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Sample records for adsorption reactive probing

  1. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  2. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND INFRARED REACTIVATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of removing trace organic contaminants and surrogates from drinking water by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The effect of multiple reactivations of spent GAC was also evaluated. Results indicated that reactivated GAC eff...

  3. Probing adsorption sites for CO on ceria.

    PubMed

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Kim, Hyun You; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Baber, Ashleigh E; Liu, Ping; Stacchiola, Dario

    2013-10-14

    Ceria based catalysts show remarkable activity for CO conversion reactions such as CO oxidation and the water-gas shift reaction. The identification of adsorption sites on the catalyst surfaces is essential to understand the reaction mechanisms of these reactions, but the complexity of heterogeneous powder catalysts and the propensity of ceria to easily change oxidation states in the presence of small concentrations of either oxidizing or reducing agents make the process difficult. In this study, the adsorption of CO on CuOx/Cu(111) and CeOx/Cu(111) systems has been studied using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. IR peaks for the adsorbed CO on O/Cu(111) with only chemisorbed oxygen, well-ordered Cu2O/Cu(111) and disordered copper oxide [CuOx/Cu(111)] were observed at 2070-2072, 2097-2098 and 2101-2111 cm(-1), respectively. On CeOx/Cu(111) systems CO chemisorbs at 90 K only on Cu sites under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, whereas at elevated CO pressures and low temperatures adsorption of CO on Ce(3+) is observed, with a corresponding IR peak at 2162 cm(-1). These experimental results are further supported by DFT calculations, and help to unequivocally distinguish the presence of Ce(3+) cations on catalyst samples by using CO as a probe molecule. PMID:23942870

  4. PROBING REACTIVITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION USING XAD-8 RESIN ADSORPTION AND ULTRAFILTRATION FRACTIONATION. (R828045)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection by-product (DBP) reactivity (yield and speciation upon reaction with chlorine) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from two surface waters was investigated. The source waters, each having significantly different specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA

  5. Thiol Reactive Probes and Chemosensors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanjing; Chen, Weixuan; Cheng, Yunfeng; Hakuna, Lovemore; Strongin, Robert; Wang, Binghe

    2012-01-01

    Thiols are important molecules in the environment and in biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), glutathione (GSH) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) play critical roles in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. The selective detection of thiols using reaction-based probes and sensors is very important in basic research and in disease diagnosis. This review focuses on the design of fluorescent and colorimetric probes and sensors for thiol detection. Thiol detection methods include probes and labeling agents based on nucleophilic addition and substitution, Michael addition, disulfide bond or Se-N bond cleavage, metal-sulfur interactions and more. Probes for H2S are based on nucleophilic cyclization, reduction and metal sulfide formation. Thiol probe and chemosensor design strategies and mechanism of action are discussed in this review. PMID:23202239

  6. Phosphate alteration of chloride behavior at the boehmite-water interface: New insights from ion-probe flow adsorption microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Gale, S Adrian; Harvey, Omar R; Rhue, R Dean

    2015-10-01

    Surface complexation of phosphate to aluminum oxyhydroxides can alter surface reactivity depending on the time-scale and mode of attachment. The effects of phosphate adsorption on reactivity of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) particles were investigated using ion-probe flow adsorption microcalorimetry (ipFAMC). Consistent with previous studies on adsorption energetics, probing the surface of pristine γ-AlOOH with chloride ions yielded endothermically unimodal temperature signals with a measured molar heat of exchange (ΔH(exc)) of -3.1 kJ/mol. However, when the surface of γ-AlOOH was probed with chloride following phosphate complexation, significant changes in surface reactivity resulted. Irrespective of phosphate loading, the typical endothermic response of the chloride-surface hydroxyl interaction was replaced with a multi-modal energy signature consisting of exothermic and endothermic features. These features indicate that in the presence of phosphate, the overall nature of the interaction of chloride with specific surface hydroxyls located on different exposed planes and their subsequent reactivity was transformed to a more complex environment accompanied by two or more short-lived secondary reactions. It was also shown that phosphate-promoted surface alteration of γ-AlOOH was highly selective to probing with chloride since no changes in reactivity were observed when nitrate was employed as the primary ion probe under identical experimental conditions. PMID:26057105

  7. Effect of ferrihydrite crystallite size on phosphate adsorption reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Li, Wei; Harrington, Richard; Liu, Fan; Parise, John B; Feng, Xionghan; Sparks, Donald L

    2013-09-17

    The influence of crystallite size on the adsorption reactivity of phosphate on 2-line to 6-line ferrihydrites was investigated by combining adsorption experiments, structure and surface analysis, and spectroscopic analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the ferrihydrite samples possessed a similar fundamental structure with a crystallite size varying from 1.6 to 4.4 nm. N2 adsorption on freeze-dried samples revealed that the specific surface area (SSABET) decreased from 427 to 234 m(2) g(-1) with increasing crystallite size and micropore volume (Vmicro) from 0.137 to 0.079 cm(3) g(-1). Proton adsorption (QH) at pH 4.5 and 0.01 M KCl ranged from 0.73 to 0.55 mmol g(-1). Phosphate adsorption capacity at pH 4.5 and 0.01 M KCl for the ferrihydrites decreased from 1690 to 980 μmol g(-1) as crystallite size increased, while the adsorption density normalized to SSABET was similar. Phosphate adsorption on the ferrihydrites exhibited similar behavior with respect to both kinetics and the adsorption mechanism. The kinetics could be divided into three successive first-order stages: relatively fast adsorption, slow adsorption, and a very slow stage. With decreasing crystallite size, ferrihydrites exhibited increasing rate constants per mass for all stages. Analysis of OH(-) release and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) and differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) results indicated that initially phosphate preferentially bound to two Fe-OH2(1/2+) groups to form a binuclear bidentate surface complex without OH(-) release, with smaller size ferrihydrites exchanging more Fe-OH2(1/2+) per mass. Subsequently, phosphate exchanged with both Fe-OH2(1/2+) and Fe-OH(1/2-) with a constant amount of OH(-) released per phosphate adsorbed. Also in this stage binuclear bidentate surface complexes were formed with a P-Fe atomic pair distance of ~3.25 Å. PMID:23992548

  8. Isotherm study of reactive Blue 19 adsorption by an alum sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khim, Ong Keat; Nor, Mohd Asri Md; Mohamad, Syuriya; Nasaruddin, Nas Aulia Ahmad; Jamari, Nor Laili-Azua; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 using dewatered alum sludge. The dewatered alum sludge was a sludge produced from drinking water treatment plant. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism of the dye adsorption. The adsorption was rapid at its initial stage but the rate decreased as it approached equilibrium. The adsorption data were evaluated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models but was best described by the Langmuir isotherm model as it gave the highest correlation.

  9. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND FLUID-BED REACTIVATION AT MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment performances of virgin and reactivated GAC were evaluated during three reactivation-exhaustion cycles by measuring total organic carbon (TOC), trihalomethanes (THM), and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). GAC adsorptive capacity was measured using traditional t...

  10. New quinolone-based thiol-reactive lanthanide luminescent probes

    PubMed Central

    Wirpsza, Laura; Krasnoperov, Lev; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent lanthanide ion complexes are distinguished by unique light emitting properties that enable both highly sensitive detection of lanthanide labels attached to biomolecules and contrast imaging of various micro objects (cells, nanoparticles, etc.). Previously, we synthesized amine-reactive cs124-based luminescent lanthanide chelates with improved brightness and metal retention. Here we report the synthesis of new thiol-reactive derivatives of the same compounds including bromoacetamido-, and maleimido- forms of cs124 and cs124CF3 fluorophores. Maleimido-compounds displayed exceptional reactivity instantaneously coupling to thiols at physiological conditions at micromolar probes concentrations. Surprisingly, they displayed strong quenching by adjacent maleimido-group, which was completely eliminated after reaction with thiols, thereby enabling their simple detection by monitoring the light emission of the reaction mixture. This reaction can be used for hyper-sensitive determination of biologically important sulphydryl compounds (e.g. glutathione, co-enzyme A, etc.) in time-resolved mode. PMID:23833545

  11. Catalytic Role Of Palladium And Relative Reactivity Of Substituted Chlorines During Adsorption And Treatment Of PCBs On Reactive Activated Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adsorption-mediated dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a unique feature of reactive activated cabon (RAC). Here, we address the RAC system, containing a tunable amount of Fe as a primary electron donor coupled with Pd as an electrochemical catalyst to pote...

  12. Application of 'waste' wood-shaving bottom ash for adsorption of azo reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Leechart, Piyawan; Nakbanpote, Woranan; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2009-02-01

    The utilization of wood-shaving bottom ash (WBA) for the removal of Red Reactive 141 (RR141), an azo reactive dye, was investigated. WBA/H(2)O and WBA/H(2)SO(4) were made by treating WBA with water and 0.1M H(2)SO(4), respectively, to increase adsorption capacity. Adsorption of RR141 from reactive dye solution (RDS) and reactive dye wastewater (RDW) by WBA/H(2)O and WBA/H(2)SO(4) involved the BET surface area and pore size diameter. Properties of adsorbents, effect of contact time, initial pH of solution, dissolved metals and elution studies indicated that the decolorisation mechanism involved both chemical adsorption and precipitation with calcium ions. In addition, the WBA/H(2)SO(4) surface might contain sulphate-cation complexes that were specific to enhancing dye adsorption from RDW. The adsorption isotherm had a best fit by the Freundlich model. Freundlich parameters showed that WBA/H(2)O used more heterogeneous surface than WBA/H(2)SO(4) and activated carbon for RDW adsorption. A thermodynamic study indicated that RDW adsorption was an endothermic process. The maximum dye adsorption capacities of WBA/H(2)O, WBA/H(2)SO(4) and activated carbon obtained from a Langmuir model at 30 degrees C were 24.3, 29.9, and 41.5mgl(-1), respectively. In addition, WBA/H(2)O and WBA/H(2)SO(4) could reduce colour and high chemical oxygen demand (COD) of real textile wastewater. According to the difficulty in the elution study, it was an environmentally safe disposal of this waste. Therefore, WBA, a waste from combustion of wood shavings, was suitable to be used as an effective adsorbent for azo reactive dye removal. PMID:18436367

  13. A fiber optic, ultraviolet light-emitting diode-based, two wavelength fluorometer for monitoring reactive adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granz, Christopher D.; Schindler, Bryan J.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Whitten, James E.

    2016-03-01

    Construction and use of an ultraviolet light-emitting diode-based fluorometer for measuring photoluminescence (PL) from powder samples with a fiber optic probe is described. Fluorescence at two wavelengths is detected by miniature photomultiplier tubes, each equipped with a different band pass filter, whose outputs are analyzed by a microprocessor. Photoluminescent metal oxides and hydroxides, and other semiconducting nanoparticles, often undergo changes in their emission spectra upon exposure to reactive gases, and the ratio of the PL intensities at two wavelengths is diagnostic of adsorption. Use of this instrument for reactive gas sensing and gas filtration applications is illustrated by measuring changes in the PL ratio for zirconium hydroxide and zinc oxide particles upon exposure to air containing low concentrations of sulfur dioxide.

  14. Adsorption of probe molecules in pillared interlayered clays: Experiment and computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, A. Guil, J. M.; Lomba, E.; Almarza, N. G.; Khatib, S. J.; Cabrillo, C.; Sanz, A.; Pires, J.

    2014-06-14

    In this paper we investigate the adsorption of various probe molecules in order to characterize the porous structure of a series of pillared interlayered clays (PILC). To that aim, volumetric and microcalorimetric adsorption experiments were performed on various Zr PILC samples using nitrogen, toluene, and mesitylene as probe molecules. For one of the samples, neutron scattering experiments were also performed using toluene as adsorbate. Various structural models are proposed and tested by means of a comprehensive computer simulation study, using both geometric and percolation analysis in combination with Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations in order to model the volumetric and microcalorimetric isotherms. On the basis of this analysis, we propose a series of structural models that aim at accounting for the adsorption experimental behavior, and make possible a microscopic interpretation of the role played by the different interactions and steric effects in the adsorption processes in these rather complex disordered microporous systems.

  15. Properties and reactivity of Fe-organic matter associations formed by coprecipitation versus adsorption: Clues from arsenate batch adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Robert; Lorenz, Dennis; Guggenberger, Georg; Haumaier, Ludwig; Freund, Anja

    2014-11-01

    Ferric oxyhydroxides play an important role in controlling the bioavailability of oxyanions such as arsenate and phosphate in soil. Despite this, little is known about the properties and reactivity of Fe(III)-organic matter phases derived from adsorption (reaction of organic matter (OM) to post-synthesis Fe oxide) versus coprecipitation (formation of Fe oxides in presence of OM). Coprecipitates and adsorption complexes were synthesized at pH 4 using two natural organic matter (NOM) types extracted from forest floor layers (Oi and Oa horizon) of a Haplic Podzol. Iron(III) coprecipitates were formed at initial molar metal-to-carbon (M/C) ratios of 1.0 and 0.1 and an aluminum (Al)-to-Fe(III) ratio of 0.2. Sample properties were studied by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 gas adsorption, dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic mobility measurements. Arsenic [As(V)] adsorption to Fe-OM phases was studied in batch experiments (168 h, pH 4, 100 μM As). The organic carbon (OC) contents of the coprecipitates (82-339 mg g-1) were higher than those of adsorption complexes (31 and 36 mg g-1), leading to pronounced variations in specific surface area (9-300 m2 g-1), average pore radii (1-9 nm), and total pore volumes (11-374 mm3 g-1) but being independent of the NOM type or the presence of Al. The occlusion of Fe solids by OM (XPS surface concentrations: 60-82 atom% C) caused comparable pHPZC (1.5-2) of adsorption complexes and coprecipitates. The synthesis conditions resulted in different Fe-OM association modes: Fe oxide particles in 'M/C 0.1' coprecipitates covered to a larger extent the outermost aggregate surfaces, for some 'M/C 1.0' coprecipitates OM effectively enveloped the Fe oxides, while OM in the adsorption complexes primarily covered the outer aggregate surfaces. Despite of their larger OC contents, adsorption of As(V) was fastest to coprecipitates formed at low Fe availability (M/C 0.1) and facilitated by desorption of weakly

  16. Color removal from acid and reactive dye solutions by electrocoagulation and electrocoagulation/adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Bellebia, S; Kacha, S; Bouberka, Z; Bouyakoub, A Z; Derriche, Z

    2009-04-01

    In this study, electrocoagulation of Marine Blue Erionyl MR (acid dye) and electrocoagulation followed by adsorption of Brilliant Blue Levafix E-BRA (reactive dye) from aqueous solutions were investigated, using aluminum electrodes and granular activated carbon (GAC). In the electrocoagulation and adsorption of dyestuff solutions, the effects of current density, loading charge, pH, conductivity, stirring velocity, contact time, and GAC concentration were examined. The optimum conditions for the electrocoagulation process were identified as loading charges 7.46 and 1.49 F/m3, for a maximum abatement of 200 mg/L reactive and acid dye, respectively. The residual reactive dye concentration was completely removed with 700 mg/L GAC. The results of this investigation provide important data for the development of a combined process to remove significant concentrations of recalcitrant dyes from water, using moderate activated carbon energy and aluminum consumption, and thereby lowering the cost of treatment. PMID:19445327

  17. Adsorption of reactive dyes from aqueous solutions by fly ash: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Dizge, N; Aydiner, C; Demirbas, E; Kobya, M; Kara, S

    2008-02-11

    Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium studies of three reactive dyes namely, Remazol Brillant Blue (RB), Remazol Red 133 (RR) and Rifacion Yellow HED (RY) from aqueous solutions at various initial dye concentration (100-500 mg/l), pH (2-8), particle size (45-112.5 microm) and temperature (293-323 K) on fly ash (FA) were studied in a batch mode operation. The adsorbent was characterized with using several methods such as SEM, XRD and FTIR. Adsorption of RB reactive dye was found to be pH dependent but both RR and RY reactive dyes were not. The result showed that the amount adsorbed of the reactive dyes increased with increasing initial dye concentration and contact time. Batch kinetic data from experimental investigations on the removal of reactive dyes from aqueous solutions using FA have been well described by external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion models. It was found that external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion had rate limiting affects on the removal process. This was attributed to the relatively simple macropore structure of FA particles. The adsorption data fitted well with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The optimum conditions for removal of the reactive dyes were 100mg/l initial dye concentration, 0.6g/100ml adsorbent dose, temperature of 293 K, 45 microm particle size, pH 6 and agitation speed of 250 rpm, respectively. The values of Langmuir and Freundlich constants were found to increase with increasing temperature in the range 135-180 and 15-34 mg/g for RB, 47-86 and 1.9-3.7 mg/g for RR and 37-61 and 3.0-3.6 mg/g for RY reactive dyes, respectively. Different thermodynamic parameters viz., changes in standard free energy, enthalpy and entropy were evaluated and it was found that the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. PMID:17574338

  18. Activation of waste MDF sawdust charcoal and its reactive dye adsorption characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gan, Q; Allen, S J; Matthews, R

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of converting waste medium density fibreboard (MDF) sawdust into chars and activated carbon using chemical activation and thermal carbonisation processes. The MDF sawdust generated during the production of architectural mouldings was characterised and found to have unique properties in terms of fine particle size and high particle density. It also has a high content of urea formaldehyde resin used as a binder in the manufacturing of MDF board. Direct thermal carbonisation and chemical activation of the sawdust by metal impregnation and acid (phosphoric acid) treatment prior to pyrolysis treatment were carried out. The surface morphology of the raw dust, its chars and activated carbon were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Adsorptive properties and total pore volume of the materials were also analysed using the BET nitrogen adsorption method. Liquid adsorption of a reactive dye (Levafix Brilliant red E-4BA) by the derived sawdust carbon was investigated in batch isothermal adsorption process and the results compared to adsorption on to a commercial activated carbon (Filtrasorb F400). The MDF sawdust carbon exhibited in general a very low adsorption capacity towards the reactive dye, and physical characterisation of the carbon revealed that the conventional chemical activation and thermal carbonisation process were ineffective in developing a microporous structure in the dust particles. The small size of the powdery dust, the high particle density, and the presence of the urea formaldehyde resin all contributed to the difficulty of developing a proper porous structure during the thermal and chemical activation process. Finally, activation of the dust material in a consolidated form (cylindrical pellet) only achieved very limited improvement in the dye adsorption capacity. This original study, reporting some unexpected outcomes, may serve as a stepping-stone for future investigations of recycle and

  19. Tuning the Reactivity of Ultrathin Oxides: NO Adsorption on Monolayer FeO(111).

    PubMed

    Merte, Lindsay R; Heard, Christopher J; Zhang, Feng; Choi, Juhee; Shipilin, Mikhail; Gustafson, Johan; Weaver, Jason F; Grönbeck, Henrik; Lundgren, Edvin

    2016-08-01

    Ultrathin metal oxides exhibit unique chemical properties and show promise for applications in heterogeneous catalysis. Monolayer FeO films supported on metal surfaces show large differences in reactivity depending on the metal substrate, potentially enabling tuning of the catalytic properties of these materials. Nitric oxide (NO) adsorption is facile on silver-supported FeO, whereas a similar film grown on platinum is inert to NO under similar conditions. Ab initio calculations link this substrate-dependent behavior to steric hindrance caused by substrate-induced rumpling of the FeO surface, which is stronger for the platinum-supported film. Calculations show that the size of the activation barrier to adsorption caused by the rumpling is dictated by the strength of the metal-oxide interaction, offering a straightforward method for tailoring the adsorption properties of ultrathin films. PMID:27346455

  20. Kinetic studies of the liquid-phase adsorption of a reactive dye onto activated lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Petrolekas, P.D.; Maggenakis, G.

    2007-02-14

    The kinetics of batch adsorption of a commercial reactive dye onto activated lignite has been investigated at temperatures of 26, 40, and 55{sup o}C, using aqueous solutions with initial dye concentrations in the range of 15-60 mg/L. An empirical single parameter relationship of the adsorbent loading versus the square root of contact time was proposed, which was determined to provide a very good description of the batch adsorption transients up to equilibrium. The data were also examined by means of the Elovich equation. The effect of the temperature and the initial dye concentration on the adsorption kinetics was analyzed, and the results were discussed by considering that intraparticle diffusion is the dominant mechanism.

  1. Potential soluble, reactive, adsorptive and particulate tracers for source-receptor experiments in MATEX

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

    1985-07-01

    A survey of potential non-conservative tracers for use in source-receptor studies in acid deposition is presented. Classes of tracers considered were water soluble tracers, chemically reactive tracers, adsorptive tracers and particulate tracers. A criterion used for the selection of compounds for nonconservative tracers is that they be as reasonably compatible in the analytical detection system used for the conservative perfluorocarbon tracers. For each class of non-conservative tracers several example compounds are given and discussed, along with the research needed to develop these tracers. A reasonable development time for these tracers is as follows; adsorptive tracers, 2 years; particulate tracers, 2 1/2 years; soluble tracers, 3 years and reactive tracers, 3 1/2 years. By development, it is meant that 1 or 2 tracers have been developed and at least demonstrated in a small field test. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Hydrogen Reactivity on Highly-hydroxylated TiO2(110) Surfaces Prepared via Carboxylic Acid Adsorption and Photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Wang, Zhitao; Henderson, Michael A.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2012-02-27

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy, temperature-programmed desorption, photo stimulated desorption, and density functional theory studies have probed the formation and reactivity of highly-hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, which were prepared via a novel, photochemical route using trimethyl acetic acid (TMAA) dissociative adsorption and subsequent photolysis at 300 K. Deprotonation of TMAA molecules upon adsorption produces both surface bridging hydroxyls (OHb) and bidentate trimethyl acetate (TMA) species with a saturation coverage of near 0.5 monolayer (ML). Ultra-violet light irradiation selectively removes TMA species, producing a highly-hydroxylated surface with up to ~0.5 ML OHb coverage. At high coverages, the OHb species typically occupy second-nearest neighbor sites along the bridging oxygen row locally forming linear (2×1) structures of different lengths, although the surface is less ordered on a long scale. The annealing of the highly-hydroxylated surface leads to hydroxyl recombination and H2O desorption with ~100% yield, thus ruling out the diffusion of H into the bulk that has been suggested in the literature. In agreement with experimental data, theoretical results show that the recombinative H2O desorption is preferred over both H bulk diffusion and H2 desorption processes.

  3. On the reactive adsorption of ammonia on activated carbons modified by impregnation with inorganic compounds.

    PubMed

    Bandosz, Teresa J; Petit, Camille

    2009-10-15

    Ammonia adsorption was studied under dynamic conditions, at room temperature, on activated carbons of different origins (coal-based, wood-based and coconut-shell-based carbons) before and after their impregnation with various inorganic compounds including metal chlorides, metal oxides and polycations. The role of humidity was evaluated by running tests in both dry and moist conditions. Adsorbents were analyzed before and after exposure to ammonia by thermal analyses, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Results of breakthrough tests show significant differences in terms of adsorption capacity depending on the parent carbon, the impregnates and the experimental conditions. It is found that surface chemistry governs ammonia adsorption on the impregnated carbons. More precisely, it was demonstrated that a proper combination of the surface pH, the strength, type and amount of functional groups present on the adsorbents' surface is a key point in ammonia uptake. Water can have either positive or negative effects on the performance of adsorbents. It can enhance NH(3) adsorption capacity since it favors ammonia dissolution and thus enables reaction between ammonium ions and carboxylic groups from the carbons' surface. On the other hand, water can also reduce the performance from the strength of adsorption standpoint. It promotes dissolution of ammonia and that ammonia is first removed from the system when the adsorbent bed is purged with air. Ammonia, besides adsorption by van der Waals forces and dissolution in water, is also retained on the surface via reactive mechanisms such as acid-base reactions (Brønsted and Lewis) or complexation. Depending on the materials used and the experimental conditions, 6-47% ammonia adsorbed is strongly retained on the surface even when the bed is purged with air. PMID:19615690

  4. On the reactive adsorption of ammonia on activated carbons modified by impregnation with inorganic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bandosz, T.J.; Petit, C.

    2009-10-15

    Ammonia adsorption was studied under dynamic conditions, at room temperature, on activated carbons of different origins (coal-based, wood-based and coconut-shell-based carbons) before and after their impregnation with various inorganic compounds including metal chlorides, metal oxides and polycations. The role of humidity was evaluated by running tests in both dry and moist conditions. Adsorbents were analyzed before and after exposure to ammonia by thermal analyses, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Results of breakthrough tests show significant differences in terms of adsorption capacity depending on the parent carbon, the impregnates and the experimental conditions. It is found that surface chemistry governs ammonia adsorption on the impregnated carbons. More precisely, it was demonstrated that a proper combination of the surface pH, the strength, type and amount of functional groups present on the adsorbents' surface is a key point in ammonia uptake. Water can have either positive or negative effects on the performance of adsorbents. It can enhance NH{sub 3} adsorption capacity since it favors ammonia dissolution and thus enables reaction between ammonium ions and carboxylic groups from the carbons' surface. On the other hand, water can also reduce the performance from the strength of adsorption standpoint. It promotes dissolution of ammonia and that ammonia is first removed from the system when the adsorbent bed is purged with air. Ammonia, besides adsorption by van der Waals forces and dissolution in water, is also retained on the surface via reactive mechanisms such as acid-base reactions (Bronsted and Lewis) or complexation. Depending on the materials used and the experimental conditions, 6-47% ammonia adsorbed is strongly retained on the surface even when the bed is purged with air.

  5. Chitosan hydrogel beads impregnated with hexadecylamine for improved reactive blue 4 adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Mohammadtaghi; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ibrahim, Mahamad Hakimi; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Salamatinia, Babak; Gholami, Zahra

    2016-02-10

    Adsorption performance of chitosan (CS) hydrogel beads was investigated after impregnation of CS with hexadecylamine (HDA) as a cationic surfactant, for the elimination of reactive blue 4 (RB4) from wastewater. The CS/HDA beads formed with 3.8% HDA were the most effective adsorbent. The adsorption capacity was increased by 1.43 times from 317 mg/g (CS) to 454 mg/g (CS/HDA). The RB4 removal increased with decrease in the pH of dye solution from 4 to 9. The isotherm data obtained from RB4 adsorption on CS and CS/HDA are adequately described by Freundlich model (R(2)=0.946 and 0.934, χ(2)=22.414 and 64.761). The kinetic study revealed that the pseudo-second-order rate model (R(2)=0.996 and 0.997) was in better agreement with the experimental data. The negative values of ΔG° (-2.28 and -6.30 kJ/mol) and ΔH° (-172.18 and -101.62 kJ/mol) for CS beads and HDA modified CS beads, respectively; suggested a spontaneous and exothermic process for RB4 adsorption. PMID:26686114

  6. Removal of reactive dyes from wastewater by adsorption on coir pith activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Santhy, K; Selvapathy, P

    2006-07-01

    The removal efficiency of activated carbon prepared from coir pith towards three highly used reactive dyes in textile industry was investigated. Batch experiments showed that the adsorption of dyes increased with an increase in contact time and carbon dose. Maximum de-colorisation of all the dyes was observed at acidic pH. Adsorption of dyes was found to follow the Freundlich model. Kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption followed first order and the values of the Lagergren rate constants of the dyes were in the range of 1.77 x 10(-2)-2.69 x 10(-2)min(-1). The column experiments using granular form of the carbon (obtained by agglomeration with polyvinyl acetate) showed that adsorption efficiency increased with an increase in bed depth and decrease of flow rate. The bed depth service time (BDST) analysis carried out for the dyes indicated a linear relationship between bed depth and service time. The exhausted carbon could be completely regenerated and put to repeated use by elution with 1.0M NaOH. The coir pith activated carbon was not only effective in removal of colour but also significantly reduced COD levels of the textile wastewater. PMID:16040240

  7. Correlation of adsorption isotherms of hydrogen isotopes on mordenite adsorbents using reactive vacancy solution theory

    SciTech Connect

    Munakata, K.; Nakamura, A.; Kawamura, Y.

    2015-03-15

    The authors have applied the isotherm equations derived from the reactive vacancy solution theory (RVST) to correlation of experimental and highly non-ideal adsorption isotherms of hydrogen and deuterium on a mordenite adsorbent, and have examined the ability of the isotherm equations to match this correlation. Several isotherm equations such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Toth, Vacancy Solution Theory and so forth were also tested, but they did not work. For the Langmuir-Freundlich equation tests have indicated that its 'ability to correlate' of the adsorption isotherms is not satisfactory. For the multi-site Langmuir-Freundlich (MSLF) equation the correlation of the isotherms appears to be somewhat improved but remains unsatisfactory. The results show that the isotherm equations derived from RVST can better correlate the experimental isotherms.

  8. A study of Reactive Red 198 adsorption on iron filings from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Azhdarpoor, Abooalfazl; Nikmanesh, Roya; Khademi, Fahime

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, reactive dyes have been widely used in textile industries with particular efficiency. They dyes are often toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic. Improper treatment and non-scientific disposal of dyed wastewater from these industries into water sources has created many environmental problems and concerns around the world. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the efficiency of iron filings in adsorption of Reactive Red 198 from aqueous solutions. This study was conducted using an experimental method at the laboratory scale. In this study, the effects of operating parameters such as pH (1-11), initial dye concentration (40-400 mg/L), contact time (5-120 min) and iron dose (0.1-1 g) with a mesh of<100 were studied. Dye concentration was determined using a spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 520 nm. The results indicated that maximum adsorption capacity of the dye in question was obtained at pH 3, contact time of 60 min and adsorbent dose of 1 g. At initial dye concentration of 100 and 200 mg/L, by increasing the dose of waste iron from 0.1 to 1 g, the removal percentage increased from approximately 76.89% to 97.28% and from 22.64% to 68.03%, respectively. At pH 3, contact time of 5 min and constant waste iron dose of 0.8 g, the dye removal efficiency was 85.34%. By increasing the contact time to 120 min, the removal efficiency increased to 99.2%. Welding iron waste as an inexpensive and available adsorbent has an optimum ability for adsorption of Reactive Red 198 from aqueous solutions. PMID:25189843

  9. Goethite surface reactivity: III. Unifying arsenate adsorption behavior through a variable crystal face - Site density model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Camacho, Carlos; Villalobos, Mario

    2010-04-01

    goethite, may be performed for each preparation either by experimental determination of site saturation by an index ion (e.g., chromate), or by achieving congruency of proton adsorption data with those of ideal goethites when plotted as percentage of proton-reactive ( lbond2 FeOH + lbond2 Fe 3OH) sites occupied. The surface arsenate complexes proposed additionally explained: (1) the higher affinity of goethite for As(V) than for Cr(VI) at high pH, and thus the gentle slope of the arsenate pH adsorption edges; and (2) the lower adsorption capacity for As(V) than for Cr(VI) at low pH on low-surface area goethites, through incomplete lbond2 FeOH site occupancy of As(V). The model is very promising as a practical means of predicting the adsorption behavior of arsenate on any goethite preparation, and may extend to predictive capabilities for adsorption behavior of many other relevant oxyanions, as well as for explaining differences in ligand-promoted surface transformation processes on goethite as a function of particle size.

  10. Protein adsorption properties of OEG monolayers and dense PNIPAM brushes probed by neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouette, N.; Xue, C.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Fragneto, G.; Leckband, D. E.; Halperin, A.; Sferrazza, M.

    2012-11-01

    The structure of dense poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) brushes and oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) monolayers has been probed using neutron reflectometry and ellipsometry. The PNIPAM brush is swollen below the Lower Critical Solution Temperature (LCST) of 32 ∘C and is collapsed at 37 ∘C. Neutron reflectivity shows that below the LCST, the brush is described by a two-layer model: an inner dense layer and a hydrated outer layer. Above the LCST the collapsed brush forms a homogenous layer. With a fully deuterated myoglobin protein to increase the neutron scattering length density contrast, the reflectivity data show no detectable primary adsorption on the grafted OEG surface. A bound on the ternary adsorption onto PNIPAM chains forming dense brushes below and above the LCST is obtained.

  11. Phosphorous adsorption and precipitation in a permeable reactive wall: Applications for wastewater disposal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.J.; Blowes, D.W. |; Placek, C.J. |

    1997-12-31

    A permeable reactive mixture has been developed using low cost, readily available materials that is capable of providing effective, long-term phosphorous treatment in areas impacted by on-land wastewater disposal. The reactive mixture creates a geochemical environment suitable for P-attenuation by both adsorption and precipitation reactions. Potential benefits include significant reductions in phosphorous loading to receiving groundwater and surface water systems, and the accumulation of P-mass in a finite and accessible volume of material. The mixture may be applied as a component within surface treatment systems or in subsurface applications such as horizontal or vertical permeable reactive walls. The mixture averaged > 90% treatment efficiency over 3.6 years of continuous-flow laboratory column experiments. The mixture was further evaluated at the pilot-scale to treat municipal wastewater, and the field-scale to treat a well-characterized septic system plume using an in situ funnel and gate system. Average PO{sub 4}-P concentrations in effluent exiting the reactive mixture range between 0 - 0.3 mg/L. Mineralogical analyses have isolated the phases responsible for phosphorous uptake, and discrete phosphate precipitates have been identified.

  12. Adsorption of phenol and reactive dye from aqueous solution on activated carbons derived from solid wastes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kyuya; Namba, Akio; Mukai, Shin R; Tamon, Hajime; Ariyadejwanich, Pisit; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut

    2004-04-01

    Activated carbons were produced from several solid wastes, namely, waste PET, waste tires, refuse derived fuel and wastes generated during lactic acid fermentation from garbage. Activated carbons having various pore size distributions were obtained by the conventional steam-activation method and via the pre-treatment method (i.e., mixture of raw materials with a metal salt, carbonization and acid treatment prior to steam-activation) that was proposed by the authors. The liquid-phase adsorption characteristics of organic compounds from aqueous solution on the activated carbons were determined to confirm the applicability of these carbons, where phenol and a reactive dye, Black5, were employed as representative adsorbates. The hydrophobic surface of the carbons prepared was also confirmed by water vapor adsorption. The characteristics of a typical commercial activated carbon were also measured and compared. It was found that the activated carbons with plentiful mesopores prepared from PET and waste tires had quite high adsorption capacity for large molecules. Therefore they are useful for wastewater treatment, especially, for removal of bulky adsorbates. PMID:15026233

  13. Adsorption of reactive blue BF-5G dye by soybean hulls: kinetics, equilibrium and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Honorio, Jacqueline Ferandin; Veit, Márcia Teresinha; Gonçalves, Gilberto da Cunha; de Campos, Élvio Antonio; Fagundes-Klen, Márcia Regina

    2016-01-01

    The textile industry is known for the high use of chemicals, such as dyes, and large volumes of effluent that contaminate waters, a fact that has encouraged research and improved treatment techniques. In this study, we used unprocessed soybean hulls for the removal of reactive blue BF-5G dye. The point of zero charge of soybean hulls was 6.76. Regarding the speed of agitation in the adsorption process, the resistance to mass transfer that occurs in the boundary layer was eliminated at 100 rpm. Kinetics showed an experimental amount of dye adsorbed at equilibrium of 57.473 mg g(-1) obtained under the following conditions: dye initial concentration = 400 mg L(-1); diameter of particle = 0.725 mm; dosage = 6 g L(-1); pH 2; 100 rpm; temperature = 30 °C; and duration of 24 hours. The pseudo-second order best showed the dye removal kinetics. The adsorption isotherms performed at different temperatures (20, 30, 40 and 50 °C) showed little variation in the concentration range assessed, being properly adjusted by the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum capacity of dye adsorption was 72.427 mg g(-1) at 30 °C. Since soybean hull is a low-cost industrial byproduct, it proved to be a potential adsorbent for the removal of the textile dye assessed. PMID:26942540

  14. The Adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 Dye onto Cucurbit[8]uril and Cucurbit[6]uril: An Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaolei; Luo, Hanhan; Lu, Huijuan; Chen, Feifei; Li, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption behavior and mechanism of Reactive Blue 19 (RB19) on cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) and cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) were investigated. The adsorption isotherm data obtained at different temperatures were fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm, and according to this model, CB[8] and CB[6] exhibited maximum monolayer adsorption capacities of 714.29 and 100.5 mg/g, respectively, at 298.15 K. The adsorption thermodynamic functions ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS were evaluated and revealed that RB19 adsorption onto CB[8] and CB[6] is a spontaneous and enthalpy-driven process. The adsorption process was determined to follow pseudo-second-order kinetics, indicating that chemisorption dominates the adsorption process. Fourier tranform IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed that the formation of an inclusion complex is the main driving force of adsorption. The phenyl and sulfone moieties of RB19 reside inside the cavity of CB[8], but because of the small cavity, only the sulfone of RB19 resides inside the cavity of CB[6]. Time-dependent DFT calculations revealed that all of the absorption bands of RB19 derive from π → π* transitions, while for the adsorption product of CB[8], the bands located at 590 and 287 nm derive from π → π* transitions and the bands located at 254 and 202 nm mainly derive from intermolecular charge transfer (ICT). PMID:27064317

  15. A Caged Electrophilic Probe for Global Analysis of Cysteine Reactivity in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Abo, Masahiro; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2015-06-10

    Cysteine residues are subject to diverse modifications, such as oxidation, nitrosation, and lipidation. The resulting loss in cysteine reactivity can be measured using electrophilic chemical probes, which importantly provide the stoichiometry of modification. An iodoacetamide (IA)-based chemical probe has been used to concurrently quantify reactivity changes in hundreds of cysteines within cell lysates. However, the cytotoxicity of the IA group precludes efficient live-cell labeling, which is important for preserving transient cysteine modifications. To overcome this limitation, a caged bromomethyl ketone (BK) electrophile was developed, which shows minimal cytotoxicity and provides spatial and temporal control of electrophile activation through irradiation. The caged-BK probe was utilized to monitor cysteine reactivity changes in A431 cells upon epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated release of cellular reactive oxygen species. Decreased reactivity was observed for cysteines known to form sulfenic acids and redox-active disulfides. Importantly, the caged-BK platform provided the first quantification of intracellular disulfide bond formation upon EGF stimulation. In summary, the caged-BK probe is a powerful tool to identify reactivity changes associated with diverse cysteine modifications, including oxidation, metal chelation, and inhibitor binding, within a physiologically relevant context. PMID:26020833

  16. Competitive adsorption of Reactive Orange 16 and Reactive Brilliant Blue R on polyaniline/bacterial extracellular polysaccharides composite--a novel eco-friendly polymer.

    PubMed

    Janaki, V; Vijayaraghavan, K; Ramasamy, A K; Lee, Kui-Jae; Oh, Byung-Taek; Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan

    2012-11-30

    The performance of polyaniline/extracellular polymeric substances (Pn/EPS) composite as an adsorbent to remove the anionic reactive dyes, Reactive Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) and Reactive Orange 16 (RO), was investigated in single and binary systems. The pH(pzc) of Pn/EPS composite was calculated as 3.7 through potentiometric mass titration method. Electrostatic interaction between the dye anion and the nitrogen present in the polymer was identified as a major mechanism in adsorption process. Single component isotherms followed the Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption capacity of 0.5775 mmol g(-1) for RBBR and 0.4748 mmol g(-1) for RO. In binary system, both the reactive dye anions compete with each other and resulted in lower uptake. Binary adsorption data were interpreted well by the Sheindorf-Rehbun-Sheintuch equation as compared to extended Langmuir model with constant interaction factor. Kinetic analysis of single solute followed pseudo-first order model. Thermodynamic studies computed that RBBR and RO adsorption was endothermic, spontaneous, and feasible process. PMID:23036702

  17. Probing the reactivity of singlet oxygen with purines

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Elise; Grüber, Raymond; Bignon, Emmanuelle; Morell, Christophe; Moreau, Yohann; Monari, Antonio; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of singlet molecular oxygen with purine DNA bases is investigated by computational means. We support the formation of a transient endoperoxide for guanine and by classical molecular dynamics simulations we demonstrate that the formation of this adduct does not affect the B-helicity. We thus identify the guanine endoperoxide as a key intermediate, confirming a low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance proof of its existence, and we delineate its degradation pathway, tracing back the preferential formation of 8-oxoguanine versus spiro-derivates in B-DNA. Finally, the latter oxidized 8-oxodGuo product exhibits an almost barrierless reaction profile, and hence is found, coherently with experience, to be much more reactive than guanine itself. On the contrary, in agreement with experimental observations, singlet-oxygen reactivity onto adenine is kinetically blocked by a higher energy transition state. PMID:26656495

  18. Probing the reactivity of singlet oxygen with purines.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Elise; Grüber, Raymond; Bignon, Emmanuelle; Morell, Christophe; Moreau, Yohann; Monari, Antonio; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of singlet molecular oxygen with purine DNA bases is investigated by computational means. We support the formation of a transient endoperoxide for guanine and by classical molecular dynamics simulations we demonstrate that the formation of this adduct does not affect the B-helicity. We thus identify the guanine endoperoxide as a key intermediate, confirming a low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance proof of its existence, and we delineate its degradation pathway, tracing back the preferential formation of 8-oxoguanine versus spiro-derivates in B-DNA. Finally, the latter oxidized 8-oxodGuo product exhibits an almost barrierless reaction profile, and hence is found, coherently with experience, to be much more reactive than guanine itself. On the contrary, in agreement with experimental observations, singlet-oxygen reactivity onto adenine is kinetically blocked by a higher energy transition state. PMID:26656495

  19. Ab Initio Study of Water Adsorption and Reactivity on the (211) Surface of Anatase TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Xu, Li-Fang; Li, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Jian-Tao; Lin, Zhe-Shuai; Liu, Kai; Cao, Yong-Ge; Selloni, Annabella

    2016-06-01

    The reactivity of the anatase TiO2 (211) surface is systematically studied by ab initio calculations of the surface energy and water-adsorption energy. We find that anatase (211) has a high surface energy of 0.97 J /m2 , close to that of the (001) surface, and the unsaturated fourfold-coordinated Ti4 atom is more reactive than the unsaturated fivefold-coordinated Ti5 atom. Accordingly, for water adsorption on the (211) surface, a dissociative form is favored on Ti4 sites, with a large adsorption energy Δ HH ,OH˜1.28 eV , while a nondissociative molecular form is favored on Ti5 sites, with a smaller adsorption energy Δ HH2O˜0.78 eV . Such distinct surface properties lead to a mixed dissociative and molecular adsorption configuration when the coverage is increased from 1 /3 to 1 monolayer. These results suggest that, similar to the (001) surface, the anatase (211) surface exhibits high reactivity and may be useful in catalytic and photocatalytic applications as well.

  20. Probing Li-ion Dynamics and Reactivity on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Kumar, Amit; Arruda, Thomas M; Guo, Senli; Proksch, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Progress in development and optimization of energy storage and conversion materials necessitates understanding their ionic and electrochemical functionality on the nanometer scale level of single grain cluster, grain, or extended defect. Classical electrochemical strategies based on Faradaic current detection are fundamentally limited on the nanoscale. Here, we review principles and recent applications of Electrochemical Strain Microscopy (ESM), a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) technique utilizing intrinsic coupling between ionic pehnomena and molar volumes. ESM imaging, as well as time and voltage spectroscopies, are illustrated for several Li-ion cathode and anode materials. Perspectives for future ESM development and applications to other ionic systems are discussed.

  1. Synergic adsorption of Pb2 + and reactive dye — RB5 on two series of organomodified bentonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jović-Jovičić, N. P.; Milutinović-Nikolić, A. D.; Žunić, M. J.; Mojović, Z. D.; Banković, P. T.; Gržetić, I. A.; Jovanović, D. M.

    2013-07-01

    Two series of organobentonites (OBs) were synthesized from Na+-exchanged bentonite clay from Bogovina, Serbia. In the first series the starting material was modified using hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA+) ion in the amounts corresponding to 0.2, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 of the CEC value. The second series was obtained using quaternary alkyl ammonium cations (QAACs) with different alkyl chain lengths: hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA+), dodecyltrimethylammonium (DDTMA+) and tetramethylammonium (TMA+) ions. The synthesized OBs were characterized. The adsorption of anionic reactive dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Pb2 + from single component solutions and their bi-component solution was investigated for both series of OBs. The adsorptive properties of the OBs were correlated to the amount and type of incorporated QAACs. The correlation was tested using different mathematical models and best fits were found. Experimental results showed that simultaneous adsorption of RB5 and Pb2 + exhibited synergic effect. The adsorption capacity for both RB5 and Pb2 + was higher in their bi-component solution than in single-component solutions. These results indicate the creation of new adsorption sites during the simultaneous adsorption.

  2. Atmospheric measurements of total OH reactivity: Intercomparison of the pump-probe technique and the comparative reactivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusanter, Sebastien; Hansen, Robert; Leonardis, Thierry; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Blocquet, Marion; Fittschen, Christa; Hanoune, Benjamin; Sinha, Vinayak; Stevens, Philip; Locoge, Nadine

    2013-04-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) drives the oxidation of organic trace gases that can lead to the production of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere. A complete understanding of the sources and sinks of OH is therefore important to address issues related to both air quality and climate change. However, recent measurements of total OH reactivity [1-2], which is the inverse of the OH lifetime, have pointed out that our understanding of OH sinks is still incomplete and important reactive trace gases have not yet been identified. These measurements of total OH reactivity are of particular interest since they provide a critical test of our understanding of the OH budget. Three techniques are available to measure the total OH reactivity, including the total OH loss rate method [3], the pump-probe method [4], and the comparative reactivity method (CRM) [5]. While the first two methods are based on direct measurements of OH decays using laser-induced fluorescence instruments, the CRM is based on a different approach in which a tracer molecule is detected instead of OH to determine the ambient OH loss rate. As these instruments were deployed in different field campaigns, intercomparison exercises would be useful to ensure the accuracy of the measurements. However, such intercomparisons have not yet been published. An informal intercomparison involving a CRM instrument from the Ecole des Mines de Douai (EMD) and a pump-probe instrument from the laboratory Physicochimie des Processus de Combustion et de l'Atmosphere (PC2A) took place in an urban environment at the university of Lille (France). The two OH reactivity instruments measured continuously side by side for a duration of two weeks. Collocated measurements of trace gases were also performed using O3, NOx and SO2 monitors, as well as two automated chromatographic instruments capable of measuring more than 50 volatile organic compounds (VOC). We will present cross calibrations of the two OH reactivity

  3. Probing protein adsorption on a nanoparticle surface using second harmonic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Das, A; Chakrabarti, A; Das, P K

    2016-09-21

    A new application of second harmonic light scattering to probe protein physisorption on a gold nanoparticle surface in aqueous buffer is reported. The free energies of adsorption, the number of protein molecules adsorbed on the surface and the binding affinity of a moderate size protein, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and a small protein, insulin, have been determined using the change in the second harmonic scattered light signal as a function of binding. Four different size gold nanoparticles from 15 to 60 nm were used to determine the effect of size on the free energy change, the affinity constant and the number of protein molecules adsorbed on the surface. All were shown to increase with an increase in size. The binding can be reversed by centrifugation, and the protein molecules can be desorbed quantitatively. The application of this method for studying thermodynamic parameters of weakly interacting biomolecules with nanoparticles for nanoparticle based diagnostic and therapeutic formulations is important. PMID:27530608

  4. Vinyltrimethylsilane (VTMS) as a probe of chemical reactivity of a TiCN diffusion barrier-covered silicon surface.

    PubMed

    Pirolli, Laurent; Teplyakov, Andrew V

    2006-03-16

    This paper presents the first molecular level investigation of chemical reactivity of a surface of an amorphous diffusion barrier film deposited on a Si(100)-2 x 1 single crystal. Vinyltrimethylsilane (VTMS) is chosen as a probe molecule because of its chemical properties and because of its role as a ligand in a common copper deposition precursor, hexafluoroacetylacetonato-copper-vinyltrimethylsilane, (hfac)Cu(VTMS). The surface chemistry of vinyltrimethylsilane on titanium carbonitride-covered Si(100)-2 x 1 has been investigated using multiple internal reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (MIR-FTIR), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), thermal desorption mass spectrometry, and computational analysis. On a film with nominal surface stoichiometry TiC(x)N(y) (x approximately y approximately 1) preannealed to 800 K, VTMS adsorbs molecularly at cryogenic temperatures even at submonolayer coverages; the major pathway for its temperature-programmed evolution is desorption. Adsorption at room temperature leads to chemisorption via a double-bond attachment. A set of computational models was designed to investigate the possible adsorption sites for a VTMS molecule on a TiCN-covered Si(100)-2 x 1 surface. A comparison of the computational predictions for a variety of possible adsorption sites with the results of thermal desorption and infrared measurements suggests that approximately 90% of the adsorbed VTMS is chemisorbed along the Ti-C bond while approximately 10% is chemisorbed on a Ti corner atom, the minority site of the surface. The Ti-N bond is not participating in the chemisorption process. PMID:16526706

  5. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.

  6. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partialmore » pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.« less

  7. Asphaltene adsorption mechanism under shear flow probed by in situ neutron reflectivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvis, Y.; Barré, L.; Jestin, J.; Gummel, J.; Cousin, F.

    2012-11-01

    We propose here a method to adapt a rheometer with a cone/plate geometry to a neutron reflectometer in order to perform in situ reflectivity measurements. This study allowed us to probe the influence of the shear rate on the mechanism of asphaltenes adsorption, the heaviest and most polar compounds of crude oil, using bad solvent conditions. Such experiment aims at describing at a local scale the surface modifications induced by flowing crude oils (pipe transportation or production through porous media). Without shearing, in a 34%/66% xylene/dodecane mixture for which the asphaltenes flocculation is achieved in bulk, the nanoaggregates are able to be adsorbed on a hydrophilic surface as multilayers, with a surface excess much larger than for good solvent conditions. Moreover, the thickness of these multilayers increases almost linearly with time, in accordance with QCM experiments. In shear rate conditions, the adsorption process is however strongly limited since the surface excess of the adsorbed layers is around twice lower at 2600 s-1 than at 1200 s-1.

  8. Adsorption of Reactive Red M-2BE dye from water solutions by multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernando M; Bergmann, Carlos P; Fernandes, Thais H M; Lima, Eder C; Royer, Betina; Calvete, Tatiana; Fagan, Solange B

    2011-09-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and powdered activated carbon were used as adsorbents for the successful removal of Reactive Red M-2BE textile dye from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of pH, shaking time and temperature on adsorption capacity were studied. In the acidic pH region (pH 2.0), the adsorption of the dye was favourable using both adsorbents. The contact time to obtain equilibrium at 298K was fixed at 1h for both adsorbents. The activation energy of the adsorption process was evaluated from 298 to 323K for both adsorbents. The Avrami fractional-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental data compared with pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order kinetic adsorption models. For Reactive Red M-2BE dye, the equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. Simulated dyehouse effluents were used to check the applicability of the proposed adsorbents for effluent treatment. PMID:21724329

  9. Trends in the adsorption and reactivity of hydrogen on magnesium silicate nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, Ichraf; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Bromley, Stefan T

    2015-04-14

    We study nanoclusters of Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene (having (MgO)6(SiO2)3 and (MgO)4(SiO2)4 compositions) with respect to their reactivity towards hydrogen atoms, using density functional calculations. Ultrasmall silicate particles are fundamental intermediates in cosmic dust grain formation and processing, and are thought to make up a significant mass fraction of the grain population. Due to their nanoscale dimensions and high surface area to bulk ratios, they are likely to also have a disproportionately large influence on surface chemistry in the interstellar medium. This work investigates the potential role of silicate nanoclusters in vital interstellar hydrogen-based chemistry by studying atomic H adsorption and H2 formation. Our extensive set of calculations confirm the generality of a Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relation between the H2 reaction barrier and the 2Hchem binding energy, suggesting it to be independent of silicate dust grain shape, size, crystallinity and composition. Our results also suggest that amorphous/porous grains with forsteritic composition would tend to dissociate H2, but relatively Mg-poor silicate grains (e.g. enstatite composition) and/or more crystalline/compact silicate grains would tend to catalyse H2 formation. The high structural thermostability of silicate nanoclusters with respect to the heat released during exothermic H2 formation reactions is also verified. PMID:25746007

  10. COD and color removal of reactive orange 16 dye solution by electrochemical oxidation and adsorption method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Zuhailie; Ahmad, Wan Yaacob Wan; Yusop, Muhammad Rahimi; Othman, Mohamed Rozali

    2015-09-01

    Degradation of Reactive Orange 16 (RO16) dye was investigated using electrochemical oxidation and adsorption (batch method) using mixture of coconut trunk charcoal-graphite-tin-polyvinyl chloride(PVC). In batch studies for adsorbents pellet and powder form of the charcoal mixture were used. RO16 was chosen as the model dye because of its high resistance towards conventional treatment methods. NaCl and RO16 concentration, treatment duration, weight of electrode and adsorbent and volume of solution were kept constant for both methods. The effectiveness of the treatments were compared and evaluated by percentage of RO16 decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and results indicated that electrochemical oxidation method ables to decolorized RO16 dye up to 98.5% after 20 minutes electrolysis time while pellet and powder in batch method only removed 17.1 and 33.6% of RO16 color respectively. However, only 45.6% of COD can be removed using electrochemical oxidation method while pellet and powder in batch method removed 47.8 and 49.6% of COD respectively. The decolorization and COD removal of RO16 was determined using UV-Vis spectrophotometer (by the changes of absorption spectrum intensity of azo chromophore (-N=N-) at λ=388 and 492.50 nm and Hach spectrophotometer respectively. FTIR was used to determine functional groups present in the coconut trunk charcoal.

  11. Immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the probe surface for molecular adsorption type endotoxin detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Katsutoshi; Tsuji, Akihito; Nishishita, Naoki; Hirano, Yoshiaki

    2007-04-01

    adsorption reaction between ɛ-polylysine and endotoxin. ɛ-polylysine has the structure of straight chain molecule composed by 25-30 residues made by lysine, and it is used as an antimicrobial agent, moreover, cellulose beads with immobilized ɛ-polylysine is used as the barrier filter for endotoxin removal. Therefore, it is expected that the endotoxin be adsorbed to the immobilized ɛ-polylysine onto the probe. As the result of this reaction, the mass of the probe is increased, and endotoxin can be detected by using of Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM). In our previous research, we have already acquired the proteins immobilization technique onto Au and Si surface. In this report, the proposal of molecular adsorption type endotoxin detection system, and the immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the probe are described. We use X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the ɛ-polylysine immobilization, and the adsorptive activity of immobilized ɛ-polylysine is measured by XPS and AFM. The purpose of this study is to bring about the realization of "Real-time endotoxin detection system".

  12. Low frequency sonochemical synthesis of nanoporous amorphous manganese dioxide (MnO2) and adsorption of remazol reactive dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Siti Zubaidah; Yusop, Muhammad Rahimi; Othman, Mohamed Rozali

    2015-09-01

    Nanoporous amorphous-MnO2 was synthesized by sonochemical process (sonication) on the solid manganese (II) acetate tetrahydrate (Mn(CH3COO)2.4H2O) in 0.1 M KMnO4. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), morphology of the material was scanned by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and absorptions of MnO2 bonding was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectrometer (FT-IR). Remazol reactive dye or Red 3BS, was used in the adsorption study using nanoporous amorphous-MnO2. In batch experiment, 10 ppm of Remazol reactive dye was used and experiment was carried out at room temperature. Adsorption of Remazol dye on 0.2g synthesized nanoporous amorphous-MnO2 showed 99 - 100% decolorization.

