magnetic properties.

  3. Adsorption on a stepped substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikoski, J.; Timonen, J.; Kaski, K.

    1994-09-01

    The effect of substrate steps on the adsorption of particles is considered. The problem is formulated as a lattice-gas model with nearest neighbor interactions and it is studied by a numerical transfer-matrix method. In particular, the influence of the substrate-induced row potential on adsorbed monolayers is discussed. It is found that strong row-transition-like features appear in the presence of a row potential and it is suggested that these may be seen in adsorption on vicinal faces.

  4. Reactivity of neuroborreliosis patients (Lyme disease) to cardiolipin and gangliosides.

    PubMed

    García Moncó, J C; Wheeler, C M; Benach, J L; Furie, R A; Lukehart, S A; Stanek, G; Steere, A C

    1993-07-01

    A subset of patients (50%) with neuroborreliosis (Lyme disease) showed IgG reactivity to cardiolipin in solid phase ELISA. In addition, a subset of patients with neuroborreliosis (29%) and syphilis (59%) had IgM reactivity to gangliosides with a Gal(beta 1-3) GalNac terminal sequence (GM1, GD1b, and asialo GM1). Anti-ganglioside IgM antibodies were significantly more frequent in these two groups of patients compared to patients with cutaneous and articular Lyme disease, primary antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and normal controls. Correlative evidence and adsorption experiments indicated that antibodies to cardiolipin had separate specificities from those directed against the gangliosides. IgM antibodies to Gal(beta 1-3) GalNac gangliosides appeared to have similar specificities since these were positively correlated and inhibitable by cross adsorption assays. Given the clinical associations of patients with neuroborreliosis and syphilis with IgM reactivity to gangliosides sharing the Gal(beta 1-3) GalNac terminus, we suggest that these antibodies could represent a response to injury in neurological disease or a cross reactive event caused by spirochetes.

  5. Removal of Chemazol Reactive Red 195 from aqueous solution by dehydrated beet pulp carbon.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Arzu Y; Tepe, Ozlem

    2011-10-30

    An agricultural low-cost by-product, dehydrated beet pulp carbon (DBPC) was used as an adsorbent for removal of Chemazol Reactive Red 195 (CRR 195) from aqueous solution. The surface area of DBPC was measured as 9.5m(2)g(-1) by using BET method. The results indicated that adsorption was strongly pH-dependent and optimum pH was determined as 1.0. The maximum dye adsorption capacity was obtained as 58.0 mg g(-1)at the temperature of 50°C at this pH value. The Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the adsorption equilibrium and it was reported that, experimental data fitted very well to Freundlich model. Mass transfer and kinetic models were applied to the experimental data to examine the mechanisms of adsorption and potential rate-controlling steps. It was found that both external mass transfer and intra-particle diffusion played an important role in the adsorption mechanisms of dye and adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-first-order type kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) had been determined. The results show that adsorption of CRR 195 on DBPC is endothermic and spontaneous in nature. PMID:21890269

  6. Design and Synthesis of Active Heparan Sulfate-based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongmei; O’Leary, Timothy R.; Huang, Xuefei; Liu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    A chemoenzymatic approach for synthesizing heparan sulfate oligosaccharides with a reactive diazoacetyl saccharide residue is reported. The resultant oligosaccharides were demonstrated to serve as specific inhibitors for heparan sulfate sulfotransferases, offering a new set of tools to probe the structural selectivity for heparan sulfate-binding proteins. PMID:26066846

  7. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption applied to protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, E; Centres, P M; Ochoa, N A; Ramirez-Pastor, A J

    2013-01-15

    Experimental adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed on sulfonated microspheres were described by means of two analytical models: the first is the well-known Langmuir-Freundlich model (LF), and the second, called fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA), is a statistical thermodynamics model developed recently by Ramirez-Pastor et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 186101]. The experimental data, obtained by Hu et al. [Biochem. Eng. J. 23 (2005) 259] for different concentrations of sulfonate group on the surface of the microspheres, were correlated by using a fitting algorithm based on least-squares statistics. The combination of LF and FSTA models, along with the choice of an adequate fitting procedure, allowed us to obtain several conclusions: (i) as previously reported in the literature, the maximum amount adsorbed increases as the amount of sulfonate group increases; (ii) the equilibrium constant does not appear as a sensitive parameter to the amount of sulfonate group on the surface of the microspheres; and (iii) the values of the fitting parameters obtained from FSTA may be indicative of a mismatch between the equilibrium separation of the intermolecular interaction and the distance between the adsorption sites. The exhaustive study presented here has shown that FSTA model is a good one considering the complexity of the physical situation, which is intended to be described and could be more useful in interpreting experimental data of adsorption of molecules with different sizes and shapes. PMID:23084559

  8. Powder-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2016-05-03

    A powder-based adsorbent and a related method of manufacture are provided. The powder-based adsorbent includes polymer powder with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the powder-based adsorbent includes irradiating polymer powder, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Powder-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  9. Foam-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2015-06-02

    Foam-based adsorbents and a related method of manufacture are provided. The foam-based adsorbents include polymer foam with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the foam-based adsorbents includes irradiating polymer foam, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Foam-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  10. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  11. Adsorption of Organics from Domestic Water Supplies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Michael J.; Suffet, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    This article discusses the current state of the art of organics removal by adsorption. Various theoretical explanations of the adsorption process are given, along with practical results from laboratory, pilot-scale, and full-scale applications. (CS)

  12. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  13. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  14. Inflatable traversing probe seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimarchi, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An inflatable seal acts as a pressure-tight zipper to provide traversing capability for instrumentation rakes and probes. A specially designed probe segment with a teardrop cross-section in the vicinity of the inflatable seal minimizes leakage at the interface. The probe is able to travel through a lengthwise slot in a pressure vessel or wind tunnel section, while still maintaining pressure integrity. The design uses two commercially available inflatable seals, opposing each other, to cover the probe slot in a wind tunnel wall. Proof-of-concept tests were conducted at vessel pressures up to 30 psig, with seals inflated to 50 psig, showing no measurable leakage along the seal's length or around the probe teardrop cross-section. This seal concept can replace the existing technology of sliding face plate/O-ring systems in applications where lengthwise space is limited.

  15. Novel live imaging techniques of cellular functions and in vivo tumors based on precise design of small molecule-based 'activatable' fluorescence probes.

    PubMed

    Urano, Yasuteru

    2012-12-01

    Recently established rational design strategies for novel fluorescence probes, especially those based on photoinduced electron transfer and spirocyclization were reviewed. Based on these design strategies, various novel fluorescence probes were successfully developed including those for reactive oxygen species, reporter enzymes. Furthermore, in vivo cancer imaging techniques based on rationally designed activatable probes such as cancer-specific antibodies tagged with acidic-pH activatable fluorescence probes and peptidase activatable fluorescence probes were also discussed.

  16. Char reactivities and their relationship to pore characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Kata, S.; Keairns, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Relative reactivities of chars in a H/sub 2/O-N/sub 2/-H/sub 2/ atmosphere were measured in a laboratory fluidized bed. Results were analyzed on the basis of Ergun's rate equation, and the relative reactivities were calculated with reference to coke breeze. Surface areas of chars were obtained by means of CO/sub 2/ adsorption, and pore volumes were measured by means of mercury penetration porosimetry. A correlation can be identified between the relative reactivity versus the surface areas and the mean pore diameter for the limited number of chars investigated in the present study. Additional studies should be conducted to establish the range of validity with additional chars and drawbacks of this approach.

  17. Ligand-incorporation site in 5-methylcytosine-detection probe modulating the site of osmium complexation with the target DNA.

    PubMed

    Sugizaki, Kaori; Nakamura, Akiko; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2012-09-01

    ICON Probes, short DNA strands containing an adenine linked to a bipyridine ligand, formed an interstrand cross-link with 5-methylcytosine located opposite the modified adenine in the presence of an osmium oxidant. The location of a bipyridine-tethered adenine in the probes varied the selectivity of the reactive base. An ICON probe where the modified adenine was located at the probe center showed a 5-methylcytosine-selective osmium complexation, whereas an ICON probe with the modified adenine at the strand end exhibited high reactivity towards thymine as well as 5-methylcytosine. The modulation of reactive bases by the incorporation of a bipyridine-tethered adenine site made facilitates design of ICON probes for the fluorometric detection of 5-methylcytosine.

  18. Multilayer adsorption by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Mateo, J.; Salmerón Sánchez, M.; Monleón Pradas, M.; Torregrosa Cabanilles, C.

    2012-10-01

    Adsorption phenomena are characterized by models that include free parameters trying to reproduce experimental results. In order to understand the relationship between the model parameters and the material properties, the adsorption of small molecules on a crystalline plane surface has been simulated using the bond fluctuation model. A direct comparison between the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) model for multilayer adsorption and computer simulations allowed us to establish correlations between the adsorption model parameters and the simulated interaction potentials.

  19. Reversible adsorption of hydrogen chloride to ice surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Stefan; Kippenberger, Matthias; Crowley, John

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen chloride is the most important reservoir of gaseous, reactive chlorine in the atmosphere. Although several laboratory investigations of the interaction of HCl with ice surfaces have been conducted, there is still great uncertainty associated with the adsorption isotherms of HCl on ice, which is largely a consequence of most previous studies being unable to work at concentrations relevant for the atmosphere and to explore the non-saturated part of the isotherm at sub-monolayer coverage. We have conducted experiments on HCl uptake on ice surfaces at temperatures between 190 and 220 K, using a coated wall flow tube. HCl at concentrations as low as 2 × 109 molecule cm3 (~10-8 Torr) was detected using a chemical-ionization, quadrupole mass spectrometer. The equilibrium surface coverage of HCl on ice could be interpreted using the Langmuir-model to derive partition coefficients (KLang). We find that the dissociative Langmuir isotherm describes our data significantly better than the non-dissociative type. Surprisingly, and in contrast to the behavior of the majority of traces-gases which adsorb reversibly on ice surfaces, the partition-coefficients we derive for HCl do not show a systematic dependence on temperature, precluding the simple derivation of an adsorption enthalpy and indicating the presence of more complex adsorption and desorption mechanisms for strong acids ionizing on the surface compared to H-bonded trace gases.

  20. Structural study of Fe (II) adsorption on hematite (1102)

    SciTech Connect

    Tanwar, K.S.; Petitto, S.C.; Ghose, S.K.; Eng, P.J.; Trainor, T.P.

    2008-07-15

    The structure of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(1{bar 1}02) reacted with Fe(II) under anoxic conditions was studied using crystal truncation rod (CTR) diffraction. The CTR results show the crystalline termination of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(1{bar 1}02) is modified due to adsorption of Fe(II) at crystallographic lattice sites. In addition, the binding sites for adsorbed Fe are similar for all studied conditions: reaction for 2 h at pH 5.0, for 34 d at pH 5.0, and for 5.5 h at pH 7.0. The occupancy of adsorbed Fe increases with both reaction time and pH, which is consistent with typical cation adsorption behavior on iron (hydr)oxide surfaces. The metal-oxygen bond lengths of the (ordered) surface Fe atoms are characteristic of Fe(III), which provides indirect evidence for oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II) and is consistent with recent studies indicating that Fe(III)-hydroxides are effective oxidants for dissolved ferrous iron. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that no crystalline surface reaction products formed during the course of Fe(II) reaction. Overall, the structural characterization of the Fe(II) adsorption reaction results in an enhanced understanding of how reduced iron affects the structure, stability and reactivity of hematite.

  1. The influence of electrostatic forces on protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Lubarsky, G V; Browne, M M; Mitchell, S A; Davidson, M R; Bradley, R H

    2005-07-25

    In this paper we investigate the importance of electrostatic double layer forces on the adsorption of human serum albumin by UV-ozone modified polystyrene. Electrostatic forces were measured between oxidized polystyrene surfaces and gold-coated atomic force microscope (AFM) probes in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutions. The variation in surface potential with surface oxygen concentration was measured. The observed force characteristics were found to agree with the theory of electrical double layer interaction under the assumption of constant potential. Chemically patterned polystyrene surfaces with adjacent 5 microm x 5 microm polar and non-polar domains have been studied by AFM before and after human serum albumin adsorption. A topographically flat surface is observed before protein adsorption indicating that the patterning process does not physically modify the surface. Friction force imaging clearly reveals the oxidation pattern with the polar domains being characterised by a higher relative friction compared to the non-polar, untreated domains. Far-field force imaging was performed on the patterned surface using the interleave AFM mode to produce two-dimensional plots of the distribution of electrostatic double-layer forces formed when the patterned polystyrene surfaces is immersed in PBS. Imaging of protein layers adsorbed onto the chemically patterned surfaces indicates that the electrostatic double-layer force was a significant driving force in the interaction of protein with the surface.

  2. Adsorption and excess fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of Xe and Kr on lunar soil 10084 was measured by a method that employs only very low fractions of monolayer coverage. Results are presented as parameters for calculation of the Henry constant for adsorption as a function of temperature. The adsorption potentials are about 3 kcal/mole for Kr and 5 kcal/mole for Xe; heating the sample in vacuum increased the Xe potential to nearly 7 kcal/mole. Henry constants at the characteristic lunar temperature are about 0.3 cu cm STP/g-atm. These data were applied to consider whether adsorption is important in producing the excess fission Xe effect characteristic of highland breccias. Sorption equilibrium with a transient lunar atmosphere vented fission Xe produces concentrations seven orders of magnitude lower than observed concentrations. Higher concentrations result because of the resistance of the regolith to upward diffusion of Xe. A diffusion coefficient of 0.26 sq cm/sec is estimated for this process.

  3. ADSORPTIVE MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES: MEDIA SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on six items to be considered when selecting an adsorptive media for removing arsenic from drinking water; performance, EBCT, pre-treatment, regeneration, residuals, and cost. Each item is discussed in general and data and photographs from th...

  4. Interfacial adsorption in ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Cruz, M.O. de la; Voorhees, P.W.

    1999-11-26

    Interfaces of A-B-C ternary alloys decomposed into two and three phases are studied. The effect of the gradient energy coefficients {bar {kappa}}{sub II}, I = A, B, C, on the interface composition profiles of ternary alloys is examined. The adsorption of component C in ternary alloys is obtained numerically by finding steady-state solutions of the nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard equations and by solving the two Euler-Lagrange equations resulting from minimizing the interfacial energy, and analytically near the critical point. It is found that the solutions from both numerical methods are identical for a two-phase system. In symmetric ternary systems (equal interaction energy between each pair of components) with a minority component C, the gradient energy coefficient of C, {bar {kappa}}{sub CC}, can have a very strong influence on the degree of adsorption. In the {alpha} and {beta} two-phase regions, where {alpha} and {beta} are the phases rich in the majority components A and B, respectively, as {bar {kappa}}{sub CC} increases, the adsorption of the minority component C in the {alpha} and {beta} interfaces decreases. Near a critical point, however, the degree of adsorption of minority component C is independent of the gradient energy coefficient.

  5. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  6. Comparison of quartz sand, anthracite, shale and biological ceramsite for adsorptive removal of phosphorus from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng; Jia, Liyue; Zhang, Bo; He, Yiliang; Kirumba, George

    2014-02-01

    The choice of substrates with high phosphorus adsorption capacity is vital for sustainable phosphorus removal from waste water in constructed wetlands. In this study, four substrates were used: quartz sand, anthracite, shale and biological ceramsite. These substrate samples were characterized by Xray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy studies for their mineral components (chemical components) and surface characteristics. The dynamic experimental results revealed the following ranking order for total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency: anthracite > biological ceramsite > shale > quartz sand. The adsorptive removal capacities for TP using anthracite, biological ceramsite, shale and quartz sand were 85.87, 81.44, 59.65, and 55.98 mg/kg, respectively. Phosphorus desorption was also studied to analyze the substrates' adsorption efficiency in wastewater treatment as well as the substrates' ability to be reused for treatment. It was noted that the removal performance for the different forms of phosphorus was dependent on the nature of the substrate and the adsorption mechanism. A comparative analysis showed that the removal of particulate phosphorus was much easier using shale. Whereas anthracite had the highest soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) adsorptive capacity, biological ceramsite had the highest dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) removal capacity. Phosphorus removal by shale and biological ceramsite was mainly through chemical adsorption, precipitation or biological adsorption. On the other hand, phosphorus removal through physical adsorption (electrostatic attraction or ion exchange) was dominant in anthracite and quartz sand.