  13. Low frequency sonochemical synthesis of nanoporous amorphous manganese dioxide (MnO{sub 2}) and adsorption of remazol reactive dye

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Siti Zubaidah; Yusop, Muhammad Rahimi; Othman, Mohamed Rozali

    2015-09-25

    Nanoporous amorphous-MnO{sub 2} was synthesized by sonochemical process (sonication) on the solid manganese (II) acetate tetrahydrate (Mn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O) in 0.1 M KMnO{sub 4}. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), morphology of the material was scanned by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and absorptions of MnO{sub 2} bonding was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectrometer (FT-IR). Remazol reactive dye or Red 3BS, was used in the adsorption study using nanoporous amorphous-MnO{sub 2}. In batch experiment, 10 ppm of Remazol reactive dye was used and experiment was carried out at room temperature. Adsorption of Remazol dye on 0.2g synthesized nanoporous amorphous-MnO{sub 2} showed 99 – 100% decolorization.

  14. Understanding pH Effects on Trichloroethylene and Perchloroethylene Adsorption to Iron in Permeable Reactive Barriers for Groundwater Remediation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Farrell, James

    2013-01-01

    Metallic iron filings are becoming increasing used in permeable reactive barriers for remediating groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Understanding solution pH effects on rates of reductive dechlorination in permeable reactive barriers is essential for designing remediation systems that can meet treatment objectives under conditions of varying groundwater properties. The objective of this research was to investigate how the solution pH value affects adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) on metallic iron surfaces. Because adsorption is first required before reductive dechlorination can occur, pH effects on halocarbon adsorption energies may explain pH effects on dechlorination rates. Adsorption energies for TCE and PCE were calculated via molecular mechanics simulations using the Universal force field and a self-consistent reaction field charge equilibration scheme. A range in solution pH values was simulated by varying the amount of atomic hydrogen adsorbed on the iron. The potential energies associated TCE and PCE complexes were dominated by electrostatic interactions, and complex formation with the surface was found to result in significant electron transfer from the iron to the adsorbed halocarbons. Adsorbed atomic hydrogen was found to lower the energies of TCE complexes more than those for PCE. Attractions between atomic hydrogen and iron atoms were more favorable when TCE versus PCE was adsorbed to the iron surface. These two findings are consistent with the experimental observation that changes in solution pH affect TCE reaction rates more than those for PCE. PMID:23626602

  15. Understanding pH Effects on Trichloroethylene and Perchloroethylene Adsorption to Iron in Permeable Reactive Barriers for Groundwater Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jing; Farrell, James

    2013-01-01

    Metallic iron filings are becoming increasing used in permeable reactive barriers for remediating groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Understanding solution pH effects on rates of reductive dechlorination in permeable reactive barriers is essential for designing remediation systems that can meet treatment objectives under conditions of varying groundwater properties. The objective of this research was to investigate how the solution pH value affects adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) on metallic iron surfaces. Because adsorption is first required before reductive dechlorination can occur, pH effects on halocarbon adsorption energies may explain pH effects on dechlorination rates. Adsorption energies for TCE and PCE were calculated via molecular mechanics simulations using the Universal force field and a self-consistent reaction field charge equilibration scheme. A range in solution pH values was simulated by varying the amount of atomic hydrogen adsorbed on the iron. The potential energies associated TCE and PCE complexes were dominated by electrostatic interactions, and complex formation with the surface was found to result in significant electron transfer from the iron to the adsorbed halocarbons. Adsorbed atomic hydrogen was found to lower the energies of TCE complexes more than those for PCE. Attractions between atomic hydrogen and iron atoms were more favorable when TCE versus PCE was adsorbed to the iron surface. These two findings are consistent with the experimental observation that changes in solution pH affect TCE reaction rates more than those for PCE. PMID:23626602

  16. A reactivity-based probe of the intracellular labile ferrous iron pool.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Benjamin; Morgan, Charles W; Fontaine, Shaun D; Vander Wal, Mark N; Chang, Christopher J; Wells, James A; Renslo, Adam R

    2016-09-01

    Improved methods for studying intracellular reactive Fe(II) are of significant interest for studies of iron metabolism and disease-relevant changes in iron homeostasis. Here we describe a highly selective reactivity-based probe in which a Fenton-type reaction with intracellular labile Fe(II) leads to unmasking of the aminonucleoside puromycin. Puromycin leaves a permanent and dose-dependent mark on treated cells that can be detected with high sensitivity and precision using a high-content, plate-based immunofluorescence assay. Using this new probe and screening approach, we detected alteration of cellular labile Fe(II) in response extracellular iron conditioning, overexpression of iron storage and/or export proteins, and post-translational regulation of iron export. We also used this new tool to demonstrate that labile Fe(II) pools are larger in cancer cells than in nontumorigenic cells. PMID:27376690

  17. Recognition- and reactivity-based fluorescent probes for studying transition metal signaling in living systems.

    PubMed

    Aron, Allegra T; Ramos-Torres, Karla M; Cotruvo, Joseph A; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-08-18

    Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzyme cofactors, in part because of their potential to trigger oxidative stress and damage via Fenton chemistry. Metals in biology can be broadly categorized into two pools: static and labile. In the former, proteins and other macromolecules tightly bind metals; in the latter, metals are bound relatively weakly to cellular ligands, including proteins and low molecular weight ligands. Fluorescent probes can be useful tools for studying the roles of transition metals in their labile forms. Probes for imaging transition metal dynamics in living systems must meet several stringent criteria. In addition to exhibiting desirable photophysical properties and biocompatibility, they must be selective and show a fluorescence turn-on response to the metal of interest. To meet this challenge, we have pursued two general strategies for metal detection, termed "recognition" and "reactivity". Our design of transition metal probes makes use of a recognition-based approach for copper and nickel and a reactivity-based approach for cobalt and iron. This Account summarizes progress in our laboratory on both the development and application of fluorescent probes to identify and study the signaling roles of transition metals in biology. In conjunction with complementary methods for direct metal detection and genetic and/or pharmacological manipulations, fluorescent probes for transition metals have helped reveal a number of principles underlying transition metal dynamics. In this Account, we give three recent

  18. Development of a Sensitive Bioluminogenic Probe for Imaging Highly Reactive Oxygen Species in Living Rats.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryosuke; Takakura, Hideo; Kamiya, Mako; Kobayashi, Eiji; Komatsu, Toru; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2015-12-01

    A sensitive bioluminogenic probe for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS), SO3 H-APL, was developed based on the concept of dual control of bioluminescence emission by means of bioluminescent enzyme-induced electron transfer (BioLeT) and modulation of cell-membrane permeability. This probe enables non-invasive visualization of physiologically relevant amounts of hROS generated deep inside the body of living rats for the first time. It is expected to serve as a practical analytical tool for investigating a wide range of biological functions of hROS in vivo. The design concept should be applicable to other in vivo bioluminogenic probes. PMID:26474404

  19. Radiolytic Modification and Reactivity of Amino Acid Residues Serving as Structural Probes for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting is a convenient and sensitive technique for mapping solvent-accessible surfaces of proteins and examining the structure and dynamics of biological assemblies. In this study, the reactivities and tendencies to form easily detectible products for all 20 (common) amino acid side chains along with cystine are directly compared using various standards. Although we have previously reported on the oxidation of many of these residues, this study includes a detailed examination of the less reactive residues and better defines their usefulness in hydroxyl radical-mediated footprinting experiments. All 20 amino amides along with cystine and a few tripeptides were irradiated by -rays, the products were analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry, and rate constants of modification were measured. The reactivities of amino acid side chains were compared based on their loss of mass spectral signal normalized to the rate of loss for Phe or Pro that were radiolyzed simultaneously to serve as internal standards. In this way, accurate quantitation of relative rates could be assured. A reactivity order of amino acid side chains was obtained as Cys > Met > Trp > Tyr > Phe > cystine > His > Leu, Ile > Arg, Lys, Val > Ser, Thr, Pro > Gln, Glu > Asp, Asn > Ala > Gly. Ala and Gly are far too unreactive to be useful probes in typical experiments and Asp and Asn are unlikely to be useful as well. Although Ser and Thr are more reactive than Pro, which is known to be a useful probe, their oxidation products are not easily detectible. Thus, it appears that 14 of the 20 side chains (plus cystine) are most likely to be useful in typical experiments. Since these residues comprise 65% of the sequence of a typical protein, the footprinting approach provides excellent coverage of the side-chain reactivity for proteins.

  20. THE INTEGRATED USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY, AND VIRTUAL REALITY TO PREDICT THE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last decade three new techniques scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (YR) and computational chemistry ave emerged with the combined capability of a priori predicting the chemically reactivity of environmental surfaces. Computational chemistry provides the cap...

  1. Monte Carlo Simulations Probing the Adsorptive Separation of Hydrogen Sulfide/Methane Mixtures Using All-Silica Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mansi S; Tsapatsis, Michael; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2015-11-10

    Selective removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from sour natural gas mixtures is one of the key challenges facing the natural gas industry. Adsorption and pervaporation processes utilizing nanoporous materials, such as zeolites, can be alternatives to highly energy-intensive amine-based absorption processes. In this work, the adsorption behavior of binary mixtures containing H2S and methane (CH4) in seven different all-silica zeolite frameworks (CHA, DDR, FER, IFR, MFI, MOR, and MWW) is investigated using Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations at two temperatures (298 and 343 K) and pressures ranging from 1 to 50 bar. The simulations demonstrate high selectivities that, with the exception of MOR, increase with increasing H2S concentration due to favorable sorbate-sorbate interactions. The simulations indicate significant inaccuracies of predictions using unary adsorption data and ideal adsorbed solution theory. In addition, the adsorption of binary H2S/H2O mixtures in MFI is considered to probe whether the presence of H2S induces coadsorption and reduces the hydrophobic character of all-silica zeolites. The simulations show preferential adsorption of H2S from moist gases with a selectivity of about 18 over H2O. PMID:26473306

  2. Protein Adsorption and Reorganization on Nanoparticles Probed by the Coffee-Ring Effect: Application to Single Point Mutation Detection.

    PubMed

    Devineau, Stéphanie; Anyfantakis, Manos; Marichal, Laurent; Kiger, Laurent; Morel, Mathieu; Rudiuk, Sergii; Baigl, Damien

    2016-09-14

    The coffee-ring effect denotes the accumulation of particles at the edge of an evaporating sessile drop pinned on a substrate. Because it can be detected by simple visual inspection, this ubiquitous phenomenon can be envisioned as a robust and cost-effective diagnostic tool. Toward this direction, here we systematically analyze the deposit morphology of drying drops containing polystyrene particles of different surface properties with various proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA) and different forms of hemoglobin). We show that deposit patterns reveal information on both the adsorption of proteins onto particles and their reorganization following adsorption. By combining pattern analysis with adsorption isotherm and zeta potential measurements, we show that the suppression of the coffee-ring effect and the formation of a disk-shaped pattern is primarily associated with particle neutralization by protein adsorption. However, our findings also suggest that protein reorganization following adsorption can dramatically invert this tendency. Exposure of hydrophobic (respectively charged) residues can lead to disk (respectively ring) deposit morphologies independently of the global particle charge. Surface tension measurements and microscopic observations of the evaporating drops show that the determinant factor of the deposit morphology is the accumulation of particles at the liquid/gas interface during evaporation. This general behavior opens the possibility to probe protein adsorption and reorganization on particles by the analysis of the deposit patterns, the formation of a disk being the robust signature of particles rendered hydrophobic by protein adsorption. We show that this method is sensitive enough to detect a single point mutation in a protein, as demonstrated here by the distinct patterns formed by human native hemoglobin h-HbA and its mutant form h-HbS, which is responsible for sickle cell anemia. PMID:27562632

  3. Recognition- and Reactivity-Based Fluorescent Probes for Studying Transition Metal Signaling in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzyme cofactors, in part because of their potential to trigger oxidative stress and damage via Fenton chemistry. Metals in biology can be broadly categorized into two pools: static and labile. In the former, proteins and other macromolecules tightly bind metals; in the latter, metals are bound relatively weakly to cellular ligands, including proteins and low molecular weight ligands. Fluorescent probes can be useful tools for studying the roles of transition metals in their labile forms. Probes for imaging transition metal dynamics in living systems must meet several stringent criteria. In addition to exhibiting desirable photophysical properties and biocompatibility, they must be selective and show a fluorescence turn-on response to the metal of interest. To meet this challenge, we have pursued two general strategies for metal detection, termed “recognition” and “reactivity”. Our design of transition metal probes makes use of a recognition-based approach for copper and nickel and a reactivity-based approach for cobalt and iron. This Account summarizes progress in our laboratory on both the development and application of fluorescent probes to identify and study the signaling roles of transition metals in biology. In conjunction with complementary methods for direct metal detection and genetic and/or pharmacological manipulations, fluorescent probes for transition metals have helped reveal a number of principles underlying transition metal dynamics. In this Account, we give

  4. Protein adsorption on piezoelectric poly(L-lactic) acid thin films by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroca, Nathalie; Vilarinho, Paula M.; Daniel-da-Silva, Ana Luisa; Wu, Aiying; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Gruverman, Alexei

    2011-03-01

    Up until now, no direct evidence of protein adsorption processes associated with polar activity of a piezoelectric has been reported. This work presents the experimental evidence of the protein adsorption process' dependence on the surface polarization of a piezoelectric by showing at the local scale that the process of protein adsorption is highly favored in the poled areas of a piezoelectric polymer such as poly(L-lactic) acid.

  5. Reactive adsorption of SO2 on activated carbons with deposited iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Arcibar-Orozco, Javier A; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2013-02-15

    The effect of iron particle size anchored on the surface of commercial activated carbon on the removal of SO(2) from a gas phase was studied. Nanosize iron particles were deposited using forced hydrolysis of FeCl(3) with or without H(3)PO(4) as a capping agent. Dynamic adsorption experiments were carried out on either dry or pre-humidified materials and the adsorption capacities were calculated. The surface of the initial and exhausted materials was extensively characterized by microscopic, porosity, thermogravimetric and surface chemistry. The results indicate that the SO(2) adsorption capacity increased two and half times after the prehumidification process owing to the formation of H(2)SO(4) in the porous system. Iron species enhance the SO(2) adsorption capacity only when very small nanoparticles are deposited on the pore walls as a thin layer. Large iron nanoparticles block the ultramicropores decreasing the accessibility of the active sites and consuming oxygen that rest adsorption centers for SO(2) molecules. Iron nanoparticles of about 3-4 nm provide highly dispersed adsorption sites for SO(2) molecules and thus increase the adsorption capacity of about 80%. Fe(2)(SO(4))(3) was detected on the surface of exhausted samples. PMID:23333487

  6. Investigation of the problems with using gas adsorption to probe catalyst pore structure evolution during coking.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Navin; Greaves, Malcolm; Wood, Joseph; Rigby, Sean P

    2013-03-01

    A common approach to try to understand the mechanism of coking in heterogeneous catalysts is to monitor the evolution of the pore structure using gas adsorption analysis of discharged pellets. However, the standard methods of analysis of gas adsorption data, to obtain pore-size distributions, make the key assumption of thermodynamically-independent pores. This assumption neglects the possibility of co-operative adsorption phenomena, which will shown to be a critical problem when looking at coking catalysts. In this work the serial adsorption technique has been used to detect and assess the extent of co-operative effects in adsorption within coking catalysts. The reaction of decane over a hydroprocessing catalyst was used as a case study. It has been shown that the conventional analysis method would lead to a flawed picture of the pore structure changes during the coking process. For the case-study considered in this work, it was found that co-operative adsorption effects meant that 26% of the measured adsorption was occurring in pores up to three times larger than the size conventional analysis would presume. The serial adsorption technique was thus shown to provide important additional information on pore structure evolution during coking. A study of the kinetics of adsorption has been used to infer information about the general spatial location of the coking process within a pellet. PMID:23141698

  7. Adsorption and simultaneous dechlorination of PCBs on GAC/Fe/Pd: mechanistic aspects and reactive capping barrier concept.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeok; Agarwal, Shirish; Al-Abed, Souhail R

    2009-01-15

    There are many concerns and challenges in current remediation strategies for sediments contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Our efforts have been geared toward the development of granular activated carbon (GAC) impregnated with reactive iron/palladium (Fe/Pd) bimetallic nanoparticles (reactive activated carbon (RAC)). In this study, we elucidate the mechanistic aspects of the hybrid RAC system dechlorinating 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-CIBP) in the aqueous phase. The following reactions occurred in parallel or consecutively: (i) 2-CIBP is promptly and completely sequestrated to RAC phase, (ii) the adsorbed 2-CIBP is almost simultaneously dechlorinated by Fe/Pd particles to form a reaction product biphenyl (BP), and (iii) the BP formed is instantly and strongly adsorbed to RAC. The 2-CIBP adsorption and dechlorination rate constants were estimated through simple first-order reaction kinetic models with an assumption for unextractable portion of carbon in RAC. The extent of 2-CIBP accumulation and BP formation in RAC phase could be well explained by the kinetic model and adsorption was found to be the rate limiting step for overall reaction. On the basis of our observations, a new strategy and concept of "reactive" cap/barrier composed of RAC was proposed as a new environmental risk management option for PCBs-contaminated sites. PMID:19238984

  8. Preparation of Chitosan Coated Magnetic Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles and Application for Adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 and Ni2+ Ions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van Cuong; Pho, Quoc Hue

    2014-01-01

    An adsorbent called chitosan coated magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (CS-MHAP) was prepared with the purpose of improvement for the removal of Ni2+ ions and textile dye by coprecipitation. Structure and properties of CS-MHAP were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Weight percent of chitosan was investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The prepared CS-MHAP presents a significant improvement on the removal efficiency of Ni2+ ions and reactive blue 19 dye (RB19) in comparison with chitosan and magnetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Moreover, the adsorption capacities were affected by several parameters such as contact time, initial concentration, adsorbent dosage, and initial pH. Interestingly, the prepared adsorbent could be easily recycled from an aqueous solution by an external magnet and reused for adsorption with high removal efficiency. PMID:24592158

  9. Using the Multipole Resonance Probe to Stabilize the Electron Density During a Reactive Sputter Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberberg, Moritz; Styrnoll, Tim; Ries, Stefan; Bienholz, Stefan; Awakowicz, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Reactive sputter processes are used for the deposition of hard, wear-resistant and non-corrosive ceramic layers such as aluminum oxide (Al2O3) . A well known problem is target poisoning at high reactive gas flows, which results from the reaction of the reactive gas with the metal target. Consequently, the sputter rate decreases and secondary electron emission increases. Both parameters show a non-linear hysteresis behavior as a function of the reactive gas flow and this leads to process instabilities. This work presents a new control method of Al2O3 deposition in a multiple frequency CCP (MFCCP) based on plasma parameters. Until today, process controls use parameters such as spectral line intensities of sputtered metal as an indicator for the sputter rate. A coupling between plasma and substrate is not considered. The control system in this work uses a new plasma diagnostic method: The multipole resonance probe (MRP) measures plasma parameters such as electron density by analyzing a typical resonance frequency of the system response. This concept combines target processes and plasma effects and directly controls the sputter source instead of the resulting target parameters.

  10. New detection targets for amyloid-reactive probes: spectroscopic recognition of bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Guilford, II; Landsman, Pavel

    2005-05-01

    We report characteristic changes in fluorescence of amyloid-binding dyes Thioflavin T (TfT), pinacyanol (PIN) and related dyes, caused by their interaction with suspended Bacillus spore cultures (B. subtilis, B thuringiensis). The gain in TfT emission in the presence of spores allowed their immediate detection in aqueous suspensions, with a sensitivity limit of < 105 spores per ml. The spectroscopic signatures are consistent with a large number of binding sites for the two dyes on spore coats. The possible structural relationship of these dye binding loci with characteristic motifs (β-stacks) of amyloid deposits and other misfolded protein formations suggests new designs for probing biocontamination and also for clinical studies of non-microbial human pathogens (e.g., amyloid-related protein aggregates in prion-related transmissible encephalopathies or in Alzheimer's disease). Also reported is a special screening technique that was designed and used herein for calibration of new detection probes and assays for spore detection. It employed spectroscopic interactions between the candidate amyloid stains and poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-coated colloid silica (Percoll) nanoparticles that also display remarkable parallelism with the corresponding dye-amyloid and dye-spore reactivities. Percoll may thus find new applications as a convenient non-biological structural model mimicking the putative probe-targeted motifs in both classes of bioanalytes. These findings are important in the design of new probes and assays for important human pathogens (i.e. bacterial spores and amyloidogenic protein aggregates).

  11. Enhanced reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on the composites of graphene/graphite oxide with copper (hydr)oxychlorides.

    PubMed

    Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-06-27

    Composites of copper (hydr)oxychlorides with graphite oxide or graphene were synthesized and used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide at dynamic conditions at ambient temperatures. The materials were extensively characterized before and after adsorption in order to link their performance to the surface features. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, thermal analysis, TEM, SEM/EDX, and adsorption of nitrogen were used. It was found that the composite with graphene has the most favorable surface features enhancing reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide. The presence of moisture in the H2S stream has a positive effect on the removal process owing to the dissociation process. H2S is retained on the surface via a direct replacement of OH groups and via acid-base reactions with the copper (hydr)oxide. Highly dispersed reduced copper species on the surface of the composite with graphene enhance activation of oxygen and cause formation of sulfites and sulfates. Higher conductivity of the graphene phase than that of graphite oxide helps in electron transfer in redox reactions. PMID:22667349

  12. Detection of reactive oxygen species in mainstream cigarette smoke by a fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Xu, Shi-jie; Li, Song-zhan

    2009-07-01

    A mass of reactive oxygen species(ROS) are produced in the process of smoking. Superfluous ROS can induce the oxidative stress in organism, which will cause irreversible damage to cells. Fluorescent probe is taken as a marker of oxidative stress in biology and has been applied to ROS detection in the field of biology and chemistry for high sensitivity, high simplicity of data collection and high resolution. As one type of fluorescent probe, dihydrorhodamine 6G (dR6G) will be oxidized to the fluorescent rhodamine 6G, which could be used to detect ROS in mainstream cigarette smoke. We investigated the action mechanism of ROS on dR6G, built up the standard curve of R6G fluorescence intensity with its content, achieved the variation pattern of R6G fluorescence intensity with ROS content in mainstream cigarette smoke and detected the contents of ROS from the 4 types of cigarettes purchased in market. The result shows that the amount of ROS has close relationship with the types of tobacco and cigarette production technology. Compared with other detecting methods such as electronic spin resonance(ESR), chromatography and mass spectrometry, this detection method by the fluorescent probe has higher efficiency and sensitivity and will have wide applications in the ROS detection field.

  13. Dopant-assisted reactive low temperature plasma probe for sensitive and specific detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendong; Hou, Keyong; Hua, Lei; Li, Haiyang

    2015-09-01

    A dopant-assisted reactive low temperature plasma (DARLTP) probe was developed for sensitive and specific detection of explosives by a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. The DARLTP probe was fabricated using a T-shaped quartz tube. The dopant gas was introduced into the plasma stream through a side-tube. Using CH2Cl2 doped wet air as the dopant gas, the detection sensitivities were improved about 4-fold (RDX), 4-fold (PETN), and 3-fold (tetryl) compared with those obtained using the conventional LTP. Furthermore, the formation of [M + (35)Cl](-) and [M + (37)Cl](-) for these explosives enhanced the specificity for their identification. Additionally, the quantities of fragment ions of tetryl and adduct ions such as [RDX + NO2](-) and [PETN + NO2](-) were dramatically reduced, which simplified the mass spectra and avoided the overlap of mass peaks for different explosives. The sensitivity improvement may be attributed to the increased intensity of reactant ion [HNO3 + NO3](-), which was enhanced 4-fold after the introduction of dopant gas. The limits of detection (LODs) for RDX, tetryl, and PETN were down to 3, 6, and 10 pg, respectively. Finally, an explosive mixture was successfully analyzed, demonstrating the potential of the DARLTP probe for qualitative and quantitative analysis of complicated explosives. PMID:26191543

  14. Investigation of the Reactivity of Oligodeoxynucleotides with Glyoxal and KMnO4 Chemical Probes by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Carol; Pierce, Sarah E.; Smith, Suncerae I.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    The reactions of two well-known chemical probes, glyoxal and potassium permanganate (KMnO4), with oligodeoxynucleotides were monitored by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry to evaluate the influence of the sequence of DNA, its secondary structure, and interactions with associated ligands on the reactivity of the two probes. Glyoxal, a guanine-reactive probe, incorporated a mass shift of 58 Da, and potassium permanganate (KMnO4) is a thymine-reactive probe that resulted in a mass shift of 34 Da. The reactions depended on the accessibility of the nucleobases, and the peak abundances of the adducts in the ESI-mass spectra were used to quantify the extent of the chemical probe reactions. In this study, both mixed-base sequences were studied as well as control sequences in which one reactive site was located at the terminus or center of the oligodeoxynucleotide while the surrounding bases were a second, different nucleobase. In addition, the reactions of the chemical probes with non-covalent complexes formed between DNA and either actinomycin D or ethidium bromide, both known to interact with single strand DNA, were evaluated. PMID:21743793

  15. Factors affecting the removal of ammonia from air on carbonaceous materials: Investigation of reactive adsorption mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Camille

    Air pollution related to the release of industrial toxic gases, represents one of the main concerns of our modern world owing to its detrimental effect on the environment. To tackle this growing issue, efficient ways to reduce/control the release of pollutants are required. Adsorption of gases on porous materials appears as a potential solution. However, the physisorption of small molecules of gases such as ammonia is limited at ambient conditions. For their removal, adsorbents providing strong adsorption forces must be used/developed. In this study, new carbon-based materials are prepared and tested for ammonia adsorption at ambient conditions. Characterization of the adsorbents' texture and surface chemistry is performed before and after exposure to ammonia to identify the features responsible for high adsorption capacity and for controlling the mechanisms of retention. The characterization techniques include: nitrogen adsorption, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Electron Microscopy. The results obtained indicate that ammonia removal is governed by the adsorbent's surface chemistry. On the contrary, porosity (and thus physisorption) plays a secondary role in this process, unless strong dispersive forces are provided by the adsorbent. The surface chemistry features responsible for the enhanced ammonia adsorption include the presence of oxygen-(carboxyl, hydroxyl, epoxy) and sulfur- (sulfonic) containing groups. Metallic species improve the breakthrough capacity as well as they lead to the formation of Lewis acid-base interactions, hydrogen-bonding or complexation. In addition to the latter three mechanisms, ammonia is retained on the adsorbent surface via Bronsted acid-base interactions or via specific reactions with the adsorbent's functionalities leading to the incorporation of ammonia into the adsorbent's matrix. Another mechanism

  16. Adsorption, Ordering, and Local Environments of Surfactant-Encapsulated Polyoxometalate Ions Probed at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Benjamin; Yin, Panchao; Ma, Ying-Zhong

    2016-08-16

    The continued development and application of surfactant-encapsulated polyoxometalates (SEPs) relies on understanding the ordering and organization of species at their interface and how these are impacted by the various local environments to which they are exposed. Here, we report on the equilibrium properties of two common SEPs adsorbed to the air-water interface and probed with surface-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. These results reveal clear shifts in vibrational band positions, the magnitude of which scales with the charge of the SEP core, which is indicative of a static field effect on the surfactant coating and the associated local chemical environment. This static field also induces ordering in surrounding water molecules that is mediated by charge screening via the surface-bound surfactants. From these SFG measurements, we are able to show that Mo132-based SEPs are more polar than Mo72V30 SEPs. Disorder in the surfactant chain packing at the highly curved SEP surfaces is attributed to large conic volumes that can be sampled without interactions with neighboring chains. Measurements of adsorption isotherms yield free energies of adsorption to the air-water interface of -46.8 ± 0.4 and -44.8 ± 1.2 kJ/mol for the Mo132 and Mo72V30 SEPs, respectively, indicating a strong propensity for the fluid surface. The influence of intermolecular interactions on the surface adsorption energies is discussed. PMID:27452922

  17. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-10-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  18. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-06-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  19. Kinetic Adsorption Profile and Conformation Evolution at the DNA-Gold Nanoparticle Interface Probed by Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic adsorption profile at the DNA–gold nanoparticle (AuNP) interface is probed by following the binding and organization of thiolated linear DNA and aptamers of varying chain lengths (15, 30, 44, and 51 mer) to the surface of AuNPs (13.0 ± 1.0 nm diameter). A systematic investigation utilizing dynamic light scattering has been performed to directly measure the changes in particle size during the course of a typical aging-salting thiolated DNA/AuNP preparation procedure. We discuss the effect of DNA chain length, composition, salt concentration, and secondary structure on the kinetics and conformation at the DNA–AuNP interface. The adsorption kinetics are chain-length dependent, composition independent, and not diffusion rate limited for the conditions we report here. The kinetic data support a mechanism of stepwise adsorption of thiols to the surface of AuNPs and reorganization of the thiols at the interface. Very interestingly, the kinetic increases of the particle sizes are modeled accurately by the pseudo-second-order rate model, suggesting that DNA could possess the statistically well-defined conformational evolution. Together with other experimental evidence, we propose a dynamic inner-layer and outer-tail (DILOT) model to describe the evolution of the DNA conformation after the initial adsorption of a single oligonucleotide layer. According to this model, the length of the tails that extend from the surface of AuNPs, capable for hybridization or molecular recognition, can be conveniently calculated. Considering the wide applications of DNA/AuNPs, the results should have important implications in sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly. PMID:25222203

  20. The effects of hazardous ions adsorption on the morphological and chemical properties of reactive cloth filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Sameh H.; Sohsah, Moustfa A.; Ghoneim, Mohammad M.

    2009-11-01

    Reactive cloth filter is fabricated by grafting of acrylonitrile/methacrylic acid onto cotton cloth, using mutual irradiation technique and the subsequent amidoximation of the reactive intermediate nitrile groups. The incorporation of the amidoxime/carboxyl groups was confirmed by different techniques. The effect of the hazardous ions chelation from radioactive waste on the morphological and chemical structure was studied. The cloth filter possessed good morphological and chemical stability suitable for practical use. The fabricated cloth filter can be used for low-level radioactive waste treatments.

  1. Equilibrium and kinetic models on the adsorption of Reactive Black 5 from aqueous solution using Eichhornia crassipes/chitosan composite.

    PubMed

    El-Zawahry, Manal M; Abdelghaffar, Fatma; Abdelghaffar, Rehab A; Hassabo, Ahmed G

    2016-01-20

    New natural biopolymer composite was prepared using extracted cellulose from an environmentally problematic water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes (EC). The extracted cellulose was functionalized by chitosan and TiO2 nanoparticles to form EC/Chitosan (EC/Cs) composite network. Surface characterization of EC/Cs natural biopolymer composite was examined by spectrum analysis FT-IR, specific surface area, micropore volume, pore width and SEM. Furthermore, the sorption experiments were carried out as a function of pH, various initial dye concentration and contact time. Experiment results showed that the EC/Cs composite have high ability to remove C.I. Reactive Black 5 from its dye-bath effluent. The equilibrium sorption evaluation of RB5 conformed and fitted well to Langmuir adsorption isotherm models and the maximum sorption capacity was 0.606 mg/g. The kinetic adsorption models followed pseudo-second order model and the dye intra-particle diffusion may suggesting a chemical reaction mechanism. Further, it was obvious from the investigation that this composite could be applied as a promising low cost adsorbent for anionic dye removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:26572382

  2. Probing Intramolecular versus Intermolecular CO2 Adsorption on Amine-Grafted SBA-15.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Chun-Jae; Lee, Li-Chen; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-12-15

    A mesoporous silica SBA-15 is modified with an array of amine-containing organosilanes including (i) propylamine, SiCH2CH2CH2NH2 (MONO), (ii) propylethylenediamine, SiCH2CH2CH2NHCH2CH2NH2 (DI), (iii) propyldiethylenetriamine, SiCH2CH2CH2NHCH2CH2NHCH2CH2NH2 (TRI), and (iv) propyltriethylenetetramine, SiCH2CH2CH2NHCH2CH2N(CH2CH2NH2)2 (TREN) and the low loading silane adsorbents (∼0.45 mmol silane/g) are evaluated for their CO2 adsorption properties, with a focus on gaining insight into the propensity for intramolecular vs intermolecular CO2 adsorption. Adsorption isotherms at low CO2 coverages are measured while simultaneously recording the heat evolved via a Tian-Calvet calorimeter. The results are compared on a silane molecule efficiency basis (mol CO2 adsorbed/mol silane) to assess the potential for intramolecular CO2 adsorption, employing two amine groups in a single silane molecule. As the number of amines in the silane molecule increases (MONO < DI < TREN ∼ TRI), the silane molecule efficiency is enhanced owing to the ability to intramolecularly capture CO2. Analysis of the CO2 uptake for samples with the surface silanols removed by capping demonstrates that cooperative uptake due to amine-CO2-silanol interactions is also possible over these adsorbents and is the primary mode of sorption for the MONO material at the studied low silane loading. As the propensity for intramolecular CO2 capture increases due to the presence of multiple amines in a single silane molecule (MONO < DI < TREN ∼ TRI), the measured heat of adsorption also increases. This study of various amine-containing silanes at low coverage is the first to provide significant, direct evidence for intramolecular CO2 capture in a single silane molecule. Furthermore, it provides evidence for the relative heats of adsorption for physisorption on a silanol laden surface (ca. 37 kJ/mol), a silanol-capped surface (ca. 25 kJ/mol), via amine-CO2-silanol interactions (ca. 46 kJ/mol), and via amine-CO2

  3. Effect of carbon surface modification with dimethylamine on reactive adsorption of NO(x).

    PubMed

    Deliyanni, Eleni; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2011-03-01

    The wood-based activated carbon, either as received or oxidized with nitric acid, was exposed to dimethylamine vapors. This modification was expected to introduce nitrogen groups. Then, the modified samples were used as adsorbents of NO(2) under dynamic conditions. Both NO(2) breakthrough curves and the NO concentration curves were recorded. The samples before and after exposure to NO(2) were characterized using adsorption of nitrogen, elemental analysis, potentiometric titration, FTIR, and thermal analysis. Modifications with amines resulted in an increase in NO(2) adsorption and in a decrease in NO emission. The effects were more visible when oxidation was used as a pretreatment of the carbon surface. This process increased the incorporation of nitrogen to the carbon matrix via acid-based reactions resulting in the formation of amides and amine carboxylic salts. Besides this, dimethylamine was strongly adsorbed on the carbon surface via hydrogen bonding with oxygen-containing groups. When the samples were exposed to nitrogen dioxide, there was an indication that nitramine and nitrosoamine were formed in the reactions of NO(2) with either amides or amines. In the reactions of amines with NO, nitrosoamines are the likely products. As a next step, the surface of the carbon matrix is reoxidized by NO(2), which is accompanied by the release of NO. PMID:21188988

  4. Intermolecular reactivity study to scale adsorption property of para- and meta-substituted nitrobenzene over 2:1 dioctahedral smectite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ebina, Takeo; Iwasaki, Takashi; Mizukami, Fujio

    2003-06-01

    Substituted nitrobenzene, a toxic series of molecules with its wide application in pesticides needs to be removed by a suitable sorbent, whose characteristic is to be determined using the reactivity index theory within the helm of the density-functional theory and as well inside the broad subject range of the hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) principle. We studied a series of meta- and para-substituted nitrobenzene molecules (NBMs) starting from -NH2, -OH, -OCH3, -CHO, -OCOCH3, -COCH3, -CF3, -CN, and -COOCH3 to monitor the effect of electrophilicity and nucleophilicity in their adsorption properties. From the values of the local softness and the charge on the hydrogen atom of the bridging/structural (occurring on the surface) hydroxyl attached to the octahedral/tetrahedral metal site present in smectite, it is concluded that the local acidities of the inorganic material systems are dependent on several characteristics which are of importance within the framework of HSAB principle. We used "group softness" for the interacting molecules, whose values were generated by adding the local softness values of constituent atoms of the respective group and found it can be a better descriptor for intermolecular interactions occurring in these NBMs. A semiquantitave scale is proposed from the group reactivity index present in NBM and the clay cluster.

  5. Mechanisms of Chromate, Selenate, and Sulfate Adsorption on Al-Substituted Ferrihydrite: Implications for Ferrihydrite Surface Structure and Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Chad P; Chrysochoou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Ferrihydrite is a nanocrystalline Fe (hydr)oxide and important sink for environmental contaminants. Although Fe (hydr)oxides are rarely pure in natural systems, little is known about the effects of structural impurities such as Al on the surface properties and reactivity of ferrihydrite. In this study, we characterized the adsorption mechanisms of chromate, selenate, and sulfate on Al-substituted ferrihydrite (0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 mol % Al) using in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Spectral data sets recorded as a function of pH were processed using a multivariate curve resolution technique to identify which types of surface species form and to generate their concentration profiles as a function of pH and Al content. Results show a significant increase in relative fraction of outer-sphere complexes for all three oxyanions with increasing Al substitution. In addition, the effect of Al substitution is found to be mechanism-specific in the case of chromate, with bidentate complexes disproportionately suppressed over monodentate complexes at higher Al contents. Overall, our findings have important implications for the fate of chromate, selenate, and sulfate in subsurface environments and offer new insight into the surface reactivity of Al-ferrihydrite. PMID:26900715

  6. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator: Using Differential Reactivity toward Channel-Permeant and Channel-Impermeant Thiol-Reactive Probes To Test a Molecular Model for the Pore†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The sixth transmembrane segment (TM6) of the CFTR chloride channel has been intensively investigated. The effects of amino acid substitutions and chemical modification of engineered cysteines (cysteine scanning) on channel properties strongly suggest that TM6 is a key component of the anion-conducting pore, but previous cysteine-scanning studies of TM6 have produced conflicting results. Our aim was to resolve these conflicts by combining a screening strategy based on multiple, thiol-directed probes with molecular modeling of the pore. CFTR constructs were screened for reactivity toward both channel-permeant and channel-impermeant thiol-directed reagents, and patterns of reactivity in TM6 were mapped onto two new, molecular models of the CFTR pore: one based on homology modeling using Sav1866 as the template and a second derived from the first by molecular dynamics simulation. Comparison of the pattern of cysteine reactivity with model predictions suggests that nonreactive sites are those where the TM6 side chains are occluded by other TMs. Reactive sites, in contrast, are generally situated such that the respective amino acid side chains either project into the predicted pore or lie within a predicted extracellular loop. Sites where engineered cysteines react with both channel-permeant and channel-impermeant probes occupy the outermost extent of TM6 or the predicted TM5−6 loop. Sites where cysteine reactivity is limited to channel-permeant probes occupy more cytoplasmic locations. The results provide an initial validation of two, new molecular models for CFTR and suggest that molecular dynamics simulation will be a useful tool for unraveling the structural basis of anion conduction by CFTR. PMID:19754156

  7. Development of ion-mobility and mass spectrometry for probing the reactivity of nanoparticles and nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lei

    2009-12-01

    Aerosols of diameter smaller than 100 nm, usually are referred as nanoparticles or ultrafines, have received considerable interests lately as a source of building blocks to novel materials. However, our capabilities for charactering these materials are greatly limited by lack of appropriate diagnostic tools. The objective of this work is to develop new aerosol-based techniques for the characterization of nanoparticles and nanocomposites. Though the scope of this dissertation is focused on probing the reactivity of metal based nanoparticles/nanocomposites and their applications in energetic materials, the methods provide generic approaches for understanding the intrinsic reactivity of nanoparticles. Real-time single particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) has been used to study the reactivity of aluminum nanoparticles. The SPMS is a powerful tool due to its ability to obtain quantitative information at the single particle level. Here in this work, we conducted extensive investigations on the quantification of the SPMS. Particle morphology and composition biases on quantifying the composition of nanoparticles were observed experimentally, was related to the high non-linear properties of the laser-particle interaction. To understand pulsed laser interaction with nanoparticles, as it applied to the implementation and quantification of SPMS, we employed a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model to determine the characteristic behavior of ions produced from the particle. In the simulation, the temporal evolution of the ionization state and energy were evaluated as a function of aluminum particle size that were heated and ionized by a nanosecond laser. The results are shown to be consistent with our experimental observation, and suggest that particle size-dependent energetic ions led to the power law relationship between peak area and particle size observed in our single particle mass spectrometer. Another approach to probe the reactivity of the nanoparticles is an ion

  8. Water adsorption on TiO2 surfaces probed by soft X-ray spectroscopies: bulk materials vs. isolated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkoula, Safia; Sublemontier, Olivier; Patanen, Minna; Nicolas, Christophe; Sirotti, Fausto; Naitabdi, Ahmed; Gaie-Levrel, François; Antonsson, Egill; Aureau, Damien; Ouf, François-Xavier; Wada, Shin-Ichi; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Miron, Catalin

    2015-10-01

    We describe an experimental method to probe the adsorption of water at the surface of isolated, substrate-free TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) based on soft X-ray spectroscopy in the gas phase using synchrotron radiation. To understand the interfacial properties between water and TiO2 surface, a water shell was adsorbed at the surface of TiO2 NPs. We used two different ways to control the hydration level of the NPs: in the first scheme, initially solvated NPs were dried and in the second one, dry NPs generated thanks to a commercial aerosol generator were exposed to water vapor. XPS was used to identify the signature of the water layer shell on the surface of the free TiO2 NPs and made it possible to follow the evolution of their hydration state. The results obtained allow the establishment of a qualitative determination of isolated NPs’ surface states, as well as to unravel water adsorption mechanisms. This method appears to be a unique approach to investigate the interface between an isolated nano-object and a solvent over-layer, paving the way towards new investigation methods in heterogeneous catalysis on nanomaterials.

  9. Water adsorption on TiO2 surfaces probed by soft X-ray spectroscopies: bulk materials vs. isolated nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Benkoula, Safia; Sublemontier, Olivier; Patanen, Minna; Nicolas, Christophe; Sirotti, Fausto; Naitabdi, Ahmed; Gaie-Levrel, François; Antonsson, Egill; Aureau, Damien; Ouf, François-Xavier; Wada, Shin-Ichi; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Miron, Catalin

    2015-01-01

    We describe an experimental method to probe the adsorption of water at the surface of isolated, substrate-free TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) based on soft X-ray spectroscopy in the gas phase using synchrotron radiation. To understand the interfacial properties between water and TiO2 surface, a water shell was adsorbed at the surface of TiO2 NPs. We used two different ways to control the hydration level of the NPs: in the first scheme, initially solvated NPs were dried and in the second one, dry NPs generated thanks to a commercial aerosol generator were exposed to water vapor. XPS was used to identify the signature of the water layer shell on the surface of the free TiO2 NPs and made it possible to follow the evolution of their hydration state. The results obtained allow the establishment of a qualitative determination of isolated NPs’ surface states, as well as to unravel water adsorption mechanisms. This method appears to be a unique approach to investigate the interface between an isolated nano-object and a solvent over-layer, paving the way towards new investigation methods in heterogeneous catalysis on nanomaterials. PMID:26462615

  10. Real-Time Discrimination and Versatile Profiling of Spontaneous Reactive Oxygen Species in Living Organisms with a Single Fluorescent Probe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruilong; Zhao, Jun; Han, Guangmei; Liu, Zhengjie; Liu, Cui; Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Bianhua; Jiang, Changlong; Liu, Renyong; Zhao, Tingting; Han, Ming-Yong; Zhang, Zhongping

    2016-03-23

    Fluorescent probes are powerful tools for the investigations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in living organisms by visualization and imaging. However, the multiparallel assays of several ROS with multiple probes are often limited by the available number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores together with large invasive effects and discrepant biological locations. Meanwhile, the spontaneous ROS profilings in various living organs/tissues are also limited by the penetration capability of probes across different biological barriers and the stability in reactive in vivo environments. Here, we report a single fluorescent probe to achieve the effective discrimination and profiling of hydroxyl radicals (•OH) and hypochlorous acid (HClO) in living organisms. The probe is constructed by chemically grafting an additional five-membered heterocyclic ring and a lateral triethylene glycol chain to a fluorescein mother, which does not only turn off the fluorescence of fluorescein, but also create the dual reactive sites to ROS and the penetration capability in passing through various biological barriers. The reactions of probe with •OH and HClO simultaneously result in cyan and green emissions, respectively, providing the real-time discrimination and quantitative analysis of the two ROS in cellular mitochondria. Surprisingly, the accumulation of probes in the intestine and liver of a normal-state zebrafish and the transfer pathway from intestine-to-blood-to-organ/tissue-to-kidney-to-excretion clearly present the profiling of spontaneous •OH and HClO in these metabolic organs. In particular, the stress generation of •OH at the fresh wound of zebrafish is successfully visualized for the first time, in spite of its extremely short lifetime. PMID:26938117

  11. Probing thyroglobulin in undiluted human serum based on pattern recognition and competitive adsorption of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ran; Huang, Shuai; Li, Jing; Chae, Junseok

    2014-10-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a sensitive indicator of persistent or recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer of follicular cell origin. Detection of Tg in human serum is challenging as bio-receptors, such as anti-Tg, used in immunoassay have relatively weak binding affinity. We engineer sensing surfaces using the competitive adsorption of proteins, termed the Vroman Effect. Coupled with Surface Plasmon Resonance, the "cross-responsive" interactions of Tg on the engineered surfaces produce uniquely distinguishable multiple signature patterns, which are discriminated using Linear Discriminant Analysis. Tg-spiked samples, down to 2 ng/ml Tg in undiluted human serum, are sensitively and selectively discriminated from the control (undiluted human serum).

  12. Surface adsorption and hopping cause probe-size-dependent microrheology of actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Tang, Jay X.

    2011-04-01

    A network of filaments formed primarily by the abundant cytoskeletal protein actin gives animal cells their shape and elasticity. The rheological properties of reconstituted actin networks have been studied by tracking micron-sized probe beads embedded within the networks. We investigate how microrheology depends on surface properties of probe particles by varying the stickiness of their surface. For this purpose, we chose carboxylate polystyrene (PS) beads, silica beads, bovine serum albumin (BSA) -coated PS beads, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) -grafted PS beads, which show descending stickiness to actin filaments, characterized by confocal imaging and microrheology. Probe size dependence of microrheology is observed for all four types of beads. For the slippery PEG beads, particle-tracking microrheology detects weaker networks using smaller beads, which tend to diffuse through the network by hopping from one confinement “cage” to another. This trend is reversed for the other three types of beads, for which microrheology measures stiffer networks for smaller beads due to physisorption of nearby filaments to the bead surface. We explain the probe size dependence with two simple models. We also evaluate depletion effect near nonadsorption bead surface using quantitative image analysis and discuss the possible impact of depletion on microrheology. Analysis of these effects is necessary in order to accurately define the actin network rheology both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Oxidative Stress Using a Reactive Oxygen Species–Activated Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    Prunty, Megan C.; Aung, Moe H.; Hanif, Adam M.; Allen, Rachael S.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Thule, Peter M.; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In vivo methods for detecting oxidative stress in the eye would improve screening and monitoring of the leading causes of blindness: diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Methods To develop an in vivo biomarker for oxidative stress in the eye, we tested the efficacy of a reactive oxygen species (ROS)–activated, near-infrared hydrocyanine-800CW (H-800CW) fluorescent probe in light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) mouse models. After intravitreal delivery in LIRD rats, fluorescent microscopy was used to confirm that the oxidized H-800CW appeared in the same retinal layers as an established ROS marker (dichlorofluorescein). Results Dose–response curves of increasing concentrations of intravenously injected H-800CW demonstrated linear increases in both intensity and total area of fundus hyperfluorescence in LIRD mice, as detected by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Fundus hyperfluorescence also correlated with the duration of light damage and functional deficits in vision after LIRD. In LIRD rats with intravitreal injections of H-800CW, fluorescent labeling was localized to photoreceptor inner segments, similar to dichlorofluorescein. Conclusions Hydrocyanine-800CW detects retinal ROS in vivo and shows potential as a novel biomarker for ROS levels in ophthalmic diseases. PMID:26348635

  14. Chemical Reactivity Probes for Assessing Abiotic Natural Attenuation by Reducing Iron Minerals.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dimin; Bradley, Miranda J; Hinkle, Adrian W; Johnson, Richard L; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2016-02-16

    Increasing recognition that abiotic natural attenuation (NA) of chlorinated solvents can be important has created demand for improved methods to characterize the redox properties of the aquifer materials that are responsible for abiotic NA. This study explores one promising approach: using chemical reactivity probes (CRPs) to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of contaminant reduction by reducing iron minerals. Assays of thermodynamic CRPs were developed to determine the reduction potentials (ECRP) of suspended minerals by spectrophotometric determination of equilibrium CRP speciation and calculations using the Nernst equation. ECRP varied as expected with mineral type, mineral loading, and Fe(II) concentration. Comparison of ECRP with reduction potentials measured potentiometrically using a Pt electrode (EPt) showed that ECRP was 100-150 mV more negative than EPt. When EPt was measured with small additions of CRPs, the systematic difference between EPt and ECRP was eliminated, suggesting that these CRPs are effective mediators of electron transfer between mineral and electrode surfaces. Model contaminants (4-chloronitrobenzene, 2-chloroacetophenone, and carbon tetrachloride) were used as kinetic CRPs. The reduction rate constants of kinetic CRPs correlated well with the ECRP for mineral suspensions. Using the rate constants compiled from literature for contaminants and relative mineral reduction potentials based on ECRP measurements, qualitatively consistent trends were obtained, suggesting that CRP-based assays may be useful for estimating abiotic NA rates of contaminants in groundwater. PMID:26814150

  15. Adsorption and photocatalysis of nanocrystalline TiO2 particles for Reactive Red 195 removal: effect of humic acids, anions and scavengers.

    PubMed

    Chládková, B; Evgenidou, E; Kvítek, L; Panáček, A; Zbořil, R; Kovář, P; Lambropoulou, D

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the coupling of adsorption capacity and photocatalytic efficiency of two different industrially produced titania catalysts was investigated and compared. The azo dye Reactive Red 195 was selected as a model compound. The tested catalysts, PK-10 and PK-180, exhibited different adsorption capacities due to their significant difference in their specific surface, but both have proven to be effective photocatalysts for photodegradation of the studied dye. PK-10 exhibited strong adsorption of the studied dye due to its high specific surface area, while the second studied catalyst, PK-180, demonstrated negligible adsorption of Reactive Red 195. The effect of the pH, the concentration of the catalyst and the initial concentration of the dye appear to affect the photocatalytic rate. The effect of the presence of humic acids and inorganic ions was also examined, while the contribution of various reactive species was indirectly evaluated through the addition of various scavengers. To evaluate the extent of mineralisation of the studied dye, total organic carbon (TOC) measurements during the experiment were also conducted. Besides total colour removal, evident reduction of TOC was also achieved using both catalysts. PMID:26054457

  16. Adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 and Congo Red dye from aqueous solution by amino-functionalized Fe3O4 particles: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ting-guo; Wang, Li-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic adsorbent was synthesized by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modification of Fe(3)O(4) particles using a two-step process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and vibration sample magnetometry were used to characterize the obtained magnetic adsorbent. EDS and XPS showed that APTES polymer was successfully introduced onto the as-prepared Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particle surfaces. The saturation magnetization of the magnetic adsorbent was around 65 emu g(-1), which indicated that the dye can be removed fast and efficiently from aqueous solution with an external magnetic field. The maximum adsorption capacities of Fe(3)O(4)/APTES for C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) were 51.4 and 118.8 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) on Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particles corresponded well to the Langmuir model and the Freundlich model, respectively. The adsorption processes for RR 228 and CR followed the pseudo-second-order model. The Boyd's film-diffusion model showed that film diffusion also played a major role in the studied adsorption processes for both dyes. Thermodynamic study indicated that both of the adsorption processes of the two dyes are spontaneous exothermic. PMID:24552735

  17. Efficient and rapid adsorption characteristics of templating modified guar gum and silica nanocomposite toward removal of toxic reactive blue and Congo red dyes.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sagar; Patra, Abhay Shankar; Ghorai, Soumitra; Sarkar, Amit Kumar; Mahato, Vivekananda; Sarkar, Supriyo; Singh, R P

    2015-09-01

    The present study highlights the potentiality of sol-gel synthesized guar gum-graft-poly (acrylamide)/silica (g-GG/SiO2) hybrid nanocomposite toward the rapid removal of toxic reactive blue 4 (RB) and Congo red (CR) dyes from aqueous solution. Various physicochemical characterizations support the feasibility of the functionalized guar gum matrix as efficient template for the formation of homogeneous nanoscale silica particles. The composite demonstrates rapid and superior adsorption efficiency of RB (Qmax: 579.01 mg g(-1) within 40 min) and CR (Qmax: 233.24 mg g(-1) within 30 min) dyes from aqueous environment. Here, the pH driven adsorption process depends strongly on the ionic strength of the salt solution. The adsorption kinetics data predicts that pseudo second-order (surface adsorption) and intraparticle diffusion take place simultaneously. The adsorption equilibrium is in good agreement with the Langmuir isotherm, while the thermodynamics study confirms spontaneous nature of the adsorption process. Desorption study predicts the excellent regenerative efficacy of nanocomposite. PMID:26002148

  18. Probing the sorption reactivity of the edge surfaces in birnessite nanoparticles using nickel(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanova, Anna A.; Kwon, Kideok D.; Bone, Sharon E.; Bargar, John R.; Refson, Keith; Sposito, Garrison; Peña, Jasquelin

    2015-09-01

    Birnessite minerals are layer-type manganese oxides characterized by large surface areas, the presence of cation vacancy sites and varying amounts of structural and adsorbed Mn(III). In this study, we identify the conditions that favor trace metal adsorption on the edge surfaces of birnessite nanoparticles by using Ni as a probe ion for Ni K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and geometry optimizations based on density function theory (DFT). In δ-MnO2 nanoparticles free of Mn(II,III) at pH 6.6, Ni was adsorbed primarily at vacancy sites, with a minor fraction of Ni present as a double-edge sharing (DES) or a double-corner sharing (DCS) complex at surface loadings exceeding the vacancy content. In Mn(III)-rich δ-MnO2 nanoparticles, about 80% of the adsorbed Ni formed a mixture of DES and DCS complexes at particle edges in samples with loadings ranging from 0.01 to 0.08 mol Ni mol-1 Mn, with only a small fraction of vacancy sites available to adsorb Ni. The presence of Mn(III) at the nanoparticle edges also changed the architecture of the DES complex, causing the Ni octahedra to adsorb onto the cavity formed between two Mn(III) octahedra at the particle edges. The EXAFS-derived Ni-Mn interatomic distances of 3.01-3.05 Å for this "flipped" Ni-DES complex were in excellent agreement with those obtained by DFT geometry optimization. Edge surfaces on birnessite nanoparticles have a lower affinity for trace metals than vacancy sites, but have a moderate sorption capacity (ca. 0.14 mol Ni mol-1 Mn at vacancies vs. 0.06 mol Ni mol-1 Mn at edge surfaces). Finally, although Mn(III) increases the relative proportion of Ni adsorbed at particle edges by blocking sorption sites on the basal surface, the overall sorption capacity of the mineral diminishes significantly.

  19. Monitoring Cr Intermediates and Reactive Oxygen Species with Fluorescent Probes during Chromate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cr(VI) genotoxicity is caused by products of its reductive metabolism inside the cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Cr(V,IV) intermediates are potential sources of oxidative damage by Cr(VI). Here, we investigated seven fluorescent probes for the detection of ROS and non-ROS oxidants in Cr(VI) reactions with its main reducers. We found that Cr(V)-skipping metabolism of Cr(VI) by ascorbate in vitro gave no responses with all tested dyes, indicating nonreactivity of Cr(IV) and absence of ROS. Cr(VI) reduction with glutathione (GSH) or Cys strongly enhanced the fluorescence of dichlorofluorescein (DCF) and dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR123) but produced minimal fluorescence with dihydroethidium and no increases with aminophenylfluorescein and CellRox Green, Orange, and Red. Several tests showed that Cr(VI)-thiol reactions lacked ROS and that Cr(V) caused oxidation of DCF and DHR123. DCF reacted only with free Cr(V), whereas DHR123 detected both the free Cr(V) and Cr(V)-GSH complex. We estimated that Cr(VI)-GSH reactions generated approximately 75% Cr(V)-GSH and 25% free Cr(V), whereas Cys reactions appeared to produce only free Cr(V). DHR123 measurements in H460 cells showed that reduction of Cr(VI) was complete within 20 min postexposure, but it lasted at least 1 h without GSH. Cells with restored ascorbate levels exhibited no DCF or DHR123 oxidation by Cr(VI). Overall, our results demonstrated that Cr(VI) metabolism with its biological reducers lacked ROS and that DHR123 and DCF responses were indicators of total and free Cr(V), respectively. CellRox dyes, dihydroethidium and aminophenylfluorescein, are insensitive to Cr(V,IV) and can be used for monitoring ROS during coexposure to Cr(VI) and oxidants. PMID:24646070

  20. Controls on the surface chemical reactivity of volcanic ash investigated with probe gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maters, Elena C.; Delmelle, Pierre; Rossi, Michel J.; Ayris, Paul M.; Bernard, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Increasing recognition that volcanic ash emissions can have significant impacts on the natural and human environment calls for a better understanding of ash chemical reactivity as mediated by its surface characteristics. However, previous studies of ash surface properties have relied on techniques that lack the sensitivity required to adequately investigate them. Here we characterise at the molecular monolayer scale the surfaces of ash erupted from Eyjafjallajökull, Tungurahua, Pinatubo and Chaitén volcanoes. Interrogation of the ash with four probe gases, trimethylamine (TMA; N(CH3)3), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA; CF3COOH), hydroxylamine (HA; NH2OH) and ozone (O3), reveals the abundances of acid-base and redox sites on ash surfaces. Measurements on aluminosilicate glass powders, as compositional proxies for the primary constituent of volcanic ash, are also conducted. We attribute the greater proportion of acidic and oxidised sites on ash relative to glass surfaces, evidenced by comparison of TMA/TFA and HA/O3 uptake ratios, in part to ash interaction with volcanic gases and condensates (e.g., H2O, SO2, H2SO4, HCl, HF) during the eruption. The strong influence of ash surface processing in the eruption plume and/or cloud is further supported by particular abundances of oxidised and reduced sites on the ash samples resulting from specific characteristics of their eruptions of origin. Intense interaction with water vapour may result in a higher fraction of oxidised sites on ash produced by phreatomagmatic than by magmatic activity. This study constitutes the first quantification of ash chemical properties at the molecular monolayer scale, and is an important step towards better understanding the factors that govern the role of ash as a chemical agent within atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic or biotic systems.

  1. Nonlinear optical property of hemicyanine self-assembled monolayers on gold and its adsorption kinetics probed by optical second-harmonic generation and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraoka, Ryo; Kaise, Go; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Okawa, Haruki; Ikezawa, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Kazuhiko

    2002-08-01

    We have prepared the organosulfur self-assembled monolayer (SAM) containing hemicyanine on gold. It shows a large second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χzzz=58 pm/V. The adsorption kinetics of the SAM on gold was also probed by the in situ real time measurements of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. While the SHG kinetics was saturated immediately after the immersion of the gold substrate in the solution, the SPR kinetics showed additional slow adsorption for more than 20 000 s. This means that rapid formation of the well-ordered hemicyanine SAM is followed by gradual physisorption where the molecules are disordered.

  2. Mesoporous magnetic activated carbon: Effect of preparation route on texture and surface properties and on effect for Reactive Black 5 adsorption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakoudakis, Dimitrios; Saroyan, Hayarpi; Lazaridis, Nikolaos; Deliyanni, Eleni

    2016-04-01

    Mesoporous magnetic activated carbon: Effect of preparation route on texture and surface properties and on effect for Reactive Black 5 adsorption. Dimitrios Giannakoudakis1, Hayarpi Saroyan2, Nikolaos Lazaridis2, Eleni Deliyanni2 1 City College of New York, Chemistry Department, 160 Convent Avenue, New York, United States 2 Laboratory of General and oInorganic Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24 Thessaloniki, Greece In this study, the effect of preparation route of a mesoporous magnetic activated carbon on Reactive Black 5 (RB5) adsorption was investigated. The synthesis of the magnetic activated carbon was achieved both with (i) impregnation method (Bmi), and (ii) co-precipitation with two precipitation agents: NaOH (Bm) and NH4OH (Bma). After synthesis, the full characterization with various techniques (SEM, FTIR, XRD, DTA, DTG, VSM) was achieved in order to testify the effect of the preparation route on its textural and surface properties. It was shown that after the precipitation method the prepared carbon presented a collapsed texture and small magnetic properties. Effects of initial solution pH, effect of temperature, adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated in order to conclude about the aforementioned effect of the preparation method on dye adsorption performance of the magnetic carbons. The adsorption evaluation of the magnetic activated carbon presented higher adsorption capacity of Bmi carbon (350 mg/g) and lower of Bm (150 mg/g). Equilibrium experiments are also performed studying the effect of contact time (pseudo-first and -second order equations) and temperature (isotherms at 25, 45 and 65 °C fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich model). A full thermodynamic evaluation was carried out, calculating the parameters of enthalpy, free energy and entropy (ΔHο, ΔGο and ΔSο). The characterization with various techniques revealed the possible interactions/forces of dye-composite system.

  3. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas. PMID:26972953

  4. A DFT study of the acid-base properties of anatase TiO2 and tetragonal ZrO2 by adsorption of CO and CO2 probe molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi Tiffany; Tosoni, Sergio; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-10-01

    We have performed a comparative study of the acid-base characteristics of the surfaces of anatase TiO2 and tetragonal ZrO2. To this end we performed DFT + U calculations on CO and CO2 probe molecules adsorbed both on terraces and steps of the two oxides. For titania, CO adsorption results in a moderate adsorption energy (about - 0.3 eV) and in a positive shift of the Csbnd O stretching frequency (about + 40 cm- 1), typical of Lewis acid sites, with no clear difference in the acidity between terraces or steps. For zirconia we found a similar CO binding energy as for titania, and a CO vibrational shift that depends on the location of the Zr cation: negligible on terraces, similar to TiO2 on steps. We conclude that the acidic properties are similar in the two oxide surfaces. Things are different for CO2 adsorption. On titania the interaction is weak and surface carbonates compete with physisorbed CO2, indicating a weak basic character. On the contrary, on zirconia three types of stable carbonates have been identified. Their vibrational frequencies are consistent with IR measurements reported in the literature. The most stable species forms on steps of the t-ZrO2 surface and consists of a CO32 - unit which lies flat on the surface with the O atoms pointing towards three Zr ions. The species forms spontaneously by extraction of a lattice oxygen by an incoming CO2 molecule. The different reactivity points towards a much more pronounced basic character of zirconia compared to titania, at least if measured by CO2 adsorption.

  5. Role of surface chemistry and morphology in the reactive adsorption of H₂S on iron (hydr)oxide/graphite oxide composites.

    PubMed

    Arcibar-Orozco, Javier A; Wallace, Rajiv; Mitchell, Joshua K; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2015-03-10

    Composites of magnetite and two-line ferrihydrite with graphite oxide (GO) were synthesized and tested as hydrogen sulfide adsorbents. Exhausted and initial composites were characterized by the adsorption of nitrogen, X-ray diffraction, potentiometric titration, thermal analysis, and FTIR. The addition of GO increased the surface area of the composites due to the formation of new micropores. The extent of the increase depended on the nature of the iron (hydr)oxide and the content of GO. The addition of GO did not considerably change the crystal structure but increased the number of acidic functional groups. While for the magnetite composites an increase in the H2S adsorption capacity after GO addition was found, the opposite effect was recorded for the ferrihydrite composites. That increase in the adsorption capacity was linked to the affinity of the composites to adsorb water in mesopores of specific sizes in which the reaction with basic surface groups takes place. Elemental sulfur and ferric and ferrous sulfates were detected on the surface of the exhausted samples. A redox reactive adsorption mechanism is proposed to govern the retention of hydrogen sulfide on the surface of the composites. The incorporation of GO enhances the chemical retention of H2S due to the incorporation of OH reactive groups and an increase in surface heterogeneity. PMID:25675243

  6. Assessing Site-Isolation of Amine Groups on Aminopropyl-Functionalized SBA-15 Materials via Spectroscopic and Reactivity Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, Jason C; Dabestani, Reza T; Buchanan III, A C; Jones, Christopher W

    2008-01-01

    The average degree of separation and the accessibility of aminopropyl groups on SBA-15 silica materials prepared using different silane grafting approaches are compared. Three specific synthetic approaches are used: (1) the traditional grafting of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane in toluene, (2) a protection/deprotection method using benzyl- or trityl-spacer groups, and (3) a cooperative dilution method where 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane and methyltrimethoxysilane are co-condensed on the silica surface as a silane mixture. The site-isolation and accessibility of the amine groups are probed via three methods: (a) evaluation of pyrene groups adsorbed onto the solids using fluorescence spectroscopy, (b) the reactions of chlorodimethyl(2,3,4,5-tetramethyl-2,4-cyclopentadien-1-yl)silane (Cp'Si(Me){sub 2}Cl) and chloro(cyclopenta-2,4-dienyl)dimethylsilane (CpSi(Me){sub 2}Cl) with the tethered amine sites, and (c) comparison of the reactivity of zirconium constrained-geometry-inspired catalysts (CGCs) prepared using the Cp'Si(Me){sub 2}-modified aminosilicas in the catalytic polymerization of ethylene to produce poly(ethylene). The spectroscopic probe of site-isolation suggests that both the protection/deprotection method and the cooperative dilution method yield similarly isolated amine sites that are markedly more isolated than sites on traditional aminosilica. In contrast, both reactivity probes show that the protection/deprotection strategy leads to more uniformly accessible amine groups. It is proposed that the reactivity probes are more sensitive tests for accessibility and site-isolation in this case.

  7. Hg2+-reactive double hydrophilic block copolymer assemblies as novel multifunctional fluorescent probes with improved performance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinming; Li, Changhua; Liu, Shiyong

    2010-01-19

    We report on novel type of responsive double hydrophilic block copolymer (DHBC)-based multifunctional chemosensors to Hg(2+) ions, pH, and temperatures and investigate the effects of thermo-induced micellization on the detection sensitivity. Well-defined DHBCs bearing rhodamine B-based Hg(2+)-reactive moieties (RhBHA) in the thermo-responsive block, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-RhBHA) (PEO-b-P(NIPAM-co-RhBHA)), were synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Nonfluorescent RhBHA moieties are subjected to selective ring-opening reaction upon addition of Hg(2+) ions or lowering solution pH, producing highly fluorescent acyclic species. Thus, at room temperature PEO-b-P(NIPAM-co-RhBHA) DHBCs can serve as water-soluble multifunctional and efficient fluorescent chemosensors to Hg(2+) ions and pH. Upon heating above the lower critical solution temperature (approximately 36 degrees C) of the PNIPAM block, they self-assemble into micelles possessing P(NIPAM-co-RhBHA) cores and well-solvated PEO coronas, which were fully characterized by dynamic and static laser light scattering. It was found that the detection sensitivity to Hg(2+) ions and pH could be dramatically improved at elevated temperatures due to fluorescence enhancement of RhBHA residues in the acyclic form, which were embedded within hydrophobic cores of thermo-induced micellar aggregates. This work represents a proof-of-concept example of responsive DHBC-based multifunctional fluorescent chemosensors for the highly efficient detection of Hg(2+) ions, pH, and temperatures with tunable detection sensitivity. Compared to reaction-based small molecule Hg(2+) probes in previous literature reports, the integration of stimuli-responsive block copolymers with well-developed small molecule-based selective sensing moieties in the current study are expected to exhibit preferred advantages including enhanced detection sensitivity, water dispersibility

  8. A BODIPY-based fluorescent probe for ratiometric detection of gold ions: utilization of Z-enynol as the reactive unit.

    PubMed

    Üçüncü, Muhammed; Karakuş, Erman; Emrullahoğlu, Mustafa

    2016-07-01

    Using an irreversible intramolecular cyclisation pathway triggered by gold ions, a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) based fluorescent probe integrated with a reactive Z-enynol motif responds selectively to gold ions. With the addition of gold(iii), the probe displays ratiometric fluorescence behaviour clearly observable to the naked eye under both visible and UV light. PMID:27284598

  9. Aggregation and adsorption of reactive dyes in the presence of an anionic surfactant on mesoporous aminopropyl silica.

    PubMed

    Cestari, Antonio R; Vieira, Eunice F S; Vieira, Gláucia S; Almeida, Luis E

    2007-05-15

    A surface tension technique was used to determine the critical aggregation concentration (cac) of a yellow and a red dye in relation to the presence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS) and to temperature changes in buffered aqueous solutions. The cac values of the yellow dye increase from 25 to 45 degrees C (from 41.37 to 50.32 mg L-1) and decrease from 45 to 55 degrees C (from 50.32 to 38.72 mg L-1). The cac values for the red dye/DBS aggregates decrease (from 124.52 to 88.50 mg L-1) from 25 to 55 degrees C. Adsorption of the two dyes onto a mesoporous aminopropyl silica (Sil-NH2) was also studied. The adsorption of the yellow dye increases with an increase in temperature from 25 to 55 degrees C. In the presence of DBS the adsorption on Sil-NH2 for the yellow dye decreases, and for the red dye increases from 25 to 55 degrees C. Adsorptions occurred below and above the cac of the anionic dyes/DBS aggregates. Adsorption of the dyes onto Sil-NH2 fitted well to the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson adsorption models. However, in the presence of DBS, only the Freundlich model fit the experimental adsorption data at low dye concentrations (less than 400 mg L-1). In this case, the Redlich-Peterson model was only fitted to the red dye adsorption data. The magnitude of the Dubinin-Radushkevich energetic parameters (E, from 7.00 to 15.00 kJ mol-1) indicates that the adsorption of the dyes onto Sil-NH2, in the absence and in the presence of DBS, is controlled by water adsorbed/dye in solution ion-exchange interactions. It is observed that the values of DeltaadsH are positive for both dyes and the values are quite similar to each other. The exception is the adsorption of the yellow dye in the presence of DBS, which is slightly exothermic. The DeltaadsG values are all negative. However, the interactions of the dyes with Sil-NH2 silica are more spontaneous in the presence of the surfactant. The positive adsorption entropy values (Deltaads

  10. Detailed characterization and preliminary adsorption model for materials for an intermediate-scale reactive-transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R.; Siegel, M.D.

    1994-12-31

    An experiment involving migration of fluid and tracers (Li, Br, Ni) through a 6-m-high x 3-m-dia caisson Wedron 510 sand, is being carried out for Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Sand`s surface chemistry of the sand was studied and a preliminary surface-complexation model of Ni adsorption formulated for transport calculations. XPS and leaching suggest that surface of the quartz sand is partially covered by thin layers of Fe-oxyhydroxide and Ca-Mg carbonate and by flakes of kaolinite. Ni adsorption by the sand is strongly pH-dependent, showing no adsorption at pH 5 and near-total adsorption at pH 7. Location of adsorption edge is independent of ionic strength and dissolved Ni concentration; it is shifted to slightly lower pH with higher pCO2 and to slightly higher pH by competition with Li. Diminished adsorption at alkiline pH with higher pCO2 implies formation of dissolved Ni-carbonato complexes. Ni adsorption edges for goethite and quartz, two components of the sand were also measured. Ni adsorption on pure quartz is only moderately pH-dependent and differs in shape and location from that of the sand, whereas Ni adsorption by goethite is strongly pH-dependent. A triple-layer surface-complexation model developed for goethite provides a good fit to the Ni-adsorption curve of the sand. Based on this model, the apparent surface area of the Fe-oxyhydroxide coating is estimated to be 560 m{sup 2}/g, compatible with its occurrence as amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxide. Potentiometric titrations on sand also differ from pure quartz and suggest that effective surface area of sand may be much greater than that measured by N{sub 2}-BET gas adsorption. Attempts to model the adsorption of bulk sand in terms of properties of pure end member components suggest that much of the sand surface is inert. Although the exact Ni adsorption mechanisms remain ambiguous, this preliminary adsorption model provides an initial set of parameters that can be used in transport calculations.

  11. Practical use of chemical probes for reactive oxygen species produced in biological systems by γ-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min Hee; Moon, Yu Ran; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Kang-Soo; Cho, Jae-Young; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2009-05-01

    Application of chemical probes, for detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS), was tested during γ-irradiation. The ethanol/α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)- N- tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN) and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) were structurally stable enough to detect rad OH and H 2O 2, increasingly generated by γ-irradiation up to 1000 Gy. Interestingly, the production rate of H 2O 2, but not rad OH, during γ-irradiation, was significantly different between in vitro systems of lettuce and spinach. These results suggest that 4-POBN and DAB could be utilized as a semi-quantitative probe to quantify rad OH and H 2O 2, produced by γ-irradiation up to 1000 Gy.

  12. New reagents for the introduction of reactive functional groups into chemically synthesized DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Skrzypczynski, Zbigniew; Wayland, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    An efficient and versatile preparative approach is described, allowing for the preparation of DNA probes modified with an aldehyde group at the 3'- or 5'-end. The developed synthetic strategy allows for the preparation of a new family of phosphoramidites and solid supports compatible with the automated synthesis of modified oligonucleotide probes. These new reagents were prepared from intermediates 3 and 3a, obtained from the commercially available aleuritic acid 1. It was demonstrated that the new phosphoramidite reagents also could be used as new types of cleavable linkers. A new and efficient method for the production of 5' aldehyde-labeled DNA probes was developed. PMID:12757390

  13. Chemical Probes for Molecular Imaging and Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide and Reactive Sulfur Species in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous species produced by both bacteria and higher eukaryotic organisms, including mammalian vertebrates, has attracted attention in recent years for its contributions to human health and disease. H2S has been proposed as a cytoprotectant and gasotransmitter in many tissue types, including mediating vascular tone in blood vessels as well as neuromodulation in the brain. The molecular mechanisms dictating how H2S affects cellular signaling and other physiological events remain insufficiently understood. Furthermore, the involvement of H2S in metal-binding interactions and formation of related RSS such as sulfane sulfur may contribute to other distinct signaling pathways. Owing to its widespread biological roles and unique chemical properties, H2S is an appealing target for chemical biology approaches to elucidate its production, trafficking, and downstream function. In this context, reaction-based fluorescent probes offer a versatile set of screening tools to visualize H2S pools in living systems. Three main strategies used in molecular probe development for H2S detection include azide and nitro group reduction, nucleophilic attack, and CuS precipitation. Each of these approaches exploit the strong nucleophilicity and reducing potency of H2S to achieve selectivity over other biothiols. In addition, a variety of methods have been developed for the detection of other reactive sulfur species (RSS), including sulfite and bisulfite, as well as sulfane sulfur species and related modifications such as S-nitrosothiols. Access to this growing chemical toolbox of new molecular probes for H2S and related RSS sets the stage for applying these developing technologies to probe reactive sulfur biology in living systems. PMID:25474627

  14. Non-hydrolyzable Diubiquitin Probes Reveal Linkage-Specific Reactivity of Deubiquitylating Enzymes Mediated by S2 Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Flierman, Dennis; van der Heden van Noort, Gerbrand J.; Ekkebus, Reggy; Geurink, Paul P.; Mevissen, Tycho E.T.; Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Komander, David; Ovaa, Huib

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitin chains are important post-translational modifications that control a large number of cellular processes. Chains can be formed via different linkages, which determines the type of signal they convey. Deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) regulate ubiquitylation status by trimming or removing chains from attached proteins. DUBs can contain several ubiquitin-binding pockets, which confer specificity toward differently linked chains. Most tools for monitoring DUB specificity target binding pockets on opposing sides of the active site; however, some DUBs contain additional pockets. Therefore, reagents targeting additional pockets are essential to fully understand linkage specificity. We report the development of active site-directed probes and fluorogenic substrates, based on non-hydrolyzable diubiquitin, that are equipped with a C-terminal warhead or a fluorogenic activity reporter moiety. We demonstrate that various DUBs in lysates display differential reactivity toward differently linked diubiquitin probes, as exemplified by the proteasome-associated DUB USP14. In addition, OTUD2 and OTUD3 show remarkable linkage-specific reactivity with our diubiquitin-based reagents. PMID:27066941

  15. Irreversible adsorption-driven assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces revealed by a dynamic surface tension probe.

    PubMed

    Bizmark, Navid; Ioannidis, Marios A; Henneke, Dale E

    2014-01-28

    Adsorption-driven self-assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces is a promising bottom-up approach for the preparation of advanced functional materials and devices. Full realization of its potential requires quantitative understanding of the parameters controlling the self-assembly, the structure of nanoparticles at the interface, the barrier properties of the assembly, and the rate of particle attachment. We argue that models of dynamic surface or interfacial tension (DST) appropriate for molecular species break down when the adsorption energy greatly exceeds the mean energy of thermal fluctuations and validate alternative models extending the application of generalized random sequential adsorption theory to nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces. Using a model colloidal system of hydrophobic, charge-stabilized ethyl cellulose nanoparticles at neutral pH, we demonstrate the potential of DST measurements to reveal information on the energy of adsorption, the adsorption rate constant, and the energy of particle-interface interaction at different degrees of nanoparticle coverage of the interface. These findings have significant implications for the quantitative description of nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces. PMID:24397479

  16. Probing the adsorption of weak acids on graphite using amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed M A; Huang, Jun; McPhedran, Kerry N; Zeng, Hongbo; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2015-03-17

    Recent thermodynamics calculations and adsorption isotherms showed that the adsorption of a self-assembled layer (SAL) of ionized weak acids to carbon was attributed to the negatively charged hydrogen bonding (-CAHB), yet the direct visualization and characterization of this adsorption behavior have not been reported. Here, an amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-FM AFM) technique was applied to discriminate the adsorption of decanoic acids (DA) on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Thermodynamics calculations revealed that the adsorption of SAL was driven by the formation of -CAHB with negatively charged functional groups of HOPG. Multilayer adsorption could occur over the adsorbed ionized SAL, leading to the development of aggregates. AM-FM AFM imaging showed that the adsorption of the DA molecules forming aggregates occurred only for the HOPG-functionalized steps, while DA molecules were found to adsorb over the entire functionalized HOPG surface after water-plasma treatment, as evident from the frequency shifts identified in AFM images. PMID:25710305

  17. The effects of the specific adsorption of anion on the reactivity of the Ru(0001) surface towards CO adsorption and oxidation: in situ FTIRS studies.

    PubMed

    Jin, J M; Lin, W F; Christensen, P A

    2008-07-01

    The dynamics of adsorption and oxidation of CO on Ru(0001) electrode in sulfuric acid solution have been studied using in situ FTIR spectroscopy under potential control and at open circuit, the latter at 20 and 55 degrees C. The in situ IR data show clearly that the bisulfate anion adsorbs on the Ru(0001) surface over the potential range from -200 mV to 350 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at 20 degrees C in the absence and presence of adsorbed CO; however, increasing the temperature to 55 degrees C and/or increasing the concentration of dissolved O(2) reduces the bisulfate adsorption. The formation of surface (hydro-) oxide at higher potentials replaces the bisulfate adsorbates. Both linear (CO(L)) and three-fold hollow bonded CO (CO(H)) adsorbates were produced following CO adsorption at Ru(0001) in H(2)SO(4), as was observed in our previous studies in HClO(4). However, the amount of adsorbed CO observed in H(2)SO(4) was ca. 10% less than that in HClO(4); in addition, the CO(L) and CO(H) frequencies were higher in H(2)SO(4), and the onset potential for CO(ads) oxidation 25 mV lower. These new results are interpreted in terms of a model in which the adsorbed bisulfate weakens the CO adlayer, allowing the active Ru oxide layer to form at lower potentials. Significantly different results were observed at open circuit in H(2)SO(4) compared both to the data under potential control and to our earlier data in HClO(4), and these observations were rationalized in terms of the adsorbed HSO(4)(-) anions (pre-adsorbed at -200 mV) inhibiting the oxidation of the surface at open circuit (after stepping from the initial potential of -200 mV), as the latter was no longer driven by the imposed electrochemical potential but via chemical oxidation by trace dissolved O(2). Results from experiments at open circuit at 55 degrees C and using oxygen-saturated H(2)SO(4) supported this model. The difference in Ru surface chemistry between imposed electrochemical control and chemical control has potential

  18. Using iron-loaded sepiolite obtained by adsorption as a catalyst in the electro-Fenton oxidation of Reactive Black 5.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, O; Fernández de Dios, M A; Pazos, M; Sanromán, M A

    2013-09-01

    This study explores the possibility of using iron-loaded sepiolite, obtained by recovering iron from polluted water, as a catalyst in the electro-Fenton oxidation of organic pollutants in textile effluents. The removal of iron ions from aqueous solution by adsorption on sepiolite was studied in batch tests at iron concentrations between 100 and 1,000 ppm. Electro-Fenton experiments were carried out in an electrochemical cell with a working volume of 0.15 L, an air flow of 1 L/min, and 3 g of iron-loaded sepiolite. An electric field was applied using a boron-doped diamond anode and a graphite sheet cathode connected to a direct current power supply with a constant potential drop. Reactive Black 5 (100 mg/L) was selected as the model dye. The adsorption isotherms proved the ability of the used adsorbent. The removal of the iron ion by adsorption on sepiolite was in the range of 80-100 % for the studied concentration range. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were found to be applicable in terms of the relatively high regression values. Iron-loaded sepiolite could be used as an effective heterogeneous catalyst for the degradation of organic dyes in the electro-Fenton process. Successive batch processes were performed at optimal working conditions (5 V and pH 2). The results indicate the suitability of the proposed combined process, adsorption to iron remediation followed by the application of the obtained iron-loaded sepiolite to the electro-Fenton technique, to oxidize polluted effluents. PMID:23516035

  19. Zinc (hydr)oxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites: role of surface features in H₂S reactive adsorption.

    PubMed

    Giannakoudakis, Dimitrios A; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2014-12-15

    Zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites with various levels of complexity were synthesized using an in situ precipitation method. Then they were used as H2S adsorbents in visible light. The materials' surfaces were characterized before and after H2S adsorption by various physical and chemical methods (XRD, FTIR, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration, adsorption of nitrogen and SEM/EDX). Significant differences in surface features and synergistic effects were found depending on the materials' composition. Addition of graphite oxide and the deposition of gold nanoparticles resulted in a marked increase in the adsorption capacity in comparison with that on the zinc hydroxide and zinc hydroxide/AuNP. Addition of AuNPs to zinc hydroxide led to a crystalline ZnO/AuNP composite while the zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNP composite was amorphous. The ZnOH/GO/AuNPs composite exhibited the greatest H2S adsorption capacity due to the increased number of OH terminal groups and the conductive properties of GO that facilitated the electron transfer and consequently the formation of superoxide ions promoting oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. AuNPs present in the composite increased the conductivity, helped with electron transfer to oxygen, and prevented the fast recombination of the electrons and holes. PMID:25306297

  20. Recent progress in the development of fluorescent, luminescent and colorimetric probes for detection of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Fang; Hyun, Ji Young; Wei, Tingwen; Qiang, Jian; Ren, Xintong; Shin, Injae; Yoon, Juyoung

    2016-05-21

    Reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species cause oxidative and nitrosative stresses, respectively. These stresses are implicated not only in diverse physiological processes but also in various pathological processes, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, some ROS and RNS in the environment are pollutants that threaten human health. As a consequence of these effects, sensitive methods, which can be employed to selectively monitor ROS and RNS in live cells, tissues and organisms as well as in environmental samples, are needed so that their biological roles can be understood and their concentrations in environmental samples can be determined. In this review, fluorescent, luminescent and colorimetric ROS and RNS probes, which have been developed since 2011, are comprehensively discussed. PMID:27092436

  1. Probing the Reactivity and Radical Nature of Oxidized Transition Metal-Thiolate Complexes by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mei; Campbell, J. Larry; Chauhan, Rajat; Grapperhaus, Craig A.; Chen, Hao

    2013-04-01

    Transition metal thiolate complexes such as [PPN]+[RuL3]- (PPN = bis(triphenylphosphoranylidene) ammonium and L = diphenylphosphinobenzenethiolate) are known to undergo addition reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons via the formation of new C-S bonds in solution upon oxidation. The reaction mechanism is proposed to involve metal-stabilized thiyl radical intermediates, a new type of distonic ions such as [RuL3]+ ion in the case of [PPN]+[RuL3]-. This study presents the reactivity and structure investigation of [RuL3]+ by mass spectrometry (MS) in conjunction with ion/molecule reactions. The addition reactions of [RuL3]+ with alkenes or methyl ketones in the gas phase are indeed observed, in agreement with the proposed mechanism. Such reactivity is also maintained by several fragment ions of [RuL3]+, indicating the preserved thiyl diradical core structure is responsible for the addition reaction. The thiyl radical nature of [RuL3]+ was further verified by the ion/molecule reaction of [RuL3]+ with dimethyl disulfide, in which the characteristic CH3S• transfer occurs, both at atmospheric pressure and also at low pressure (~mTorr). These results provide, for the first time, clear mass spectrometric evidence of the radical nature of [RuL3]+ (i.e., the distonic ion structure of [RuL3]+), arising from the oxidation of non-innocent thiolate ligands of the complex [PPN]+[RuL3]-. Similar thiolate complexes, including ReL3 and NiL2, were also examined. Although reactions of oxidized ReL3 or NiL2 with CH3SSCH3 take place at atmospheric pressure, the corresponding reaction did not occur in vacuum. Consistent with these data, the addition of ethylene was not observed either, indicating lower reactivities of [ReL3]+ and [NiL2]+ in comparison to [RuL3]+.

  2. Emerging scanning probe approaches to the measurement of ionic reactivity at energy storage materials.

    PubMed

    Barton, Zachary J; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-04-01

    Many modern energy storage technologies operate via the nominally reversible shuttling of alkali ions between an anode and a cathode capable of hosting them. The degradation process that occurs with normal usage is not yet fully understood, but emerging progress in analytical tools may help address this knowledge gap. By interrogating ionic fluxes over electrified surfaces, scanning probe methods may identify features that impact the local cyclability of a material and subsequently help inform rational electrode design for future generations of batteries. Methods developed for identifying ion fluxes for batteries show great promise for broader applications, including biological interfaces, corrosion, and catalysis. Graphical Abstract Versatile ionics for next-generation batteries. PMID:26898202

  3. Reactivity, Selectivity, and Stability in Sulfenic Acid Detection: A Comparative Study of Nucleophilic and Electrophilic Probes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinayak; Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S

    2016-05-18

    The comparative reaction efficiencies of currently used nucleophilic and electrophilic probes toward cysteine sulfenic acid have been thoroughly evaluated in two different settings-(i) a small molecule dipeptide based model and (ii) a recombinant protein model. We further evaluated the stability of corresponding thioether and sulfoxide adducts under reducing conditions which are commonly encountered during proteomic protocols and in cell analysis. Powered by the development of new cyclic and linear C-nucleophiles, the unsurpassed efficiency in the capture of sulfenic acid under competitive conditions is achieved and thus holds great promise as highly potent tools for activity-based sulfenome profiling. PMID:27123991

  4. Probing adsorption of polyacrylamide-based polymers on anisotropic Basal planes of kaolinite using quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Alagha, Lana; Wang, Shengqun; Yan, Lujie; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob

    2013-03-26

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was applied to investigate the adsorption characteristics of polyacrylamide-based polymers (PAMs) on anisotropic basal planes of kaolinite. Kaolinite basal planes were differentiated by depositing kaolinite nanoparticles (KNPs) on silica and alumina sensors in solutions of controlled pH values. Adsorption of an in-house synthesized organic-inorganic Al(OH)3-PAM (Al-PAM) as an example of cationic hybrid PAM and a commercially available partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (MF1011) as an example of anionic PAM was studied. Cationic Al-PAM was found to adsorb irreversibly and preferentially on tetrahedral silica basal planes of kaolinite. In contrast, anionic MF1011 adsorbed strongly on aluminum-hydroxy basal planes, while its adsorption on tetrahedral silica basal planes was weak and reversible. Adsorption study revealed that both electrostatic attraction and hydrogen-bonding mechanisms contribute to adsorption of PAMs on kaolinite. The adsorbed Al-PAM layer was able to release trapped water overtime and became more compact, while MF1011 film became more dissipative as backbones stretched out from kaolinite surface with minimal overlapping. Experimental results obtained from this study provide clear insights into the phenomenon that governs flocculation-based solid-liquid separation processes using multicomponent flocculants of anionic and cationic nature. PMID:23398356

  5. Earle K. Plyler Prize Talk: Using High Resolution Electronic Spectroscopy to Probe Reactive Chemical Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Terry

    2009-03-01

    Gas phase chemical reactions, such as occur in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, plasma processing, etc. are of great importance to our economy and society. These reactions are typically very complex involving up to 1000's of elementary steps with a corresponding number of reactive chemical intermediates. Spectrospic diagnostics, based upon well analyzed and well understood spectra of the intermediates, are crucial for monitoring such reactions and unraveling their mechanisms. These spectral analyses often benefit from the guidance provided by quantum chemical calculations and conversely the molecular parameters, experimentally determined from the spectra, serve as ``gold standards'' for benchmarking such calculations. Such standards are especially valuable for reactive intermediates whose electronic or geometric structure is particularly complex because of electron-spin interactions, Jahn-Teller effects or other vibronic interactions, hindered internal motions, large molecular size and weight, etc. The organic alkoxy, RO., and peroxy, RO2., (R=alkyl group) free radicals are excellent examples of such species. The talk will focus on our recent characterization of these radicals via their ``high-resolution,'' mostly rotationally resolved, electronic spectra utilizing the techniques of laser induced fluorescence, stimulated emission pumping, and cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Selected spectra, their analysis, and the molecular information resulting therefrom will be discussed.

  6. Adsorption And Simultaneous Dechlorination Of PCBs On GAC/Fe/Pd: Mechanistic Aspects And Reactive Capping Barrier Concept

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are many concerns and challenges in current remediation strategies for sediments contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Our efforts have been geared toward the development of granular activated carbon (GAC) impregnated with reactive iron/palladium (Fe/Pd) bime...

  7. Physiological and pathophysiological reactive oxygen species as probed by EPR spectroscopy: the underutilized research window on muscle ageing.

    PubMed

    A Abdel-Rahman, Engy; Mahmoud, Ali M; Khalifa, Abdulrahman M; Ali, Sameh S

    2016-08-15

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) play crucial roles in triggering, mediating and regulating physiological and pathophysiological signal transduction pathways within the cell. Within the cell, ROS efflux is firmly controlled both spatially and temporally, making the study of ROS dynamics a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed for ROS assessment; however, many of these assays are not capable of direct identification or determination of subcellular localization of different ROS. Here we highlight electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy as a powerful technique that is uniquely capable of addressing questions on ROS dynamics in different biological specimens and cellular compartments. Due to their critical importance in muscle functions and dysfunction, we discuss in some detail spin trapping of various ROS and focus on EPR detection of nitric oxide before highlighting how EPR can be utilized to probe biophysical characteristics of the environment surrounding a given stable radical. Despite the demonstrated ability of EPR spectroscopy to provide unique information on the identity, quantity, dynamics and environment of radical species, its applications in the field of muscle physiology, fatiguing and ageing are disproportionately infrequent. While reviewing the limited examples of successful EPR applications in muscle biology we conclude that the field would greatly benefit from more studies exploring ROS sources and kinetics by spin trapping, protein dynamics by site-directed spin labelling, and membrane dynamics and global redox changes by spin probing EPR approaches. PMID:26801204

  8. Bonding and reactivity of clean and chemically-modified semiconductor surfaces probed with STM

    SciTech Connect

    Hamers, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has been used to directly study the interrelationships between chemical composition, chemical reactivity, electronic structure, and surface morphology at the atomic level on clean and chemically-modified semiconductor surfaces. Our work has focused recently on understanding the atomic-level interactions of dopants such as phosphorus and boron on the Si(001) surface, and the influence of these atoms on other chemical reactions such as the thermal decomposition of disilane to grow epitaxial silicon. Using STM to study how these atoms modify the surface in combination with tunneling spectroscopy to reveal the occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals of these structures provides direct insight into the nature of chemical bonding on these surfaces. This talk will discuss the application of STM to understand chemical bonding at silicon surfaces.

  9. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  10. Probing the electron-accepting reactivity of isomeric bis(pyrrolidinium) fullerene salts in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Guldi, D.M.

    2000-02-24

    A series of water-soluble isomer bis(pyrrolidinium) salts, with C{sub 60}(C{sub 4}H{sub 10}N{sup +}){sub 2} as cationic moiety (2a--2d), were probed in radical- and light-induced reduction studies and compared to bis(carboxylates) C{sub 60}[C(COO{sup {minus}}){sub 2}]{sub 2} and to {gamma}-CD-encapsulated C{sub 60}. Pulse radiolytic reduction of 2a--2d with hydrated electrons and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}}COH radicals leads to the formation of the fullerene {pi}-radical anion, exhibiting fingerprint absorption characteristics in the near-IR region. Because of the electron-withdrawing nature of the pyrrolidinium groups the electron-acceptor properties of the investigated bis(pyrrolidinium) salts are markedly improved relative to the bis(carboxylates) (C{sub 60}[C(COO{sup {minus}}){sub 2}]{sub 2}) and also relative to C{sub 60}. For example, the rate constants for the fullerene reduction of 2a--2d with hydrated electrons ((0.88--2.2) x 10{sup 10} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}) and (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}{sm{underscore}bullet}COH radicals ((4.7--7.1) x 10{sup 8} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}) are clearly faster than those noted for C{sub 60}[C(COO{sup {minus}}){sub 2}]{sub 2} (e{sub aq}{sup {minus}}: (0.19--0.34) x 10{sup 10} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}; (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}}COH: (0.9--2.2) x 10{sup 8}M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}), and C{sub 60} (e{sub aq}{sup {minus}}: 1.8 x 10{sup 10} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}; (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}}COH: 2.7 x 10{sup 8} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}). Photolysis of 2a--2d gives rise to singlet excited state absorptions that closely resemble earlier observations for the pyrrolidine precursor, e.g., C{sub 60}(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}N){sub 2} (1a--1d) in deoxygenated toluene solutions. The triplet lifetimes of 2a--2d, as measured by nanosecond-resolved photolysis, are typically around 33 {mu}s, similar to the triplet lifetimes of truly monomeric fullerene

  11. Probing the adsorption and orientation of 2,3-dichloro-5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone on gold nano-rods: A SERS and XPS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukaegbu, Maraizu; Enwerem, Nkechi; Bakare, Oladapo; Sam, Vichetra; Southerland, William; Vivoni, Alberto; Hosten, Charles

    2016-06-01

    2, 3-Dichloro-5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DDNQ) is a synthetic naphthaquinone which has shown reduced chemotoxicity and enhanced chemotherapeutic activity in in vitro studies. The ability of DDNQ to serve as a chemical dopant of graphene resulting improved performance of graphene by tuning its band gap is also being explored. In this report surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy was utilized to probe the adsorption/orientation of DDNQ on gold nano-rods. Interpretation of the SERS data required a complete assignment of the vibrational modes of DDNQ and this was performed with DFT calculations using BP86/6-31G (d, p), B3LYP/6-31G (d) basis sets, and potential energy distribution (PED) calculations. Surface selection rules and relative band enhancement factors were utilized to propose an orientation and mode of interaction for DDNQ adsorbed on Au nanosurfaces. XPS data supported the conclusions obtained from the SERS data.

  12. Probing Defect Sites on CeO2 Nanocrystals with Well-Defined Surface Planes by Raman Spectroscopy and O2 Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Li, Meijun; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer III, Harry M; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2010-01-01

    Defect sites play an essential role in ceria catalysis. In this study, ceria nanocrystals with well defined surface planes have been synthesized and utilized for studying defect sites with both Raman spectroscopy and O2 adsorption. Ceria nanorods ({110} + {100}), nanocubes ({100}), and nano-octahedrons ({111}) are employed to analyze the quantity and quality of defect sites on different ceria surfaces. On oxidized surface, nanorods have the most abundant intrinsic defect sites, followed by nanocubes and nano-octahedrons. When reduced, the induced defect sites are more clustered on nanorods than on nanocubes although similar amount (based on surface area) of such defect sites are produced on the two surfaces. Very few defect sites can be generated on the nano-octahedrons due to the least reducibility. These differences can be rationalized by the crystallographic surface terminations of the ceria nanocrystals. The different defect sites on these nanocrystals lead to the adsorption of different surface dioxygen species. Superoxide on one-electron defect sites and peroxide on two-electron defect sites with different clustering degree are identified on the ceria nanocrystals depending on their morphology. Furthermore, the stability and reactivity of these oxygen species are also found to be surface-dependent, which is of significance for ceria-catalyzed oxidation reactions.

  13. Probing the adsorption mechanism in thiamazole bound to the silver surface with Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering and DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Nandita; Thomas, Susy; Sarkar, Anjana; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2009-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of thiamazole have been investigated in aqueous solution. Thiamazole is an important anti-thyroid drug that is used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism (over activity of the thyroid gland). Due to its medicinal importance, the surface adsorption properties of thiamazole have been studied. The experimental Raman and SERS data are supported with DFT calculations using B3LYP functional with LANL2DZ basis set. From the SERS spectra as well as theoretical calculations, it has been inferred that thiamazole is chemisorbed to the silver surface directly through the sulphur atom and the ring N atom, with a tilted orientation.

  14. Probing adsorption of DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG5000 to the surface of felodipine and griseofulvin nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Rydberg, Hanna A; Yanez Arteta, Marianna; Berg, Staffan; Lindfors, Lennart; Sigfridsson, Kalle

    2016-08-20

    Nanosized formulations of poorly water-soluble drugs show great potential due to improved bioavailability. In order to retain colloidal stability, the nanocrystals need to be stabilized. Here we explore the use of the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugated phospholipids DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG5000 as stabilizers of felodipine and griseofulvin nanocrystals. Nanocrystal stability and physicochemical properties were examined and the interaction between the PEGylated lipids and the nanocrystal surface as well as a macroscopic model surface was investigated. Using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring both mass adsorption and the thickness of the adsorbed layer were estimated. The results indicate that the PEGylated lipids are adsorbed as flat layers of around 1-3nm, and that DSPE-PEG5000 forms a thicker layer compared with DSPE-PEG2000. In addition, the mass adsorption to the drug crystals and the model surface are seemingly comparable. Furthermore, both DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG5000 rendered stable drug nanocrystals, with a somewhat higher surface binding and stability seen for DSPE-PEG2000. These results suggest DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG5000 as efficient nanocrystal stabilizers, with DSPE-PEG2000 giving a somewhat higher surface coverage and superior colloidal stability, whereas DSPE-PEG5000 shows a more extended structure that may have advantages for prolongation of circulation time in vivo and facilitation for targeting modifications. PMID:27329674

  15. Reactive adsorption of ammonia and ammonia/water on CuBTC metal-organic framework: A ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liangliang; Bandosz, Teresa; Joshi, Kaushik L.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Gubbins, Keith E.

    2013-01-01

    We report ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulations for reactive adsorption of NH3 on dehydrated CuBTC metal-organic framework. If the temperature is moderate (up to 125 °C), the dehydrated CuBTC demonstrates a good hydrostatic stability for water concentrations up to 4.0 molecules per copper site. However, if the temperature increases to 550 K, the dehydrated CuBTC will collapse even at a small water concentration, 1.0 H2O molecule per copper site. When NH3 molecules are adsorbed in the channel and micropores of CuBTC, they prefer to chemisorb to the copper sites rather than forming a dimer with another NH3 molecule. The formation of equimolar Cu2(NH2)4 and (NH4)3BTC structures is observed at 348 K, which is in good agreement with previous experimental findings. The dehydrated CuBTC framework is partially collapsed upon NH3 adsorption, while the Cu-Cu dimer structure remains stable under the investigated conditions. Further calculations reveal that the stability of CuBTC is related to the ammonia concentration. The critical NH3 concentration after which the dehydrated CuBTC starts to collapse is determined to be 1.0 NH3 molecule per copper site. Depending on whether NH3 concentration is below or above the critical value, the dehydrated CuBTC can be stable to a higher temperature, 378 K, or can collapse at a lower temperature, 250 K. H2O/NH3 mixtures have also been studied, and we find that although water molecules do not demonstrate a strong interaction with the copper sites of CuBTC, the existence of water molecules can substantially prevent ammonia from interacting with CuBTC, and thus reduce the amount of chemisorbed NH3 molecules on CuBTC and stabilize the CuBTC framework to some extent.

  16. Novel Lipophilic Probe for Detecting Near-Membrane Reactive Oxygen Species Responses and Its Application for Studies of Pancreatic Acinar Cells: Effects of Pyocyanin and L-Ornithine

    PubMed Central

    Chvanov, Michael; Huang, Wei; Jin, Tao; Wen, Li; Armstrong, Jane; Elliot, Vicky; Alston, Ben; Burdyga, Alex; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The aim of this study was to develop a fluorescent reactive oxygen species (ROS) probe, which is preferentially localized in cellular membranes and displays a strong change in fluorescence upon oxidation. We also aimed to test the performance of this probe for detecting pathophysiologically relevant ROS responses in isolated cells. Results: We introduced a novel lipophilic ROS probe dihydrorhodamine B octadecyl ester (H2RB-C18). We then applied the new probe to characterize the ROS changes triggered by inducers of acute pancreatitis in pancreatic acinar cells. We resolved ROS changes produced by L-ornithine, L-arginine, cholecystokinin-8, acetylcholine, taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate, palmitoleic acid ethyl ester, and the bacterial toxin pyocyanin. Particularly prominent ROS responses were induced by pyocyanin and L-ornithine. These ROS responses were accompanied by changes in cytosolic Ca2+concentration ([Ca2+]i), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), and NAD(P)H concentration. Innovation: The study describes a novel sensitive lipophilic ROS probe. The probe is particularly suitable for detecting ROS in near-membrane regions and therefore for reporting the ROS environment of plasma membrane channels and pumps. Conclusions: In our experimental conditions, the novel probe was more sensitive than 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (CM-H2DCF) and dihydrorhodamine123 (H2R123) and allowed us to resolve ROS responses to secretagogues, pyocyanin, and L-ornithine. Changes in the fluorescence of the new probe were particularly prominent in the peripheral plasma membrane-associated regions. Our findings suggest that the new probe will be a useful tool in studies of the contribution of ROS to the pathophysiology of exocrine pancreas and other organs/tissues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 451–464. PMID:24635199

  17. A water-soluble selenoxide reagent as a useful probe for the reactivity and folding of polythiol peptides☆

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Kenta; Noguchi, Masato; Singh, Beena G.; Priyadarsini, K. Indira; Fujio, Katsuhiko; Kubo, Yurika; Takayama, Kyoko; Ando, Setsuko; Iwaoka, Michio

    2012-01-01

    A water-soluble selenoxide (DHSox) having a five-membered ring structure enables rapid and selective conversion of cysteinyl SH groups in a polypeptide chain into SS bonds in a wide pH and temperature range. It was previously demonstrated that the second-order rate constants for the SS formation with DHSox would be proportional to the number of the free SH groups present in the substrate if there is no steric congestion around the SH groups. In the present study, kinetics of the SS formation with DHSox was extensively studied at pH 4–10 and 25 °C by using reduced ribonuclease A, recombinant hirudin variant (CX-397), insulin A- and B-chains, and relaxin A-chain, which have two to eight cysteine residues, as polythiol substrates. The obtained rate constants showed stochastic SS formation behaviors under most conditions. However, the rate constants for CX-397 at pH 8.0 and 10.0 were not proportional to the number of the free SH groups, suggesting that the SS intermediate ensembles possess densely packed structures under weakly basic conditions. The high two-electron redox potential of DHSox (375 mV at 25 °C) compared to l-cystine supported the high ability of DHSox for SS formation in a polypeptide chain. Interestingly, the rate constants of the SS formation jumped up at a pH around the pKa value of the cysteinyl SH groups. The SS formation velocity was slightly decreased by addition of a denaturant due probably to the interaction between the denaturant and the peptide. The stochastic behaviors as well as the absolute values of the second-order rate constants in comparison to dithiothreitol (DTTred) are useful to probe the chemical reactivity and conformation, hence the folding, of polypeptide chains. PMID:23772375

  18. Comparative Study on Synergetic Degradation of a Reactive Dye Using Different Types of Fly Ash in Combined Adsorption and Photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri Babu, P. V. S.; Swaminathan, G.

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study was carried out on four different fly ashes used as a catalyst for the degradation of Acid Red 1 using ultraviolet rays. These fly ashes are collected from different thermal power stations located at various places in India and having different chemical compositions. Three fly ashes are from lignite-based thermal power plants, and one is from the coal-based power plant. One fly ash is classified as Class F, two fly ashes are classified as Class C and remaining one is not conforming to ASTM C618 classification. X-Ray Fluorescence analysis was used to identify the chemical composition of fly ashes and SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, Fe2O3 and TiO2 were found to be the major elements present in different proportions. Various analysis were carried out on all the fly ashes like Scanning Electron Microscopy to identify the microphysical properties, Energy Dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy to quantify the elements present in the catalyst and X-Ray Diffraction to identify the catalyst phase analysis. The radical generated during the reaction was identified by Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The parameters such as initial pH of the dye solution, catalyst dosage and initial dye concentration which influence the dye degradation efficiency were studied and optimised. In 60 min duration, the dye degradation efficiency at optimum parametric values of pH 2.5, initial dye concentration of 10 mg/L and catalyst dosage of 1.0 g/L using various fly ashes, i.e., Salam Power Plant, Barmer Lignite Power Plant, Kutch Lignite Power Plant and Neyveli Lignite Thermal Power plant (NLTP) were found to be 40, 60, 67 and 95 % respectively. The contribution of adsorption alone was 18 % at the above mentioned optimum parametric values. Among the above four fly ash NLTP fly ashes proved to be most efficient.

  19. Concerns in the application of fluorescent probes DCDHF-DA, DHR 123 and DHE to measure reactive oxygen species in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Mazyar

    2015-12-25

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed in biological systems by partial reduction of molecular oxygen. The essential role of ROS in maintaining physiological health may be corrupted into oxidative stress by their overproduction or the exhaustion of antioxidant mechanisms. Many studies covering a broad range of methodologies have investigated ROS production and their toxic mechanisms of action. Of these methodologies, fluorometry has been among the preferred techniques. Three frequently used fluorescent probes for in vitro studies are 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCDHF-DA), Dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR 123) and Dihydroethidium (DHE). Apart from the unavoidable limitations of auto-oxidation, photo-oxidation and photo-conversion, there are also concerns relating to protocol modification for the improved monitoring of ROS. This paper aims to highlight such contributing factors, including cell culture conditions and the characteristics of individual fluorescent probes in the utilization of these selected probes in in vitro systems. PMID:26318276

  20. RADMAP: Simple probes for rapid assessment of complex reactivity: A method and case studies on the reaction of hydrogen atoms with unsaturated organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew K; Fawcett, Jason A; Clyburne, Jason A C; Pye, Cory C

    2016-03-01

    RADMAP, an open source program, allows for rapid analysis and visualization of the earliest stages of reactions between any molecule and a monoatomic probe (i.e., H*, H(+), H(-), Br*, or any other monoatomic species) using ab initio methods. This program creates non-planar potential energy surfaces of the initial interaction between a molecule of interest and the monoatomic probe. These surfaces can be used to both predict the site of addition as well as provide a qualitative estimate for the relative proportion of the formation of adducts; therefore, it gives insight into both the reactivity and the kinetic stability of a molecule. The program presents a way to quickly predict the number of signals anticipated in transverse field muon spin resonance spectra as well as their relative intensities. PMID:26851865

  1. Characterization of reactive impurities in methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol by monitoring the activities of added ionic probes with ion selective electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Deshmukh, B.K.; Coetzee, J.F.

    1984-11-01

    The presence of reactive impurities compromises many important applications of solvents. It is shown that a wide variety of impurities can be detected and determined by adding such highly reactive probes as hydrogen, methoxide, copper(II), mercury(II), and fluoride ions and monitoring their activities over an appropriately wide range with the corresponding ion selective electrodes. The results for the alcohols show that typical reagent grades of these solvents contain amines at the 10/sup -5/ - 10/sup -4/ M (1-10 ppm) level as well as other reactive impurities. This approach is applicable to most polar solvents. It has the overriding merits that it detects impurities on the basis on their reactivities (rather than only their concentrations) and that its lower detection limit is self-adjusting in that it is lowest (most favorable) in the very solvents in which impurities are most harmful, i.e., relatively inert solvent. In such solvents, its lower detection limit can be much lower than that attainable with gas chromatography.

  2. Development of type-specific and cross-reactive serological probes for the minor capsid protein of human papillomavirus type 33.

    PubMed Central

    Volpers, C; Sapp, M; Komly, C A; Richalet-Secordel, P; Streeck, R E

    1993-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 33 (HPV33) is associated with malignant tumors of the cervix. In an attempt to develop immunological probes for HPV33 infections, antisera against various bacterial fusion proteins carrying sequences of the minor capsid protein encoded by L2 were raised in animals. Antigenic determinants on the HPV33 L2 protein were identified by using truncated fusion proteins and were classified as type specific or cross-reactive with respect to HPV1, -8, -11, -16, and -18. Cross-reactive epitopes map to amino acids 98 to 107 or to amino acids 102 to 112 and 107 to 117, respectively, depending on the fusion protein used for immunization. Antibodies directed toward these epitopes detect L2 proteins of HPV11, -16, and -18, but not of HPV1 and -8, in Western immunoblots and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. HPV33 L2 amino acids 82 to 94 and 117 to 130 induce type-specific antibodies, with the major response directed to amino acids 117 to 130. By using a synthetic peptide corresponding to L2 amino acids 117 to 130, high-titered, type-specific antisera were obtained. These antisera should be useful as immunological probes for HPV33 infection. Images PMID:8383218

  3. Benzofuroxan as a thiol-specific reactivity probe. Kinetics of its reactions with papain, ficin, bromelain and low-molecular-weight thiols.