  7. Molecular Insights into the pH-Dependent Adsorption and Removal of Ionizable Antibiotic Oxytetracycline by Adsorbent Cyclodextrin Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Cai, Xiyun; Xiong, Weina; Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Haitong; Yang, Xianhai; Li, Chao; Fu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    Effects of pH on adsorption and removal efficiency of ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) by environmental adsorbents are an area of debate, because of its dual mediation towards adsorbents and adsorbate. Here, we probe the pH-dependent adsorption of ionizable antibiotic oxytetracycline (comprising OTCH2+, OTCH±, OTC−, and OTC2−) onto cyclodextrin polymers (CDPs) with the nature of molecular recognition and pH inertness. OTCH± commonly has high adsorption affinity, OTC− exhibits moderate affinity, and the other two species have negligible affinity. These species are evidenced to selectively interact with structural units (e.g., CD cavity, pore channel, and network) of the polymers and thus immobilized onto the adsorbents to different extents. The differences in adsorption affinity and mechanisms of the species account for the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. The mathematical equations are derived from the multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis of quantitatively relating adsorption affinity of OTC at varying pH to adsorbent properties. A combination of the MLR analysis for OTC and molecular recognition of adsorption of the species illustrates the nature of the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. Based on this finding, γ-HP-CDP is chosen to adsorb and remove OTC at pH 5.0 and 7.0, showing high removal efficiency and strong resistance to the interference of coexisting components. PMID:24465975

  8. Adsorption Behavior and Mechanism of Antibiotic Sulfamethoxazole on Carboxylic-Functionalized Carbon Nanofibers-Encapsulated Ni Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yi K; Chen, Tse C; Tsai, Hsing J; Wu, Hung C; Lin, Jarrn H; Lin, I K; Lee, Jyh F; Chen, Ching S

    2016-09-20

    In this work we developed a one-step process for synthesizing carboxylic-functionalized carbon nanofibers (CNFs)-encapsulated Ni magnetic nanoparticles (Ni@CNFs) that exhibit an excellent magnetic response and a large content of hydrophilic carboxylate groups with a negative charge (RCOO(-)) on the carbon surface. The carbon-encapsulated magnetic Ni nanoparticles could be rapidly separated from water, and they showed high efficiency for adsorption of the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SMX) in aqueous solution. The adsorption of SMX on Ni@CNFs as a function of pH was investigated, and the greatest adsorption occurred at pH 7.0. The adsorption isotherms for SMX on Ni@CNFs depended on different pH values. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to probe the relationship between molecular conformation and π-π interaction. The high adsorption of SMX on Ni@CNFs at pH 7.0 could be ascribed to deprotonated SMX being easily converted to a planar-like conformation, thereby resulting in the formation of π rings that were approximately parallel to the graphite surface and that enhanced strong π-π interaction. Electrostatic and π-π interactions both contributed to deprotonated SMX adsorption at pH 7.0, and they influenced the adsorption isotherm toward the Freundlich model. However, in weakly acidic environments (pH 2.0 and 4.0), the electrostatic interaction alone could induce an adsorption pattern that was similar to the Langmuir model.

  9. Reactive power compensator

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  10. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  11. Adsorption of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) on modified jute fibres.

    PubMed

    Shukla, S R; Pai, Roshan S

    2005-09-01

    The potential of a lignocellulosic fibre, jute, was assessed for adsorption of heavy metal ions like Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) from their aqueous solutions. The fibre was also used as adsorbent after chemically modifying it by two different techniques viz, loading of a dye with specific structure, C.I. Reactive Orange 13, and oxidising with hydrogen peroxide. Both the modified jute fibres gave higher metal ion adsorption. Thus, the dye loaded jute fibres showed metal ion uptake values of 8.4, 5.26 and 5.95 mg/g for Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II), respectively, while the corresponding values for oxidised jute fibres were 7.73, 5.57 and 8.02 mg/g, as against 4.23, 3.37 and 3.55 mg/g for unmodified jute fibres. Adsorption isotherm models indicated best fit for Langmuir model for the modified jute fibres. The adsorption values decreased with lowering of pH. The desorption efficiency, regenerative and reuse capacity of these adsorbents were also assessed for three successive adsorption-desorption cycles. The adsorptive capacity was retained only when the caustic soda regeneration is carried out as an intermediate step after desorption. Possible mechanism has been given.

  12. Density functional study of CO adsorption on Sc(n) (n=2-13) clusters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guangfen; Wang, Jinlan; Lu, Yiming; Yang, Mingli

    2008-06-14

    The adsorption properties of a single CO molecule on Sc(n) (n=2-13) clusters are studied by means of a density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. Two adsorption patterns are identified. Pattern a (n=3, 4, 6, 8, 11, and 12), CO binds to hollow site while Pattern b (n=5, 7, 9, 10, and 13), CO binds to bridge site accompanied by significantly lengthening of the Sc-Sc bond. The adsorption energy exhibits clear size-dependent variation and odd-even oscillation for n<10 and reach the peak at n=5, 7, and 9, implying their high chemical reactivity. Similar variations are noted in C-O bond length, vibrational frequency, and charge transferred between CO and the clusters. This can be understood in light of the adsorption pattern, the atomic motif, and the relative stability of the bare Sc clusters. Compared with the free Sc clusters, the magnetic nature remains upon adsorption except n=2, 4, 12, and 13. Particularly, the moments of n=13 reduce significantly from 19 to 5 micro(B), implying the adsorption plays an attenuation influence on the magnetism of the cluster.

  13. Dibenzothiophene adsorption at boron doped carbon nanoribbons studied within density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    López-Albarrán, P.; Navarro-Santos, P.; Garcia-Ramirez, M. A.; Ricardo-Chávez, J. L.

    2015-06-21

    The adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) on bare and boron-doped armchair carbon nanoribbons (ACNRs) is being investigated in the framework of the density functional theory by implementing periodic boundary conditions that include corrections from dispersion interactions. The reactivity of the ACNRs is characterized by using the Fukui functions as well as the electrostatic potential as local descriptors. Non-covalent adsorption mechanism is found when using the local Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof functional, regardless of the DBT orientation and adsorption location. The dispersion interactions addition is a milestone to describe the adsorption process. The charge defects introduced in small number (i.e., by doping with B atoms), within the ACNRs increases the selectivity towards sulfur mainly due to the charge depletion at B sites. The DBT magnitude in the adsorption energy shows non-covalent interactions. As a consequence, the configurations where the DBT is adsorbed on a BC{sub 3} island increase the adsorption energy compared to random B arrangements. The stability of these configurations can be explained satisfactorily in terms of dipole interactions. Nevertheless, from the charge-density difference analysis and the weak Bader charge-distribution interactions cannot be ruled out completely. This is why the electronic properties of the ribbons are analyzed in order to elucidate the key role played by the B and DBT states in the adsorbed configurations.

  14. Variations in Reactivity on Different Crystallographic Orientations of Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Albrecht, Peter M; Calaza, Florencia C

    2013-01-01

    Cerium oxide is a principal component in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. One of its key characteristics is the ability to provide or remove oxygen in chemical reactions. The different crystallographic faces of ceria present significantly different surface structures and compositions that may alter the catalytic reactivity. The structure and composition determine the number of coordination vacancies surrounding surface atoms, the availability of adsorption sites, the spacing between adsorption sites and the ability to remove O from the surface. To investigate the role of surface orientation on reactivity, CeO2 films were grown with two different orientations. CeO2(100) films were grown ex situ by pulsed laser deposition on Nb-doped SrTiO3(100). CeO2(111) films were grown in situ by thermal deposition of Ce metal onto Ru(0001) in an oxygen atmosphere. The chemical reactivity was characterized by the adsorption and decomposition of various molecules such as alcohols, aldehydes and organic acids. In general the CeO2(100) surface was found to be more active, i.e. molecules adsorbed more readily and reacted to form new products, especially on a fully oxidized substrate. However the CeO2(100) surface was less selective with a greater propensity to produce CO, CO2 and water as products. The differences in chemical reactivity are discussed in light of possible structural terminations of the two surfaces. Recently nanocubes and nano-octahedra have been synthesized that display CeO2(100) and CeO2(111) faces, respectively. These nanoparticles enable us to correlate reactions on high surface area model catalysts at atmospheric pressure with model single crystal films in a UHV environment.

  15. Reactive Simulations for Biochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boero, M.

    After a brief review of the hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamics scheme and its coupling to the metadynamics method, I will show how such a combination of computational tools can be used to study chemical reactions of general biological interest. Specifically, by using such a reactive hybrid paradigm, where the QM driver is a Car-Parrinello Lagrangian dynamics, we have inspected the ATP hydrolysis reaction in the anti-freezing protein known as heat shock cognate protein (Hsc70) and the unconventional propagation of protons across peptide groups in the H-path of the bovine cytochrome c oxidase. While the former represents a fundamental reaction operated by all living beings in a wealth of processes and functions, the second one is involved in cell respiration. For both systems accurate X-ray data are available, yet the actual reaction mechanism escapes experimental probes. The simulations presented here provide the complementary information missing in experiments, offer a direct insight into the reaction mechanisms at a molecular level, and allow to understand which pathways nature can follow to realize these processes fundamental to living organisms.

  16. Molecular Probes for Thermometry in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosse, Charlie; Bergaud, Christian; Löw, Peter

    The temperature is an important parameter with regard to chemical reactivity. It is therefore essential to ensure good thermal control within microsystems designed to carry out biological analysis. We begin by reviewing temperature measurement in the context of the lab-on-a-chip, and outlining the various generic strategies available. We then turnmore specifically to luminescentmolecular probes.We shall show that they all exploit the effect of temperature on a chemical reaction (in the broad sense of the term). More precisely, these probes can be divided in three main categories depending on whether one relies on a phase transition, the modification of a reaction rate, or a shift in an equilibrium. We shall also discuss the main experimental strategies used to transform the image obtained by fluorescence microscopy into a thermal map. Finally, we shall extend the discussion to a few other spectroscopic techniques and examine the prospects for this particular area of microfluidics.

  17. Adsorption of dyes by ACs prepared from waste tyre reinforcing fibre. Effect of texture, surface chemistry and pH.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Beatriz; Rocha, Raquel P; Pereira, Manuel F R; Figueiredo, José L; Barriocanal, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    This paper compares the importance of the texture and surface chemistry of waste tyre activated carbons in the adsorption of commercial dyes. The adsorption of two commercial dyes, Basic Astrazon Yellow 7GLL and Reactive Rifafix Red 3BN on activated carbons made up of reinforcing fibres from tyre waste and low-rank bituminous coal was studied. The surface chemistry of activated carbons was modified by means of HCl-HNO3 treatment in order to increase the number of functional groups. Moreover, the influence of the pH on the process was also studied, this factor being of great importance due to the amphoteric characteristics of activated carbons. The activated carbons made with reinforcing fibre and coal had the highest SBET, but the reinforcing fibre activated carbon samples had the highest mesopore volume. The texture of the activated carbons was not modified upon acid oxidation treatment, unlike their surface chemistry which underwent considerable modification. The activated carbons made with a mixture of reinforcing fibre and coal experienced the largest degree of oxidation, and so had more acid surface groups. The adsorption of reactive dye was governed by the mesoporous volume, whilst surface chemistry played only a secondary role. However, the surface chemistry of the activated carbons and dispersive interactions played a key role in the adsorption of the basic dye. The adsorption of the reactive dye was more favored in a solution of pH 2, whereas the basic dye was adsorbed more easily in a solution of pH 12.

  18. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  19. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  20. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  1. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2007-07-03

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  2. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2009-07-07

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  3. Transient enthalpy probe development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Brian K.

    A reliable diagnostic probe has been developed to measure the local enthalpy in high-pressure, arc heated test streams that simulate atmospheric reentry conditions. The probe employs the double sonic-throat technique and is designed for the sweep (transient) mode to survive the severe heating environment. Tests in the high-pressure arc heater facilities show that, under certain conditions, the enthalpy probe measurements are in good agreement with enthalpy profiles inferred from heat flux measurements using the theory of Fay and Riddell (1958).

  4. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, George R.; Peter, Frank J.; Butler, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  5. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-02-16

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir. 7 figs.

  6. Phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having the general structure: ##STR1## (wherein X is F, Cl, or NO.sub.2, and Y is CO, SO.sub.2 or C(CF.sub.3).sub.2) is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having the general structure: ##STR2## (wherein R is any aliphatic or aromatic moiety) is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  7. Modelling Cu(II) adsorption to ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite-bacteria composites: Deviation from additive adsorption in the composite sorption system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2013-03-01

    Bacterially associated iron (hydr)oxides are widespread in natural environments and are potent scavengers of dissolved metal ions. However, it is unclear whether metal sorption on these composites adheres to the additivity principle, and thus whether metal concentrations in environments where these composites comprise a significant proportion of the reactive iron phases can be modelled assuming component additivity. Here we address this issue for Cu adsorption on ferrihydrite-Bacillus subtilis composites. We precipitated pure ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite composites with different ferrihydrite:bacteria mass ratios, and measured Cu adsorption as a function of pH, Cu adsorbed concentration and composite mass ratio. We develop a molecular-level surface complexation model for Cu adsorption on pure ferrihydrite. We then combine our end-member models for Cu adsorption on B. subtilis (Moon and Peacock, 2011) and ferrihydrite to model the observed Cu adsorption on the composites, adopting a component linear additivity approach. By comparing observed Cu adsorption to that predicted by our composite model, constrained to the exact best fitting end-member stability constants, we find that Cu adsorption behaviour on ferrihydrite-B. subtilis composites deviates from additivity. Specifically, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite is enhanced across the adsorption pH edge (pH ˜3-6), while on our composite composed mainly of bacteria adsorption is enhanced at mid-high pH (pH ˜5-6) but diminished at mid-low pH (pH ˜5-3), compared to additivity. In current surface complexation modelling constructs, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite can be modelled in a component additivity approach, by optimising the stability constants for Cu adsorption on the ferrihydrite and bacteria fractions to values that are within the uncertainty on the end-member stability constant values. The deviation from additivity of these composites, apparent when

  8. Spin-probe ESR study on the entrapment of organic solutes by the nanochannel of MCM-41 in benzene.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Masaharu; Anandan, Sambandam; Seelan, Sindhu; Nishida, Masakazu; Toriyama, Kazumi

    2007-01-30

    An ESR study has been made on the adsorption of three types of aminoxyl radicals with different substituent groups in the nanochannel of MCM-41 in benzene. In the suspensions of MCM-41, all the aminoxyl radicals, usually called as spin probes, show the ESR spectra composed of two signals: the main broader one from the spin probes trapped in the nanochannel, and a sharp minor signal from those in the bulk. The spin probes adsorbed in the nanochannel retain considerable mobility especially at higher temperatures over 300 K. When fumed silica, having a surface structure similar to that of MCM-41, is employed, on the other hand, the relatively hydrophobic spin probe mainly remains in the bulk, but the hydrophilic one is mostly adsorbed and immobilized rigidly. From these results, the adsorption by the MCM-41 nanochannel in benzene is characterized by medium selectivity and considerable motional allowance to the adsorbate molecule. The mobility of the spin probe in the MCM-41 nanochannel increases and the adsorption efficiency decreases by either of the following changes made to the system: (a) increasing the channel diameter, (b) increasing the hydrophobicity of the spin probe, (c) adding a small amount of 2-propanol in the solution, (d) methylation of the surface OH groups of the nanochannel, and (e) elevating the system temperature. A model of this special type of adsorption has been proposed on the basis of the thermodynamic parameters and the ESR spectra for the modified systems including those with different solvents.

  9. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part II--A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment on Surface Adsorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Larsen, Sarah C.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. The use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in organic and inorganic chemistry laboratory courses as well as in undergraduate research was presented…

  10. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  11. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC. PMID:26871732

  12. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed

    Calvet, R

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described.

  13. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal–halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the “Cl-down” configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable. PMID:27066160

  14. Adsorption and desorption of arsenic to aquifer sediment on the Red River floodplain at Nam Du, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Hoa Mai, Nguyen; Postma, Dieke; Thi Kim Trang, Pham; Jessen, Søren; Hung Viet, Pham; Larsen, Flemming

    2014-10-01

    The adsorption of arsenic onto aquifer sediment from the Red River floodplain, Vietnam, was determined in a series of batch experiments. Due to water supply pumping, river water infiltrates into the aquifer at the field site and has leached the uppermost aquifer sediments. The leached sediments remain anoxic but contain little reactive arsenic and iron, and are used in our experiments. The adsorption and desorption experiments were carried out by addition or removal of arsenic from the aqueous phase in sediment suspensions under strictly anoxic conditions. Also the effects of HCO3, Fe(II), PO4 and Si on arsenic adsorption were explored. The results show much stronger adsorption of As(V) as compared to As(III), full reversibility for As(III) adsorption and less so for As(V). The presence or absence of HCO3 did not influence arsenic adsorption. Fe(II) enhanced As(V) sorption but did not influence the adsorption of As(III) in any way. During simultaneous adsorption of As(III) and Fe(II), As(III) was found to be fully desorbable while Fe(II) was completely irreversibly adsorbed and clearly the two sorption processes are uncoupled. Phosphate was the only solute that significantly could displace As(III) from the sediment surface. Compiling literature data on arsenic adsorption to aquifer sediment in Vietnam and Bangladesh revealed As(III) isotherms to be almost identical regardless of the nature of the sediment or the site of sampling. In contrast, there was a large variation in As(V) adsorption isotherms between studies. A tentative conclusion is that As(III) and As(V) are not adsorbing onto the same sediment surface sites. The adsorption behavior of arsenic onto aquifer sediments and synthetic Fe-oxides is compared. Particularly, the much stronger adsorption of As(V) than of As(III) onto Red River as well as on most Bangladesh aquifer sediments, indicates that the perception that arsenic, phosphate and other species compete for the same surface sites of iron oxides in

  15. Adsorption site analysis of impurity embedded single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Mota, J.P.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Bundle morphology and adsorptive contributions from nanotubes and impurities are studied both experimentally and by simulation using a computer-aided methodology, which employs a small physisorbed probe molecule to explore the porosity of nanotube samples. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of nitrogen adsorption on localized sites of a bundle is carried out to predict adsorption in its accessible internal pore volume and on its external surface as a function of tube diameter. External adsorption is split into the contributions from the clean surface of the outermost nanotubes of the bundle and from the surface of the impurities. The site-specific isotherms are then combined into a global isotherm for a given sample using knowledge of its tube-diameter distribution obtained by Raman spectroscopy. The structural parameters of the sample, such as the fraction of open-ended nanotubes and the contributions from impurities and nanotube bundles to total external surface area, are determined by fitting the experimental nitrogen adsorption data to the simulated isotherm. The degree of closure between experimental and calculated adsorption isotherms for samples manufactured by two different methods, to provide different nanotube morphology and contamination level, further strengthens the validity and resulting interpretations based on the proposed approach. The average number of nanotubes per bundle and average bundle size, within a sample, are also quantified. The proposed method allows for extrapolation of adsorption properties to conditions where the purification process is 100% effective at removing all impurities and opening access to all intrabundle adsorption sites. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chitosan/Graphene Oxide Composite as an Effective Adsorbent for Reactive Red Dye Removal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Qu, Lijun; Tian, Mingwei; Zhu, Shifeng; Zhang, Xiansheng; Tang, Xiaoning; Sun, Kaikai

    2016-07-01

    Chitosan, modified with different dosages of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO), was first prepared, and its adsorption capacity for reactive red (RR) dye in aqueous solutions was investigated, in this paper. The structure and morphology of the adsorbents were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, SEM, EDX, BET, and TGA. The effect of varying parameters (pH, temperature, adsorbent loading, and contact time) was also investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity based on the Langmuir model was found to be 32.16 mg/g. In addition, experimental kinetic data were analyzed by the psuedo-first order and psuedo-second order equation models. The psuedo-second order model proved to be the best model for the adsorption system, which suggested that adsorption might be controlled by the chemical rate-limiting step through sharing of electrons or by covalent forces.

  17. Chitosan/Graphene Oxide Composite as an Effective Adsorbent for Reactive Red Dye Removal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Qu, Lijun; Tian, Mingwei; Zhu, Shifeng; Zhang, Xiansheng; Tang, Xiaoning; Sun, Kaikai

    2016-07-01

    Chitosan, modified with different dosages of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO), was first prepared, and its adsorption capacity for reactive red (RR) dye in aqueous solutions was investigated, in this paper. The structure and morphology of the adsorbents were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, SEM, EDX, BET, and TGA. The effect of varying parameters (pH, temperature, adsorbent loading, and contact time) was also investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity based on the Langmuir model was found to be 32.16 mg/g. In addition, experimental kinetic data were analyzed by the psuedo-first order and psuedo-second order equation models. The psuedo-second order model proved to be the best model for the adsorption system, which suggested that adsorption might be controlled by the chemical rate-limiting step through sharing of electrons or by covalent forces. PMID:27329054

  18. Technology for Entry Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, James A.; Arnold, James; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul; Laub, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph describing technologies for entry probes is presented. The topics include: 1) Entry Phase; 2) Descent Phase; 3) Long duration atmospheric observations; 4) Survivability at high temperatures; and 5) Summary.

  19. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  20. Effect of Doping on Surface Reactivity and Conduction Mechanism in Sm-doped CeO2 Thin Films

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Nan; Belianinov, Alex; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tebano, Antonello; Daniele, Di Castro; Schlueter, Christoph; Lee, Tien-Lin; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Wisinger, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; et al

    2014-11-21

    Scanning probe microscopy measurements show irreversible surface electrochemistry in Sm-doped CeO2 thin films, which depends on humidity, temperature and doping concentration. A systematic study by electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) in samples with two different Sm content and in several working conditions allows disclosing the microscopic mechanism underlying the difference in water adsorption and splitting with subsequent proton liberation. We measure the behavior of the hysteresis loops by changing temperature and humidity, both in standard ESM configuration and using the first order reversal curve (FORC) method. Complementing our study with spectroscopic measurements by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy we find that watermore » incorporation is favored until the doping with Sm is too high to allow the presence of Ce3+. The influence of doping on the surface reactivity and conduction mechanism clearly emerges from all of our experimental results. We find that at lower Sm concentration proton conduction is prevalent, featured by lower activation energy and higher mobility. Defect concentrations determine the type of the prevalent charge carrier in a doping dependent manner.« less

  1. Effect of Doping on Surface Reactivity and Conduction Mechanism in Sm-doped CeO2 Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nan; Belianinov, Alex; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tebano, Antonello; Daniele, Di Castro; Schlueter, Christoph; Lee, Tien-Lin; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Wisinger, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Aruta, Carmela

    2014-11-21

    Scanning probe microscopy measurements show irreversible surface electrochemistry in Sm-doped CeO2 thin films, which depends on humidity, temperature and doping concentration. A systematic study by electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) in samples with two different Sm content and in several working conditions allows disclosing the microscopic mechanism underlying the difference in water adsorption and splitting with subsequent proton liberation. We measure the behavior of the hysteresis loops by changing temperature and humidity, both in standard ESM configuration and using the first order reversal curve (FORC) method. Complementing our study with spectroscopic measurements by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy we find that water incorporation is favored until the doping with Sm is too high to allow the presence of Ce3+. The influence of doping on the surface reactivity and conduction mechanism clearly emerges from all of our experimental results. We find that at lower Sm concentration proton conduction is prevalent, featured by lower activation energy and higher mobility. Defect concentrations determine the type of the prevalent charge carrier in a doping dependent manner.

  2. Surface Complexation Modeling of U(VI) Adsorption onto Savannah River Site Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Denham, M.; Davis, J.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) was a U.S. Department of Energy facility for plutonium production during the Cold War. Waste plumes containing low-level radioactivity and acidic waste solutions were discharged to a series of unlined seepage basins in the F-Area of the SRS from 1955 to 1988. Although the site has undergone many years of active remediation, the groundwater remains acidic, and the concentrations of U and other radionuclides are still significantly higher than their Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs). The objective of this effort is to understand and predict U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes through developing surface complexation models (SCMs). Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to evaluate U adsorption behavior over the pH range of 3.0 to 9.5. Ten sorbent samples were selected including six contaminated sediment samples from three boreholes drilled within the plume and along the groundwater flow direction, two uncontaminated (pristine) sediment samples from a borehole outside of the plume, and two reference minerals, goethite and kaolinite (identified as the dominant minerals in the clay size fraction of the F-Area sediments). The results show that goethite and kaolinite largely control U partitioning behavior. In comparison with the pristine sediment, U(VI) adsorption onto contaminated sediments exhibits adsorption edges shifted toward lower pH by about 1.0 unit (e.g., from pH≈4.5 to pH≈3.5). We developed a SCMs based component additivity (CA) approach, which can successfully predict U(VI) adsorption onto uncontaminated SRS sediments. However, application of the same SCMs based CA approach to contaminated sediments resulted in underestimates of U(VI) adsorption at acidic pH conditions. The model sensitivity analyses indicate that both goethite and kaolinite surfaces co-contributed to U(VI) adsorption under acidic pH conditions. In particular, the exchange sites of clay minerals might play an important role in adsorption of U(VI) at p

  3. Cluster-Models for Uranyl(VI) Adsorption on alpha-Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2011-02-24

    Aqueous complexation, adsorption and redox chemistry of actinide species at mineral surfaces have significant impact on their transport and reactive behaviour in chemically and physically heterogeneous environments. The adsorption configurations and energies of micro-solvated uranyl dication, UO2 2+, on fully hydroxylated and H-deficient a-alumina (0001)-like finite cluster models were studied. The significant size of the models provides faithful representations of features that have emerged from periodic calculations, but most importantly, they afford us a systematic study of the preferred adsorption configurations, effect of secondary solvation shells and explicit treatment of the total charge. The energetics computed from the difference between the optimized structures and the appropriate reference states, point at a preference for inner sphere type complex.

  4. Reactivity of Graphene Investigated by Density-Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Himadri; Gebhardt, Julian; Görling, Andreas; Chair of Theoretical Chemistry Team

    Using spin-polarized density-functional theory, we study the adsorption and reaction of hydrogen and fluorine with graphene. Graphene has a bipartite lattice with two different sublattices and hence, due to Lieb's theorem, the inequality between two sublattices should lead to a net magnetic moment upon adsorption of hydrogen or fluorine. Our calculations using density-functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation predict a magnetic moment of 1 µB for a single hydrogen adsorbed on graphene but not for a single fluorine atom adsorbed on graphene. Switching to hybrid density-functional theory with the HSE functional, we obtain a magnetic moment of 1 µB for of a single fluorine atom adsorption on graphene. This is in line with work of Kim et al., who also found in density-functional theory calculations with the HSE exchange-correlation functional spin-polarization for a fluorine adatom on graphene. Here, we present a systematic study of the reactivity and relevant adsorption mechanism for single-sided graphene, i.e., a graphene sheet which is accessible by an adsorbate from only one side with hydrogen and fluorine using hybrid density-functional theory. German Research Council (DFG) by the Collaborative Research Center 953.

  5. Relation between Water Vapor Adsorption Isotherms and Dynamic Dehumidification Performances of Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Koji; Matsuguma, Shingo; Jin, Wei-Li; Okano, Hiroshi; Teraoka, Yasutake; Hirose, Tsutomu

    Desiccant rotors with different water vapor adsorption properties were fabricated by the synthesis of silica gels inside the honeycomb matrices. Dynamic dehumidification performances of the rotors were measured under different conditions and they were discussed in relation to water vapor adsorption isotherms. At the reactivation air temperatures of 80 and 140 oC, the best dynamic performance was observed with the rotor on which the adsorbed amount of water vapor at lower relative humidity was highest. When the reactivation air temperature was 50 oC, on the other hand, the rotor of which the isotherm exhibited monotonic and nearly linear increase up to higher relative humidity was the most suitable. The normalized changes of absolute humidity and adsorbed amount were defined, and these phenomena were analyzed. When the dependences of both parameters against the relative humidity were similar, the rotor showed the best dehumidification performance.

  6. Adsorption of various alcohols on Illinois No. 6 coal in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.C.; Rigby, R.R.

    1993-07-01

    Hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and aromacity of Illinois {number_sign}6 coal in water are relatively determined by evaluating equilibrium physical/chemical adsorption of probe compounds on the coal. Experiments on equilibrium adsorption loadings of various additives on 60--200 mesh Illinois {number_sign}6 coal (DECS-2; Randolph county) were performed to investigate relatively surface properties of the coal at 25{degree}C. The additives include various alcohols, alkanes and aromatic compounds. The main objectives of this research are to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals with the inverse liquid chromatography technique, using various probe compounds, to analyze flotation recoveries of coals with a micro-flotation apparatus in order to relate coal floatability to evaluated coal surface properties, and to delineate roles of coal-cleaning/handling additives with the inverse liquid chromatography technique.

  7. Adsorption air cleaning from ozone.

    PubMed

    Baltrenas, Pranas; Paliulis, Dainius; Vasarevicius, Saulius; Simaitis, Ramutis

    2003-01-01

    Not much has been written about air cleaning from ozone. The aim of this paper was to demonstrate the possibility of adsorption air cleaning from ozone. The second aim was to investigate the dependence of the efficiency of ozone removal from the air on the height of the adsorber layer and on concentrations of ozone, and to obtain empirical formulas for calculating the efficiency of ozone treatment. Equipment for air cleaning from ozone and nitrogen and sulphur dioxides is suggested.

  8. Studies on Vapor Adsorption Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamsundar, N.; Ramotowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The project consisted of performing experiments on single and dual bed vapor adsorption systems, thermodynamic cycle optimization, and thermal modeling. The work was described in a technical paper that appeared in conference proceedings and a Master's thesis, which were previously submitted to NASA. The present report describes some additional thermal modeling work done subsequently, and includes listings of computer codes developed during the project. Recommendations for future work are provided.

  9. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  10. Reactive power compensating system

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  11. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  12. Specific fluorogenic probes for ozone in biological and atmospheric samples.

    PubMed

    Garner, Amanda L; St Croix, Claudette M; Pitt, Bruce R; Leikauf, George D; Ando, Shin; Koide, Kazunori

    2009-07-01

    Ozone exposure is a growing global health problem, especially in urban areas. While ozone in the stratosphere protects the earth from harmful ultraviolet light, tropospheric or ground-level ozone is toxic and can damage the respiratory tract. It has recently been shown that ozone may be produced endogenously in inflammation and antibacterial responses of the immune system; however, these results have sparked controversy owing to the use of a non-specific colorimetric probe. Here we report the synthesis of fluorescent molecular probes able to unambiguously detect ozone in both biological and atmospheric samples. Unlike other ozone-detection methods, in which interference from different reactive oxygen species is often a problem, these probes are ozone specific. Such probes will prove useful for the study of ozone in environmental science and biology, and so possibly provide some insight into the role of ozone in cells.

  13. Specific fluorogenic probes for ozone in biological and atmospheric samples

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Amanda L.; St Croix, Claudette M.; Pitt, Bruce R.; Leikauf, George D.; Ando, Shin; Koide, Kazunori

    2010-01-01

    Ozone exposure is a growing global health problem, especially in urban areas. While ozone in the stratosphere protects the earth from harmful ultraviolet light, tropospheric or ground-level ozone is toxic and can damage the respiratory tract. It has recently been shown that ozone may be produced endogenously in inflammation and antibacterial responses of the immune system; however, these results have sparked controversy owing to the use of a non-specific colorimetric probe. Here we report the synthesis of fluorescent molecular probes able to unambiguously detect ozone in both biological and atmospheric samples. Unlike other ozone-detection methods, in which interference from different reactive oxygen species is often a problem, these probes are ozone specific. Such probes will prove useful for the study of ozone in environmental science and biology, and so possibly provide some insight into the role of ozone in cells. PMID:20634904

  14. Protein adsorption onto ceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Takami, Y; Yamane, S; Makinouchi, K; Otsuka, G; Glueck, J; Benkowski, R; Nosé, Y

    1998-04-01

    Ceramics seldom have been used as blood-contacting materials. However, alumina ceramic (Al2O3) and polyethylene are incorporated into the pivot bearings of the Gyro centrifugal blood pump. This material combination was chosen based on the high durability of the materials. Due to the stagnant flow that often occurs in a continuous flow condition inside a centrifugal pump, pivot bearing system is extremely critical. To evaluate the thombogenicity of pivot bearings in the Gyro pump, this study sought to investigate protein adsorption, particularly albumin, IgG, fibrinogen, and fibronectin onto ceramic surfaces. Al2O3 and silicon carbide ceramic (SiC) were compared with polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC). Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay revealed that the amount of adsorbed proteins onto Al2O3 and SiC was significantly less than that on PVC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicated that numerous proteins adsorbed onto PVC compared to PE, Al2O3, and SiC. Identification of adsorbed proteins by Western immunoblotting revealed that the adsorption of albumin was similar on all four materials tested. Western immunoblotting also indicated lesser amounts of IgG, fibrinogen, and fibronectin on Al2O3 and SiC than on PE and PVC. In conclusion, ceramics (Al2O3 and SiC) are expected to be thromboresistant from the viewpoint of protein adsorption. PMID:9511095

  15. Mesoporous zirconium titanium oxides. Part 1: Porosity modulation and adsorption properties of xerogels.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Christopher S; Sizgek, G Devlet; Sizgek, Erden; Scales, Nicholas; Yee, Patrick J; Luca, Vittorio

    2008-11-01

    A series of zirconium titanium oxide mesophases containing 33 atom % Zr have been prepared using carboxylic acids of different alkyl chain lengths (Cy ) from y=4-18 through organic-inorganic polymer phase segregation as the gel transition is approached. Thermal treatment of these transparent gels up to 450 degrees C eliminated the organic template, and domain coarsening occurred affording stable worm-hole mesoporous materials of homogeneous composition and pore diameters varying from about 3 to 4 nm in fine increments. With such materials, it was subsequently possible to precisely study the adsorption of vanadium oxo-anions and cations from aqueous solutions and, more particularly, probe the kinetics of intraparticle mass transport as a function of the associated pore dimension. The kinetics of mass transport through the pore systems was investigated using aqueous vanadyl (VO2+) and orthovanadate (VO3(OH)2-) probe species at concentrations ranging from 10 to 200 ppm (0.2 to 4 mmol/L) and pH values of 0 and 10.5, respectively. In the case of both of these vanadium species, the zirconium titanate mesophases displayed relatively slow kinetics, taking in excess of about 500 min to achieve maximum uptake. By using a pseudo-second-order rate law, it was possible to extract the instantaneous and overall rate of the adsorption processes and then relate these to the pore diameters. Both the instantaneous and overall rates of adsorption increased with increasing surface area and pore diameter over the studied pore size range. However, the equilibrium adsorption capacity increased linearly with pore diameter only for the higher concentrations and was independent of pore diameter for the lower concentration. These results have been interpreted using a model in which discrete adsorption occurs at low concentrations and is then followed by multilayer adsorption at higher concentration.