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, M; Brocklehurst, K

    1977-01-01

    1. The characteristics of benzofuroxan (benzofurazan 1-oxide, benzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole N-oxide) that relate to its application as a reactivity probe for the study of environments of thiol groups are discussed. 2. To establish a kinetic and mechanistic basis for its use as a probe, a kinetic study of its reaction with 2-mercaptoethanol was carried out. 3. This reaction appears to proceed by a rate-determining attack of the thiolate ion on one of the electrophilic centres of benzofuroxan (possibly C-6) to provide a low steady-state concentration of an intermediate adduct; rapid reaction of this adduct with a second molecule of thiol gives the disulphide and o-benzoquinone dioxime. 4. The effects of the different types of environment that proteins can provide on the kinetic characteristics of reactions of thiol groups with benzofuroxan are delineated. 5. Benzofuroxan was used as a thiolspecific reactivity probe to investigate the active centres of papain (EC 3.4.22.2), ficin (EC 3.4.22.3) and bromelain (EC 3.4.22.4). The results support the concept that the active centres of all three enzymes either contain a nucleophilic thiolate ion whose formation is characterized by a pKa of 3-4 and whose reaction with an electrophile can be assisted by interaction of a site of high electron density in the electrophile with active-centre imidazolium ion of pKa 8-9, or can provide such ions by protonic redistribution in enzyme-reagent or enzyme-substrate complexes. PMID:23765

  4. PREDICTING CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES FOR MINERALS AND XENOBIOTICS: USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY AND VIRTUAL REALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter we review the literature on scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (VR), and computational chemistry and our earlier work dealing with modeling lignin, lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC), humic substances (HSs) and non-bonded organo-mineral interactions...

  5. Azobenzene-caged sulforhodamine dyes: a novel class of ‘turn-on’ reactive probes for hypoxic tumor cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Piao, Wen; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    New sulforhodamine-based fluorescent ‘turn-on’ probes have been developed for the direct imaging of cellular hypoxia. Rapid access to this novel class of water-soluble ‘azobenzene-caged’ fluorophores was made possible through an easily-implementable azo-coupling reaction between a fluorescent primary arylamine derived from a sulforhodamine 101 scaffold (named SR101-NaphtNH 2 ) and a tertiary aniline whose N-substituents are neutral, cationic, or zwitterionic. The detection mechanism is based on the bioreductive cleavage of the azo bond that restores strong far-red fluorescence (emission maximum at 625 nm) by regenerating the original sulforhodamine SR101-NaphtNH 2 . This valuable fluorogenic response was obtained for the three ‘smart’ probes studied in this work, as shown by an in vitro assay using rat liver microsomes placed under aerobic and then under hypoxic conditions. Most importantly, the probe namely SR101-NaphtNH 2 -Hyp-diMe was successfully applied for imaging the hypoxic status of tumor cells (A549 cells).

  6. Different Adsorption Behavior of Rare Earth and Metallic Ion Complexes on Langmuir Mono layers Probed by Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Woongmo; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2013-02-25

    Adsorption behavior of counterions under a Langmuir monolayer was investigated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. By comparing SFG spectra of arachidic acid (AA) Langmuir monolayer/water interface with and without added salt, it was found that the simple trivalent cation La3+ adsorbed on AA monolayer only when the carboxylic headgroups are charged (deprotonated), implying that counterion adsorption is induced by Coulomb interaction. On the other hand, metal hydroxide complex Fe(OH)3 adsorbed even on a charge-neutral AA monolayer, indicating that the adsorption of iron hydroxide is due to chemical interaction such as covalent or hydrogen bonding to the headgroup of the molecules at the monolayer.

  7. Surface-site reactivity in small-molecule adsorption: A theoretical study of thiol binding on multi-coordinated gold clusters

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Elvis C M; Popa, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: The adsorption of organic molecules on metal surfaces has a broad array of applications, from device engineering to medical diagnosis. The most extensively investigated class of metal–molecule complexes is the adsorption of thiols on gold. Results: In the present manuscript, we investigate the dependence of methylthiol adsorption structures and energies on the degree of unsaturation at the metal binding site. We designed an Au20 cluster with a broad range of metal site coordination numbers, from 3 to 9, and examined the binding conditions of methylthiol at the various sites. Conclusion: We found that despite the small molecular size, the dispersive interactions of the backbone are a determining factor in the molecular affinity for various sites. Kink sites were preferred binding locations due to the availability of multiple surface atoms for dispersive interactions with the methyl groups, whereas tip sites experienced low affinity, despite having low coordination numbers. PMID:26925352

  8. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  9. Phosphate-based glass fiber vs. bulk glass: Change in fiber optical response to probe in vitro glass reactivity.

    PubMed

    Massera, J; Ahmed, I; Petit, L; Aallos, V; Hupa, L

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the effect of fiber drawing on the thermal and structural properties as well as on the glass reactivity of a phosphate glass in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-buffered (TRIS) solution and simulated body fluid (SBF). The changes induced in the thermal properties suggest that the fiber drawing process leads to a weakening and probable re-orientation of the POP bonds. Whereas the fiber drawing did not significantly impact the release of P and Ca, an increase in the release of Na into the solution was noticed. This was probably due to small structural reorientations occurring during the fiber drawing process and to a slight diffusion of Na to the fiber surface. Both the powders from the bulk and the glass fibers formed a Ca-P surface layer when immersed in SBF and TRIS. The layer thickness was higher in the calcium and phosphate supersaturated SBF than in TRIS. This paper for the first time presents the in vitro reactivity and optical response of a phosphate-based bioactive glass (PBG) fiber when immersed in SBF. The light intensity remained constant for the first 48h after which a decrease with three distinct slopes was observed: the first decrease between 48 and 200h of immersion could be correlated to the formation of the Ca-P layer at the fiber surface. After this a faster decrease in light transmission was observed from 200 to ~425h in SBF. SEM analysis suggested that after 200h, the surface of the fiber was fully covered by a thin Ca-P layer which is likely to scatter light. For immersion times longer than ~425h, the thickness of the Ca-P layer increased and thus acted as a barrier to the dissolution process limiting further reduction in light transmission. The tracking of light transmission through the PBG fiber allowed monitoring of the fiber dissolution in vitro. These results are essential in developing new bioactive fiber sensors that can be used to monitor bioresponse in situ. PMID:24582246

  10. Synthesis Of Reactive Nano-Fe/Pd Bimetallic System-Impregnated Activated Carbon For The Simultaneous Adsorption And Dechlorination Of PCBs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synthesis and use of reactive metal particles have shown significant environmental implications for the remediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated compounds. Herein, we have developed an effective strategy, employing a series of innovative granular act...

  11. Di- and triarylmethylium ions as probes for the ambident reactivities of carbanions derived from 5-benzylated Meldrum's acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Tan, Yue; Berionni, Guillaume; Ofial, Armin R; Mayr, Herbert

    2014-08-25

    The kinetics of the reactions of carbocations with carbanions 1 derived from 5-benzyl-substituted Meldrum's acids 1-H (Meldrum's acid = 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane-4,6-dione) were investigated by UV/Vis spectroscopic methods. Benzhydryl cations Ar2CH(+) added exclusively to C-5 of the Meldrum's acid moiety. As the second-order rate constants (kC) of these reactions in DMSO followed the linear free-energy relationship lg k = sN (N+E), the nucleophile-specific reactivity parameters N and sN for the carbanions 1 could be determined. In contrast, trityl cations Ar3C(+) reacted differently. While tritylium ions of low electrophilicity (E<-2) reacted with 1 through rate-determining β-hydride abstraction, more Lewis acidic tritylium ions initially reacted at the carbonyl oxygen of 1 to form trityl enolates, which subsequently reionized and eventually yielded triarylmethanes and 5-benzylidene Meldrum's acids by hydride transfer. PMID:25099696

  12. Surface reactivity of iron oxide pigmentary powders toward atmospheric components: XPS, FESEM, and gravimetry of CO and CO{sub 2} adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, H.M.; Cadenhead, D.A.; Zaki, M.I.

    1997-10-15

    The adsorption of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide on a number of specially prepared {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples was measured gravimetrically at 25 C. The samples were prepared from a steel-pickling waste (97 wt% FeSO{sub 4}{center_dot}7H{sub 2}O) by roasting the original material at 700 C for 5 h in air, oxygen, and nitrogen, Estimated surface coverages by the adsorbed CO and CO{sub 2} were made on the basis of nitrogen-adsorption-based surface areas, while the nature of the sample surfaces was investigated by both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field emission SEM (FESEM) techniques. In addition a depth profiling study utilizing a sputtering argon beam and XPS was undertaken. Morphological studies using FESEM showed that neither CO nor CO{sub 2} caused any significant structural changes. The nature of the resultant {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample surfaces differed, with the degree of oxygenation decreasing in the order of preparatory gases: oxygen, (wet) air, nitrogen [IP(O), IP(A), and IP(N)]. The amounts of both CO and CO{sub 2} adsorbed decreased in the sample order IP(A) > IP(O) > IP(N), though in the case of CO adsorption, the amounts adsorbed on IP(A), and IP(O) were not greatly different. In all cases the amounts adsorbed represented only fractional coverage.

  13. Adsorption sites in zeolites A and X probed by competitive adsorption of H{sub 2} with N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}: Implications for N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} separation

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, J.; Trouw, F.; Bug, A.L.R.

    1998-08-01

    The authors determine details of the adsorption of O{sub 2} or N{sub 2} in Li{sup +} exchanged zeolites by way of their effect on coadsorbed H{sub 2} molecules using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) techniques. The results clearly show, for example, the absence of type III cations in Li-A and the expected stronger binding of N{sub 2} (compared with O{sub 2}) and thereby provide insight into the relative efficacy of Li-X for O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation.

  14. Uptake and bio-reactivity of polystyrene nanoparticles is affected by surface modifications, ageing and LPS adsorption: in vitro studies on neural tissue cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Kumarasamy; Kenesei, Kata; Li, Yang; Demeter, Kornél; Környei, Zsuzsanna; Madarász, Emilia

    2015-02-01

    Because of their capacity of crossing an intact blood-brain barrier and reaching the brain through an injured barrier or via the nasal epithelium, nanoparticles have been considered as vehicles to deliver drugs and as contrast materials for brain imaging. The potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles, however, is not fully explored. Using particles with a biologically inert polystyrene core material, we investigated the role of the chemical composition of particle surfaces in the in vitro interaction with different neural cell types. PS NPs within a size-range of 45-70 nm influenced the metabolic activity of cells depending on the cell-type, but caused toxicity only at extremely high particle concentrations. Neurons did not internalize particles, while microglial cells ingested a large amount of carboxylated but almost no PEGylated NPs. PEGylation reduced the protein adsorption, toxicity and cellular uptake of NPs. After storage (shelf-life >6 months), the toxicity and cellular uptake of NPs increased. The altered biological activity of ``aged'' NPs was due to particle aggregation and due to the adsorption of bioactive compounds on NP surfaces. Aggregation by increasing the size and sedimentation velocity of NPs results in increased cell-targeted NP doses. The ready endotoxin adsorption which cannot be prevented by PEG coating, can render the particles toxic. The age-dependent changes in otherwise harmless NPs could be the important sources for variability in the effects of NPs, and could explain the contradictory data obtained with ``identical'' NPs.Because of their capacity of crossing an intact blood-brain barrier and reaching the brain through an injured barrier or via the nasal epithelium, nanoparticles have been considered as vehicles to deliver drugs and as contrast materials for brain imaging. The potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles, however, is not fully explored. Using particles with a biologically inert polystyrene core material, we investigated the

  15. Correlation of plasma characteristics to etch rate and via sidewall angle in a deep reactive ion etch system using Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Koirala, S. P.; Awaah, I.; Burkett, S. L.; Gordon, M. H.

    2011-01-15

    A Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy were used in a deep reactive ion etch system to correlate plasma parameters (atomic fluorine and argon emission, electron density, ion density, and electron average energy) with the etch rate and via sidewall angle. All data were obtained for coil powers ranging from 200 to 800 W, platen powers ranging from 7 to 16 W, and pressure ranging from 3.8 to 62 mTorr with constant SF{sub 6} and Ar flow rates of 112 and 18 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP), respectively. Results indicate that there is a correlation with etch rate for all plasma parameters except for argon emission. For argon emission, the etch rate exhibits a double-valued relation where the etch rate can either increase or decrease with increasing argon emission intensity due to changes in pressure which affect the energy coupling efficiency. As expected, the etch rate increases for measured increases in fluorine emission, electron density, and ion density. The etch rate, however, decreases with increasing average electron energy due to collision processes. In contrast, no correlation is observed between any of the measured plasma parameters with sidewall angle. The last result is consistent with the idea that sidewall angle is primarily controlled by the passivation cycle as opposed to the etching cycle, where all the authors' data were obtained.

  16. Temperature-dependences of the kinetics of reactions of papain and actinidin with a series of reactivity probes differing in key molecular recognition features

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Sheraz; Mellor, Geoffrey W.; Thomas, Emrys W.; Brocklehurst, Keith

    2006-01-01

    The temperature-dependences of the second-order rate constants (k) of the reactions of the catalytic site thiol groups of two cysteine peptidases papain (EC 3.4.22.2) and actinidin (EC 3.4.22.14) with a series of seven 2-pyridyl disulphide reactivity probes (R-S-S-2-Py, in which R provides variation in recognition features) were determined at pH 6.7 at temperatures in the range 4–30 °C by stopped-flow methodology and were used to calculate values of ΔS‡, ΔH‡ and ΔG‡. The marked changes in ΔS‡ from negative to positive in the papain reactions consequent on provision of increase in the opportunities for key non-covalent recognition interactions may implicate microsite desolvation in binding site–catalytic site signalling to provide a catalytically relevant transition state. The substantially different behaviour of actinidin including apparent masking of changes in ΔH‡ by an endothermic conformational change suggests a difference in mechanism involving kinetically significant conformational change. PMID:16445383

  17. Gas adsorption on microporous carbon thin films

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, S.; Pailthorpe, B.A.; Collins, R.E.; Furlong, D.N. )

    1992-05-01

    A gas adsorption study was performed on amorphous hydrogenated carbon thin films which are deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering using acetylene gas. It is found that the films are highly microporous. Annealing significantly increases the adsorption capacity of the films and decreases the effects of low-pressure hysteresis in the adsorption isotherms. The general gas adsorption behavior closely resembles that of powdered activated carbons. The Dubinin-Radushkevich equation can be used to model the submonolayer adsorption isotherm for a variety of gases. 38 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the oxidant-sensing probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Rajesh P; Singh, Shailendra P; Häder, Donat-P; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2010-07-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under simulated solar radiation (UV-B: 0.30Wm(-2), UV-A: 25.70Wm(-2) and PAR: 118.06Wm(-2)) was studied in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937 using the oxidant-sensing fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). DCFH-DA is a nonpolar dye, converted into the polar derivative DCFH by cellular esterases that are nonfluorescent but switched to highly fluorescent DCF when oxidized by intracellular ROS and other peroxides. The images obtained from the fluorescence microscope after 12h of irradiation showed green fluorescence from cells covered with 295, 320 or 395nm cut-off filters, indicating the generation of ROS in all treatments. However, the green/red fluorescence ratio obtained from fluorescence microscopic analysis showed the highest generation of ROS after UV-B radiation in comparison to PAR or UV-A radiation. Production of ROS was also measured by a spectrofluorophotometer and results obtained supported the results of fluorescence microscopy. Low levels of ROS were detected at the start (0h) of the experiment showing that they are generated even during normal metabolism. This study also showed that UV-B radiation causes the fragmentation of the cyanobacterial filaments which could be due to the observed oxidative stress. This is the first report for the detection of intracellular ROS in a cyanobacterium by fluorescence microscopy using DCFH-DA and thereby suggesting the applicability of this method in the study of in vivo generation of ROS. PMID:20570649

  19. Detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the oxidant-sensing probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, Rajesh P.; Singh, Shailendra P.; Haeder, Donat-P.; Sinha, Rajeshwar P.

    2010-07-02

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under simulated solar radiation (UV-B: 0.30 Wm{sup -2}, UV-A: 25.70 Wm{sup -2} and PAR: 118.06 Wm{sup -2}) was studied in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937 using the oxidant-sensing fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). DCFH-DA is a nonpolar dye, converted into the polar derivative DCFH by cellular esterases that are nonfluorescent but switched to highly fluorescent DCF when oxidized by intracellular ROS and other peroxides. The images obtained from the fluorescence microscope after 12 h of irradiation showed green fluorescence from cells covered with 295, 320 or 395 nm cut-off filters, indicating the generation of ROS in all treatments. However, the green/red fluorescence ratio obtained from fluorescence microscopic analysis showed the highest generation of ROS after UV-B radiation in comparison to PAR or UV-A radiation. Production of ROS was also measured by a spectrofluorophotometer and results obtained supported the results of fluorescence microscopy. Low levels of ROS were detected at the start (0 h) of the experiment showing that they are generated even during normal metabolism. This study also showed that UV-B radiation causes the fragmentation of the cyanobacterial filaments which could be due to the observed oxidative stress. This is the first report for the detection of intracellular ROS in a cyanobacterium by fluorescence microscopy using DCFH-DA and thereby suggesting the applicability of this method in the study of in vivo generation of ROS.

  20. Scaling Aspects of Block Co-Polymer Adsorption on Curved Surfaces from Nonselective Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Hershkovits, Eli; Tannenbaum, Allen; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we have developed a geometric-based scaling model that describes the adsorption of diblock copolymer chains from good solvents and θ-solvents onto reactive surfaces of varying curvatures. To evaluate the impact of particle size on the adsorption process, we probed the adsorption of poly(styrene-bmethymethacrylate) (PS-PMMA) diblock copolymers from solvents with different degrees of selectivity on aluminum oxide (Al2O3) surfaces belonging to particles of different sizes. When the adsorbed PMMA layer is dense enough (in the case of a θ-solvent for the PMMA block), our results show good correlation between the theory and experimental results, pointing to the formation of a PMMA adsorption layer and a brushlike PS layer. Conversely, when adsorption occurs from a nonpreferential solvent, particularly on particles with high curvature, the PMMA adsorption layer at the surface becomes less dense and the grafted PS moiety exhibits a transitional morphology consisting of several layers of increasingly sparsely spaced blobs. PMID:18399678

  1. Reactivity of a thick BaO film supported on Pt(111): adsorption and reaction of NO2, H2O, and CO2.

    PubMed

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Yi, Cheol-Woo; Szanyi, János

    2009-09-15

    Reactions of NO2, H2O, and CO2 with a thick (>20 monolayer equivalent (MLE)) BaO film supported on Pt(111) were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). NO2 reacts with a thick BaO layer to form surface nitrite-nitrate ion pairs at 300 K, while only nitrates form at 600 K. In the thermal decomposition process of nitrite-nitrate ion pairs, first nitrites decompose and desorb as NO. Then nitrates decompose in two steps: at lower temperature with the release of NO2 and at higher temperature, nitrates dissociate to NO+O2. The thick BaO layer converts completely to Ba(OH)2 following the adsorption of H2O at 300 K. Dehydration/dehydroxylation of this hydroxide layer can be fully achieved by annealing to 550 K. CO2 also reacts with BaO to form BaCO3 that completely decomposes to regenerate BaO upon annealing to 825 K. However, the thick BaO film cannot be converted completely to Ba(NOx)2 or BaCO3 under the experimental conditions employed in this study. PMID:19588918

  2. Reactivity of a Thick BaO Film Supported on Pt(111): Adsorption and Reaction of NO2, H2O and CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Yi, Cheol-Woo W.; Szanyi, Janos

    2009-09-15

    Reactions of NO2, H2O, and CO2 with a thick (> 20 MLE) BaO film supported on Pt(111) were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). NO2 reacts with a thick BaO to form surface nitrite-nitrate ion pairs at 300 K, while only nitrates form at 600 K. In the thermal decomposition process of nitrite–nitrate ion pairs, first nitrites decompose and desorb as NO. Then nitrates decompose in two steps : at lower temperature with the release of NO2 and at higher temperature, nitrates dissociate to NO + O2. The thick BaO layer converts completely to Ba(OH)2 following the adsorption of H2O at 300 K. Dehydration/dehydroxylation of this hydroxide layer can be fully achieved by annealing to 550 K. CO2 also reacts with BaO to form BaCO3 that completely decomposes to regenerate BaO upon annealing to 825 K. However, the thick BaO film cannot be converted completely to Ba(NOx)2 or BaCO3 under the experimental conditions employed in this study.

  3. Fluorescence turn-on detection of mercury ions based on the controlled adsorption of a perylene probe onto the gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Juanmin; Chen, Jian; Chen, Yang; Li, Yongxin; Shahzad, Sohail Anjum; Wang, Yan; Yang, Meiding; Yu, Cong

    2016-01-01

    A novel fluorescence turn-on strategy based on Au nanoparticles and a perylene probe for the sensing of Hg(2+) ions has been developed. It was observed that a perylene probe could be adsorbed onto the surface of Au NPs through strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Its fluorescence was efficiently quenched by the Au nanoparticles. However, in the presence of Hg(2+) and NaBH4, Hg(2+) was reduced and an Au/Hg amalgam was formed on the surface of the Au nanoparticles. The perylene probe could hardly be adsorbed and quenched by the Au/Hg amalgam. A turn on fluorescence signal was therefore detected. The assay is quite sensitive, and 5 nM Hg(2+) could be easily detected. It is also very selective, a number of metal ions were tested and no noticeable interference was observed. The assay was also successfully applied for the determination of Hg(2+) in lake water samples. A simple, fast, inexpensive, highly sensitive and selective Hg(2+) sensing strategy is therefore established. PMID:26618370

  4. Probing the Properties of the Molecular Adlayers on Metal Substrates: Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study of Amine Adsorption on Gold(111) and Graphene Nanoislands on Cobalt(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hui

    In this thesis, we present our findings on two major topics, both of which are studies of molecules on metal surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The first topic is on adsorption of a model amine compound, 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), on the reconstructed Au(111) surface, chosen for its potential application as a molecular electronic device. The molecules were deposited in the gas phase onto the substrate in the vacuum chamber. Five different patterns of BDA molecules on the surface at different coverages, and the preferred adsorption sites of BDA molecules on reconstructed Au(111) surface, were observed. In addition, BDA molecules were susceptible to tip-induced movement, suggesting that BDA molecules on metal surfaces can be a potential candidate in STM molecular manipulations. We also studied graphene nanoislands on Co(0001) in the hope of understanding interaction of expitaxially grown graphene and metal substrates. This topic can shed a light on the potential application of graphene as an electronic device, especially in spintronics. The graphene nanoislands were formed by annealing contorted hexabenzocoronene (HBC) on the Co(0001) surface. In our experiments, we have determined atop registry of graphene atoms with respect to the underlying Co surface. We also investigated the low-energy electronic structures of graphene nanoislands by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The result was compared with a first-principle calculation using density functional theory (DFT) which suggested strong coupling between graphene pi-bands and cobalt d-electrons. We also observed that the islands exhibit zigzag edges, which exhibits unique electronic structures compared with the center areas of the islands.

  5. Self-healable and reversible liposome leakage by citrate-capped gold nanoparticles: probing the initial adsorption/desorption induced lipid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Juewen

    2015-09-01

    We herein report that the adsorption/desorption of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) transiently causes leakage in fluid phase DOPC liposomes, while the liposomes do not leak with AuNPs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Leakage also fails to occur for gel phase DPPC liposomes. Citrate-capped (but not MPA-capped) AuNPs raise the phase transition temperature of DPPC. We conclude that citrate-capped AuNPs interact with the PC liposomes very strongly, inducing a local fluid-to-gel lipid phase transition for DOPC. Leakage takes place during this transition, and the membrane integrity is resumed after the transition. Citrate-capped AuNPs allow stronger van der Waals forces than MPA-capped AuNPs with PC liposomes, since the latter are separated from the liposome surface by the ~0.3 nm MPA layer.We herein report that the adsorption/desorption of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) transiently causes leakage in fluid phase DOPC liposomes, while the liposomes do not leak with AuNPs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Leakage also fails to occur for gel phase DPPC liposomes. Citrate-capped (but not MPA-capped) AuNPs raise the phase transition temperature of DPPC. We conclude that citrate-capped AuNPs interact with the PC liposomes very strongly, inducing a local fluid-to-gel lipid phase transition for DOPC. Leakage takes place during this transition, and the membrane integrity is resumed after the transition. Citrate-capped AuNPs allow stronger van der Waals forces than MPA-capped AuNPs with PC liposomes, since the latter are separated from the liposome surface by the ~0.3 nm MPA layer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methods, TEM, UV-vis and DLS data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04805b

  6. XPS investigation of surface reactivity of electrode materials: effect of the transition metal.

    PubMed

    Andreu, N; Flahaut, D; Dedryvère, R; Minvielle, M; Martinez, H; Gonbeau, D

    2015-04-01

    The role of the transition metal nature and Al2O3 coating on the surface reactivity of LiCoO2 and LiNi(1/3)Mn(1/3)Co(1/3)O2 (NMC) materials were studied by coupling chemisorption of gaseous probes molecules and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The XPS analyses have put in evidence the low reactivity of the LiMO2 materials toward basic gaseous probe (NH3). The reactivity toward SO2 gaseous probe is much larger (roughly more than 10 times) and strongly influenced by the nature of metal. Only one adsorption mode (redox process producing adsorbed sulfate species) was observed at the LiCoO2 surface, while NMC materials exhibit sulfate and sulfite species at the surface. On the basis of XPS analysis of bare materials and previous theoretical work, we propose that the acid-base adsorption mode involving the Ni(2+) cation is responsible for the sulfite species on the NMC surface. After Al2O3 coating, the surface reactivity was clearly decreasing for both LiCoO2 and NMC materials. In addition, for LiCoO2, the coating modifies the surface reactivity with the identification of both sulfate and sulfite species. This result is in line with a change in the adsorption mode from redox toward acid-base after Al/Co substitution. In the case of NMC materials, the coating induced a decrease of the sulfite species content at the surface. This phenomenon can be related to the cation mixing effect in the NMC. PMID:25751495

  7. NO Adsorption on Pd(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garda, Graciela R.; Ferullo, Ricardo M.; Castellani, Norberto J.

    The reactive behavior of NO on Pd(111) has been studied using a semiempirical theoretical method. The adsorption sites and the related electronic structure have been considered. In particular, the dissociation process has been studied and compared with CO. Different dissociation mechanisms have been proposed and the formation of NCO species has been considered. The results follow the trends reported in the experimental literature.

  8. Optically probing Al—O and O—H vibrations to characterize water adsorption and surface reconstruction on α-alumina: An experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Yujin Kirsch, Harald; Wolf, Martin; Campen, R. Kramer; Wirth, Jonas; Saalfrank, Peter

    2015-02-07

    Oxide/water interfaces are ubiquitous in a wide variety of applications and the environment. Despite this ubiquity, and attendant decades of study, gaining molecular level insight into water/oxide interaction has proven challenging. In part, this challenge springs from a lack of tools to concurrently characterize changes in surface structure (i.e., water/oxide interaction from the perspective of the solid) and O—H population and local environment (i.e., water/oxide interaction from the water perspective). Here, we demonstrate the application of surface specific vibrational spectroscopy to the characterization of the interaction of the paradigmatic α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) surface and water. By probing both the interfacial Al—O (surface phonon) and O—H spectral response, we characterize this interaction from both perspectives. Through electronic structure calculation, we assign the interfacial Al—O response and rationalize its changes on surface dehydroxylation and reconstruction. Because our technique is all-optical and interface specific, it is equally applicable to oxide surfaces in vacuum, ambient atmospheres and at the solid/liquid interface. Application of this approach to additional alumina surfaces and other oxides thus seems likely to significantly expand our understanding of how water meets oxide surfaces and thus the wide variety of phenomena this interaction controls.

  9. AB INITIO Simulations of Desorption and Reactivity of Glycine at a Water-Pyrite Interface at ``Iron-Sulfur World'' Prebiotic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollet, Rodolphe; Boehme, Christian; Marx, Dominik

    2006-08-01

    Glycine at the interface of a pyrite surface (001) FeS2, and bulk water at high pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the “iron-sulfur world” scenario of the origin of life is investigated by theoretical means. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics is used in order to study the desorption process of the zwitterionic form of this amino acid using two different adsorption modes, where either only one or both oxygens of the carboxylate group are anchored to surface iron atoms. It is found that the formation of stabilizing hydrogen bonds plays a key role in the detachment process, leading to longer retention times for the bidentate adsorption mode. In addition, the chemical reactivity of this heterogeneous system is probed by calculating the Fukui functions as site-specific reactivity indices. The most prominent targets for both nucleophilic and electrophilic reactions to occur are surface atoms, whereas the reactivity of glycine is only slightly affected upon anchoring.

  10. Developing an Acidic Residue Reactive and Sulfoxide-Containing MS-Cleavable Homobifunctional Cross-Linker for Probing Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Craig B; Yu, Clinton; Novitsky, Eric J; Huszagh, Alexander S; Rychnovsky, Scott D; Huang, Lan

    2016-08-16

    Cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) has become a powerful strategy for defining protein-protein interactions and elucidating architectures of large protein complexes. However, one of the inherent challenges in MS analysis of cross-linked peptides is their unambiguous identification. To facilitate this process, we have previously developed a series of amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linkers. These MS-cleavable reagents have allowed us to establish a common robust XL-MS workflow that enables fast and accurate identification of cross-linked peptides using multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)). Although amine-reactive reagents targeting lysine residues have been successful, it remains difficult to characterize protein interaction interfaces with little or no lysine residues. To expand the coverage of protein interaction regions, we present here the development of a new acidic residue-targeting sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable homobifunctional cross-linker, dihydrazide sulfoxide (DHSO). We demonstrate that DHSO cross-linked peptides display the same predictable and characteristic fragmentation pattern during collision induced dissociation as amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linked peptides, thus permitting their simplified analysis and unambiguous identification by MS(n). Additionally, we show that DHSO can provide complementary data to amine-reactive reagents. Collectively, this work not only enlarges the range of the application of XL-MS approaches but also further demonstrates the robustness and applicability of sulfoxide-based MS-cleavability in conjunction with various cross-linking chemistries. PMID:27417384

  11. Developing an Acidic Residue Reactive and Sulfoxide-Containing MS-Cleavable Homobifunctional Cross-Linker for Probing Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking mass spectrometry (XL-MS) has become a powerful strategy for defining protein–protein interactions and elucidating architectures of large protein complexes. However, one of the inherent challenges in MS analysis of cross-linked peptides is their unambiguous identification. To facilitate this process, we have previously developed a series of amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linkers. These MS-cleavable reagents have allowed us to establish a common robust XL-MS workflow that enables fast and accurate identification of cross-linked peptides using multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn). Although amine-reactive reagents targeting lysine residues have been successful, it remains difficult to characterize protein interaction interfaces with little or no lysine residues. To expand the coverage of protein interaction regions, we present here the development of a new acidic residue-targeting sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable homobifunctional cross-linker, dihydrazide sulfoxide (DHSO). We demonstrate that DHSO cross-linked peptides display the same predictable and characteristic fragmentation pattern during collision induced dissociation as amine-reactive sulfoxide-containing MS-cleavable cross-linked peptides, thus permitting their simplified analysis and unambiguous identification by MSn. Additionally, we show that DHSO can provide complementary data to amine-reactive reagents. Collectively, this work not only enlarges the range of the application of XL-MS approaches but also further demonstrates the robustness and applicability of sulfoxide-based MS-cleavability in conjunction with various cross-linking chemistries. PMID:27417384

  12. Using density functional theory to study shape-reactivity relationships in Keggin Al-nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Corum, Katie W; Mason, Sara E

    2016-10-01

    Keggin-based aluminum nanoclusters have been shown to be efficient sorbents for the removal of arsenic from water. Obtaining a molecular-level understanding of the adsorption processes associated with these molecules is of fundamental importance, and could pave the way for rational design strategies for water treatment. Due to their size and the availability of experimental crystal structures, Al nanoclusters are computationally tractable at the density functional theory (DFT) level. Here, we compare the reactivity of three aluminum polycations: [Al13O4(OH)24(H2O)12](7+) (Al13), [Al30O8(OH)56(H2O)26](18+) (Al30), and [Al32O8(OH)60(H2O)30](20+) (Al32). We use DFT calculations to determine reactivity as a function of particle topography, using sulfate and chloride as adsorption probes. Our comparative modeling of outer-sphere adsorption of Cl(-) and SO4(2-) on Al13, Al30, and A132 supports that the unique "hourglass" shape characteristic to Al30 gives rise to relatively strong adsorption in the molecular beltway, as well as a wide range of reaction energies as a function of particle topography. PMID:27393966

  13. Binding hotspots on K-Ras: consensus ligand binding sites and other reactive regions from probe-based molecular dynamics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Priyanka; Hancock, John F.; Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used probe-based molecular dynamics (pMD) simulations to search for interaction hotspots on the surface of the therapeutically highly relevant oncogenic K-Ras G12D. Combining the probe-based query with an ensemble-based pocket identification scheme and an analysis of existing Ras-ligand complexes, we show that (i) pMD is a robust and cost-effective strategy for binding site identification, (ii) all four of the previously reported ligand binding sites are suitable for structure-based ligand design, and (iii) in some cases probe binding and expanded sampling of configurational space enable pocket expansion and increase the likelihood of site identification. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution of hotspots in non-pocket-like regions with known protein- and membrane-interacting interfaces, we propose that pMD has the potential to predict surface patches responsible for protein-biomolecule interactions. These observations have important implications for future drug design efforts and will facilitate the search for potential interfaces responsible for the proposed transient oligomerization or interaction of Ras with other biomolecules in the cellular milieu. PMID:25740554

  14. Carbon monoxide adsorption on beryllium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, A.

    2013-02-01

    Density functional calculations are here carried out to study the carbon monoxide molecule adsorption on pristine, hydrogenated and hydroxylated beryllium Be (0001) surfaces. The adsorption energies and structures, the activation barriers to molecular adsorption and dissociation are calculated. These reactions are described in terms of potential energy surfaces and electronic density of states. The quantum results are discussed along two directions: the beryllium surface reactivity in the domain of nuclear fusion devices and the possible usage of beryllium as a catalyst of Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis.

  15. Probing the Orientation of Electrostatically Immobilized Protein G B1 by Time of Flight Secondary Ion Spectrometry, Sum Frequency Generation and Near-edge X-Ray Adsorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Joe E.; Weidner, Tobias; Baugh, Loren; Gamble, Lara J.; Stayton, Patrick S.; Castner, David G.

    2011-01-01

    To fully develop techniques that provide an accurate description of protein structure at a surface, we must start with a relatively simple model system before moving on to increasingly complex systems. In this study, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG), near-edge x-ray adsorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used to probe the orientation of Protein G B1 (6 kDa) immobilized onto both amine (NH3+) and carboxyl (COO−) functionalized gold. Previously, we have shown that we could successful control orientation of a similar Protein G fragment via a cysteine-maleimide bond. In this investigation, to induce opposite end-on orientations, a charge distribution was created within the Protein G B1 fragment by first substituting specific negatively charged amino acids with neutral amino acids and then immobilizing the protein onto two oppositely charged self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces (NH3+ and COO−). Protein coverage, on both surfaces, was monitored by the change in the atomic % N, as determined by XPS. Spectral features within the SFG spectra, acquired for the protein adsorbed onto a NH3+-SAM surface, indicates that this electrostatic interaction does induce the protein to form an oriented monolayer on the SAM substrate. This corresponded to the polarization dependence of the spectral feature related to the NEXAFS N1s to π* transition of the β-sheet peptide bonds within the protein layer. ToF-SIMS data demonstrated a clear separation between the two samples based on the intensity differences of secondary ions stemming from amino acids located asymmetrically within Protein G B1 (Methionine: 62 and 105 m/z; Tyrosine: 107 and 137 m/z; Leucine: 86 m/z). For a more quantitative examination of orientation, we developed a ratio comparing the sum of the intensities of secondary-ions stemming from the amino acid residues at either end of the protein

  16. A mechanistic model of the pyrolysis chemistry of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl as a probe of hydrocarbon structure/reactivity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, T.D.; Klein, M.T.

    1995-12-01

    A mechanistic model of the pyrolysis chemistry of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NBBM) was developed. The elementary steps within NBBM hydropyrolysis reaction families were summarized in the form of reaction matrices, each with a set of associated rules. The pyrolysis model was constructed through the application of the matrices and rules to the components of the reacting system. The kinetics within each reaction family were constrained to follow Polanyi relationships. The Polanyi relation parameters were regressed to fit the model predictions with observed experimental yields for NBBM hydropyrolysis at 420 C. The model was validated by the close agreement between experimental findings and model predictions and then used to probe the controlling mechanisms of NBBM pyrolysis.

  17. Trifluoroethanol and 19F magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance as a basic surface hydroxyl reactivity probe for zirconium(IV) hydroxide structures.

    PubMed

    DeCoste, Jared B; Glover, T Grant; Mogilevsky, Gregory; Peterson, Gregory W; Wagner, George W

    2011-08-01

    A novel technique for determining the relative accessibility and reactivity of basic surface hydroxyl sites by reacting various zirconium(IV) hydroxide materials with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) and characterizing the resulting material using (19)F magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is presented here. Studied here are three zirconium hydroxide samples, two unperturbed commercial materials, and one commercial material that is crushed by a pellet press. Factors, such as the ratio of bridging/terminal hydroxyls, surface area, and pore size distribution, are examined and found to affect the ability of the zirconium(IV) hydroxide to react with TFE. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen isotherms, and (1)H MAS NMR were used to characterize the unperturbed materials, while thermogravitric analysis with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry along with the (19)F MAS NMR were used to characterize the materials that were reacted with TFE. Zirconium hydroxide materials with a high surface area and a low bridging/terminal hydroxyl ratio were found to react TFE in the greatest amounts. PMID:21699226

  18. Characterization of micro- and mesoporous materials using accelerated dynamics adsorption.

    PubMed

    Qajar, Ali; Peer, Maryam; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Foley, Henry C

    2013-10-01

    Porosimetry is a fundamental characterization technique used in development of new porous materials for catalysis, membrane separation, and adsorptive gas storage. Conventional methods like nitrogen and argon adsorption at cryogenic temperatures suffer from slow adsorption dynamics especially for microporous materials. In addition, CO2, the other common probe, is only useful for micropore characterization unless being compressed to exceedingly high pressures to cover all required adsorption pressures. Here, we investigated the effect of adsorption temperature, pressure, and type of probe molecule on the adsorption dynamics. Methyl chloride (MeCl) was used as the probe molecule, and measurements were conducted near room temperature under nonisothermal condition and subatmospheric pressure. A pressure control algorithm was proposed to accelerate adsorption dynamics by manipulating the chemical potential of the gas. Collected adsorption data are transformed into pore size distribution profiles using the Horvath-Kavazoe (HK), Saito-Foley (SF), and modified Kelvin methods revised for MeCl. Our study shows that the proposed algorithm significantly speeds up the rate of data collection without compromising the accuracy of the measurements. On average, the adsorption rates on carbonaceous and aluminosilicate samples were accelerated by at least a factor of 4-5. PMID:23919893

  19. Use of cysteine-reactive crosslinkers to probe conformational flexibility of human DJ-1 demonstrates that Glu18 mutations are dimers

    PubMed Central

    Prahlad, Janani; Hauser, David N.; Milkovic, Nicole M.; Cookson, Mark R.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of a key cysteine residue (Cys106) in the parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1 regulates its ability to protect against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Cys106 interacts with a neighboring protonated Glu18 residue, stabilizing the Cys106-SO2− (sulfinic acid) form of DJ-1. To study this important post-translational modification, we previously designed several Glu18 mutations (E18N, E18D, E18Q) that alter the oxidative propensity of Cys106. However, recent results suggest these Glu18 mutations cause loss of DJ-1 dimerization, which would severely compromise the protein’s function. The purpose of this study was to conclusively determine the oligomerization state of these mutants using X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, thermal stability analysis, CD spectroscopy, sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation, and crosslinking. We found that all of the Glu18 DJ-1 mutants were dimeric. Thiol crosslinking indicates that these mutant dimers are more flexible than the wild-type protein and can form multiple crosslinked dimeric species due to the transient exposure of cysteine residues that are inaccessible in the wild-type protein. The enhanced flexibility of Glu18 DJ-1 mutants provides a parsimonious explanation for their lower observed crosslinking efficiency in cells. In addition, thiol crosslinkers may have an underappreciated value as qualitative probes of protein conformational flexibility. PMID:24832775

  20. Adsorption and functionality of fibrinogen on triblock copolymer-coated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Stephen Moss

    To assess the influence of the surface microenvironment on the adsorption and biologic activity of fibrinogen, a series of poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(propylene oxide) triblock copolymers were adsorbed to solid, hydrophobic polystyrene-divinylbenzene beads. The copolymers, which were of the form PEOsb{b}PPOsb{a}PEOsb{b}, varied in their hydrophile/lipophile balances (HLB) due only to differences in their PEO chain length (5 to 129 EO units) as the hydrophobic PPO core segment was of fixed length (56 or 69 PO units). The surface coverage of copolymers was determined first and after exposing the beads to fibrinogen or to human plasma, the total amount of protein adsorbed to their surface was measured. The functionality of fibrinogen bound to copolymer-modified beads was assessed in terms of fibrin clot formation and by the adherence of macrophages (THP-1 tumor cells). Enzymatic processing was used to probe the surface orientation of fibrinogen. The copolymers appear to adsorb in an expanded fashion, a conclusion supported by surface pressure-area isotherms of the copolymers spread at the air-water interface. As compared to copolymer-free surfaces, protein adsorption decreases by up to 90% as the PEO chain length of the copolymers increases. The copolymer coatings appear to lower fibrinogen adsorption by limiting the available surface area. On surfaces coated with the hydrophobic versions of the copolymers, the biologic assays demonstrate that fibrinogen is as reactive/coagulable as for surfaces with saturated coverages of fibrin despite that these copolymer-coated surfaces have 60% less fibrinogen adsorbed to them. When adsorbed at the same low surface concentration in the absence of copolymer, fibrinogen is not active. Enzymatic processing of bound fibrinogen suggests that the presence of the copolymers promote the adsorption of the protein in end-on fashion. It is proposed here, that when adsorbed end-on, fibrinogen is functional because its reactive sites are

  1. Study of Gas Adsorption on Biphasic Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nader, Rami; Hamieh, Tayssir; Villieras, Frédéric; Angelina. Razafitianamaharav; Toufaily, Joumana; Mcheik, Ali S.; Thomas, Fabien

    This work has carried out on grafted nanoparticles oxide silica to determine the possible existence of "nanoeffect". The textural properties and heterogeneity of surface of the samples were studied at the interface solid-gas. The Geometric properties were discussed in terms of the surface area while the energy properties were discussed in terms of the reactive sites of the surface.In the framework of this study, firstly, the sample was used in the non-grafted state and then in the grafted state using a hydrophilic molecule and a hydrophobic molecule. Several techniques have been used: Infrared spectroscopy, X ray diffraction, the point by point volumetric technique, which enable us to study the interactions between the adsorbate and the solid surface. Finally we have determined the size and electro thermal mobility using zestasizer (Nano ZS). The results obtained show that there are two types of groups silanols and siloxanes on the silica OX5 giving a composite hydrophilic-hydrophobic. This character causes a singular behavior in adsorptive material, the presence of hydrophilic groups, strongly polarized, and is detected by infrared spectroscopy. These groups cause significant differences depending on the polarizability of the probe molecules, and the adsorption of argon shows no heterogeneity of the surface, while nitrogen is adsorbed on the polar sites at low relative pressure, While the volumetric continues to adsorption of argon and nitrogen on combustion silica to obtain and to highlight sites of high energy and polar surface sites. The combustion silica which has been used as adsorbent in this study has an amorphous surface, virtually free of impurities indicates that the sample is not micro porous and grafting of the molecules makes a decrease in high energy sites or to a relative increase in surface low energy.

  2. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  3. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  4. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    The number and chemical identity of reactive sites on surfaces of glass affects the processing, reliability, and lifetime of a number of important commercial products. Surface site densities, distributions, and structural identities are closely tied to the formation and processing of the glass surface, and exert a direct influence on strength and coating performance. The surface of a glass sample may vary markedly from the composition and chemistry of the bulk glass. We are taking a physicochemical approach to understanding adsorption sites on pristine multicomponent glass fibers surfaces, directly addressing the effect of processing on surface reactivity. This project aimed to understand the energy distributions of surface adsorption sites, the chemical/structural identity of those sites, and the relationship of these glasses to glass composition, thermal history, and in future work, surface coatings. We have studied the bulk and surface structure as well as the surface reactivity of the glass fibers with solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, inverse gas chromatography (IGC), and computational chemistry methods. These methods, solid-state NMR and IGC, typically require high surface area materials; however, by using probe molecules for NMR experiments or packing a column at high density for IGC measurements, lower surface area materials, such as glass fibers, can be investigated. The glasses used within this study were chosen as representative specimens of fibers with potentially different reactive sites on their surfaces. The two glass compositions were centered around a nominal E-glass, which contains very little alkali cations and mainly alkaline earth cations, and wool glass, which contains an abundance of alkali cations. The concentration of boron was varied from 0 to 8 mole % in both fiber compositions. Fibers were drawn from each composition at a variety of temperatures and draw speeds to provide a range of glass samples with varying

  5. Probing the Adsorption Behavior of 4,5-Diazafluoren-9-one and Its Schiff Base Derivatives on SIlver and Gold Nanosurfaces Using Raman Spectroscopy, Density Functional Theory and Potential Energy Distribution Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Rhonda Patrice

    from the center ring was shortened because of metal-ligand coordination. These observations are correlated to the shifts in Raman frequencies; a decrease in bond length resulted in a shift to a higher vibrational energy. The surface-enhanced Raman spectrum of DAFO was obtained on silver colloids and gold nanorods. The resulting SER spectra were compared to their corresponding normal Raman spectra, there were changes in relative band intensities and there were bands shifted because of adsorption; these observations were used to probe orientation. Orientation is determined by applying surface selections rules developed by both Creighton and Moskovits. The rules indicate, when the vibrational modes assigned to out-of-plane modes are observed as enhanced in the SER spectrum, the ligand is considered parallel relative to the metal surface, and when the vibrational modes assigned to in-plane modes are observed as enhanced, the ligand is not parallel relative to the metal surface. The relative surface enhancement factors were calculated by normalizing the spectra and then by taking the ratio of ISERS/INR. Based on the enhancement factors, the bands assigned to in-plane modes exhibited the highest enhancement factors on the Au and Ag SER spectra. This observation suggests that DAFO is not parallel to the metal nano-surfaces. In the Ag SERS spectrum the bands with the highest enhancement factors were assigned to quadrant ring stretching and cyclopentone bending. Analysis of the carbonyl stretching frequency on the Ag spectrum revealed the frequency shifted to a lower vibrational energy. This shift has been ascribed to the carbonyl bond losing double bond character, which permits the interaction between the metal and the carbonyl oxygen. It was proposed the DAFO ligand is sandwiched between the silver hydrosol. The TER spectrum of DAFO was obtained; analysis of the spectrum revealed similarities to the Ag SERS spectrum. The carbonyl stretching frequency was lowered, the bands

  6. O2 adsorption on MO2 (M=Ru, Ir, Sn) films supported on rutile TiO2(110) by DFT calculations: Probing the nature of metal oxide-support interaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianglan; Sun, Xiongfei; Sun, Baozhen; Peng, Honggen; Liu, Wenming; Wang, Xiang

    2016-07-01

    To explore metal oxide-support interaction and its effect on O2 adsorption, periodic DFT calculations were used to explore the most preferred O2 molecular and dissociative adsorption on stoichiometric (MO2) and defective (MO2-x) (M=Ru, Ir, Sn) films supported on rutile TiO2(110), and compared with that on pure surfaces without TiO2(110) support. For defective RuO2-x films, it is revealed that the TiO2(110) support and the film thickness have an evident impact on the O2 adsorbed species. On the contrary, the two factors show little influence for defective IrO2-x and SnO2-x films. The analyses for Bader charge and density of states indicate that the reducibility change of the unsaturated surface Ru atoms, which are adjacent to the bridge oxygen vacancies, is responsible for this O2 adsorption alteration. These results provide insights into the oxide-oxide interaction, and its effect on the properties of supported oxide catalysts. PMID:27060230

  7. Adsorptive properties of flyash carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, U.M.; Rathbone, R.F.; Robl, T.L.

    1996-10-01

    Flyash carbon constitutes the char particles that are left in flyash after the incomplete combustion of coal in the furnace, rendering flyash above spec for ASTM C618 applications for cement. A beneficiation process allows the selective separation of unburned carbon from flyash to be used for upgrading into a higher value product. Flyash carton is composed of several microscopically distinguishable types; inertinite is relatively unreactive in the thermal processing of coal and occurs essentially unaltered in the flyash while {open_quotes}coke{close_quotes} is produced from the melting, devolatilization, swelling and resolidification of the reactive macerals vitrinite and liptinite. The porosity, surface area, and surface chemistry of flyash carbons are characterized using mercury porosimetry, BET analysis, and vapor- and liquid-phase adsorption of various organic compounds. Results suggest that different carbon forms in flyash affect the degree of adsorption of phenols as will as other hydrocarbon pollutants onto the flyash carbon. A comparison of adsorptability of the flyash carbon compared to commercially available active carbons are discussed.

  8. Adsorption of amino acids and glucose by sediments of Resurrection Bay, Alaska, USA: Functional group effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrichs, Susan M.; Sugai, Susan F.

    1993-02-01

    The adsorption of amino acids and glucose was investigated in sediments from Resurrection Bay, Alaska. Adsorption of the basic amino acid lysine was greater than adsorption of glutamic acid, alanine, leucine, or glucose. Formaldehyde and heat treatments were used to separate adsorption from biological uptake, but can alter adsorption significantly; formaldehyde treatment, followed by a seawater rinse, was the most satisfactory. Much of the rapid amino acid adsorption by these sediments was due to the formation of ionic bonds, since adsorbed amino acids could be extracted using concentrated solutions of amino acid, cesium chloride, sodium citrate, ammonium chloride, or sodium acetate. However, most amino acid adsorption was not reversible by ion exchange solutions, indicating that additional processes or chemical reactions occur which result in irreversible binding to sediment. Consistent with literature reports of the negative surface charge of marine particulate matter, lysine (with a net positive charge) was adsorbed to the greatest extent and had the largest cation-exchangeable adsorption. However, negatively charged amino acid functional groups also influenced adsorption. Chemical modification of sediments with reagents reactive with aldehydes decreased lysine adsorption. This suggests that reactive functional groups of sediment organic matter contribute to adsorption, consistent with a melanoidintype reaction. An estimate of the rate of amino acid adsorption indicates that adsorption could produce a significant amount of the total refractory sediment organic nitrogen.

  9. A molecular investigation of adsorption onto mineral pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninness, Brian J.

    Pigment suspensions are important in several processes such as ceramics, paints, inks, and coatings. In the wet state, pigments are combined with a variety of chemical species such as polymers, surfactants, and polyelectrolytes which produce a complex colloidal system. The adsorption, desorption, and redistribution of these species at the pigment-aqueous solution interface can have an impact on the behavior in both the wet state or its final dried state. The goal of this work is to establish a molecular picture of the adsorption properties of these pigmented systems. A novel in situ infrared technique has been developed which allows the detection of adsorbed surface species on pigment particles in an aqueous environment. The technique involves the use of a polymeric binder to anchor the colloidal pigment particles to the surface of an internal reflection element (IRE). The binder only weakly perturbs about 25% of the reactive surface sites (hydroxyl groups) on silica. The reaction of succinic anhydride with an aminosilanized silica surface has been quantified using this technique. The adsorption dynamics of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) at the TiO2-aqueous solution interface has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and electrokinetic analysis. At low bulk concentrations, C16TAB is shown to adsorb as isolated islands with a "defective" bilayer structure. Anionic probe molecules are shown to effectively "tune" the adsorbed surfactant microstructure. The results indicate that the structure of the adsorbed surfactant layer, and not the amount of adsorbed surfactant, dictates the subsequent adsorption behavior of the system. Atomic Layer Deposition is used to deposit a TiO2 layer onto the surfaces of silica and kaolin pigments. The process involves the cyclic reaction sequence of the vapors of TiCl4 and H2O. Three complete deposition cycles are needed before the surfaces

  10. Interactions of Water with Mineral Dust Aerosol: Water Adsorption, Hygroscopicity, Cloud Condensation, and Ice Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Cziczo, Daniel J; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-13

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the major types of aerosol present in the troposphere. The molecular level interactions of water vapor with mineral dust are of global significance. Hygroscopicity, light scattering and absorption, heterogneous reactivity and the ability to form clouds are all related to water-dust interactions. In this review article, experimental techniques to probe water interactions with dust and theoretical frameworks to understand these interactions are discussed. A comprehensive overview of laboratory studies of water adsorption, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation of fresh and atmspherically aged mineral dust particles is provided. Finally, we relate laboratory studies and theoretical simulations that provide fundemental insights into these processes on the molecular level with field measurements that illustrate the atmospheric significance of these processes. Overall, the details of water interactions with mineral dust are covered from multiple perspectives in this review article. PMID:27015126

  11. Probing the role of P dbnd O stretching mode enhancement in nerve-agent sensors: Simulation of the adsorption of diisopropylfluorophosphate on the model MgO and CaO surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziejczyk, Wojciech; Majumdar, D.; Roszak, Szczepan; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2007-12-01

    The interactions of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) with model MgO and CaO surfaces have been investigated using density functional (DFT) and Møller-Plesset second order perturbation techniques. The geometries were fully optimized at the DFT level. The calculated interaction energies and the corresponding thermodynamic properties show that DFP is physisorbed on these two model oxide surfaces and adsorption on the MgO surface is stronger. Analyses of the calculated IR and Raman spectra point to the enhancement of the P dbnd O stretching mode with respect to the isolated DFP and this property could be used to detect nerve-agents using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  13. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  14. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2012-07-10

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  15. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  16. Functional Probes for Scanning Probe Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Kotone; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Hasegawa, Yukio; Sakurai, Toshio

    2007-03-01

    For superior performance of scanning probe microscopy, we are working to fabricate functional probes. For Kelvin probe force microscopy, we fabricated a metal-tip cantilever by attaching a thin metal wire to a regular Si cantilever and milling it by focused ion beam (FIB)^1. By using the W tip with a curvature radius of 3.5 nm, we obtained the potential profile of Ge/Si(105) surface in atomic resolution with the energy resolution better than 3 meV^2. For synchrotron-radiation-light-irradiated scanning tunneling microscopy which aims at atomically resolved elemental analysis, we fabricated a glass-coated W tip using FIB^3. It is found that the glass coating blocks the unwanted secondary electrons, which come from large area of the sample, by a factor of 40 with respect to the case no coating. Using the tip to detect the electrons emitted just below the tip, we obtained element specific images with a spatial resolution better than 20 nm under the photo irradiation whose energy is just above the adsorption edge of the element^4. 1 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 033705 (2005) 2 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., PRL 93, 266102 (2004) 3 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 083711 (2005) 4 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., APL, in press

  17. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  18. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  19. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  20. Reactive arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive arthritis is a group of conditions that may involve the joints, eyes, and urinary and genital systems. ... The exact cause of reactive arthritis is unknown. It occurs most often in men younger than age 40. It may follow an infection in the urethra ...