  16. First-principles study of SO2 molecule adsorption on the pristine and Mn-doped boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zun-Yi; Zhang, Jian-Min; Xu, Ke-Wei

    2015-08-01

    To exploit the potential application of nitride nanotube (BNNT), the adsorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2) on pristine and Mn-doped BNNT was theoretically studied using first-principles approach based on density functional theory (DFT). The most stable adsorption geometry, adsorption energy, magnetic moment, charge transfer and density of states of these systems are discussed. SO2 molecule is weakly adsorbed on the pristine BNNT. The Mn-doped BNNT show high reactivity toward SO2 regardless of the MnB site or MnN site adsorption. The larger formation energies and analysis of density of states show the SO2 molecules are chemically bonded to Mn-doped BNNT and the covalent interaction between the SO2 molecule and Mn atom can be formed. Therefore, the Mn-doped BNNT can be used as SO2 gas sensor manufacturing raw materials, and it may be a potential material for nanodevice applications.

  17. Comparative adsorption of metal and dye on flake- and bead-types of chitosans prepared from fishery wastes.

    PubMed

    Wu, F C; Tseng, R L; Juang, R S

    2000-03-13

    The adsorption capacities and rates of Cu(II) and a commercial reactive dye RR222 on flake- and bead-types of chitosans prepared from three fishery wastes (shrimp, crab, and lobster shells) were compared at 30 degrees C. It was shown that all equilibrium isotherms could be well fitted by the Langmuir equation. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) on flake- and bead-types of chitosans appeared to be comparable, but the adsorption capacity of RR222 on bead type was much larger than that on flake type by a factor of 2. 0-3.8. The rates of dye adsorption on both types of chitosans indicated different controlling mechanisms. In addition, the bead type of chitosans exhibited a greater rate compared to the flake type.

  18. Isolation and Reactivity of Trifluoromethyl Iodonium Salts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The strategic incorporation of the trifluoromethyl (CF3) functionality within therapeutic or agrochemical agents is a proven strategy for altering their associated physicochemical properties (e.g., metabolic stability, lipophilicity, and bioavailability). Electrophilic trifluoromethylation has emerged as an important methodology for installing the CF3 moiety onto an array of molecular architectures, and, in particular, CF3 λ3-iodanes have garnered significant interest because of their unique reactivity and ease of handling. Trifluoromethylations mediated by these hypervalent iodine reagents often require activation through an exogenous Lewis or Brønsted acid; thus, putative intermediates invoked in these transformations are cationic CF3 iodoniums. These iodoniums have, thus far, eluded isolation and investigation of their innate reactivity (which has encouraged speculation that such species cannot be accessed). A more complete understanding of the mechanistic relevance of CF3 iodoniums is paramount for the development of new trifluoromethylative strategies involving λ3-iodanes. Here, we demonstrate that CF3 iodonium salts are readily prepared from common λ3-iodane precursors and exhibit remarkable persistence under ambient conditions. These reagents are competent electrophiles for a variety of trifluoromethylation reactions, and their reactivity is reminiscent of that observed when CF3 iodanes are activated using Lewis acids. As such, our results suggest the mechanistic relevance of CF3 iodonium intermediates in trifluoromethylative processes mediated by λ3-iodanes. The isolation of CF3 iodonium salts also presents the unique opportunity to employ them more generally as mechanistic probes. PMID:27280169

  19. STXM and NanoSIMS investigations on EPS fractions before and after adsorption to goethite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinran; Eusterhues, Karin; Thieme, Jürgen; Ciobota, Valerian; Höschen, Carmen; Mueller, Carsten W; Küsel, Kirsten; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Totsche, Kai U

    2013-04-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are expected to be an important source for the formation of mineral-organic associations in soil. Because such formations affect the composition of mobile and immobile organic matter as well as the reactivity of minerals, we investigated the composition of EPS before and after adsorption to goethite. Raman measurements on EPS extracted from Bacillus subtilis distinguished four fractions rich in proteins, polysaccharides, lipids, or lipids and proteins. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy identified three different EPS-fractions that varied in their composition in proteins, nonaromatic proteins, and polysaccharides. Reaction of EPS with goethite led to a preferential adsorption of lipids and proteins. The organic coverage was heterogeneous, consisting of ~100 × 200 nm large patches of either lipid-rich or protein-rich material. Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry showed a strong S enrichment in aggregates of ~400 nm in the goethite adsorbed EPS. From our simplified model system, we learned that only a small portion (<10%) of EPS was immobilized via adsorption to goethite. This fraction formed a coating of subμm spaced protein-rich and lipid-rich domains, i.e., of two materials which will strongly differ in their reactive sites. This will finally affect further adsorption, the particle mobility and eventually also colloidal stability.

  20. Groundwater protection from cadmium contamination by permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, F; Di Natale, M; Greco, R; Lancia, A; Laudante, C; Musmarra, D

    2008-12-30

    This work studies the reliability of an activated carbon permeable reactive barrier in removing cadmium from a contaminated shallow aquifer. Laboratory tests have been performed to characterize the equilibrium and kinetic adsorption properties of the activated carbon in cadmium-containing aqueous solutions. A 2D numerical model has been used to describe pollutant transport within a groundwater and the pollutant adsorption on the permeable adsorbing barrier (PRB). In particular, it has been considered the case of a permeable adsorbing barrier (PAB) used to protect a river from a Cd(II) contaminated groundwater. Numerical results show that the PAB can achieve a long-term efficiency by preventing river pollution for several months.

  1. Cysteine Modification: Probing Channel Structure, Function and Conformational Change.

    PubMed

    Akabas, Myles H

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine substitution has been a powerful tool to investigate the structure and function of proteins. It has been particularly useful for studies of membrane proteins in their native environment, embedded in phospholipid membranes. Among the 20 amino acids, cysteine is uniquely reactive. This reactivity has motivated the synthesis of a wide array of sulfhydryl reactive chemicals. The commercially available array of sulfhydryl reactive reagents has allowed investigators to probe the local steric and electrostatic environment around engineered cysteines and to position fluorescent, paramagnetic and mass probes at specific sites within proteins and for distance measurements between pairs of sites. Probing the reactivity and accessibility of engineered cysteines has been extensively used in Substituted Cysteine Accessibility Method (SCAM) investigations of ion channels, membrane transporters and receptors. These studies have successfully identified the residues lining ion channels, agonist/antagonist and allosteric modulator binding sites, and regions whose conformation changes as proteins transition between different functional states. The thousands of cysteine-substitution mutants reported in the literature demonstrate that, in general, mutation to cysteine is well tolerated. This has allowed systematic studies of residues in transmembrane segments and in other parts of membrane proteins. Finally, by inserting pairs of cysteines and assaying their ability to form disulfide bonds, changes in proximity and mobility relationships between specific positions within a protein can be inferred. Thus, cysteine mutagenesis has provided a wealth of data on the structure of membrane proteins in their functional environment. This data can complement the structural insights obtained from the burgeoning number of crystal structures of detergent solubilized membrane proteins whose functional state is often uncertain. This article will review the use of cysteine mutagenesis to probe

  2. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  3. The effect of the nanosize on surface properties of NiO nanoparticles for the adsorption of Quinolin-65.

    PubMed

    Marei, Nedal N; Nassar, Nashaat N; Vitale, Gerardo

    2016-03-01

    Using Quinolin-65 (Q-65) as a model-adsorbing compound for polar heavy hydrocarbons, the nanosize effect of NiO nanoparticles on the adsorption of Q-65 was investigated. Different-sized NiO nanoparticles with sizes between 5 and 80 nm were prepared by the controlled thermal dehydroxylation of Ni(OH)2. The properties of the nanoparticles were characterized using XRD, BET, FTIR, HRTEM and TGA. The effects of the nanosize on the textural properties, the shape and the morphology were studied. The adsorption of Q-65 molecules onto different-sized nanoparticles was tested in toluene-based solutions. On a normalized surface area basis, the number of Q-65 molecules adsorbed per nm(2) of the NiO surface was the highest for NiO nanoparticles of size 80 nm, while that for 5 nm sized NiO nanoparticles was the lowest. Excitingly, the adsorption capacity of other NiO sizes varied from loading suggesting different adsorption behavior, which exhibits the significance of textural properties during the adsorption of Q-65. Computational modeling of the interaction between the Q-65 molecule and the NiO nanoparticle surface was carried out to get more understanding of its adsorption behavior. A number of factors contributing to the enhanced adsorption capacity of nanoscale NiO were determined. These include surface reactivity, topology, morphology and textural properties.

  4. Adsorption of thiophene on Pt, Pd, Au, and Rh(100) surfaces with the role of the van der Waals' interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Walter; Matos, Jeronimo; Kara, Abdelkader

    We explore the adsorption of thiophene (C4H4S) on Pt(100), Au(100), Pd(100), and Rh(100) surfaces using density functional theory with and without self-consistent van der Waals interactions (vdWs). The six functionals we use are PBE, optB86b-vdW, optB88-vdW, optPBE-vdW, revPBE-vdW, and rPW86-vdW2. We examine a variety of adsorption sites with the molecule's plane both parallel and perpendicular to the surface. In the case of parallel adsorption the highest binding energy occurs when the molecule is centered over a hollow site with the sulfur atom near an atop site. The highest adsorption energy for perpendicular configurations is achieved when the sulfur atom lies over a bridge site and the carbon atoms near hollow sites. We find that for thiophene on the coinage metals the vdW functionals predict higher adsorption energies than those predicted by the PBE functional. On the other hand, for thiophene on the reactive transition metal substrates only optB86b-vdW, optB88-vdW, and optPBE-vdW result in an enhancement in the adsorption energy over the PBE value. We also explore some of the electronic properties of the system including charge transfer and change in the work function. Our results indicate that adsorption characteristics depends heavily on the functional used and geometry.

  5. Quantum chemical study of arsenic (III, V) adsorption on Mn-oxides: implications for arsenic(III) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengqiang; Paul, Kristian W; Kubicki, James D; Sparks, Donald L

    2009-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to investigate As(V) and As(III) surface complex structures and reaction energies on both Mn(III) and Mn(IV) sites in an attempt to better understand As(III) oxidation bybirnessite, a layered Mn-dioxide mineral. Edge-sharing dioctahedral Mn(III) and Mn(IV) clusters with different combinations of surface functional groups (>MnOH and >MnOH2) were employed to mimic pH variability. Results show that As(V) adsorption was more thermodynamically favorable than As(III) adsorption on both Mn(III) and Mn(IV) surface sites under simulated acidic pH conditions. Therefore, we propose that As(V) adsorption inhibits As(III) oxidation by blocking adsorption sites. Under simulated acidic pH conditions, Mn(IV) sites exhibited stronger adsorption affinity than Mn(III) sites for both As(III) and As(V). Overall, we hypothesize that Mn(III) sites are less reactive in terms of As(III) oxidation due to their lower affinity for As(III) adsorption, higher potential to be blocked by As(V) complexes, and slower electron transfer rates with adsorbed As(III). Results from this study offer an explanation regarding the experimental observations of Mn(III) accumulation on birnessite and the long residence time of As(III) adsorption complexes on manganite (r-MnOOH) during As(III) oxidation. PMID:19764231

  6. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  7. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  8. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  9. Interaction of ciprofloxacin and probe compounds with palygorskite PFl-1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Hsiang; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Li, Zhaohui; Kuo, Chung-Yih; Wu, Qingfeng; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Lv, Guocheng

    2016-02-13

    The adsorption of ciprofloxacin (CIP) as well as probe compounds, phenylpiperazine (PP) (NH) and fluorochloroquinolone carboxylic acid (FCQCA) (COOH), on palygorskite (PFl-1) obeyed the Langmuir isotherm at pH 2, 7, and 11 except the FCQCA adsorption at pH 2. The CIP and PP adsorption onto PFl-1 was 98-160 mmol/kg. In neutral solution the total amount of exchangeable cations desorbed correlated with the adsorbed amount of CIP and PP well with a slope of 0.9-1, indicating a cation-exchange mechanism. A low amount of FCQCA adsorption of 27-57 mmol/kg was observed and the amount of exchangeable cations desorbed negatively correlate with the amount of FCQCA adsorbed as influenced by surface complexation or cation bridging. FTIR band shifting due to the ring-stretch vibration of PP and the keto-carbonyl group stretching of FCQCA suggested strong interactions as PP and FCQCA absorbed on PFl-1 in neutral solution. In the interaction of CIP with PFl-1, the piperazine-amine group played an important role in cation-exchange interaction in acidic to neutral solution, while the deprotonated keto carbonyl group actively partook in cation bridging or surface complexation with metal cations adsorbed on PFl-1 when the CIP was in anionic form in alkaline solution.

  10. Adsorption of goethite onto quartz and kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Weiner, Eugene R.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of colloidal goethite onto quartz and kaolinite substrates has been studied as a function of pH and NaCl concentration. Goethite adsorption was measured quantitatively by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that adsorption onto both substrates is due primarily to coulombic forces; however, the pH dependence of adsorption is very different for the two substrates. This is explained by the fact that the surface charge on quartz is entirely pH-dependent, while kaolinite has surface faces which carry a permanent negative charge. Adsorption of goethite on to kaolinite increases markedly with increasing NaCl concentration, while adsorption onto quartz is relatively independent of NaCl concentration. This can be explained by the influence of NaCl concentration upon the development of surface charge on the substrates. A method is described for separating surface-bound goethite from free goethite.

  11. Ice-Borehole Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Carsey, Frank; Lane, Arthur; Engelhardt, Herman

    2006-01-01

    An instrumentation system has been developed for studying interactions between a glacier or ice sheet and the underlying rock and/or soil. Prior borehole imaging systems have been used in well-drilling and mineral-exploration applications and for studying relatively thin valley glaciers, but have not been used for studying thick ice sheets like those of Antarctica. The system includes a cylindrical imaging probe that is lowered into a hole that has been bored through the ice to the ice/bedrock interface by use of an established hot-water-jet technique. The images acquired by the cameras yield information on the movement of the ice relative to the bedrock and on visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a

  12. Reactive Air Aluminization

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  13. [Reactive arthritis. A review].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, F; Espinoza, L R

    1990-07-01

    The arthritides that meet the definition or reactive arthritis include the so-called seronegative spondyloarthropathies. Patients are usually aged less than thirty-two. Preceding infection is generally intestinal or venereal, although the involved agent may remain unknown. Enteric forms occur in small epidemics, whereas venereal forms correlate with a recent new sexual partner. The clinical picture varies in severity, with manifestations overlapping between disorders, and often the first complaint is extra-articular. Highly suggestive of reactive arthritis is "sausage" deformity of fingers and toes, pain and stiffness about multiple joints accompanied by radiating lower back discomfort, and enthesitis, particularly at the Achilles tendon. One out of six or seven patients becomes disabled; therapy aimed at preventing disability is vital since medication has little effect on spinal involvement. Antibiotic therapy may be effective in cases in which specific etiologic agents are well defined.