  1. Recent Progress in Fluorescent Imaging Probes.

    PubMed

    Pak, Yen Leng; Swamy, K M K; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and low detection limit, especially the bioimaging ability for cells, fluorescence probes serve as unique detection methods. With the aid of molecular recognition and specific organic reactions, research on fluorescent imaging probes has blossomed during the last decade. Especially, reaction based fluorescent probes have been proven to be highly selective for specific analytes. This review highlights our recent progress on fluorescent imaging probes for biologically important species, such as biothiols, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, metal ions including Zn(2+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+) and Au(3+), and anions including cyanide and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:26402684

  2. Recent Progress in Fluorescent Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Yen Leng; Swamy, K. M. K.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and low detection limit, especially the bioimaging ability for cells, fluorescence probes serve as unique detection methods. With the aid of molecular recognition and specific organic reactions, research on fluorescent imaging probes has blossomed during the last decade. Especially, reaction based fluorescent probes have been proven to be highly selective for specific analytes. This review highlights our recent progress on fluorescent imaging probes for biologically important species, such as biothiols, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, metal ions including Zn2+, Hg2+, Cu2+ and Au3+, and anions including cyanide and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:26402684

  3. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  4. Characterization and reactivity of sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fiber surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz Rivera, Lymaris; Bakaev, Victor A.; Banerjee, Joy; Mueller, Karl T.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2016-05-01

    Multicomponent complex oxides, such as sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fibers, are important materials used for thermal insulation in buildings and homes. Although the surface properties of single oxides, such as silica, have been extensively studied, less is known about the distribution of reactive sites at the surface of multicomponent oxides. Here, we investigated the reactivity of sodium aluminoborosilicate glass fiber surfaces for better understanding of their interface chemistry and bonding with acrylic polymers. Acetic acid (with and without a 13C enrichment) was used as a probe representative of the carboxylic functional groups in many acrylic polymers and adhesives. Inverse gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (IGC-MS), and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), were used to characterize the fiber surface reactions and surface chemical structure. In this way, we discovered that both sodium ions in the glass surface, as well as sodium carbonate salts that formed on the surface due to the intrinsic reactivity of this glass in humid air, are primary sites of interaction with the carboxylic acid. Surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of sodium carbonates on these surfaces. Computer simulations of the interactions between the reactive sites on the glass fiber surface with acetic acid were performed to evaluate energetically favorable reactions. The adsorption reactions with sodium in the glass structure provide adhesive bonding sites, whereas the reaction with the sodium carbonate consumes the acid to form sodium-carboxylate, H2O and CO2 without any contribution to chemical bonding at the interface.

  5. Characterization of papaya peptidase A as a cysteine proteinase of Carica papaya L. with active-centre properties that differ from those of papain by using 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide and 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan as reactivity probes. Use of two-protonic-state electrophiles in the identification of catalytic-site thiol groups.

    PubMed Central

    Baines, B S; Brocklehurst, K

    1982-01-01

    1. The proteinase papaya peptidase A, one of the major components of the latex of Carica papaya L., was shown to contain 1 thiol group per molecule; this thiol group is essential for catalytic activity and is part of the catalytic site. 2. The usefulness of two-protonic-state reactivity probes coupled with modification/activity-loss data in assigning a thiol group as an integral part of the catalytic site as against merely 'essential' for activity is discussed. 3. The active centre of papaya peptidase A was investigated by using 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide and 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan as reactivity probes. The presence in the enzyme in weakly acidic media of an interactive system containing a nucleophile S atom (pKI3.9,pKII7.9) was demonstrated. 5. Papaya peptidase A resembles ficin (EC 3.4.22.3) and actinidin (the cysteine proteinase from Actinidin chinenis) in that it does not appear to possess a carboxy group able to influence the reactivity of the thiol group by change of ionization state at pH values of about 4, a situation that contrasts markedly with that which obtains in papain. 6. Implications of the results for possible variations in cysteine proteinase mechanism are discussed. PMID:6751321

  6. Reactive Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with treatment and may cause joint damage. What Research Is Being Conducted on Reactive Arthritis? Researchers continue ... such as methotrexate and sulfasalazine. More information on research is available from the following websites: National Institutes ...

  7. ARSENIC TREATMENT BY ADSORPTIVE TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the removal of arsenic from drinking water using the adsorptive media treatment process. Fundamental information is provided on the design and operation of adsorptive media technology including the selection of the adsorptive media. The information cites...

  8. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  9. Reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  10. Reactivity of Fe(II) species associated with clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Thomas B; Schwarzenbach, René P; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2003-02-01

    Mineral-bound Fe(II) species represent important natural reductants of pollutants in the anaerobic subsurface. At clay minerals, three types of Fe(II) species in fundamentally different chemical environments may be present simultaneously, i.e., structural Fe(II), Fe(II) complexed by surface hydroxyl groups, and Fe(II) bound by ion exchange. We investigated the accessibility and reactivity of these three types of Fe(II) species in suspensions of two different clay minerals containing either ferrous iron-bearing nontronite or iron-free hectorite. Nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) exhibiting different sorption behavior on clays were used to probe the reactivity of the various types of reduced iron species. The clay treatment allowed for a preparation of nontronite and hectorite surfaces with Fe(II) adsorbed by surface hydroxyl groups at the edge surfaces. Furthermore, hectorite suspensions with additional Fe(II) bound to the ion exchange sites at the basal siloxane surfaces were set up. We found that both structural Fe(II) and Fe(II) complexed by surface hydroxyl groups of nontronite reduced the NACs to anilines. An electron balance revealed that more than 10% of the total iron in nontronite was reactive Fe(II). Fe(II) bound by ion exchange did not contribute to the observed reduction of NACs. Reversible adsorption of the NACs at the basal siloxane surface of the clays strongly retarded NAC reduction, even in the presence of high concentrations of Fe(II) bound by ion exchange to the basal siloxane surfaces. Our work shows that in natural systems a fraction of the total Fe(II) present on clays may contribute to the pool of highly reactive Fe(II) species in the subsurface. Furthermore, this work may help to distinguish between Fe(II) species of different reactivity regarding pollutant reduction. Although structural iron in clays represents only a small fraction of the total iron pool in soils and aquifers, reactive Fe(II) species originating from the reduction of

  11. A general view on the reactivity of the oxygen-functionalized graphene basal plane.

    PubMed

    Dobrota, Ana S; Pašti, Igor A; Mentus, Slavko V; Skorodumova, Natalia V

    2016-03-01

    In this contribution we inspect the adsorption of H, OH, Cl and Pt on oxidized graphene using DFT calculations. The introduction of epoxy and hydroxyl groups on the graphene basal plane significantly alters its chemisorption properties, which can be attributed to the deformation of the basal plane and the type and distribution of these groups. We show that a general scaling relation exists between the hydrogen binding energies and the binding energies of other investigated adsorbates, which allows for a simple probing of the reactivity of oxidized graphene with only one adsorbate. The electronic states of carbon atoms located within the 2 eV interval below the Fermi level are found to be responsible for the interaction of the basal plane with the chosen adsorbates. The number of electronic states situated in this energy interval is shown to correlate with hydrogen binding energies. PMID:26866995

  12. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  13. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  14. Biodegradable hollow zein nanoparticles for removal of reactive dyes from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Helan; Zhang, Yue; Jiang, Qiuran; Reddy, Narendra; Yang, Yiqi

    2013-08-15

    In this study, biodegradable hollow zein nanoparticles with diameters less than 100 nm were developed to remove reactive dyes from simulated post-dyeing wastewater with remarkably high efficiency. Reactive dyes are widely used to color cellulosic materials, such as cotton and rayon. Wastewater from reactive dyeing process contains up to 50% dye and electrolytes with concentrations up to 100 g L(-1). Current methods to remove reactive dyes from wastewater are suffering from low adsorption capacities or low biodegradability of the sorbents. In this research, biodegradable zein nanoparticles showed high adsorption capacities for dyes. Hollow zein nanoparticles showed higher adsorption for Reactive Blue 19 than solid structures, and the adsorption amount increased as temperature decreased, pH decreased or initial dye concentration increased. At pH 6.5 and pH 9.0, increasing electrolyte concentration could improve dye adsorption significantly. Under simulated post-dyeing condition with 50.0 g L(-1) salt and pH 9.0, maximum adsorption of 1016.0 mg dye per gram zein nanoparticles could be obtained. The adsorption capacity was much higher than that of various biodegradable adsorbents developed to remove reactive dye. It is suggested that the hollow zein nanoparticles are good candidates to remove reactive dye immediately after dyeing process. PMID:23643969

  15. Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

    2012-03-29

    Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

  16. A review on chitosan-based adsorptive membranes.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Ehsan; Daraei, Parisa; Arabi Shamsabadi, Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Membrane adsorbents have emerged as powerful and attractive tools for the removal of hazardous materials such as dyes and heavy metal ions, mainly in trace amounts, from water resources. Among membrane adsorbents, those prepared from or modified with chitosan biopolymer and its derivatives are cases of interest because of chitosan advantages including biocompatibility, biodegradability, nontoxicity, reactivity, film and fiber forming capacity and favorable hydrophilicity. This review is oriented to provide a framework for better insight into fabrication methods and applications of chitosan-based adsorptive membranes. Critical aspects including thermokinetic analyses of adsorption and regeneration capacity of the membrane adsorbents have been also overviewed. Future of chitosan-based adsorptive membranes might include efforts for the improvement of mechanical stability and reusability and also most targeted application of appropriate copolymers as well as nanostructures in preparing high performance adsorptive membranes. PMID:27516289

  17. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  18. Problems affecting the fidelity of pressure measuring instruments for planetary probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Determination is made of the nature and magnitude of surface-related effects that cause errors in pressure measuring instruments, with special reference being made to instruments intended for use in planetary probes. The interaction of gases with clean surfaces of metals likely to be used as gage construction materials was studied. Special emphasis was placed on the adsorption, chemical reaction, and electron-induced desorption processes. The results indicated that all metals tested were subject to surface processes which would degrade gage fidelity. It was also found, however, that the formation of inert adsorbed layers on these metal surfaces, such as carbon on platinum, greatly reduced or eliminated these effects. This process, combined with a system design which avoids contact between reactive gases and hot filaments, appears to offer the most promising solution to the gage fidelity problem.

  19. Poisoning and reactivation processes in oxide-type cathodes: Part I. Polycrystalline mixed oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, A.; Haas, G. A.

    A study has been made of the poisoning and reactivation characteristics of alkaline earth oxide-type cathodes after extended periods of shelf storage. Both emitted and incident electrons were used to measure changes in the electronics properties, i.e. work function. The variations in work function over the surface were obtained in both distribution form as well as topographic presentation using a scanning low energy electron probe (SLEEP). These measurements were correlated with simultaneously occurring compositional changes using Auger, gas desorption and ion scattering techniques. Measurements were made on realistic cathodes in actual vacuum tube ambients. The results showed that oxide-type cathodes poison within a few hours after shut-down by the adsorption of residual gases contained in the vacuum ambient. (The effects of CO 2 were specifically demonstrated.) These adsorbates are, however, desorbed upon heating and in combination with other reactivation processes (such as formation of surface Ba layers when using reducing substrates), the cathode can reach full activation again by the time the temperature reaches the normal operating temperature. The poisoning and reactivation phenomena are a combination of a number of simultaneous processes, and studies to separate and identify these is the objective of part II of this paper.

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1995-03-21

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devices, in probe array devices. 10 figures.

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1995-01-01

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devises, in probe array devices.

  2. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extends in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  3. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Daum, Edward D.; Downs, William; Jankura, Bryan J.; McCoury, Jr., John M.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sampling a gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extend in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  4. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  5. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Tailoring oxide properties: An impact on adsorption characteristics of molecules and metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkala, Karoliina

    2014-12-01

    Both density functional theory calculations and numerous experimental studies demonstrate a variety of unique features in metal supported oxide films and transition metal doped simple oxides, which are markedly different from their unmodified counterparts. This review highlights, from the computational perspective, recent literature on the properties of the above mentioned surfaces and how they adsorb and activate different species, support metal aggregates, and even catalyse reactions. The adsorption of Au atoms and clusters on metal-supported MgO films are reviewed together with the cluster's theoretically predicted ability to activate and dissociate O2 at the Au-MgO(100)/Ag(100) interface, as well as the impact of an interface vacancy to the binding of an Au atom. In contrast to a bulk MgO surface, an Au atom binds strongly on a metal-supported ultra-thin MgO film and becomes negatively charged. Similarly, Au clusters bind strongly on a supported MgO(100) film and are negatively charged favouring 2D planar structures. The adsorption of other metal atoms is briefly considered and compared to that of Au. Existing computational literature of adsorption and reactivity of simple molecules including O2, CO, NO2, and H2O on mainly metal-supported MgO(100) films is discussed. Chemical reactions such as CO oxidation and O2 dissociation are discussed on the bare thin MgO film and on selected Au clusters supported on MgO(100)/metal surfaces. The Au atoms at the perimeter of the cluster are responsible for catalytic activity and calculations predict that they facilitate dissociative adsorption of oxygen even at ambient conditions. The interaction of H2O with a flat and stepped Ag-supported MgO film is summarized and compared to bulk MgO. The computational results highlight spontaneous dissociation on MgO steps. Furthermore, the impact of water coverage on adsorption and dissociation is addressed. The modifications, such as oxygen vacancies and dopants, at the oxide

  7. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  8. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  9. Study of char gasification in a reaction/adsorption apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.; Crowley, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    The reaction of an activated carbon (coconut char) with CO/sub 2/ was studied in a reaction/adsorption apparatus which allows successive reactivity and physical adsorption measurements to be made on the same solid sample. Reaction and surface area evolution data were obtained in the temperature range from 800 to 900/sup 0/C. All reaction rate trajectories obtained in this study showed a maximum in the reaction rate, 2-3 times higher than the initial rate, at about 85% conversion. There was no correlation between these results and the evolution of the internal surface area although the reaction appeared to take place initially in the kinetically controlled regime.

  10. Nitrogen reactivity toward beryllium: surface reactions.

    PubMed

    Allouche, A

    2013-06-01

    Recent experiments with nitrogen as a seeding gas in fusion plasma devices together with the option of using beryllium as an armor material in the future ITER tokamak (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) have raised new interest in the interactions of beryllium surfaces with nitrogen (atomic or molecular). The strong reactivity of nitrogen implies the formation of beryllium nitrite and, in conjunction with oxygen and other possible impurities, experimentalists have to consider the probability of generating various complex moieties such as imine, amine or oxyamine, and amide radicals. This chemistry would obviously dramatically perturb the plasma, and quantum investigations can be of great predictive help. Nitrogen adsorption on beryllium basal surfaces is investigated through quantum density functional theory. Different situations are examined: molecular or atomic nitrogen reactions; nitride radical adsorption or formation on surfaces; hydrogen retention on surfaces; combined nitrogen/oxygen reactivity and hydrogen retention. A tentative comparison with experiment is also proposed. PMID:23594802

  11. ADSORPTION-DESORPTION PROCESSES IN SUBSURFACE REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of equilibrium geochemical models to calculate the solubilities and aqueous speciation of contaminants is well established in the field of geochemical modeling. Surface complexation modeling is an extension of this thermodynamic modeling approach to include the reactions between dissolved sp...

  12. The influence of CO adsorption on the surface composition of cobalt/palladium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, A.; Trant, A. G.; Gustafson, J.; Jones, T. E.; Noakes, T. C. Q.; Bailey, P.; Baddeley, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    Segregation induced by the adsorption of gas phase species can strongly influence the composition of bimetallic surfaces and can therefore play an important role in influencing heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The addition of palladium to cobalt catalysts has been shown to promote Fischer Tropsch catalysis. We investigate the adsorption of CO onto bimetallic CoPd surfaces on Pd{111} using a combination of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and medium energy ion scattering. The vibrational frequency of adsorbed CO provides crucial information on the adsorption sites adopted by CO and medium energy ion scattering probes the surface composition before and after CO exposure. We show that cobalt segregation is induced by CO adsorption and rationalise these observations in terms of the strength of adsorption of CO in various surface adsorption sites.

  13. Adsorption and Separation Modeling of Porous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanoski, Anthony; van Swol, Frank

    2001-03-01

    With the advent of self-assembly techniques has come the potential to tailor materials for adsorption and separation applications. For example, using surfactants as templating agents it is now feasible to finely control both the three-dimensional (3D) porosity as well as the surface chemistry. With an eye on assisting the emerging materials design we have embarked on a program that focuses on modeling adsorption/desorption, reactions and permeation phenomena in such structures. What makes the modeling particularly challenging is the coupling of length scales. The role of the atomic length scale features such as surface reactions and surface structure must be captured as well as the role of the network connectivity and other larger length scales. The latter include the pore shape and length, and the presence of external surfaces. This paper reports on how we employ refineable lattice models to tackle the modeling problems. We use both equilibrium and non-equilibrium Monte Carlo (MC) and 3D density functional theory (DFT) techniques to study the equilibrium and transport behavior in nanostructured porous materials. We will present 1) results of both adsorption/desorption hysteresis in large regular and random networks and 2) the results of using reactive sites in separation membranes, and compare these with experiments.

  14. LOCATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBSURFACE ANOMALIES USING A SOIL CONDUCTIVITY PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electrical conductivity probe, designed for use with "direct push" technology, has been successfully used to locate buried drums, contaminant plumes, and to precisely locate and characterize a previously installed permeable reactive iron wall. The conductivity probe was desig...

  15. Differences in the chemical and catalytic characteristics of two crystallographically 'identical' enzyme catalytic sites. Characterization of actinidin and papain by a combination of pH-dependent substrate catalysis kinetics and reactivity probe studies targeted on the catalytic-site thiol group and its immediate microenvironment.

    PubMed Central

    Salih, E; Malthouse, J P; Kowlessur, D; Jarvis, M; O'Driscoll, M; Brocklehurst, K

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of actinidin (EC 3.4.22.14) and papain (EC 3.4.22.2), two cysteine proteinases whose catalytic-site regions appear to superimpose to a degree that approaches atomic co-ordinate accuracy of both crystal structures, were evaluated by determining (a) the pH-dependence in acid media of the acylation process of the catalytic act (k+2/Ks) using N alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine p-nitroanilide (L-Bz-Arg-Nan) as substrate and (b) the sensitivity of the reactivity of the catalytic-site thiol group and its pH-dependence to structural change in small, thiol-specific, two-protonic-state reactivity probes (2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide and methyl 2-pyridyl disulphide) where enzyme-probe contacts should be restricted to areas close to the catalytic site. Distortion of the catalytic sites of the two enzymes at pH less than 4 was evaluated over time-scales appropriate for both stopped-flow reactivity probe kinetics (less than or equal to 1-2 s) and steady-state substrate catalysis kinetics (3-5 min) by using the 2,2'-dipyridyl disulphide monocation as a titrant for non-distorted catalytic sites. This permitted a lower pH limit to be defined for valid kinetic analysis of both types. The behaviour of the enzymes at pH less than 4 requires a kinetic model in which the apparently biomolecular reaction of enzyme with probe reagent is separated from the process leading to loss of conformational integrity by a potentially reversible step. The acylation of actinidin with L-Bz-Arg-Nan in acidic media occurs in two protonic states, one produced by raising the pH across pKa less than 4 which probably characterizes the formation of -S-/-ImH+ ion pair (pKa approx. 3) and the other, of higher reactivity, produced by raising the pH across pKa 5.5, which may characterize rearrangement of catalytic-site geometry. The pH-dependence of the acylation of papain by L-Bz-Arg-Nan is quite different and is not influenced by protonic dissociation with pKa values in the range 5-6. The earlier

  16. Microcolumn studies of dye adsorption onto manganese oxides modified diatomite.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouti, M A; Khraisheh, M A M; Ahmad, M N; Allen, S J

    2007-07-19

    The method described here cannot fully replace the analysis of large columns by small test columns (microcolumns). The procedure, however, is suitable for speeding up the determination of adsorption parameters of dye onto the adsorbent and for speeding up the initial screening of a large adsorbent collection that can be tedious if a several adsorbents and adsorption conditions must be tested. The performance of methylene blue (MB), a basic dye, Cibacron reactive black (RB) and Cibacron reactive yellow (RY) was predicted in this way and the influence of initial dye concentration and other adsorption conditions on the adsorption behaviour were demonstrated. On the basis of the experimental results, it can be concluded that the adsorption of RY onto manganese oxides modified diatomite (MOMD) exhibited a characteristic "S" shape and can be simulated effectively by the Thomas model. It is shown that the adsorption capacity increased as the initial dye concentration increased. The increase in the dye uptake capacity with the increase of the adsorbent mass in the column was due to the increase in the surface area of adsorbent, which provided more binding sites for the adsorption. It is shown that the use of high flow rates reduced the time that RY in the solution is in contact with the MOMD, thus allowing less time for adsorption to occur, leading to an early breakthrough of RY. A rapid decrease in the column adsorption capacity with an increase in particle size with an average 56% reduction in capacity resulting from an increase in the particle size from 106-250 microm to 250-500 microm. The experimental data correlated well with calculated data using the Thomas equation and the bed depth-service time (BDST) equation. Therefore, it might be concluded that the Thomas equation and the BDST equations can produce accurate predication for variation of dye concentration, mass of the adsorbent, flow rate and particle size. In general, the values of adsorption isotherm capacity

  17. Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L.

    2009-12-15

    High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

  18. Protein adsorption onto medical alloys: Voltage effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettens, Robert T. T.

    This work examined the adsorption of an important-plasma protein, fibrinogen (Fb), onto a clinically-relevant-biomedical alloy, 316L stainless steel (SS) and electrically polarized 316L SS. Then, several key-interfacial properties important to protein adsorption were examined. The overriding role of electrochemical (EC) charge-transfer processes in the behavior of both the adsorption of Fb and interfacial properties was apparent. Adsorption of Fb onto polarized 316L SS was observed and quantified using both in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Significant differences in Fb adsorption were observed across potential. Ex situ studies showed significantly lower area coverage and height of adsorbed Fb at cathodic potentials. In situ studies showed significantly slower kinetics below -100 mV. Current density data showed large charge-transfer processes (˜1x10 -5 to 1x10-4 A/cm2) taking place at voltages below -100 mV. A parallel-plate electrocapillary method was used to measure changes in metal-electrolyte surface energy (Deltagammasl) with potential. The results showed increasingly negative Deltagamma sl values on 316L SS at more cathodic voltages (i.e., more hydrophilic) and little to no change above -100 mV. These data correlate linearly with current density. Force measurements using a colloidal-AFM probe measured interfacial forces. Increasingly repulsive forces scaled with increasingly cathodic potentials; little interaction was detected at anodic potentials. These data correlated linearly with current density. The EC impedance was also studied. Electrochemical AFM (ECAFM) simultaneously gave impedance and structural changes with potential. Several regions of oxide topography/impedance characteristic were apparent which matched closely with the impedance behavior of the system. Through Mott-Schottky analysis the presence of the flatband potential was determined to be around -150 mV. Property observations of polarized 316L SS, specifically

  19. Arsenate adsorption mechanisms at the allophane - Water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; Sparks, D.L.; Davis, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated arsenate (As(V)) reactivity and surface speciation on amorphous aluminosilicate mineral (synthetic allophane) surfaces using batch adsorption experiments, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The adsorption isotherm experiments indicated that As(V) uptake increased with increasing [As(V)]0 from 50 to 1000 ??M (i.e., Langmuir type adsorption isotherm) and that the total As adsorption slightly decreased with increasing NaCl concentrations from 0.01 to 0.1 M. Arsenate adsorption was initially (0-10 h) rapid followed by a slow continuum uptake, and the adsorption processes reached the steady state after 720 h. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses suggest that As(V) predominantly forms bidentate binuclear surface species on aluminum octahedral structures, and these species are stable up to 11 months. Solubility calculations and powder XRD analyses indicate no evidence of crystalline AI-As(V) precipitates in the experimental systems. Overall, macroscopic and spectroscopic evidence suggest that the As(V) adsorption mechanisms at the allophane-water interface are attributable to ligand exchange reactions between As(V) and surface-coordinated water molecules and hydroxyl and silicate ions. The research findings imply that dissolved tetrahedral oxyanions (e.g., H2PO42- and H2AsO42-) are readily retained on amorphous aluminosilicate minerals in aquifer and soils at near neutral pH. The innersphere adsorption mechanisms might be important in controlling dissolved arsenate and phosphate in amorphous aluminosilicate-rich low-temperature geochemical environments. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  20. Extracorporeal adsorption of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Staubach, K H; Rosenfeldt, J A; Veit, O; Bruch, H P

    1997-02-01

    In a porcine endotoxin shock model using a continuous intravenous endotoxin infusion of 250 ng/kg body weight per hour, the cardiorespiratory and hematologic parameters were studied while applying a new on-line polymyxin B immobilized adsorption system. This preliminary report shows that the new adsorbent can remove endotoxin selectively from the circulation and confers a good amount of protection from endotoxin-induced cardiopulmonary decompensation as well as hematologic alterations. Survival time could be extended from 216 min to 313 min. Whereas cardiac output and mean arterial pressure declined critically after 3 h in the controls, the treated group remained stable for another 3 h. These data show that endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B coupled covalently to acrylic spheres as an adjunctive on-line measure in the septic syndrome seems feasible. PMID:10225785

  1. The 'reactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Piccardo, Giovanni; Guarnieri, Luisa

    2010-05-01

    The Ligurian ophiolitic peridotites [South Lanzo, Erro-Tobbio, Internal Ligurides and Corsica] are characterized by the abundance of spinel(Sp) peridotites showing depleted compositions and ranging from Cpx-poor Sp lherzolites to Sp harzburgites. They were recognized in the last decades as refractory residua by MORB-forming partial melting of the asthenosphere, and were similar to abyssal peridotites. Recent structural and compositional studies promoted a better understanding of their structural and compositional features and their genetic processes. In the field these depleted peridotites replace with primary contacts pyroxenite-bearing fertile Sp lherzolites that have been recognized as sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Field relationships evidence that decametric-hectometric bodies of pristine pyroxenite-veined lithospheric Sp lherzolites are preserved as structural remnants within the km-scale masses of depleted peridotites. The depleted peridotites show coarse-grained recrystallized textures and reaction micro-structures indicating pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation that have been considered as records of melt/peridotite interaction during reactive diffuse porous flow of undersaturated melts. They show, moreover, contrasting bulk and mineral chemistries that cannot be produced by simple partial melting and melt extraction. In particular, their bulk compositions are depleted in SiO2 and enriched in FeO with respect to refractory residua after any kind of partial melting, as calculated by Niu (1997), indicating that they cannot be formed by simple partial melting and melt extraction processes. Moreover, TiO2 content in Sp is usually significantly higher (up to 0.8-1.0 wt%) than typical TiO2 contents of spinels (usually < 0.1-0.2 wt %) in fertile mantle peridotites and melting refractory residua, indicating that spinel attained element equilibration with a Ti-bearing basaltic melt. The depleted peridotites usually show strongly variable Cpx modal

  2. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  3. ICES ON TITAN: LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS THAT COMPLEMENT THE HUYGENS PROBE

    SciTech Connect

    J. ROBINSON; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The composition of the cold bodies in the outer solar system may hold some of the key molecular clues concerning the composition of the prestellax molecular cloud that gave rise to the solar system. We studied the physical chemistry and heterogeneous (gas/surface) reactivity of extraterrestrial ice analogs of the surfaces of Saturn's moon Titan. This program coupled our surface spectroscopic techniques with physical adsorption measurements. We addressed several of the pressing questions regarding Titan such as: Is storage of hydrocarbons in Titan's water ice crust feasible? Do heterogeneous processes influence the atmospheric chemical composition of Titan? Are phase transitions to be expected? These data can be incorporated into photochemical models with the goal of improved modeling of the chemical composition and meteorology of Titan's atmosphere. Titan will be probed by the Cassini-Huygens Mission. Our results on Titan ice analogs can be used to help interpret the mission data.

  4. Activation of Methane Promoted by Adsorption of CO on Mo2 C2 (-) Cluster Anions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Yu; Ma, Jia-Bi; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Chongyang; Ning, Chuan-Gang; Chen, Hui; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-05-01

    Atomic clusters are being actively studied for activation of methane, the most stable alkane molecule. While many cluster cations are very reactive with methane, the cluster anions are usually not very reactive, particularly for noble metal free anions. This study reports that the reactivity of molybdenum carbide cluster anions with methane can be much enhanced by adsorption of CO. The Mo2 C2 (-) is inert with CH4 while the CO addition product Mo2 C3 O(-) brings about dehydrogenation of CH4 under thermal collision conditions. The cluster structures and reactions are characterized by mass spectrometry, photoelectron spectroscopy, and quantum chemistry calculations, which demonstrate that the Mo2 C3 O(-) isomer with dissociated CO is reactive but the one with non-dissociated CO is unreactive. The enhancement of cluster reactivity promoted by CO adsorption in this study is compared with those of reported systems of a few carbonyl complexes. PMID:27060286

  5. Probing framework-guest interactions in phenylene-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica using spin-probe EPR.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Meng, Xiangyan; Mertens, Myrjam; Cool, Pegie; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2014-11-01

    The pore walls of phenylene-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilicas (B-PMOs) can be crystal-like or amorphous depending on the synthesis conditions. Here, spin-probe electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used to monitor the adsorption of nitroxide radicals on three types of B-PMO with varying pore size and wall characteristics. Nitroxide radicals with varying polarity are chosen as probes to mimic guest molecules with different properties. The study shows that the B-PMO materials with amorphous walls allow an overall better adsorption of the spin probes than the one with crystalline walls, independent of the nature of the spin probe. The effect of hydration of the guest-host system on the mobility of the spin probe molecule depends more on the nature of the spin probe than on the B-PMO material. Comparison of the spin-probe adsorption on B-PMOs and ethylene-bridged PMO materials shows the sensitivity of the mobility of the guest molecule to the nature of the organic group. PMID:25231242

  6. On 'reactivity' versus 'tolerance'.

    PubMed

    Zinkernagel, Rolf M

    2004-08-01

    In Burnet's review on 'The impact of ideas on immunology' he considers himself an observer of nature using biochemical and molecular analysis for more detailed understanding, a description that applies also to me. I use three examples--repertoire selection of T cells, rules of immune reactivity versus non-reactivity and immunological memory--to illustrate the difficulties we all have in probing nature's immunological secrets and in critically testing immunologists' ideas. At one end of the spectrum of biological research one may argue everything is possible and therefore all results are correct, if correctly measured. But perhaps it is more important to always ask again and again what is frequent and enhances survival versus what is rare and an exception. At the same time one must keep in mind that special situations and special tricks may well be applied for medical benefits, although they may have little impact on physiology and species survival. I will attempt to use disease in virus-infected mice to obtain some answers to what I consider to be important immunological questions with the hope of improving the ratio of answers that are right for the right experimental reasons versus those that are right for the wrong reasons. Some of these experiments falsify hypotheses, previous experiments and interpretations and therefore are particularly important in correcting misleading concepts. They should help to find out which half of immunological ideas and truths in immunological text books written today are likely to be wrong. Ideas are important in immunology, but are often rather demagogically handled and therefore may cost us very dearly indeed. Evaluating immunity to infections and tumours in vivo should help prevent us from getting lost in immunology. PMID:15283843

  7. Probing the Influence of a 4,6-O-Acetal on the Reactivity of Galactopyranosyl Donors: Verification of the Disarming Influence of the trans-gauche Conformation of C5–C6 Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Moumé-Pymbock, Myriame; Furukawa, Takayuki; Mondal, Sujit; Crich, David

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a 4,6-O-alkylidene acetal on the rate of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of methyl galactopyranosides and of spontaneous hydrolysis of 2,4-dinitrophenyl galactopyranosides has been studied through the synthesis and hydrolysis of analogs in which O6 is replaced by a methoxymethylene unit in which the methoxy group adopts either an equatorial or an axial position according to the configuration. Consistent with earlier studies under both acid-catalyzed and spontaneous hydrolysis conditions the alkylidene acetal, or its 7-carba analog, retards hydrolysis with respect to comparable systems lacking the cyclic protecting group. The configuration at C7 in the 7-carba analogs does not influence the rate of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis but has a minor influence on the rate of spontaneous hydrolysis of the 2,4-dinitrophenyl galactosides, confirming earlier studies on the role played by the hydroxymethyl group conformation on glycoside reactivity. The benzylidene acetal is found to stabilize the α-anomer of galactopyranose derivatives relative to monocyclic analogs. Reasons for the α-selectivity of 4,6-O-benzylidene-protected galactopyranosyl donors bearing neighboring group-active protecting groups at O2 are discussed. PMID:23984633

  8. [Comparison study on adsorption of middle molecular substances with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Li, Guifeng; Wan, Jianxin; Huang, Xiangqian; Zeng, Qiao; Tang, Jing

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs) are very favorable to the adsorption of middle molecular substances in the hemoperfusion because of their multiporous structure, large surface area and high reactivity, which are beneficial to the excellent absorption properties. The purpose of this study was to study the MWCTs on the adsorption capacity of the middle molecular substances. Vitamin B12 (VB12) was selected as a model of the middle molecular substances. The morphologies of MWCTs and activated carbon from commercial "carbon kidney" were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption behavior of VB12 was compared to each other with UV-visible absorption spectra. The MWCTs formed a sophistaicate gap structure, and compared to the activated carbon, MWCTs had a larger surface area. By Langmuir equation and Freundlich equation fitting analysis, VB12 adsorption on MWCTs is fit for multi-molecular layer adsorption, and the adsorption type of activated carbon is more inclined to the model corresponding to Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The adsorption rate of MWCTs is faster than that of the activated carbon and the adsorption capacity is greater, which could be expected to become the new adsorbent in the hemoperfusion. PMID:21936376

  9. DISCOVERY AND ELIMINATION OF DIOXINS FROM A CARBON REACTIVATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a project done to ensure an environmentally acceptable granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and reactivation system--to be sure that chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDD's) and chlorinated dibenzo furans (CDF's) and combustion would not present problems--results from a GAC...

  10. Random sequential adsorption of tetramers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał

    2013-07-01

    Adsorption of a tetramer built of four identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Tetramers were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Two different models of the adsorbate were investigated: a rhomboid and a square one; monomer centres were put on vertices of rhomboids and squares, respectively. Numerical simulations allow us to establish the maximal random coverage ratio as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining kinetics of the adsorption process. These results were compared with data obtained experimentally for KfrA plasmid adsorption. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured.

  11. Xe adsorption site distributions on Pt(111), Pt(221) and Pt(531)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellman, Andrew J.; Baker, L.; Holsclaw, B. S.

    2016-04-01

    The ideal structures of the Pt(111), Pt(221) and Pt(531) surfaces expose adsorption sites that can be qualitatively described as terrace sites on Pt(111), both step and terrace sites on Pt(221), and kink sites on Pt(531). The real surface structures of these surfaces can be complicated by imperfections such as misorientation, reconstruction and thermal roughening, all of which will influence their distributions of adsorption sites. Xe adsorption sites on the Pt(111), Pt(221) and Pt(531) surfaces have been probed using both photoemission of adsorbed Xe (PAX) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of Xe. Both PAX and Xe TPD are sensitive to the adsorption sites of the Xe and serve as complementary means of assessing the distributions of adsorption sites on these three Pt surfaces. The adsorption of Xe is sufficiently sensitive to detect the presence of residual steps on the Pt(111) surface at a density of ~ 1.5% step atoms per Pt atom. On the Pt(221) surface, PAX and Xe TPD reveal adsorption at both terrace and step sites simultaneously. Although the ideal structure of the Pt(531) surface has no well-defined steps or terraces, Xe adsorption indicates that its adsorption sites are best described as a distribution of both step and kink sites with roughly twice as many steps sites as kinks.

  12. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  13. Modeling diffusion and adsorption in compacted bentonite: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Bourg, Alain C M; Sposito, Garrison

    2003-03-01

    The current way of describing diffusive transport through compacted clays is a simple diffusion model coupled to a linear adsorption coefficient (K(d)). To fit the observed results of cation diffusion, this model is usually extended with an adjustable "surface diffusion" coefficient. Description of the negative adsorption of anions calls for a further adjustment through the use of an "effective porosity". The final model thus includes many fitting parameters. This is inconvenient where predictive modeling is called for (e.g., for waste confinement using compacted clay liners). The diffusion/adsorption models in current use have been derived from the common hydrogeological equation of advection/dispersion/adsorption. However, certain simplifications were also borrowed without questioning their applicability to the case of compacted clays. Among these simplifications, the assumption that the volume of the adsorbed phase is negligible should be discussed. We propose a modified diffusion/adsorption model that accounts for the volume of the adsorbed phase. It suggests that diffusion through highly compacted clay takes place through the interlayers (i.e., in the adsorbed phase). Quantitative prediction of the diffusive flux will necessitate more detailed descriptions of surface reactivity and of the mobility of interlayer species. PMID:12598111

  14. Dissociative adsorption of O2 on unreconstructed metal (100) surfaces: Pathways, energetics, and sticking kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2014-05-06

    An accurate description of oxygen dissociation pathways and kinetics for various local adlayer environments is key for an understanding not just of the coverage dependence of oxygen sticking, but also of reactive steady states in oxidation reactions. Density functional theory analysis for M(100) surfaces with M=Pd, Rh, and Ni, where O prefers the fourfold hollow adsorption site, does not support the traditional Brundle-Behm-Barker picture of dissociative adsorption onto second-nearest-neighbor hollow sites with an additional blocking constraint. Rather adsorption via neighboring vicinal bridge sites dominates, although other pathways can be active. The same conclusion also applies for M=Pt and Ir, where oxygen prefers the bridge adsorption site. Statistical mechanical analysis is performed based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of a multisite lattice-gas model consistent with our revised picture of adsorption. This analysis determines the coverage and temperature dependence of sticking for a realistic treatment of the oxygen adlayer structure.

  15. On the physical adsorption of vapors by microporous carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, R.H. . Inst. of Surface Science and Technology); Rand, B. . Division of Ceramics)

    1995-01-01

    The physical adsorption of nonpolar and polar vapors by active carbons is discussed in relation to pore structure and pore wall chemistry. For nonpolar vapors the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation is used to derive micropore volumes (W[sub 0]), average adsorption energies (E[sub 0]), and micropore widths (L) for a number of systems. These parameters are used to interpret the adsorption behavior of nitrogen which, because it is a relatively small molecule, is frequently used at 77 K to probe porosity and surface area. Results are presented for three carbons from differing precursors, namely, coal, coconut shells, and polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) to illustrate the applicability of the technique. For the latter carbon increases in micropore size, induced by activation in carbon dioxide, and reductions in accessible pore volume caused by heat treatment in argon are also characterized and related to structural changes. The approach is then extended to the adsorption of larger hydrogen vapors, where the resulting W[sub 0] values may require correction for molecular packing effects which occur in the lower relative pressure regions of the isotherms, i.e., during the filling of ultramicropores. These packing effects are shown to limit the use of the Polanyi characteristic curve for correlating isotherm data for several vapors, of differing molecular size, by one adsorbent. Data for the adsorption of water, which is a strongly polar liquid, have been interpreted using the Dubinin-Serpinsky equation.

  16. Adsorption of nonmetallic elements on defect-free MgO(001) surface - DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pašti, Igor A.; Baljozović, Miloš; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2015-02-01

    Adsorption of 11 non-metals (H, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl and Br) on defect-free MgO(001) surface was investigate using DFT approach. Adsorption energies were found to be between - 0.56 eV (hydrogen adsorption) and - 2.63 eV (carbon adsorption). Charge transfer from substrate to adsorbate was observed to follow the periodicity in the Periodic Table of Elements, as increases from left to right and decreases from top to bottom. All investigated adsorbates prefer oxygen sites on MgO surface. The analysis of adsorbate-MgO(001) electronic structure suggested that the electronic structure of the O adsorption center and adsorbate atom is molecule-like and there is no strong interaction with MgO electronic bands. Based on the obtained dataset for adsorption energies of selected non-metallic adsorbates (X) the reactivity of MgO towards the bond cleavage in the cases of X-X, H-X and HO-X bonds was discussed. Obtained results point to weak reactivity of MgO(001) towards atomic adsorption and low activity for bond cleavage. However, these results can be used as a starting point for the functionalization of MgO, particularly in the cases where bond cleavage activity and surface-mediated stabilization of dissociation products are desired.

  17. Rethinking Critical Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Peach, Sarah; Polak, Robert D.

    1996-03-01

    Recent reflectivity experiments on near-critical mixtures of carbon disulfide and nitromethane contained in glass cells footnote Niraj S. Desai, Sarah Peach, and Carl Franck, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4129 (1995) have shown that preferential adsorption of one liquid component onto the wall can be controlled by chemical modification of the glass. The glass was treated with varying amounts of hexamethyldisilazane to decrease surface polarity and therefore enhance the adsorption of carbon disulfide in a surprisingly continuous way. The effect of the glass wall on the local liquid composition can be described by two different scaling hypotheses: using a short range field on the liquid closest to the wall, or pinning the amplitude of the order parameter at the surface. We have found that only the second approach is consistent with the experimental data, although this is difficult to reconcile with observed wetting critical phenomena. We also have reexamined the issue of substrate inhomogeneity and conclude that the substrates were indeed homogeneous on relevant length scales. Supported by the NSF under DMR-9320910 and the central facilities of the Materials Science Center at Cornell University.

  18. Adsorption behaviour of bulgur.

    PubMed

    Erbaş, Mustafa; Aykın, Elif; Arslan, Sultan; Durak, Atike N

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this research was to determine the adsorption behaviour of bulgur. Three different particle sizes (2adsorption, because of %E values lower than 10%. Bulgur must be stored below 70% relative humidity and with less than 10 g water per 100 g of dry mater. PMID:26575716

  19. Lateral variation of target poisoning during reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Guettler, D.; Groetzschel, R.; Moeller, W.

    2007-06-25

    The reactive gas incorporation into a Ti sputter target has been investigated using laterally resolving ion beam analysis during dc magnetron deposition of TiN in an Ar/N{sub 2} atmosphere. At sufficiently low reactive gas flow, the nitrogen incorporation exhibits a pronounced lateral variation, with a lower areal density in the target racetrack compared to the target center and edge. The findings are reproduced by model calculations. In the racetrack, the balance of reactive gas injection and sputter erosion is shifted toward erosion. The injection of nitrogen is dominated by combined molecular adsorption and recoil implantation versus direct ion implantation.

  20. Lateral variation of target poisoning during reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güttler, D.; Grötzschel, R.; Möller, W.

    2007-06-01

    The reactive gas incorporation into a Ti sputter target has been investigated using laterally resolving ion beam analysis during dc magnetron deposition of TiN in an Ar /N2 atmosphere. At sufficiently low reactive gas flow, the nitrogen incorporation exhibits a pronounced lateral variation, with a lower areal density in the target racetrack compared to the target center and edge. The findings are reproduced by model calculations. In the racetrack, the balance of reactive gas injection and sputter erosion is shifted toward erosion. The injection of nitrogen is dominated by combined molecular adsorption and recoil implantation versus direct ion implantation.

  1. Adsorption of fulvic acid on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Filius, J.D.; Lumsdon, D.G.; Meeussen, J.C.L.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsduk, W.H. van

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption of fulvic acid by goethite was determined experimentally as a function of concentration, pH, and ionic strength. The data were described with the CD-MUSIC model of Hiemstra and Van Riemsdijk (1996), which allows the distribution of charge of the bound fulvate molecule over a surface region. Simultaneously, the concentration, pH, and salt dependency of the binding of fulvic acid can be described. Using the same parameters, the basic charging behavior of the goethite in the absence of fulvic acid could be described well. The surface species used in the model indicate that inner sphere coordination of carboxylic groups of the fulvate molecule is important at low pH, whereas at high pH the outer sphere coordination with reactive groups of the fulvate molecule with high proton affinity is important.

  2. Global versus local adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Marloie, Gael; Markovits, Alexis; Ellinger, Yves

    2015-10-01

    The origin of the enantiomeric excess found in the amino acids present in the organic matter of carbonaceous meteorites is still unclear. Selective adsorption of one of the two enantiomers existing after a racemic formation could be part of the answer. Hereafter we report a comparative study of the adsorption of the R and S enantiomers of α-alanine and lactic acid on the hydroxylated { } chiral surface of α-quartz using numerical simulation techniques. Structurally different adsorption sites were found with opposite R versus S selectivity for the same molecule-surface couple, raising the problem of whether to consider adsorption as a local property or as a global response characteristic of the whole surface. To deal with the second term of this alternative, a statistical approach was designed, based on the occurrence of each adsorption site whose energy was calculated using first principle periodic density functional theory. It was found that R-alanine and S-lactic acid are the enantiomers preferentially adsorbed, even if the adsorption process on the quartz { } surface stays with a disappointingly poor enantio-selectivity. Nevertheless, it highlighted the important point that considering adsorption as a global property changes perspectives in the search for more efficient enantio-selective supports and more generally changes the way to apprehend adsorption processes in astro-chemistry/biology.

  3. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  4. ADSORPTION MEDIA FOR ARSENIC REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the use of adsorptive media for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. Presentation is a fundamental discussion on the use of adsorptive media for arsenic removal and includes information from several EPA field studies on removal of arsenic from dr...

  5. Effect Of Reaction Environments On The Reactivity Of PCB (2-Chlorobiphenyl) Over Activated Carbon Impregnated With Palladized Iron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles has been developed to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, we evaluated the effects of various reaction environments on the adsorption-mediated dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-...

  6. Structure-function relationships in the cysteine proteinases actinidin, papain and papaya proteinase omega. Three-dimensional structure of papaya proteinase omega deduced by knowledge-based modelling and active-centre characteristics determined by two-hydronic-state reactivity probe kinetics and kinetics of catalysis.

    PubMed Central

    Topham, C M; Salih, E; Frazao, C; Kowlessur, D; Overington, J P; Thomas, M; Brocklehurst, S M; Patel, M; Thomas, E W; Brocklehurst, K

    1991-01-01

    1. A model of the three-dimensional structure of papaya proteinase omega, the most basic cysteine proteinase component of the latex of papaya (Carica papaya), was built from its amino acid sequence and the two currently known high-resolution crystal structures of the homologous enzymes papain (EC 3.4.22.2) and actinidin (EC 3.4.22.14). The method used a knowledge-based approach incorporated in the COMPOSER suite of programs and refinement by using the interactive graphics program FRODO on an Evans and Sutherland PS 390 and by energy minimization using the GROMOS program library. 2. Functional similarities and differences between the three cysteine proteinases revealed by analysis of pH-dependent kinetics of the acylation process of the catalytic act and of the reactions of the enzyme catalytic sites with substrate-derived 2-pyridyl disulphides as two-hydronic-state reactivity probes are reported and discussed in terms of the knowledge-based model. 3. To facilitate analysis of complex pH-dependent kinetic data, a multitasking application program (SKETCHER) for parameter estimation by interactive manipulation of calculated curves and a simple method of writing down pH-dependent kinetic equations for reactions involving any number of reactive hydronic states by using information matrices were developed. 4. Papaya proteinase omega differs from the other two enzymes in the ionization characteristics of the common (Cys)-SH/(His)-Im+H catalytic-site system and of the other acid/base groups that modulate thiol reactivity towards substrate-derived inhibitors and the acylation process of the catalytic act. The most marked difference in the Cys/His system is that the pKa for the loss of the ion-pair state to form -S-/-Im is 8.1-8.3 for papaya proteinase omega, whereas it is 9.5 for both actinidin and papain. Papaya proteinase omega is similar to actinidin in that it lacks the second catalytically influential group with pKa approx. 4 present in papain and possesses a

  7. Structure-function relationships in the cysteine proteinases actinidin, papain and papaya proteinase omega. Three-dimensional structure of papaya proteinase omega deduced by knowledge-based modelling and active-centre characteristics determined by two-hydronic-state reactivity probe kinetics and kinetics of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Topham, C M; Salih, E; Frazao, C; Kowlessur, D; Overington, J P; Thomas, M; Brocklehurst, S M; Patel, M; Thomas, E W; Brocklehurst, K

    1991-11-15

    1. A model of the three-dimensional structure of papaya proteinase omega, the most basic cysteine proteinase component of the latex of papaya (Carica papaya), was built from its amino acid sequence and the two currently known high-resolution crystal structures of the homologous enzymes papain (EC 3.4.22.2) and actinidin (EC 3.4.22.14). The method used a knowledge-based approach incorporated in the COMPOSER suite of programs and refinement by using the interactive graphics program FRODO on an Evans and Sutherland PS 390 and by energy minimization using the GROMOS program library. 2. Functional similarities and differences between the three cysteine proteinases revealed by analysis of pH-dependent kinetics of the acylation process of the catalytic act and of the reactions of the enzyme catalytic sites with substrate-derived 2-pyridyl disulphides as two-hydronic-state reactivity probes are reported and discussed in terms of the knowledge-based model. 3. To facilitate analysis of complex pH-dependent kinetic data, a multitasking application program (SKETCHER) for parameter estimation by interactive manipulation of calculated curves and a simple method of writing down pH-dependent kinetic equations for reactions involving any number of reactive hydronic states by using information matrices were developed. 4. Papaya proteinase omega differs from the other two enzymes in the ionization characteristics of the common (Cys)-SH/(His)-Im+H catalytic-site system and of the other acid/base groups that modulate thiol reactivity towards substrate-derived inhibitors and the acylation process of the catalytic act. The most marked difference in the Cys/His system is that the pKa for the loss of the ion-pair state to form -S-/-Im is 8.1-8.3 for papaya proteinase omega, whereas it is 9.5 for both actinidin and papain. Papaya proteinase omega is similar to actinidin in that it lacks the second catalytically influential group with pKa approx. 4 present in papain and possesses a

  8. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  9. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  10. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  11. A pulse chromatographic study of the adsorption properties of the amino-MIL-53 (Al) metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Couck, Sarah; Rémy, Tom; Baron, Gino V; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2010-08-28

    Low-coverage adsorption properties of the metal-organic framework amino-MIL-53 (Al) were determined using the pulse chromatographic technique. By using n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, 1-alkenes, cyclohexane and benzene as probe molecules, the nature of the adsorptive interactions in amino-MIL-53 (Al) was studied. Henry adsorption constants and adsorption enthalpies of iso-alkanes are significantly lower than those of the linear alkanes, demonstrating the shape selective properties of amino-MIL-53. The presence of amino-groups in the pores of the material increases the electrostatic contributions with molecules containing double bonds. A simple model relates adsorption enthalpies to the number of hydrogen atoms and double bonds in the molecule. The effective pore size of the material was estimated based on the relationship between adsorption enthalpy and entropy. PMID:20532387

  12. Sulfur-bonded thiophenes in organometallic rhenium complexes and adsorption of isocyanides on gold

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.J.

    1993-08-01

    This dissertation contains results of research conducted in two different areas: (1) organometallic synthesis and reactivity, and (2) organometallic surface chemistry. In the synthesis and reactivity studies, sulfur coordination of thiophene and benzo[b]thiophene to the metal center in organometallic rhenium complexes is examined. In the surface chemistry studies, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is used to analyze the adsorption of several isocyanides on the surface of gold powder. Results are compared and contrasted to known organometallic chemistry.

  13. Reactivity of nanocolloidal particles gamma-Fe2O3 at charged interfaces. Part 2. Electrochemical conversion. Role of the electrode material.

    PubMed

    Lucas, I T; Dubois, E; Chevalet, J; Durand-Vidal, S; Joiret, S

    2008-06-14

    In this paper we are interested in the reactivity of magnetic nanoparticles at the electrode involved in the electrochemical synthesis of magnetic and conductive liquids. The reactivity of charged colloidal particles occurs in two steps, first the approach toward the electrode with a possible adsorption phenomenon and secondly the electron transfer. In this paper we focus on the electrochemical behaviour of well-defined gamma-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles at a gold and at a mercury electrode. Particles can be electrochemically reduced at the two electrodes and can be dispersed into mercury at a highly negative potential. Here, we probe in particular the properties of nanoreactor of the particles, that is to say, the possible conservation of their size after they have undergone the electrochemical process. By correlating complementary techniques (here atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations, Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry on gold electrode) and by studying the magnetic properties of the material obtained after reduction of the particles on a mercury electrode, we are able to probe both the chemical nature and the physical state of the particles once transformed. Experimental results show that under specific conditions, the particles are individually converted into iron, which justifies their use for preparing a liquid with both magnetic properties and properties of electron conduction. PMID:18500405

  14. Adsorption of polymeric brushes: Bridging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johner, Albert; Joanny, Jean-François

    1992-04-01

    We study the adsorption of grafted polymer layers on a planar surface parallel to the grafting surface. The layer consists of two types of chains: nonadsorbed chains with a free end and adsorbed chains forming bridges between the two plates. In the limit of strong adsorption a dead zone exists in the vicinity of the adsorbing plate; its size increases with the adsorption strength. Two adsorption mechanisms are possible: adsorption of the last monomer only and adsorption of all the monomers. In both cases the adsorption regimes at equilibrium (when no external force acts on the plates) are discussed within the framework of the self-consistent mean-field theory. We also give scaling laws taking into account excluded volume correlations. Finally, we consider situations where a finite external force, either tangential or normal to the plates, is applied on the adsorbing plate. Pulling and tangential forces both reduce the fraction of bridges and eventually lead to rupture, whereas compressional forces favor bridging. For normal forces, force vs distance profiles between planes and crossed cylinders are given.

  15. Random sequential adsorption on fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-01

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  16. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions. PMID:22852643

  17. Characterization and adsorption modeling of silicon carbide-derived carbons.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T X; Bae, J-S; Bhatia, S K

    2009-02-17

    We present characterization results of silicon carbide-derived carbons (Si-CDCs) prepared from both nano- and micron-sized betaSiC particles by oxidation in pure chlorine atmosphere at various synthesis temperatures (600-1000 degrees C). Subsequently, the adsorption modeling study of simple gases (CH4 and CO2) in these Si-CDC samples for a wide range of pressures and temperatures using our Finite Wall Thickness model [Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K. Langmuir 2004, 20, 3532] was also carried out. In general, characterization results showed that the core of Si-CDC particles contains predominantly amorphous material while minor graphitization was also observed on the surface of these particles for all the investigated synthesis temperatures (600-1000 degrees C). Furthermore, postsynthetic heat treatment at 1000 degrees C for 3 days, as well as particle size of precursor (betaSiC) were shown to have slight impact on the graphitization. In spite of the highly disordered nature of Si-CDC samples, the adsorption modeling results revealed that the Finite Wall Thickness model provides reasonably good prediction of experimental adsorption data of CO2 and CH4 in all the investigated Si-CDC samples at the temperatures of 273 K, 313 K, and 333 K for a wide range of pressure up to 200 bar. Furthermore, the impact of the difference in molecular size and geometry between analysis and probing gases on the prediction of the experimental adsorption isotherm in a disordered carbon using the slit-pore model is also found. Finally, the correlation between compressibility of the Si-CDC samples under high pressure adsorption and their synthesis temperature was deduced from the adsorption modeling. PMID:19123908

  18. Reactive sticking coefficients of silane on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

    1988-09-15

    Reactive sticking coefficients (RSCs) were measured for silane and disilane on polycrystalline silicon for a wide range of temperature and flux (pressure) conditions. The data were obtained from deposition rate measurements using molecular beam scattering and a very low pressure cold wall reactor. The RSCs have non-Arrhenius temperature dependences and decreases with increasing flux at low (710/sup 0/) temperatures. A simple model involving dissociative adsorption of silane is consistent with these results. The results are compared with previous studies of the SiH/sub 4//Si(s) reaction.

  19. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  20. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  1. Dexamethasone Coated Neural Probes Elicit Attenuated Inflammatory Response and Neuronal Loss Compared to Uncoated Neural Probes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yinghui; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2007-01-01

    Glial scar formation around implanted silicon neural probes compromises their ability to facilitate long-term recordings. One approach to modulate the tissue reaction around implanted probes in the brain is to develop probe coatings that locally release antiinflammatory drugs. In this study, we developed a nitrocellulose-based coating for the local delivery of the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone (DEX). Silicon neural probes with and without nitrocellulose-DEX coatings were implanted into rat brains, and inflammatory response was evaluated 1 week and 4 weeks post implantation. DEX coatings significantly reduced the reactivity of microglia and macrophages one week post implantation as evidenced by ED1 immunostaining. CS56 staining demonstrated that DEX treatment significantly reduced chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) expression one week post implantation. Both at one week and at four week time points, GFAP staining for reactive astrocytes and neurofilament (NF) staining revealed that local DEX treatment significantly attenuated astroglial response and reduced neuronal loss in the vicinity of the probes. Weak ED1, neurocan, and NG2 positive signal was detected four weeks post implantation for both coated and uncoated probes, suggesting a stabilization of the inflammatory response over time in this implant model. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the nitrocellulose-DEX coating can effectively attenuate the inflammatory response to the implanted neural probes, and reduce neuronal loss in the vicinity of the coated probes. Thus anti-inflammatory probe coatings may represent a promising approach to attenuate astroglial scar and reduce neural loss around implanted neural probes. PMID:17376408

  2. Bromide Adsorption by Reference Minerals and Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bromide, Br-, adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous Al and Fe oxide, montmorillonite, kaolinite, and temperate and tropical soils. Bromide adsorption decreased with increasing solution pH with minimal adsorption occurring above pH 7. Bromide adsorption was higher for amorphous oxides t...

  3. Chemical modeling of boron adsorption by humic materials using the constant capacitance model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The constant capacitance surface complexation model was used to describe B adsorption behavior on reference Aldrich humic acid, humic acids from various soil environments, and dissolved organic matter extracted from sewage effluents. The reactive surface functional groups on the humic materials wer...

  4. TRANSLATION OF REPORTS ON SPECIAL PROBLEMS OF WATER TECHNOLOGY. VOLUME 9 - ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the summer of 1975 a Conference was held at the Engler-Bunte-Institute in Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany on the subject of adsorption and reactivation as a water treatment unit process. Twenty-four papers were presented by the leading scientists and engineers in Wester...

  5. Molecular adsorption on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingmei; Enders, Axel; Rahman, Talat S.; Dowben, Peter A.

    2014-11-01

    Current studies addressing the engineering of charge carrier concentration and the electronic band gap in epitaxial graphene using molecular adsorbates are reviewed. The focus here is on interactions between the graphene surface and the adsorbed molecules, including small gas molecules (H2O, H2, O2, CO, NO2, NO, and NH3), aromatic, and non-aromatic molecules (F4-TCNQ, PTCDA, TPA, Na-NH2, An-CH3, An-Br, Poly (ethylene imine) (PEI), and diazonium salts), and various biomolecules such as peptides, DNA fragments, and other derivatives. This is followed by a discussion on graphene-based gas sensor concepts. In reviewing the studies of the effects of molecular adsorption on graphene, it is evident that the strong manipulation of graphene’s electronic structure, including p- and n-doping, is not only possible with molecular adsorbates, but that this approach appears to be superior compared to these exploiting edge effects, local defects, or strain. However, graphene-based gas sensors, albeit feasible because huge adsorbate-induced variations in the relative conductivity are possible, generally suffer from the lack of chemical selectivity.

  6. Molecular adsorption on graphene.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingmei; Enders, Axel; Rahman, Talat S; Dowben, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    Current studies addressing the engineering of charge carrier concentration and the electronic band gap in epitaxial graphene using molecular adsorbates are reviewed. The focus here is on interactions between the graphene surface and the adsorbed molecules, including small gas molecules (H(2)O, H(2), O(2), CO, NO(2), NO, and NH(3)), aromatic, and non-aromatic molecules (F4-TCNQ, PTCDA, TPA, Na-NH(2), An-CH(3), An-Br, Poly (ethylene imine) (PEI), and diazonium salts), and various biomolecules such as peptides, DNA fragments, and other derivatives. This is followed by a discussion on graphene-based gas sensor concepts. In reviewing the studies of the effects of molecular adsorption on graphene, it is evident that the strong manipulation of graphene's electronic structure, including p- and n-doping, is not only possible with molecular adsorbates, but that this approach appears to be superior compared to these exploiting edge effects, local defects, or strain. However, graphene-based gas sensors, albeit feasible because huge adsorbate-induced variations in the relative conductivity are possible, generally suffer from the lack of chemical selectivity. PMID:25287516

  7. Synthesis of BiOBr-PVP hybrids with enhanced adsorption-photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanqing; Wang, Zeyan; Huang, Baibiao; Dai, Ying; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Qin, Xiaoyan

    2015-08-01

    We synthesized BiOBr-PVP hybrids by a simple solvothermal process, and investigated the adsorption and photocatalytic properties. Due to the presence of PVP, the thickness of the BiOBr nanosheets in BiOBr-PVP hybrids can be greatly reduced, which increased the percentage of highly reactive (0 0 1) facets exposed. And PVP was found to be adsorbed on the surface of BiOBr nanosheets by a strong donor-acceptor interactions via Cdbnd O bonds, which lead to an enhanced zeta potential and stronger adsorption capacity of cationic RhB molecules on the surface of BiOBr-PVP hybrids. And due to the synergistic effects of both high percentage of reactive (0 0 1) crystal facets and strong adsorption capacity, BiOBr-PVP hybrids exhibit excellent activities and stabilities on RhB dye degradation, which could be potentially used for practical waste water treatments.

  8. Effect of tribology processes on adsorption of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yu; Yang, Hongjuan; Wang, Linghe; Su, Yanjing; Qiao, Lijie

    2016-03-01

    As soon as artificial joint replacements are implanted into patients, the adsorption of proteins can occur. Joint implants operate in a protein-rich and relatively corrosive environment under tribological contact. The contacted area acted as an anodic part and the rest of the surface was more cathodic. Therefore, the adsorption of proteins is different in and outside the wear track. Adsorbed proteins would denature during rubbing and a tribofilm could form. The tribofilm can lubricate the surface and act as a barrier to corrosion damage. However, to observe the adsorption of proteins in situ has always been a challenge. Scanning Kelvin probe force microscope (SKPFM) was used to study the adsorption of albumin on the surface of CoCrMo alloy under simulated tribology movement. Fluorescence microscopy (FM) was employed to reveal the protein molecules in the wear scar. It was found that albumin molecules can decrease the surface potential and accelerate the corrosion process. In the wear track, albumin denatured and changed the surface potential as time progressed.

  9. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  10. Fracture Reactivation in Chemically Reactive Rock Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Hooker, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of existing fractures is a fundamental process of brittle failure that controls the nucleation of earthquake ruptures, propagation and linkage of hydraulic fractures in oil and gas production, and the evolution of fault and fracture networks and thus of fluid and heat transport in the upper crust. At depths below 2-3 km, and frequently shallower, brittle processes of fracture growth, linkage, and reactivation compete with chemical processes of fracture sealing by mineral precipitation, with precipitation rates similar to fracture opening rates. We recently found rates of fracture opening in tectonically quiescent settings of 10-20 μm/m.y., rates similar to euhedral quartz precipitation under these conditions. The tendency of existing partially or completely cemented fractures to reactivate will vary depending on strain rate, mineral precipitation kinetics, strength contrast between host rock and fracture cement, stress conditions, degree of fracture infill, and fracture network geometry. Natural fractures in quartzite of the Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland, exhibit a complex history of fracture formation and reactivation, with reactivation involving both repeated crack-seal opening-mode failure and shear failure of fractures that formed in opening mode. Fractures are partially to completely sealed with crack-seal or euhedral quartz cement or quartz cement fragmented by shear reactivation. Degree of cementation controls the tendency of fractures for later shear reactivation, to interact elastically with adjacent open fractures, and their intersection behavior. Using kinematic, dynamic, and diagenetic criteria, we determine the sequence of opening-mode fracture formation and later shear reactivation. We find that sheared fracture systems of similar orientation display spatially varying sense of slip We attribute these inconsistent directions of shear reactivation to 1) a heterogeneous stress field in this highly fractured rock unit and 2

  11. Reactive spreading in ceramic/metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Cannon, Rowland M.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2000-11-06

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated mechanistically. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the steps involved in spreading are outlined to permit comparison to the steps in the compound formation that typically accompanies reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. They can all be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. This analysis plus assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than commonly believed, and perhaps is the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the slow spreading rates plus the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  12. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  13. First principle study of the surface reactivity of layered lithium oxides LiMO2 (M = Ni, Mn, Co)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallverdu, Germain; Minvielle, Marie; Andreu, Nathalie; Gonbeau, Danielle; Baraille, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    LiNixMnyCo1 - x - yO2 compounds (NMC) are layered oxides widely used in commercial lithium-ion batteries at the positive electrode. Nevertheless surface reactivity of this material is still not well known. As a first step, based on first principle calculations, this study deals with the electronic properties and the surface reactivity of LiMO2 (M = Co, Ni, Mn) compounds, considering the behavior of each transition metal separately in the same R 3 ̅ mα-NaFeO2-type structure, the one of LiCoO2 and NMC. For each compound, after a brief description of the bare slab electronic properties, we explored the acido-basic and redox properties of the (110) and (104) surfaces by considering the adsorption of a gaseous probe. The chemisorption of SO2 produces both sulfite or sulfate species associated respectively to an acido-basic or a reduction process. These processes are localized on the transition metals of the first two layers of the surface. Although sulfate species are globally favored, a different behavior is obtained depending on both the surface and the transition metal considered. We conclude with a simple scheme which describes the reduction processes on the both surfaces in terms of formal oxidation degrees of transition metals.

  14. Gold Supported on La2O3: Structure and Reactivity with CO2 and Implicatinos for CO Oxidation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaylov, M.; Ivanova, E; Hao, Y; Hadjiivanov, K; Knozinger, H; Gates, B

    2008-01-01

    A sample consisting of gold dispersed on high-area porous lanthanum oxide was prepared by adsorption of dimethylgold acetylacetonate. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the gold species and their ligands, and CO as a probe molecule was used with IR spectroscopy to follow the changes in the gold species under various reaction conditions, with a focus on oxidation?reduction processes. Gold on the initially prepared sample was present as Au{sup 3+} species, but only a small fraction of them were apparently reactive with the CO probe molecule. After evacuation at elevated temperatures, the gold was first reduced to give clusters incorporating positively charged gold species, which in turn were converted to neutral gold species. CO and O{sub 2} reacted with the reduced sample in a process that appears to be autocatalytic and related to the existence of oxidized gold species that facilitate oxygen activation and CO oxidation catalysis. Surprisingly, it was also established that - although they are inert toward O{sub 2} at room temperature - the supported gold nanoparticles are readily oxidized by CO{sub 2}, a result that suggests that CO{sub 2} may be the actual oxidant of gold in CO oxidation catalysis. The supported zerovalent gold nanoparticles are also easily oxidized by NO and by NO{sub 2}.

  15. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  16. Material Exhibiting Efficient CO2 Adsorption at Room Temperature for Concentrations Lower Than 1000 ppm: Elucidation of the State of Barium Ion Exchanged in an MFI-Type Zeolite.

    PubMed

    Itadani, Atsushi; Oda, Akira; Torigoe, Hiroe; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Sato, Mineo; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is well-known as a greenhouse gas that leads to global warming. Many efforts have been made to capture CO2 from coal-fired power plants, as well as to reduce the amounts of excess CO2 in the atmosphere to around 400 ppm. However, this is not a simple task, particularly in the lower pressure region than 1000 ppm. This is because the CO2 molecule is chemically stable and has a relatively low reactivity. In the present study, the CO2 adsorption at room temperature on MFI-type zeolites exchanged with alkaline-earth-metal ions, with focus on CO2 concentrations <1000 ppm, was investigated both experimentally and by calculation. These materials exhibited a particularly efficient adsorption capability for CO2, compared with other presented samples, such as the sodium-form and transition-metal ion-exchanged MFI-type zeolites. Ethyne (C2H2) was used as a probe molecule. Analyses were carried out with IR spectroscopy and X-ray absorption, and provided significant information regarding the presence of the M(2+)-O(2-)-M(2+) (M(2+): alkaline-earth-metal ion) species formed in the samples. It was subsequently determined that this species acts as a highly efficient site for CO2 adsorption at room temperature under very low pressure, compared to a single M(2+) species. A further advantage is that this material can be easily regenerated by a treatment, e.g., through the application of the temperature swing adsorption process, at relatively low temperatures (300-473 K). PMID:26990497

  17. Water adsorption kinetics and contact angles of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Muster, Tim H; Prestidge, Clive A

    2005-04-01

    Water sorption kinetics and water contact angles have been characterized for a range of pharmaceutical powders: ambroxol hydrochloride, griseofulvin, N,n-octyl-D-gluconamide, paracetamol, sulfathiazole, and theophylline. The uptake of water by powder samples at saturated vapor pressure was modeled using a pseudo first-order kinetic relationship. Parameters from this model have been correlated with the concentration and reactivity of the active surface sites of the pharmaceutical powders and their contact angles. The study has shown that analysis of water adsorption kinetics can be a powerful technique for characterizing the surface chemistry and wettability of pharmaceutical powders, and is particularly sensitive to their surface modification through excipient adsorption: ethyl(hydroxyethyl)cellulose treatment of griseofulvin and butyryl chloride treatment of sulfathiazole are reported as case studies. PMID:15736196

  18. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  19. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  20. Capability of defective graphene-supported Pd13 and Ag13 particles for mercury adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeprasert, Jittima; Junkaew, Anchalee; Rungnim, Chompoonut; Kunaseth, Manaschai; Kungwan, Nawee; Promarak, Vinich; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2016-02-01

    Reactivity of single-vacancy defective graphene (DG) and DG-supported Pdn and Agn (n = 1, 13) for mercury (Hg0) adsorption has been studied using density functional theory calculation. The results show that Pdn binds defective site of DG much stronger than the Agn, while metal nanocluster binds DG stronger than single metal atom. Metal clustering affects the adsorption ability of Pd composite while that of Ag is comparatively less. The binding strength of -8.49 eV was found for Pd13 binding on DG surface, indicating its high stability. Analyses of structure, energy, partial density of states, and d-band center (ɛd) revealed that the adsorbed metal atom or cluster enhances the reactivity of DG toward Hg adsorption. In addition, the Hg adsorption ability of Mn-DG composite is found to be related to the ɛd of the deposited Mn, in which the closer ɛd of Mn to the Fermi level correspond to the higher adsorption strength of Hg on Mn-DG composite. The order of Hg adsorption strength on Mn-DG composite are as follows: Pd13 (-1.68 eV) >> Ag13 (-0.67 eV) ∼ Ag1 (-0.69 eV) > Pd1 (-0.62 eV). Pd13-DG composite is therefore more efficient sorbent for Hg0 removal in terms of high stability and high adsorption reactivity compared to the Ag13. Further design of highly efficient carbon based sorbents should be focused on tailoring the ɛd of deposited metals.

  1. Adsorption of pentacene on (100) vicinal surfaces: role of coordination, surface chemistry and vdWs effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Jeronimo; Kara, Abdelkader

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to low miller index surfaces, vicinal surfaces are characterized by steps and step edges that not only present an interesting atomic landscape for the adsorption organic molecules, but also a unique electronic structure resulting in part from the low coordinated atoms at the step edges. The adsorption of pentacene on the stepped (511), (711), (911) surfaces (respectively 3, 4 and 5-atom wide terraces) of Cu and Ag (coinage transition metals); Pt (reactive transition metal); and Ni (reactive, magnetic transition metal) are studied using density functional theory, in order to investigate the support effects arising from differing surface chemistry. We compare the adsorption energy, adsorption geometry and electronic structure predicted by the PBE functional with those obtained from one of the optimized vdW-DF methods: optB88-vdW. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Basic Energy Science under Contract No. DE-FG02-11ER16243.

  2. Bioreactive self-assembled monolayers on hydrogen-passivated Si(111) as a new class of atomically flat substrates for biological scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, P; Nock, S; Spudich, J A; Volkmuth, W D; Chu, S; Cicero, R L; Wade, C P; Linford, M R; Chidsey, C E

    1997-07-01

    This is the first report of bioreactive self-assembled monolayers, covalently bound to atomically flat silicon surfaces and capable of binding biomolecules for investigation by scanning probe microscopy and other surface-related assays and sensing devices. These monolayers are stable under a wide range of conditions and allow tailor-made functionalization for many purposes. We describe the substrate preparation and present an STM and SFM characterization, partly performed with multiwalled carbon nanotubes as tapping-mode supertips. Furthermore, we present two strategies of introducing in situ reactive headgroup functionalities. One method entails a free radical chlorosulfonation process with subsequent sulfonamide formation. A second method employs singlet carbenemediated hydrogen-carbon insertion of a heterobifunctional, amino-reactive trifluoromethyl-diazirinyl crosslinker. We believe that this new substrate is advantageous to others, because it (i) is atomically flat over large areas and can be prepared in a few hours with standard equipment, (ii) is stable under most conditions, (iii) can be modified to adjust a certain degree of reactivity and hydrophobicity, which allows physical adsorption or covalent crosslinking of the biological specimen, (iv) builds the bridge between semiconductor microfabrication and organic/biological molecular systems, and (v) is accessible to nanopatterning and applications requiring conductive substrates. PMID:9245759

  3. The effects of pH and surface composition on Pb adsorption to natural freshwater biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A R; Lion, L W; Nelson, Y M; Shuler, M L; Ghiorse, W C

    2001-08-01

    Two dominant variables that control the adsorption of toxic trace metals to suspended particulate materials and aquatic surface coatings are surface composition and solution pH. A model for the pH-dependent adsorption of Pbto heterogeneous particulate surface mixtures was derived from experimental evaluation of Pb adsorption to laboratory-derived surrogates. The surrogate materials were selected to represent natural reactive surface components. Pb adsorption to both the laboratory surrogates and natural biofilms was determined in chemically defined solutions under controlled laboratory conditions. Pb adsorption was measured over a pH range of 5-8, with an initial Pb concentration in solution of 2.0 microM. The surface components considered include amorphous Fe oxide, biogenic Mn oxide produced by a Mn(II) oxidizing bacterium (Leptothrix discophora SS-1), Al oxide, the common green alga Chlorella vulgaris, and Leptothrix discophora SS-1 cells. A linearization of Pb adsorption data for each adsorbent was used to quantify the relationship between Pb adsorption and pH. The parameters for individual adsorbents were incorporated into an additive model to predict the total Pb adsorption in multiple-adsorbent natural surface coatings that were collected from Cayuga Lake, NY. Pb adsorption experiments on the natural surface coatings at variable pH were utilized to verify the additive model predictions based on the pH dependent behavior of the experimental laboratory surrogates. Observed Pb adsorption is consistent with the model predictions (within 1-24%) over the range of solution pH values considered. The experimental results indicate that the combination of Fe and biogenic Mn oxides can contribute as much as 90% of Pb adsorbed on Cayuga Lake biofilms, with the dominant adsorbent switching from Mn to Fe oxide with increasing pH. PMID:11505999

  4. Polymer Adsorption on Graphite and CVD Graphene Surfaces Studied by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Yudan; Han, Hui-Ling; Cai, Qun; Wu, Qiong; Xie, Mingxiu; Chen, Daoyong; Geng, Baisong; Zhang, Yuanbo; Wang, Feng; Shen, Y R; Tian, Chuanshan

    2015-10-14

    Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was employed to probe polymer contaminants on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and to study alkane and polyethylene (PE) adsorption on graphite. In comparing the spectra from the two surfaces, it was found that the contaminants on CVD graphene must be long-chain alkane or PE-like molecules. PE adsorption from solution on the honeycomb surface results in a self-assembled ordered monolayer with the C-C skeleton plane perpendicular to the surface and an adsorption free energy of ∼42 kJ/mol for PE(H(CH2CH2)nH) with n ≈ 60. Such large adsorption energy is responsible for the easy contamination of CVD graphene by impurity in the polymer during standard transfer processes. Contamination can be minimized with the use of purified polymers free of PE-like impurities. PMID:26367247

  5. Automatic Processing of Reactive Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1985-01-01

    A series of process modeling computer codes were examined. The codes use finite element techniques to determine the time-dependent process parameters operative during nonisothermal reactive flows such as can occur in reaction injection molding or composites fabrication. The use of these analytical codes to perform experimental control functions is examined; since the models can determine the state of all variables everywhere in the system, they can be used in a manner similar to currently available experimental probes. A small but well instrumented reaction vessel in which fiber-reinforced plaques are cured using computer control and data acquisition was used. The finite element codes were also extended to treat this particular process.

  6. Comparison of two strategies for detection of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weidong; Zhou, Yuanshu; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved treatment that was applied to oncology , dermatology, and ophthalmology. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a important role in the efficacy of PDT. Online monitoring of reactive oxygen species is the key to understand effect of PDT treatment. We used Fluorescence probes DPBF and luminescent probe luminal to measure the ROS in cells. And we revaluate the relationship between the amount of light and cell survival. There is strongly correlated between the amount of light and cell kill.

  7. Adsorption of mercury in coal-fired power plants gypsum slurry on TiO2/chitosan composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Gao, B. B.; Gao, J. Q.; Zhang, K.; Chen, Y. J.; Yang, Y. P.; Chen, H. W.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a simple method was used to prepare a chitosan adsorbent to mix with KI and TiO2. Gravimetric analysis (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize the samples before and after adsorption of Hg2+. A mercury adsorption experiment was also conducted in the gypsum slurry. The results show that using hydrobromic acid as a solvent of adsorbent resulted in a better adsorption effect than using acetic acid alone. Also, the sample (CS-KI/TiO2-HBr) had a maximum mercury adsorption capacity when the pH=5 and the t=50°C. The characterization experiments showed that the thermal stability of composite materials declined and the TiO2 uniformly dispersed in the surface of the samples with a lamellar structure, generating a lot of cracks and recesses that increased the reactive sites. Furthermore, when the TiO2 reacted with CS, it resulted in Ti-C, Ti-O and Ti-N bonds. The Br- can prevent the growth of TiO2 crystal grains and strengthen the ability of I- to remove mercury. The adsorption isotherm and kinetic results indicated that the adsorption behaviour of CS-KI/TiO2-HBr as it removes Hg2+ is an inhomogeneous multilayer adsorption process. The surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion effects are both important in the Hg2+ adsorption process.

  8. Adsorption and desorption of chlorpyrifos to soils and sediments.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Seyoum Yami; Beutel, Marc W; Yonge, David R; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2012-01-01

    ,439 and 15,500 L/kg for sediipents. This variation may result from several factors, including various experimental artifacts, variation in quality of soil organic matter, and inconsistencies in experimental methodologies. Based on this review, there appears to be no definitive quantification of chlorpyrifos adsorption or desorption characteristics. Thus, it is difficult to predict its adsorptive behavior with certainty, without resorting to experimental methods specific to the soil or sediment of interest. This limitation should be recognized in the context of current efforts to predict the risk, fate, and transport of chlorpyrifos based upon published partition coefficients. Based on a comprehensive review of the peer-reviewed literature related to adsorption and desorption of chlorpyrifos, we propose the following key areas for future research. From this review, it becomes increasingly evident that pesticide partitioning cannot be fully accounted for by the fraction of soil or solid-matrix organic matter or carbon content. Therefore, research that probes the variation in the nature and quality of soil organic matter on pesticide adsorption is highly desirable. Pesticide persistence and bioavailability depend on insights into desorption capacity. Therefore, understanding the fate and environmental impact of hydrophobic pesticides is incomplete without new research being performed to improve insights into pesticide desorption from soils and sediments. There is also a need for greater attention and consistency in developing experimental methods aimed at estimating partition coefficients. Moreover, in such testing, choosing initial concentrations and liquid-solid ratios that are more representative of environmental conditions could improve usefulness and interpretation of data that are obtained. Future monitoring efforts should include the sampling and analysis of suspended particulates to account for suspended solid-phase CPF, a commonly underestimated fraction in surface

  9. Water Adsorption and Dissociation on CeO2 (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Han, Zhong-Kang; Shao, Nan; Mei, Wai-Ning

    The complexity and flexibility of ceria surface hinders the fully understanding of its reactivity and real applications. Here, we use H2O/CeO2(111) as the model system to investigate the water effect on the electron localization and vacancy diffusion on CeO2(111) surface by the first-principle calculations. Our results indicate the water adsorption would high affect the electronic structures of CeO2(111) surface, which further induce the dissociation of H2O molecule. This molecular mechanism might provide more guidance to the future applications including the watergas shift reactions.

  10. Reactive Nitrogen Species Reactivities with Nitrones: Theoretical and Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Kevin M.; Rockenbauer, Antal; Villamena, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitrogen dioxide (•NO2), peroxynitrite (ONOO–), and nitrosoperoxycarbonate (ONOOCO2–) are among the most damaging species present in biological systems due to their ability to cause modification of key biomolecular systems through oxidation, nitrosylation and nitration. Nitrone spin traps are known to react with free radicals and non-radicals via electrophilic and nucleophilic addition reactions, and have been employed as reagents to detect radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and as pharmacological agents against oxidative stress-mediated injury. This study examines the reactivity of cyclic nitrones such as 5,5-dimethylpyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) with, •NO2, ONOO–, ONOOCO2–, SNAP and SIN-1 using EPR. The thermochemistries of nitrone reactivity with RNS, and isotropic hfsc's of the addition products were also calculated at the PCM(water)/B3LYP/6-31+G**//B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory with and without explicit water molecules in order to rationalize the nature of the observed EPR spectra. Spin trapping of other RNS such as azide (•N3), nitrogen trioxide (•NO3), amino (•NH2) radicals, and nitroxyl (HNO) were also theoretically and experimentally investigated by EPR spin trapping and mass spectrometry. This study also shows other spin traps such as AMPO, EMPO and DEPMPO can react with radical and non-radical RNS, thus, making spin traps suitable probes as well as antioxidants against RNS mediated oxidative damage. PMID:22775566

  11. Macroscopic and spectroscopic investigations of the adsorption of nitroaromatic compounds on graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide, and graphene nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Baoliang

    2015-05-19

    The surface properties and adsorption mechanisms of graphene materials are important for potential environmental applications. The adsorption of m-dinitrobenzene, nitrobenzene, and p-nitrotoluene onto graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (RGO), and graphene (G) nanosheets was investigated using IR spectroscopy to probe the molecular interactions of graphene materials with nitroaromatic compounds (NACs). The hydrophilic GO displayed the weakest adsorption capability. The adsorption of RGO and G was significantly increased due to the recovery of hydrophobic π-conjugation carbon atoms as active sites. RGO nanosheets, which had more defect sites than did GO or G nanosheets, resulted in the highest adsorption of NACs which was 10-50 times greater than the reported adsorption of carbon nanotubes. Superior adsorption was dominated by various interaction modes including π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions between the π-electron-deficient phenyls of the NACs and the π-electron-rich matrix of the graphene nanosheets, and the charge electrostatic and polar interactions between the defect sites of graphene nanosheets and the -NO2 of the NAC. The charge transfer was initially proved by FTIR that a blue shift of asymmetric -NO2 stretching was observed with a concomitant red shift of symmetric -NO2 stretching after m-dinitrobenzene was adsorbed. The multiple interaction mechanisms of the adsorption of NAC molecule onto flat graphene nanosheets favor the adsorption, detection, and transformation of explosives. PMID:25877513

  12. Wet oxidative regeneration of activated carbon loaded with reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Shende, R V; Mahajani, V V

    2002-01-01

    Wet Oxidative Regeneration (WOR) of powdered activated carbon (PAC) and granular activated carbon (GAC) loaded with the reactive dyes, namely chemictive brilliant blue R and cibacron turquoise blue G, was studied. Attempts were made to regenerate the loaded carbons designated now as spent carbon. A slurry (10% w/v) of spent carbon in distilled water was oxidized by wet oxidation in the temperature range of 150-250 degrees C using oxygen partial pressures between 0.69-1.38 MPa in an 1 1 SS 316 autoclave. The percent regeneration was determined from a ratio, X(RC)/X(VC), corresponding to an equilibrium adsorption capacity of regenerated carbon/equilibrium adsorption capacity of virgin carbon from an initial adsorption period of 3 h. It was observed that the regeneration mainly occurred due to the oxidation of the adsorbates taking place on the surface of carbon. It was possible to regenerate the spent GAC and PAC to the extent of more than 98% (approximately X(RC)/X(VC) > 0.98) by wet oxidation. After four consecutive cycles of adsorption and regeneration using the same stocks of GAC, carbon weight loss observed at 200 degrees C was about 40%. SEM studies of the regenerated carbon showed widening of the pores and loss of structure between the adjacent pores as compared with the virgin carbon. PAC was found to be more suitable as compared with GAC for the adsorption and wet oxidative regeneration processes to treat the aqueous solution containing lower concentration of unhydrolyzed reactive dye. The suitability of wet oxidative regeneration is demonstrated at a bench scale to treat the synthetic reactive dye solution. PMID:11942707

  13. Phenylethynyl reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having a specified general structure is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having a specified general structure is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react with to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  14. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  15. Antibody and DNA dual-labeled gold nanoparticles: Stability and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Fei-Yan; Liu, Jun; Li, Fu-Rong; Kong, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Hao-Li; Zhou, Han-Xin

    2008-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles labeled by both antibody (IgG) and single stranded DNA (ss-DNA) have been synthesized and characterized. The stability and reactivity of the dual-labeled nanoparticles were compared with the conventional IgG or ss-DNA modified nanoparticles. It was found that the IgG adsorption significantly improved the stability of the nanoparticles in aqueous solution, which is beneficial for attaching ss-DNA. The presence of IgG also effectively prohibits the desorption of ss-DNA against dithiothreitol (DTT) displacement. The coverage on dual-labeled nanoparticles was found to be 50 ± 15 ss-DNA/nanoparticle and 10 ± 2 IgG/nanoparticle, respectively, compared to the value of 70 ± 15 ss-DNA/nanoparticle of only ss-DNA-labeled gold nanoparticles. Dot-immuno and cross-linking experiments confirmed that both the IgG and ss-DNA retained their bioactivity on the nanoparticle surface. The dual-labeled nanoparticles have potential to be used as novel bio-probes for ultrasensitive detection.

  16. Reactive Arthritis Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Of Spondylitis The Heart In Spondyloarthritis Inflammatory vs. Mechanical Back ... Arthritis Symptoms Because there is no specific laboratory test for reactive arthritis, doctors sometimes find it difficult ...

  17. Adsorption on a stepped substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikoski, J.; Timonen, J.; Kaski, K.

    1994-09-01

    The effect of substrate steps on the adsorption of particles is considered. The problem is formulated as a lattice-gas model with nearest neighbor interactions and it is studied by a numerical transfer-matrix method. In particular, the influence of the substrate-induced row potential on adsorbed monolayers is discussed. It is found that strong row-transition-like features appear in the presence of a row potential and it is suggested that these may be seen in adsorption on vicinal faces.

  18. Directing polyallylamine adsorption on microlens array patterned silicon for microarray fabrication.

    PubMed

    Saini, Gaurav; Gates, Richard; Asplund, Matthew C; Blair, Steve; Attavar, Sachin; Linford, Matthew R

    2009-06-21

    The selective adsorption of reagents is often essential for bioarray and lab-on-a-chip type devices. As the starting point for a bioarray, alkyl monolayer terminated silicon shards were photopatterned in a few nanoseconds with thousands of wells (spots) using an optical element, a microlens array. Polyallylamine (PAAm), a primary amine containing polymer, adsorbed with little selectivity to the spots, i.e., silicon oxide, over the hydrophobic background. However, at appropriate concentrations, addition of a cationic surfactant to the PAAm deposition solution, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride, prevented the nonspecific adsorption of PAAm onto the hydrophobic monolayer, while directing it effectively to the active spots on the device. A nonionic surfactant was less effective in preventing the nonspecific adsorption of PAAm onto the hydrophobic monolayer. The localized reactions/interactions of adsorbed PAAm with four species that are useful for bioconjugate chemistry: glutaric anhydride, phenylenediisothiocyanate, biotin NHS ester, and an oligonucleotide (DNA) were shown in the spots of an array. The reactivity of PAAm was further demonstrated with an isocyanate. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) played an important role in confirming selective surface reactivity and adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), spectroscopic ellipsometry, and wetting confirmed PAAm reactivity on planar substrates. PMID:19495464

  19. Water adsorption isotherms on porous onionlike carbonaceous particles. Simulations with the grand canonical Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantal, György; Picaud, Sylvain; Hoang, Paul N. M.; Voloshin, Vladimir P.; Medvedev, Nikolai N.; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2010-10-01

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the adsorption isotherms of water molecules on different types of model soot particles. These soot models are constructed by first removing atoms from onion-fullerene structures in order to create randomly distributed pores inside the soot, and then performing molecular dynamics simulations, based on the reactive adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) description of the interaction between carbon atoms, to optimize the resulting structures. The obtained results clearly show that the main driving force of water adsorption on soot is the possibility of the formation of new water-water hydrogen bonds with the already adsorbed water molecules. The shape of the calculated water adsorption isotherms at 298 K strongly depends on the possible confinement of the water molecules in pores of the carbonaceous structure. We found that there are two important factors influencing the adsorption ability of soot. The first of these factors, dominating at low pressures, is the ability of the soot of accommodating the first adsorbed water molecules at strongly hydrophilic sites. The second factor concerns the size and shape of the pores, which should be such that the hydrogen bonding network of the water molecules filling them should be optimal. This second factor determines the adsorption properties at higher pressures.

  20. Water adsorption isotherms on porous onionlike carbonaceous particles. Simulations with the grand canonical Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Hantal, György; Picaud, Sylvain; Hoang, Paul N M; Voloshin, Vladimir P; Medvedev, Nikolai N; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2010-10-14

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the adsorption isotherms of water molecules on different types of model soot particles. These soot models are constructed by first removing atoms from onion-fullerene structures in order to create randomly distributed pores inside the soot, and then performing molecular dynamics simulations, based on the reactive adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) description of the interaction between carbon atoms, to optimize the resulting structures. The obtained results clearly show that the main driving force of water adsorption on soot is the possibility of the formation of new water-water hydrogen bonds with the already adsorbed water molecules. The shape of the calculated water adsorption isotherms at 298 K strongly depends on the possible confinement of the water molecules in pores of the carbonaceous structure. We found that there are two important factors influencing the adsorption ability of soot. The first of these factors, dominating at low pressures, is the ability of the soot of accommodating the first adsorbed water molecules at strongly hydrophilic sites. The second factor concerns the size and shape of the pores, which should be such that the hydrogen bonding network of the water molecules filling them should be optimal. This second factor determines the adsorption properties at higher pressures. PMID:20950025

  1. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  2. Preliminary investigation of phosphorus adsorption onto two types of iron oxide-organic matter complexes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinlong; Jiang, Tao; Yao, Ying; Lu, Song; Wang, Qilei; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-04-01

    Iron oxide (FeO) coated by natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous. The associations of minerals with organic matter (OM) significantly changes their surface properties and reactivity, and thus affect the environmental fate of pollutants, including nutrients (e.g., phosphorus (P)). In this study, ferrihydrite/goethite-humic acid (FH/GE-HA) complexes were prepared and their adsorption characteristics on P at various pH and ionic strength were investigated. The results indicated that the FeO-OM complexes showed a decreased P adsorption capacity in comparison with bare FeO. The maximum adsorption capacity (Qmax) decreased in the order of FH (22.17mg/g)>FH-HA (5.43mg/g)>GE (4.67mg/g)>GE-HA (3.27mg/g). After coating with HA, the amorphous FH-HA complex still showed higher P adsorption than the crystalline GE-HA complex. The decreased P adsorption observed might be attributed to changes of the FeO surface charges caused by OM association. The dependence of P adsorption on the specific surface area of adsorbents suggests that the FeO component in the complexes is still the main contributor for the adsorption surfaces. The P adsorptions on FeO-HA complexes decreased with increasing initial pH or decreasing initial ionic strength. A strong dependence of P adsorption on ionic strength and pH may demonstrate that outer-sphere complexes between the OM component on the surface and P possibly coexist with inner-sphere surface complexes between the FeO component and P. Therefore, previous over-emphasis on the contributions of original minerals to P immobilization possibly over-estimates the P loading capacity of soils, especially in humic-rich areas. PMID:27090706

  3. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  4. Adsorption of Organics from Domestic Water Supplies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Michael J.; Suffet, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    This article discusses the current state of the art of organics removal by adsorption. Various theoretical explanations of the adsorption process are given, along with practical results from laboratory, pilot-scale, and full-scale applications. (CS)

  5. Probing Surface Sites of TiO2: Reactions with [HRe(CO)5] and [CH3Re(CO)5

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo-Lapidus, R.; Gates, B

    2010-01-01

    Two carbonyl complexes of rhenium, [HRe(CO){sub 5}] and [CH{sub 3}Re(CO){sub 5}], were used to probe surface sites of TiO{sub 2} (anatase). These complexes were adsorbed from the gas phase onto anatase powder that had been treated in flowing O{sub 2} or under vacuum to vary the density of surface OH sites. Infrared (IR) spectra demonstrate the variation in the number of sites, including Ti{sup +3} {double_bond} OH and Ti{sup +4} {double_bond} OH. IR and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra show that chemisorption of the rhenium complexes led to their decarbonylation, with formation of surface-bound rhenium tricarbonyls, when [HRe(CO){sub 5}] was adsorbed, or rhenium tetracarbonyls, when [CH{sub 3}Re(CO){sub 5}] was adsorbed. These reactions were accompanied by the formation of water and surface carbonates and removal of terminal hydroxyl groups associated with Ti{sup +3} and Ti{sup +4} ions on the anatase. Data characterizing the samples after adsorption of [HRe(CO){sub 5}] or [CH{sub 3}Re(CO){sub 5}] determined a ranking of the reactivity of the surface OH sites, with the Ti{sup +3}OH groups being the more reactive towards the rhenium complexes but the less likely to be dehydroxylated. The two rhenium pentacarbonyl probes provided complementary information, suggesting that the carbonate species originate from carbonyl ligands initially bonded to the rhenium and from hydroxyl groups of the titania surface, with the reaction leading to the formation of water and bridging hydroxyl groups on the titania. The results illustrate the value of using a family of organometallic complexes as probes of oxide surface sites.

  6. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis.

    PubMed

    Basak, P Y; Turkmen, C

    2001-01-01

    Acquired perforating disorder has been recognized as an uncommon distinct dermatosis in which altered collagen is eliminated through the epidermis. Several disorders accompanied by itching and scratching were reported to be associated with reactive perforating collagenosis. A 67-year-old white woman diagnosed as acquired reactive perforating collagenosis with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and congestive cardiac failure is presented. PMID:11525959

  7. Heat pipe cooled probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J. (Inventor); Couch, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    The basic heat pipe principle is employed to provide a self-contained passively cooled probe that may be placed into a high temperature environment. The probe consists of an evaporator region of a heat pipe and a sensing instrument. Heat is absorbed as the working fluid evaporates in the probe. The vapor is transported to the vapor space of the condenser region. Heat is dissipated from the condenser region and fins causing condensation of the working fluid, which returns to the probe by gravity and the capillary action of the wick. Working fluid, wick and condenser configurations and structure materials can be selected to maintain the probe within an acceptable temperature range.

  8. Adsorption and excess fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of Xe and Kr on lunar soil 10084 was measured by a method that employs only very low fractions of monolayer coverage. Results are presented as parameters for calculation of the Henry constant for adsorption as a function of temperature. The adsorption potentials are about 3 kcal/mole for Kr and 5 kcal/mole for Xe; heating the sample in vacuum increased the Xe potential to nearly 7 kcal/mole. Henry constants at the characteristic lunar temperature are about 0.3 cu cm STP/g-atm. These data were applied to consider whether adsorption is important in producing the excess fission Xe effect characteristic of highland breccias. Sorption equilibrium with a transient lunar atmosphere vented fission Xe produces concentrations seven orders of magnitude lower than observed concentrations. Higher concentrations result because of the resistance of the regolith to upward diffusion of Xe. A diffusion coefficient of 0.26 sq cm/sec is estimated for this process.

  9. ADSORPTIVE MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES: MEDIA SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on six items to be considered when selecting an adsorptive media for removing arsenic from drinking water; performance, EBCT, pre-treatment, regeneration, residuals, and cost. Each item is discussed in general and data and photographs from th...

  10. Protein Adsorption in Microengraving Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Microengraving is a novel immunoassay forcharacterizing multiple protein secretions from single cells. During the immunoassay, characteristic diffusion and kinetic time scales τD and τK determine the time for molecular diffusion of proteins secreted from the activated single lymphocytes and subsequent binding onto the glass slide surface respectively. Our results demonstrate that molecular diffusion plays important roles in the early stage of protein adsorption dynamics which shifts to a kinetic controlled mechanism in the later stage. Similar dynamic pathways are observed for protein adsorption with significantly fast rates and rapid shifts in transport mechanisms when C0* is increased a hundred times from 0.313 to 31.3. Theoretical adsorption isotherms follow the trend of experimentally obtained data. Adsorption isotherms indicate that amount of proteins secreted from individual cells and subsequently captured on a clean glass slide surface increases monotonically with time. Our study directly validates that protein secretion rates can be quantified by the microengraving immunoassay. This will enable us to apply microengraving immunoassays to quantify secretion rates from 104–105 single cells in parallel, screen antigen-specific cells with the highest secretion rate for clonal expansion and quantitatively reveal cellular heterogeneity within a small cell sample. PMID:26501282

  11. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  12. ARSENIC REMOVAL USING ADSORPTION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recently promulgated Arsenic Rule will require that many new drinking water systems treat their water to remove arsenic. Many groundwaters that have arsenic in their source water will likely consider adsorption technology as a reasonable approach to remove arsenic. Adsorptio...

  13. ADSORPTION TECHNOLOGIES FOR ARSENIC REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recently promulgated Arsenic Rule will require that many new drinking water systems treat their water to remove arsenic. Many groundwaters that have arsenic in their source water will likely consider adsorption technology as a reasonable approach to remove arsenic. Adsorptio...

  14. Foam-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2015-06-02

    Foam-based adsorbents and a related method of manufacture are provided. The foam-based adsorbents include polymer foam with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the foam-based adsorbents includes irradiating polymer foam, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Foam-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  15. Powder-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2016-05-03

    A powder-based adsorbent and a related method of manufacture are provided. The powder-based adsorbent includes polymer powder with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the powder-based adsorbent includes irradiating polymer powder, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Powder-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  16. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  17. Traversing probe system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  18. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  19. Reversible adsorption of hydrogen chloride to ice surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Stefan; Kippenberger, Matthias; Crowley, John

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen chloride is the most important reservoir of gaseous, reactive chlorine in the atmosphere. Although several laboratory investigations of the interaction of HCl with ice surfaces have been conducted, there is still great uncertainty associated with the adsorption isotherms of HCl on ice, which is largely a consequence of most previous studies being unable to work at concentrations relevant for the atmosphere and to explore the non-saturated part of the isotherm at sub-monolayer coverage. We have conducted experiments on HCl uptake on ice surfaces at temperatures between 190 and 220 K, using a coated wall flow tube. HCl at concentrations as low as 2 × 109 molecule cm3 (~10-8 Torr) was detected using a chemical-ionization, quadrupole mass spectrometer. The equilibrium surface coverage of HCl on ice could be interpreted using the Langmuir-model to derive partition coefficients (KLang). We find that the dissociative Langmuir isotherm describes our data significantly better than the non-dissociative type. Surprisingly, and in contrast to the behavior of the majority of traces-gases which adsorb reversibly on ice surfaces, the partition-coefficients we derive for HCl do not show a systematic dependence on temperature, precluding the simple derivation of an adsorption enthalpy and indicating the presence of more complex adsorption and desorption mechanisms for strong acids ionizing on the surface compared to H-bonded trace gases.

  20. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  1. Adsorption of sodium polyacrylate in high solids loading calcium carbonate slurries.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joshua J; Sigmund, Wolfgang M

    2010-01-15

    The adsorption of sodium polyacrylate (NaPAA) in slurries with up to 75 wt.% calcium carbonate was investigated with the use of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and adsorption of probe molecules. Analysis of the IR spectra demonstrated that the carboxylate groups of NaPAA adsorbed onto ground calcium carbonate (GCC) in three different modes. These modes were shown to be dependent on the solids loading and age of the slurry. Further investigation lead to the determination of the chelating ability of NaPAA at high solids loading. PMID:19875128

  2. Pretreatment of amphiphilic comb polymer surfaces dramatically affects protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanping; Ma, Hongwei; Hausner, Douglas B; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Beebe, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    New applications in regenerative biotechnology require the ability to understand and control protein-surface interactions on micrometer and submicrometer length scales. Evidence presented here shows that micropatterned amphiphilic comb polymer films exhibit a pretreatment-dependent behavior with respect to protein adsorption for the proteins fibronectin, laminin, and for serum. A micropatterned surface, consisting of protein-reactive regions, separated by comb polymer, was created and tested for protein adsorption using the surface-sensitive imaging tool TOF-SIMS. Immersion of micropatterned surfaces in solutions of fibronectin or laminin resulted in uniform protein coverage on both the comb polymer and protein-reactive regions. However, preimmersion of similarly patterned surfaces in water for 2 h prior to protein incubation was found to dramatically improve the protein-resistant properties of the comb polymer regions. These results are consistent with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chain reorientation and/or hydration and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) backbone segregation away from the interface region. PMID:16283770

  3. Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials Studied by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Anderson, Robert; Mao, Shenghua

    2007-03-01

    Hydrogen adsorption in carbon-based materials such as boron-doped graphite and boron-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). ^1H NMR is shown to be a sensitive and quantitative probe for detecting adsorbed gas molecules such as H2, methane, and ethane. NMR measurements were carried out in-situ under given H2 pressure up to a pressure of over 100 atm. From such ^1H NMR measurement, the amount of adsorbed H2 molecules was determined versus pressure. This gives an alternative method for measuring the adsorption isotherms where the H2 signature is identified based on spin properties rather than weight or volume as in gravimetric and volumetric measurements. The measurement shows that boron doping has a favorable effect on increasing the adsorption enthalpy of H2 in carbon-based systems. This work was done in collaboration with NREL and Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, within the DOE Center of Excellence on Carbon-based Hydrogen Storage Materials and is supported by DOE.

  4. Mechanism and energetics of O and O2 adsorption on polar and non-polar ZnO surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.; Ertekin, Elif

    2016-05-01

    Polar surfaces of semiconducting metal oxides can exhibit structures and chemical reactivities that are distinct from their non-polar surfaces. Using first-principles calculations, we examine O adatom and O2 molecule adsorption on 8 different known ZnO reconstructions including Zn-terminated (Zn-ZnO) and O-terminated (O-ZnO) polar surfaces, and non-polar surfaces. We find that adsorption tendencies are largely governed by the thermodynamic environment, but exhibit variations due to the different surface chemistries of various reconstructions. The Zn-ZnO surface reconstructions which appear under O-rich and H-poor environments are found to be most amenable to O and O2 adsorption. We attribute this to the fact that on Zn-ZnO, the O-rich environments that promote O adsorption also simultaneously favor reconstructions that involve adsorbed O species. On these Zn-ZnO surfaces, O2 dissociatively adsorbs to form O adatoms. By contrast, on O-ZnO surfaces, the O-rich conditions required for O or O2 adsorption tend to promote reconstructions involving adsorbed H species, making further O species adsorption more difficult. These insights about O2 adsorption on ZnO surfaces suggest possible design rules to understand the adsorption properties of semiconductor polar surfaces.

  5. Mechanism and energetics of O and O2 adsorption on polar and non-polar ZnO surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G; Ertekin, Elif

    2016-05-14

    Polar surfaces of semiconducting metal oxides can exhibit structures and chemical reactivities that are distinct from their non-polar surfaces. Using first-principles calculations, we examine O adatom and O2 molecule adsorption on 8 different known ZnO reconstructions including Zn-terminated (Zn-ZnO) and O-terminated (O-ZnO) polar surfaces, and non-polar surfaces. We find that adsorption tendencies are largely governed by the thermodynamic environment, but exhibit variations due to the different surface chemistries of various reconstructions. The Zn-ZnO surface reconstructions which appear under O-rich and H-poor environments are found to be most amenable to O and O2 adsorption. We attribute this to the fact that on Zn-ZnO, the O-rich environments that promote O adsorption also simultaneously favor reconstructions that involve adsorbed O species. On these Zn-ZnO surfaces, O2 dissociatively adsorbs to form O adatoms. By contrast, on O-ZnO surfaces, the O-rich conditions required for O or O2 adsorption tend to promote reconstructions involving adsorbed H species, making further O species adsorption more difficult. These insights about O2 adsorption on ZnO surfaces suggest possible design rules to understand the adsorption properties of semiconductor polar surfaces. PMID:27179501

  6. Density functional study of CO adsorption on Sc(n) (n=2-13) clusters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guangfen; Wang, Jinlan; Lu, Yiming; Yang, Mingli

    2008-06-14

    The adsorption properties of a single CO molecule on Sc(n) (n=2-13) clusters are studied by means of a density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. Two adsorption patterns are identified. Pattern a (n=3, 4, 6, 8, 11, and 12), CO binds to hollow site while Pattern b (n=5, 7, 9, 10, and 13), CO binds to bridge site accompanied by significantly lengthening of the Sc-Sc bond. The adsorption energy exhibits clear size-dependent variation and odd-even oscillation for n<10 and reach the peak at n=5, 7, and 9, implying their high chemical reactivity. Similar variations are noted in C-O bond length, vibrational frequency, and charge transferred between CO and the clusters. This can be understood in light of the adsorption pattern, the atomic motif, and the relative stability of the bare Sc clusters. Compared with the free Sc clusters, the magnetic nature remains upon adsorption except n=2, 4, 12, and 13. Particularly, the moments of n=13 reduce significantly from 19 to 5 micro(B), implying the adsorption plays an attenuation influence on the magnetism of the cluster. PMID:18554021

  7. Dibenzothiophene adsorption at boron doped carbon nanoribbons studied within density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    López-Albarrán, P.; Navarro-Santos, P.; Garcia-Ramirez, M. A.; Ricardo-Chávez, J. L.

    2015-06-21

    The adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) on bare and boron-doped armchair carbon nanoribbons (ACNRs) is being investigated in the framework of the density functional theory by implementing periodic boundary conditions that include corrections from dispersion interactions. The reactivity of the ACNRs is characterized by using the Fukui functions as well as the electrostatic potential as local descriptors. Non-covalent adsorption mechanism is found when using the local Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof functional, regardless of the DBT orientation and adsorption location. The dispersion interactions addition is a milestone to describe the adsorption process. The charge defects introduced in small number (i.e., by doping with B atoms), within the ACNRs increases the selectivity towards sulfur mainly due to the charge depletion at B sites. The DBT magnitude in the adsorption energy shows non-covalent interactions. As a consequence, the configurations where the DBT is adsorbed on a BC{sub 3} island increase the adsorption energy compared to random B arrangements. The stability of these configurations can be explained satisfactorily in terms of dipole interactions. Nevertheless, from the charge-density difference analysis and the weak Bader charge-distribution interactions cannot be ruled out completely. This is why the electronic properties of the ribbons are analyzed in order to elucidate the key role played by the B and DBT states in the adsorbed configurations.

  8. Molecular Insights into the pH-Dependent Adsorption and Removal of Ionizable Antibiotic Oxytetracycline by Adsorbent Cyclodextrin Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Cai, Xiyun; Xiong, Weina; Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Haitong; Yang, Xianhai; Li, Chao; Fu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    Effects of pH on adsorption and removal efficiency of ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) by environmental adsorbents are an area of debate, because of its dual mediation towards adsorbents and adsorbate. Here, we probe the pH-dependent adsorption of ionizable antibiotic oxytetracycline (comprising OTCH2+, OTCH±, OTC−, and OTC2−) onto cyclodextrin polymers (CDPs) with the nature of molecular recognition and pH inertness. OTCH± commonly has high adsorption affinity, OTC− exhibits moderate affinity, and the other two species have negligible affinity. These species are evidenced to selectively interact with structural units (e.g., CD cavity, pore channel, and network) of the polymers and thus immobilized onto the adsorbents to different extents. The differences in adsorption affinity and mechanisms of the species account for the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. The mathematical equations are derived from the multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis of quantitatively relating adsorption affinity of OTC at varying pH to adsorbent properties. A combination of the MLR analysis for OTC and molecular recognition of adsorption of the species illustrates the nature of the pH-dependent adsorption of OTC. Based on this finding, γ-HP-CDP is chosen to adsorb and remove OTC at pH 5.0 and 7.0, showing high removal efficiency and strong resistance to the interference of coexisting components. PMID:24465975

  9. Reactive metabolites and agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Uetrecht, J P

    1996-01-01

    Central to most hypotheses of the mechanism of idiosyncratic drug-induced blood dyscrasias is the involvement of reactive metabolites. In view of the reactive nature of the majority of such metabolites, it is likely that they are formed by, or in close proximity to the blood cells affected. The major oxidative system of neutrophils generates hypochlorous acid. We have demonstrated that the drugs associated with the highest incidence of agranulocytosis are oxidized to reactive metabolites by hypochlorous acid and/or activated neutrophils. There are many mechanisms by which such reactive metabolites could induce agranulocytosis. In the case of aminopyrine-induced agranulocytosis, most cases appear to involve drug-dependent anti-neutrophil antibodies, and these are likely to be induced by cell membrane antigens modified by the reactive metabolite of aminopyrine. The target of agranulocytosis associated with many other drugs is usually neutrophil precursors and may involve cytotoxicity or a cell-mediated immune reaction induced by a reactive metabolite. In the case of aplastic anaemia, there is evidence in some cases for involvement of cytotoxic T cells, which could either be induced by metabolites generated by neutrophils, or more likely, by reactive metabolites generated by stem cells. PMID:8987247

  10. Dye adsorption behavior of Luffa cylindrica fibers.

    PubMed

    Demir, H; Top, A; Balköse, D; Ulkü, S

    2008-05-01

    Using natural Luffa cylindrica fibers as adsorbent removal of methylene blue dye from aqueous solutions at different temperatures and dye concentrations was investigated in this study. Thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption were also investigated. The adsorption isotherms could be well defined with Langmuir model instead of Freundlich model. The thermodynamic parameters of methylene blue (MB) adsorption indicated that the adsorption is exothermic and spontaneous. The average MB adsorption capacity was found out as 49 mg/g and average BET surface area of fibers was calculated as 123 m(2)/g. PMID:17919814

  11. Reactive Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, C.; Bouret, Y.; Celestini, F.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the reactivity of Leidenfrost droplets with their supporting substrates. Several organic liquids are put into contact with a copper substrate heated above their Leidenfrost temperature. As the liquid evaporates, the gaseous flow cleans the superficial copper oxide formed at the substrate surface and the reaction maintains a native copper spot below the evaporating droplet. The copper spot can reach several times the droplet size for the most reactive organic compounds. This study shows an interesting coupling between the physics of the Leidenfrost effect and the mechanics of reactive flows. Different applications are proposed such as drop motion tracking and vapor flow monitoring.

  12. Effective reactive surface area: An anisotropic property of physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W.; Schafer, A.L.