  14. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  15. Multifunctional reactive nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatis, Demitrios

    Many multifunctional nanocomposite materials have been developed for use in propellants, explosives, pyrotechnics, and reactive structures. These materials exhibit high reaction rates due to their developed reaction interfacial area. Two applications addressed in this work include nanocomposite powders prepared by arrested reactive milling (ARM) for burn rate modifiers and reactive structures. In burn rate modifiers, addition of reactive nanocomposite powders to aluminized propellants increases the burn rate of aluminum and thus the overall reaction rate of an energetic formulation. Replacing only a small fraction of aluminum by 8Al·MoO3 and 2B·Ti nanocomposite powders enhances the reaction rate with little change to the thermodynamic performance of the formulation; both the rate of pressure rise and maximum pressure measured in the constant volume explosion test increase. For reactive structures, nanocomposite powders with bulk compositions of 8Al·MoO3, 12Al·MoO3, and 8Al·3CuO were prepared by ARM and consolidated using a uniaxial die. Consolidated samples had densities greater than 90% of theoretical maximum density while maintaining their high reactivity. Pellets prepared using 8Al·MoO3 powders were ignited by a CO2 laser. Ignition delays increased at lower laser powers and greater pellet densities. A simplified numerical model describing heating and thermal initiation of the reactive pellets predicted adequately the observed effects of both laser power and pellet density on the measured ignition delays. To investigate the reaction mechanisms in nanocomposite thermites, two types of nanocomposite reactive materials with the same bulk compositions 8Al·MoO3 were prepared by different methods. One of the materials was manufactured by ARM and the other, so called metastable interstitial composite (MIC), by mixing of nano-scaled individual powders. Clear differences in the low-temperature redox reactions, welldetectable by differential scanning calorimetry

  16. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  17. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  18. Adsorption and kinetic studies of seven different organic dyes onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste and removal of them from wastewater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas; Ahmadi, Mazaher

    2012-12-01

    Adsorption of seven different organic dyes from aqueous solutions onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste (MNLTW) was studied. MNLTW was prepared via a simple method and was fully characterized. The properties of this magnetic adsorbent were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Adsorption characteristics of the MNLTW adsorbent was examined using Janus green, methylene blue, thionine, crystal violet, Congo red, neutral red and reactive blue 19 as adsorbates. Dyes adsorption process was thoroughly studied from both kinetic and equilibrium points of view for all adsorbents. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Redlich-Peterson, Brouers-Sotolongo and Temkin isotherms. The results from Langmuir isotherm indicated that the capacity of MNLTW for the adsorption of cationic dyes was higher than that for anionic dyes. The adsorption kinetics was tested for the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models at different experimental conditions.

  19. Adsorption and kinetic studies of seven different organic dyes onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste and removal of them from wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas; Ahmadi, Mazaher

    2012-12-01

    Adsorption of seven different organic dyes from aqueous solutions onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste (MNLTW) was studied. MNLTW was prepared via a simple method and was fully characterized. The properties of this magnetic adsorbent were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Adsorption characteristics of the MNLTW adsorbent was examined using Janus green, methylene blue, thionine, crystal violet, Congo red, neutral red and reactive blue 19 as adsorbates. Dyes adsorption process was thoroughly studied from both kinetic and equilibrium points of view for all adsorbents. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Redlich-Peterson, Brouers-Sotolongo and Temkin isotherms. The results from Langmuir isotherm indicated that the capacity of MNLTW for the adsorption of cationic dyes was higher than that for anionic dyes. The adsorption kinetics was tested for the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models at different experimental conditions. PMID:23058993

  20. Skylab reactivation mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    On July 11, 1979, Skylab impacted the Earth's surface. The debris dispersion area stretched from the South Eastern Indian Ocean across a sparsely populated section of Western Australia. The events leading to the reentry of Skylab are discussed and a final assessment of the Skylab debris impact footprint is presented. Also included are detailed evaluations of the various Skylab systems that were reactivated when control of Skylab was regained in mid-1978 after having been powered down since February 4, 1974.

  1. Reactivation of latent melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A B; Ali, N

    1990-09-01

    Reports of melioidosis in residents of European countries are rare. We describe a case of reactivation of latent melioidosis in a United Kingdom resident. The case demonstrates the lack of clinical response to chemotherapy despite proven in vitro sensitivity of the organism to the drugs used. It is important to consider melioidosis as a cause of septicaemic illness in patients who have travelled to, or been resident in South-East Asia.

  2. Reactivation of latent melioidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A. B.; Ali, N.

    1990-01-01

    Reports of melioidosis in residents of European countries are rare. We describe a case of reactivation of latent melioidosis in a United Kingdom resident. The case demonstrates the lack of clinical response to chemotherapy despite proven in vitro sensitivity of the organism to the drugs used. It is important to consider melioidosis as a cause of septicaemic illness in patients who have travelled to, or been resident in South-East Asia. PMID:2235805

  3. Effect of surface area and chemisorbed oxygen on the SO2 adsorption capacity of activated char

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether activated char produced from Illinois coal could be used effectively to remove sulfur dioxide from coal combustion flue gas. Chars were prepared from a high-volatile Illinois bituminous coal under a wide range of pyrolysis and activation conditions. A novel char preparation technique was developed to prepare chars with SO2 adsorption capacities significantly greater than that of a commercial activated carbon. In general, there was no correlation between SO2 adsorption capacity and surface area. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) was used to determine the nature and extent of carbon-oxygen (C-O) complexes formed on the char surface. TPD data revealed that SO2 adsorption was inversely proportional to the amount of C-O complex. The formation of a stable C-O complex during char preparation may have served only to occupy carbon sites that were otherwise reactive towards SO2 adsorption. A fleeting C(O) complex formed during SO2 adsorption is postulated to be the reaction intermediate necessary for conversion of SO2 to H2SO4. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  4. Cd adsorption onto Pseudomonas putida in the presence and absence of extracellular polymeric substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueshima, Masato; Ginn, Brian R.; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2008-12-01

    The role of bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in metal adsorption was determined by studying Cd adsorption onto the gram-negative bacterial species Pseudomonas putida with and without enzymatic removal of EPS from the biomass material. A range of experimental approaches were used to characterize the Cd adsorption reactions, including bulk proton and Cd adsorption measurements, FTIR spectroscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. The proton-reactivities of the biomass samples with EPS are not significantly different from those obtained for EPS-free biomass. Similarly, the presence of EPS does not significantly affect the extent of Cd removal from solution by the biomass on a mass-normalized basis, based on bulk Cd adsorption measurements conducted as a function of pH, nor does it appear to strongly affect the Cd-binding groups as observed by FTIR. However, fluorescence microscopy indicates that Cd, although concentrated on cell walls, is also bound to some extent to EPS. Together, the results from this study suggest that the P. putida EPS can bind significant concentrations of Cd from solution, and that the nature and mass-normalized extent of the binding is similar to that of the cell wall. Therefore, the EPS-bearing systems do not exhibit enhanced mass-normalized removal of Cd from solution relative to the EPS-free systems. The presence of the EPS effectively increases the viability of cells exposed to aqueous Cd, likely due to sequestration of the Cd away from the cells due to Cd-EPS binding.

  5. Adsorption properties of boroxol ring doped zigzag boron nitride nanotube toward NO molecule using DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Ehsan; Babaie, Mahsa; Bahmanpour, Hooman

    2016-05-01

    In previous researches it is demonstrated that reactivity and sensitivity of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) toward gas molecules can be modified by impurity. In this work, oxygen defect for three nitrogen sites was used to study the adsorption of NO molecule through the surface of boroxol ring of oxygen doped BNNT (7,0) with different adsorption patterns, including side-on and end-on. All calculations are performed using the DFT-B3LYP/6-31G∗ level of theory, and their electronic energies are corrected by gCP and D3 correction terms. High binding energies indicate that NO molecule undergoes chemical adsorption with large charge transfer from the tube which can significantly change electronic properties of the tube. Density of state (DOS) and partial DOS (PDOS) analyses revealed that adsorption of NO molecule on the boroxol ring position is covalent in nature with significant effect on the electronic properties of tube. The Laplacian of electron density, Lagrangian kinetic energy density, Hamiltonian kinetic energy density and potential energy density at bond critical points between the tube and NO indicate that the interaction between the tube and NO molecule is covalent in nature. Topological analysis of the electron localization function shows that electrons in the new formed bonds are approximately localized, meaning that the nature of adsorption process is chemical covalent. The studied nanotube is a suitable candidate to filter and eliminate NO gas molecule.

  6. Pyrolysis of tire rubber: Porosity and adsorption characteristics of the pyrolytic chars

    SciTech Connect

    Miguel, G.S.; Fowler, G.D.; Sollars, C.J.

    1998-06-01

    Tire rubber has been pyrolyzed at various temperatures under a nitrogen atmosphere. The resulting chars have been analyzed for their porosity using nitrogen gas adsorption and for their aqueous adsorption characteristics using phenol, methylene blue, and the reactive dyes Procion Turquoise H-A and Procion Red H-E3B. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were modeled to the BET and Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) equations to determine effective surface areas, mesopore volumes, and micropore volumes. Results showed that pyrolysis of tire rubber was essentially complete at 500 C and resulted in a char yield of approximately 42 wt%. Pyrolytic chars exhibited BET surface areas up to 85 m{sup 2}/g and micropore volumes up to 0.04 mL/g. Owing to their poorly developed micropore structure, the pyrolytic chars exhibited limited aqueous adsorption capacity for compounds of small molecular weight, such as phenol. However, the chars possessed significantly greater adsorption capacity for species of large molecular weight which was attributed to the presence of large mesopore volumes (up to 0.19 mL/g).

  7. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system. PMID:23249062

  8. Becoming Reactive by Concretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prieditis, Armand; Janakiraman, Bhaskar

    1992-01-01

    One way to build a reactive system is to construct an action table indexed by the current situation or stimulus. The action table describes what course of action to pursue for each situation or stimulus. This paper describes an incremental approach to constructing the action table through achieving goals with a hierarchical search system. These hierarchies are generated with transformations called concretizations, which add constraints to a problem and which can reduce the search space. The basic idea is that an action for a state is looked up in the action table and executed whenever the action table has an entry for that state; otherwise, a path is found to the nearest (cost-wise in a graph with costweighted arcs) state that has a mappring from a state in the next highest hierarchy. For each state along the solution path, the successor state in the path is cached in the action table entry for that state. Without caching, the hierarchical search system can logarithmically reduce search. When the table is complete the system no longer searches: it simply reacts by proceeding to the state listed in the table for each state. Since the cached information is specific only to the nearest state in the next highest hierarchy and not the goal, inter-goal transfer of reactivity is possible. To illustrate our approach, we show how an implemented hierarchical search system can completely reactive.

  9. First-principles study toward CO adsorption on Au/Ni surface alloys.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu Cheng; Du, Jin Yan; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Su Fan

    2012-12-01

    The introduction of a second metal, gold, into a nickel matrix can effectively improve the catalytic performance and thermal stability of the catalysts toward steam reforming of methane. To investigate the effect of Au on the adsorption properties and electronic structure of the Ni(111) surface, we chose CO as a probe molecule and examined CO adsorption on various Au/Ni surfaces. It was revealed that Au addition weakened the absorbate-substrate interactions on the Ni(111) surface. With increasing gold concentration, the binding energy declines further. The variation of the binding energies has been interpreted by exploring the electronic structure of surface nickel atoms. The effect of gold can be quantitatively characterized by the slopes of the fitting equations between the binding energy and the number of gold atoms surrounding the adsorption site. Our results show that the binding energy at top sites can be approximately estimated by counting the number of surrounding gold atoms. On one specific surface, the relative magnitude of the binding energy can be simply judged by the distance between gold and the geometrical center of the adsorption site. This empirical rule holds true for C, H, and O adsorption on the Au/Ni surface. It may be applicable to a system in which a doped atom of larger atomic size is incorporated into the host metal surface by forming a surface alloy. PMID:23047643

  10. Acid strength of silica-supported oxide catalysts studied by microcalorimetric measurements of pyridine adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Cardona-Martinez, N.; Dumesic, J.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Microcalorimetric measurements of the differential heat of pyridine adsorption were used to probe the distribution of acid strength on a series of silica-supported oxide catalysts. Depositing oxides of the following cations onto silica increased the acid strength of the catalyst: Ga{sup 3{plus}}, Zn{sup 2{plus}}, Al{sup 3{plus}}, Fe{sup 3{plus}}, Fe{sup 2{plus}}, Mg{sup 2{plus}}, and Sc{sup 3{plus}}. The acid strength distribution curves for the supported oxide samples showed either two or three regions of constant heat of adsorption while silica had an energetically homogeneous surface. The Ga, Al, and Sc samples were found to have both Bronsted and Lewis acidity while the remaining samples showed only Lewis acidity. Incremental adsorption of pyridine indicated that the initial region of highest heat corresponds to strong Lewis acidity while intermediate heats seemed to be due to weaker Lewis acid sites or a combination of Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. The final region of lowest heat was due to H-bonded pyridine on silica. Estimates of the entropies of adsorption were determined, providing information about the mobility of the adsorbed pyridine molecules. The initial differential heat of adsorption increases proportionally to the Sanderson electronegativity of the added oxide.

  11. New method for the simultaneous determination of diffusion and adsorption of dyes in silica hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Perullini, Mercedes; Jobbágy, Matías; Japas, María Laura; Bilmes, Sara A

    2014-07-01

    The fine tuning of porosity in sol gel based devices makes possible the design of novel applications in which the transport of molecules through the oxide gel plays a crucial role. In this work we develop a new method for the simultaneous analysis of diffusion and adsorption of small diffusing probes, as anionic and cationic dyes, through silica mesoporous hydrogels synthesized by sol-gel. The novelty of the work resides in the simplicity of acquisition of the experimental data (by means of a desk scanner) and further mathematical modeling, which is in line with high throughput screening procedures, enabling rapid and simultaneous determination of relevant diffusion and adsorption parameters. Net mass transport and adsorption properties of the silica based hydrogels were contrasted to dye adsorption isotherms and textural characterization of the wet gels by SAXS, as well as that of the corresponding aerogels determined by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and N2 adsorption. Thus, the validation of the results with well-established characterization methods demonstrates that our approach is robust enough to give reliable physicochemical information on these systems.

  12. A curved vitrectomy probe.

    PubMed

    Chalam, K V; Shah, Vinay A; Tripathi, Ramesh C

    2004-01-01

    A curved vitrectomy probe for better accessibility of the peripheral retina in phakic eyes is described. The specially designed curved vitrectomy probe has a 20-gauge pneumatic cutter. The radius of curvature at the shaft is 19.4 mm and it is 25 mm long. The ora serrata is accessed through a 3.0- or 4.0-mm sclerotomy in phakic eyes without touching the crystalline lens. Use of this instrument avoids inadvertent trauma to the clear lens in phakic eyes requiring vitreous base excision. This curved vitrectomy instrument complements wide-angle viewing systems and endoscopes for safe surgical treatment of peripheral retinal pathology in phakic eyes. PMID:15185799

  13. Multifractal characteristics of Nitrogen adsorption isotherms from tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    One of the primary methods used to characterize a wide range of porous materials, including soils, are gas adsorption isotherms. An adsorption isotherm is a function relating the amount of adsorbed gas or vapour to the respective equilibrium pressure, during pressure increase at constant temperature. Adsorption data allow easily estimates of specific surface area and also can provide a characterization of pore surface heterogeneity. Most of the properties and the reactivity of soil colloids are influenced by their specific surface area and by parameters describing the surface heterogeneity. For a restricted scale range, linearity between applied pressure and volume of adsorbate holds, which is the basis for current estimations of specific surface area. However, adsorption isotherms contain also non-linear segments of pressure versus volume so that evidence of multifractal scale has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to analyze the multifractal behaviour of nitrogen adsorption isotherms from a set of tropical soils. Samples were collected form 54 horizons belonging to 19 soil profiles in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The most frequent soil type was Oxisol, according to the Soil Survey Staff, equivalent to Latossolo in the Brazilian soil classification system. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms at standard 77 K were measured using a Thermo Finnigan Sorptomatic 1990 gas sorption analyzer (Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA). From the raw data a distributions of mass along a support was obtained to perform multifractal analysis. The probability distribution was constructed by dividing the values of the measure in a given segment by the sum of the measure in the whole scale range. The box-counting method was employed to perform multifractal analysis. All the analyzed N2 adsorption isotherms behave like a multifractal system. The singularity spectra, f(α), showed asymmetric concave down parabolic shapes, with a greater tendency toward the left side, where moments

  14. Adsorption thermodynamics of Methylene Blue onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Hong, Song; Wen, Cheng; He, Jing; Gan, Fuxing; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2009-08-15

    The effect of temperature on the equilibrium adsorption of Methylene Blue dye from aqueous solution using bentonite was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using three widely applied isotherms: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson. A non-linear method was used for comparing the best fit of the isotherms. Best fit was found to be Redlich-Peterson isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees, and DeltaS degrees were calculated using adsorption equilibrium constant obtained from the Langmuir isotherm. Results suggested that the Methylene Blue adsorption on bentonite was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  15. Adsorption of phenol on wood surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of phenol on aspen and pine wood is investigated. It is shown that adsorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. The woods' specific surface areas and adsorption interaction constants are determined. It is found that the sorption of phenol on surfaces of aspen and pine is due to Van der Waals interactions ( S sp = 45 m2/godw for aspen and 85 m2/godw for pine). The difference between the adsorption characteristics is explained by properties of the wood samples' microstructures.