    1999-07-01

    Although transport calculations are often formulated in terms of mass-based isotropic distribution coefficients, it is the abundance of reactive surface areas of subsurface materials that controls contaminant adsorption. In water-saturated homogeneous systems devoid of advective fluxes (e.g., batch experiments), the available reactive surface area is similar to the total surface area (as measured by conventional methods such as BET gas adsorption). However, in physically and chemically heterogeneous systems with advective fluxes, the effective reactive surface area (i.e., the surface area that a packet of advecting water interacts with) is smaller than the laboratory measured surface area and is a complex function of advective velocity and the correlation structures of the physical and chemical heterogeneities. Theoretical derivations for an important but simple type of heterogeneity (fine-scale horizontal layering) suggest that the effective reactive surface area is an anisotropic property of the medium and is inversely correlated with the anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity. The implications of reactive transport anisotropy include the concept that the retardation factor should be treated as a directional property rather than being treated as a constant. Furthermore, because of the inverse relationship between effective reactive surface area and hydraulic conductivity, batch adsorption experiments tend to overestimate the retention of contaminants relative to intact natural materials.

  13. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal–halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the “Cl-down” configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable. PMID:27066160

  14. Adsorption of lipase on polypropylene powder.

    PubMed

    Gitlesen, T; Bauer, M; Adlercreutz, P

    1997-04-01

    Adsorption of different lipases by EP-100 polypropylene powder from crude and pure lipase preparations was studied. Langmuir isotherms described the adsorption equilibria well both for protein and lipase activity adsorption. Adsorption isotherms for five different proteins all gave a similar saturation level of 220 mg protein per g carrier. Twelve commercial lipase preparations were tested for selectivity in the adsorption of lipase. For all preparations the selectivity factor was larger than one. In a crude lipase preparation from Pseudomonas fluorescence, the specific activity in solution decreased by two orders of magnitude after adsorption. The adsorption was not significantly influenced by pH changes in the adsorption buffer, indicating that hydrophobic and not electrostatic interactions are the dominating adsorption forces. Adsorption of a crude lipase from Candida rugosa (Sigma) was fast and equilibrium was reached in 30 and 100 min for protein and lipase activity adsorption respectively. Desorption in aqueous solution was negligible. Investigations with seven different lipases showed no correlation between the specific lipolytic activity of dissolved enzyme in aqueous solution and the specific activity of adsorbed enzyme in an esterification reaction in organic solvent. PMID:9106498

  15. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  16. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC. PMID:26871732

  17. Modelling Cu(II) adsorption to ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite-bacteria composites: Deviation from additive adsorption in the composite sorption system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2013-03-01

    Bacterially associated iron (hydr)oxides are widespread in natural environments and are potent scavengers of dissolved metal ions. However, it is unclear whether metal sorption on these composites adheres to the additivity principle, and thus whether metal concentrations in environments where these composites comprise a significant proportion of the reactive iron phases can be modelled assuming component additivity. Here we address this issue for Cu adsorption on ferrihydrite-Bacillus subtilis composites. We precipitated pure ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite composites with different ferrihydrite:bacteria mass ratios, and measured Cu adsorption as a function of pH, Cu adsorbed concentration and composite mass ratio. We develop a molecular-level surface complexation model for Cu adsorption on pure ferrihydrite. We then combine our end-member models for Cu adsorption on B. subtilis (Moon and Peacock, 2011) and ferrihydrite to model the observed Cu adsorption on the composites, adopting a component linear additivity approach. By comparing observed Cu adsorption to that predicted by our composite model, constrained to the exact best fitting end-member stability constants, we find that Cu adsorption behaviour on ferrihydrite-B. subtilis composites deviates from additivity. Specifically, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite is enhanced across the adsorption pH edge (pH ˜3-6), while on our composite composed mainly of bacteria adsorption is enhanced at mid-high pH (pH ˜5-6) but diminished at mid-low pH (pH ˜5-3), compared to additivity. In current surface complexation modelling constructs, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite can be modelled in a component additivity approach, by optimising the stability constants for Cu adsorption on the ferrihydrite and bacteria fractions to values that are within the uncertainty on the end-member stability constant values. The deviation from additivity of these composites, apparent when

  18. Approaches for drug delivery with intracortical probes.

    PubMed

    Spieth, Sven; Schumacher, Axel; Trenkle, Fabian; Brett, Olivia; Seidl, Karsten; Herwik, Stanislav; Kisban, Sebastian; Ruther, Patrick; Paul, Oliver; Aarts, Arno A A; Neves, Hercules P; Rich, P Dylan; Theobald, David E; Holtzman, Tahl; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Janssen, Peter; Zengerle, Roland

    2014-08-01

    Intracortical microprobes allow the precise monitoring of electrical and chemical signaling and are widely used in neuroscience. Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technologies have greatly enhanced the integration of multifunctional probes by facilitating the combination of multiple recording electrodes and drug delivery channels in a single probe. Depending on the neuroscientific application, various assembly strategies are required in addition to the microprobe fabrication itself. This paper summarizes recent advances in the fabrication and assembly of micromachined silicon probes for drug delivery achieved within the EU-funded research project NeuroProbes. The described fabrication process combines a two-wafer silicon bonding process with deep reactive ion etching, wafer grinding, and thin film patterning and offers a maximum in design flexibility. By applying this process, three general comb-like microprobe designs featuring up to four 8-mm-long shafts, cross sections from 150×200 to 250×250 µm², and different electrode and fluidic channel configurations are realized. Furthermore, we discuss the development and application of different probe assemblies for acute, semichronic, and chronic applications, including comb and array assemblies, floating microprobe arrays, as well as the complete drug delivery system NeuroMedicator for small animal research. PMID:24101367

  19. Functional probes for scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio; Akiyama, Kotone; Hamada, Masayuki; Eguchi, Toyoaki; An, Toshu; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Sakurai, Toshio

    2008-03-01

    Inspite of importance of the probe in scanning probe microscopy (SPM), little attention was paid for the SPM probes for most of the measurements of SPM. We developed sharp metal-tip cantilevers with a typical curvature radius better than 5nm using focused ion beam (FIB) suitable for Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM)^1. We obtained atomically resolved KFM images with an energy resolution less than 3meV with the probe^2. We also developed a glass-coated tungsten tip for synchrotron radiation-scanning tunneling microscopy with the FIB method^3 and obtained elementally resolved images in a resolution less than 20nm^4. We are now developing a precise atomic force microscope (AFM) lithography^5 with the FIB-milled tip attached to a quartz tuning fork controlled by noncontact AFM. We will present recent results of our AFM lithography, such as an Au line with a width of 20˜30 nm and characters drawn with Au nano dots on a Si surface. 1 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 033705 (2005) 2 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., PRL 93, 266102 (2004) 3 K. Akiyama et al., RSI 76, 083711 (2005) 4 T. Eguchi, K. Akiyama et al., APL 89, 243119 (2006) 5 K. Akiyama et al., JP 61, 22 (2007).

  20. Periodontal probing: a review.

    PubMed

    Al Shayeb, Kwthar Nassar A; Turner, Wendy; Gillam, David G

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal probes are the main instruments that are used to assess the status of the periodontium, either for screening purposes or to evaluate periodontal changes throughout the treatment process. With increased knowledge and understanding of periodontal disease, the probes have evolved from a unidimensional manual shape into a more sophisticated computerised instrument. This is due to the need to increase the accuracy and reproducibility of readings and to improve efficiency (time, effort, money). Each probe has characteristic features that makes it unique and, in some cases, specific and limited to use. The aim of this paper is to present a brief introduction to periodontal disease and the methodology of measuring it, followed by probing limitations. The paper will also discuss the methodology of reducing probing error, examiner calibration and probing reproducibility. PMID:25198634

  1. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  2. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-07-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra-articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA-B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised "trigger" infection. The identification and management of "sexually acquired" and "enteric" forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  3. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  4. Stress Reactivity in Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Gehrman, Philip R; Hall, Martica; Barilla, Holly; Buysse, Daniel; Perlis, Michael; Gooneratne, Nalaka; Ross, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether individuals with primary insomnia (PI) are more reactive to stress than good sleepers (GS). PI and GS (n = 20 per group), matched on gender and age, completed three nights of polysomnography. On the stress night, participants received a mild electric shock and were told they could receive additional shocks during the night. Saliva samples were obtained for analysis of cortisol and alpha amylase along with self-report and visual analog scales (VAS). There was very little evidence of increased stress on the stress night, compared to the baseline night. There was also no evidence of greater stress reactivity in the PI group for any sleep or for salivary measures. In the GS group, stress reactivity measured by VAS scales was positively associated with an increase in sleep latency in the experimental night on exploratory analyses. Individuals with PI did not show greater stress reactivity compared to GS. PMID:25126695

  5. Adsorption processing - Optimization through understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Adsorption processes used in the natural gas industry for dehydration, sweetening and liquids recovery are batch systems, very similar to laboratory chromatographs. For continuous processing a plant must contain multiple adsorbers, so that while one column adsorbs, another or others can be desorbed and prepared for their next turn at adsorption. Variations in the cycle, the number of adsorbers and the way multiple towers may be sequenced; in series, in parallel, etc. are so numerous that an entire presentation could be devoted to the reasons and results of the various arrangements. For a consideration of the process fundamentals and the way they can be manipulated, this discussion concentrates on a simple two tower system typical of what is frequently used to dehydrate gas ahead of a cryogenic plant; a turboexpander unit or a peak shaving LNG facility.

  6. Adsorption kinetics of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Burde, Jared T; Calbi, M Mercedes

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption dynamics of diatomic molecules on solid surfaces is examined by using a Kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm. Equilibration times at increasing loadings are obtained, and explained based on the elementary processes that lead to the formation of the adsorbed film. The ability of the molecules to change their orientation accelerates the overall uptake and leads to competitive kinetic behaviour between the different orientations. The dependence of the equilibration time on coverage follows the same decreasing trend obtained experimentally for ethane adsorption on closed-end carbon nanotube bundles. The exploration of molecule-molecule interaction effects on this trend provides relevant insights to understand the kinetic behaviour of other species, from simpler molecules to larger polyatomic molecules, adsorbing on surfaces with different binding strength. PMID:24654004

  7. Adsorption and desorption of arsenic to aquifer sediment on the Red River floodplain at Nam Du, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Hoa Mai, Nguyen; Postma, Dieke; Thi Kim Trang, Pham; Jessen, Søren; Hung Viet, Pham; Larsen, Flemming

    2014-10-01

    The adsorption of arsenic onto aquifer sediment from the Red River floodplain, Vietnam, was determined in a series of batch experiments. Due to water supply pumping, river water infiltrates into the aquifer at the field site and has leached the uppermost aquifer sediments. The leached sediments remain anoxic but contain little reactive arsenic and iron, and are used in our experiments. The adsorption and desorption experiments were carried out by addition or removal of arsenic from the aqueous phase in sediment suspensions under strictly anoxic conditions. Also the effects of HCO3, Fe(II), PO4 and Si on arsenic adsorption were explored. The results show much stronger adsorption of As(V) as compared to As(III), full reversibility for As(III) adsorption and less so for As(V). The presence or absence of HCO3 did not influence arsenic adsorption. Fe(II) enhanced As(V) sorption but did not influence the adsorption of As(III) in any way. During simultaneous adsorption of As(III) and Fe(II), As(III) was found to be fully desorbable while Fe(II) was completely irreversibly adsorbed and clearly the two sorption processes are uncoupled. Phosphate was the only solute that significantly could displace As(III) from the sediment surface. Compiling literature data on arsenic adsorption to aquifer sediment in Vietnam and Bangladesh revealed As(III) isotherms to be almost identical regardless of the nature of the sediment or the site of sampling. In contrast, there was a large variation in As(V) adsorption isotherms between studies. A tentative conclusion is that As(III) and As(V) are not adsorbing onto the same sediment surface sites. The adsorption behavior of arsenic onto aquifer sediments and synthetic Fe-oxides is compared. Particularly, the much stronger adsorption of As(V) than of As(III) onto Red River as well as on most Bangladesh aquifer sediments, indicates that the perception that arsenic, phosphate and other species compete for the same surface sites of iron oxides in

  8. Adsorption site analysis of impurity embedded single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agnihotri, S.; Mota, J.P.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Bundle morphology and adsorptive contributions from nanotubes and impurities are studied both experimentally and by simulation using a computer-aided methodology, which employs a small physisorbed probe molecule to explore the porosity of nanotube samples. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of nitrogen adsorption on localized sites of a bundle is carried out to predict adsorption in its accessible internal pore volume and on its external surface as a function of tube diameter. External adsorption is split into the contributions from the clean surface of the outermost nanotubes of the bundle and from the surface of the impurities. The site-specific isotherms are then combined into a global isotherm for a given sample using knowledge of its tube-diameter distribution obtained by Raman spectroscopy. The structural parameters of the sample, such as the fraction of open-ended nanotubes and the contributions from impurities and nanotube bundles to total external surface area, are determined by fitting the experimental nitrogen adsorption data to the simulated isotherm. The degree of closure between experimental and calculated adsorption isotherms for samples manufactured by two different methods, to provide different nanotube morphology and contamination level, further strengthens the validity and resulting interpretations based on the proposed approach. The average number of nanotubes per bundle and average bundle size, within a sample, are also quantified. The proposed method allows for extrapolation of adsorption properties to conditions where the purification process is 100% effective at removing all impurities and opening access to all intrabundle adsorption sites. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Studies on Vapor Adsorption Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamsundar, N.; Ramotowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The project consisted of performing experiments on single and dual bed vapor adsorption systems, thermodynamic cycle optimization, and thermal modeling. The work was described in a technical paper that appeared in conference proceedings and a Master's thesis, which were previously submitted to NASA. The present report describes some additional thermal modeling work done subsequently, and includes listings of computer codes developed during the project. Recommendations for future work are provided.

  10. Optimum conditions for adsorptive storage.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Suresh K; Myers, Alan L

    2006-02-14

    The storage of gases in porous adsorbents, such as activated carbon and carbon nanotubes, is examined here thermodynamically from a systems viewpoint, considering the entire adsorption-desorption cycle. The results provide concrete objective criteria to guide the search for the "Holy Grail" adsorbent, for which the adsorptive delivery is maximized. It is shown that, for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen and delivery between 30 and 1.5 bar pressure, for the optimum adsorbent the adsorption enthalpy change is 15.1 kJ/mol. For carbons, for which the average enthalpy change is typically 5.8 kJ/mol, an optimum operating temperature of about 115 K is predicted. For methane, an optimum enthalpy change of 18.8 kJ/mol is found, with the optimum temperature for carbons being 254 K. It is also demonstrated that for maximum delivery of the gas the optimum adsorbent must be homogeneous, and that introduction of heterogeneity, such as by ball milling, irradiation, and other means, can only provide small increases in physisorption-related delivery for hydrogen. For methane, heterogeneity is always detrimental, at any value of average adsorption enthalpy change. These results are confirmed with the help of experimental data from the literature, as well as extensive Monte Carlo simulations conducted here using slit pore models of activated carbons as well as atomistic models of carbon nanotubes. The simulations also demonstrate that carbon nanotubes offer little or no advantage over activated carbons in terms of enhanced delivery, when used as storage media for either hydrogen or methane. PMID:16460092

  11. Char reactivities and their relationship to pore characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Kata, S.; Keairns, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Relative reactivities of chars in a H/sub 2/O-N/sub 2/-H/sub 2/ atmosphere were measured in a laboratory fluidized bed. Results were analyzed on the basis of Ergun's rate equation, and the relative reactivities were calculated with reference to coke breeze. Surface areas of chars were obtained by means of CO/sub 2/ adsorption, and pore volumes were measured by means of mercury penetration porosimetry. A correlation can be identified between the relative reactivity versus the surface areas and the mean pore diameter for the limited number of chars investigated in the present study. Additional studies should be conducted to establish the range of validity with additional chars and drawbacks of this approach.

  12. Titan Probe navigation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayaraghavan, A.; Wood, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    In the proposed Cassini mission, a combined Saturn Orbiter/Titan Probe spacecraft will be launched from the Space Shuttle to arrive at Saturn around 2002, by means of a delta-VEGA trajectory. After Saturn-orbit insertion and a pericrone raise maneuver, the probe will be released to enter the Titan atmosphere and impact onto its surface. During its descent phase and impact onto Titan, the probe will maintain radio contact with the orbiter. Since the Titan-probe experimental phase lasts for only about four hours, probe-orbiter geometry and probe-delivery accuracy are critical to successful completion of this part of the mission. From a preliminary navigation analysis for probe delivery accuracy, it seems feasible to deliver the probe within 50 km (1-sigma value) of the desired aim-point in the Titan B-plane. The covariance study, however, clearly indicates the need for optical data, in addition to radio metric data. A Monte Carlo study indicates that a Delta-V capability of 98 m/sec for trajectory correction maneuvers will be sufficient to cover 99 percent of all contingencies during the segment from Saturn-orbit insertion to Titan-probe release.

  13. Surface Complexation Modeling of U(VI) Adsorption onto Savannah River Site Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Denham, M.; Davis, J.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) was a U.S. Department of Energy facility for plutonium production during the Cold War. Waste plumes containing low-level radioactivity and acidic waste solutions were discharged to a series of unlined seepage basins in the F-Area of the SRS from 1955 to 1988. Although the site has undergone many years of active remediation, the groundwater remains acidic, and the concentrations of U and other radionuclides are still significantly higher than their Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs). The objective of this effort is to understand and predict U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes through developing surface complexation models (SCMs). Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to evaluate U adsorption behavior over the pH range of 3.0 to 9.5. Ten sorbent samples were selected including six contaminated sediment samples from three boreholes drilled within the plume and along the groundwater flow direction, two uncontaminated (pristine) sediment samples from a borehole outside of the plume, and two reference minerals, goethite and kaolinite (identified as the dominant minerals in the clay size fraction of the F-Area sediments). The results show that goethite and kaolinite largely control U partitioning behavior. In comparison with the pristine sediment, U(VI) adsorption onto contaminated sediments exhibits adsorption edges shifted toward lower pH by about 1.0 unit (e.g., from pH≈4.5 to pH≈3.5). We developed a SCMs based component additivity (CA) approach, which can successfully predict U(VI) adsorption onto uncontaminated SRS sediments. However, application of the same SCMs based CA approach to contaminated sediments resulted in underestimates of U(VI) adsorption at acidic pH conditions. The model sensitivity analyses indicate that both goethite and kaolinite surfaces co-contributed to U(VI) adsorption under acidic pH conditions. In particular, the exchange sites of clay minerals might play an important role in adsorption of U(VI) at p

  14. Removal of nitric oxide by the highly reactive anatase TiO2 (001) surface: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenwen; Tian, Feng Hui; Wang, Xiaobin; Zhao, Linghuan; Wang, Yun; Fu, Aiping; Yuan, Shuping; Chu, Tianshu; Xia, Linhua; Yu, Jimmy C; Duan, Yunbo

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, density functional theory (DFT) calculation was employed to study the adsorption of nitric oxide (NO) on the highly reactive anatase TiO2 (001) surface. For comparison, the adsorption of NO on the (101) surface was also considered. Different from the physical adsorption on the (101) surface, NO molecules are found to chemisorb on the TiO2 (001) surface. The twofold coordinate oxygen atoms (O2c) on the anatase (001) surface are the active sites. Where NO is oxidized into a nitrite species (NO2(-)) trapping efficiently on the surface, with one of the surface Ti5c-O2c bonds adjacent to the adsorption site broken. Our results, therefore, supply a theoretical guidance to remove NO pollutants using highly reactive anatase TiO2 (001) facets. PMID:24998049

  15. Cluster-Models for Uranyl(VI) Adsorption on alpha-Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2011-02-24

    Aqueous complexation, adsorption and redox chemistry of actinide species at mineral surfaces have significant impact on their transport and reactive behaviour in chemically and physically heterogeneous environments. The adsorption configurations and energies of micro-solvated uranyl dication, UO2 2+, on fully hydroxylated and H-deficient a-alumina (0001)-like finite cluster models were studied. The significant size of the models provides faithful representations of features that have emerged from periodic calculations, but most importantly, they afford us a systematic study of the preferred adsorption configurations, effect of secondary solvation shells and explicit treatment of the total charge. The energetics computed from the difference between the optimized structures and the appropriate reference states, point at a preference for inner sphere type complex.

  16. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part II--A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment on Surface Adsorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Larsen, Sarah C.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. The use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in organic and inorganic chemistry laboratory courses as well as in undergraduate research was presented…

  17. Surface texture and specific adsorption sites of sol-gel synthesized anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zaki, Mohamed I.; Mekhemer, Gamal A.H.; Fouad, Nasr E.; Jagadale, Tushar C.; Ogale, Satishchandra B.

    2010-10-15

    The surface properties of sol-gel synthesized anatase titania (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles are probed by sorptiometry, infrared absorption spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results reveal strong correlations of the surface area, porosity, pyridine adsorption capacity and strength, and catalytic methylbutynol decomposition activity.

  18. Relation between Water Vapor Adsorption Isotherms and Dynamic Dehumidification Performances of Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Koji; Matsuguma, Shingo; Jin, Wei-Li; Okano, Hiroshi; Teraoka, Yasutake; Hirose, Tsutomu

    Desiccant rotors with different water vapor adsorption properties were fabricated by the synthesis of silica gels inside the honeycomb matrices. Dynamic dehumidification performances of the rotors were measured under different conditions and they were discussed in relation to water vapor adsorption isotherms. At the reactivation air temperatures of 80 and 140 oC, the best dynamic performance was observed with the rotor on which the adsorbed amount of water vapor at lower relative humidity was highest. When the reactivation air temperature was 50 oC, on the other hand, the rotor of which the isotherm exhibited monotonic and nearly linear increase up to higher relative humidity was the most suitable. The normalized changes of absolute humidity and adsorbed amount were defined, and these phenomena were analyzed. When the dependences of both parameters against the relative humidity were similar, the rotor showed the best dehumidification performance.

  19. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-15

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas.

  20. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-01

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas. PMID:20886976

  1. Variations in Reactivity on Different Crystallographic Orientations of Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Albrecht, Peter M; Calaza, Florencia C

    2013-01-01

    Cerium oxide is a principal component in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. One of its key characteristics is the ability to provide or remove oxygen in chemical reactions. The different crystallographic faces of ceria present significantly different surface structures and compositions that may alter the catalytic reactivity. The structure and composition determine the number of coordination vacancies surrounding surface atoms, the availability of adsorption sites, the spacing between adsorption sites and the ability to remove O from the surface. To investigate the role of surface orientation on reactivity, CeO2 films were grown with two different orientations. CeO2(100) films were grown ex situ by pulsed laser deposition on Nb-doped SrTiO3(100). CeO2(111) films were grown in situ by thermal deposition of Ce metal onto Ru(0001) in an oxygen atmosphere. The chemical reactivity was characterized by the adsorption and decomposition of various molecules such as alcohols, aldehydes and organic acids. In general the CeO2(100) surface was found to be more active, i.e. molecules adsorbed more readily and reacted to form new products, especially on a fully oxidized substrate. However the CeO2(100) surface was less selective with a greater propensity to produce CO, CO2 and water as products. The differences in chemical reactivity are discussed in light of possible structural terminations of the two surfaces. Recently nanocubes and nano-octahedra have been synthesized that display CeO2(100) and CeO2(111) faces, respectively. These nanoparticles enable us to correlate reactions on high surface area model catalysts at atmospheric pressure with model single crystal films in a UHV environment.

  2. Adsorption of various alcohols on Illinois No. 6 coal in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.C.; Rigby, R.R.

    1993-07-01

    Hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and aromacity of Illinois {number_sign}6 coal in water are relatively determined by evaluating equilibrium physical/chemical adsorption of probe compounds on the coal. Experiments on equilibrium adsorption loadings of various additives on 60--200 mesh Illinois {number_sign}6 coal (DECS-2; Randolph county) were performed to investigate relatively surface properties of the coal at 25{degree}C. The additives include various alcohols, alkanes and aromatic compounds. The main objectives of this research are to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals with the inverse liquid chromatography technique, using various probe compounds, to analyze flotation recoveries of coals with a micro-flotation apparatus in order to relate coal floatability to evaluated coal surface properties, and to delineate roles of coal-cleaning/handling additives with the inverse liquid chromatography technique.

  3. Influence of strain on water adsorption and dissociation on rutile TiO2(110) surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Long; Shu, Da-Jun; Li, Shao-Chun; Wang, Mu

    2016-06-01

    The influence of externally applied strain on water adsorption and dissociation on a defect-free rutile TiO2(110) surface is studied by using first-principles calculations. We found that while compressive strain makes water adsorption and dissociation less favorable, tensile strain increases the energy gain of water adsorption, and decreases the energy cost of water dissociation. Specifically, dissociative water becomes more stable than molecular water when an 8% tensile in-plane strain is applied. Moreover, the dissociation barrier decreases with increasing strain more rapidly for more isolated water. The rate of decrease of this barrier for nearly isolated water is 0.017 eV per 1% biaxial strain. This demonstrates that applying strain is a possible way to engineer the surface adsorption and dissociation of water on a TiO2(110) surface, and therefore engineer the relevant surface reactivity. PMID:27138099

  4. First-principles study of SO2 molecule adsorption on the pristine and Mn-doped boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zun-Yi; Zhang, Jian-Min; Xu, Ke-Wei

    2015-08-01

    To exploit the potential application of nitride nanotube (BNNT), the adsorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2) on pristine and Mn-doped BNNT was theoretically studied using first-principles approach based on density functional theory (DFT). The most stable adsorption geometry, adsorption energy, magnetic moment, charge transfer and density of states of these systems are discussed. SO2 molecule is weakly adsorbed on the pristine BNNT. The Mn-doped BNNT show high reactivity toward SO2 regardless of the MnB site or MnN site adsorption. The larger formation energies and analysis of density of states show the SO2 molecules are chemically bonded to Mn-doped BNNT and the covalent interaction between the SO2 molecule and Mn atom can be formed. Therefore, the Mn-doped BNNT can be used as SO2 gas sensor manufacturing raw materials, and it may be a potential material for nanodevice applications.

  5. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  6. Reactive power compensator

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  7. Mechanism of DNA adsorption and desorption on graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon Soo; Goo, Nam-In; Kim, Dong-Eun

    2014-10-28

    Graphene oxide (GO) adsorbing a fluorophore-labeled single-stranded (ss) DNA serves as a sensor system because subsequent desorption of the adsorbed probe DNA from GO in the presence of complementary target DNA enhances the fluorescence. In this study, we investigated the interaction of single- and double-stranded (ds) DNAs with GO by using a fluorescently labeled DNA probe. Although GO is known to preferentially interact with ssDNA, we found that dsDNA can also be adsorbed on GO, albeit with lower affinity. Furthermore, the status of ssDNA or dsDNA previously adsorbed on the GO surface was investigated by adding complementary or noncomplementary DNA (cDNA or non-cDNA) to the adsorption complex. We observed that hybridization occurred between the cDNA and the probe DNA on the GO surface. On the basis of the kinetics driven by the incoming additional DNA, we propose a mechanism for the desorption of the preadsorbed probe DNA from the GO surface: the desorption of the GO-adsorbed DNA was facilitated following its hybridization with cDNA on the GO surface; when the GO surface was almost saturated with the adsorbed DNA, nonspecific desorption dominated the process through a simple displacement of the GO-adsorbed DNA molecules by the incoming DNA molecules because of the law of mass action. Our results can be applied to design appropriate DNA probes and to choose proper GO concentrations for experimental setups to improve specific signaling in many biosensor systems based on the GO platform. PMID:25283243

  8. Enthalpies of proton adsorption onto Bacillus licheniformis at 25, 37, 50, and 75 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew

    2011-03-01

    Understanding bacterial surface reactivity requires many different lines of investigation. Toward this end, we used isothermal titration calorimetry to measure heats of proton adsorption onto a Gram positive thermophile Bacillus licheniformis at 25, 37, 50, and 75 °C. Proton adsorption under all conditions exhibited exothermic heat production. Below pH 4.5, exothermic heats decreased as temperature increased above 37 °C; above pH 4.5, there was no significant difference in heats evolved at the temperatures investigated. Total proton uptake did not vary significantly with temperature. Site-specific enthalpies and entropies were calculated by applying a 4-site, non-electrostatic surface complexation model to the calorimetric data. Interpretation of site-specific enthalpies and entropies of proton adsorption for site L1, L2, and L4 are consistent with previous interpretations of phosphoryl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl/amine site-identities, respectively, and with previous calorimetric measurements of proton adsorption onto mesophilic species. Enthalpies and entropies for surface site L3 are not consistent with the commonly inferred phosphoryl site-identity and are more consistent with sulfhydryl functional groups. These results reveal intricacies of surface reactivity that are not detectable by other methods.

  9. Methanol adsorption on magnesium oxide surface with defects: a DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branda, M. M.; Ferullo, R. M.; Belelli, P. G.; Castellani, N. J.

    2003-03-01

    The methanol adsorption on several defects of the magnesium oxide surface were studied. Structural and electronic study with geometrical optimization and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis were performed using a density functional theory (DFT) method. Oxygen and magnesium with different coordination numbers have very different reactivity in this surface producing dissociated and non-dissociated species. These results are in agreement with infrared spectroscopy observations where CH 3OH, OCH 3 and OH species were found in defective MgO surfaces.

  10. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  11. Magnetically driven filament probe.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Herrmann, A; Rohde, V; Maraschek, M; Müller, H W

    2007-05-01

    A radially movable probe has been developed for studies of filamentary transport in ASDEX Upgrade during edge localized modes (ELMs) by means of Langmuir tips and magnetic pickup coils. The probe is permanently installed at the low field side in the ASDEX Upgrade vacuum vessel and is not subject to limitations in probe size, as, for example, probes on a shared manipulator are. The probe is moved by a magnetic drive, which allows for easy installation in the vessel, and has moderate machine requirements, as it will only require an electric feedthrough and an external power supply. The drive gives a linear motion with a radial range of 5 cm within 50 ms, where range and velocity can be largely scaled according to experimental requirements. The probe has been installed in the outer midplane of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel, where ELM filaments are expected to have their maximum amplitude. Filaments are coherent substructures within an ELM, carrying a fraction of the ELM released energy towards the wall. The new probe allows to measure the structure of these filaments, in particular, parameters such as filament rotation (by time delay measurements) and size (by peak width analysis). Activating the drive moves the probe from a safe position behind the limiter to a position in front of the limiters, i.e., exposes the Langmuir pins to the scrape-off layer plasma. PMID:17552815

  12. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  13. Chitosan/Graphene Oxide Composite as an Effective Adsorbent for Reactive Red Dye Removal.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Qu, Lijun; Tian, Mingwei; Zhu, Shifeng; Zhang, Xiansheng; Tang, Xiaoning; Sun, Kaikai

    2016-07-01

    Chitosan, modified with different dosages of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO), was first prepared, and its adsorption capacity for reactive red (RR) dye in aqueous solutions was investigated, in this paper. The structure and morphology of the adsorbents were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, SEM, EDX, BET, and TGA. The effect of varying parameters (pH, temperature, adsorbent loading, and contact time) was also investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity based on the Langmuir model was found to be 32.16 mg/g. In addition, experimental kinetic data were analyzed by the psuedo-first order and psuedo-second order equation models. The psuedo-second order model proved to be the best model for the adsorption system, which suggested that adsorption might be controlled by the chemical rate-limiting step through sharing of electrons or by covalent forces. PMID:27329054

  14. Circumferential pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Fantl, Andrew J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A probe for measuring circumferential pressure inside a body cavity is disclosed. In the preferred embodiment, a urodynamic pressure measurement probe for evaluating human urinary sphincter function is disclosed. Along the length of the probe are disposed a multiplicity of deformable wall sensors which typically comprise support tube sections with flexible side wall areas. These are arranged along the length of the probe in two areas, one just proximal to the tip for the sensing of fluid pressure inside the bladder, and five in the sensing section which is positioned within the urethra at the point at which the urinary sphincter constricts to control the flow of urine. The remainder of the length of the probe comprises multiple rigid support tube sections interspersed with flexible support tube sections in the form of bellows to provide flexibility.

  15. Automatic kelvin probe compatible with ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikie, I. D.; van der Werf, K. O.; Oerbekke, H.; Broeze, J.; van Silfhout, A.

    1989-05-01

    This article describes a new type of in situ ultrahigh-vacuum compatible kelvin probe based on a voice-coil driving mechanism. This design exhibits several advantages over conventional mechanical feed-through and (in situ) piezoelectric devices in regard to the possibility of multiple probe geometry, flexibility of probe geometry, amplitude of oscillation, and pure parallel vibration. Automatic setup and constant spacing features are achieved using a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) steered offset potential. The combination of very low driver noise pick-up and data-acquisition system (DAS) signal processing techniques results in a work function (wf ) resolution, under optimal conditions, of <0.1 meV. Due to its high surface sensitivity and compatibility with standard sample cleaning and analysis techniques this design has numerous applications in surface studies, e.g., adsorption kinetics, sample topography and homogeneity, sputter profiles, etc. For semiconductor specimens the high wf resolution makes it eminently suitable for surface photovoltage (SPV) spectroscopy.

  16. Reactive Simulations for Biochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boero, M.

    After a brief review of the hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamics scheme and its coupling to the metadynamics method, I will show how such a combination of computational tools can be used to study chemical reactions of general biological interest. Specifically, by using such a reactive hybrid paradigm, where the QM driver is a Car-Parrinello Lagrangian dynamics, we have inspected the ATP hydrolysis reaction in the anti-freezing protein known as heat shock cognate protein (Hsc70) and the unconventional propagation of protons across peptide groups in the H-path of the bovine cytochrome c oxidase. While the former represents a fundamental reaction operated by all living beings in a wealth of processes and functions, the second one is involved in cell respiration. For both systems accurate X-ray data are available, yet the actual reaction mechanism escapes experimental probes. The simulations presented here provide the complementary information missing in experiments, offer a direct insight into the reaction mechanisms at a molecular level, and allow to understand which pathways nature can follow to realize these processes fundamental to living organisms.

  17. Adsorption of goethite onto quartz and kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Weiner, Eugene R.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of colloidal goethite onto quartz and kaolinite substrates has been studied as a function of pH and NaCl concentration. Goethite adsorption was measured quantitatively by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that adsorption onto both substrates is due primarily to coulombic forces; however, the pH dependence of adsorption is very different for the two substrates. This is explained by the fact that the surface charge on quartz is entirely pH-dependent, while kaolinite has surface faces which carry a permanent negative charge. Adsorption of goethite on to kaolinite increases markedly with increasing NaCl concentration, while adsorption onto quartz is relatively independent of NaCl concentration. This can be explained by the influence of NaCl concentration upon the development of surface charge on the substrates. A method is described for separating surface-bound goethite from free goethite.

  18. Adsorption of octylamine on titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwińska, Daria; Kołodziejczak-Radzimska, Agnieszka; Krysztafkiewicz, Andrzej; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2009-05-01

    Processes of adsorption and desorption of a model active substance (octylamine) on the surface of unmodified titanium dioxide (E 171) have been performed. The effects of concentration of octylamine and time of the process on the character of adsorption have been studied and the efficiency of the adsorption/desorption has been determined. The samples obtained have been studied by X-ray diffraction. The nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, particle size distribution and absorption capacities of water, dibutyl phthalate and paraffin oil have been determined. The efficiency of octylamine adsorption on the surface of the titanium dioxide has been found positively correlated with the concentration of octylamine in the initial solution. The desorption of octylamine has decreased with increasing concentration of this compound adsorbed. For octylamine in low concentrations the physical adsorption has been found to dominate, which is desirable when using TiO 2 in the production of pharmaceuticals.

  19. Adsorption of thiophene on Pt, Pd, Au, and Rh(100) surfaces with the role of the van der Waals' interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Walter; Matos, Jeronimo; Kara, Abdelkader

    We explore the adsorption of thiophene (C4H4S) on Pt(100), Au(100), Pd(100), and Rh(100) surfaces using density functional theory with and without self-consistent van der Waals interactions (vdWs). The six functionals we use are PBE, optB86b-vdW, optB88-vdW, optPBE-vdW, revPBE-vdW, and rPW86-vdW2. We examine a variety of adsorption sites with the molecule's plane both parallel and perpendicular to the surface. In the case of parallel adsorption the highest binding energy occurs when the molecule is centered over a hollow site with the sulfur atom near an atop site. The highest adsorption energy for perpendicular configurations is achieved when the sulfur atom lies over a bridge site and the carbon atoms near hollow sites. We find that for thiophene on the coinage metals the vdW functionals predict higher adsorption energies than those predicted by the PBE functional. On the other hand, for thiophene on the reactive transition metal substrates only optB86b-vdW, optB88-vdW, and optPBE-vdW result in an enhancement in the adsorption energy over the PBE value. We also explore some of the electronic properties of the system including charge transfer and change in the work function. Our results indicate that adsorption characteristics depends heavily on the functional used and geometry.

  20. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  1. Adsorption of organic molecules on silica surface.

    PubMed

    Parida, Sudam K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, B K

    2006-09-13

    The adsorption behaviour of various organic adsorbates on silica surface is reviewed. Most of the structural information on silica is obtained from IR spectral data and from the characteristics of water present at the silica surface. Silica surface is generally embedded with hydroxy groups and ethereal linkages, and hence considered to have a negative charged surface prone to adsorption of electron deficient species. Adsorption isotherms of the adsorbates delineate the nature of binding of the adsorbate with silica. Aromatic compounds are found to involve the pi-cloud in hydrogen bonding with silanol OH group during adsorption. Cationic and nonionic surfactants adsorb on silica surface involving hydrogen bonding. Sometimes, a polar part of the surfactants also contributes to the adsorption process. Styryl pyridinium dyes are found to anchor on silica surface in flat-on position. On modification of the silica by treating with alkali, the adsorption behaviour of cationic surfactant or polyethylene glycol changes due to change in the characteristics of silica or modified silica surface. In case of PEG-modified silica, adsolubilization of the adsorbate is observed. By using a modified adsorption equation, hemimicellization is proposed for these dyes. Adsorptions of some natural macromolecules like proteins and nucleic acids are investigated to study the hydrophobic and hydrophilic binding sites of silica. Artificial macromolecules like synthetic polymers are found to be adsorbed on silica surface due to the interaction of the multifunctional groups of the polymers with silanols. Preferential adsorption of polar adsorbates is observed in case of adsorbate mixtures. When surfactant mixtures are considered to study competitive adsorption on silica surface, critical micelle concentration of individual surfactant also contributes to the adsorption isotherm. The structural study of adsorbed surface and the thermodynamics of adsorption are given some importance in this review

  2. Volumetric interpretation of protein adsorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnthip, Naris

    Protein adsorption is believed to be a very important factor ultimately leading to a predictive basis for biomaterials design and improving biocompatibility. Standard adsorption theories are modified to accommodate experimental observations. Adsorption from single-protein solutions and competitive adsorption from binary solutions are mainly considered. The standard solution-depletion method of measuring protein adsorption is implemented with SDS-gel electrophoresis as a multiplexing, separation-and-quantification tool to measure protein adsorption to hydrophobic octyl sepharose (OS) adsorbent particles. Standard radiometric methods have also been used as a further check on the electrophoresis method mentioned above for purified-protein cases. Experimental results are interpreted in terms of an alternative kinetic model called volumetric interpretation of protein adsorption. A partitioning process between bulk solution and a three-dimensional interphase region that separates bulk solution from the physical adsorbent surface is the concept of the model. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into an inflating interphase that is spontaneously formed by bringing a protein solution into contact with a physical surface, then follows by rearrangement of proteins within this interphase to achieve the maximum interphase concentration (dictated by energetics of interphase dehydration) within the thinnest (lowest volume) interphase possible. An important role of water in protein adsorption is emphasized and supported by this model. The fundamental aspects including the reversibility/irreversibility of protein adsorption, the multilayer adsorption, the applicability of thermodynamic/computational models, the capacity of protein adsorption, and the mechanism of so called Vroman effect are discussed and compared to the conventional theories. Superhydrophobic effect on the adsorption of human serum albumin is also examined.

  3. Phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having the general structure: ##STR1## (wherein X is F, Cl, or NO.sub.2, and Y is CO, SO.sub.2 or C(CF.sub.3).sub.2) is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having the general structure: ##STR2## (wherein R is any aliphatic or aromatic moiety) is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  4. Interactive chemical reactivity exploration.

    PubMed

    Haag, Moritz P; Vaucher, Alain C; Bosson, Maël; Redon, Stéphane; Reiher, Markus

    2014-10-20

    Elucidating chemical reactivity in complex molecular assemblies of a few hundred atoms is, despite the remarkable progress in quantum chemistry, still a major challenge. Black-box search methods to find intermediates and transition-state structures might fail in such situations because of the high-dimensionality of the potential energy surface. Here, we propose the concept of interactive chemical reactivity exploration to effectively introduce the chemist's intuition into the search process. We employ a haptic pointer device with force feedback to allow the operator the direct manipulation of structures in three dimensions along with simultaneous perception of the quantum mechanical response upon structure modification as forces. We elaborate on the details of how such an interactive exploration should proceed and which technical difficulties need to be overcome. All reactivity-exploration concepts developed for this purpose have been implemented in the samson programming environment. PMID:25205397

  5. Reactivity of Graphene Investigated by Density-Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Himadri; Gebhardt, Julian; Görling, Andreas; Chair of Theoretical Chemistry Team

    Using spin-polarized density-functional theory, we study the adsorption and reaction of hydrogen and fluorine with graphene. Graphene has a bipartite lattice with two different sublattices and hence, due to Lieb's theorem, the inequality between two sublattices should lead to a net magnetic moment upon adsorption of hydrogen or fluorine. Our calculations using density-functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation predict a magnetic moment of 1 µB for a single hydrogen adsorbed on graphene but not for a single fluorine atom adsorbed on graphene. Switching to hybrid density-functional theory with the HSE functional, we obtain a magnetic moment of 1 µB for of a single fluorine atom adsorption on graphene. This is in line with work of Kim et al., who also found in density-functional theory calculations with the HSE exchange-correlation functional spin-polarization for a fluorine adatom on graphene. Here, we present a systematic study of the reactivity and relevant adsorption mechanism for single-sided graphene, i.e., a graphene sheet which is accessible by an adsorbate from only one side with hydrogen and fluorine using hybrid density-functional theory. German Research Council (DFG) by the Collaborative Research Center 953.

  6. Effect of Doping on Surface Reactivity and Conduction Mechanism in Sm-doped CeO2 Thin Films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Nan; Belianinov, Alex; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tebano, Antonello; Daniele, Di Castro; Schlueter, Christoph; Lee, Tien-Lin; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Wisinger, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; et al

    2014-11-21

    Scanning probe microscopy measurements show irreversible surface electrochemistry in Sm-doped CeO2 thin films, which depends on humidity, temperature and doping concentration. A systematic study by electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) in samples with two different Sm content and in several working conditions allows disclosing the microscopic mechanism underlying the difference in water adsorption and splitting with subsequent proton liberation. We measure the behavior of the hysteresis loops by changing temperature and humidity, both in standard ESM configuration and using the first order reversal curve (FORC) method. Complementing our study with spectroscopic measurements by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy we find that watermore » incorporation is favored until the doping with Sm is too high to allow the presence of Ce3+. The influence of doping on the surface reactivity and conduction mechanism clearly emerges from all of our experimental results. We find that at lower Sm concentration proton conduction is prevalent, featured by lower activation energy and higher mobility. Defect concentrations determine the type of the prevalent charge carrier in a doping dependent manner.« less

  7. Effect of Doping on Surface Reactivity and Conduction Mechanism in Sm-doped CeO2 Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nan; Belianinov, Alex; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tebano, Antonello; Daniele, Di Castro; Schlueter, Christoph; Lee, Tien-Lin; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Wisinger, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Aruta, Carmela

    2014-11-21

    Scanning probe microscopy measurements show irreversible surface electrochemistry in Sm-doped CeO2 thin films, which depends on humidity, temperature and doping concentration. A systematic study by electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM) in samples with two different Sm content and in several working conditions allows disclosing the microscopic mechanism underlying the difference in water adsorption and splitting with subsequent proton liberation. We measure the behavior of the hysteresis loops by changing temperature and humidity, both in standard ESM configuration and using the first order reversal curve (FORC) method. Complementing our study with spectroscopic measurements by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy we find that water incorporation is favored until the doping with Sm is too high to allow the presence of Ce3+. The influence of doping on the surface reactivity and conduction mechanism clearly emerges from all of our experimental results. We find that at lower Sm concentration proton conduction is prevalent, featured by lower activation energy and higher mobility. Defect concentrations determine the type of the prevalent charge carrier in a doping dependent manner.

  8. Surface reactivity of pyrite and related sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Riley; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Pyrite, FeS 2, commonly referred to as "Fool's gold" is the most common sulfide in the Earth's surface region. Not only is the mineral ubiquitous, but the reactivity of pyrite is of central importance in a devastating environmental issue known as acid mine drainage (AMD) and in beneficial commercial processes such as mineral benefaction, which can range from the desulfurization of coal to the isolation of copper or gold ores. Pyrite has even been postulated to be a key constituent of a prebiotic iron-sulfur world existing at the high pressure and temperature conditions common to hydrothermal vents at the oceanic floor. The development of an atomic level picture of the structure and reactivity of pyrite is paramount to understanding the chemistry of this mineral in these wide-ranging environments. This contribution focuses on research carried out over the past three decades that has used modern surface science tools to understand the reactivity of pyrite surfaces. An understanding of the reactivity of the pyrite surfaces has benefited from studies using a wide range of experimental techniques that range from vacuum-based experiments utilizing electron and photon spectroscopies, and probe microscopy to in situ studies using infra-red spectroscopy. Synchrotron-based techniques that include photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy have played a large role in both these environments. These techniques have perhaps been the most useful in establishing the structure of the pristine pyrite surface. Related iron sulfides are also briefly introduced in this review including pyrrhotite (Fe xS 1- x) and the dimorph of pyrite, marcasite. The surface reactivity of these sulfides exhibit both similarities and differences to pyrite, and help to bring forward the unique activity of pyrite in both environmentally and technologically important conditions.

  9. Activity-Based Proteome Profiling Probes Based on Woodward's Reagent K with Distinct Target Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Schürmann, Marc; Janning, Petra; Hedberg, Christian; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-06-27

    Woodward's reagent K (WRK) is a reactive heterocyclic compound that has been employed in protein chemistry to covalently and unspecifically label proteins at nucleophilic amino acids, notably at histidine and cysteine. We have developed a panel of WRK-derived activity-based probes and show that surprisingly and unexpectedly, these probes are fairly selective for a few proteins in the human proteome. The WRK-derived probes show unique reactivity towards the catalytic N-terminal proline in the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and can be used to label and, if equipped with a fluorophore, to image MIF activities in living cells. PMID:27159346

  10. Adsorption of phenol on wood surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of phenol on aspen and pine wood is investigated. It is shown that adsorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. The woods' specific surface areas and adsorption interaction constants are determined. It is found that the sorption of phenol on surfaces of aspen and pine is due to Van der Waals interactions ( S sp = 45 m2/godw for aspen and 85 m2/godw for pine). The difference between the adsorption characteristics is explained by properties of the wood samples' microstructures.

  11. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  12. Adsorption interactions of humic acids with biocides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'Tseva, E. V.; Ivanov, A. A.; Yudina, N. V.

    2009-11-01

    The chemical composition of humic acids from brown coal (Aldrich) was determined by element analysis, 13C NMR spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration. The adsorption ability of humic acids with different biocides (cyproconasol, propiconasol, tebuconasol, irgarol 1051, and DCOIT) was studied. The adsorption ability of a mixture of biocides in aqueous solutions was higher than that of the individual components. The limiting concentration of humic acids at which adsorption of biocides was maximum was determined. Adsorption constants were calculated by the Freundlich equation for each biocide in aqueous solution.

  13. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  14. Moisture adsorption in optical coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, H. Angus

    1988-01-01

    The thin film filter is a very large aperture component which is exceedingly useful because of its small size, flexibility and ease of mounting. Thin film components, however, do have defects of performance and especially of stability which can cause problems in systems, particularly where long-term measurements are being made. Of all of the problems, those associated with moisture absorption are the most serious. Moisture absorption occurs in the pore-shaped voids inherent in the columnar structure of the layers. Ion-assisted deposition is a promising technique for substantially reducing moisture adsorption effects in thin film structures.

  15. Charcoal/Nitrogen Adsorption Cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Refrigerator with no wear-related moving parts produces 0.5 W of cooling at 118 K. When fully developed, refrigerator needs no electrical power, and life expectancy of more than 10 yr, operates unattended to cool sensitive infrared detectors for long periods. Only moving parts in adsorption cryocooler are check valves. As charcoal is cooled in canister, gas pressure drops, allowing inlet check valve to open and admit more nitrogen. When canister is heated, pressure rises, closing inlet valve and eventually opening outlet valve.

  16. Enthalpy of adsorption and isotherms for adsorption of naphthenic acid onto clays

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, L.; Han, B.; Yan, H.; Kasperski, K.L.; Xu, Y.; Hepler, L.G.

    1997-06-15

    The enthalpies of adsorption and the isotherms for adsorption of naphthenic acid onto Na-montmorillonite, Na-kaolinite, and Na-illite were studied by means of calorimetry and the static method at 298.15 K. The results show that the enthalpies of adsorption and saturated adsorption amounts of naphthenic acid on different clays change in the order Na-montmorillonite > Na-illite > Na-kaolinite. The interaction between naphthenic acid and clays is discussed.

  17. Impedance Characteristics of the Plasma Absorption Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazawa, Yohei

    2009-10-01

    The plasma absorption probe (PAP) is a diagnostics for determination of spatially resolved electron density.footnotetextH. Kokura, et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 38 5262 (1999). PAP has attracted considerable interest because of its applicability in a reactive plasma. The simple structure of the probe allows us a robust measurement while the mechanism of the absorption is complicated and there are still some uncertainty.footnotetextM. Lapke, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 121502 (2007) In this study, we focus on the frequency characteristics of the impedance instead of the absorption spectrum. An electromagnetic field simulation reveals that there is only one parallel resonance in the impedance characteristics even in a case there are many peaks in absorption spectrum. Thus, the impedance characteristics provide a clue to understanding the mechanism.

  18. Adsorption properties of boroxol ring doped zigzag boron nitride nanotube toward NO molecule using DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Ehsan; Babaie, Mahsa; Bahmanpour, Hooman

    2016-05-01

    In previous researches it is demonstrated that reactivity and sensitivity of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) toward gas molecules can be modified by impurity. In this work, oxygen defect for three nitrogen sites was used to study the adsorption of NO molecule through the surface of boroxol ring of oxygen doped BNNT (7,0) with different adsorption patterns, including side-on and end-on. All calculations are performed using the DFT-B3LYP/6-31G∗ level of theory, and their electronic energies are corrected by gCP and D3 correction terms. High binding energies indicate that NO molecule undergoes chemical adsorption with large charge transfer from the tube which can significantly change electronic properties of the tube. Density of state (DOS) and partial DOS (PDOS) analyses revealed that adsorption of NO molecule on the boroxol ring position is covalent in nature with significant effect on the electronic properties of tube. The Laplacian of electron density, Lagrangian kinetic energy density, Hamiltonian kinetic energy density and potential energy density at bond critical points between the tube and NO indicate that the interaction between the tube and NO molecule is covalent in nature. Topological analysis of the electron localization function shows that electrons in the new formed bonds are approximately localized, meaning that the nature of adsorption process is chemical covalent. The studied nanotube is a suitable candidate to filter and eliminate NO gas molecule.

  19. Cd adsorption onto Pseudomonas putida in the presence and absence of extracellular polymeric substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueshima, Masato; Ginn, Brian R.; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2008-12-01

    The role of bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in metal adsorption was determined by studying Cd adsorption onto the gram-negative bacterial species Pseudomonas putida with and without enzymatic removal of EPS from the biomass material. A range of experimental approaches were used to characterize the Cd adsorption reactions, including bulk proton and Cd adsorption measurements, FTIR spectroscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. The proton-reactivities of the biomass samples with EPS are not significantly different from those obtained for EPS-free biomass. Similarly, the presence of EPS does not significantly affect the extent of Cd removal from solution by the biomass on a mass-normalized basis, based on bulk Cd adsorption measurements conducted as a function of pH, nor does it appear to strongly affect the Cd-binding groups as observed by FTIR. However, fluorescence microscopy indicates that Cd, although concentrated on cell walls, is also bound to some extent to EPS. Together, the results from this study suggest that the P. putida EPS can bind significant concentrations of Cd from solution, and that the nature and mass-normalized extent of the binding is similar to that of the cell wall. Therefore, the EPS-bearing systems do not exhibit enhanced mass-normalized removal of Cd from solution relative to the EPS-free systems. The presence of the EPS effectively increases the viability of cells exposed to aqueous Cd, likely due to sequestration of the Cd away from the cells due to Cd-EPS binding.

  20. Adsorption kinetics of phosphate and arsenate on goethite. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina; Brigante, Maximiliano; Avena, Marcelo

    2007-07-15

    The adsorption kinetics of phosphate and arsenate on goethite is studied and compared. Batch adsorption experiments were performed at different adsorbate concentrations, pH, temperatures and stirring rates. For both oxoanions the adsorption rate increases by increasing adsorbate concentration, decreasing pH and increasing temperature. It does not change by changing stirring rate. The adsorption takes place in two processes: a fast one that takes place in less than 5 min and a slow one that takes place in several hours or more. The rate of the slow process does not depend directly on the concentration of phosphate or arsenate in solution, but depends linearly on the amount of phosphate or arsenate that was adsorbed during the fast process. Apparent activation energies and absence of stirring rate effects suggest that the slow process is controlled by diffusion into pores, although the evidence is not conclusive. The similarities in the adsorption kinetics of phosphate and arsenate are quantitatively shown by using a three-parameters equation that takes into account both the fast and the slow processes. These similarities are in line with the similar reactivity that phosphate and arsenate have in general and may be important for theoretical and experimental studies of the fate of these oxoanions in the environment. PMID:17448491

  1. Pyrolysis of tire rubber: Porosity and adsorption characteristics of the pyrolytic chars

    SciTech Connect

    Miguel, G.S.; Fowler, G.D.; Sollars, C.J.

    1998-06-01

    Tire rubber has been pyrolyzed at various temperatures under a nitrogen atmosphere. The resulting chars have been analyzed for their porosity using nitrogen gas adsorption and for their aqueous adsorption characteristics using phenol, methylene blue, and the reactive dyes Procion Turquoise H-A and Procion Red H-E3B. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were modeled to the BET and Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) equations to determine effective surface areas, mesopore volumes, and micropore volumes. Results showed that pyrolysis of tire rubber was essentially complete at 500 C and resulted in a char yield of approximately 42 wt%. Pyrolytic chars exhibited BET surface areas up to 85 m{sup 2}/g and micropore volumes up to 0.04 mL/g. Owing to their poorly developed micropore structure, the pyrolytic chars exhibited limited aqueous adsorption capacity for compounds of small molecular weight, such as phenol. However, the chars possessed significantly greater adsorption capacity for species of large molecular weight which was attributed to the presence of large mesopore volumes (up to 0.19 mL/g).

  2. Mechanism of Arsenic Adsorption on Magnetite Nanoparticles from Water: Thermodynamic and Spectroscopic Studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Hua; Chuang, Ya-Hui; Chen, Tsan-Yao; Tian, Yuan; Li, Hui; Wang, Ming-Kuang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Removal of arsenic (As) from water supplies is needed to reduce As exposure through drinking water and food consumption in many regions of the world. Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are promising and novel adsorbents for As removal because of their great adsorption capacity for As and easy separation. This study aimed to investigate the adsorption mechanism of arsenate, As(V), and arsenite, As(III), on MNPs by macroscopic adsorption experiments in combination with thermodynamic calculation and microspectroscopic characterization using synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adsorption reactions are favorable endothermic processes as evidenced by increased adsorption with increasing temperatures, and high positive enthalpy change. EXAFS spectra suggested predominant formation of bidentate binuclear corner-sharing complexes ((2)C) for As(V), and tridentate hexanuclear corner-sharing ((3)C) complexes for As(III) on MNP surfaces. The macroscopic and microscopic data conclusively identified the formation of inner-sphere complexes between As and MNP surfaces. More intriguingly, XANES and XPS results revealed complex redox transformation of the adsorbed As on MNPs exposed to air: Concomitant with the oxidation of MNPs, the oxidation of As(III) and MNPs was expected, but the observed As(V) reduction was surprising because of the role played by the reactive Fe(II). PMID:26055623

  3. Effect of surface area and chemisorbed oxygen on the SO2 adsorption capacity of activated char

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether activated char produced from Illinois coal could be used effectively to remove sulfur dioxide from coal combustion flue gas. Chars were prepared from a high-volatile Illinois bituminous coal under a wide range of pyrolysis and activation conditions. A novel char preparation technique was developed to prepare chars with SO2 adsorption capacities significantly greater than that of a commercial activated carbon. In general, there was no correlation between SO2 adsorption capacity and surface area. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) was used to determine the nature and extent of carbon-oxygen (C-O) complexes formed on the char surface. TPD data revealed that SO2 adsorption was inversely proportional to the amount of C-O complex. The formation of a stable C-O complex during char preparation may have served only to occupy carbon sites that were otherwise reactive towards SO2 adsorption. A fleeting C(O) complex formed during SO2 adsorption is postulated to be the reaction intermediate necessary for conversion of SO2 to H2SO4. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  4. Adsorption and kinetic studies of seven different organic dyes onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste and removal of them from wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas; Ahmadi, Mazaher

    2012-12-01

    Adsorption of seven different organic dyes from aqueous solutions onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste (MNLTW) was studied. MNLTW was prepared via a simple method and was fully characterized. The properties of this magnetic adsorbent were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Adsorption characteristics of the MNLTW adsorbent was examined using Janus green, methylene blue, thionine, crystal violet, Congo red, neutral red and reactive blue 19 as adsorbates. Dyes adsorption process was thoroughly studied from both kinetic and equilibrium points of view for all adsorbents. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Redlich-Peterson, Brouers-Sotolongo and Temkin isotherms. The results from Langmuir isotherm indicated that the capacity of MNLTW for the adsorption of cationic dyes was higher than that for anionic dyes. The adsorption kinetics was tested for the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models at different experimental conditions. PMID:23058993

  5. Adsorption and kinetic studies of seven different organic dyes onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste and removal of them from wastewater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas; Ahmadi, Mazaher

    2012-12-01

    Adsorption of seven different organic dyes from aqueous solutions onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste (MNLTW) was studied. MNLTW was prepared via a simple method and was fully characterized. The properties of this magnetic adsorbent were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Adsorption characteristics of the MNLTW adsorbent was examined using Janus green, methylene blue, thionine, crystal violet, Congo red, neutral red and reactive blue 19 as adsorbates. Dyes adsorption process was thoroughly studied from both kinetic and equilibrium points of view for all adsorbents. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Redlich-Peterson, Brouers-Sotolongo and Temkin isotherms. The results from Langmuir isotherm indicated that the capacity of MNLTW for the adsorption of cationic dyes was higher than that for anionic dyes. The adsorption kinetics was tested for the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models at different experimental conditions.

  6. Multifractal characteristics of Nitrogen adsorption isotherms from tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    One of the primary methods used to characterize a wide range of porous materials, including soils, are gas adsorption isotherms. An adsorption isotherm is a function relating the amount of adsorbed gas or vapour to the respective equilibrium pressure, during pressure increase at constant temperature. Adsorption data allow easily estimates of specific surface area and also can provide a characterization of pore surface heterogeneity. Most of the properties and the reactivity of soil colloids are influenced by their specific surface area and by parameters describing the surface heterogeneity. For a restricted scale range, linearity between applied pressure and volume of adsorbate holds, which is the basis for current estimations of specific surface area. However, adsorption isotherms contain also non-linear segments of pressure versus volume so that evidence of multifractal scale has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to analyze the multifractal behaviour of nitrogen adsorption isotherms from a set of tropical soils. Samples were collected form 54 horizons belonging to 19 soil profiles in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The most frequent soil type was Oxisol, according to the Soil Survey Staff, equivalent to Latossolo in the Brazilian soil classification system. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms at standard 77 K were measured using a Thermo Finnigan Sorptomatic 1990 gas sorption analyzer (Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA). From the raw data a distributions of mass along a support was obtained to perform multifractal analysis. The probability distribution was constructed by dividing the values of the measure in a given segment by the sum of the measure in the whole scale range. The box-counting method was employed to perform multifractal analysis. All the analyzed N2 adsorption isotherms behave like a multifractal system. The singularity spectra, f(α), showed asymmetric concave down parabolic shapes, with a greater tendency toward the left side, where moments

  7. Adsorption and reaction of nitromethane (CH 3NO 2) on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, Najat; Wang, Jiang; Bansenauer, Barbara A.; Koel, Bruce E.

    1997-11-01

    The adsorption of nitromethane (CH 3NO 2 and CD 3NO 2) on Pt(111) surfaces has been investigated. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) mass spectrometry, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) were used to probe the adsorption bond strength and bonding geometry of the chemisorbed state, and also thermal decomposition reactions on the Pt(111) surface. Nitromethane is weakly chemisorbed on Pt(111) with an adsorption energy of ca 11 kcal mol -1. Adsorption is mostly (> 75%) reversible, but some nitromethane decomposition on Pt(111) does occur at low coverages. HCN, H 2O, NO and CO were the primary gas phase products that were detected in TPD as a result of this decomposition. The principal decomposition pathway is via cleavage of N-O bonds, mostly leaving the C-N bond intact, rather than the isomerization of nitromethane to methyl nitrite (CH 3ONO) on the surface. Consistent with the small adsorption energy of molecular nitromethane, UPS and HREELS of the chemisorbed monolayer show only small changes in the electronic structure and vibrational spectra of nitromethane compared to condensed phase results. HREELS data indicate that chemisorbed nitromethane adopts a 'pseudo-bidentate' bonding geometry with C s( yz) symmetry in which the two oxygens are coordinated inequivalently to the surface with the molecular axis tilted within the molecular plane.

  8. Reactivity of dicoordinated stannylones (Sn0) versus stannylenes (SnII): an investigation using DFT-based reactivity indices.

    PubMed

    Broeckaert, Lies; Frenking, Gernot; Geerlings, Paul; De Proft, Frank

    2013-10-01

    The reactivity of dicoordinated Sn(0) compounds, stannylones, is probed using density functional theory (DFT)-based reactivity indices and compared with the reactivity of dicoordinated Sn(II) compounds, stannylenes. For the former compounds, the influence of different types of electron-donating ligands, such as cyclic and acyclic carbenes, stannylenes and phosphines, on the reactivity of the central Sn atom is analyzed in detail. Sn(0) compounds are found to be relatively soft systems with a high nucleophilicity, and the plots of the Fukui function f(-) for an electrophilic attack consistently predict the highest reactivity on the Sn atom. Next, complexes of dicoordinated Sn compounds with different Lewis acids of variable hardness are computed. In a first part, the double-base character of stannylones is demonstrated in interactions with the hardest Lewis acid H(+). Both the first and second proton affinities (PAs) are high and are well correlated with the atomic charge on the Sn atom, probing its local hardness. These observations are also in line with electrostatic potential plots that demonstrate that the tin atom in Sn(0) compounds bears a higher negative charge in comparison to Sn(II) compounds. Stannylones and stannylenes can be distinguished from each other by the partial charges at Sn and by various reactivity indices. It also becomes clear that there is a smooth transition between the two classes of compounds. We furthermore demonstrate both from DFT-based reactivity indices and from energy decomposition analysis, combined with natural orbitals for chemical valence (EDA-NOCV), that the monocomplexed stannylones are still nucleophilic and as reactive towards a second Lewis acid as towards the first one. The dominating interaction is a strong σ-type interaction from the Sn atom towards the Lewis acid. The interaction energy is higher for complexes with the cation Ag(+) than with the non-charged electrophiles BH(3), BF(3), and AlCl(3). PMID:23946256

  9. Surface energetics of alkaline-earth metal oxides: Trends in stability and adsorption of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Nørskov, Jens K.; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    We present a systematic theoretical investigation of the surface properties, stability, and reactivity of rocksalt type alkaline-earth metal oxides including MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO. The accuracy of commonly used exchange-correlation density functionals (LDA, PBE, RPBE, PBEsol, BEEF-vdW, and hybrid HSE) and random-phase approximation (RPA) is evaluated and compared to existing experimental values. Calculated surface energies of the four most stable surface facets under vacuum conditions, the (100) surface, the metal and oxygen terminated octopolar (111), and the (110) surfaces, exhibit a monotonic increase in stability from MgO to BaO. On the MgO(100) surface, adsorption of CO, NO, and CH4 is characterized by physisorption while H2O chemisorbs, which is in agreement with experimental findings. We further use the on-top metal adsorption of CO and NO molecules to map out the surface energetics of each alkaline-earth metal oxide surface. The considered functionals all qualitatively predict similar adsorption energy trends. The ordering between the adsorption energies on different surface facets can be attributed to differences in the local geometrical surface structure and the electronic structure of the metal constituent of the alkaline-earth metal oxide. The striking observation that CO adsorption strength is weaker than NO adsorption on the (100) terraces as the period of the alkaline-earth metal in the oxide increases is analyzed in detail in terms of charge redistribution within the σ and π channels of adsorbates. Finally, we also present oxygen adsorption and oxygen vacancy formation energies in these oxide systems.

  10. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  11. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  12. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2007-07-03

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  13. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2009-07-07

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  14. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, George R.; Peter, Frank J.; Butler, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  15. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-02-16

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir. 7 figs.

  16. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  17. Differences in reactive hyperemia between the intestinal mucosa and muscularis.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, A P; Riedel, G L

    1984-12-01

    In a previous study of regional intestinal blood flow by laser-Doppler velocimetry, we noted that the mucosa displayed reactive hyperemia following arterial occlusion but that the muscularis did not. Therefore, to determine whether this observation is generally valid, we compared responses of the mucosa and muscularis externa to arterial occlusion. We measured total blood flow to isolated loops of canine small bowel with an electromagnetic flow probe on the supply artery; blood flow either in the mucosa or in the muscularis was measured by laser-Doppler velocimetry. Mucosal and total blood flow consistently showed reactive hyperemia in response to a 60-s occlusion, but the muscularis did not. To determine whether metabolic rate influenced reactive hyperemia, we increased enteric oxygen uptake by placing 5% bile and transportable solutes in the lumen; these agents increased oxygen consumption by 36%. After a 60-s occlusion, the durations of both total and mucosal reactive hyperemia were significantly prolonged by increased metabolic rate. Similarly, the payback-to-debt ratios in both total and mucosal blood flows were significantly increased at elevated metabolic rate. These data support the conclusions that reactive hyperemia occurs more frequently and has a greater magnitude in the mucosa compared with the muscularis and both total and mucosal reactive hyperemia are strongly influenced by the preocclusive oxygen demand. These findings therefore constitute further evidence that metabolic factors contribute to reactive hyperemia in the intestinal circulation. PMID:6391202

  18. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 3: Competition with natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2010-10-15

    This study (part 3) was carried out to investigate the effect of the natural organic matter (NOM) concentration on Bromacil (pesticide) adsorption on powdered activated carbon (PAC) in the same experimental conditions as in our previous studies (parts 1 and 2). Our previous findings showed that Bromacil adsorption in buffered pure water (pH 7.8) occurred at two types of site. In the presence of NOM (three kinds), we noted a significant reduction in Bromacil adsorption capacities due to the competitive effects exerted by NOM. Highly reactive sites (or pores) in PAC appeared to be blocked by NOM adsorption, as demonstrated by the application of a pseudo-single solute isotherm and of the simplified ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST), regardless of the initial Bromacil and NOM concentrations. The competing effect of low-molecular weight NOM was found to be greater than the competing effect of high-molecular weight NOM. The pseudo-second order surface-reaction model fitted Bromacil adsorption particularly well, even in the presence of NOM. However, the adsorption-kinetic constant values were found to be independent of the aqueous equilibrium concentration of the target compound, contrary to that observed in pure water. The kinetic data thus confirmed that high reactivity PAC sites were blocked by NOM adsorption. A practical approach concluded this work. PMID:20619963

  19. Surface reactivity in the pathogenic response to particulates.

    PubMed Central

    Fubini, B

    1997-01-01

    The peculiar characteristics of dust toxicity are discussed in relation to the processes taking place at the particle-biological medium interface. Because of surface reactivity, toxicity of solids is not merely predictable from chemical composition and molecular structure, as with water soluble compounds. With particles having the same bulk composition, micromorphology (the thermal and mechanical history of dust and adsorption from the environment) determines the kind and abundance of active surface sites, thus modulating reactivity toward cells and tissues. The quantitative evaluation of doses is discussed in comparisons of dose-response relationships obtained with different materials. Responses related to the surface of the particle are better compared on a per-unit surface than per-unit weight basis. The role of micromorphology, hydrophilicity, and reactive surface cations in determining the pathogenicity of inhaled particles is described with reference to silica and asbestos toxicity. Heating crystalline silica decreases hydrophilicity, with consequent modifications in membranolytic potential, retention, and transport. Transition metal ions exposed at the surface generate free radicals in aqueous suspensions. Continuous redox cycling of iron, with consequent activation-reactivation of the surface sites releasing free radicals, could account for the long-term pathogenicity caused by the inhalation of iron-containing fibers. In various pathogenicities caused by mixed dusts, the contact between components modifies toxicity. Hard metal lung disease is caused by exposure to mixtures of metals and carbides, typically cobalt (Co) and tungsten carbide (WC), but not to single components. Toxicity stems from reactive oxygen species generation in a mechanism involving both Co metal and WC in mutual contact. A relationship between the extent of water adsorption and biopersistence is proposed for vitreous fibers. Modifications of the surface taking place in vivo are

  20. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-05-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on water/air interfaces, the latter gives an impression of surfactant adsorption to a hydrophobic surface and illustrates the importance of the CMC for the adsorption process. Then attention is paid to the most important types of soil particles: humic and fulvic acids, silica, metal oxides and layered aluminosilicates. Information is provided on their structure, surface properties and primary (proton) charge characteristics, which are all important for surfactant binding. Subsequently, the adsorption of different types of surfactants on these individual soil components is discussed in detail, based on mainly experimental results and considering the specific (chemical) and electrostatic interactions, with hydrophobic attraction as an important component of the specific interactions. Adsorption models that can describe the features semi-quantitatively are briefly discussed. In the last part of the paper some trends of surfactant adsorption on soils are briefly discussed together with some complications that may occur and finally the consequences of surfactant adsorption for soil colloidal stability and permeability are considered. When we seek to understand the fate of surfactants in soil and aqueous environments, the hydrophobicity and charge density of the soil or soil particles, must be considered together with the structure, hydrophobicity and charge of the surfactants, because these factors affect the adsorption. The pH and ionic strength are important parameters with respect to the charge density of the particles. As surfactant adsorption influences soil structure and permeability, insight in surfactant adsorption to soil particles is useful for good soil management. PMID

  1. Hydrogen adsorption on functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X B; Xiao, B; Fletcher, A J; Thomas, K M

    2005-05-12

    There is considerable interest in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes and porous carbons as a method of storage for transport and related energy applications. This investigation has involved a systematic investigation of the role of functional groups and porous structure characteristics in determining the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of porous carbons. Suites of carbons were prepared with a wide range of nitrogen and oxygen contents and types of functional groups to investigate their effect on hydrogen adsorption. The porous structures of the carbons were characterized by nitrogen (77 K) and carbon dioxide (273 K) adsorption methods. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were studied at 77 K and pressure up to 100 kPa. All the isotherms were Type I in the IUPAC classification scheme. Hydrogen isobars indicated that the adsorption of hydrogen is very temperature dependent with little or no hydrogen adsorption above 195 K. The isosteric enthalpies of adsorption at zero surface coverage were obtained using a virial equation, while the values at various surface coverages were obtained from the van't Hoff isochore. The values were in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ mol(-1) for the carbons studied. The thermodynamics of the adsorption process are discussed in relation to temperature limitations for hydrogen storage applications. The maximum amounts of hydrogen adsorbed correlated with the micropore volume obtained from extrapolation of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for carbon dioxide adsorption. Functional groups have a small detrimental effect on hydrogen adsorption, and this is related to decreased adsorbate-adsorbent and increased adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. PMID:16852056

  2. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  3. Reactive power compensating system

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  4. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  5. Working Memory and Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goo, Jaemyung

    2010-01-01

    The present study explores the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC) and think-alouds, focusing on the issue of reactivity. Two WM span tasks (listening span and operation span) were administered to 42 English-speaking learners of Spanish. Learner performance on reading comprehension and written production was measured under two…

  6. Synthesizing mixed phase titania nanocomposites with enhanced photoactivity and redshifted photoresponse by reactive DC magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Le

    Recent work points out the importance of the solid-solid interface in explaining the high photoactivity of mixed phase TiO2 catalysts. The goal of this research was to probe the synthesis-structure-function relationships of the solid-solid interfaces created by the reactive direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering of titanium dioxide. I hypothesize that the reactive DC magnetron sputtering is a useful method for synthesizing photo-catalysts with unique structure including solid-solid interfaces and surface defects that are associated with enhanced photoreactivity as well as a photoresponse shifted to longer wavelengths of light. I showed that sputter deposition provides excellent control of the phase and interface formation as well as the stoichiometry of the films. I explored the effects exerted by the process parameters of pressure, oxygen partial pressure, target power, substrate bias (RF), deposition incidence angle, and post annealing treatment on the structural and functional characteristics of the catalysts. I have successfully made pure and mixed phase TiO2 films. These films were characterized with UV-Vis, XPS, AFM, SEM, TEM, XRD and EPR, to determine optical properties, elemental stoichiometry, surface morphology, phase distribution and chemical coordination. Bundles of anatase-rutile nano-columns having high densities of dual-scale of interfaces among and within the columns are fabricated. Photocatalytic performance of the sputtered films as measured by the oxidation of the pollutant, acetaldehyde, and the reduction of CO2 for fuel (CH4) production was compared (normalized for surface area) to that of mixed phase TiO2 fabricated by other methods, including flame hydrolysis powders, and solgel deposited TiO 2 films. The sputtered mixed phase materials were far superior to the commercial standard (Degussa P25) and solgel TiO2 based on gas phase reaction of acetaldehyde oxidation under UV light and CO2 reduction under both UV and visible illuminations. The

  7. Brain-reactive autoantibody levels in the sera of ageing autoimmune mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, S A; Arbogast, D N; Ford, P M; Shucard, D W; Harbeck, R J

    1987-01-01

    Brain-reactive autoantibodies are thought to play an important role in mediating central nervous system (CNS) disorders in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this paper the developmental occurrence of these antibodies in the sera of autoimmune mice, i.e. NZB, NZB/W, MRL/l and BXSB mice were examined. All murine strains tested, whether autoimmune or not, showed some degree of serum reactivity toward brain antigens. Autoimmune mice, however, displayed higher levels of serum brain-reactive antibodies, and at earlier ages, than non-autoimmune mice. Immunofluorescence assays against brain sections and adsorption assays, with both neural and non-neural tissue, indicated a heterogeneity in the specificity of the populations of brain-reactive antibodies present. These studies provide an important step in characterizing the appearance and diversity of brain-reactive autoantibodies, with the goal of better understanding their significance and potential role in mediating CNS dysfunction in SLE. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3319304

  8. Quantitative Understanding of van der Waals Interactions by Analyzing the Adsorption Structure and Low-Frequency Vibrational Modes of Single Benzene Molecules on Silver.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dingwang; Han, Zhumin; Czap, Gregory; Chiang, Chi-Lun; Xu, Chen; Ho, W; Wu, Ruqian

    2016-06-16

    The combination of a sub-Kelvin scanning tunneling microscope and density functional calculations incorporating van der Waals (vdW) corrections has been used successfully to probe the adsorption structure and low-frequency vibrational modes of single benzene molecules on Ag(110). The inclusion of optimized vdW functionals and improved C6-based vdW dispersion schemes in density functional theory is crucial for obtaining the correct adsorption structure and low-energy vibrational modes. These results demonstrate the emerging capability to quantitatively probe the van der Waals interactions between a physisorbed molecule and an inert substrate. PMID:27232051

  9. Technology for Entry Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, James A.; Arnold, James; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul; Laub, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph describing technologies for entry probes is presented. The topics include: 1) Entry Phase; 2) Descent Phase; 3) Long duration atmospheric observations; 4) Survivability at high temperatures; and 5) Summary.

  10. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  11. Isolation and Reactivity of Trifluoromethyl Iodonium Salts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The strategic incorporation of the trifluoromethyl (CF3) functionality within therapeutic or agrochemical agents is a proven strategy for altering their associated physicochemical properties (e.g., metabolic stability, lipophilicity, and bioavailability). Electrophilic trifluoromethylation has emerged as an important methodology for installing the CF3 moiety onto an array of molecular architectures, and, in particular, CF3 λ3-iodanes have garnered significant interest because of their unique reactivity and ease of handling. Trifluoromethylations mediated by these hypervalent iodine reagents often require activation through an exogenous Lewis or Brønsted acid; thus, putative intermediates invoked in these transformations are cationic CF3 iodoniums. These iodoniums have, thus far, eluded isolation and investigation of their innate reactivity (which has encouraged speculation that such species cannot be accessed). A more complete understanding of the mechanistic relevance of CF3 iodoniums is paramount for the development of new trifluoromethylative strategies involving λ3-iodanes. Here, we demonstrate that CF3 iodonium salts are readily prepared from common λ3-iodane precursors and exhibit remarkable persistence under ambient conditions. These reagents are competent electrophiles for a variety of trifluoromethylation reactions, and their reactivity is reminiscent of that observed when CF3 iodanes are activated using Lewis acids. As such, our results suggest the mechanistic relevance of CF3 iodonium intermediates in trifluoromethylative processes mediated by λ3-iodanes. The isolation of CF3 iodonium salts also presents the unique opportunity to employ them more generally as mechanistic probes. PMID:27280169

  12. Reactivity Network: Secondary Sources for Inorganic Reactivity Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    Provides an eclectic annotated bibliography of secondary sources for inorganic reactivity information of interest to reactivity network review authors and to anyone seeking information about simple inorganic reactions in order to develop experiments and demonstrations. Gives 119 sources. (MVL)

  13. Reflections on Electric Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, Nicholas

    2007-10-01

    One of the more immediate temptations for an experimental plasma physicist is to insert some kind of refractory, conducting material into a plasma, as a simple means of probing its charge composition. Irvine Langmuir tried it in the 1920s and was one of the first to develop an electrical probe method in his early work on electrical discharge plasmas. There are now numerous variations on the theme including planar, cylindrical and spherical geometry with single, double and triple probes. There are also probes that resonate, propagate and reciprocate. Some probes are electrostatic and others are electromagnetic; some are effectively wireless; most absorb but some emit. All types can be used in steady and transient plasmas, while special schemes have been devised for RF plasmas, using passive and active compensation. Magnetised plasmas pose further challenges. Each configuration is accompanied by assumptions that constrain both their applicability and the analytical methods that translate the measured currents and voltages variously into charge densities, space potentials, particle fluxes, energy distributions and measures of collisionality. This talk will take a broad look at the options and opportunities for electric probes, principally in the environment of non-equilibrium plasma.

  14. Arsenate adsorption by unsaturated alluvial sediments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arsenate adsorption as a function of solution arsenic concentration and solution pH was investigated on five alluvial sediments from the Antelope Valley, Western Mojave Desert, California. Arsenate adsorption increased with increasing solution pH, exhibited a maximum around pH 4 to 5, and then decr...

  15. Size dependent adsorption on nanocrystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. M.; Wen, Z.; Jiang, Q.

    2005-03-01

    A quantitative thermodynamic correlation method to describe the size dependent Langmuir adsorption isotherm is developed. According to the model, the equilibrium adsorption constant increases as material size decreases, which is in agreement with the literature data of acetic acid, valeric acid, oxalic acid, and adipic acid on anatase nanoparticles.

  16. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  17. Adsorption of pyridine by combusted oil shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essington, M. E.

    1992-03-01

    Large volumes of solid waste material will be produced during the commercial production of shale oil. An alternative to the disposal of the solid waste product is utilization. One potential use of spent oil shale is for the stabilization of hazardous organic compounds. The objective of this study was to examine the adsorption of pyridine, commonly found in oil shale process water, by spent oil shale. The adsorption of pyridine by fresh and weathered samples of combusted New Albany Shale and Green River Formation oil shale was examined. In general, pyridine adsorption can be classified as L-type and the isotherms modeled with the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. For the combusted New Albany Shale, weathering reduced the predicted pyridine adsorption maximum and increased the amount of pyridine adsorbed at low solution concentrations. For the combusted Green River Formation oil shales, weathering increased the predicted pyridine adsorption maximum. The pyridine adsorption isotherms were similar to those produced for a combusted Australian oil shale. Although adsorption can be mathematically described by empirical models, the reduction in solution concentrations of pyridine was generally less than 10 mg/l at an initial concentration of 100 mg/l. Clearly, the observed reduction in solution pyridine concentrations does not sufficiently justify using spent oil shale as a stabilizing medium. However, data in the literature suggest that other organic compounds can be effectively removed from solution by spent oil shale and that adsorption is dependent on process conditions and organic compound type.

  18. Specific fluorogenic probes for ozone in biological and atmospheric samples

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Amanda L.; St Croix, Claudette M.; Pitt, Bruce R.; Leikauf, George D.; Ando, Shin; Koide, Kazunori

    2010-01-01

    Ozone exposure is a growing global health problem, especially in urban areas. While ozone in the stratosphere protects the earth from harmful ultraviolet light, tropospheric or ground-level ozone is toxic and can damage the respiratory tract. It has recently been shown that ozone may be produced endogenously in inflammation and antibacterial responses of the immune system; however, these results have sparked controversy owing to the use of a non-specific colorimetric probe. Here we report the synthesis of fluorescent molecular probes able to unambiguously detect ozone in both biological and atmospheric samples. Unlike other ozone-detection methods, in which interference from different reactive oxygen species is often a problem, these probes are ozone specific. Such probes will prove useful for the study of ozone in environmental science and biology, and so possibly provide some insight into the role of ozone in cells. PMID:20634904

  19. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  20. Bovine and human insulin adsorption at lipid monolayers: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Sergio; Pandey, Ravindra; Rzeznicka, Izabela; Lu, Hao; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Insulin is a widely used peptide in protein research and it is utilised as a model peptide to understand the mechanics of fibril formation, which is believed to be the cause of diseases such as Alzheimer and Creutzfeld-Jakob syndrome. Insulin has been used as a model system due to its biomedical relevance, small size and relatively simple tertiary structure. The adsorption of insu lin on a variety of surfaces has become the focus of numerous studies lately. These works have helped in elucidating the consequence of surface/protein hydrophilic/hydrophobic interaction in terms of protein refolding and aggregation. Unfortunately, such model surfaces differ significantly from physiological surfaces. Here we spectroscopically investigate the adsorption of insulin at lipid monolayers, to further our understanding of the interaction of insulin with biological surfaces. In particular we study the effect of minor mutations of insulin’s primary amino acid sequence on its interaction with 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) model lipid layers. We probe the structure of bovine and human insulin at the lipid/water interface using sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG). The SFG experiments are complemented with XPS analysis of Langmuir-Schaefer deposited lipid/insulin films. We find that bovine and human insulin, even though very similar in sequence, show a substantially different behavior when interacting with lipid films.

  1. Argon Adsorption on Open Carbon Nanohorns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Brice; Calvillo, Angel; Khanal, Pravin; Migone, Aldo; Iijima, Sumio; Yudasaka, Masako

    We have measured adsorption isotherms for argon adsorbed on a 0.1692 g sample of chemically-opened carbon nanohorns. Two clear substeps are visible in the adsorption data, corresponding to groups of stronger binding sites (lower pressure substep) and weaker binding sites (higher pressure substep). We have measured adsorption at eight different temperatures in the range between approximately 70 and 110 K. The space at the interior of the individual nanohorns is accessible to sorbates in these chemically opened nanohorns. Consequently, higher loadings are obtained on these samples when compared to those measured on unopened (as-produced) nanohorns. Results for the kinetics of adsorption, the effective specific surface area, and the isosteric heat of adsorption as a function of sorbent loading will be presented and compared to results from other gases adsorbed on nanohorns. This work was supported by the NSF through Grant DMR-1006428.

  2. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  3. Cysteine Modification: Probing Channel Structure, Function and Conformational Change.

    PubMed

    Akabas, Myles H

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine substitution has been a powerful tool to investigate the structure and function of proteins. It has been particularly useful for studies of membrane proteins in their native environment, embedded in phospholipid membranes. Among the 20 amino acids, cysteine is uniquely reactive. This reactivity has motivated the synthesis of a wide array of sulfhydryl reactive chemicals. The commercially available array of sulfhydryl reactive reagents has allowed investigators to probe the local steric and electrostatic environment around engineered cysteines and to position fluorescent, paramagnetic and mass probes at specific sites within proteins and for distance measurements between pairs of sites. Probing the reactivity and accessibility of engineered cysteines has been extensively used in Substituted Cysteine Accessibility Method (SCAM) investigations of ion channels, membrane transporters and receptors. These studies have successfully identified the residues lining ion channels, agonist/antagonist and allosteric modulator binding sites, and regions whose conformation changes as proteins transition between different functional states. The thousands of cysteine-substitution mutants reported in the literature demonstrate that, in general, mutation to cysteine is well tolerated. This has allowed systematic studies of residues in transmembrane segments and in other parts of membrane proteins. Finally, by inserting pairs of cysteines and assaying their ability to form disulfide bonds, changes in proximity and mobility relationships between specific positions within a protein can be inferred. Thus, cysteine mutagenesis has provided a wealth of data on the structure of membrane proteins in their functional environment. This data can complement the structural insights obtained from the burgeoning number of crystal structures of detergent solubilized membrane proteins whose functional state is often uncertain. This article will review the use of cysteine mutagenesis to probe

  4. Influence of Probe Flexibility and Gelatin Embedding on Neuronal Density and Glial Responses to Brain Implants

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Per; Wolff, Anette; Ejserholm, Fredrik; Wallman, Lars

    2015-01-01

    To develop long-term high quality communication between brain and computer, a key issue is how to reduce the adverse foreign body responses. Here, the impact of probe flexibility and gelatine embedding on long-term (6w) tissue responses, was analyzed. Probes of same polymer material, size and shape, flexible mainly in one direction, were implanted in rat cerebral cortex (nimplants = 3 x 8) in two orientations with respect to the major movement direction of the brain relative to the skull: parallel to (flex mode) or transverse to (rigid mode). Flex mode implants were either embedded in gelatin or non-embedded. Neurons, activated microglia and astrocytes were visualized using immunohistochemistry. The astrocytic reactivity, but not microglial response, was significantly lower to probes implanted in flex mode as compared to rigid mode. The microglial response, but not astrocytic reactivity, was significantly smaller to gelatin embedded probes (flex mode) than non-embedded. Interestingly, the neuronal density was preserved in the inner zone surrounding gelatin embedded probes. This contrasts to the common reports of reduced neuronal density close to implanted probes. In conclusion, sheer stress appears to be an important factor for astrocytic reactivity to implanted probes. Moreover, gelatin embedding can improve the neuronal density and reduce the microglial response close to the probe. PMID:25790172

  5. PREDICTING CHEMICAL REACTIVITY BY COMPUTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical models for predicting the fate of pollutants in the environment require reactivity parameter values--that it, the physical and chemical constants that govern reactivity. lthough empirical structure-activity relationships have been developed that allow estimation of s...

  6. A mitochondria-targeted turn-on fluorescent probe for the detection of glutathione in living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Bao, Xiaolong; Zhou, Junliang; Peng, Fangfang; Ren, Hang; Dong, Xiaochun; Zhao, Weili

    2016-11-15

    A novel turn-on red fluorescent BODIPY-based probe (Probe 1) for the detection of glutathione was developed. Such a probe carries a para-dinitrophenoxy benzyl pyridinium moiety at the meso position of a BODIPY dye as self-immolative linker. Probe 1 responds selectively to glutathione with the detection limit of 109nM over other amino acids, common metal ions, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, and reactive sulfur species. A novel electrostatic interaction to modulate the SNAr attack of glutathione was believed to play significant role for the observed selective response to glutathione. The cleavage of dinitrophenyl ether by glutathione leads to the production of para-hydroxybenzyl moiety which is able to self-immolate through an intramolecular 1,4-elimination reaction to release the fluorescent BODIPY dye. The low toxic probe has been successfully used to detect mitochondrial glutathione in living cells. PMID:27176914

  7. Anisotropic nanocolloids: self-assembly, interfacial adsorption, and electrostatic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, J.

    2012-06-01

    In this thesis we consider the influence of anisotropy on the behaviour of colloids using theory and simulations. The recent increase in the ability to synthesize anisotropic particles (cubes, caps, octapods, etc.) has led to samples of sufficient quality to perform self-assembly experiments. Our investigation is therefore particularly relevant to current and future experimental studies of colloids. We examine several topics for which shape anisotropy plays an important role: (1.) - Interfacial adsorption. We introduced the triangular-tessellation technique to approximate the surface areas and line length which are associated with a plane-particle intersection. Our method allowed us to determine the free energy of adsorption for a single irregular colloid with heterogeneous surface properties adsorbed at a flat liquid-liquid interface in the Pieranski approximation. Ellipsoids only adsorbed at the interface perpendicular to the interfacial normal. However, for cylinders we could find a metastable adsorption minimum corresponding to parallel adsorption. We also considered the possible time dependence of the adsorption process using simple dynamics. Finally, we studied the adsorption of truncated nanocubes with a contact-angle surface pattern and we observed that there are three prototypical equilibrium adsorption configurations for these particles. (2.) - Crystal-structure prediction. We extended an existing crystal-structure-prediction algorithm to predict structures for systems comprised of irregular hard particles. Using this technique we examined the high-density crystal structures for 17 irregular nonconvex shapes and we confirmed several mathematical conjectures for the packings of a large set of 142 convex polyhedra. We also proved that we have obtained the densest configurations for rhombicuboctahedra and rhombic enneacontrahedra, respectively. Moreover, we considered a family of truncated cubes, which interpolates between a cube and an octahedron, for which

  8. Advances in reactive surfactants.

    PubMed

    Guyot, A

    2004-05-20

    The study of reactive surfactants and their applications in the synthesis of latexes for waterborne coatings has been recently boosted by two successive European programmes, involving all together eight academic and five industrial laboratories. The most significant results were obtained using surfactants derived from maleic and related anhydrides, or both nonionic and anionic reactive polymeric surfactants. Such surfactants are able to improve the stability of styrenic and acrylic latexes vs. various constraints, such as electrolyte addition, freeze-thawing tests or extraction with alcohol or acetone. The properties of films used in waterborne coatings are also improved in case of water exposure (less water uptake, dimensional stability), as well as improved weatherability, and blocking properties. Formulations for woodstain varnishes, metal coating of printing inks, based on the use of simple polymerizable surfactants, are now in the market. PMID:15072924

  9. Reactive Air Aluminization

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  10. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  11. Multifunctional reactive nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatis, Demitrios

    Many multifunctional nanocomposite materials have been developed for use in propellants, explosives, pyrotechnics, and reactive structures. These materials exhibit high reaction rates due to their developed reaction interfacial area. Two applications addressed in this work include nanocomposite powders prepared by arrested reactive milling (ARM) for burn rate modifiers and reactive structures. In burn rate modifiers, addition of reactive nanocomposite powders to aluminized propellants increases the burn rate of aluminum and thus the overall reaction rate of an energetic formulation. Replacing only a small fraction of aluminum by 8Al·MoO3 and 2B·Ti nanocomposite powders enhances the reaction rate with little change to the thermodynamic performance of the formulation; both the rate of pressure rise and maximum pressure measured in the constant volume explosion test increase. For reactive structures, nanocomposite powders with bulk compositions of 8Al·MoO3, 12Al·MoO3, and 8Al·3CuO were prepared by ARM and consolidated using a uniaxial die. Consolidated samples had densities greater than 90% of theoretical maximum density while maintaining their high reactivity. Pellets prepared using 8Al·MoO3 powders were ignited by a CO2 laser. Ignition delays increased at lower laser powers and greater pellet densities. A simplified numerical model describing heating and thermal initiation of the reactive pellets predicted adequately the observed effects of both laser power and pellet density on the measured ignition delays. To investigate the reaction mechanisms in nanocomposite thermites, two types of nanocomposite reactive materials with the same bulk compositions 8Al·MoO3 were prepared by different methods. One of the materials was manufactured by ARM and the other, so called metastable interstitial composite (MIC), by mixing of nano-scaled individual powders. Clear differences in the low-temperature redox reactions, welldetectable by differential scanning calorimetry

  12. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  13. Skylab reactivation mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    On July 11, 1979, Skylab impacted the Earth's surface. The debris dispersion area stretched from the South Eastern Indian Ocean across a sparsely populated section of Western Australia. The events leading to the reentry of Skylab are discussed and a final assessment of the Skylab debris impact footprint is presented. Also included are detailed evaluations of the various Skylab systems that were reactivated when control of Skylab was regained in mid-1978 after having been powered down since February 4, 1974.

  14. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system.

  15. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system. PMID:23249062

  16. Becoming Reactive by Concretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prieditis, Armand; Janakiraman, Bhaskar

    1992-01-01

    One way to build a reactive system is to construct an action table indexed by the current situation or stimulus. The action table describes what course of action to pursue for each situation or stimulus. This paper describes an incremental approach to constructing the action table through achieving goals with a hierarchical search system. These hierarchies are generated with transformations called concretizations, which add constraints to a problem and which can reduce the search space. The basic idea is that an action for a state is looked up in the action table and executed whenever the action table has an entry for that state; otherwise, a path is found to the nearest (cost-wise in a graph with costweighted arcs) state that has a mappring from a state in the next highest hierarchy. For each state along the solution path, the successor state in the path is cached in the action table entry for that state. Without caching, the hierarchical search system can logarithmically reduce search. When the table is complete the system no longer searches: it simply reacts by proceeding to the state listed in the table for each state. Since the cached information is specific only to the nearest state in the next highest hierarchy and not the goal, inter-goal transfer of reactivity is possible. To illustrate our approach, we show how an implemented hierarchical search system can completely reactive.

  17. Wet oxidation of ordered mesoporous carbon FDU-15 by using (NH4)2S2O8 for fast adsorption of Sr(II): An investigation on surface chemistry and adsorption mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Ye, Gang; Chen, Jing; Lv, Dachao; Wang, Jianchen

    2015-12-01

    Surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) by wet oxidation provides an oxygen-enriched platform for complexation of metal ions. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the surface chemistry and textual property of OMC FDU-15 modified by wet oxidation using (NH4)2S2O8 as a benign oxidant. And, for the first time, the adsorption behavior and mechanism of wet-oxidized OMC FDU-15 toward Sr(II) in aqueous solutions were investigated. The mesostructural regularity of the OMC FDU-15 was well-reserved under wet oxidation. Compared to OMC CMK-type counterparts prepared via nanocasting, the OMC FDU-15 by soft template method showed much-enhanced structural stability. Due to the introduction of abundant oxygen-containing species, the oxidized OMC FDU-15 exhibited excellent hydrophilicity and dispersibility in aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior toward Sr(II) was fully investigated, showing a super-fast adsorption kinetics (< 5 min to reach equilibrium) and a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Moreover, an in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis through deconvolution of high resolution C1s and O1s spectra was implemented to identify the chemical species of the surface functional groups, while probing the adsorption mechanism. The results suggested that oxygen donor atoms in Csbnd O single bonds mainly contribute to the adsorption of Sr(II) via formation of metal-ligand complexation.

  18. Identifying reactive peptides from phage-displayed libraries

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Glenn M.; Weiss, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phage display enables the synthesis, selection and screening of large, polypeptide libraries (>1 × 1010). Selections from such libraries can identify binding partners to essentially any desired target (1, 2). Peptide with affinity or reactivity to small molecule probes are attractive for numerous uses including the targeted, site-specific labeling of proteins. Here, we describe selection and screening protocols for the identification of short peptides that can selectively bind to and/or react with small molecules. PMID:25616334

  19. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  20. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  1. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  2. Visualization of Endogenous and Exogenous Hydrogen Peroxide Using A Lysosome-Targetable Fluorescent Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dabin; Kim, Gyoungmi; Nam, Sang-Jip; Yin, Jun; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play crucial roles in diverse physiological processes; therefore, the efficient detection of ROS is very crucial. In this study, we report a boronate-based hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) probe having naphthalimide fluorophore. This probe also contained a morpholine moiety as a directing group for lysosome. The recognition property indicated that the probe exhibited high selectivity towards H2O2 not only in the solution but also in the living cells. Furthermore, it was used to monitor the level of endogenous and exogenous H2O2. These results support that the probe can function as an efficient indicator to detect H2O2.

  3. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  4. Pressure measuring probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention is a probe for measuring changes in pressure in a high velocity fluid stream over and adjacent to the surface of an object. The probe is formed of an exterior housing having a closed pressure chamber in which a piezoelectric pressure transducer is mounted. An open connector tube having a probe tip passes a portion of the fluid stream into the closed pressure chamber; any change of pressure within, which requires a settling-time to appear in the closed pressure chamber, is inversely proportional to the cross-sectional area of the connector tube. A cooling chamber formed around the pressure chamber is connected to a source of cooling fluid by means of inlet and outlet tubes.

  5. Multispectral imaging probe

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  6. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  7. Adsorption of dissolved organics in lake water by aluminum oxide. Effect of molecular weight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.; Gloor, R.

    1981-01-01

    Dissolved organic compounds in a Swiss lake were fractionated into three molecular size classes by gel exclusion chromatography, and adsorption of each fraction on colloidal alumina was studied as a function of pH. Organic compounds with molecular weight (Mr) greater than 1000 formed strong complexes with the alumina surface, but low molecular weight compounds were weakly adsorbed. Electrophoretic mobility measurements indicated that alumina particles suspended in the original lake water were highly negatively charged because of adsorbed organic matter. Most of the adsorbed organic compounds were in the Mr range 1000 < Mr < 3000. Adsorption of these compounds during the treatment of drinking water by alum coagulation may be responsible for the preferential removal of trihalomethane precursors. Adsorption may also influence the molecular-weight distribution of dissolved organic material in lakes. surface, the present work will focus on the influence of molecular size and pH on the adsorption behavior of dissolved organic material of a Swiss lake. From a geochemical point of view, it is important to know the molecular-weight distribution of adsorbed organic matter so that we may better assess its reactivity with trace elements. The study also serves as a first step in quantifying the role of adsorption in the geochemical cycle of organic carbon in lacustrine environments. For water-treatment practice, we need to determine whether molecular weight fractionation occurs during adsorption by aluminum oxide. Such a fractionation could be significant in the light of recent reports that chloroform and other organochlorine compounds are preferentially produced by particular molecular-weight fractions (25-27). ?? 1981 American Chemical Society.

  8. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  9. Adsorption in sparse networks. 2: Silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.; Calas, S.; Sempere, R.

    1998-06-15

    The model developed in Part 1 is applied to nitrogen adsorption isotherms obtained for a series of silica aerogels whose densities are varied by partial sintering. The isotherms are adequately described by a cubic network model, with all of the pores falling in the mesopore range; the adsorption and desorption branches are fit by the same pore size distribution. For the least dense gels, a substantial portion of the pore volume is not detected by condensation. The model attributes this effect to the shape of the adsorbate/adsorptive interface, which can adopt zero curvature even in mesopores, because of the shape of the network.

  10. Adsorption of lead over Graphite Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb2+ was found to be 98, 91 and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water. PMID:24152870

  11. Random sequential adsorption of trimers and hexamers.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-12-01

    Adsorption of trimers and hexamers built of identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Particles were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Numerical simulations allowed us to determine the maximal random coverage ratio, RSA kinetics as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining the kinetics of the adsorption process obtained experimentally. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured. All the results were compared with previous results obtained for spheres, dimers and tetramers. PMID:24193213

  12. Pioneer III Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Looking more like surgeons, these technicians wearing 'cleanroom' attire inspect the Pioneer III probe before shipping it to Cape Canaveral, Florida. Pioneer III was launched on December 6, 1958 aboard a Juno II rocket at the Atlantic Missile Range, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The mission objectives were to measure the radiation intensity of the Van Allen radiation belt, test long range communication systems, the launch vehicle and other subsystems. The Juno II failed to reach proper orbital escape velocity. The probe re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on December 7th ending its brief mission.

  13. Adsorption/aggregation of surfactants and their mixtures at solid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Somasundaran, P; Huang, L

    2000-12-11

    Adsorption of surfactants and polymers at solid-liquid interfaces is used widely to modify interfacial properties in a variety of industrial processes such as flotation, ceramic processing, flocculation/dispersion, personal care product formulation and enhanced oil recovery. The behavior of surfactants and polymers at interfaces is determined by a number of forces, including electrostatic attraction, covalent bonding, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic bonding, and solvation and desolvation of various species. The extent and type of the forces involved varies depending on the adsorbate and the adsorbent, and also the composition and other characteristics of the solvent and dissolved components in it. The influence of such forces on the adsorption behavior is reviewed here from a thermodynamics point of view. The experimental results from microcalorimetric and spectroscopic studies of adsorbed layers of different surfactant and polymer systems at solid-liquid interfaces are also presented. Calorimetric data from the adsorption of an anionic surfactant, sodium octylbenzenesulfonate, and a non-ionic surfactant, dodecyloxyheptaethoxyethylalcohol, and their mixtures on alumina, yielded important thermodynamic information. It was found that the adsorption of anionic surfactants alone on alumina was initially highly exothermic due to the electrostatic interaction with the substrate. Further adsorption leading to a solloid (hemimicelle) formation is proposed to be mainly an entropy-driven process. The entropy effect was found to be more pronounced for the adsorption of anionic-non-ionic surfactant mixtures than for the anionic surfactant alone. Fluorescence studies using a pyrene probe on an adsorbed surfactant and polymer layers, along with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, reveal the role of surface aggregation and the conformation of the adsorbed molecules in controlling the dispersion and wettability of the system. PMID:11185696

  14. Electrochemical and surface characterization of 4-aminothiophenol adsorption at polycrystalline platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I; Fachini, Estevao R; Hernández, Jessica; Pérez-Davis, Marla E; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2006-07-01

    The formation of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on polycrystalline platinum electrodes has been characterized by surface analysis and electrochemistry techniques. The 4-ATP monolayer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry, Raman spectroscopy, reflection-absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). CV was used to study the dependence of the adsorption time and 4-ATP solution concentration on the relative degree of coverage of 4-ATP monolayers on polycrystalline Pt electrodes. The adsorption time range probed was 24-72 h. The optimal concentration of 4-ATP needed to obtain the highest surface at the lowest adsorption time was 10 mM. RAIR and Raman spectroscopy for 4-ATP-modified platinum electrodes showed the characteristic adsorption bands for 4-ATP, such as nuNH, nuCH(arom), and nuCS(arom), indicating the adsorption on the platinum surface. The XPS spectra for the modified Pt surface presented the binding energy peaks of sulfur and nitrogen. High energy resolution XPS studies, RAIR, and Raman spectrum for platinum electrodes modified with 4-ATP indicate that the molecules are sulfur-bonded to the platinum surface. The formation of a S-Pt bond suggests that ATP adsorption leads to an amino-terminated electrode surface. The thickness of the monolayer was evaluated via angle-resolved XPS (AR-XPS) analyses, giving a value of 8 A. As evidence of the terminal amino group on the electrode surface, the chemical derivatization of the 4-ATP SAM was done with 16-Br hexadecanoic acid. This surface reaction was followed by RAIR spectroscopy. PMID:16800665

  15. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.M.; Lindquist, L.O.

    1982-09-07

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and noninvasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly by means of changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  16. Interfacial Reactivity of Radionuclides: Emerging Paradigms from Molecular Level Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-08-15

    Over the past few decades use of an increasing array of molecular-level analytical probes has provided new detailed insight into mineral and radionuclide interfacial reactivity in subsurface environments. This capability has not only helped change the way mineral surface reactivity is studied but also how field-scale contaminant migration problems are addressed and ultimately resolved. Here we overview examples of relatively new interfacial reactivity paradigms with implications for future research directions. Specific examples include understanding: the role of site-to-site electron conduction at mineral surfaces and through bulk mineral phases, effects of local chemical environment on the stability of intermediate species in oxidation/reduction reactions, and the importance of mechanistic reaction pathway for defining possible reaction products and thermodynamic driving force. The discussion also includes examples of how detailed molecular/microscopic characterization of field samples has changed the way complex contaminant migration problems were conceptualized and modeled.

  17. Oligodeoxynucleotide Probes for Detecting Intact Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosson, Reinhardt A.; Maurina-Brunker, Julie; Langley, Kim; Pynnonen, Christine M.

    2004-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive test using chemiluminescent oligodeoxynucleotide probes has been developed for detecting, identifying, and enumerating intact cells. The test is intended especially for use in detecting and enumerating bacteria and yeasts in potable water. As in related tests that have been developed recently for similar purposes, the oligodeoxynucleotide probes used in this test are typically targeted at either singlecopy deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genes (such as virulence genes) or the multiple copies (10,000 to 50,000 copies per cell) of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acids (rRNAs). Some of those tests involve radioisotope or fluorescent labeling of the probes for reporting hybridization of probes to target nucleic acids. Others of those tests involve labeling with enzymes plus the use of chemiluminescent or chromogenic substrates to report hybridization via color or the emission of light, respectively. The present test is of the last-mentioned type. The chemiluminescence in the present test can be detected easily with relatively simple instrumentation. In developing the present test, the hybridization approach was chosen because hybridization techniques are very specific. Hybridization detects stable, inheritable genetic targets within microorganisms. These targets are not dependent on products of gene expression that can vary with growth conditions or physiological states of organisms in test samples. Therefore, unique probes can be designed to detect and identify specific genera or species of bacteria or yeast (in terms of rRNA target sequences) or can be designed to detect and identify virulence genes (genomic target sequences). Because of the inherent specificity of this system, there are few problems of cross-reactivity. Hybridization tests are rapid, but hybridization tests now available commercially lack sensitivity; typically, between 10(exp 6) and 10(exp 7) cells of the target organism are needed to ensure a reliable test. Consequently, the numbers of

  18. DNA adsorption onto glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Krista Lynn

    Streaming potential measurements were performed on microspheres of silica, lime silicate (SLS) and calcium aluminate (CA) glasses containing silica and iron oxide (CASi and CAFe). The silicate based glasses exhibited acidic surfaces with isoelectric points (IEP) around a pH of 3 while the calcium aluminates displayed more basic surfaces with IEP ranging from 8--9.5. The surface of the calcium aluminate microspheres containing silica reacted with the background electrolyte, altering the measured zeta potential values and inhibiting electrolyte flow past the sample at ˜ pH 4 due to formation of a solid plug. DNA adsorption experiments were performed using the microspheres and a commercially available silicate based DNA isolation filter using a known quantity of DNA suspended in a chaotropic agent free 0.35 wt% Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) buffer solution. The microspheres and commercial filter were also used to isolate DNA from macrophage cells in the presence of chaotropic agents. UV absorbance at ˜260 nm and gel electrophoresis were used to quantify the amount and size of the DNA strands that adsorbed to the microsphere surfaces. In both experiments, the 43--106 microm CAFe microspheres adsorbed the largest quantity of DNA. However, the 43--106 microm SLS microspheres isolated more DNA from the cells than the <43 microm CAFe microspheres, indicating that microsphere size contributes to isolation ability. The UV absorbance of DNA at ˜260 nm was slightly altered due to the dissolution of the calcium aluminate glasses during the adsorption process. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) determined that calcium and aluminum ions leached from the CA and CAFe microsphere surfaces during these experiments. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the leached ions had no effect on the conformation of the DNA, and therefore would not be expected to interfere in downstream applications such as DNA replication. The 0.35 wt

  19. Albumin (BSA) Adsorption over Graphene in Aqueous Environment: Influence of Orientation, Adsorption Protocol, and Solvent Treatment.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vellosillo, Perceval; Serena, P A; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-02-23

    We report 150 ns explicit solvent MD simulations of the adsorption on graphene of albumin (BSA) in two orientations and using two different adsorption protocols, i.e., free and forced adsorption. Our results show that free adsorption occurs with little structural rearrangements. Even taking adsorption to an extreme, by forcing it with a 5 nN downward force applied during the initial 20 ns, we show that along a particular orientation BSA is able to preserve the structural properties of the majority of its binding sites. Furthermore, in all the cases considered in this work, the ibuprofen binding site has shown a strong resilience to structural changes. Finally, we compare these results with implicit solvent simulations and find that the latter predicts an extreme protein unfolding upon adsorption. The origin of this discrepancy is attributed to a poor description of the water entropic forces at interfaces in the implicit solvent methods. PMID:26799950

  20. Adsorption of Cu(II) to Bacillus subtilis: A pH-dependent EXAFS and thermodynamic modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2011-11-01

    Bacteria are very efficient sorbents of trace metals, and their abundance in a wide variety of natural aqueous systems means biosorption plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of many elements. We measured the adsorption of Cu(II) to Bacillus subtilis as a function of pH and surface loading. Adsorption edge and XAS experiments were performed at high bacteria-to-metal ratio, analogous to Cu uptake in natural geologic and aqueous environments. We report significant Cu adsorption to B. subtilis across the entire pH range studied (pH ˜2-7), with adsorption increasing with pH to a maximum at pH ˜6. We determine directly for the first time that Cu adsorbs to B. subtilis as a (CuO 5H n) n-8 monodentate, inner-sphere surface complex involving carboxyl surface functional groups. This Cu-carboxyl complex is able to account for the observed Cu adsorption across the entire pH range studied. Having determined the molecular adsorption mechanism of Cu to B. subtilis, we have developed a new thermodynamic surface complexation model for Cu adsorption that is informed by and consistent with EXAFS results. We model the surface electrostatics using the 1p K basic Stern approximation. We fit our adsorption data to the formation of a monodentate, inner-sphere tbnd RCOOCu + surface complex. In agreement with previous studies, this work indicates that in order to accurately predict the fate and mobility of Cu in complex biogeochemical systems, we must incorporate the formation of Cu-bacteria surface complexes in reactive transport models. To this end, this work recommends log K tbnd RCOOCu + = 7.13 for geologic and aqueous systems with generally high B. subtilis-to-metal ratio.