  16. Physical adsorption strength in open systems.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, M Todd; Stuart, Steven J; Cooper, Alan C; Pez, G P; Cheng, Hansong

    2006-11-23

    For a physical adsorption system, the distances of adsorbates from the surface of a substrate can vary significantly, depending on particle loading and interatomic interactions. Although the total adsorption energy is quantified easily, the normalized, per-particle adsorption energies are more ambiguous if some of these particles are far away from the surface and are interacting only weakly with the substrate. A simple analytical procedure is proposed to characterize the distance dependence of the physisorption strength and effective adsorption capacity. As an example, the method is utilized to describe H2 physisorption in a finite bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17107125

  17. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  18. Surface energetics of alkaline-earth metal oxides: Trends in stability and adsorption of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Nørskov, Jens K.; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    We present a systematic theoretical investigation of the surface properties, stability, and reactivity of rocksalt type alkaline-earth metal oxides including MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO. The accuracy of commonly used exchange-correlation density functionals (LDA, PBE, RPBE, PBEsol, BEEF-vdW, and hybrid HSE) and random-phase approximation (RPA) is evaluated and compared to existing experimental values. Calculated surface energies of the four most stable surface facets under vacuum conditions, the (100) surface, the metal and oxygen terminated octopolar (111), and the (110) surfaces, exhibit a monotonic increase in stability from MgO to BaO. On the MgO(100) surface, adsorption of CO, NO, and CH4 is characterized by physisorption while H2O chemisorbs, which is in agreement with experimental findings. We further use the on-top metal adsorption of CO and NO molecules to map out the surface energetics of each alkaline-earth metal oxide surface. The considered functionals all qualitatively predict similar adsorption energy trends. The ordering between the adsorption energies on different surface facets can be attributed to differences in the local geometrical surface structure and the electronic structure of the metal constituent of the alkaline-earth metal oxide. The striking observation that CO adsorption strength is weaker than NO adsorption on the (100) terraces as the period of the alkaline-earth metal in the oxide increases is analyzed in detail in terms of charge redistribution within the σ and π channels of adsorbates. Finally, we also present oxygen adsorption and oxygen vacancy formation energies in these oxide systems.

  19. A combined streaming-potential optical reflectometer for studying adsorption at the water/solid surface.

    PubMed

    Theodoly, O; Cascão-Pereira, L; Bergeron, V; Radke, C J

    2005-10-25

    A novel in-situ streaming-potential optical reflectometry apparatus (SPOR) was constructed and utilized to probe the molecular architecture of aqueous adsorbates on a negatively charged silica surface. By combining optical reflectometry and electrokinetic streaming potentials, we measure simultaneously the adsorption density, gamma, and zeta potential, zeta, in a rectangular flow cell constructed with one transparent wall. Both dynamic and equilibrium measurements are possible, allowing the study of sorption kinetics and reversibility. Using SPOR, we investigate the adsorption of a classic nonionic surfactant (pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, C12E5), a simple cationic surfactant (hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) of opposite charge to that of the substrate surface, and two cationic polyelectrolytes (poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate), PDAEMA; (poly(propyl methacrylate) trimethylammonium chloride, MAPTAC). For the polyethylene oxide nonionic surfactant, bilayer adsorption is established above the critical micelle concentration (cmc) both from the adsorption amounts and from the interpretation of the observed zeta potentials. Near adsorption saturation, CTAB also forms bilayer structures on silica. Here, however, we observe a strong charge reversal of the surface. The SPOR data, along with Gouy-Chapman theory, permit assessment of the net ionization fraction of the CTAB bilayer at 10% so that most of the adsorbed CTAB molecules are counterion complexed. The adsorption of both C12E5 and CTAB is reversible. The adsorption of the cationic polymers, however, is completely irreversible to a solvent wash. As with CTAB, both PDAEMA and MAPTAC demonstrate strong charge reversal. For the polyelectrolyte molecules, however, the adsorbed layer is thin and flat. Here also, a Gouy-Chapman analysis shows that less than 20% of the adsorbed layer is ionized. Furthermore, the amount of charge reversal is inversely proportional to the Debye length in agreement

  20. Charcoal/Nitrogen Adsorption Cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Refrigerator with no wear-related moving parts produces 0.5 W of cooling at 118 K. When fully developed, refrigerator needs no electrical power, and life expectancy of more than 10 yr, operates unattended to cool sensitive infrared detectors for long periods. Only moving parts in adsorption cryocooler are check valves. As charcoal is cooled in canister, gas pressure drops, allowing inlet check valve to open and admit more nitrogen. When canister is heated, pressure rises, closing inlet valve and eventually opening outlet valve.

  1. Moisture adsorption in optical coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, H. Angus

    1988-01-01

    The thin film filter is a very large aperture component which is exceedingly useful because of its small size, flexibility and ease of mounting. Thin film components, however, do have defects of performance and especially of stability which can cause problems in systems, particularly where long-term measurements are being made. Of all of the problems, those associated with moisture absorption are the most serious. Moisture absorption occurs in the pore-shaped voids inherent in the columnar structure of the layers. Ion-assisted deposition is a promising technique for substantially reducing moisture adsorption effects in thin film structures.

  2. Oligodeoxynucleotide Probes for Detecting Intact Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosson, Reinhardt A.; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Langley, Kim; Pynnonen, Christine M.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive test using chemiluminescent oligodeoxynucleotide probes has been developed for detecting, identifying, and enumerating intact cells. The test is intended especially for use in detecting and enumerating bacteria and yeasts in potable water. As in related tests that have been developed recently for similar purposes, the oligodeoxynucleotide probes used in this test are typically targeted at either singlecopy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genes (such as virulence genes) or the multiple copies (10,000 to 50,000 copies per cell) of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNAs). Some of those tests involve radioisotope or fluorescent labeling of the probes for reporting hybridization of probes to target nucleic acids. Others of those tests involve labeling with enzymes plus the use of chemiluminescent or chromogenic substrates to report hybridization via color or the emission of light, respectively. The present test is of the last-mentioned type. The chemiluminescence in the present test can be detected easily with relatively simple instrumentation. In developing the present test, the hybridization approach was chosen because hybridization techniques are very specific. Hybridization detects stable, inheritable genetic targets within microorganisms. These targets are not dependent on products of gene expression that can vary with growth conditions or physiological states of organisms in test samples. Therefore, unique probes can be designed to detect and identify specific genera or species of bacteria or yeast (in terms of rRNA target sequences) or can be designed to detect and identify virulence genes (genomic target sequences). Because of the inherent specificity of this system, there are few problems of cross-reactivity. Hybridization tests are rapid, but hybridization tests now available commercially lack sensitivity; typically, between 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 7) cells of the target organism are needed to ensure a reliable test. Consequently, the numbers of

  3. Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    A research program is proposed for the investigation of the dependence of the sorptive capacity of metal/metal oxide desulfurization sorbents on their pore size distribution and their intraparticle diffusivity. Integrated reaction/adsorption systems, chromatographic and gravimetric, will be used for successive reactivity, adsorption, and well as diffusivity, measurements. Single particle models that have been developed by our research group for gas-solid reactions with solid product will be used as basis for experimental data analysis and development of a general mathematical model for fixed-bed desulfurization and sorbent regeneration.

  4. Reactivity of Two-Dimensional Au9, Pt9, and Au18Pt18 against Common Molecules.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Lauren; Takahashi, Keisuke

    2016-09-19

    Adsorption of common molecules over two-dimensional Au9, Pt9, and Au18Pt18 is investigated with implementation of first-principles calculations. In general, it is found that Pt9 and Au18Pt18 exhibit low adsorption energies where Au18Pt18 preserves the structural integrity of the molecule and surface. In particular, adsorption of molecules onto Au18Pt18 frequently results in low adsorption energies and high reactivity with minor surface reconstruction of Au18Pt18 and average bond lengths of molecules. The decrease in adsorption energy can be attributed to the presence of platinum, while gold can be considered responsible for structural stability. In addition, molecule dissociation is observed in the cases of H2, HCl, CH4, SO, and SO2 when Pt atoms are involved. Thus, two-dimensional Au9, Pt9, and Au18Pt18 show low adsorption energies against common molecules, reflecting adsorption energies observed in small Au and Pt clusters. These results demonstrate that Au18Pt18 can successfully utilize the low adsorption energies associated with platinum while preserving the integrity of the surface structure using gold atoms, making it possible to adsorb desired molecules using select areas of the Au18Pt18 surface. PMID:27608367

  5. Neurochemistry and electroanalytical probes.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Kevin P; Heien, Michael L A V; Venton, B Jill; Wightman, R Mark

    2002-10-01

    Electroanalytical techniques have been applied to monitoring chemical events including neurotransmitter release during rodent behaviour and the release of zeptomoles of molecules from single cells. Transgenic mice models have been developed and studied to identify specific cell types in vitro. Characterization and surface modification of electroanalytical probes has enhanced the selectivity and sensitivity of measurements.

  6. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  7. The Phoenix Pluto Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunning, George R.; Spapperi, Jeff; Wilkinson, Jeffrey P.; Eldred, Jim; Labij, Dennis; Strinni, Meredith

    1990-01-01

    A design proposal for an unmanned probe to Pluto is presented. The topics covered include: (1) scientific instrumentation; (2) mission management, planning, and costing; (3) power and propulsion system; (4) structural subsystem; (5) command, control, and communication; and (6) attitude and articulation control.

  8. Ultrasonic search wheel probe

    DOEpatents

    Mikesell, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

  9. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  10. Experimenting with Temperature Probes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    1989-01-01

    Presented are four activities which are designed to familiarize children with the multiple uses of computers and help them learn about heat and temperature using temperature probes. Included are the tempering effect of water, heat capacity, caloric content of foods, and weather. Hardware and software are discussed. (CW)

  11. Probing the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  12. Laboratory plasma probe studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    Diagnostic experiments performed in a collisionless plasma using CO2 as the working gas are described. In particular, simultaneous measurements that have been performed by means of Langmuir- and RF-probes are presented. A resonance occurring above the parallel resonance in the frequency characteristic of a two electrode system is interpreted as being due to the resonant excitation of electroacoustic waves.

  13. Adsorption kinetics and dynamics in Si(100) epitaxial growth and oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Bradley Alan

    Molecular beam surface science techniques have been employed to probe the adsorption kinetics and dynamics of disilane and oxygen on Si(100)-2 x 1. In particular, the beam reflectivity method of King and Wells was used to measure reaction probabilities over a wide range of incident translational energies, incident angles, and surface temperatures. Oxygen is shown to chemisorb on Si(100) via two distinct adsorption mechanisms: trapping-mediated and direct chemisorption. In the low kinetic energy range, the adsorption probability is found to decrease strongly with increasing surface temperature and kinetic energy, which are trends consistent with a trapping-mediated mechanism. A simple mathematical model for trapping-mediated chemisorption fits the data in this range quite well. Trapping probabilities can be estimated from the data using the model, and decrease with increasing kinetic energy, as would be expected. In the high kinetic energy range, the chemisorption probability increases strongly with increasing kinetic energy, which is a defining characteristic of direct chemisorption. The molecular beam adsorption probability measurements are convoluted with a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of incident kinetic energies and angles to predict the average adsorption probability of a thermalized gas. From these calculations, the trapping-mediated mechanism dominates adsorption at low temperatures, while the direct mechanism takes over as the temperature is raised. The adsorption probability of disilane was measured over a wide range of conditions as well. The trapping-mediated and direct chemisorption mechanisms are also shown to be active in this system. However, the trapping probability in this system is much higher over a wider range of kinetic energies, primarily due to an increased physical adsorption binding energy. Also, the effect of surface hydrogen coverage on the chemisorption probability was investigated, and was found to obey a simple second order kinetic

  14. Redox reactivity of cerium oxide nanoparticles against dopamine.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Daniel; Bulbul, Gonca; Andreescu, Silvana

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between dopamine and the redox active cerium oxide nanoparticles, or nanoceria was studied using a suite of spectroscopic and surface characterization methods. Changes in the chemical reactivity and concentration of dopamine upon exposure to nanoceria was assessed in aqueous solutions and a human physiological fluid--human serum. The results indicate strong attachment of dopamine to the nanoparticle surface through oxidation followed by chemisorption of the oxidative product with formation of a charge transfer complex. Such oxidation/surface adsorption processes between nanoceria and dopamine lead to a reduction of the concentration of free dopamine in aqueous environments. These findings suggest that the redox reactivity of nanoceria may alter dopamine levels in biological systems exposed to these particles and indicate the need for a comprehensive assessment of the potential neurological consequences that might result from intended or unintended exposure to these particles. PMID:24461841

  15. Adsorption behaviors of monomer and dimer of formic acid on Pt(111) in the absence and presence of water.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Rongxiu; Zhang, Dongju

    2014-06-01

    By performing density functional theory (DFT) theory calculations, we studied the adsorption behaviors of the monomer and dimer of formic acid (HCOOH, FA) on the Pt(111) surface with and without the presence of water molecules. The monomer prefers to stand on the surface of Pt(111), and in the most stable adsorption configuration the carbonyl O of HCOOH binds to the atop site of a Pt atom and the hydroxyl H points asymmetrically to two neighboring Pt atoms. The dimer of HCOOH not only exists in the gas-phase but also on Pt(111) surface, and the eight-membered ring dimer is identified as the energetically most favorable dimeric structure of HCOOH both in gas-phase and on Pt(111) surface. With the presence of water molecules, both the monomer and dimer of HCOOH prefer to lie parallel to the surface so as to maximize the number of H-bonds to adjacent water molecules. These results indicate that water molecules significantly influence the initial adsorption manner of HCOOH and further its decomposition reactivity on Pt(111) surface. The present work shows the adsorption behavior of HCOOH dimer on Pt(111) for the first time and also gives several new adsorption configurations of the monomer that are not reported in literature. The theoretical results are expected to provide a valuable input to understand the reactivity of HCOOH on Pt(111). PMID:24827612

  16. Density Functional Theory Studies of Sb(V) Oxyanion Adsorption on α -Al2O3 1102 surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadugu, Sai Kumar; Mason, Sara

    2014-03-01

    We apply density functional theory and periodic slab models to understand the adsorption and reactivity of Sb(OH) 6-1on various surface terminations of α-Al2O3 (1 1 02). On all surfaces studied, Sb(V) adsorption is preferred when adsorbed in a bidentate, corner-sharing geometry. On the other hand, all theoretical bidentate edge-sharing modes are relatively high in energy. This is in good agreement with recent experiments that do not observe any bidentate edge-sharing adsorption of Sb(OH) 6-1on hydrous aluminum oxide. We identify factors that govern the preference for corner-sharing adsorption, and compare how well the surface reactivity can be predicted based on periodic DFT vs. quantum chemical cluster models. From the DFT projected density of states, we clearly show how strained ligands of Sb(V) cannot achieve good overlap with the electronic states of the surface, even at Sb-O distances predicted to be ideal by empirical bond-valence. The results thus provide a molecular-level understanding of Sb(V) specific adsorption and also allow us to assess other modeling approaches to computational geochemical surface science.

  17. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-05-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on water/air interfaces, the latter gives an impression of surfactant adsorption to a hydrophobic surface and illustrates the importance of the CMC for the adsorption process. Then attention is paid to the most important types of soil particles: humic and fulvic acids, silica, metal oxides and layered aluminosilicates. Information is provided on their structure, surface properties and primary (proton) charge characteristics, which are all important for surfactant binding. Subsequently, the adsorption of different types of surfactants on these individual soil components is discussed in detail, based on mainly experimental results and considering the specific (chemical) and electrostatic interactions, with hydrophobic attraction as an important component of the specific interactions. Adsorption models that can describe the features semi-quantitatively are briefly discussed. In the last part of the paper some trends of surfactant adsorption on soils are briefly discussed together with some complications that may occur and finally the consequences of surfactant adsorption for soil colloidal stability and permeability are considered. When we seek to understand the fate of surfactants in soil and aqueous environments, the hydrophobicity and charge density of the soil or soil particles, must be considered together with the structure, hydrophobicity and charge of the surfactants, because these factors affect the adsorption. The pH and ionic strength are important parameters with respect to the charge density of the particles. As surfactant adsorption influences soil structure and permeability, insight in surfactant adsorption to soil particles is useful for good soil management. PMID

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.M.; Lindquist, L.O.

    1982-09-07

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and noninvasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly by means of changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  19. Adsorptive separation in bioprocess engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.W.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The invention and development of an energy-efficient separation technique for recovery of desired chemicals from biomass conversion would greatly enhance the economic viability of this bioprocess. Adsorptive separation of several chemicals from aqueous solution was studied in this thesis. The desired species were recovered from the dilute aqueous solution by using crosslinked polyvinylpyridine resin to effect selective sorption. The sorbed chemicals were then removed from the resin by either thermal regeneration or elution with some appropriate desorbents. The effects of temperature, pH value, and solute concentration on resin swelling were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms, resin capacities and resin selectivities of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, isopropanol, glycerol, acetone, 1-butanol, tert-butanol, and 2,3-butanediol were determined to study the homologies. Furthermore, acetic acid, butyric acid, hydrochloric acid, lactic acid, and sulfuric acid were recovered from very dilute aqueous solutions. The concentration of the sorbed chemical in the stationary phase can be many times higher than in the mobile phase for some acids. Finally, different types of equilibrium isotherms were used to fit the experimental data. A mathematical model was developed by using the theory of interference to predict the breakthrough curves and the process efficiency to provide information for large-scale process design and development.

  20. Density functional theory study of mercury adsorption on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Steckel, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Density functional theory _DFT_ calculations are used to characterize the interaction of mercury with copper, nickel, palladium, platinum, silver, and gold surfaces. Mercury binds relatively strongly to all the metal surfaces studied, with binding energies up to _1 eV for Pt and Pd. DFT calculations underestimate the energy of adsorption with respect to available experimental data. Plane-wave DFT results using the local density approximation and the Perdew-Wang 1991 and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof parametrizations of the generalized gradient approximation indicate that binding of mercury at hollow sites is preferred over binding at top orbridge sites. The interaction with mercury in order of increasing reactivity over the six metals studied is Ag_Au_Cu_Ni_Pt_Pd. Binding is stronger on the _001_ faces of the metal surfaces, where mercury issituated in fourfold hollow sites as opposed to the threefold hollow sites on _111_ faces. In general, mercury adsorption leads to decreases in the work function; adsorbate-induced work function changes are particularly dramatic on Pt.

  1. Density functional theory study of mercury adsorption on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Steckel, Janice A.

    2008-03-10

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to characterize the interaction of mercury with copper, nickel, palladium, platinum, silver, and gold surfaces. Mercury binds relatively strongly to all the metal surfaces studied, with binding energies up to ~1eV for Pt and Pd. DFT calculations underestimate the energy of adsorption with respect to available experimental data. Plane-wave DFT results using the local density approximation and the Perdew-Wang 1991 and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof parametrizations of the generalized gradient approximation indicate that binding of mercury at hollow sites is preferred over binding at top or bridge sites. The interaction with mercury in order of increasing reactivity over the six metals studied is Agadsorption leads to decreases in the work function; adsorbate-induced work function changes are particularly dramatic on Pt.

  2. Bovine and human insulin adsorption at lipid monolayers: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Sergio; Pandey, Ravindra; Rzeznicka, Izabela; Lu, Hao; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Insulin is a widely used peptide in protein research and it is utilised as a model peptide to understand the mechanics of fibril formation, which is believed to be the cause of diseases such as Alzheimer and Creutzfeld-Jakob syndrome. Insulin has been used as a model system due to its biomedical relevance, small size and relatively simple tertiary structure. The adsorption of insu lin on a variety of surfaces has become the focus of numerous studies lately. These works have helped in elucidating the consequence of surface/protein hydrophilic/hydrophobic interaction in terms of protein refolding and aggregation. Unfortunately, such model surfaces differ significantly from physiological surfaces. Here we spectroscopically investigate the adsorption of insulin at lipid monolayers, to further our understanding of the interaction of insulin with biological surfaces. In particular we study the effect of minor mutations of insulin’s primary amino acid sequence on its interaction with 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) model lipid layers. We probe the structure of bovine and human insulin at the lipid/water interface using sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG). The SFG experiments are complemented with XPS analysis of Langmuir-Schaefer deposited lipid/insulin films. We find that bovine and human insulin, even though very similar in sequence, show a substantially different behavior when interacting with lipid films.

  3. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  4. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  5. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  6. Adsorption kinetics of methyl violet onto perlite.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Mehmet; Alkan, Mahir

    2003-01-01

    This study examines adsorption kinetics and activation parameters of methyl violet on perlite. The effect of process parameters like contact time, concentration of dye, temperature and pH on the extent of methyl violet adsorption from solution has been investigated. Results of the kinetic studies show that the adsorption reaction is first order with respect to dye solution concentration with activation energy of 13.2 kJ mol(-1). This low activation energy value indicates that the adsorption reaction is diffusion controlled. The activation parameters using Arrhenius and Eyring equations have been calculated. Adsorption increases with increase of variables such as contact time, initial dye concentration, temperature and pH.

  7. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  8. FRET study of G-quadruplex forming fluorescent oligonucleotide probes at the lipid monolayer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatkowska, Angelika; Kosman, Joanna; Juskowiak, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Spectral properties and G-quadruplex folding ability of fluorescent oligonucleotide probes at the cationic dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) monolayer interface are reported. Two oligonucleotides, a 19-mer bearing thrombin binding aptamer sequence and a 21-mer with human telomeric sequence, were end-labeled with fluorescent groups (FAM and TAMRA) to give FRET probes F19T and F21T, respectively. The probes exhibited abilities to fold into a quadruplex structure and to bind metal cations (Na+ and K+). Fluorescence spectra of G-quadruplex FRET probes at the monolayer interface are reported for the first time. Investigations included film balance measurements (π-A isotherms) and fluorescence spectra recording using a fiber optic accessory interfaced with a spectrofluorimeter. The effect of the presence of DODAB monolayer, metal cations and the surface pressure of monolayer on spectral behavior of FRET probes were examined. Adsorption of probe at the cationic monolayer interface resulted in the FRET signal enhancement even in the absence of metal cations. Variation in the monolayer surface pressure exerted rather modest effect on the spectral properties of probes. The fluorescence energy transfer efficiency of monolayer adsorbed probes increased significantly in the presence of sodium or potassium ion in subphase, which indicated that the probes retained their cation binding properties when adsorbed at the monolayer interface.

  9. Fast, active droplet interaction: coalescence and reactive mixing controlled by electrowetting on a superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Accardo, Angelo; Mecarini, Federico; Leoncini, Marco; Brandi, Fernando; Di Cola, Emanuela; Burghammer, Manfred; Riekel, Christian; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2013-02-01

    A novel electrowetting-on-dielectrics (EWOD) device in open planar geometry allows probing of droplet mixing on a superhydrophobic substrate under quasi contact-free conditions. We demonstrate a droplet-based microreactor with integrated convective-flow mixing for the reactive-mixing of CaCl(2)/Na(2)CO(3) solutions. The device provides unique conditions for scattering, spectroscopy and imaging probes requiring an unobstructed droplet-access.

  10. Anisotropic nanocolloids: self-assembly, interfacial adsorption, and electrostatic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, J.

    2012-06-01

    In this thesis we consider the influence of anisotropy on the behaviour of colloids using theory and simulations. The recent increase in the ability to synthesize anisotropic particles (cubes, caps, octapods, etc.) has led to samples of sufficient quality to perform self-assembly experiments. Our investigation is therefore particularly relevant to current and future experimental studies of colloids. We examine several topics for which shape anisotropy plays an important role: (1.) - Interfacial adsorption. We introduced the triangular-tessellation technique to approximate the surface areas and line length which are associated with a plane-particle intersection. Our method allowed us to determine the free energy of adsorption for a single irregular colloid with heterogeneous surface properties adsorbed at a flat liquid-liquid interface in the Pieranski approximation. Ellipsoids only adsorbed at the interface perpendicular to the interfacial normal. However, for cylinders we could find a metastable adsorption minimum corresponding to parallel adsorption. We also considered the possible time dependence of the adsorption process using simple dynamics. Finally, we studied the adsorption of truncated nanocubes with a contact-angle surface pattern and we observed that there are three prototypical equilibrium adsorption configurations for these particles. (2.) - Crystal-structure prediction. We extended an existing crystal-structure-prediction algorithm to predict structures for systems comprised of irregular hard particles. Using this technique we examined the high-density crystal structures for 17 irregular nonconvex shapes and we confirmed several mathematical conjectures for the packings of a large set of 142 convex polyhedra. We also proved that we have obtained the densest configurations for rhombicuboctahedra and rhombic enneacontrahedra, respectively. Moreover, we considered a family of truncated cubes, which interpolates between a cube and an octahedron, for which

  11. Reactivity of Hydrogen and Methanol on (001) Surfaces of WO3, ReO3, WO3/ReO3 and ReO3/WO3

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Sanliang; Mei, Donghai; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2011-05-16

    Bulk tungsten trioxide (WO3) and rhenium trioxide (ReO3) share very similar structures but display different electronic properties. WO3 is a wide bandgap semiconductor while ReO3 is an electronic conductor. With the advanced molecular beam epitaxy techniques, it is possible to make heterostructures comprised of layers of WO3 and ReO3. These heterostructures might display reactivity different than pure WO3 and ReO3. The interactions of two probe molecules (hydrogen and methanol) with the (001) surfaces of WO3, ReO3, and two heterostructures ReO3/WO3 and WO3/ReO3 were investigated at the density functional theory level. Atomic hydrogen prefers to adsorb at the terminal O1C sites forming a surface hydroxyl on four surfaces. Dissociative adsorption of a hydrogen molecule at the O1C site leads to formation of a water molecule adsorbed at the surface M5C site. This is thermodynamically the most stable state. A thermodynamically less stable dissociative state involves two surface hydroxyl groups O1CH and O2CH. The interaction of molecular hydrogen and methanol with pure ReO3 is stronger than with pure WO3 and the strength of the interaction substantially changes on the WO3/ReO3 and ReO3/WO3 heterostructures. The reaction barriers for decomposition and recombination reactions are sensitive to the nature of heterostructure. The calculated adsorption energy of methanol on WO3(001) of -65.6 kJ/mol is consistent with the previous experimental estimation of -67 kJ/mol. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Modular Rake of Pitot Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Timothy A.; Henry, Michael W.; Homyk, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a modular rake of 17 pitot probes for measuring both transient and steady-state pressures in a supersonic wind tunnel. In addition to pitot tubes visible in the figure, the probe modules contain (1) high-frequency dynamic-pressure transducers connected through wires to remote monitoring circuitry and (2) flow passages that lead to tubes that, in turn, lead to remote steady-state pressure transducers. Prior pitot-probe rakes were fabricated as unitary structures, into which the individual pitot probes were brazed. Repair or replacement of individual probes was difficult, costly, and time-consuming because (1) it was necessary to remove entire rakes in order to unbraze individual malfunctioning probes and (2) the heat of unbrazing a failed probe and of brazing a new probe in place could damage adjacent probes. In contrast, the modules in the present probe are designed to be relatively quickly and easily replaceable with no heating and, in many cases, without need for removal of the entire rake from the wind tunnel. To remove a malfunctioning probe, one first removes a screw-mounted V-cross-section cover that holds the probe and adjacent probes in place. Then one removes a screw-mounted cover plate to gain access to the steady-state pressure tubes and dynamicpressure wires. Next, one disconnects the tube and wires of the affected probe. Finally, one installs a new probe in the reverse of the aforementioned sequence. The wire connections can be made by soldering, but to facilitate removal and installation, they can be made via miniature plugs and sockets. The connections between the probe flow passages and the tubes leading to the remote pressure sensors can be made by use of any of a variety of readily available flexible tubes that can be easily pulled off and slid back on for removal and installation, respectively.

  13. Determination of Reactive Surface Area of Melt Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier,W.L.; Roberts, S.; Smith, D.K.; Hulsey, S.; Newton,L.; Sawvel, A.; Bruton, C.; Papelis, C.; Um, W.; Russell, C. E.; Chapman,J.

    2000-10-01

    A comprehensive investigation of natural and manmade silicate glasses, and nuclear melt glass was undertaken in order to derive an estimate of glass reactive surface area. Reactive surface area is needed to model release rates of radionuclides from nuclear melt glass in the subsurface. Because of the limited availability of nuclear melt glasses, natural volcanic glass samples were collected which had similar textures and compositions as those of melt glass. A flow-through reactor was used to measure the reactive surface area of the analog glasses in the presence of simplified NTS site ground waters. A measure of the physical surface area of these glasses was obtained using the BET gas-adsorption method. The studies on analog glasses were supplemented by measurement of the surface areas of pieces of actual melt glass using the BET method. The variability of the results reflect the sample preparation and measurement techniques used, as well as textural heterogeneity inherent to these samples. Based on measurements of analog and actual samples, it is recommended that the hydraulic source term calculations employ a range of 0.001 to 0.01 m{sup 2}/g for the reactive surface area of nuclear melt glass.

  14. Wet oxidation of ordered mesoporous carbon FDU-15 by using (NH4)2S2O8 for fast adsorption of Sr(II): An investigation on surface chemistry and adsorption mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Ye, Gang; Chen, Jing; Lv, Dachao; Wang, Jianchen

    2015-12-01

    Surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) by wet oxidation provides an oxygen-enriched platform for complexation of metal ions. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the surface chemistry and textual property of OMC FDU-15 modified by wet oxidation using (NH4)2S2O8 as a benign oxidant. And, for the first time, the adsorption behavior and mechanism of wet-oxidized OMC FDU-15 toward Sr(II) in aqueous solutions were investigated. The mesostructural regularity of the OMC FDU-15 was well-reserved under wet oxidation. Compared to OMC CMK-type counterparts prepared via nanocasting, the OMC FDU-15 by soft template method showed much-enhanced structural stability. Due to the introduction of abundant oxygen-containing species, the oxidized OMC FDU-15 exhibited excellent hydrophilicity and dispersibility in aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior toward Sr(II) was fully investigated, showing a super-fast adsorption kinetics (< 5 min to reach equilibrium) and a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Moreover, an in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis through deconvolution of high resolution C1s and O1s spectra was implemented to identify the chemical species of the surface functional groups, while probing the adsorption mechanism. The results suggested that oxygen donor atoms in Csbnd O single bonds mainly contribute to the adsorption of Sr(II) via formation of metal-ligand complexation.

  15. Heavy ion beam probing

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  16. Probing properties of cold radiofrequency plasma with polymer probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, E.; Chaniel, G.; Multanen, V.

    2015-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows the estimation of Debye length of cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by lunar simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Rickman, Douglas; Schoonen, Martin A.

    2016-05-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and past experiences of Apollo astronauts has rekindled interest into the possible harmful effects of lunar dust on human health. In comparison to the Apollo-era explorations, human explorers may be weeks on the Moon, which will raise the risk of inhalation exposure. The mineralogical composition of lunar dust is well documented, but its effects on human health are not fully understood. With the aim of understanding the reactivity of dusts that may be encountered on geologically different lunar terrains, we have studied Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by a suite of lunar simulants of different mineralogical-chemical composition dispersed in water and Simulated Lung Fluid (SLF). To further explore the reactivity of simulants under lunar environmental conditions, we compared the reactivity of simulants both in air and inert atmosphere. As the impact of micrometeorites with consequent shock-induced stresses is a major environmental factor on the Moon, we also studied the effect of mechanical stress on samples. Mechanical stress was induced by hand crushing the samples both in air and inert atmosphere. The reactivity of samples after crushing was analyzed for a period of up to nine days. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water and SLF was analyzed by an in situ electrochemical probe and hydroxyl radical (•OH) by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Adenine probe. Out of all simulants, CSM-CL-S was found to be the most reactive simulant followed by OB-1 and then JSC-1A simulant. The overall reactivity of samples in the inert atmosphere was higher than in air. Fresh crushed samples showed a higher level of reactivity than uncrushed samples. Simulant samples treated to create agglutination, including the formation of zero-valent iron, showed less reactivity than untreated simulants. ROS generation in SLF is initially slower than in deionized water (DI), but the ROS formation is sustained for as long as 7

  18. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  19. Space Probe Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, the Space Tug was a reusable multipurpose space vehicle designed to transport payloads to different orbital inclinations. Utilizing mission-specific combinations of its three primary modules (crew, propulsion, and cargo) and a variety of supplementary kits, the Space Tug was capable of numerous space applications. This 1970 artist's concept depicts the Tug's propulsion module launching a space probe into lunar orbit.

  20. Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.

    2001-01-01

    Closing the oxygen loop in an air revitalization system based on four-bed molecular sieve and Sabatier reactor technology requires a vacuum pump-compressor that can take the low-pressure CO, from the 4BMS and compress and store for use by a Sabatier reactor. NASA Ames Research Center proposed a solid-state temperature-swing adsorption (TSA) compressor that appears to meet performance requirements, be quiet and reliable, and consume less power than a comparable mechanical compressor/accumulator combination. Under this task, TSA compressor technology is being advanced through development of a complete prototype system. A liquid-cooled TSA compressor has been partially tested, and the rest of the system is being fabricated. An air-cooled TSA compressor is also being designed.

  1. Probing the switching mechanism in ZnO nanoparticle memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Beirne, Gareth J.; Kamita, Gen; Lakhwani, Girish; Wang, Jianpu; Greenham, Neil C.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the resistance switching mechanism in memristors based on colloidal ZnO nanoparticles using electroabsorption (EA) spectroscopy. In this EA experiment, we incorporate a small amount of low-bandgap polymer, poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole), as a probe molecule in ZnO-nanoparticle memristors. By characterizing this polymer, we can study the change of built-in potential (VBI) in the device during the resistance switching process without disturbing the resistance state by the EA probe light. Our results show that VBI increases when the device is switched to the high resistance state, suggesting a shift of effective workfunction of the electrode. Thus, we attribute the resistance switching to the field-dependent migration of oxygen vacancies associated with the adsorption and desorption of oxygen molecules at the Al/ZnO interface. This process results in the modulation of the interfacial injection barrier, which governs the resistance state of the device.

  2. Icing Sensor Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Edward; Kok, Gregory L.

    2002-01-01

    Aircraft icing is a serious safety problem for the general aviation and some commuter transport airplanes. There has been tremendous growth in the commuter aviation industry in the last few years, Since these type of aircraft generally operate at lower altitudes they consequently spend a far greater proportion of their time operating in icing conditions. For the past thirty years airborne and ground based facilities have relied primarily on two types of cloud physics instrumentation to measure the characteristics of icing clouds: hot wire liquid water content probes and laser based particle sizing probes for the measurement of water droplet size. The instrumentation is severely limited by the technology that was developed during the 1970's and is quite large in size. The goal of this research is to develop one instrument with a wide bandwidth, better response time, higher resolution, user selectability, and small and lightweight. NASA Glenn Research Center, Droplet Measurement Technology, and Meteorology Society of Canada have developed a collaborative effort to develop such an instrument. This paper describes the development and test results of the prototype Icing Sensor Probe.

  3. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  4. Nanoscale thermal probing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem. PMID:22419968

  5. Adsorption and oxidation of oxalic acid on anatase TiO2 (001) surface: A density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-09-15

    Anatase TiO2 (001) surfaces have attracted great interest for photo-degradation of organic species recently due to their high reactivity. In this work, adsorption properties and oxidation mechanisms of oxalic acid on the anatase TiO2 (001) surface have been theoretically investigated using the first-principles density functional theory. Various possible adsorption configurations are considered by diversifying the connectivity of carboxylic groups with the surface. It is found that the adsorption of oxalic acid on the anatase (001) surface prefer the dissociative states. A novel double-bidentate configuration has been found due to the structural match between oxalic acid and the (001) surface. More charge is transferred from the adsorbed oxalic acid to the surface with the double-bidentate configuration when comparing with other adsorption structures. Thus, there is a positive correlation relationship between the transferred charge amount and the interfacial bond numbers when oxalic acid adsorbs on the anatase TiO2 (001) surface. The adsorption energies with dispersion corrections have demonstrated that the van der Waals interactions play an important role in the adsorption, especially when adsorbates are close to the surface.

  6. Photodegradation mechanism of two dyes: the influence of adsorption behavior on the novel TiO2 particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yi-zhong

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between adsorption behavior and photocatalytic mechanism of the two dyes was investigated. Adsorption isotherms showed that the adsorption of cationic pink FG was Langmuir type behavior, while the reactive brilliant red k-2G was Freundlich type behavior. The increasing pH favored the adsorption of FG but have little effect on the photodegradation. The increasing pH favored the adsorption and the photodegradation of k-2G. The presence of scavenger of hvb+ and OH* radical potassium iodide inhibited the degradation of k-2G, free radicals scavenger tetranitromethane inhibited the photodegradation of FG. These results indicated that the photodegradation of FG mainly via free radicals in solution, and the photodegradation of k-2G was mainly on the catalysts surface or near the interface of solid and solution by react with hvb+ and surface-bound OH*. The different effect of SO4(2-), HCO3- on the adsorption and photodegradation of two dyes confirmed these results. PMID:15137664

  7. Aromatics saturation over hydrotreating catalysts: Reactivity and susceptibility to poisons

    SciTech Connect

    Kokayeff, P.

    1994-12-31

    Aromatics saturation over hydrotreating catalysts has been investigated by processing a synthetic feedstock to which naphthalene, biphenyl, tetralin, and cyclohexylbenzene have been added as model aromatic compounds. The saturation reactions were successfully correlated with a kinetic model of consecutive first order reactions. The rates of saturation of the di-aromatics, naphthalene and biphenyl, were approximately 5--40 times faster than the rate of saturation of the mono-aromatics, tetralin and cyclohexylbenzene. The nature of the di-aromatic is a significant determinant of its reactivity for saturation. The rate of saturation of naphthalene is 10--20 times faster than the rate of saturation of biphenyl. The two mono-aromatics, tetralin and cyclohexylbenzene, exhibited nearly identical reactivities for saturation. An investigation of the effect of organo-nitrogen compounds on saturation activity revealed a very severe poisoning and attenuation of saturation activity. Since activity was recoverable upon the removal of the poisoning agent the chemical effect was conjectured to be due to adsorption of the poison on the active sites of the catalyst. The adsorption constants were determined for three model nitrogen compounds--quinoline, indole, and tert-butylamine. The poisoning action of an organo-nitrogen compound was found to be dependent on both basicity and chemical structure.

  8. Reactive oxygen species and redox compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Kaludercic, Nina; Deshwal, Soni; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and signaling are of major importance and regulate a number of processes in physiological conditions. A disruption in redox status regulation, however, has been associated with numerous pathological conditions. In recent years it has become increasingly clear that oxidative and reductive modifications are confined in a spatio-temporal manner. This makes ROS signaling similar to that of Ca2+ or other second messengers. Some subcellular compartments are more oxidizing (such as lysosomes or peroxisomes) whereas others are more reducing (mitochondria, nuclei). Moreover, although more reducing, mitochondria are especially susceptible to oxidation, most likely due to the high number of exposed thiols present in that compartment. Recent advances in the development of redox probes allow specific measurement of defined ROS in different cellular compartments in intact living cells or organisms. The availability of these tools now allows simultaneous spatio-temporal measurements and correlation between ROS generation and organelle and/or cellular function. The study of ROS compartmentalization and microdomains will help elucidate their role in physiology and disease. Here we will examine redox probes currently available and how ROS generation may vary between subcellular compartments. Furthermore, we will discuss ROS compartmentalization in physiological and pathological conditions focusing our attention on mitochondria, since their vulnerability to oxidative stress is likely at the basis of several diseases. PMID:25161621

  9. [Development and biological applications of various bioimaging probes].

    PubMed

    Nagano, Tetsuo

    2006-10-01

    Fluorescence imaging is the most powerful technique currently available for continuous observation of dynamic intracellular processes in living cells. However, only a very limited range of biomolecules can be visualized because of the lack of flexible design strategies for fluorescence probes. In our laboratory, it was elucidated that fluorescein which has been widely employed as a core of fluorescence probes could be understood as a directly linked electron donor/fluorophore acceptor system. Fluorescence properties of fluorescein derivatives could be easily anticipated and modulated by controlling the rate of photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) from the donor moiety to the xanthene fluorophore. Further, we found that the opposite direction of PeT from the singlet excited fluorophore to the electron acceptor moiety could be occurred. More than twenty probes for imaging of nitric oxide, beta-galactosidase, highly reactive oxygen species, zinc ion et al. have been developed according to precise and rational design strategies based on PeT mechanism.

  10. Luminescent Probes for Ultrasensitive Detection of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Marras, Salvatore A.E.; Kozlov, Maxim; Wirpsza, Laura; Mustaev, Arkady

    2010-01-01

    Novel amino-reactive derivatives of lanthanide-based luminescent labels of enhanced brightness and metal retention were synthesized and used for the detection of complementary DNA oligonucleotides by molecular beacons. Time-resolved acquisition of the luminescent signal that occurs upon hybridization of the probe to the target enabled the avoidance of short-lived background fluorescence, markedly enhancing the sensitivity of detection, which was less than 1 pM. This value is about 50 to 100 times more sensitive than the level achieved with conventional fluorescence-based molecular beacons, and is 10 to 60 times more sensitive than previously reported for other lanthanide-based hybridization probes. These novel luminescent labels should significantly enhance the sensitivity of all type of nucleic acid hybridization probes, and could dramatically improve the detection limit of other biopolymers and small compounds that are used in a variety of biological applications. PMID:20085336

  11. Neural probe design for reduced tissue encapsulation in CNS.

    PubMed

    Seymour, John P; Kipke, Daryl R

    2007-09-01

    This study investigated relationships between a microscale neural probe's size and shape and its chronic reactive tissue response. Parylene-based probes were microfabricated with a thick shank (48 microm by 68 microm) and an integrated thin lateral platform (5 microm by 100 microm, either solid or one of three lattice sizes). Devices were implanted in rat cerebral cortex for 4 weeks before immunostaining for neurons, astrocytes, microglia, fibronectin, laminin, and neurofilament. While nonneuronal density (NND) generally increased and neuronal density decreased within 75 microm of a probe interface compared to unimplanted control regions, there were significant differential tissue responses within 25 microm of the platform's lateral edge compared to the shank. The NND in this region of the lateral edge was less than one-third of the corresponding region of the shank (129% and 425% increase, respectively). Moreover, neuronal density around the platform lateral edge was about one-third higher than at the shank (0.70 and 0.52 relative to control, respectively). Also, microglia reactivity and extracellular protein deposition was reduced at the lateral edge. There were no significant differences among platform designs. These results suggest that neural probe geometry is an important parameter for reducing chronic tissue encapsulation.

  12. Biological decolorization of the reactive dyes Reactive Black 5 by a novel isolated bacterial strain Enterobacter sp. EC3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zheng, Xiao-Wei; Su, Jian-Qiang; Tian, Yun; Xiong, Xiao-Jing; Zheng, Tian-Ling

    2009-11-15

    Studies were carried out on the decolorization of the reactive dye Reactive Black 5 by a newly isolated bacterium, EC3. Phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence comparisons indicate that this strain belonged to the genus Enterobacter. The optimal conditions for the decolorizing activity of Enterobacter sp. EC3 were anaerobic conditions with glucose supplementation, at pH 7.0, and 37 degrees C. The maximum decolorization efficiency against Reactive Black 5 achieved in this study was 92.56%. Ultra-violet and visible (UV-vis) analyses before and after decolorization and the colorless bacterial biomass after decolorization suggested that decolorization was due to biodegradation, rather than inactive surface adsorption. The bacterial strain also showed a strong ability to decolorize various reactive textile dyes, including both azo and anthraquinone dyes. To our knowledge, it is the first time that a bacterial strain of Enterobacter sp. has been reported with decolorizing ability against both azo and anthraquinone dyes.

  13. Influence of calcite on uranium(VI) reactive transport in the groundwater–river mixing zone

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2014-01-23

    Calcite is an important mineral that can affect uranyl reactive transport in subsurface sediments. This study investigated the distribution of calcite and its influence on uranyl adsorption and reactive transport in the groundwater-river mixing zone at US Hanford 300A, Washington State. Simulations using a 2D reactive transport model under field-relevant hydrogeochemical conditions revealed a complex distribution of calcite concentration as a result of dynamic groundwater-river interactions. The calcite concentration distribution in turn affected the spatial and temporal changes in aqueous carbonate, calcium, and pH, which subsequently influenced U(VI) mobility and discharge rates into the river. The results implied that calcite distribution and its concentration dynamics is an important consideration for field characterization, monitoring, and reactive transport prediction.

  14. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  15. Reactive Power from Distributed Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Rizy, Tom; Li, Fangxing; Fall, Ndeye

    2006-12-15

    Distributed energy is an attractive option for solving reactive power and distribution system voltage problems because of its proximity to load. But the cost of retrofitting DE devices to absorb or produce reactive power needs to be reduced. There also needs to be a market mechanism in place for ISOs, RTOs, and transmission operators to procure reactive power from the customer side of the meter where DE usually resides. (author)

  16. Controlling Material Reactivity Using Architecture.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kyle T; Zhu, Cheng; Duoss, Eric B; Gash, Alexander E; Kolesky, David B; Kuntz, Joshua D; Lewis, Jennifer A; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    3D-printing methods are used to generate reactive material architectures. Several geometric parameters are observed to influence the resultant flame propagation velocity, indicating that the architecture can be utilized to control reactivity. Two different architectures, channels and hurdles, are generated, and thin films of thermite are deposited onto the surface. The architecture offers an additional route to control, at will, the energy release rate in reactive composite materials. PMID:26669517

  17. Comparative evaluation of probing depth and clinical attachment level using a manual probe and Florida probe

    PubMed Central

    Kour, Amandeep; Kumar, Ashish; Puri, Komal; Khatri, Manish; Bansal, Mansi; Gupta, Geeti

    2016-01-01

    Background: To compare and evaluate the intra- and inter-examiner efficacy and reproducibility of the first-generation manual (Williams) probe and the third-generation Florida probe in terms of measuring pocket probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Materials and Methods: Forty subjects/4000 sites were included in this comparative, cross-sectional study. Group- and site-wise categorizations were done. Based on gingival index, PD, and CAL, patients were divided into four groups, i.e., periodontally healthy, gingivitis, mild to moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis. Further, based on these parameters, a total of 4000 sites, with 1000 sites in each category randomly selected from these 40 patients, were taken. Full mouth PD and CAL measurements were recorded with two probes, by Examiner 1 and on Ramfjord teeth by Examiner 2. Results: Full mouth and Ramfjord teeth group- and site-wise PD obtained with the manual probe by both the examiners were statistically significantly deeper than that obtained with the Florida probe. The full mouth and Ramfjord teeth mean CAL measurement by Florida probe was higher as compared to manual probe in mild to moderate periodontitis group and sites, whereas in severe periodontitis group and sites, manual probe recorded higher CAL as compared to Florida probe. Conclusion: Mean PD and CAL measurements were deeper with the manual probe as compared to the Florida probe in all the groups and sites, except for the mild-moderate periodontitis group and sites where the CAL measurements with the manual probe were less than the Florida probe. Manual probe was more reproducible and showed less interexaminer variability as compared to the Florida probe. PMID:27563204

  18. Fluorescent probes for the selective detection of chemical species inside mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-21

    During the last few years, the preparation of novel fluorescent probes for the selective detection of chemical species inside mitochondria has attracted considerable attention because of their wide applications in chemistry, biology, and medical science. This feature article focuses on the recent advances in the design principles and recognition mechanisms of these kinds of fluorescent probes. In addition, their applications for the detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide, reactive sulfur species (RSS), thioredoxin (Trx), metal ions, anions, etc. in the mitochondrion is discussed as well.

  19. Reactivity of Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    In the preceding chapter, the fundamental nature of sulfide mineral surfaces has been discussed, and the understanding we have of the ways in which the surface differs from a simple truncation of the bulk crystal structure reviewed. This naturally leads on to considering our understanding of sulfide surface chemistry, in the sense of how sulfide surfaces interact and react, particularly with gases and liquids. As noted elsewhere in this volume, research on sulfide mineral surfaces and surface reactivity is a relatively recent concern of mineralogists and geochemists, partly prompted by the availability of new imaging and spectroscopic methods, powerful computers and new computer algorithms. There has been a significantly longer history of sulfide mineral surface research associated with technologists working with, or within, the mining industry. Here, electrochemical methods, sometimes combined with analytical and spectroscopic techniques, have been used to probe surface chemistry. The motivation for this work has been to gain a better understanding of the controls of leaching reactions used to dissolve out metals from ores, or to understand the chemistry of the froth flotation systems used in concentrating the valuable (usually sulfide) minerals prior to metal extraction. The need for improved metal extraction technologies is still a major motivation for research on sulfide surfaces, but in the last couple of decades, new concerns have become important drivers for such work. In particular, much greater awareness of the negative environmental impact of acid and toxic metal-bearing waters derived from breakdown of sulfide minerals at former mining operations has prompted research on oxidation reactions, and on sorption of metals at sulfide surfaces. At the interface between fundamental geochemistry and industrial chemistry, the role of sulfide substrates in catalysis, and in the self-assembly and functionalization of organic molecules, has become an area of

  20. Modeling the adsorption of mixed gases based on pure gas adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, N.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption-based Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers usually operate with pure gases. A sorption-based compressor has many benefits; however, it is limited by the pressure ratios it can provide. Using a mixed-refrigerant (MR) instead of a pure refrigerant in JT cryocoolers allows working at much lower pressure ratios. Therefore, it is attractive using MRs in sorption- based cryocoolers in order to reduce one of its main limitations. The adsorption of mixed gases is usually investigated under steady-state conditions, mainly for storage and separation processes. However, the process in a sorption compressor goes through various temperatures, pressures and adsorption concentrations; therefore, it differs from the common mixed gases adsorption applications. In order to simulate the sorption process in a compressor a numerical analysis for mixed gases is developed, based on pure gas adsorption characteristics. The pure gas adsorption properties have been measured for four gases (nitrogen, methane, ethane, and propane) with Norit-RB2 activated carbon. A single adsorption model is desired to describe the adsorption of all four gases. This model is further developed to a mixed-gas adsorption model. In future work more adsorbents will be tested using these four gases and the adsorption model will be verified against experimental results of mixed-gas adsorption measurements.